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Sample records for donepezil reverses buprenorphine-induced

  1. Early postnatal maternal deprivation in rats induces memory deficits in adult life that can be reversed by donepezil and galantamine.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Fernando; Mello, Pâmela Billig; Bonini, Juliana Sartori; Monteiro, Siomara; Cammarota, Martín; Izquierdo, Iván

    2009-02-01

    Early postnatal maternal deprivation is known to cause long-lasting neurobiological effects. Here, we investigated whether some of the cognitive aspects of these deficits might be related to a disruption of the cholinergic system. Pregnant Wistar rats were individually housed and maintained on a 12:12h light/dark cycle with food and water freely available. The mothers were separated from their pups for 3h per day from postnatal day 1 (PND-1) to PND-10. To do that, the dams were moved to a different cage and the pups maintained in the original home cage, which was transferred to a different room kept at 32 degrees C. After they reached 120-150 days of age, maternal-deprived and non-deprived animals were either sacrificed for brain acetylcholinesterase measurement, or trained and tested in an object recognition task and in a social recognition task as described by Rossato et al. (2007) [Rossato, J.I., Bevilaqua, L. R.M., Myskiw, J.C., Medina, J.H., Izquierdo, I., Cammarota, M. 2007. On the role hippocampal synthesis in the consolidation and reconsolidation of object recognition memory. Learn. Mem. 14, 36-46] and Lévy et al. (2003) [Lévy, F., Melo. A.I., Galef. B.G. Jr., Madden, M., Fleming. A.S. 2003. Complete maternal deprivation affects social, but not spatial, learning in adult rats. Dev. Psychobiol. 43, 177-191], respectively. There was increased acetylcholinesterase activity in hippocampus and perirhinal cortex of the deprived animals. In addition, they showed a clear impairment in memory of the two recognition tasks measured 24h after training. Oral administration of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, donepezil or galantamine (1mg/kg) 30min before training reversed the memory impairments caused by maternal deprivation. The findings suggest that maternal deprivation affects memory processing at adulthood through a change in brain cholinergic systems.

  2. A new HPLC method to determine Donepezil hydrochloride in tablets.

    PubMed

    Pappa, Horacio; Farrú, Romina; Vilanova, Paula Otaño; Palacios, Marcelo; Pizzorno, María Teresa

    2002-01-01

    A HPLC stability-indicating assay for Donepezil hydrochloride in tablets was developed and validated. Donepezil hydrochloride is a reversible inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, indicated for the treatment of mild to moderate dementia of the Alzheimer's type. The HPLC method was performed with a reversed phase C18 column, detection at 268 nm and a mixture of methanol, phosphate buffer 0.02 M and triethylamine (50:50:0.5) as mobile phase. Typical retention time for Donepezil was 9 min. The method was statistically validated for linearity, accuracy, precision and selectivity following ICH recommendations. Due to its simplicity and accuracy, the method can be used for routine quality control analysis.

  3. Donepezil improves learning and memory deficits in APP/PS1 mice by inhibition of microglial activation.

    PubMed

    Guo, H B; Cheng, Y F; Wu, J G; Wang, C M; Wang, H T; Zhang, C; Qiu, Z K; Xu, J P

    2015-04-01

    Donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor, is a representative symptomatic therapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies have reported the anti-inflammatory effects of donepezil. However, limited studies that investigate its anti-inflammatory effect in AD have been reported. Considering the role of proinflammatory molecules and microglial activation in the pathogenesis of AD, the current study aimed to elucidate the effects of donepezil on microglial activation induced by amyloid deposition in transgenic mice. Our results showed that chronic treatment with donepezil significantly improved the cognitive function in the novel object recognition test and Morris water maze test in amyloid precursor protein (APP)/presenilin-1 (PS1) transgenic mice. We further demonstrated that these cognitive enhancements were related to the anti-inflammatory effect of donepezil. We found that donepezil could inhibit the expression of CD68, a specific marker of microglial activation, and reduce the release of proinflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. Immunohistochemistry and Congo red co-staining revealed that congophilic amyloid and activated microglia around plaques were also reduced by donepezil treatment. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis showed that donepezil decreased insoluble Aβ40/Aβ42 and soluble Aβ40 levels. Moreover, donepezil reversed the impaired expression of insulin-degrading enzyme in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice. Our findings indicated that donepezil improves cognitive deficits in APP/PS1 mice by a mechanism that may be associated with its inhibition of microglial activation and release of proinflammatory cytokines.

  4. Donepezil attenuates high glucose-accelerated senescence in human umbilical vein endothelial cells through SIRT1 activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Tian, Feng; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Shanshan; Dong, Xueqing; Guo, Kai; Jing, Jing; Zhou, Ying; Chen, Yundai

    2015-09-01

    Cellular senescence of endothelial cells is a damage and stress response which induces pro-inflammatory, pro-atherosclerotic, and pro-thrombotic phenotypes. Donepezil is a drug used for the treatment of mild to moderate dementia of the Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aim of the present study was to investigate the attenuation of endothelial cell senescence by donepezil and to explore the mechanisms underlying the anti-aging effects of donepezil. Our results indicated that high glucose (HG) markedly decreased cell viability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and this phenomenon was reversed by treatment with donepezil. Importantly, our results displayed that the frequency of senescent (SA-ß-gal-positive) cells and the expression level of senescence genes (PAI-1 and p21) were significantly higher in the HG group compared with the normal glucose (NG) group, and these changes were blocked by treatment with donepezil. Also, our results showed that donepezil inhibits the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which promotes cellular senescence. Pretreatment with nicotinamide (NAM), a sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) inhibitor, inhibited the reduction in senescence associated with donepezil. Indeed, our results indicated that donepezil increased the SIRT1 enzyme activity. Therefore, these results show that donepezil delays cellular senescence that is promoted under HG condition via activation of SIRT1.

  5. Morphology-based mammalian stem cell tests reveal potential developmental toxicity of donepezil.

    PubMed

    Lau, Caroline G Y; Marikawa, Yusuke

    2014-11-01

    Various compounds, including therapeutic drugs, can adversely impact the survival and development of embryos in the uterus. Identification of such development-interfering agents is a challenging task, although multi-angle approaches--including the use of in vitro toxicology studies involving embryonic stem cells--should alleviate some of the current difficulties. In the present study, we utilized the in vitro elongation of embryoid bodies (EBs) derived from mouse embryonal carcinoma stem cell line P19C5 as a model of early embryological events, specifically that of gastrulation and axial patterning. From our study, we identified donepezil, a medication indicated for the management of Alzheimer's disease, as a potential developmental toxicant. The extent of P19C5 EB axial elongation was diminished by donepezil in a dose-dependent manner. Although donepezil is a known inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, interference of elongation was not mediated through this enzyme. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR revealed that donepezil altered the expression pattern of a specific set of developmental regulator genes involved in patterning along the anterior-posterior body axis. When tested in mouse whole embryo culture, donepezil caused morphological abnormalities including impaired somitogenesis. Donepezil also diminished elongation morphogenesis of EBs generated from human embryonic stem cells. These results suggest that donepezil interferes with axial elongation morphogenesis of early embryos by altering the expression pattern of regulators of axial development.

  6. Roles of μ-Opioid Receptors and Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Peptide Receptors in Buprenorphine-Induced Physiological Responses in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Cremeans, Colette M.; Gruley, Erin; Kyle, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    Buprenorphine is known as a μ-opioid peptide (MOP) receptor agonist, but its antinociception is compromised by the activation of nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptors in rodents. The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of MOP and NOP receptors in regulating buprenorphine-induced physiological responses in primates (rhesus monkeys). The effects of MOP antagonist (naltrexone), NOP antagonist [(±)-1-[(3R*,4R*)-1-(cyclooctylmethyl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-4-piperidinyl]-3-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one (J-113397)], and NOP agonists [(1S,3aS)-8-(2,3,3a,4,5,6-hexahydro-1H-phenalen-1-yl)-1-phenyl-1,3,8-triaza-spiro[4.5] decan-4-one (Ro 64-6198) and 3-endo-8-[bis(2-methylphenyl)methyl]-3-phenyl-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octan-3-ol (SCH 221510)] on buprenorphine were studied in three functional assays for measuring analgesia, respiratory depression, and itch in primates. Over the dose range of 0.01 to 0.1 mg/kg, buprenorphine dose-dependently produced antinociception, respiratory depression, and itch/scratching responses, and there was a ceiling effect at higher doses (0.1–1 mg/kg). Naltrexone (0.03 mg/kg) produced similar degrees of rightward shifts of buprenorphine's dose-response curves for all three endpoints. Mean pKB values of naltrexone (8.1–8.3) confirmed that MOP receptors mediated mainly buprenorphine-induced antinociception, respiratory depression, and itch/scratching. In contrast, J-113397 (0.1 mg/kg) did not change buprenorphine-induced physiological responses, indicating that there were no functional NOP receptors in buprenorphine-induced effects. More importantly, both NOP agonists, Ro 64-6198 and SCH 221510, enhanced buprenorphine-induced antinociception without respiratory depression and itch/ scratching. The dose-addition analysis revealed that buprenorphine in combination with the NOP agonist synergistically produced antinociceptive effects. These findings provided functional evidence that the activation of NOP receptors did not

  7. Donepezil

    MedlinePlus

    ... AD; a brain disease that slowly destroys the memory and the ability to think, learn, communicate and ... cholinesterase inhibitors. It improves mental function (such as memory, attention, the ability to interact with others, speak, ...

  8. Donepezil in Alzheimer’s disease: From conventional trials to pharmacogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Cacabelos, Ramón

    2007-01-01

    Donepezil is the leading compound for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in more than 50 countries. As compared with other conventional acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs), donepezil is a highly selective and reversible piperidine derivative with AChEI activity that exhibits the best pharmacological profile in terms of cognitive improvement, responders rate (40%–58%), dropout cases (5%–13%), and side-effects (6%–13%) in AD. Although donepezil represents a non cost-effective treatment, most studies convey that this drug can provide a modest benefit on cognition, behavior, and activities of the daily living in both moderate and severe AD, contributing to slow down disease progression and, to a lesser exetnt, to delay institutionalization. Patients with vascular dementia might also benefit from donepezil in a similar fashion to AD patients. Some potential effects of donepezil on the AD brain, leading to reduced cortico-hippocampal atrophy, include the following: AChE inhibition, enhancement of cholinergic neurotransmission and putative modulation of other neurotransmitter systems, protection against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity, activation of neurotrophic mechanisms, promotion of non-amyloidodgenic pathways for APP processing, and indirect effects on cerebrovascular function improving brain perfusion. Recent studies demonstrate that the therapeutic response in AD is genotype-specific. Donepezil is metabolized via CYP-related enzymes, especially CYP2D6, CYP3A4, and CYP1A2. Approximately, 15%–20% of the AD population may exhibit an abnormal metabolism of AChEIs; about 50% of this population cluster would show an ultrarapid metabolism, requiring higher doses of AChEIs to reach a therapeutic threshold, whereas the other 50% of the cluster would exhibit a poor metabolism, displaying potential adverse events at low doses. In AD patients treated with a multifactorial therapy, including donepezil, the best responders are the CYP2D6-related extensive

  9. Withdrawal syndrome after donepezil cessation in a patient with dementia.

    PubMed

    Bidzan, Leszek; Bidzan, Mariola

    2012-12-01

    We describe a 62-year-old female diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, who had been treated with donepezil for approximately 1 year. When she developed a low-grade fever and digestive complaints, her family physician interpreted these symptoms as side effects of the drug and ordered donepezil to be discontinued. Not only was there no improvement of the somatic symptoms after discontinuation of donepezil, but there was also a worsening of the dementia symptoms, culminating in delirium. When donepezil was re-prescribed, the delirium resolved and the patient's mental state stabilized. The authors urge great caution in discontinuing treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil. PMID:22249402

  10. The combination of donepezil and procyclidine protects against soman-induced seizures in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Haug, Kristin Huse . E-mail: k.h.haug@medisin.uio.no; Myhrer, Trond; Fonnum, Frode

    2007-04-15

    Current treatment of nerve agent poisoning consists of prophylactic administration of pyridostigmine and therapy using atropine, an oxime and a benzodiazepine. Pyridostigmine does however not readily penetrate the blood-brain barrier giving ineffective protection of Brain against centrally mediated seizure activity. In this study, we have evaluated donepezil hydrochloride, a partial reversible inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) clinically used for treating Alzheimer's disease, in combination with procyclidine, used in treatment of Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia, as prophylaxis against intoxication by the nerve agent soman. The results demonstrated significant protective efficacy of donepezil (2.5 mg/kg) combined with procyclidine (3 or 6 mg/kg) when given prophylactically against a lethal dose of soman (1.6x LD{sub 50}) in Wistar rats. No neuropathological changes were found in rats treated with this combination 48 h after soman intoxication. Six hours after soman exposure cerebral AChE activity and acetylcholine (ACh) concentration was 5% and 188% of control, respectively. The ACh concentration had returned to basal levels 24 h after soman intoxication, while AChE activity had recovered to 20% of control. Loss of functioning muscarinic ACh receptors (17%) but not nicotinic receptors was evident at this time point. The recovery in brain AChE activity seen in our study may be due to the reversible binding of donepezil to the enzyme. Donepezil is well tolerated in humans, and a combination of donepezil and procyclidine may prove useful as an alternative to the currently used prophylaxis against nerve agent intoxication.

  11. Donepezil-related intractable hiccups: a case report.

    PubMed

    McGrane, Ian R; Shuman, Michael D; McDonald, Robert W

    2015-03-01

    This case report describes a man with intractable hiccups probably caused by donepezil. The patient's symptoms were not responsive to commonly used medications for hiccups, but they were improved and completely relieved upon donepezil dose deescalation and discontinuation. We report two occasions in which the discontinuation of donepezil resulted in hiccup resolution and three occasions in which initiation of donepezil was associated with the onset of hiccups. This report contributes to the growing body of literature that describes an association between centrally acting medications and intractable hiccups.

  12. Temporal trends for donepezil utilization among older people.

    PubMed

    Ndukwe, Henry C; Nishtala, Prasad S

    2016-05-01

    To examine and characterize overall donepezil and concomitant utilization with β-blockers, yearly, in older New Zealanders. Deidentified data from the Pharmaceutical claims database and the National Minimum Dataset were obtained for 2011 to 2013 from the Ministry of Health. Population-level data were extracted for donepezil and β-blockers utilization, measured by defined daily dose (DDD) per thousand older people per day (TOPD). Donepezil utilization increased from 5.2 to 8.2 DDD/TOPD between 2011 and 2013. In 2011, the number of prevalent users was 4634, the mean age was 79.4±6.6 years and 57.5% were women. Highest use by age for donepezil was in those aged 85 years or older (2.3 DDD/TOPD), followed by those aged 80-84 years (2.2 DDD/TOPD). The mean utilization volumes were significantly lower for donepezil 5 mg (Student t-test=9.86; P<0.05) and 10 mg (10.90; P<0.05) in the 65- to 69-year age group compared with the 80- to 84-year age group, whereas the proportion of concomitant utilization of donepezil with β-blockers decreased (17.9% to 5.1%). Donepezil utilization in DDD/TOPD increased by three-fifths between 2011 and 2013. Prescribers appear to be aware of the potential risk of bradycardia with the concomitant use of donepezil and β-blockers.

  13. Effects of Donepezil on Cognitive Functioning in Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, N.; Fahey, C.; Chicoine, B.; Chong, G.; Gitelman, D.

    2003-01-01

    Donepezil, an acetycholinesterase inhibitor, or a placebo were given to 29 subjects with Down syndrome and no dementia. Measures of cognitive functioning and caregiver ratings indicated no improvement in any cognitive subtests (with the exception of language), behavioral scores, or caregiver ratings. Results suggest donepezil may improve language…

  14. Effects of donepezil on hERG potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Ju; Lee, Hong Joon; Jeon, Ji Hyun; Kim, In-Beom; Choi, Jin-Sung; Sung, Ki-Wug; Hahn, Sang June

    2015-02-01

    Donepezil is a potent, selective inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, which is used for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Whole-cell patch-clamp technique and Western blot analyses were used to study the effects of donepezil on the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel. Donepezil inhibited the tail current of the hERG in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 of 1.3 μM. The metabolites of donepezil, 6-ODD and 5-ODD, inhibited the hERG currents in a similar concentration-dependent manner; the IC50 values were 1.0 and 1.5 μM, respectively. A fast drug perfusion system demonstrated that donepezil interacted with both the open and inactivated states of the hERG. A fast application of donepezil during the tail currents inhibited the open state of the hERG in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 of 2.7 μM. Kinetic analysis of donepezil in an open state of the hERG yielded blocking and unblocking rate constants of 0.54 µM(-1)s(-1) and 1.82 s(-1), respectively. The block of the hERG by donepezil was voltage-dependent with a steep increase across the voltage range of channel activation. Donepezil caused a reduction in the hERG channel protein trafficking to the plasma membrane at low concentration, but decreased the channel protein expression at higher concentrations. These results suggest that donepezil inhibited the hERG at a supratherapeutic concentration, and that it did so by preferentially binding to the activated (open and/or inactivated) states of the channels and by inhibiting the trafficking and expression of the hERG channel protein in the plasma membrane.

  15. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors mediate donepezil-induced oligodendrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Osamu; Arai, Masaaki; Dateki, Minori; Ogata, Toru; Uchida, Ryuji; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Takishima, Kunio

    2015-12-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system (CNS). Failure of myelin development and oligodendrocyte loss results in serious human disorders, including multiple sclerosis. Here, we show that donepezil, an acetlycholinesterase inhibitor developed for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, can stimulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation of neural stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells without affecting proliferation or cell viability. Transcripts for essential myelin-associated genes, such as PLP, MAG, MBP, CNPase, and MOG, in addition to transcription factors that regulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination, were rapidly increased after treatment with donepezil. Furthermore, luciferase assays confirmed that both MAG and MBP promoters display increased activity upon donepezil-induced oligodendrocytes differentiation, suggesting that donepezil increases myelin gene expression mainly through enhanced transcription. We also found that the increase in the number of oligodendrocytes observed following donepezil treatment was significantly inhibited by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist mecamylamine, but not by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist scopolamine. Moreover, donepezil-induced myelin-related gene expression was suppressed by mecamylamine at both the mRNA and protein level. These results suggest that donepezil stimulates oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelin-related gene expression via nAChRs in neural stem cell-derived oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. We show that donepezil, a drug for the treatment of Alzheimer disease, can stimulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Transcripts for essential myelin-associated genes, such as PLP, MAG, MBP, CNPase and MOG in addition to transcripton factors that regulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination were rapidly increased after treatment with donepezil

  16. Diverse age-related effects of Bacopa monnieri and donepezil in vitro on cytokine production, antioxidant enzyme activities, and intracellular targets in splenocytes of F344 male rats.

    PubMed

    Priyanka, Hannah P; Singh, Ran Vijay; Mishra, Miti; ThyagaRajan, Srinivasan

    2013-02-01

    Aged people are more prone to developing neurodegenerative and infectious diseases, autoimmune disorders, and cancer due to impairment of neuroendocrine-immune functions. Neuronal degeneration and immunosuppression aided by increased generation of reactive oxygen species combined with loss of antioxidant enzyme activities promote the aging process. Bacopa monnieri (brahmi), an Ayurvedic herb, and donepezil, a reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, have been used to reverse cognitive dysfunctions in several neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of in vitro incubation of lymphocytes from spleens of young (3-month-old), early middle-aged (8- to 9-month-old), and old (18-month-old) F344 rats with brahmi (0.001%, 0.01%, 0.05%, 0.1%, and 1%) and donepezil (5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 μg/ml) on Concanavalin (Con A)-induced proliferation of T lymphocytes and cytokine production, and the activities of antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)]. In addition, the effects of these compounds on the expression of intracellular signaling pathway markers (ERK, p-ERK, CREB, p-CREB, Akt and p-Akt), nitric oxide (NO) production, and the extent of lipid peroxidation were measured in the splenocytes. Age-related decline in Con A-induced proliferation of T lymphocytes was not reversed by treatment with brahmi and donepezil but donepezil alone further reduced the lymphocyte proliferation in young rats. Lower doses of brahmi treatment reversed the age-related decrease in Con A-induced IL-2 and IFN-γ production by the splenocytes while their production by splenocytes was suppressed by treatment with donepezil in the young and early middle-aged rats. An age-associated decline in the activities of SOD, CAT, GPx, and GST was evident in the lymphocytes of spleen. Brahmi enhanced CAT activity of lymphocytes in all the age groups while donepezil increased SOD

  17. Increased libido associated with donepezil treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Segrec, Nusa; Zaman, Rashid; Pregelj, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Inappropriate verbal and physical sexual behaviour is not common among individuals with dementia, but when it does occur, it can have profound consequences. We report a case of 79-year-old woman with dementia of the Alzheimer's type who complained of increased libido after an increased dose of donepezil, which was being used along with tianeptine. Donepezil withdrawal led to the resolution of increased libido, but when it was reintroduced, increased libido reappeared once again (Naranjo score: 7). Increased libido was not reported by the patient during the 6-year follow-up period after donepezil withdrawal. A potential mechanism of acetylcholinesterase inhibitor-induced increased libido and the current literature on hypersexuality as a side-effect of donepezil treatment are discussed.

  18. Increased libido associated with donepezil treatment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Segrec, Nusa; Zaman, Rashid; Pregelj, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Inappropriate verbal and physical sexual behaviour is not common among individuals with dementia, but when it does occur, it can have profound consequences. We report a case of 79-year-old woman with dementia of the Alzheimer's type who complained of increased libido after an increased dose of donepezil, which was being used along with tianeptine. Donepezil withdrawal led to the resolution of increased libido, but when it was reintroduced, increased libido reappeared once again (Naranjo score: 7). Increased libido was not reported by the patient during the 6-year follow-up period after donepezil withdrawal. A potential mechanism of acetylcholinesterase inhibitor-induced increased libido and the current literature on hypersexuality as a side-effect of donepezil treatment are discussed. PMID:25735193

  19. Steady-state plasma concentration of donepezil enantiomers and its stereoselective metabolism and transport in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lili, Wan; Cheng, Guo; Zhiyong, Zhou; Qi, Yu; Yan, Li; Dan, Li; Xueli, Zheng; Yuan, Zhong

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate the differences in the plasma concentration of two enantiomers of donepezil in Chinese patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and investigate in vitro stereoselective metabolism and transport. Donepezil enantiomers were separated and determined by LC-MS/MS using D5-donepezil as an internal standard on a Sepax Chiralomix SB-5 column. In vitro stereoselective metabolism and transport of donepezil were investigated in human liver microsomes and MDCKII-MDR1 cell monolayer. Pre-dose (Css-min) plasma concentrations were determined in 52 patients. The mean plasma level of (R)-donepezil was 14.94 ng/ml and that of (S)-donepezil was 23.37 ng/ml. One patient's plasma concentration of (R)-donepezil was higher than (S)-donepezil and the ratio is 1.51. The mean plasma levels of (S)-donepezil were found to be higher than those of (R)-donepezil in 51 patients and the ratio of plasma (R)- to (S)-donepezil varies from 0.34 to 0.85. In the in vitro microsomal system, (R)-donepezil degraded faster than (S)-donepezil. V(max) of (R)-donepezil was significantly higher than (S)-donepezil. The P-gp inhibition experiment shown that the P(app) of the two enantiomers was higher than 200 and the efflux ratios were 1.11 and 0.99. The results of the P-gp inhibition identification experiment showed IC50 values of 35.5 and 20.4 μM, respectively, for the two enantiomers. The results indicate that donepezil exhibits stereoselective hepatic metabolism that may explain the differences in the steady-state plasma concentrations observed. Neither (R)- nor (S)-donepezil was a P-gp substance and the two enantiomers are highly permeable through the blood-brain barrier.

  20. Neuroprotective effects of donepezil against Aβ42-induced neuronal toxicity are mediated through not only enhancing PP2A activity but also regulating GSK-3β and nAChRs activity.

    PubMed

    Noh, Min-Young; Koh, Seong H; Kim, Sung-Min; Maurice, Tangui; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Kim, Seung H

    2013-11-01

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate whether donepezil, acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, shown to play a protective role through inhibiting glycogen synthesis kinase-3β (GSK-3β) activity, could also exert neuroprotective effects by stimulating protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity in the amyloid-beta (Aβ)42-induced neuronal toxicity model of Alzheimer's disease. In Aβ42-induced toxic conditions, each PP2A and GSK-3β activity measured at different times showed time-dependent reverse pattern toward the direction of accelerating neuronal deaths with the passage of time. In addition, donepezil pre-treatment showed dose-dependent stepwise increase of neuronal viability and stimulation of PP2A activity. However, such effects on them were significantly reduced through the depletion of PP2A activity with either okadaic acid or PP2Ac siRNA. In spite of blocked PP2A activity in this Aβ42 insult, however, donepezil pretreatment showed additional significant recovering effect on neuronal viability when compared to the value without donepezil. Moreover, donepezil partially recovered its dephosphorylating effect on hyperphosphorylated tau induced by Aβ42. This observation led us to assume that additional mechanisms of donepezil, including its inhibitory effect on GSK-3β activity and/or the activation role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), might be involved. Taken together, our results suggest that the neuroprotective effects of donepezil against Aβ42-induced neurotoxicity are mediated through activation of PP2A, but its additional mechanisms including regulation of GSK-3β and nAChRs activity would partially contribute to its effects. We investigated neuroprotective mechanisms of donepezil against Aβ42 toxicity: Donepezil increased neuronal viability with reduced p-tau by enhancing PP2A activity. Despite of blocked PP2A activity, donepezil showed additional recovering effect on neuronal viability, which findings led us to assume that additional

  1. Donepezil Improved Cognitive Deficits in a Patient With Neurosyphilis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Shan; Lane, Hsien-Yuan; Lin, Chieh-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    A large number of patients with neurosyphilis present dementia with a progressive course and psychiatric symptoms such as depression, mania, and psychosis. Despite prompt and proper antibiotic treatment, the recovery is often incomplete, especially when tissue damage has occurred. We reported a patient with persisted cognitive decline associated with neurosyphilis that improved substantially after donepezil therapy. A 43-year-old man manifested significant psychiatric symptoms such as mania, psychosis, and cognitive impairment due to neurosyphilis. Subsequently, the patient was treated with antipsychotics and donepezil concurrent with an adequate antibiotic treatment for neurosyphilis. During the 1-year follow-up, his rapid plasma reagin titer approached from 1:256 to 1:64. His Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale scores improved from 12 to 25 and 42.3 to 6.3, respectively, after a 6-month donepezil treatment. Donepezil was discontinued. Three months later, worsening of cognitive impairment (MMSE score, 23) was noted. After donepezil was started again for 3 months, his MMSE score improved to 26. Persistent cognitive impairment is commonly associated with neurosyphilis despite adequate penicillin treatment. Treatment of the cognitive impairment is important but difficult. Cholinergic pathways are considered as involving in the cognitive deficit induced by neurosyphilis and donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor, which may be useful for the improvement of cognition. In this case report, we described for the first time the successful use of donepezil in treating cognitive impairment associated with neurosyphilis. The role of cholinesterase inhibitors in the treatment of cognitive impairments caused by neurosyphilis needs further studies.

  2. Cholinesterase inhibitors, donepezil and rivastigmine, attenuate spatial memory and cognitive flexibility impairment induced by acute ethanol in the Barnes maze task in rats.

    PubMed

    Gawel, Kinga; Labuz, Krzysztof; Gibula-Bruzda, Ewa; Jenda, Malgorzata; Marszalek-Grabska, Marta; Filarowska, Joanna; Silberring, Jerzy; Kotlinska, Jolanta H

    2016-10-01

    Central cholinergic dysfunction contributes to acute spatial memory deficits produced by ethanol administration. Donepezil and rivastigmine elevate acetylcholine levels in the synaptic cleft through the inhibition of cholinesterases-enzymes involved in acetylcholine degradation. The aim of our study was to reveal whether donepezil (acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) and rivastigmine (also butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor) attenuate spatial memory impairment as induced by acute ethanol administration in the Barnes maze task (primary latency and number of errors in finding the escape box) in rats. Additionally, we compared the influence of these drugs on ethanol-disturbed memory. In the first experiment, the dose of ethanol (1.75 g/kg, i.p.) was selected that impaired spatial memory, but did not induce motor impairment. Next, we studied the influence of donepezil (1 and 3 mg/kg, i.p.), as well as rivastigmine (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), given either before the probe trial or the reversal learning on ethanol-induced memory impairment. Our study demonstrated that these drugs, when given before the probe trial, were equally effective in attenuating ethanol-induced impairment in both test situations, whereas rivastigmine, at both doses (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), and donepezil only at a higher dose (3 mg/kg, i.p.) given prior the reversal learning, attenuated the ethanol-induced impairment in cognitive flexibility. Thus, rivastigmine appears to exert more beneficial effect than donepezil in reversing ethanol-induced cognitive impairments-probably due to its wider spectrum of activity. In conclusion, the ethanol-induced spatial memory impairment may be attenuated by pharmacological manipulation of central cholinergic neurotransmission. PMID:27376896

  3. Cholinesterase inhibitors, donepezil and rivastigmine, attenuate spatial memory and cognitive flexibility impairment induced by acute ethanol in the Barnes maze task in rats.

    PubMed

    Gawel, Kinga; Labuz, Krzysztof; Gibula-Bruzda, Ewa; Jenda, Malgorzata; Marszalek-Grabska, Marta; Filarowska, Joanna; Silberring, Jerzy; Kotlinska, Jolanta H

    2016-10-01

    Central cholinergic dysfunction contributes to acute spatial memory deficits produced by ethanol administration. Donepezil and rivastigmine elevate acetylcholine levels in the synaptic cleft through the inhibition of cholinesterases-enzymes involved in acetylcholine degradation. The aim of our study was to reveal whether donepezil (acetylcholinesterase inhibitor) and rivastigmine (also butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor) attenuate spatial memory impairment as induced by acute ethanol administration in the Barnes maze task (primary latency and number of errors in finding the escape box) in rats. Additionally, we compared the influence of these drugs on ethanol-disturbed memory. In the first experiment, the dose of ethanol (1.75 g/kg, i.p.) was selected that impaired spatial memory, but did not induce motor impairment. Next, we studied the influence of donepezil (1 and 3 mg/kg, i.p.), as well as rivastigmine (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), given either before the probe trial or the reversal learning on ethanol-induced memory impairment. Our study demonstrated that these drugs, when given before the probe trial, were equally effective in attenuating ethanol-induced impairment in both test situations, whereas rivastigmine, at both doses (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), and donepezil only at a higher dose (3 mg/kg, i.p.) given prior the reversal learning, attenuated the ethanol-induced impairment in cognitive flexibility. Thus, rivastigmine appears to exert more beneficial effect than donepezil in reversing ethanol-induced cognitive impairments-probably due to its wider spectrum of activity. In conclusion, the ethanol-induced spatial memory impairment may be attenuated by pharmacological manipulation of central cholinergic neurotransmission.

  4. Memantine ER/Donepezil: A Review in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Greig, Sarah L

    2015-11-01

    A once-daily, fixed-dose combination of memantine extended-release (ER)/donepezil 28/10 mg (Namzaric™) is available in the USA for patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease (AD) on stable memantine and donepezil therapy. The fixed-dose formulation is bioequivalent to coadministration of the individual drugs. In a 24-week, phase III trial in patients with moderate to severe AD, addition of memantine ER 28 mg once daily to stable cholinesterase inhibitor (ChEI) therapy was more effective than add-on placebo on measures of cognition, global clinical status, dementia behaviour and semantic processing ability, although between-group differences on a measure of daily function did not significantly differ. In subgroup analyses in donepezil-treated patients, add-on memantine ER was more effective than add-on placebo on measures of cognition, dementia behaviour and semantic processing, although there were no significant between-group differences on measures of global clinical status and daily function. Memantine ER plus ChEI combination therapy was generally well tolerated in the phase III trial, with diarrhoea, dizziness and influenza occurring at least twice as often with add-on memantine ER as add-on placebo in donepezil-treated patients. Thus, memantine ER plus donepezil combination therapy is an effective and well tolerated treatment option for patients with moderate to severe AD. The fixed-dose combination is potentially more convenient than coadministration of the individual agents.

  5. RP-HPLC analytical method development and optimization for quantification of donepezil hydrochloride in orally disintegrating tablet.

    PubMed

    Liew, Kai Bin; Peh, Kok Khiang; Fung Tan, Yvonne Tze

    2013-09-01

    An easy, fast and validated RV-HPLC method was invented to quantify donepezil hydrochloride in drug solution and orally disintegrating tablet. The separation was carried out using reversed phase C-18 column (Agilent Eclipse Plus C-18) with UV detection at 268 nm. Method optimization was tested using various composition of organic solvent. The mobile phase comprised of phosphate buffer (0.01M), methanol and acetonitrile (50:30:20, v/v) adjusted to pH 2.7 with phosphoric acid (80%) was found as the optimum mobile phase. The method showed intraday precision and accuracy in the range of 0.24% to -1.83% and -1.83% to 1.99% respectively, while interday precision and accuracy ranged between 1.41% to 1.81% and 0.11% to 1.90% respectively. The standard calibration curve was linear from 0.125 μg/mL to 16 μg/mL, with correlation coefficient of 0.9997±0.00016. The drug solution was stable under room temperature at least for 6 hours. System suitability studies were done. The average plate count was > 2000, tailing factor <1, and capacity factor of 3.30. The retention time was 5.6 min. The HPLC method was used to assay donepezil hydrochloride in tablet and dissolution study of in-house manufactured donepezil orally disintegrating tablet and original Aricept.

  6. Effect of Donepezil on Wernicke Aphasia After Bilateral Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction: Subtraction Analysis of Brain F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomographic Images.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Seo Yeon; Kim, Je-Kyung; An, Young-Sil; Kim, Yong Wook

    2015-01-01

    Aphasia is one of the most common neurologic deficits occurring after stroke. Although the speech-language therapy is a mainstream option for poststroke aphasia, pharmacotherapy is recently being tried to modulate different neurotransmitter systems. However, the efficacy of those treatments is still controversial. We present a case of a 53-year-old female patient with Wernicke aphasia, after the old infarction in the territory of left middle cerebral artery for 8 years and the recent infarction in the right middle cerebral artery for 4 months. On the initial evaluation, the Aphasia Quotient in Korean version of the Western Aphasia Battery was 25.6 of 100. Baseline brain F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic images demonstrated a decreased cerebral metabolism in the left temporoparietal area and right temporal lobe. Donepezil hydrochloride, a reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, was orally administered 5 mg/d for 6 weeks after the initial evaluation and was increased to 10 mg/d for the following 6 weeks. After the donepezil treatment, the patient showed improvement in language function, scoring 51.0 of 100 on Aphasia Quotient. A subtraction analysis of the brain F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomographic images after donepezil medication demonstrated increased uptake in both middle temporal gyri, extended to the occipital area and the left cerebellum. Thus, we suggest that donepezil can be an effective therapeutic choice for the treatment of Wernicke aphasia.

  7. Spectral studies of Donepezil release from streched PVA polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechifor, Cristina-Delia; Zelinschi, Carmen-Beatrice; Stoica, Iuliana; Closca, Valentina; Dorohoi, Dana-Ortansa

    2013-07-01

    The focus of this research is to obtain poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) polymer foils containing Donepezil in different concentration, in order to be used in controlled drug release as a palliative treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. The influence of polymeric foil stretching degree on drug release was analyzed using spectral measurements.

  8. Serum adipokine levels modified by donepezil treatment in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Pákáski, Magdolna; Fehér, Agnes; Juhász, Anna; Drótos, Gergely; Fazekas, Orsike Csilla; Kovács, János; Janka, Zoltán; Kálmán, János

    2014-01-01

    Neurotransmitter enhancement therapy with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) is a clinically proven approach for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Donepezil is one of the three currently approved AChEIs for treating AD symptoms delaying the decline in cognitive function. In addition to cholinergic hypofunction, there are several factors in AD pathogenesis. For example, adipocytokines released from adipose tissue are also thought to play a role in the progress of dementia. Adipokines, i.e., leptin and adiponectin, are involved in the modulation of certain cognitive functions in the brain. The goal of our study was to elucidate effects of donepezil therapy on the serum levels of certain adipokines, such as leptin and adiponectin in AD patients. Clinically diagnosed mild-to-moderate AD patients (n = 26) were involved in this open-labeled, single-center, prospective self-control study. ApoE polymorphism, serum adiponectin, leptin, LDL, HDL, triglyceride levels, and BMI were determined before and at 12 and 24 weeks intervals of donepezil treatment, respectively. Twenty-four weeks of donepezil treatment induced a linear decrease of serum leptin levels (p = 0.013) and a linear elevation of serum adiponectin levels (p = 0.007). BMI (p < 0.001) and abdominal circumference (p = 0.017) were significantly lower at 24 weeks as compared to control values. None of the other examined metabolic parameters were changed during the treatment period. This previously unrecognized serum adipokine regulating potential of donepezil may be relevant in its therapeutic, disease modifying effect in AD by transferring protective (by increasing serum adiponectin levels) and detrimental (by decreasing serum leptin levels) effects onto the neurodegenerative process at the same time.

  9. Stereoselective metabolism of donepezil and steady-state plasma concentrations of S-donepezil based on CYP2D6 polymorphisms in the therapeutic responses of Han Chinese patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin; Wan, Lili; Zhong, Yuan; Yu, Qi; Han, Yonglong; Chen, Pengguo; Wang, Beiyun; Li, Wei; Miao, Ya; Guo, Cheng

    2015-11-01

    The therapeutic response rates of patients to donepezil vary from 20% to 60%, one of the reasons is their genetic differences in donepezil-metabolizing enzymes, which directly influence liver metabolism. However, the mechanism of donepezil metabolism and that of its enantiomers is unknown. This study evaluated CYP2D6 polymorphisms to elucidate the stereoselective metabolism of donepezil and to confirm the association between the steady-state plasma concentrations of the pharmaco-effective S-donepezil and the therapeutic responses of Han Chinese patients with Alzheimer's disease. The in vitro study of the stereoselective metabolism demonstrated that CYP2D6 is the predominant P450 enzyme that metabolizes donepezil and that different CYP2D6 alleles differentially affect donepezil enantiomers metabolism. A total of 77 Han Chinese patients with Alzheimer's disease were recruited to confirm these results, by measuring their steady-state plasma concentrations of S-donepezil. The related CYP2D6 genes were genotyped. Plasma concentrations of S-donepezil (based on CYP2D6 polymorphisms) were significantly associated with therapeutic responses. This finding suggests that plasma concentrations of S-donepezil influence therapeutic outcomes following treatment with donepezil in Han Chinese patients with Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, determining a patient's steady-state plasma concentration of S-donepezil in combination with their CYP2D6 genotype might be useful for clinically monitoring the therapeutic efficacy of donepezil.

  10. Donepezil inhibits the amyloid-beta oligomer-induced microglial activation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Geun; Moon, Minho; Choi, Jin Gyu; Park, Gunhyuk; Kim, Ae-Jung; Hur, Jinyoung; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Oh, Myung Sook

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies on Alzheimer's disease (AD) have focused on soluble oligomeric forms of amyloid-beta (Aβ oligomer, AβO) that are directly associated with AD-related pathologies, such as cognitive decline, neurodegeneration, and neuroinflammation. Donepezil is a well-known anti-dementia agent that increases acetylcholine levels through inhibition of acetylcholinesterase. However, a growing body of experimental and clinical studies indicates that donepezil may also provide neuroprotective and disease-modifying effects in AD. Additionally, donepezil has recently been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory effects against lipopolysaccharides and tau pathology. However, it remains unknown whether donepezil has anti-inflammatory effects against AβO in cultured microglial cells and the brain in animals. Further, the effects of donepezil against AβO-mediated neuronal death, astrogliosis, and memory impairment have also not yet been investigated. Thus, in the present study, we examined the anti-inflammatory effect of donepezil against AβO and its neuroinflammatory mechanisms. Donepezil significantly attenuated the release of inflammatory mediators (prostaglandin E2, interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-α, and nitric oxide) from microglia. Donepezil also decreased AβO-induced up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 protein and phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase as well as translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B. We next showed that donepezil suppresses activated microglia-mediated toxicity in primary hippocampal cells using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. In intrahippocampal AβO-injected mice, donepezil significantly inhibited microgliosis and astrogliosis. Furthermore, behavioral tests revealed that donepezil (2 mg/kg/day, 5 days, p.o.) significantly ameliorated AβO-induced memory impairment. These results suggest that donepezil directly inhibits microglial activation

  11. Reversals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on special education materials--the bibliography covers nine materials for remediating reversals in handicapped students at the early childhood and elementary levels. Entries are presented in order of NIMIS accession…

  12. Results, rhetoric, and randomized trials: the case of donepezil.

    PubMed

    Gilstad, John R; Finucane, Thomas E

    2008-08-01

    Whether donepezil provides meaningful benefit to patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is controversial, but drug sales annually total billions of dollars. A review of data from published randomized clinical trials (RCTs) found rhetorical patterns that may encourage use of this drug. To create a reproducible observation, the sentences occurring at five specific text sites in all 18 RCTs of donepezil for AD were tabulated, as were study design, sources of financial support, and outcomes that could be compared between trials. Rhetoric in the 13 vendor-supported trials (15 publications) was strongly positive. Three early trials used the motif "efficacious (or effective) ... treating ... symptoms" four times. "Well-tolerated and efficacious" or an equivalent motif appeared 11 times in five RCTs. Nine RCTs referred 15 times to previously proven effectiveness. Seven trials encourage off-label use, for "early" cognitive impairment, severe dementia in advance of the Food and Drug Administration labeling change, or behavioral symptoms. These rhetorical motifs and themes appeared only in the vendor-supported trials. Trials without vendor support described the drug's effects as "small" or absent; two emphasized the need for better treatments. RCT results were highly consistent in all trials; the small differences do not explain differences in rhetoric. At these text sites in the primary research literature on donepezil for AD, uniformly positive rhetoric is present in all vendor-supported RCTs. Reference to the limited benefit of donepezil is confined to RCTs without vendor support. Data in the trials are highly consistent. This observation generates the hypothesis that rhetoric in vendor-supported published RCTs may promote vendors' products. PMID:18662199

  13. Neuroprotection against vascular dementia after acupuncture combined with donepezil hydrochloride: P300 event related potential

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiang; Wang, Xiu-juan; Zhang, Zhe-cheng; Xue, Rong; Li, Ping; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture can be used to treat various nervous system diseases. Here, 168 vascular dementia patients were orally administered donepezil hydrochloride alone (5 mg/day, once a day for 56 days), or combined with acupuncture at Shenting (DU24), Tianzhu (BL10), Sishencong (Extra), Yintang (Extra), Renzhong (DU26), Neiguan (PC6), Shenmen (HT7), Fengchi (GB20), Wangu (GB12) and Baihui (DU20) (once a day for 56 days). Compared with donepezil hydrochloride alone, P300 event related potential latency was shorter with an increased amplitude in patients treated with donepezil hydrochloride and acupuncture. Mini-Mental State Examination score was also higher. Moreover, these differences in P300 latency were identified within different infarcted regions in patients treated with donepezil hydrochloride and acupuncture. These findings indicate that acupuncture combined with donepezil hydrochloride noticeably improves cognitive function in patients with vascular dementia, and exerts neuroprotective effects against vascular dementia. PMID:27127486

  14. PET Evidence of the Effect of Donepezil on Cognitive Performance in an Animal Model of Chemobrain.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ilhan; Joung, Hye-Young; Yu, A Ram; Shim, Insop; Kim, Jin Su

    2016-01-01

    A considerable number of patients with breast cancer complain of cognitive impairment after chemotherapy. In this study, we showed that donepezil enhanced memory function and increased brain glucose metabolism in a rat model of cognitive impairment after chemotherapy using behavioral analysis and positron emission tomography (PET). We found that chemotherapy affected spatial learning ability, reference memory, and working memory and that donepezil improved these cognitive impairments. According to PET analysis, chemotherapy reduced glucose metabolism in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and donepezil increased glucose metabolism in the bilateral frontal lobe, parietal lobe, and hippocampus. Reduced glucose metabolism was more prominent after treatment with doxorubicin than cyclophosphamide. Our results demonstrated the neural mechanisms for cognitive impairment after chemotherapy and show that cognition was improved after donepezil intervention using both behavioral and imaging methods. Our results suggested that donepezil can be employed clinically for the treatment of cognitive deficits after chemotherapy. PMID:27556039

  15. PET Evidence of the Effect of Donepezil on Cognitive Performance in an Animal Model of Chemobrain

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ilhan; Yu, A Ram

    2016-01-01

    A considerable number of patients with breast cancer complain of cognitive impairment after chemotherapy. In this study, we showed that donepezil enhanced memory function and increased brain glucose metabolism in a rat model of cognitive impairment after chemotherapy using behavioral analysis and positron emission tomography (PET). We found that chemotherapy affected spatial learning ability, reference memory, and working memory and that donepezil improved these cognitive impairments. According to PET analysis, chemotherapy reduced glucose metabolism in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and donepezil increased glucose metabolism in the bilateral frontal lobe, parietal lobe, and hippocampus. Reduced glucose metabolism was more prominent after treatment with doxorubicin than cyclophosphamide. Our results demonstrated the neural mechanisms for cognitive impairment after chemotherapy and show that cognition was improved after donepezil intervention using both behavioral and imaging methods. Our results suggested that donepezil can be employed clinically for the treatment of cognitive deficits after chemotherapy. PMID:27556039

  16. Influence of cholinesterase inhibitors, donepezil and rivastigmine on the acquisition, expression, and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference in rats.

    PubMed

    Gawel, Kinga; Labuz, Krzysztof; Jenda, Malgorzata; Silberring, Jerzy; Kotlinska, Jolanta H

    2014-07-15

    The influence of systemic administration of cholinesterase inhibitors, donepezil and rivastigmine on the acquisition, expression, and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) was examined in rats. Additionally, this study aimed to compare the effects of donepezil, which selectively inhibits acetylcholinesterase, and rivastigmine, which inhibits both acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase on morphine reward. Morphine-induced CPP (unbiased method) was induced by four injections of morphine (5 mg/kg, i.p.). Donepezil (0.5, 1, and 3 mg/kg, i.p.) or rivastigmine (0.03, 0.5, and 1 mg/kg, i.p.) were given 20 min before morphine during conditioning phase and 20 min before the expression or reinstatement of morphine-induced CPP. Our results indicated that both inhibitors of cholinesterase attenuated the acquisition and expression of morphine CPP. The results were more significant after rivastigmine due to a broader inhibitory spectrum of this drug. Moreover, donepezil (1 mg/kg) and rivastigmine (0.5 mg/kg) attenuated the morphine CPP reinstated by priming injection of 5mg/kg morphine. These properties of both cholinesterase inhibitors were reversed by mecamylamine (3 mg/kg, i.p.), a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist but not scopolamine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.), a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist. All effects of cholinesterase inhibitors were observed at the doses that had no effects on locomotor activity of animals. Our results suggest beneficial role of cholinesterase inhibitors in reduction of morphine reward and morphine-induced seeking behavior. Finally, we found that the efficacy of cholinesterase inhibitors in attenuating reinstatement of morphine CPP provoked by priming injection may be due to stimulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  17. Single dose pharmacokinetics of the novel transdermal donepezil patch in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yo Han; Choi, Hee Youn; Lim, Hyeong-Seok; Lee, Shi Hyang; Jeon, Hae Sun; Hong, Donghyun; Kim, Seong Su; Choi, Young Kweon; Bae, Kyun-Seop

    2015-01-01

    Background Donepezil is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor indicated for Alzheimer’s disease. The aim of this randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose, dose-escalation study was to investigate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of the donepezil patch in healthy male subjects. Methods Each healthy male subject received a single transdermal donepezil patch (72 hours patch-on periods) of 43.75 mg/12.5 cm2, 87.5 mg/25 cm2, or 175 mg/50 cm2. Serial blood samples were collected up to 312 hours after patch application. The plasma concentrations of donepezil were determined by using a validated liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry method. Pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained by noncompartmental analysis. Tolerability of the patches and performance of the patches (adhesion, skin irritation, residual donepezil content in the patch) were assessed throughout the study. Results The study was completed by 36 healthy subjects. After patch application, the maximal plasma donepezil concentration (Cmax) and the area under the curve (AUC) increased in a dose-proportional manner. Median time to Cmax was ~74–76 hours (~2–4 hours after patch removal), and mean t1/2β was ~63.77–93.07 hours. The average donepezil residue in the patch after 72 hours was ~73.9%–86.7% of the loading dose. There were neither serious adverse events nor adverse events that lead to discontinuation. Skin adhesion of the patch was good in 97.2% of the subjects. All skin irritations after patch removal were mild and were resolved during the study period. Conclusion The donepezil patch appeared to be generally well tolerated and adhesive. Pharmacokinetic analysis of the donepezil patch demonstrated linear kinetics. PMID:25792802

  18. Effects of donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, on neurogenesis in a rat model of vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kyoung Ja; Kim, Min Kyeong; Lee, Eun Joo; Kim, Jung Nam; Choi, Bo-Ryoung; Kim, Soo Young; Cho, Kyu Suk; Han, Jung-Soo; Kim, Hahn Young; Shin, Chan Young; Han, Seol-Heui

    2014-12-15

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is the second most common form of dementia caused by cerebrovascular disease. Several recent reports demonstrated that cholinergic deficits are implicated in the pathogenesis of VaD and that cholinergic therapies have shown improvement of cognitive function in patients with VaD. However, the precise mechanisms by which donepezil achieves its effects on VaD are not fully understood. Donepezil hydrochloride is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI) currently used for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Several lines of evidence have demonstrated that AChEIs such as donepezil promote neurogenesis in the central nervous system. We investigated whether donepezil regulated hippocampal neurogenesis after bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) in rats, a commonly used animal model of VaD. To evaluate the effect of donepezil on neurogenesis, we orally treated rats with donepezil (10mg/kg) once a day for 3weeks, and injected BrdU over the same 3-week period to label newborn cells. The doses of donepezil that we used have been reported to activate cholinergic activity in rats. After 3weeks, a water maze task was performed on these rats to test spatial learning, and a subsequent histopathological evaluation was conducted. Donepezil improved memory impairment and increased the number of BrdU-positive cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) of BCCAO animals. These results indicated that donepezil improves cognitive function and enhances the survival of newborn neurons in the DG in our animal model of VaD, possibly by enhancing the expression of choline acetyltransferase and brain-derived neurotropic factor.

  19. Donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, attenuates nicotine self-administration and reinstatement of nicotine seeking in rats.

    PubMed

    Kimmey, Blake A; Rupprecht, Laura E; Hayes, Matthew R; Schmidt, Heath D

    2014-07-01

    Nicotine craving and cognitive impairments represent core symptoms of nicotine withdrawal and predict relapse in abstinent smokers. Current smoking cessation pharmacotherapies have limited efficacy in preventing relapse and maintaining abstinence during withdrawal. Donepezil is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor that has been shown previously to improve cognition in healthy non-treatment-seeking smokers. However, there are no studies examining the effects of donepezil on nicotine self-administration and/or the reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior in rodents. The present experiments were designed to determine the effects of acute donepezil administration on nicotine taking and the reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior, an animal model of relapse in abstinent human smokers. Moreover, the effects of acute donepezil administration on sucrose self-administration and sucrose seeking were also investigated in order to determine whether donepezil's effects generalized to other reinforced behaviors. Acute donepezil administration (1.0 or 3.0 mg/kg, i.p.) attenuated nicotine, but not sucrose self-administration maintained on a fixed-ratio 5 schedule of reinforcement. Donepezil administration also dose-dependently attenuated the reinstatement of both nicotine- and sucrose-seeking behaviors. Commonly reported adverse effects of donepezil treatment in humans are nausea and vomiting. However, at doses required to attenuate nicotine self-administration in rodents, no effects of donepezil on nausea/malaise as measured by pica were observed. Collectively, these results indicate that increased extracellular acetylcholine levels are sufficient to attenuate nicotine taking and seeking in rats and that these effects are not due to adverse malaise symptoms such as nausea.

  20. Characterization of oral disintegrating film containing donepezil for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Liew, Kai Bin; Tan, Yvonne Tze Fung; Peh, Kok Khiang

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a taste-masked oral disintegrating film (ODF) containing donepezil, with fast disintegration time and suitable mechanical strength, for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, corn starch, polyethylene glycol, lactose monohydrate and crosspovidone served as the hydrophilic polymeric bases of the ODF. The uniformity, in vitro disintegration time, drug release and the folding endurance of the ODF were examined. The in vitro results showed that 80% of donepezil hydrochloride was released within 5 minutes with mean disintegration time of 44 seconds. The result of the film flexibility test showed that the number of folding time to crack the film was 40 times, an indication of sufficient mechanical property for patient use. A single-dose, fasting, four-period, eight-treatment, double-blind study involving 16 healthy adult volunteers was performed to evaluate the in situ disintegration time and palatability of ODF. Five parameters, namely taste, aftertaste, mouthfeel, ease of handling and acceptance were evaluated. The mean in situ disintegration time of ODF was 49 seconds. ODF containing 7 mg of sucralose were more superior than saccharin and aspartame in terms of taste, aftertaste, mouthfeel and acceptance. Furthermore, the ODF was stable for at least 6 months when stored at 40°C and 75% relative humidity.

  1. Bioequivalence Study of Donepezil Hydrochloride Tablets in Healthy Male Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Rojanasthien, Noppamas; Aunmuang, Siriluk; Hanprasertpong, Nutthiya; Roongapinun, Sukit; Teekachunhatean, Supanimit

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the bioequivalence of two formulations of 5 mg donepezil HCL tablets: Tonizep as the test and Aricept as the reference. The two products were administered as a single oral dose according to a randomized two-phase crossover with a 3-week washout period in 20 healthy Thai Male volunteers. After drug administration, serial blood samples were collected over a period of 216 hours. Plasma donepezil concentrations were measured by high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection. Pharmacokinetic parameters were analyzed based on noncompartmental analysis. The logarithmically transformed data of AUC0–∞ and Cmax were analyzed for 90% confidence intervals (CI) using ANOVA. The mean (90% CI) values for the ratio of AUC0–∞ and Cmax values of the test product over those of the reference product were 1.08 (1.02–1.14) and 1.08 (0.99–1.17), respectively (within the bioequivalence range of 0.8–1.25). The median Tmax for the test product was similar to that of the reference product (2.0 hr), and the 90% CI for the Tmax difference between the two preparations was –0.19 to 0.29 hr and within the bioequivalence range of ± 20% of the Tmax of the reference formulation. Our study demonstrated the bioequivalence of the two preparations. PMID:23209934

  2. Greater responsiveness to donepezil in Alzheimer patients with higher levels of acetylcholinesterase based on attention task scores and a donepezil PET study.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Masashi; Meguro, Kenichi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Funaki, Yoshihito; Ishikawa, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Naofumi; Iwata, Ren; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to predict donepezil responders among patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) based on cognitive tests and positron emission tomography. The Mini-Mental State Examination, Digit Symbol subtest (DigSm) of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Revised, and Trail-Making Test A were administered for 80 patients with AD to assess global function, attention, and executive function, respectively. The same tests and the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale were conducted after treatment with oral donepezil (5 mg/d) for 6 months (study 1). [C]-Donepezil positron emission tomography examinations were conducted before and after treatment for 30 randomly selected patients. The distribution volume (DV), which indicates the density of donepezil-binding sites, was calculated using Logan graphical analysis (study 2). In study 1, 35 patients were identified as responders based on the CGI and Mini-Mental State Examination changes. These patients had higher baseline DigSm scores compared with nonresponders. In study 2, 15 patients were responders. DigSm correlated with DV at baseline. DV at baseline and %DV change in responders were higher than in nonresponders, and these variables correlated with ΔDigSm and CGI scores. Higher baseline attention may predict responsiveness to donepezil in patients with AD, and higher acetylcholinesterase levels result in a greater clinical effect.

  3. Alzheimer disease. Donepezil and nursing home placement--benefits and costs.

    PubMed

    Jelic, Vesna; Winblad, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    The recent DOMINO-AD trial suggests that continued treatment with donepezil delays nursing home placement for patients with severe Alzheimer disease, but more work is needed to support strong conclusions about whether the benefits outweigh the costs.

  4. The safety and tolerability of donepezil in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Stephen; Ham, Richard J; Wilkinson, David

    2004-01-01

    Cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitors, which prevent the hydrolysis of acetylcholine, have been approved for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) for over a decade. However, the first ChE inhibitors were associated with a high incidence of side-effects and general tolerability concerns, including hepatotoxicity. Side-effects associated with increased cholinergic activity, particularly in the gastrointestinal (GI) system, can prevent patients from achieving effective doses of drug. In addition, the advanced age and frail nature of patients with AD mean that poor tolerability is a serious concern. The potential for drug–drug interactions is also an important consideration, due to the high prevalence of comorbid disease in these patients. Data both from clinical trials and studies in routine clinical practice have shown that donepezil is associated with a low incidence of GI adverse events (AEs) that is comparable with placebo. Donepezil is a potent, selective inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, and selective inhibition of central as opposed to peripheral ChEs might be expected to reduce the incidence of AEs, thus this may explain the lower incidence of cholinergic AEs observed following treatment with donepezil, compared with nonselective ChE inhibitors. There are no differences in cardiovascular AEs, including bradycardia, between placebo and donepezil groups in the clinical trials published to date, even in a very sick vascular dementia population with high rates of comorbidity and concomitant medication use. Data from single- and multiple-dose studies of donepezil in patients with hepatic impairment and with moderately to severely impaired renal function indicate that donepezil is safe and well tolerated in these groups. Furthermore, both in vitro and clinical studies have shown that donepezil is not associated with drug–drug interactions. The incidence of weight loss is very similar between donepezil- and placebo-treated patients. Although insomnia

  5. Rational modification of donepezil as multifunctional acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Min; Cai, Pei; Liu, Qiao-Hong; Xu, Ding-Qiao; Yang, Xue-Lian; Wu, Jia-Jia; Kong, Ling-Yi; Wang, Xiao-Bing

    2016-11-10

    A series of novel donepezil derivatives was designed, synthesized and evaluated as multifunctional acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The screening results indicated that most of the compounds exhibited potent inhibition of AChE with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. Moreover, these derivatives displayed good antioxidant, Aβ interaction, blood-brain barrier penetration (PAMPA-BBB+) and ADMET properties (in silico). Among them, 5c demonstrated excellent AChE inhibition (IC50: 85 nM for eeAChE, 73 nM for hAChE), metal chelation, and inhibitory effects on self-induced, hAChE-induced and Cu(2+)-induced Aβ1-42 aggregation (18.5%, 72.4% and 46.3%, at 20 μM). Kinetic analysis and molecular modeling studies suggested that 5c could bind simultaneously to the catalytic active site (CAS) and peripheral anionic site (PAS) of AChE. More importantly, 5c exhibited significant neuroprotective potency against Aβ1-42-induced PC12 cell injury. Furthermore, the step-through passive avoidance test showed 5c significantly reversed scopolamine-induced memory deficit and no hepatotoxicity in mice. These results indicated that 5c might be a promising drug candidate for AD therapy. PMID:27484514

  6. Cholinergic Neurotransmission in the Posterior Insular Cortex Is Altered in Preclinical Models of Neuropathic Pain: Key Role of Muscarinic M2 Receptors in Donepezil-Induced Antinociception

    PubMed Central

    Ferrier, Jérémy; Bayet-Robert, Mathilde; Dalmann, Romain; El Guerrab, Abderrahim; Aissouni, Youssef; Graveron-Demilly, Danielle; Chalus, Maryse; Pinguet, Jérémy; Eschalier, Alain; Richard, Damien; Daulhac, Laurence; Balayssac, David

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is one of the most debilitating pain conditions, yet no therapeutic strategy has been really effective for its treatment. Hence, a better understanding of its pathophysiological mechanisms is necessary to identify new pharmacological targets. Here, we report important metabolic variations in brain areas involved in pain processing in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy using HRMAS 1H-NMR spectroscopy. An increased concentration of choline has been evidenced in the posterior insular cortex (pIC) of neuropathic animal, which was significantly correlated with animals' pain thresholds. The screening of 34 genes mRNA involved in the pIC cholinergic system showed an increased expression of the high-affinity choline transporter and especially the muscarinic M2 receptors, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis in oxaliplatin-treated rats and the spared nerve injury model (SNI). Furthermore, pharmacological activation of M2 receptors in the pIC using oxotremorine completely reversed oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Consistently, systemic treatment with donepezil, a centrally active acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, prevented and reversed oxaliplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia as well as social interaction impairment. Intracerebral microdialysis revealed a lower level of acetylcholine in the pIC of oxaliplatin-treated rats, which was significantly increased by donepezil. Finally, the analgesic effect of donepezil was markedly reduced by a microinjection of the M2 antagonist, methoctramine, within the pIC, in both oxaliplatin-treated rats and spared nerve injury rats. These findings highlight the crucial role of cortical cholinergic neurotransmission as a critical mechanism of neuropathic pain, and suggest that targeting insular M2 receptors using central cholinomimetics could be used for neuropathic pain treatment. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our study describes a decrease in cholinergic neurotransmission in the posterior insular

  7. Donepezil Regulates 1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-Induced Microglial Polarization in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Teng; Hou, Ruihua; Xu, Shujun; Wu, Chengyuan

    2015-10-21

    1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) induces microglial activation and degeneration of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons. Donepezil is a well-known acetylcholinesterase inhibitor used clinically to treat cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that MPP+ promotes microglial M1 polarization and suppresses M2 polarization and that this can be restored by donepezil. Results indicate that MPP+ treatment in microglial BV2 cells promotes microglial polarization toward the M1 state. However, pretreatment with donepezil inhibited MPP+-induced M1 polarization in microglia by suppressing the release of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Importantly, we found that MPP+ inhibited microglial M2 polarization by suppressing expression of Arg-1, Fizz1, and Ym1, which was also rescued by pretreatment with donepezil. In addition, IL-4-mediated induction of anti-inflammatory marker genes IL-10, IL-13, and transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2) were significantly attenuated by MPP+ in BV2 cells, which was restored by pretreatment with donepezil in a concentration-dependent manner. Mechanistically, we found that the addition of MPP+ reduced the intensity of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) but not total STAT6 in IL-4-stimulated BV2 cells. Importantly, pretreatment of microglial BV2 cells with donepezil 3 h prior to administration of MPP+ rescued the reduction of STAT6 phosphorylation induced by MPP+.

  8. Donepezil across the spectrum of Alzheimer's disease: dose optimization and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Lee, J-H; Jeong, S-K; Kim, B C; Park, K W; Dash, A

    2015-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible and progressive neurodegenerative disorder. AD is the most common cause of dementia worldwide, and its incidence is increasing in line with population aging. The primary feature of AD is progressive cognitive decline, and severe AD is characterized by reduced communication skills and mobility. However, successful treatment can substantially improve quality of life. Donepezil is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor approved for use across the full spectrum of mild, moderate, and severe AD. Donepezil has been available at doses of 5 or 10 mg once daily for more than a decade and, more recently, a single high once-daily sustained-release 23-mg dose has been approved for treatment of patients with moderate to severe AD. The rationale for the higher dose formulation was the expected increase in acetylcholinesterase inhibition given the dose-response relationship of donepezil, with the benefits of the higher dose being most apparent in patients with more advanced AD. Donepezil 5 and 10 mg/day have been well studied in mild-to-moderate AD, and a clinical trial has confirmed the benefits of donepezil 23 mg/day in patients with moderate to severe AD, particularly for language and visuospatial ability. This review presents an overview of the evidence for donepezil across the spectrum of AD, with a focus on dose optimization for disease progression.

  9. The Effects of Donepezil on 15-Item Geriatric Depression Scale Structure in Patients with Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Youngsoon; Kwak, Yong Tae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims In Alzheimer disease (AD), depression is among the most common accompanying neuropsychiatric symptoms and has different clinical manifestations when compared with early-life depression. In patients with drug-naïve AD, we tried to explore the structure of the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS15) and the effect of donepezil on these substructures. Methods GDS15, cognitive function, and activities of daily living function tests were administered to 412 patients with probable AD who had not been medicated before visiting the hospital. Using principal component analysis, three factors were identified. The patients with AD who received only donepezil were retrospectively analyzed and we compared the change of cognition and GDS15 subgroup after donepezil medication. Results Our study identified three factors and revealed that the GDS15 may be comprised of a heterogeneous scale. The Barthel index was significantly correlated with factor 1 (positively) and factor 2 (negatively). The Korean version of the MMSE (K-MMSE) was significantly correlated with factor 2 and factor 3. Compared to the baseline state, K-MMSE and GDS15 showed significant improvement after taking donepezil. Among GDS15 subgroups, factor 2 and factor 3 showed significant improvement after donepezil treatment. Conclusions These results suggest that the GDS15 may be comprised of a heterogeneous scale and donepezil differentially affects the GDS15 subgroup in AD. PMID:27790242

  10. Deterioration in donepezil-induced PR prolongation after a coadministration of memantine in a patient with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Igeta, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Yutaro; Motegi, Takaharu; Sasaki, Aiko; Yokoyama, Yuichi; Someya, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    The side effects and interaction of memantine and donepezil hydrochloride when used concomitantly are currently unknown. We encountered a case of a 77-year-old female with Alzheimer's disease in which the concomitant use of memantine exacerbated the prolonged electrocardiogram PR interval which appeared while donepezil hydrochloride was being orally administered. In terms of the cardiac circulation system side effects caused by donepezil hydrochloride and memantine, bradycardia has been reported. However, clinicians should be also aware of PR prolongation associated with the concomitant use of donepezil and memantine.

  11. Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Clinical Trial of Donepezil in Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Román, Gustavo C.; Salloway, Stephen; Black, Sandra E.; Royall, Donald R.; DeCarli, Charles; Weiner, Michael W.; Moline, Margaret; Kumar, Dinesh; Schindler, Rachel; Posner, Holly

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose We sought to assess the efficacy and safety of donepezil in patients with vascular dementia (VaD) fulfilling National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke–Association Internationale pour la Recherche et l’Enseignement en Neurosciences criteria. Methods This international, multicenter, 24-week trial was conducted from March 2003 to August 2005. Patients (N=974; mean age, 73.0 years) with probable or possible VaD were randomized 2:1 to receive donepezil 5 mg/d or placebo. Coprimary outcome measures were scores on the Vascular-Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale–Cognitive Subscale and Clinician’s Interview–Based Impression of Change, plus carer interview. Analyses were performed for the intent-to-treat population with the last-observation-carried-forward method. Results Compared with placebo, donepezil-treated patients showed significant improvement from baseline to end point on the Vascular-Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale–Cognitive Subscale (least-squares mean difference, −1.156; 95% CI, −1.98 to −0.33; P<0.01) but not on the Clinician’s Interview–Based Impression of Change, plus carer interview. Patients with hippocampal atrophy who were treated with donepezil demonstrated stable cognition versus a decline in the placebo-treated group; in those without atrophy, cognition improved with donepezil versus relative stability with placebo. Results on secondary efficacy measures were inconsistent. The incidence of adverse events was similar across groups. Eleven deaths occurred in the donepezil group (1.7%), similar to rates previously reported for donepezil trials in VaD, whereas no deaths occurred in the placebo group. Conclusions Patients treated with donepezil 5 mg/d demonstrated significant improvement in cognitive, but not global, function. Donepezil was relatively well tolerated; adverse events were consistent with current labeling. Mortality in the placebo group was unexpectedly low. The differential

  12. Molecularly imprinted microparticles in lipid-based formulations for sustained release of donepezil.

    PubMed

    Ruela, André Luís Morais; de Figueiredo, Eduardo Costa; de Araújo, Magali Benjamim; Carvalho, Flávia Chiva; Pereira, Gislaine Ribeiro

    2016-10-10

    Donepezil is a drug administered for Alzheimer's disease treatment, and it is a potential template molecule for imprinted microparticles. The precipitation polymerization technique allows the synthesis of spherical imprinted microparticles, and the intermolecular interactions among drug and molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) play a promising role for delineating drug delivery systems. Once that donepezil is a poorly-water soluble compound, lipid based-formulations (LBFs) may enhance its oral administration. Based on this, LBFs are useful vehicles to incorporate imprinted microparticles synthesized by precipitation polymerization. In these formulations, the drug dissolved in lipids is accessible to adsorbate in the polymers, and the hydrophobic environment of lipids increases the molecular recognition of MIPs. The formulations based on MIPs using pure oleic acid as vehicle prolong the in vitro release of donepezil up to several hours by a Fickian diffusion mechanism, and it provides a multiphasic release pattern related to the heterogeneity of the binding sites. The modulation of donepezil release from MIPs-based formulations using oil vehicles may contribute to decrease its side effects, possibly regulating its absorption rate in the gastrointestinal tract. These systems represent a novel technological platform to prolong the delivery not only for donepezil, but also for a variety of therapeutics.

  13. Microneedle-mediated delivery of donepezil: Potential for improved treatment options in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Mary-Carmel; Caffarel-Salvador, Ester; Fallows, Steven J; McCarthy, Helen O; Donnelly, Ryan F

    2016-06-01

    Transdermal drug delivery is an attractive route of drug administration; however, there are relatively few marketed transdermal products. To increase delivery across the skin, strategies to enhance skin permeability are widely investigated, with microneedles demonstrating particular promise. Hydrogel-forming microneedles are inserted into the skin, and following dissolution of a drug loaded reservoir and movement of the drug through the created channels, the microneedle array is removed intact, and can then be readily and safely discarded. This study presents the formulation and evaluation of an integrated microneedle patch containing the Alzheimer's drug, donepezil hydrochloride. The integrated patch consisted of hydrogel-forming microneedles in combination with a donepezil hydrochloride containing film. Formulation and characterisation of plasticised films, prepared from poly(vinylpyrrolidone) or poly (methyl vinyl ether co-maleic anhydride/acid) (Gantrez®) polymers, is presented. Furthermore, in vitro permeation of donepezil hydrochloride across neonatal porcine skin from the patches was investigated, with 854.71μg±122.71μg donepezil hydrochloride delivered after 24h, using the optimum patch formulation. Following administration of the patch to an animal model, plasma concentrations of 51.8±17.6ng/mL were obtained, demonstrating the success of this delivery platform for donepezil hydrochloride. PMID:27018330

  14. Donepezil delays photoreceptor apoptosis induced by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea in mice

    PubMed Central

    WU, LONGYAN; XU, MAN; LIU, SHENGTAO; CHEN, GUO; ZHANG, FENGJUN; ZHAO, YAO; YI, JINGLIN

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited retinal degeneration diseases characterized by photoreceptor cell death that causes visual disturbances and eventual blindness. Intraperitoneal injection of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) causes photoreceptor loss, and is used to create an animal model for investigating the mechanisms that cause retinal degeneration diseases. Donepezil is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor that has a protective effect on retinal ganglion cells in vitro and in vivo, and it is understood that donepezil increases the expression of a heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), which serves to protect neurons. Hsp70 functions as a chaperone molecule that protects cells from protein aggregation and assists in the refolding of denatured proteins. In the present study, the effects of donepezil on photoreceptor survival in mice was investigated. It was observed that donepezil upregulates the expression of Hsp70, to increase resistance to MNU-induced photoreceptor cell apoptosis by using its anti-apoptotic properties. In addition, the present study observed that Hsp70 promotes photoreceptor cell survival by upregulating the expression levels of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2). In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that donepezil has the potential to be used as a treatment for retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:27284332

  15. Donepezil rescues spatial learning and memory deficits following traumatic brain injury independent of its effects on neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tzong-Shiue; Kim, Ahleum; Kernie, Steven G

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is ubiquitous and effective treatments for it remain supportive largely due to uncertainty over how endogenous repair occurs. Recently, we demonstrated that hippocampal injury-induced neurogenesis is one mechanism underlying endogenous repair following TBI. Donepezil is associated with increased hippocampal neurogenesis and has long been known to improve certain aspects of cognition following many types of brain injury through unknown mechanisms. By coupling donepezil therapy with temporally regulated ablation of injury-induced neurogenesis using nestin-HSV transgenic mice, we investigated whether the pro-cognitive effects of donepezil following injury might occur through increasing neurogenesis. We demonstrate that donepezil itself enhances neurogenesis and improves cognitive function following TBI, even when injury-induced neurogenesis was inhibited. This suggests that the therapeutic effects of donepezil in TBI occur separately from its effects on neurogenesis.

  16. Imaging acetylcholinesterase density in peripheral organs in Parkinson's disease with 11C-donepezil PET.

    PubMed

    Gjerløff, Trine; Fedorova, Tatyana; Knudsen, Karoline; Munk, Ole L; Nahimi, Adjmal; Jacobsen, Steen; Danielsen, Erik H; Terkelsen, Astrid J; Hansen, John; Pavese, Nicola; Brooks, David J; Borghammer, Per

    2015-03-01

    Parkinson's disease is associated with early parasympathetic dysfunction leading to constipation and gastroparesis. It has been suggested that pathological α-synuclein aggregations originate in the gut and ascend to the brainstem via the vagus. Our understanding of the pathogenesis and time course of parasympathetic denervation in Parkinson's disease is limited and would benefit from a validated imaging technique to visualize the integrity of parasympathetic function. The positron emission tomography tracer 5-[(11)C]-methoxy-donepezil was recently validated for imaging acetylcholinesterase density in the brain and peripheral organs. Donepezil is a high-affinity ligand for acetylcholinesterase-the enzyme that catabolizes acetylcholine in cholinergic synapses. Acetylcholinesterase histology has been used for many years for visualizing cholinergic neurons. Using 5-[(11)C]-methoxy-donepezil positron emission tomography, we studied 12 patients with early-to-moderate Parkinson's disease (three female; age 64 ± 9 years) and 12 age-matched control subjects (three female; age 62 ± 8 years). We collected clinical information about motor severity, constipation, gastroparesis, and other parameters. Heart rate variability measurements and gastric emptying scintigraphies were performed in all subjects to obtain objective measures of parasympathetic function. We detected significantly decreased (11)C-donepezil binding in the small intestine (-35%; P = 0.003) and pancreas (-22%; P = 0.001) of the patients. No correlations were found between the (11)C-donepezil signal and disease duration, severity of constipation, gastric emptying time, and heart rate variability. In Parkinson's disease, the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus undergoes severe degeneration and pathological α-synuclein aggregations are also seen in nerve fibres innervating the gastro-intestinal tract. In contrast, the enteric nervous system displays little or no loss of cholinergic neurons. Decreases in (11)C-donepezil

  17. Donepezil: an important prototype to the design of new drug candidates for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Simões, Maria Cecilia; Dias Viegas, Flávia Pereira; Moreira, Marcella Soares; de Freitas Silva, Matheus; Riquiel, Mariana Máximo; da Rosa, Patrícia Mattos; Castelli, Maísa Rosa; dos Santos, Marcelo Henrique; Soares, Marisi Gomes; Viegas, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive and incurable neurodegenerative disorder, with a dramatic socioeconomic impact. The progress of AD is characterized by a severe loss in memory and cognition, leading to behavioral changing, depression and death. During the last decades, only a few anticholinergic drugs were launched in the market, mainly acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs), with indications for the treatment of initial and moderate stages of AD. The search for new AChEIs, capable to overcome the limitations observed for rivastigmine and tacrine, led Sugimoto and co-workers to the discovery of donepezil. Besides its high potency, donepezil also exhibited high selectivity for AChE and a very low toxicity. In this review, we discuss the main structural and pharmacological attributes that have made donepezil the first choice medicine for AD, and a versatile structural model for the design of novel AChEIs, in spite of multipotent and multitarget-directed ligands. Many recent data from literature transdue great efforts worldwide to produce modifications in the donepezil structure that could result in new bioactive chemical entities with innovative structural pattern. Furthermore, multi-potent ligands have also been designed by molecular hybridization, affording rivastigmine-, tacrine- and huperzine-donepezil potent and selective AChEIs. In a more recent strategy, structural features of donepezil have been used as a model to design multitarget-directed ligands, aiming at the discovery of new effective drug candidates that could exhibit concomitant pharmacological activities as dual or multi- enzymatic inhibitors as genuine innovative therapeutic alternatives for the treatment of AD.

  18. Combination treatment in Alzheimer's disease: results of a randomized, controlled trial with cerebrolysin and donepezil.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, X Antón; Cacabelos, R; Sampedro, C; Couceiro, V; Aleixandre, M; Vargas, M; Linares, C; Granizo, E; García-Fantini, M; Baurecht, W; Doppler, E; Moessler, H

    2011-08-01

    Treatment with neurotrophic agents might enhance and/or prolong the effects of cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We compared the safety and efficacy of the neurotrophic compound Cerebrolysin (10 ml; n=64), donepezil (10 mg; n=66) and a combination of both treatments (n=67) in mild-to-moderate (mini-mental state examination-MMSE score 12-25) probable AD patients enrolled in a randomized, double-blind trial. Primary endpoints were global outcome (Clinician's Interview-Based Impression of Change plus caregiver input; CIBIC+) and cognition (change from baseline in AD Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale+; ADAS-cog+) at week 28. Changes in functioning (AD Cooperative Study-Activities of Daily Living scale, ADCS-ADL) and behaviour (Neuropsychiatric Inventory, NPI) were secondary endpoints. Treatment effects in cognitive, functional and behavioral domains showed no significant group differences; whereas improvements in global outcome favored Cerebrolysin and the combination therapy. Cognitive performance improved in all treatment groups (mean±SD for Cerebrolysin: -1.7±7.5; donepezil: -1.2±6.1; combination: -2.3±6.0) with best scores in the combined therapy group at all study visits. Cerebrolysin was as effective as donepezil, and the combination of neurotrophic (Cerebrolysin) and cholinergic (donepezil) treatment was safe in mild-to-moderate AD. The convenience of exploring long-term synergistic effects of this combined therapy is suggested.

  19. Relevance of Donepezil in Enhancing Learning and Memory in Special Populations: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoo, J. Helen; Valdovinos, Maria G.; Williams, Dean C.

    2007-01-01

    This review discusses the laboratory and clinical research supporting the rationale for the efficacy of donepezil (Aricept[R] USA) in enhancing cognition in autism, Alzheimer disease, Down syndrome, traumatic brain injury, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and schizophrenia. While preliminary animal models have shown effective,…

  20. Donepezil increases contrast sensitivity for the detection of objects in scenes.

    PubMed

    Boucart, Muriel; Bubbico, Giovanna; Szaffarczyk, Sebastien; Defoort, Sabine; Ponchel, Amelie; Waucquier, Nawal; Deplanque, Dominique; Deguil, Julie; Bordet, Régis

    2015-10-01

    We assessed the effects of donepezil, a drug that stimulates cholinergic transmission, and scopolamine, an antagonist of cholinergic transmission, on contrast sensitivity. 30 young male participants were tested under three treatment conditions: placebo, donepezil, and scopolamine in a random order. Pairs of photographs varying in contrast were displayed left and right of fixation for 50 ms. Participants were asked to locate the scene containing an animal. Accuracy was better under donepezil than under scopolamine, particularly for signals of high intensity (at higher levels of contrast). A control experiment showed that the lower performance under scopolamine did not result from the mydriasis induced by scopolamine. The results suggest that cholinergic stimulation, through donepezil, facilitates signal detection in agreement with studies on animals showing that the pharmacological activation of cholinergic receptors controls the gain in the relationship between the stimulus contrast (intensity of the visual input) and visual response. As Alzheimer disease is associated to depletion in acetylcholine, and there is evidence of deficits in contrast sensitivity in Alzheimer, it might be interesting to integrate such rapid and sensitive visual tasks in the biomarkers at early stage of drug development.

  1. A novel electronic skin patch for delivery and pharmacokinetic evaluation of donepezil following transdermal iontophoresis.

    PubMed

    Saluja, Sonal; Kasha, Purna C; Paturi, Jyotsna; Anderson, Carter; Morris, Russell; Banga, Ajay K

    2013-09-10

    The nature of Alzheimer's disease limits the effectiveness of available oral treatments. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of transdermal iontophoretic delivery of donepezil in a hairless rat model as a potential treatment modality in Alzheimer's and to evaluate the effect of current densities on its pharmacokinetics. Donepezil loaded integrated Wearable Electronic Drug Delivery (WEDD(®)) patches supplied current levels of 0, 0.13, 0.26 and 0.39 mA. Plasma extracted donepezil was analyzed by HPLC. Noncompartmental analysis was used to characterize disposition of the drug. The amount delivered across hairless rat skin and areas under the curve (AUC) were found to rise in proportion to the current levels. Peak plasma levels of 0.094, 0.237 and 0.336 μg/ml were achieved at 0.13, 0.26 and 0.39 mA respectively. Time to peak plasma concentrations was after termination of current and same for all current levels. Transdermal elimination half-life was significantly increased from the true value of 3.2h due to depot formation, prolonging complete absorption of the drug. Donepezil was successfully delivered iontophoretically at levels sufficient to produce pharmacodymanic effect. Pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated linear kinetics at the current levels used and flip flop kinetics following iontophoretic administration.

  2. Neuroprotection of donepezil against morphine-induced apoptosis is mediated through Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Shafie, Alireza; Moradi, Farshid; Izadpanah, Esmael; Mokarizadeh, Aram; Moloudi, Mohammad Raman; Nikzaban, Mehrnoush; Hassanzadeh, Kambiz

    2015-10-01

    Previously, we had shown that donepezil provides anti-apoptotic effects associated with the prevention of morphine tolerance to the analgesic effect. In this regard, the present study aimed to evaluate the molecular mechanisms involved in this effect considering the possible role of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2,4, and the balance between pre-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic Bcl family proteins. To this end, male Wistar rats received daily morphine in combination with either normal saline or donepezil (0.5, 1, or 1.5 mg/kg, ip). The analgesic effect was assessed by the plantar test apparatus. The latency was recorded when the animal responded to the light stimulus. On the 15th day, when no significant difference was observed between morphine and saline groups in terms of analgesia, the frontal cortex and lumbar spinal cord of the animals were dissected. Then, TLR2 and 4, Bcl2, and Bax mRNA fold changes were calculated using Real-time PCR method. The results indicated no significant analgesic effect in the morphine group compared with the saline treated animals after 15 days of injection, while daily co-administration of donepezil with morphine preserved significant analgesia. Moreover, Quantitative PCR showed that morphine significantly increased TLRs and Bax gene expressions and decreased the anti-apoptotic Bcl2. In contrast, donepezil prevented these morphine induced changes in the mentioned gene expressions. Taken together, the results suggest that the neuroprotective effects of donepezil in attenuating morphine-induced tolerance and apoptosis are mediated by preventing morphine-induced changes in TLR2 and 4 gene expressions.

  3. Protective effects of NMDA receptor antagonist, memantine, against senescence of PC12 cells: A possible role of nNOS and combined effects with donepezil.

    PubMed

    Ota, Hidetaka; Ogawa, Sumito; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Akishita, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cognitive dysfunction. The pathology of AD is mainly related to amyloid ß (Aß)-peptides, but glutamate-mediated toxicity is also one of the main processes of memory impairment in AD. Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS) and is particularly involved in synaptic plasticity, memory, and learning. Memantine is a low-affinity voltage-dependent noncompetitive antagonist at glutamatergic NMDA receptors. Here,we investigated whether memantine protects against glutamate-induced senescence. In PC12 cells, treatment with glutamate induced senescent phenotypes as judged by the cell appearance and senescence-associated ß-galactosidase (SA-ßgal) in parallel with decreased SIRT1 and increased p53 expression. However, treatment with memantine decreased glutamate-induced senescent PC12 cells and reversed the changes in SIRT1 and p53 expression. Glutamate is known to stimulate the production of NO and O2(-) and has the capacity to generate ONOO(-) in the CNS. Therefore, we investigated whether glutamate activates nNOS and memantine reverses it. Treatment with glutamate increased nNOS expression, activity, and production of NO,whereas memantine blocked them. Next, the in vivo effects of memantine on cognitive function in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8), as a model of AD, were investigated. In the Morris water maze test, SAMP8 showed a marked decline in performance, but memantine administration improved it. Moreover, neuronal senescence and the level of oxidative stress in the hippocampus were decreased by memantine. Finally, the effects of combination treatment with memantine and donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor, were investigated. We observed additive effects of memantine and donepezil on the senescent phenotype of PC12 cells and the hippocampus of SAMP8. These results indicate that inhibition of the NMDA receptor by memantine leads to a

  4. Protective effects of NMDA receptor antagonist, memantine, against senescence of PC12 cells: A possible role of nNOS and combined effects with donepezil.

    PubMed

    Ota, Hidetaka; Ogawa, Sumito; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Akishita, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cognitive dysfunction. The pathology of AD is mainly related to amyloid ß (Aß)-peptides, but glutamate-mediated toxicity is also one of the main processes of memory impairment in AD. Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS) and is particularly involved in synaptic plasticity, memory, and learning. Memantine is a low-affinity voltage-dependent noncompetitive antagonist at glutamatergic NMDA receptors. Here,we investigated whether memantine protects against glutamate-induced senescence. In PC12 cells, treatment with glutamate induced senescent phenotypes as judged by the cell appearance and senescence-associated ß-galactosidase (SA-ßgal) in parallel with decreased SIRT1 and increased p53 expression. However, treatment with memantine decreased glutamate-induced senescent PC12 cells and reversed the changes in SIRT1 and p53 expression. Glutamate is known to stimulate the production of NO and O2(-) and has the capacity to generate ONOO(-) in the CNS. Therefore, we investigated whether glutamate activates nNOS and memantine reverses it. Treatment with glutamate increased nNOS expression, activity, and production of NO,whereas memantine blocked them. Next, the in vivo effects of memantine on cognitive function in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8), as a model of AD, were investigated. In the Morris water maze test, SAMP8 showed a marked decline in performance, but memantine administration improved it. Moreover, neuronal senescence and the level of oxidative stress in the hippocampus were decreased by memantine. Finally, the effects of combination treatment with memantine and donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor, were investigated. We observed additive effects of memantine and donepezil on the senescent phenotype of PC12 cells and the hippocampus of SAMP8. These results indicate that inhibition of the NMDA receptor by memantine leads to a

  5. Donepezil for the Treatment of Language Deficits in Adults With Down Syndrome: A Preliminary 24-Week Open Trial

    PubMed Central

    Heller, James H.; Spiridigliozzi, Gail A.; Sullivan, Jennifer A.; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Krishnan, Ranga R.; Kishnani, Priya S.

    2009-01-01

    At present, there is no proven pharmacologic treatment for cognitive or language impairments in Down syndrome (DS). Cholinergic deficits have been documented in DS and linked to cognitive deficits. This study is a 24-week open-label clinical trial of donepezil hydrochloride for the treatment of language deficits in adults with DS. To our knowledge, this is the first prospective study to evaluate systematically the effects of donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor, on specific language domains in DS. The main finding that emerged was an improvement in expressive language performance following donepezil therapy. Despite the multiple methodological limitations, the results raise important questions regarding the role of the cholinergic system in language function and the specific effect of cholinergic therapy in the treatment of language impairment in DS. The results support the need for large-scale controlled studies of the effects of donepezil treatment on language and on other cognitive domains in DS. PMID:12494428

  6. Donepezil attenuates Aβ-associated mitochondrial dysfunction and reduces mitochondrial Aβ accumulation in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chun Yan; Lei, Yun; Tang, Xi Can; Zhang, Hai Yan

    2015-08-01

    The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the influence of donepezil, a well-known acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor, on amyloid-β (Aβ)-associated mitochondrial dysfunction, in order to gain a better understanding of the neuroprotective effects of this clinically used anti-Alzheimer's disease (AD) drug. First, our study verifies the ameliorative effects of donepezil on behavioral deficits in both working memory and anxiety in APP/PS1 double transgenic mice, at a time point that AChE is not inhibited. Meanwhile, we demonstrate that donepezil enhances the resistance of brain mitochondria of APP/PS1 mice to the induction of mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) by calcium ions. Moreover, the level of mitochondrial Aβ in the brain of donepezil-treated APP/PS1 transgenic mice is significantly lower than that of vehicle-treated APP/PS1 mice. Our in vitro study using isolated mitochondria from rat brains, which is expected as an AChE-free subcellular system, further confirms the ameliorative effects of donepezil on oligomeric Aβ1-42 induced mitochondrial swelling and ATP reduction. In addition, donepezil treatment also significantly blocks the Aβ accumulation in the isolated mitochondria. Our study reported for the first time that the protective effects of donepezil against Aβ-associated mitochondrial dysfunction are closely associated with the reduction of Aβ accumulation in the mitochondria. Above observation led us to assume that, besides potent AChE inhibitory effect, other non-cholinergic mechanisms may be involved in the neuroprotective profiles of donepezil.

  7. The anti-inflammatory effect of donepezil on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57 BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Zou, Yan; Chen, Shaoqiong; Zhu, Cansheng; Wu, Aimin; Liu, Yingying; Ma, Lili; Zhu, Dongliang; Ma, Xiaomeng; Liu, Mei; Kang, Zhuang; Pi, Rongbiao; Peng, Fuhua; Wang, Qing; Chen, Xiaohong

    2013-10-01

    Donepezil is a potent and selective acetylcholinesterase inhibitor. It has been reported to restore cognitive performance in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice, an established model of MS. However, there are no reports about the anti-inflammatory effects of donepezil on EAE. In this study, the donepezil treatments on EAE mice were initiated at day 7 post immunization (7 p.i., subclinical periods, early donepezil treatment) and day 13 p.i. (clinical periods, late donepezil treatment) with the dosage of 1, 2 and 4 mg/kg/d respectively and the treatments persisted throughout the experiments. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability was detected by Evan's blue content, the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9, Akt and phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) as well as nerve growth factor (NGF) and its precursor form (proNGF) in the brains of EAE mice were detected by Western blot, and the levels of interferon-γ and interleukin-4 in the splenocytes culture supernatants and brains of EAE mice were evaluated by ELISA. The results showed that the 2 mg/kg/d late donepezil treatment was the optimal dosage and could ameliorate clinical and pathological parameters, improve magnetic resonance imaging outcomes, reduce the permeability of BBB, inhibit the production of MMP-2 and MMP-9, modulate the expression of NGF and proNGF, increase Th2 bias and the phosphorylation of Akt in the brains of EAE mice. Our data suggested that the anti-inflammatory effects of donepezil may be a novel mechanism on treating EAE and provided further insights to understand the donepezil's neuroprotective activities in MS.

  8. A new pharmacological role for donepezil: attenuation of morphine-induced tolerance and apoptosis in rat central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tolerance to the analgesic effect of opioids is a pharmacological phenomenon that occurs after their prolonged administration. It has been shown that morphine-induced tolerance is associated with apoptosis in the central nervous system and neuroprotective agents which prevented apoptosis signaling could attenuate tolerance to the analgesic effects. On the other hand donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects. Therefore in this study, the effect of systemic administration of donepezil on morphine-induced tolerance and apoptosis in the rat cerebral cortex and lumbar spinal cord was evaluated. Various groups of rats received morphine (ip) and different doses of donepezil (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 mg/kg/day). Nociception was assessed using tail flick apparatus. Tail flick latency was recorded when the rat shook its tail. For apoptosis assay other groups of rats received the above treatment and apoptosis was evaluated by in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) method. Results The results showed that administration of donepezil (0.5, 1, 1.5 mg/kg, ip) delayed the morphine tolerance for 9, 12 and 17 days, respectively. Furthermore pretreatment injection of donepezil attenuated the number of apoptotic cells in the cerebral cortex and lumbar spinal cord compared to the control group. Conclusion In conclusion, we found that systemic administration of donepezil attenuated morphine-induced tolerance and apoptosis in the rat cerebral cortex and lumbar spinal cord. PMID:24455992

  9. Spectroscopic studies of solid-state forms of donepezil free base and salt forms with various salicylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brittain, Harry G.

    2014-12-01

    The polymorphic forms of donepezil free base have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. None of the free base crystal forms was observed to exhibit detectable fluorescence in the solid state under ambient conditions. Crystalline salt products were obtained by the reaction of donepezil with salicylic and methyl-substituted salicylic acids, with the salicylate and 4-methylsalicylate salts being obtained as non-solvated products, and the 3-methylsalicylate and 5-methylsalicylate salts being obtained as methanol solvated products. The intensity of solid-state fluorescence from donepezil salicylate and donepezil 4-methylsalicylate was found to be reduced relative to the fluorescence intensity of the corresponding free acids, while the solid-state fluorescence intensity of donepezil 3-methylsalicylate methanolate and donepezil 5-methylsalicylate methanolate was greatly increased relative to the fluorescence intensity of the corresponding free acids. Desolvation of the solvated salt products led to formation of glassy solids that exhibited strong green fluorescence.

  10. Clinical Recommendations for the Use of Donepezil 23 mg in Moderate-to-Severe Alzheimer's Disease in the Asia-Pacific Region

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh, Marwan; Han, SeolHeui; Kim, SangYun; Na, Hae-Ri; Lee, Jae-Hong; Kandiah, Nagaendran; Phanthumchinda, Kammant; Suthisisang, Chuthamanee; Senanarong, Vorapun; Pai, Ming-Chyi; Narilastri, Diatri; Sowani, Ajit M.; Ampil, Encarnita; Dash, Amitabh

    2016-01-01

    Background The ‘Asia-Pacific Expert Panel (APEX) for donepezil 23 mg’ met in November 2015 to review evidence for the recently approved high dose of donepezil and to provide recommendations to help physicians in Asia make informed clinical decisions about using donepezil 23 mg in patients with moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's disease (AD). Summary In a global phase III study (study 326) in patients with moderate-to-severe AD, donepezil 23 mg/day demonstrated significantly greater cognitive benefits versus donepezil 10 mg/day, with a between-treatment difference in mean change in the Severe Impairment Battery score of 2.2 points (p < 0.001) in the overall population and 3.1 points (p < 0.001) in patients with advanced AD. A subanalysis of study 326 demonstrated that the benefits and risks associated with donepezil 23 mg/day versus donepezil 10 mg/day in Asian patients with moderate-to-severe AD were comparable to those in the global study population. Key Message Donepezil 23 mg is a valuable treatment for patients with AD, particularly those with advanced disease. The APEX emphasized the importance of patient selection (AD severity, tolerability of lower doses of donepezil, and absence of contraindications), a stepwise titration strategy for dose escalation, and appropriate monitoring and counseling of patients and caregivers in the management of patients with AD. PMID:27703471

  11. Population pharmacokinetic approach to evaluate the effect of CYP2D6, CYP3A, ABCB1, POR and NR1I2 genotypes on donepezil clearance

    PubMed Central

    Noetzli, Muriel; Guidi, Monia; Ebbing, Karsten; Eyer, Stephan; Wilhelm, Laurence; Michon, Agnès; Thomazic, Valérie; Stancu, Ioana; Alnawaqil, Abdel-Messieh; Bula, Christophe; Zumbach, Serge; Gaillard, Michel; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon; von Gunten, Armin; Csajka, Chantal; Eap, Chin B

    2014-01-01

    Aims A large interindividual variability in plasma concentrations has been reported in patients treated with donepezil, the most frequently prescribed antidementia drug. We aimed to evaluate clinical and genetic factors influencing donepezil disposition in a patient population recruited from a naturalistic setting. Methods A population pharmacokinetic study was performed including data from 129 older patients treated with donepezil. The patients were genotyped for common polymorphisms in the metabolic enzymes CYP2D6 and CYP3A, in the electron transferring protein POR and the nuclear factor NR1I2 involved in CYP activity and expression, and in the drug transporter ABCB1. Results The average donepezil clearance was 7.3 l h−1 with a 30% interindividual variability. Gender markedly influenced donepezil clearance (P < 0.01). Functional alleles of CYP2D6 were identified as unique significant genetic covariate for donepezil clearance (P < 0.01), with poor metabolizers and ultrarapid metabolizers demonstrating, respectively, a 32% slower and a 67% faster donepezil elimination compared with extensive metabolizers. Conclusion The pharmacokinetic parameters of donepezil were well described by the developed population model. Functional alleles of CYP2D6 significantly contributed to the variability in donepezil disposition in the patient population and should be further investigated in the context of individual dose optimization to improve clinical outcome and tolerability of the treatment. PMID:24433464

  12. Investigating the binding interactions of the anti-Alzheimer's drug donepezil with CYP3A4 and P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    McEneny-King, Alanna; Edginton, Andrea N; Rao, Praveen P N

    2015-01-15

    The anti-Alzheimer's agent donepezil is known to bind to the hepatic enzyme CYP3A4, but its relationship with the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is not as well elucidated. We conducted in vitro inhibition studies of donepezil using human recombinant CYP3A4 and P-gp. These studies show that donepezil is a weak inhibitor of CYP3A4 (IC50=54.68±1.00μM) whereas the reference agent ketoconazole exhibited potent inhibition (CYP3A4 IC50=0.20±0.01μM). P-gp inhibition studies indicate that donepezil exhibits better inhibition relative to CYP3A4 (P-gp EC50=34.85±4.63μM) although it was less potent compared to ketoconazole (P-gp EC50=9.74±1.23μM). At higher concentrations, donepezil exhibited significant inhibition of CYP3A4 (69%, 84% and 87% inhibition at 100, 250 and 500μM, respectively). This indicates its potential to cause drug-drug interactions with other CYP3A4 substrates upon co-administration; however, this scenario is unlikely in vivo due to the low therapeutic concentrations of donepezil. Similarly, donepezil co-administration with P-gp substrates or inhibitors is unlikely to result in beneficial or adverse drug interactions. The molecular docking studies show that the 5,6-dimethoxyindan-1-one moiety of donepezil was oriented closer to the heme center in CYP3A4 whereas in the P-gp binding site, the protonated benzylpiperidine pharmacophore of donepezil played a major role in its binding ability. Energy parameters indicate that donepezil complex with both CYP3A4 and P-gp was less stable (CDOCKER energies=-15.05 and -4.91kcal/mol, respectively) compared to the ketoconazole-CYP3A4 and P-gp complex (CDOCKER energies=-41.89 and -20.03kcal/mol, respectively).

  13. Memantine and donepezil: a fixed drug combination for the treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimer's dementia.

    PubMed

    Owen, R T

    2016-04-01

    Donepezil (and other cholinesterase inhibitors [ChEIs]) and memantine are the mainstays of treatment in Alzheimer's dementia, addressing respectively, the cholinergic and glutamatergic dysregulation which underlies or results from its pathophysiology. To alleviate the pill burden and swallowing difficulties associated with the condition, a fixed drug combination of extended-release memantine and donepezil was developed. This combination was shown to be both bioequivalent to the components administered separately and could be administered sprinkled over soft food. The mode of action, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy and safety and tolerability of the combination are discussed together with the wider, often conflicting trial literature of combination versus monotherapy with memantine and ChEIs, their meta-analyses and treatment guidelines.

  14. The protective role of tacrine and donepezil in the retina of acetylcholinesterase knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Yun-Min; Cai, Li; Shao, Yi; Xu, Man; Yi, Jing-Lin

    2015-01-01

    AIM To determine the effect of different concentrations of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors tacrine and donepezil on retinal protection in AChE+/− mice (AChE knockout mice) of various ages. METHODS Cultured ARPE-19 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at concentrations of 0, 250, 500, 1000 and 2000 µmol/L and protein levels were measured using Western blot. Intraperitoneal injections of tacrine and donepezil (0.1 mg/mL, 0.2 mg/mL and 0.4 mg/mL) were respectively given to AChE+/− mice aged 2mo and 4mo and wild-type S129 mice for 7d; phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was administered to the control group. The mice were sacrificed after 30d by in vitro cardiac perfusion and retinal samples were taken. AChE-deficient mice were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis using specific genotyping protocols obtained from the Jackson Laboratory website. H&E staining, immunofluorescence and Western blot were performed to observe AChE protein expression changes in the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell layer. RESULTS Different concentrations of H2O2 induced AChE expression during RPE cell apoptosis. AChE+/− mice retina were thinner than those in wild-type mice (P<0.05); the retinal structure was still intact at 2mo but became thinner with increasing age (P<0.05); furthermore, AChE+/− mice developed more slowly than wild-type mice (P<0.05). Increased concentrations of tacrine and donepezil did not significantly improve the protection of the retina function and morphology (P>0.05). CONCLUSION In vivo, tacrine and donepezil can inhibit the expression of AChE; the decrease of AChE expression in the retina is beneficial for the development of the retina. PMID:26558196

  15. Donepezil Treatment of Older Adults with Cognitive Impairment and Depression (DOTCODE study): clinical rationale and design

    PubMed Central

    Pelton, Gregory H.; Andrews, Howard; Roose, Steven P.; Marcus, Sue M.; D’Antonio, Kristina; Husn, Hala; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Zannas, Anthony S.; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Devanand, D. P.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment strategies for patients with depression and cognitive impairment (DEP-CI), who are at high risk to develop a clinical diagnosis of dementia, are not established. This issue is addressed in the donepezil treatment of cognitive impairment and depression (DOTCODE) pilot clinical trial. The DOTCODE study is the first long-term treatment trial that assesses differences in conversion to dementia and cognitive change in DEP-CI patients using a study design of open antidepressant medication plus add-on randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled treatment with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil. In Phase 1, DEP-CI patients receive optimized antidepressant treatment for 16 weeks. In Phase 2, antidepressant treatment is continued with the addition of randomized, double-blind treatment with donepezil or placebo. The total study duration for each patient is 78 weeks (18 months). Eighty DEP-CI outpatients (age 55 to 95 years) are recruited: 40 at New York State Psychiatric Institute/Columbia University and 40 at Duke University Medical Center. The primary outcome is conversion to a clinical diagnosis of dementia. The secondary outcomes are cognitive change scores in Selective Reminding Test (SRT) total recall and the modified Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-cog). Other key assessments include the 24-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and antidepressant response; Clinical Global Impression (CGI) for depression, cognition, and global status; neuropsychological test battery for diagnosis; informant report of functional abilities (Pfeffer FAQ); Treatment Emergent Symptom Scale (TESS) for somatic side effects. Apolipoprotein E ε4 status, odor identification deficits, and MRI entorhinal/hippocampal cortex atrophy at baseline are evaluated as neurobiological moderators of donepezil treatment effects. PMID:24315979

  16. Donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory response in murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 through inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B translocation.

    PubMed

    Arikawa, Mikihiko; Kakinuma, Yoshihiko; Noguchi, Tatsuya; Todaka, Hiroshi; Sato, Takayuki

    2016-10-15

    We have previously demonstrated that the pharmacotherapy with donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, suppresses cardiac remodeling in a mouse model of ischemic heart failure after myocardial infarction (MI). However, the precise mechanisms of the cardioprotective effect of donepezil have not been completely delineated. Because post-ischemic inflammation is a pathological key event in the cardiac remodeling process following MI, we investigated the hypothesis that donepezil acts as an inhibitor of inflammatory mediators. RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells were pretreated with donepezil (100µM) prior to a pro-inflammatory stimulation by administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 10ng/ml). Donepezil significantly reduced intra- and extracellular levels of various kinds of inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-18 after the LPS stimulation, and attenuated LPS-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). These results indicate that donepezil possesses an anti-inflammatory property. However, the inhibitory effect of donepezil on the macrophage inflammatory responses was never reproduced by ACh, nor was disrupted by ACh receptor blockers. Moreover, other kinds of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors failed to inhibit the inflammatory responses in LPS-stimulated macrophage cells. These results suggest that a cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway would not be involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of donepezil and that the specific characteristics of donepezil in suppressing the LPS-induced cytokine release and the NF-κB activation would be independent of its acetylcholinesterase inhibition. The present study showed that donepezil exerts an anti-inflammatory effect independently of acetylcholinesterase inhibitory action, thereby donepezil may contribute to cardioprotection during cardiac remodeling process in an ischemic heart failure after MI.

  17. Interaction with sigma(1) protein, but not N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, is involved in the pharmacological activity of donepezil.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Tangui; Meunier, Johann; Feng, Bihua; Ieni, John; Monaghan, Daniel T

    2006-05-01

    In the present study, we examined the interaction of (+/-)-2,3-dihydro-5,6-dimethoxy-2-[[1-(phenylmethyl)-4-piperidinyl]-methyl]-1H-inden-1-one hydrochloride (donepezil), a potent cholinesterase inhibitor, with two additional therapeutically relevant targets, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and sigma(1) receptors. Donepezil blocked the responses of recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The blockade was voltage-dependent, suggesting a channel blocker mechanism of action, and was not competitive at either the l-glutamate or glycine binding sites. The low potency of donepezil (IC(50) = 0.7-3 mM) suggests that NMDA receptor blockade does not contribute to the therapeutic actions of donepezil. Of potential therapeutic relevance, donepezil binds to the sigma(1) receptor with high affinity (K(i) = 14.6 nM) in an in vitro preparation (Neurosci Lett 260:5-8, 1999). Thus, we sought to determine whether an interaction with the sigma(1) receptor may occur in vivo under physiologically relevant conditions by evaluating the sigma(1) receptor dependence effects of donepezil in behavioral tasks. Donepezil showed antidepressant-like activity in the mouse-forced swimming test as did the sigma(1) receptor agonist igmesine. This effect was not displayed by the other cholinesterase inhibitors, rivastigmine and tacrine. The donepezil and igmesine effects were blocked by preadministration of the sigma(1) receptor antagonist N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(dimethylamino) ethylamine (BD1047) and an in vivo antisense probe treatment. The memory-enhancing effect of donepezil was also investigated. All cholinesterase inhibitors attenuated dizocilpine-induced learning impairments. However, only the donepezil and igmesine effects were blocked by BD1047 or the antisense treatment. Therefore, donepezil behaved as an effective sigma(1) receptor agonist on these behavioral responses, and an interaction of the drug with the sigma(1) receptor must be considered in its

  18. Donepezil delays progression to AD in MCI subjects with depressive symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Lu, P H.; Edland, S D.; Teng, E; Tingus, K; Petersen, R C.; Cummings, J L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the presence of depression predicts higher rate of progression to Alzheimer disease (AD) in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and whether donepezil treatment beneficially affect this relationship. Methods: The study sample was composed of 756 participants with aMCI from the 3-year, double-blind, placebo-controlled Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study drug trial of donepezil and vitamin E. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was used to assess depressive symptoms at baseline and participants were followed either to the end of study or to the primary endpoint of progression to probable or possible AD. Results: Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusted for age at baseline, gender, apolipoprotein genotype, and NYU paragraph delayed recall score, showed that higher BDI scores were associated with progression to AD (p = 0.03). The sample was stratified into depressed (BDI score ≥10; n = 208) and nondepressed (BDI <10; n = 548) groups. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that among the depressed subjects, the proportion progressing to AD was lower for the donepezil group than the combined vitamin E and placebo groups at 1.7 years (p = 0.023), at 2.2 years (p = 0.025), and remained marginally lower at 2.7 years (p = 0.070). The survival curves among the three treatment groups did not differ within the nondepressed participants. Conclusions: Results suggest that depression is predictive of progression from amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) to Alzheimer disease (AD) and treatment with donepezil delayed progression to AD among depressed subjects with aMCI. Donepezil appears to modulate the increased risk of AD conferred by the presence of depressive symptoms. GLOSSARY AD = Alzheimer disease; ADCS = Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study; aMCI = amnestic mild cognitive impairment; BDI = Beck Depression Inventory; CDR = Clinical Dementia Rating; ChEI = cholinesterase inhibitors; DSM-IV = Diagnostic and Statistical Manual

  19. The involvement of sigma1 receptors in donepezil-induced rescue of hippocampal LTP impaired by beta-amyloid peptide.

    PubMed

    Solntseva, E I; Kapai, N A; Popova, O V; Rogozin, P D; Skrebitsky, V G

    2014-07-01

    Donepezil is a potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitor used for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Additional therapeutically relevant target for donepezil is sigma1 receptor (Sig1-R). Beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of AD. In our previous work (Kapai et al., 2012), we have shown that donepezil antagonizes the suppressive action of Aβ(1-42) on long-term potentiation (LTP) in rat hippocampal slices. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether Sig1-R is involved into the mechanisms of donepezil action. For this purpose, we have tested whether agonist of Sig1-R PRE-084 mimics, and antagonist of Sig1-R haloperidol abolishes the effect of donepezil. Population spikes (PSs) were recorded from the pyramidal layer of the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices. Drugs were applied by addition to the perfusate starting 15 min before and ending 5 min after the tetanus. In the control group, the amplitude of PS 30 min post-tetanus reached 153±10%. Aβ (200 nM) markedly suppressed the LTP magnitude or even caused the suppression of baseline PS (82±8%, P<0.001). This suppression of LTP could be markedly prevented when 1 μM donepezil was co-administered with Aβ (136±11%, P<0.05). Further, we co-administered three substances: Aβ, donepezil and 0.5 μM haloperidol and have found that haloperidol antagonized the stimulating effect of donepezil on LTP (92±6%, P<0.05). Agonist of Sig1-R PRE-084 (0.1-10 μM) enhanced control LTP and abolished the inhibitory effect of Aβ on LTP in a concentration-dependent manner. The amplitude of PS 30 min post-tetanus reached 183±7% (P<0.01) for 10 μM PRE-084. The results suggest that activation of Sig1-R is involved into the mechanisms of donepezil-induced rescue of hippocampal LTP impaired by Aβ.

  20. Multi-Target Directed Donepezil-Like Ligands for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Unzeta, Mercedes; Esteban, Gerard; Bolea, Irene; Fogel, Wieslawa A; Ramsay, Rona R; Youdim, Moussa B H; Tipton, Keith F; Marco-Contelles, José

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS ASS234 is a MTDL compound containing a moiety from Donepezil and the propargyl group from the PF 9601N, a potent and selective MAO B inhibitor. This compound is the most advanced anti-Alzheimer agent for preclinical studies identified in our laboratory.Derived from ASS234 both multipotent donepezil-indolyl (MTDL-1) and donepezil-pyridyl hybrids (MTDL-2) were designed and evaluated as inhibitors of AChE/BuChE and both MAO isoforms. MTDL-2 showed more high affinity toward the four enzymes than MTDL-1.MTDL-3 and MTDL-4, were designed containing the N-benzylpiperidinium moiety from Donepezil, a metal- chelating 8-hydroxyquinoline group and linked to a N-propargyl core and they were pharmacologically evaluated.The presence of the cyano group in MTDL-3, enhanced binding to AChE, BuChE and MAO A. It showed antioxidant behavior and it was able to strongly complex Cu(II), Zn(II) and Fe(III).MTDL-4 showed higher affinity toward AChE, BuChE.MTDL-3 exhibited good brain penetration capacity (ADMET) and less toxicity than Donepezil. Memory deficits in scopolamine-lesioned animals were restored by MTDL-3.MTDL-3 particularly emerged as a ligand showing remarkable potential benefits for its use in AD therapy. Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of adult onset dementia, is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory loss, decline in language skills, and other cognitive impairments. Although its etiology is not completely known, several factors including deficits of acetylcholine, β-amyloid deposits, τ-protein phosphorylation, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation are considered to play significant roles in the pathophysiology of this disease. For a long time, AD patients have been treated with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil (Aricept®) but with limited therapeutic success. This might be due to the complex multifactorial nature of AD, a fact that has prompted the design of new Multi-Target-Directed Ligands

  1. Multi-Target Directed Donepezil-Like Ligands for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Unzeta, Mercedes; Esteban, Gerard; Bolea, Irene; Fogel, Wieslawa A.; Ramsay, Rona R.; Youdim, Moussa B. H.; Tipton, Keith F.; Marco-Contelles, José

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS ASS234 is a MTDL compound containing a moiety from Donepezil and the propargyl group from the PF 9601N, a potent and selective MAO B inhibitor. This compound is the most advanced anti-Alzheimer agent for preclinical studies identified in our laboratory.Derived from ASS234 both multipotent donepezil-indolyl (MTDL-1) and donepezil-pyridyl hybrids (MTDL-2) were designed and evaluated as inhibitors of AChE/BuChE and both MAO isoforms. MTDL-2 showed more high affinity toward the four enzymes than MTDL-1.MTDL-3 and MTDL-4, were designed containing the N-benzylpiperidinium moiety from Donepezil, a metal- chelating 8-hydroxyquinoline group and linked to a N-propargyl core and they were pharmacologically evaluated.The presence of the cyano group in MTDL-3, enhanced binding to AChE, BuChE and MAO A. It showed antioxidant behavior and it was able to strongly complex Cu(II), Zn(II) and Fe(III).MTDL-4 showed higher affinity toward AChE, BuChE.MTDL-3 exhibited good brain penetration capacity (ADMET) and less toxicity than Donepezil. Memory deficits in scopolamine-lesioned animals were restored by MTDL-3.MTDL-3 particularly emerged as a ligand showing remarkable potential benefits for its use in AD therapy. Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of adult onset dementia, is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory loss, decline in language skills, and other cognitive impairments. Although its etiology is not completely known, several factors including deficits of acetylcholine, β-amyloid deposits, τ-protein phosphorylation, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation are considered to play significant roles in the pathophysiology of this disease. For a long time, AD patients have been treated with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil (Aricept®) but with limited therapeutic success. This might be due to the complex multifactorial nature of AD, a fact that has prompted the design of new Multi-Target-Directed Ligands

  2. Efficacy of Memantine, Donepezil, or Their Association in Moderate-Severe Alzheimer's Disease: A Review of Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Molino, Ivana; Colucci, Luisa; Fasanaro, Angiola M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE)/cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitors (Is) and memantine are licensed for symptomatic treatment of mild-moderate and moderate-severe forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD), respectively. High doses of the AChE-I donepezil were licensed in the USA for moderate-severe AD, and the association AChE/ChE-Is plus memantine was proposed for AD at this stage. Objectives. This paper has reviewed evidence from clinical trials of the effectiveness of memantine, donepezil, or the two drugs in association in managing moderate-severe AD. Method. Double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trials (RCTs) using memantine or donepezil alone or in association versus placebo in moderate-severe AD were reviewed. Analysis done in January 2013 considered the years 2007–2012. Results and Conclusion. Only 83 of the 941 papers selected were considered relevant, and only 13 met the criterion of “adequacy and representativeness.” Memantine and donepezil lead to improvements in moderate-to-severe AD and the choice between the compounds should be based on their contraindications more than on disease severity. No evidence was found of advantages of the association of memantine-donepezil. The heterogeneity of conditions explored by RCTs, the relatively short time of observation (24–52 weeks), and the different cognitive assessment tools used did not allow comparing properly different trials. PMID:24288512

  3. Concurrent administration of donepezil HCl and sertraline HCl in healthy volunteers: assessment of pharmacokinetic changes and safety following single and multiple oral doses

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Christa F; Kumar, Dinesh; Perdomo, Carlos A; Wason, Suman; Cullen, Edward I; Pratt, Raymond D

    2004-01-01

    Aim This study evaluated the safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of donepezil HCl and sertraline HCl when administered separately and in combination. Methods This was a randomized, open-label, three-period crossover study. In consecutive dosing periods separated by washout periods of ≥3 weeks, healthy volunteers received either oral donepezil HCI 5 mg once daily for 15 days, oral sertraline HCl 50 mg once daily for 5 days followed by 10 days of once-daily sertraline HCl 100 mg, or the simultaneous administration of oral donepezil HCl and sertraline HCl. Plasma donepezil and sertraline concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Safety was evaluated by physical and laboratory evaluations and the monitoring of adverse events (AEs). Results A total of 19 volunteers (16 male and three female) were enrolled. Three male subjects withdrew from the study prematurely due to AEs (one case of nausea/stomach cramps and one case of eosinophilia during combination treatment, and one upper respiratory tract infection during treatment with sertraline HCl alone). In subjects who completed all three treatment periods (n = 16), the concurrent administration of donepezil HCl and sertraline HCl did not alter the steady-state (day 15) PK parameters of donepezil HCl. A small (<12%) but statistically significant (P = 0.02) increase in donepezil Cmax was seen after single doses of sertraline HCl and donepezil HCl on day 1 but this was not thought to be clinically meaningful. No significant differences in the tmax or AUC0–24 h of donepezil were observed between the donepezil HCl only or donepezil HCl plus sertraline HCl groups on day 1. No significant changes in sertraline PK parameters were observed either on day 1 (single dose) or on day 15 (steady state) when sertraline HCl was co-administered with donepezil HCl. Generally, the concurrent administration of donepezil HCl and sertraline HCl was well tolerated, with no serious AEs reported

  4. Procognitive effect of AC-3933 in aged mice, and synergistic effect of combination with donepezil in scopolamine-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takashi; Hatayama, Yuki; Nakamichi, Keiko; Yoshida, Naoyuki

    2014-12-15

    We have previously reported that AC-3933, a newly developed benzodiazepine receptor partial inverse agonist, facilitates acetylcholine release in the hippocampus and ameliorates scopolamine-induced memory deficits in rats. To further confirm the procognitive effect of AC-3933, we assessed in this study the beneficial effects of this compound in aged mice using the Y-maze and object recognition tests. In addition, we investigated the synergistic effect of AC-3933 and donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor, on scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice. In aged mice, oral administration of AC-3933 at doses of 0.05-0.1 mg/kg and 0.05 mg/kg significantly improved spatial working memory and episodic memory, respectively. In scopolamine-treated mice, both AC-3933 and donepezil significantly ameliorated memory deficits in the Y-maze test at doses of 0.3-3 mg/kg and 10-15 mg/kg, respectively. The beneficial effect of AC-3933, but not that of donepezil, on scopolamine-induced memory impairment was antagonized by flumazenil, a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, indicating that the procognitive action of AC-3933 arises via a mechanism different from that of donepezil. Co-administration of donepezil at the suboptimal dose of 3 mg/kg with AC-3933 at doses of 0.1-1 mg/kg significantly ameliorated scopolamine-induced memory impairment, suggesting that AC-3933 potentiates the effect of donepezil on memory impairment induced by cholinergic hypofunction. These findings indicate that AC-3933 not only has good potential as a cognitive enhancer by itself, but also is useful as a concomitant drug for the treatment of Alzheimer׳s disease.

  5. Donepezil provides greater benefits in mild compared to moderate Alzheimer's disease: implications for early diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Molinuevo, J L; Berthier, M L; Rami, L

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the cognitive and functional outcomes of donepezil treatment in mild versus moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We performed a 6-month prospective, observational, multicenter study of the progression of cognitive and functionality abilities in a large sample patients with AD who initiated treatment with donepezil in monotherapy. According to baseline mini mental state examination (MMSE), patients were divided in two groups: mild AD (MMSE ≥ 21) and moderate AD (MMSE <21). Patients were evaluated with the memory alteration test (M@T) and the Alzheimer's disease functional assessment and change scale (ADFACS) at baseline and at 6 months. A total of 403 patients finished the study (mild AD=152; moderate AD=251). The MMSE total score and M@T score remained stable at 6 months in the whole sample, with MMSE memory domain and M@T free and cued recall domains improving significantly from baseline. Total ADFACS, instrumental (IADL) and basic activities of daily living (BADL) got significantly worse, with the worsening being significantly greater in the moderate AD group. Significant differences between the groups favoring mild AD were observed for MMSE memory, orientation and language domains, M@T temporal orientation and semantic memory domains, and for IADL. We concluded that in AD patients on donepezil, cognition remains stable at 6 months. The beneficial effect of donepezil treatment, in terms of cognition and functionality, is greater for mild than for moderate AD. PMID:19948364

  6. Progressive cholinergic decline in Alzheimer's Disease: consideration for treatment with donepezil 23 mg in patients with moderate to severe symptomatology.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Marwan; Cummings, Jeffrey

    2011-02-07

    Of the estimated 5.3 million people with Alzheimer's disease in the United States, more than half would be classified as having moderate or severe disease. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder with the moderate to severe stages generally characterized by significant cognitive, functional, and behavioral dysfunction. Unsurprisingly, these advanced stages are often the most challenging for both patients and their caregivers/families. Symptomatic treatments for moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease are approved in the United States and include the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil and the glutamate receptor antagonist memantine. Progressive symptomatic decline is nevertheless inevitable even with the available therapies, and therefore additional treatment options are urgently needed for this segment of the Alzheimer's disease population. An immediate-release formulation of donepezil has been available at an approved dose of 5-10 mg/d for the past decade. Recently, the United States Food and Drug Administration approved a higher-dose (23 mg/d) donepezil formulation, which provides more gradual systemic absorption, a longer time to maximum concentration (8 hours) versus the immediate-release formulation (3 hours), and higher daily concentrations. Herein, we review (1) the scientific data on the importance of cholinergic deficits in Alzheimer's disease treatment strategies, (2) the rationale for the use of higher-dose acetylcholinesterase inhibitors in patients with advanced disease, and (3) recent clinical evidence supporting the use of higher-dose donepezil in patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Donepezil in the Treatment of ADHD-Like Symptoms in Youths with Pervasive Developmental Disorder: A Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Robert L.; Frazier, Jean; Spencer, Thomas J.; Geller, Daniel; Biederman, Joseph; Wilens, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    Background: Recent studies reported ADHD-like symptoms and cognitive deficits in pervasive developmental disorder (PDD). Because work in dementia documents improvement in executive function deficits with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil, the authors reason that similar benefits could be obtained in PDD. Method: The authors describe…

  8. Donepezil-like multifunctional agents: Design, synthesis, molecular modeling and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Yu; Esteban, Gerard; Brogi, Simone; Shionoya, Masahi; Wang, Li; Campiani, Giuseppe; Unzeta, Mercedes; Inokuchi, Tsutomu; Butini, Stefania; Marco-Contelles, Jose

    2016-10-01

    Currently available drugs against Alzheimer's disease (AD) are only able to ameliorate the disease symptoms resulting in a moderate improvement in memory and cognitive function without any efficacy in preventing and inhibiting the progression of the pathology. In an effort to obtain disease-modifying anti-Alzheimer's drugs (DMAADs) following the multifactorial nature of AD, we have recently developed multifunctional compounds. We herein describe the design, synthesis, molecular modeling and biological evaluation of a new series of donepezil-related compounds possessing metal chelating properties, and being capable of targeting different enzymatic systems related to AD (cholinesterases, ChEs, and monoamine oxidase A, MAO-A). Among this set of analogues compound 5f showed excellent ChEs inhibition potency and a selective MAO-A inhibition (vs MAO-B) coupled to strong complexing properties for zinc and copper ions, both known to be involved in the progression of AD. Moreover, 5f exhibited moderate antioxidant properties as found by in vitro assessment. This compound represents a novel donepezil-hydroxyquinoline hybrid with DMAAD profile paving the way to the development of a novel class of drugs potentially able to treat AD.

  9. DOMINO-AD protocol: donepezil and memantine in moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease – a multicentre RCT

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rob; Sheehan, Bart; Phillips, Patrick; Juszczak, Ed; Adams, Jessica; Baldwin, Ashley; Ballard, Clive; Banerjee, Sube; Barber, Bob; Bentham, Peter; Brown, Richard; Burns, Alistair; Dening, Tom; Findlay, David; Gray, Richard; Griffin, Mary; Holmes, Clive; Hughes, Alan; Jacoby, Robin; Johnson, Tony; Jones, Roy; Knapp, Martin; Lindesay, James; McKeith, Ian; McShane, Rupert; Macharouthu, Ajay; O'Brien, John; Onions, Caroline; Passmore, Peter; Raftery, James; Ritchie, Craig; Howard, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the commonest cause of dementia. Cholinesterase inhibitors, such as donepezil, are the drug class with the best evidence of efficacy, licensed for mild to moderate AD, while the glutamate antagonist memantine has been widely prescribed, often in the later stages of AD. Memantine is licensed for moderate to severe dementia in AD but is not recommended by the England and Wales National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. However, there is little evidence to guide clinicians as to what to prescribe as AD advances; in particular, what to do as the condition progresses from moderate to severe. Options include continuing cholinesterase inhibitors irrespective of decline, adding memantine to cholinesterase inhibitors, or prescribing memantine instead of cholinesterase inhibitors. The aim of this trial is to establish the most effective drug option for people with AD who are progressing from moderate to severe dementia despite treatment with donepezil. Method DOMINO-AD is a pragmatic, 15 centre, double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled trial. Patients with AD, currently living at home, receiving donepezil 10 mg daily, and with Standardized Mini-Mental State Examination (SMMSE) scores between 5 and 13 are being recruited. Each is randomized to one of four treatment options: continuation of donepezil with memantine placebo added; switch to memantine with donepezil placebo added; donepezil and memantine together; or donepezil placebo with memantine placebo. 800 participants are being recruited and treatment continues for one year. Primary outcome measures are cognition (SMMSE) and activities of daily living (Bristol Activities of Daily Living Scale). Secondary outcomes are non-cognitive dementia symptoms (Neuropsychiatric Inventory), health related quality of life (EQ-5D and DEMQOL-proxy), carer burden (General Health Questionnaire-12), cost effectiveness (using Client Service Receipt Inventory) and institutionalization

  10. Local Drug-Drug Interaction of Donepezil with Cilostazol at Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (ABCG2) Increases Drug Accumulation in Heart.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Ryota; Shinozaki, Kohki; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2016-01-01

    Clinical reports indicate that cardiotoxicity due to donepezil can occur after coadministration with cilostazol. We speculated that the concentration of donepezil in heart tissue might be increased as a result of interaction with cilostazol at efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp, ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2), which are expressed in many tissues including the heart, and our study tested this hypothesis. First, donepezil was confirmed to be a substrate of both BCRP and P-glycoprotein in transporter-transfected cells in vitro. Cilostazol inhibited BCRP and P-glycoprotein with half-inhibitory concentrations of 130 nM and 12.7 μM, respectively. Considering the clinically achievable unbound plasma concentration of cilostazol (about 200 nM), it is plausible that BCRP-mediated transport of donepezil would be affected by cilostazol in vivo. Indeed, in an in vivo rat study, we found that coadministration of cilostazol significantly increased the concentrations of donepezil in the heart and brain, where BCRP functions as a part of the blood-tissue barrier, whereas the plasma concentration of donepezil was unaffected. In addition, in vitro accumulation of donepezil in heart tissue slices of rats was significantly increased in the presence of cilostazol. These results indicate that donepezil-cilostazol interaction at BCRP may be clinically relevant in heart and brain tissues. In other words, the tissue distribution of drugs can be influenced by drug-drug interaction (DDI) at efflux transporters in certain tissues (local DDI) without any apparent change in plasma concentration (systemic DDI).

  11. Donepezil is ineffective in promoting motor and cognitive benefits after controlled cortical impact injury in male rats.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kaitlyn E; Bondi, Corina O; Light, Samuel H; Massimino, Lire A; McAloon, Rose L; Monaco, Christina M; Kline, Anthony E

    2013-04-01

    The acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor donepezil is used as a therapy for Alzheimer's disease and has been recommended as a treatment for enhancing attention and memory after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Although select clinical case studies support the use of donepezil for enhancing cognition, there is a paucity of experimental TBI studies assessing the potential efficacy of this pharmacotherapy. Hence, the aim of this pre-clinical study was to evaluate several doses of donepezil to determine its effect on functional outcome after TBI. Ninety anesthetized adult male rats received a controlled cortical impact (CCI; 2.8 mm cortical depth at 4 m/sec) or sham injury, and then were randomly assigned to six TBI and six sham groups (donepezil 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, or 3.0 mg/kg, and saline vehicle 1.0 mL/kg). Treatments began 24 h after surgery and were administered i.p. once daily for 19 days. Function was assessed by motor (beam balance/walk) and cognitive (Morris water maze) tests on days 1-5 and 14-19, respectively. No significant differences were observed among the sham control groups in any evaluation, regardless of dose, and therefore the data were pooled. Furthermore, no significant differences were revealed among the TBI groups in acute neurological assessments (e.g., righting reflex), suggesting that all groups received the same level of injury severity. None of the five doses of donepezil improved motor or cognitive function relative to vehicle-treated controls. Moreover, the two highest doses significantly impaired beam-balance (3.0 mg/kg), beam-walk (2.0 mg/kg and 3.0 mg/kg), and cognitive performance (3.0 mg/kg) versus vehicle. These data indicate that chronic administration of donepezil is not only ineffective in promoting functional improvement after moderate CCI injury, but depending on the dose is actually detrimental to the recovery process. Further work is necessary to determine if other AChE inhibitors exert similar effects after

  12. Donepezil is ineffective in promoting motor and cognitive benefits after controlled cortical impact injury in male rats.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kaitlyn E; Bondi, Corina O; Light, Samuel H; Massimino, Lire A; McAloon, Rose L; Monaco, Christina M; Kline, Anthony E

    2013-04-01

    The acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor donepezil is used as a therapy for Alzheimer's disease and has been recommended as a treatment for enhancing attention and memory after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Although select clinical case studies support the use of donepezil for enhancing cognition, there is a paucity of experimental TBI studies assessing the potential efficacy of this pharmacotherapy. Hence, the aim of this pre-clinical study was to evaluate several doses of donepezil to determine its effect on functional outcome after TBI. Ninety anesthetized adult male rats received a controlled cortical impact (CCI; 2.8 mm cortical depth at 4 m/sec) or sham injury, and then were randomly assigned to six TBI and six sham groups (donepezil 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, or 3.0 mg/kg, and saline vehicle 1.0 mL/kg). Treatments began 24 h after surgery and were administered i.p. once daily for 19 days. Function was assessed by motor (beam balance/walk) and cognitive (Morris water maze) tests on days 1-5 and 14-19, respectively. No significant differences were observed among the sham control groups in any evaluation, regardless of dose, and therefore the data were pooled. Furthermore, no significant differences were revealed among the TBI groups in acute neurological assessments (e.g., righting reflex), suggesting that all groups received the same level of injury severity. None of the five doses of donepezil improved motor or cognitive function relative to vehicle-treated controls. Moreover, the two highest doses significantly impaired beam-balance (3.0 mg/kg), beam-walk (2.0 mg/kg and 3.0 mg/kg), and cognitive performance (3.0 mg/kg) versus vehicle. These data indicate that chronic administration of donepezil is not only ineffective in promoting functional improvement after moderate CCI injury, but depending on the dose is actually detrimental to the recovery process. Further work is necessary to determine if other AChE inhibitors exert similar effects after

  13. Effect of fatty acids on the transdermal delivery of donepezil: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Joonho; Choi, Min-Koo; Chong, Saeho; Chung, Suk-Jae; Shim, Chang-Koo; Kim, Dae-Duk

    2012-01-17

    The effect of fatty acids on the skin permeation of donepezil base (DPB) and its hydrochloride salt (DPH) were studied in vitro using hairless mouse and human cadaver skin. DPB and DPH were solubilized in propylene glycol (PG) containing 1% (w/v) fatty acid, after which the in vitro permeation through hairless mouse skin and human cadaver skin were evaluated using Keshary-Chien diffusion cells. The optimized formulation obtained from the in vitro study was then tested in rats for an in vivo pharmacokinetic study. The relative in vitro skin permeation rate of donepezil (DP) through the hairless mouse skin showed a parabolic relationship with increased carbon length of the fatty acid enhancers. Among the fatty acids tested, oleic acid for DPB and palmitoleic acid for DPH showed the highest enhancing effect, respectively. Both the permeation rates of DPB and DPH evaluated in human cadaver skin were in good correlation with those in hairless mouse skin, regardless of the presence of fatty acids. This suggests that the mouse skin model serves as a useful in vitro system that satisfactorily represents the characteristics of the human skin. Moreover, based on the in vitro results, the optimal formulation that could maintain the human plasma concentration of 50 ng/mL was determined to be 10mg DP with 1% (w/v) enhancer. When the DP transdermal formulations were applied to the abdominal skin of rats (2.14 cm(2)), the C(ss) was maintained for 48 h, among which the highest value of 52.21 ± 2.09 ng/mL was achieved with the DPB formulation using oleic acid. These results showed that fatty acids could enhance the transdermal delivery of DP and suggested the feasibility of developing a novel transdermal delivery system for clinical use.

  14. Expression of APP, BACE1, AChE and ChAT in an AD model in rats and the effect of donepezil hydrochloride treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Chen, Min; Liu, Hongmin; Yang, Liqun; Yang, Guiying

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the pathological changes in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the effect of donepezil hydrochloride (HCl) treatment. The rat model of AD was established by the bilateral injection of amyloid β₁₋₄₀ (Aβ₁₋₄₀) into the hippocampus. Changes in spatial learning and memory functions were examined using the Morris water maze test and changes in catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities were determined using chemical colorimetry. Moreover, the changes in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) expression were analyzed using immunohistochemical staining. The mRNA expression levels of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and β-secreted enzyme 1 (BACE1) were evaluated using RT-PCR. The effects of donepezil HCl on the aforementioned indices were also observed. The rat memories of the platform quadrants in the blank, sham and donepezil HCl groups were improved compared with those of the rats in the model group. The ratio of swim distance in the fourth platform quadrant (l₄) to the total swim distance (l total) for the model group rats (l₄/l total) was significantly decreased compared with that for the blank and sham group rats. Following donepezil HCl treatment, the ratio of l₄/l total significantly increased. AD modeling caused a significant decrease in the CAT and GSH-Px activities in the brain tissues of the rats. The CAT and GSH-Px activities in the AD model rats significantly increased following donepezil HCl treatment. Moreover, donepezil HCl treatment significantly decreased the AChE, APP and BACE1 mRNA expression levels and increased the ChAT expression levels. Therefore, donepezil HCl was able to significantly decrease learning and memory damage in a rat model of AD.

  15. Cognitive Results of CANTAB Tests and Their Change Due to the First Dose of Donepezil May Predict Treatment Efficacy in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmickienė, Jurgita; Kaubrys, Gintaras

    2015-01-01

    Background Ability to predict the efficacy of treatment in Alzheimer disease (AD) may be very useful in clinical practice. Cognitive predictors should be investigated alongside with the demographic, genetic, and other predictors of treatment efficacy. The aim of this study was to establish whether the baseline measures of CANTAB tests and their changes due to the first donepezil dose are able to predict the efficacy of treatment after 4 months of therapy. We also compared the predictive value of cognitive, clinical, and demographic predictors of treatment efficacy in AD. Material/Methods Seventy-two AD patients (62 treatment-naïve and 10 donepezil-treated) and 30 controls were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, rater-blinded, follow-up study. Treatment-naïve AD patients were randomized to 2 groups to take the first donepezil dose after the first or second CANTAB testing, separated by 4 hours. Follow-up Test 3 was performed 4 months after the initial assessment. Results The groups were similar in age, education, gender, Hachinski index, and depression. General Regression Models (GRM) have shown that cognitive changes after the first dose of donepezil in PAL (t-values for regression coefficients from 3.43 to 6.44), PRMd (t=4.33), SWM (t=5.85) test scores, and baseline results of PAL (t=2.57–2.86), PRM (t=3.08), and CRT (t=3.42) tests were significant predictors of long-term donepezil efficacy in AD (p<0.05). Conclusions The cognitive changes produced by the first donepezil dose in CANTAB PAL, PRM, and SWM test measures are able to predict the long-term efficacy of donepezil in AD. Baseline PAL, PRM, and CRT test results were significant predictors. PMID:26656642

  16. Cognitive Results of CANTAB Tests and Their Change Due to the First Dose of Donepezil May Predict Treatment Efficacy in Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Kuzmickienė, Jurgita; Kaubrys, Gintaras

    2015-12-14

    BACKGROUND Ability to predict the efficacy of treatment in Alzheimer disease (AD) may be very useful in clinical practice. Cognitive predictors should be investigated alongside with the demographic, genetic, and other predictors of treatment efficacy. The aim of this study was to establish whether the baseline measures of CANTAB tests and their changes due to the first donepezil dose are able to predict the efficacy of treatment after 4 months of therapy. We also compared the predictive value of cognitive, clinical, and demographic predictors of treatment efficacy in AD. MATERIAL AND METHODS Seventy-two AD patients (62 treatment-naïve and 10 donepezil-treated) and 30 controls were enrolled in this prospective, randomized, rater-blinded, follow-up study. Treatment-naïve AD patients were randomized to 2 groups to take the first donepezil dose after the first or second CANTAB testing, separated by 4 hours. Follow-up Test 3 was performed 4 months after the initial assessment. RESULTS The groups were similar in age, education, gender, Hachinski index, and depression. General Regression Models (GRM) have shown that cognitive changes after the first dose of donepezil in PAL (t-values for regression coefficients from 3.43 to 6.44), PRMd (t=4.33), SWM (t=5.85) test scores, and baseline results of PAL (t=2.57-2.86), PRM (t=3.08), and CRT (t=3.42) tests were significant predictors of long-term donepezil efficacy in AD (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS The cognitive changes produced by the first donepezil dose in CANTAB PAL, PRM, and SWM test measures are able to predict the long-term efficacy of donepezil in AD. Baseline PAL, PRM, and CRT test results were significant predictors.

  17. Preparation, characterization, and in vivo evaluation of intranasally administered liposomal formulation of donepezil.

    PubMed

    Al Asmari, Abdulrahman K; Ullah, Zabih; Tariq, Mohammad; Fatani, Amal

    2016-01-01

    The adequate amount of drug delivery to the brain in neurological patients is a major problem faced by the physicians. Recent studies suggested that intranasal administration of liposomal formulation may improve the drug delivery to the brain. In the present study, an attempt was made to study the brain bioavailability of commonly used anti-Alzheimer drug donepezil (DNP) liposomal formulation by intranasal route in rats. We adopted the thin layer hydration technique for the preparation of liposomes by using cholesterol, polyethylene glycol, and 1,2-distearyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC). The prepared liposomes were characterized by determining particle size, shape, surface morphology, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro release of DNP. The pharmacokinetic parameters of liposomal DNP in plasma and brain of rats were determined following oral and nasal administration. The results of this study showed that the DNP liposomal formulation was stable with a consistent size (102 ± 3.3 nm) and shape. The prepared liposomes showed high encapsulation efficiency (84.91% ±3 .31%) and sustained-release behavior. The bioavailability of DNP in plasma and brain increased significantly (P<0.05) after administration of liposomal formulation by the intranasal route. Histopathological examination showed that the formulation was safe and free from toxicity. It can be concluded that the nasal administration of liposomal preparation may provide an efficient and reliable mode of drug delivery to the central nervous system.

  18. Effects of donepezil and serotonin reuptake inhibitor on acute regression during adolescence in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tamasaki, Akiko; Saito, Yoshiaki; Ueda, Riyo; Ohno, Koyo; Yokoyama, Katsutoshi; Satake, Takahiro; Sakuma, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Kondoh, Tatsuro; Maegaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy with Down syndrome (DS) showed a gradual decline in his daily activities and feeding capacities, and a marked deterioration triggered by a streptococcal infection was observed at the age of 15 years. He became bedridden, accompanied by sleep disturbance, sustained upward gaze, and generalized rigidity. Magnetic resonance imaging showed unremarkable findings, but antiglutamate receptor autoantibodies were positive in his cerebrospinal fluid. Treatment with thiamine infusion and steroid pulse therapy showed little effect, but gross motor dysfunction and appetite loss were ameliorated by the administration of l-DOPA and serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Thereafter, autistic behaviors predominated, including loss of social interaction, oral tendency, water phobia, and aggressiveness. Initiation of donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, resulted in the disappearance of these symptoms and total recovery of the patient to his previous psychosocial levels. We hypothesize that the acute regression in adolescence represents a process closely related to the defects of serotonergic and cholinergic systems that are innate to DS brains and not just a nonspecific comorbidity of depression or limbic encephalitis.

  19. Preparation, characterization, and in vivo evaluation of intranasally administered liposomal formulation of donepezil.

    PubMed

    Al Asmari, Abdulrahman K; Ullah, Zabih; Tariq, Mohammad; Fatani, Amal

    2016-01-01

    The adequate amount of drug delivery to the brain in neurological patients is a major problem faced by the physicians. Recent studies suggested that intranasal administration of liposomal formulation may improve the drug delivery to the brain. In the present study, an attempt was made to study the brain bioavailability of commonly used anti-Alzheimer drug donepezil (DNP) liposomal formulation by intranasal route in rats. We adopted the thin layer hydration technique for the preparation of liposomes by using cholesterol, polyethylene glycol, and 1,2-distearyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC). The prepared liposomes were characterized by determining particle size, shape, surface morphology, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro release of DNP. The pharmacokinetic parameters of liposomal DNP in plasma and brain of rats were determined following oral and nasal administration. The results of this study showed that the DNP liposomal formulation was stable with a consistent size (102 ± 3.3 nm) and shape. The prepared liposomes showed high encapsulation efficiency (84.91% ±3 .31%) and sustained-release behavior. The bioavailability of DNP in plasma and brain increased significantly (P<0.05) after administration of liposomal formulation by the intranasal route. Histopathological examination showed that the formulation was safe and free from toxicity. It can be concluded that the nasal administration of liposomal preparation may provide an efficient and reliable mode of drug delivery to the central nervous system. PMID:26834457

  20. Effect of Donepezil, Tacrine, Galantamine and Rivastigmine on Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition in Dugesia tigrina.

    PubMed

    Bezerra da Silva, Cristiane; Pott, Arnildo; Elifio-Esposito, Selene; Dalarmi, Luciane; Fialho do Nascimento, Kátia; Moura Burci, Ligia; de Oliveira, Maislian; de Fátima Gaspari Dias, Josiane; Warumby Zanin, Sandra Maria; Gomes Miguel, Obdulio; Dallarmi Miguel, Marilis

    2016-01-01

    Dugesia tigrina is a non-parasitic platyhelminth, which has been recently utilized in pharmacological models, regarding the nervous system, as it presents a wide sensitivity to drugs. Our trials aimed to propose a model for an in vivo screening of substances with inhibitory activity of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase. Trials were performed with four drugs commercialized in Brazil: donepezil, tacrine, galantamine and rivastigmine, utilized in the control of Alzheimer's disease, to inhibit the activity of acetylcholinesterase. We tested five concentrations of the drugs, with an exposure of 24 h, and the mortality and the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase planarian seizure-like activity (pSLA) and planarian locomotor velocity (pLMV) were measured. Galantamine showed high anticholinesterasic activity when compared to the other drugs, with a reduction of 0.05 μmol·min(-1) and 63% of convulsant activity, presenting screw-like movement and hypokinesia, with pLMV of 65 crossed lines during 5 min. Our results showed for the first time the anticholinesterasic and convulsant effect, in addition to the decrease in locomotion induced by those drugs in a model of invertebrates. The experimental model proposed is simple and low cost and could be utilized in the screening of substances with anticholinesterasic action. PMID:26760993

  1. Development of an LC-MS/MS method for simultaneous determination of memantine and donepezil in rat plasma and its application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Bhateria, Manisha; Ramakrishna, Rachumallu; Pakala, Dora Babu; Bhatta, Rabi Sankar

    2015-09-15

    Recently, a fixed dose combination (FDC) of memantine (MM) and donepezil (DPZ) has been approved for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present work, a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of MM and DPZ was developed and validated in rat plasma over the linearity range of 0.2-400ng/mL using amantadine (AM) as an internal standard. Both the analytes and IS were extracted using one step liquid-liquid extraction procedure. The analytes were separated on C18 reversed phase column with mobile phase consisting of a mixture of methanol and 10mM ammonium acetate, pH 5 (92:8 v/v) at a flow rate of 0.7mL/min. The detection of the analytes was done on triple quadrupole mass spectrometer operated in positive electrospray ionization mode (ESI) and quantified using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The method was fully validated in terms of linearity, accuracy, precision, recovery, matrix effect, dilution integrity, carry-over effect and stability. The within- and between-run precisions were <10% and accuracy was all within ±10%. The mean recovery of MM and DPZ was found to be greater than 80%. The % RSD value at higher as well as lower concentration was well within the acceptable range (±15%) in all the stability experiments. The method was successfully applied to the oral pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interaction study of MM and DPZ in male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats.

  2. The effect of a combination of gabapentin and donepezil in an experimental pain model in healthy volunteers: Results of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Yvonne; Fernando, Disala; Kurz, Hazel; Miller, Sam R; Zucchetto, Mauro; Storey, James

    2014-12-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-period cross-over, 4-treatment option, incomplete block study (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT01485185), with an adaptive design for sample size re-estimation, was designed to evaluate gabapentin plus donepezil in an established experimental model of electrical hyperalgesia. Thirty healthy male subjects aged 18-55 years were randomized to receive gabapentin 900 mg or gabapentin 900 mg+donepezil 5mg for 2 of the 3 treatment periods, with 50% of subjects randomized to receive placebo (negative control) and 50% to gabapentin 1800 mg (positive control) for the remaining period. Each treatment period was 14 days. Gabapentin or corresponding placebo was administered on Day 13 and the morning of Day 14. Donepezil or corresponding placebo was administered nocturnally from Day 1-13 and the morning of Day 14. Co-primary endpoints were the area of pinprick hyperalgesia (260 mN von Frey filament) and allodynia (stroking by cotton bud) evoked by electrical hyperalgesia on Day 14. Gabapentin 1800 mg (n=14) significantly reduced the area of allodynia vs placebo (n=14; -12.83 cm(2); 95% confidence interval [CI] -23.14 to -2.53; P=0.015) with supportive results for hyperalgesia (-14.04 cm(2); 95% CI -28.49-0.41; P=0.057), validating the electrical hyperalgesia model. Gabapentin+donepezil (n=30) significantly reduced the area of hyperalgesia vs gabapentin 900 mg (n=30; -11.73 cm(2); 95% CI -21.04 to -2.42; P=0.014), with supportive results for allodynia (-6.62 cm(2); 95% CI -13.29-0.04; P=0.052). The adverse event profile for gabapentin+donepezil was similar to the same dose of gabapentin. Data are supportive of further clinical investigation of a gabapentin-and-donepezil combination in patients with an inadequate response to gabapentin.

  3. Effects of donepezil on brain morphometric and metabolic changes in patients with Alzheimer's disease: A DARTEL-based VBM and (1)H-MRS.

    PubMed

    Moon, Chung-Man; Kim, Byeong-Chae; Jeong, Gwang-Woo

    2016-09-01

    A few studies have performed on the brain morphometric changes over the whole brain structure following donepezil treatment in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). We evaluated the gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) volume alterations and cellular metabolic changes in patients with AD before and after donepezil treatment, and further to reveal the correlations of the scores of various neuropsychological scales with the volumetric and metabolic changes. Twenty-one subjects comprising of 11 patients with AD and 10 age-matched healthy controls participated in this study. All of the patients participated in the follow-up study 24weeks following donepezil treatment. In this study, a combination of voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was used to assess the brain morphometric and metabolic alterations in AD. In the GM volumetric analysis, both of the untreated and treated patients with donepezil showed significantly reduced volumes in the hippocampus (Hip), parahippocampal gyrus (PHG), precuneus (PCu) and middle frontal gyrus compared with healthy controls. However, donepezil-treated patients showed significantly increased volumes in the Hip, PCu, fusiform gyrus and caudate nucleus compared to untreated patients. In the WM volumetric analysis, untreated and treated patients showed significant volume reductions in the posterior limb of internal capsule (PLIC), cerebral peduncle of the midbrain and PHG compared to healthy controls. However, there was no significant WM morphological change after donepezil treatment in patients with AD. In MRS study, untreated patients with AD showed decreased N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) and increased myo-inositol (mI)/Cr compared to healthy controls, while treated patients showed only decreased NAA/Cr in the same comparison. However, the treated patients showed simultaneously increased NAA/Cr and decreased mI/Cr and choline (Cho)/Cr ratios compared to untreated patients. This

  4. Characterization of cognitive deficits in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and effects of donepezil and memantine.

    PubMed

    Nagakura, Akira; Shitaka, Yoshitsugu; Yarimizu, Junko; Matsuoka, Nobuya

    2013-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by a progressive decline in cognitive function and involves β-amyloid (Aβ) in its pathogenesis. To characterize cognitive deficits associated with Aβ accumulation, we analyzed PS1/APP mice overexpressing mutant presenilin-1 (PS1, M146L; line 6.2) and amyloid precursor protein (APP, K670N/M671L; line Tg2576), a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease with accelerated Aβ production. Age-dependent changes in working and spatial memory behaviors were investigated using Y-maze and Morris water maze tasks, respectively, in female PS1/APP mice at ages of 2, 4, 6, and 12 months. Significant deficits in working and spatial memory were observed from 4 and 6 months of age, respectively. Acute single-dose administrations of memantine, a low-to-moderate-affinity N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, showed improvements in working memory deficits at 4 months of age, whereas donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor, did not. However, both drugs improved spatial memory dysfunction at 6 months of age at therapeutically relevant doses. No age-related dramatic changes were observed in expression levels of several proteins relating to memory dysfunction and also the mechanisms of donepezil and memantine in the cerebral cortex of PS1/APP mice until 6 months of age. Taken together, these results suggest dysfunctions in cholinergic and/or glutamatergic transmissions may be involved in the cognitive deficits associated with Aβ toxicity. Since donepezil and memantine have been widely used for treating patients of Alzheimer's disease, these results also suggest that cognitive deficits in PS1/APP mice assessed in the Y-maze and Morris water maze tasks are a useful animal model for evaluating novel Alzheimer's disease therapeutics.

  5. Combined administration of cerebrolysin and donepezil induces plastic changes in prefrontal cortex in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Alcántara-González, Faviola; Mendoza-Perez, Claudia Rebeca; Zaragoza, Néstor; Juarez, Ismael; Arroyo-García, Luis Enrique; Gamboa, Citlalli; De La Cruz, Fidel; Zamudio, Sergio; Garcia-Dolores, Fernando; Flores, Gonzalo

    2012-11-01

    Cerebrolysin (Cbl) shows neurotrophic and neuroprotective properties while donepezil (Dnp) is a potent acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor, both drugs are prescribed for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment. Previous studies have shown that the Dnp and Cbl administered separately, modify dendritic morphology of neurons in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in senile rodents. Since the deficit of neurotrophic factor activity is implicated in the degeneration of cholinergic neurons of basal forebrain, a combination therapy of Dnp and Cbl has been tested recently in Alzheimer's patients. However, the plastic changes that may underlie this combined treatment have not yet been explored. We present here the effect of the combined administration of Cbl and Dnp on dendritic morphology in brain regions related to learning and memory in aged mice. The Golgi-Cox staining protocol and Sholl analysis were used for studying dendritic changes. Cbl and Dnp were administrated daily for 2 months to 9-months-old mice. Locomotor activity was assessed, as well as the dendritic morphology of neurons in several limbic regions was analyzed. Results showed that Cbl and Dnp induced an increase in locomotor activity without synergistic effect. The Cbl or Dnp treatment modified the dendritic morphology of neurons from prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsal hippocampus (DH), dentate gyrus (DG), and the shell of nucleus accumbens (NAcc). These changes show an increase in the total dendritic length and spine density, resulting in an improvement of dendritic arborization. Prominently, a synergistic effect of Cbl and Dnp was observed on branching order and total dendritic length of pyramidal neurons from PFC. These results suggest that Dnp and Cbl may induce plastic changes in a manner independent of each other, but could enhance their effect in target cells from PFC.

  6. Methyllycaconitine- and scopolamine-induced cognitive dysfunction: differential reversal effect by cognition-enhancing drugs.

    PubMed

    Andriambeloson, Emile; Huyard, Bertrand; Poiraud, Etienne; Wagner, Stéphanie

    2014-08-01

    There is a growing body of evidence pointing to the pivotal role of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAchR) dysfunction in cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer's disease or schizophrenia. This study was undertaken to establish and characterize an in vivo model for cognitive disorder secondary to the blockade of α7 nAChR by its specific antagonist, methyllycaconitine (MLA). The results show that MLA elicited cognitive dysfunction as assessed by reduced spontaneous alternation of mice in the T-maze. The maximal effect of MLA produced 25-30% reduction in the spontaneous alternation of mice, a level comparable with that induced by the muscarinic antagonism of scopolamine. Donepezil and galantamine fully reversed both MLA and scopolamine-induced cognitive dysfunction. However, the ED50 of donepezil and galantamine was significantly shifted to the left in the MLA- compared to scopolamine-treated mice (0.0005 and 0.002 mg/kg for donepezil; 0.0003 and 0.7 mg/kg for galantamine). Moreover, memantine elicited marked reversion of cognitive dysfunction (up to 70%) in MLA-treated mice while only a weak reversal effect at high dose of memantine (less than 20%) was observed in scopolamine-treated mice. The above findings indicate that MLA-induced cognitive dysfunction in the mouse is highly sensitive and more responsive to the current procognitive drugs than the traditional scopolamine-based assay. Thus, it can be of value for the preclinical screening and profiling of cognition-enhancing drugs. PMID:25505596

  7. Enhanced dendritic spine number of neurons of the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and nucleus accumbens in old rats after chronic donepezil administration

    PubMed Central

    Alcantara-Gonzalez, Faviola; Juarez, Ismael; Solis, Oscar; Martinez-Tellez, Isaura; Camacho-Abrego, Israel; Masliah, Eliezer; Mena, Raul; Flores, Gonzalo

    2010-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease brains morphological changes in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus have been observed. These changes are particularly reflected in the decrement of both the dendritic tree and spine number. Donepezil is a potent and selective acetylcholinesterase inhibitor used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. We have studied the effect of oral administration of this drug on the morphology of neuronal cells from the brain of aged rats. We examined dendrites of pyramidal neurons of the PFC, dorsal or ventral hippocampus and medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). Donepezil (1 mg/Kg, vo) was administrated every day for 60 days to rats aged 10 and 18 months. Dendritic morphology was studied by the Golgi-Cox stain procedure followed by Sholl analysis at 12 and 20 months ages, respectively. In all Donepezil treated-rats a significant increment of the dendritic spines number in pyramidal neurons of the PFC, dorsal hippocampus was observed. However, pyramidal neurons of the ventral hippocampus and medium spiny cells of the NAcc only showed an increase in the number of their spines in 12 months old-rats. Our results suggest that Donepezil prevents the alterations of the neuronal dendrite morphology caused by aging. PMID:20336627

  8. Synergistic Increase of Serum BDNF in Alzheimer Patients Treated with Cerebrolysin and Donepezil: Association with Cognitive Improvement in ApoE4 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Irene; Iglesias, Olalla; Crespo, Ignacio; Figueroa, Jesus; Aleixandre, Manuel; Linares, Carlos; Granizo, Elias; Garcia-Fantini, Manuel; Marey, Jose; Masliah, Eliezer; Winter, Stefan; Muresanu, Dafin; Moessler, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Background: Low circulating brain derived neurotrophic factor may promote cognitive deterioration, but the effects of neurotrophic and combination drug therapies on serum brain derived neurotrophic factor were not previously investigated in Alzheimer’s disease. Methods: We evaluated the effects of Cerebrolysin, donepezil, and the combined therapy on brain derived neurotrophic factor serum levels at week 16 (end of Cerebrolysin treatment) and week 28 (endpoint) in mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s disease patients. Results: Cerebrolysin, but not donepezil, increased serum brain derived neurotrophic factor at week 16, while the combination therapy enhanced it at both week 16 and study endpoint. Brain derived neurotrophic factor responses were significantly higher in the combination therapy group than in donepezil and Cerebrolysin groups at week 16 and week 28, respectively. Brain derived neurotrophic factor increases were greater in apolipoprotein E epsilon-4 allele carriers, and higher brain derived neurotrophic factor levels were associated with better cognitive improvements in apolipoprotein E epsilon-4 allele patients treated with Cerebrolysin and the combined therapy. Conclusion: Our results indicate a synergistic action of Cerebrolysin and donepezil to increase serum brain derived neurotrophic factor and delaying cognitive decline, particularly in Alzheimer’s disease cases with apolipoprotein E epsilon-4 allele. PMID:27207906

  9. Drug induced parkinsonism caused by the concurrent use of donepezil and risperidone in a patient with traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Kang, Si Hyun; Kim, Don-Kyu

    2013-02-01

    A 69-year-old male patient with previous history of traumatic brain injury 5 months ago was admitted to the Department of Neuropsychiatry because of aggressive behavior and delusional features. After starting on 2 mg of risperidone per day, his delusion, anxiety, and aggressive behavior gradually improved. Two weeks later, he was given 10 mg of donepezil per day for his mild cognitive impairment. After 6 weeks of admission in the Department of Neuropsychiatry, he showed parkinsonian features including difficulty in walking, decreased arm swing during walking, narrowed step width, scooped posture, bradykinesia, tremor, and sleep disorder. To rule out the primary Parkinsonism, dopamine transporter imaging technique [18F]fluoropropyl-carbomethoxy-iodopropyl-nor-β-tropane positron emission tomography-computed tomography (18F]FP(IT PET-CT)) was performed, and dopamine transporter activity was not decreased. We considered that his parkinsonian features were associated with the combination of risperidone and donepezil. Both drugs were stopped and symptoms rapidly disappeared in several days. PMID:23526695

  10. Rapid and sustained cognitive recovery in APP/PS1 transgenic mice by co-administration of EPPS and donepezil

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Yun; Kim, Hyunjin Vincent; Lee, Dongkeun K.; Yang, Seung-Hoon; Kim, YoungSoo

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by sequential progression of pathological events, such as aggregation of amyloid-β proteins, followed by outward symptoms of cognitive impairments. Given that a combination of different therapeutic strategies often provides more rapid and effective outcomes in diverse areas of clinical treatment, we hypothesized that administration of anti-amyloid drugs with cognitive enhancers would result in synergistic effects in AD treatment. Here, we co-administered 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazinepropane-sulphonic acid (EPPS), an amyloid-clearing chemical, and donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, to determine whether they could serve complementary roles for each other in regards to AD treatment. We found that oral administration of these two molecules led to a rapid and consistent cognitive improvement in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Although there was no evidence for synergistic effects, our results indicated that EPPS and donepezil function complementary to each other without altering their individual effects. Thus, the combined use of disease-modifying and symptomatic relief drugs may be a promising approach in the treatment of AD. PMID:27796293

  11. Increased iPLA2 activity and levels of phosphorylated GSK3B in platelets are associated with donepezil treatment in Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Talib, L L; Hototian, S R; Joaquim, H P G; Forlenza, O V; Gattaz, W F

    2015-12-01

    Reduced phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity and increased phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3B (GSK3B) participate in the production of beta-amyloid plaques and of neurofibrillary tangles, which are two neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Experimental evidences suggest a neuroprotective effect of the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil in the treatment the disease. The aims of the present study were to evaluate in AD patients the effects of treatment with donepezil on PLA2 activity and GSK3B level. Thirty patients with AD were treated during 6 months with 10 mg daily of donepezil. Radio-enzymatic assays were used to measure PLA2 activity and Elisa assays for GSK3B level, both in platelets. Before treatment and after 3 and 6 months on donepezil, AD patients underwent a cognitive assessment and platelet samples were collected. Values were compared to a healthy control group of 42 sex- and age-matched elderly individuals. Before treatment, iPLA2 activity was lower in patients with AD as compared to controls (p < 0.001). At baseline, no differences were found in GSK3B level between both groups. After 3 and 6 months of treatment, we found a significant increase in iPLA2 activity (p = 0.015 and p < 0.001, respectively). iPLA2 increment was related to the cognitive improvement during treatment (p = 0.037). After 6 months, we found an increase in phosphorylated GSK3B (p = 0.02). The present findings suggest two possible mechanisms by which donepezil delays the progression of AD. The increment of iPLA2 activity may reduce the production of beta-amyloid plaques, whereas the phosphorylation of GSK3B inactivates the enzyme, reducing thus the phosphorylation of tau protein. PMID:25920742

  12. The ASCOMALVA (Association between the Cholinesterase Inhibitor Donepezil and the Cholinergic Precursor Choline Alphoscerate in Alzheimer's Disease) Trial: interim results after two years of treatment.

    PubMed

    Amenta, Francesco; Carotenuto, Anna; Fasanaro, Angiola Maria; Rea, Raffaele; Traini, Enea

    2014-01-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors (ChE-Is) are used for symptomatic treatment of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD), but long-term effects of these compounds are mild and not always obvious. Preclinical studies have shown that combination of ChE-Is and the cholinergic precursor choline alphoscerate increases brain acetylcholine levels more effectively than single compounds alone. ASCOMALVA (Effect of association between a ChE-I and choline alphoscerate on cognitive deficits in AD associated with cerebrovascular injury) is a double-blind trial investigating if the ChE-I donepezil and choline alphoscerate in combination are more effective that donepezil alone. The trial has recruited AD patients suffering from ischemic brain damage documented by neuroimaging and has completed 2 years of observation in 113 patients of the 210 planned. Patients were randomly allotted to an active treatment group (donepezil + choline alphoscerate) or to a reference group (donepezil + placebo). Cognitive functions were assessed by the Mini-Mental State Evaluation and Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale Cognitive subscale. Daily activity was evaluated by the basic and instrumental activities of daily living tests. Behavioral symptoms were assessed by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. Over the 24-month observation period, patients of the reference group showed a moderate time-dependent worsening in all the parameters investigated. Treatment with donepezil plus choline alphoscerate significantly slowed changes of the different items analyzed. These findings suggest that the combination of choline alphoscerate with a ChE-I may prolong/increase the effectiveness of cholinergic therapies in AD with concomitant ischemic cerebrovascular injury.

  13. Increased iPLA2 activity and levels of phosphorylated GSK3B in platelets are associated with donepezil treatment in Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Talib, L L; Hototian, S R; Joaquim, H P G; Forlenza, O V; Gattaz, W F

    2015-12-01

    Reduced phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity and increased phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3B (GSK3B) participate in the production of beta-amyloid plaques and of neurofibrillary tangles, which are two neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Experimental evidences suggest a neuroprotective effect of the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil in the treatment the disease. The aims of the present study were to evaluate in AD patients the effects of treatment with donepezil on PLA2 activity and GSK3B level. Thirty patients with AD were treated during 6 months with 10 mg daily of donepezil. Radio-enzymatic assays were used to measure PLA2 activity and Elisa assays for GSK3B level, both in platelets. Before treatment and after 3 and 6 months on donepezil, AD patients underwent a cognitive assessment and platelet samples were collected. Values were compared to a healthy control group of 42 sex- and age-matched elderly individuals. Before treatment, iPLA2 activity was lower in patients with AD as compared to controls (p < 0.001). At baseline, no differences were found in GSK3B level between both groups. After 3 and 6 months of treatment, we found a significant increase in iPLA2 activity (p = 0.015 and p < 0.001, respectively). iPLA2 increment was related to the cognitive improvement during treatment (p = 0.037). After 6 months, we found an increase in phosphorylated GSK3B (p = 0.02). The present findings suggest two possible mechanisms by which donepezil delays the progression of AD. The increment of iPLA2 activity may reduce the production of beta-amyloid plaques, whereas the phosphorylation of GSK3B inactivates the enzyme, reducing thus the phosphorylation of tau protein.

  14. The Efficacy of Licensed-Indication Use of Donepezil and Memantine Monotherapies for Treating Behavioural and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, I.A.; Orme, M.E.; Mitchell, S.A.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) greatly increase caregiver burden. The abilities of donepezil and memantine to manage BPSD within their licensed indications in AD were compared. Methods A systematic review, random effects meta-analysis and Bucher indirect comparison were conducted. Results Six randomised controlled studies (4 donepezil and 2 memantine) reported use within the licensed indication and had Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) data suitable for meta-analysis. BPSD showed significant improvement with donepezil compared with placebo [weighted mean difference (WMD) in NPI −3.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) −5.75, −1.27], whereas this was not the case for memantine (WMD −1.65, 95% CI −4.78, 1.49). WMD in NPI for donepezil versus memantine favoured donepezil but was not statistically significant (−1.86, 95% CI −5.71, 1.99; p = 0.34). Conclusion Within its licensed indication, donepezil is efficacious for the management of BPSD in AD compared with placebo. PMID:22163246

  15. Efficacy of Galantamine on Cognition in Mild-to-Moderate Alzheimer's Dementia after Failure to Respond to Donepezil

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Tae-Young; Ahn, Inn-Sook; Kim, Seonwoo

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study compares the efficacy of the cholinesterase inhibitor (ChEI) galantamine on cognition in patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's dementia (AD) who were either naïve to ChEI drugs or who had failed a trial of the ChEI donepezil. Methods Outpatients with AD were sequentially referred for screening and enrollment. Current outpatients who had taken donepezil for at least 6 months without demonstrated efficacy on cognition were switched to galantamine (switched group). New outpatients with no ChEI prescription history were classified as the naïve group and were given galantamine. The primary outcome measures for the between-group comparison were response rate on cognition at 26 and 52 weeks (categorical) and change on the Korean version of the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (dimensional). Secondary cognitive outcomes were measured using the subset of frontal executive function and the Korean Mini-Mental State Examination. Results Seventy outpatients were enrolled and 66 were analyzed by Intent-to-treat (ITT). There were 42 cases in the naïve group and 24 in the switched group. Response rates did not differ at 26 weeks (71.4% naïve vs. 58.3% switched; p=0.277) or at 52 weeks (59.5% naïve vs. 41.6% switched; p=0.162). No significant differences were observed in the pattern of change over the 52 weeks on the primary and secondary cognitive scales. Conclusion As the efficacy of galantamine on cognition was not inferior in the switched group compared to that in the naïve group, switching ChEI drugs is clinically feasible for non-responding patients with mild-to-moderate AD. PMID:27247602

  16. Selective Ability of Some CANTAB Battery Test Measures to Detect Cognitive Response to a Single Dose of Donepezil in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmickienė, Jurgita; Kaubrys, Gintaras

    2015-01-01

    Background The Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) was used to explore which tests and their measures are able to detect cognitive change after a single dose of donepezil in Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. The aim of this study was to establish the ability of CANTAB tests and their measures to detect cognitive change after a single 5-mg dose of donepezil in treatment-naïve AD patients. Material/Methods We enrolled 62 treatment-naïve AD patients and 30 healthy controls in this prospective, randomized, rater-blinded study. AD patients were randomized to 2 groups: the AD+ group received donepezil after the first CANTAB testing and the AD− group remained treatment-naïve at second testing. The time period between repeated testing was 4 hours. Parallel versions of CRT, SOC, PAL, SWM, and PRM tests were used. Results All groups did not differ according to age, education, gender, or depression (p>0.05). AD+ and AD− groups did not differ according to MMSE. SOC, PAL, PRM, and SWM tests distinguished AD from controls. Eight measures of PAL and PRM had a strong correlation with MMSE (r>0.7). Repeated-measures ANOVA with Bonferroni post-hoc test showed the difference of change in AD+ and AD− groups between first and second CANTAB testing in 7 PAL measures. AD+ and AD− groups differed in the second testing by 7 PAL measures. Four PAL measures differed in first and second testing within the AD+ group. Conclusions The CANTAB PAL test measures, able to detect cognitive change after a single dose of donepezil in AD patients, are: PAL mean trials to success, total errors (adjusted), total errors (6 shapes, adjusted), and total trials (adjusted). PMID:26336931

  17. Reversible dementias

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Manjari; Vibha, Deepti

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, more attention has been given to the early diagnostic evaluation of patients with dementia which is essential to identify patients with cognitive symptoms who may have treatable conditions. Guidelines suggest that all patients presenting with dementia or cognitive symptoms should be evaluated with a range of laboratory tests, and with structural brain imaging with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). While many of the disorders reported as ‘reversible dementias’ are conditions that may well be associated with cognitive or behavioral symptoms, these symptoms are not always sufficiently severe to fulfill the clinical criteria for dementia. Thus, while the etiology of a condition may be treatable it should not be assumed that the associated dementia is fully reversible. Potentially reversible dementias should be identified and treatment considered, even if the symptoms are not sufficiently severe to meet the clinical criteria for dementia, and even if partial or full reversal of the cognitive symptoms cannot be guaranteed. In the literature, the most frequently observed potentially reversible conditions identified in patients with cognitive impairment or dementia are depression, adverse effects of drugs, drug or alcohol abuse, space-occupying lesions, normal pressure hydrocephalus, and metabolic conditions land endocrinal conditions like hypothyroidism and nutritional conditions like vitamin B-12 deficiency. Depression is by far the most common of the potentially reversible conditions. The review, hence addresses the common causes of reversible dementia and the studies published so far. PMID:21416018

  18. Effects of memantine and donepezil on cortical and hippocampal acetylcholine levels and object recognition memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Ihalainen, Jouni; Sarajärvi, Timo; Rasmusson, Doug; Kemppainen, Susanna; Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Lehtonen, Marko; Banerjee, Pradeep K; Semba, Kazue; Tanila, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    This preclinical study investigated the ability of memantine (MEM) to stimulate brain acetylcholine (ACh) release, potentially acting synergistically with donepezil (DON, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor). Acute systemic administration of either MEM or DON to anesthetized rats caused dose-dependent increases of ACh levels in neocortex and hippocampus, and the combination of MEM (5 mg/kg) and DON (0.5 mg/kg) produced significantly greater increases than either drug alone. To determine whether ACh release correlated with cognitive improvement, rats with partial fimbria-fornix (FF) lesions were treated with acute or chronic MEM or DON. Acute MEM treatment significantly elevated baseline hippocampal ACh release but did not significantly improve task performance on a delayed non-match-to-sample (DNMS) task, whereas chronic MEM treatment significantly improved DNMS performance but only marginally elevated baseline ACh levels. Acute or chronic treatment with DON (in the presence of neostigmine to allow ACh collection) did not significantly improve DNMS performance or alter ACh release. In order to investigate the effect of adding MEM to ongoing DON therapy, lesioned rats pretreated with DON for 3 weeks were given a single intraperitoneal dose of MEM. MEM significantly elevated baseline hippocampal ACh levels, but did not significantly improve DNMS task scores compared to chronic DON-treated animals. These data indicate that MEM, in addition to acting as an NMDA receptor antagonist, can also augment ACh release; however, in this preclinical model, increased ACh levels did not directly correlate with improved cognitive performance.

  19. Reversible Sterilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Largey, Gale

    1977-01-01

    Notes that difficult questions arise concerning the use of sterilization for alleged eugenic and euthenic purposes. Thus, how reversible sterilization will be used with relation to the poor, mentally ill, mentally retarded, criminals, and minors, is questioned. (Author/AM)

  20. Reversible Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies (CMs) have many etiological factors that can result in severe structural and functional dysregulation. Fortunately, there are several potentially reversible CMs that are known to improve when the root etiological factor is addressed. In this article, we discuss several of these reversible CMs, including tachycardia-induced, peripartum, inflammatory, hyperthyroidism, Takotsubo, and chronic illness–induced CMs. Our discussion also includes a review on their respective pathophysiology, as well as possible management solutions. PMID:26052233

  1. Donepezil, an acetylcholine esterase inhibitor, and ABT-239, a histamine H3 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist, require the integrity of brain histamine system to exert biochemical and procognitive effects in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Provensi, Gustavo; Costa, Alessia; Passani, M Beatrice; Blandina, Patrizio

    2016-10-01

    Histaminergic H3 receptors (H3R) antagonists enhance cognition in preclinical models and modulate neurotransmission, in particular acetylcholine (ACh) release in the cortex and hippocampus, two brain areas involved in memory processing. The cognitive deficits seen in aging and Alzheimer's disease have been associated with brain cholinergic deficits. Donepezil is one of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor approved for use across the full spectrum of these cognitive disorders. We addressed the question if H3R antagonists and donepezil require an intact histamine neuronal system to exert their procognitive effects. The effect of the H3R antagonist ABT-239 and donepezil were evaluated in the object recognition test (ORT), and on the level of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β) phosphorylation in normal and histamine-depleted mice. Systemic administration of ABT-239 or donepezil ameliorated the cognitive performance in the ORT. However, these compounds were ineffective in either genetically (histidine decarboxylase knock-out, HDC-KO) or pharmacologically, by means of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of the HDC irreversible inhibitor a-fluoromethylhistidine (a-FMHis), histamine-deficient mice. Western blot analysis revealed that ABT-239 or donepezil systemic treatments increased GSK-3β phosphorylation in cortical and hippocampal homogenates of normal, but not of histamine-depleted mice. Furthermore, administration of the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 that blocks GSK-3β phosphorylation, prevented the procognitive effects of both drugs in normal mice. Our results indicate that both donepezil and ABT-239 require the integrity of the brain histaminergic system to exert their procognitive effects and strongly suggest that impairments of PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β intracellular pathway activation is responsible for the inefficacy of both drugs in histamine-deficient animals. PMID:27291828

  2. Protection by sigma-1 receptor agonists is synergic with donepezil, but not with memantine, in a mouse model of amyloid-induced memory impairments.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Tangui

    2016-01-01

    Drugs activating the sigma-1 (σ1) chaperone protein are anti-amnesic and neuroprotective in neurodegenerative pathologies like Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since these so-called σ1 receptor (σ1R) agonists modulate cholinergic and glutamatergic systems in a variety of physiological responses, we addressed their putative additive/synergistic action in combination with cholinergic or glutamatergic drugs. The selective σ1 agonist PRE-084, or the non-selective σ1 drug ANAVEX2-73 was combined with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil or the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine in the nontransgenic mouse model of AD-like memory impairments induced by intracerebroventricular injection of oligomeric Aβ25-35 peptide. Two behavioral tests, spontaneous alternation and passive avoidance response, were used in parallel and both protective and symptomatic effects were examined. After determination of the minimally active doses for each compound, the combinations were tested and the combination index (CI) calculated. Combinations between the σ1 agonists and donepezil showed a synergic protective effect, with CI<1, whereas the combinations with memantine showed an antagonist effect, with CI>1. Symptomatic effects appeared only additive for all combinations, with CI=1. A pharmacological analysis of the PRE-084+donepezil combination revealed that the synergy could be due to an inter-related mechanism involving α7 nicotinic ACh receptors and σ1R. These results demonstrated that σ1 drugs do not only offer a protective potential alone but also in combination with other therapeutic agents. The nature of neuromodulatory molecular chaperone of the σ1R could eventually lead to synergistic combinations.

  3. A fixed-dose combination of memantine extended-release and donepezil in the treatment of moderate-to-severe Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Deardorff, William James; Grossberg, George T

    2016-01-01

    Currently available therapies for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) consist of cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs), such as donepezil, and the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist memantine. In December 2014, the US Food and Drug Administration approved Namzaric™, a once-daily, fixed-dose combination (FDC) of memantine extended-release (ER) and donepezil for patients with moderate-to-severe AD. The FDC capsule is bioequivalent to the coadministered individual drugs, and its bioavailability is similar when taken fasting, with food, or sprinkled onto applesauce. The combination of memantine and ChEIs in moderate-to-severe AD provides additional benefits to ChEI monotherapy across multiple domains and may delay the time to nursing home admission. A dedicated study of memantine ER compared to placebo in patients on a stable dose of a ChEI found statistically significant benefits on cognition and global status but not functioning. Treatment with memantine ER and donepezil is generally well tolerated, although higher doses of ChEIs are associated with more serious adverse events such as vomiting, syncope, and weight loss. Potential advantages of the FDC include a simpler treatment regimen, reduction in pill burden, and the ability to sprinkle the capsule onto soft foods. Patients who may benefit from the FDC include those with significant dysphagia, a history of poor compliance, or limited caregiver interaction. However, available evidence that these advantages would increase treatment adherence and persistence is conflicting, meaning that the added cost of switching patients from generic options to an FDC may not always be justified. PMID:27757016

  4. Effectiveness of Donepezil, Rivastigmine, and (±)Huperzine A in Counteracting the Acute Toxicity of Organophosphorus Nerve Agents: Comparison with Galantamine

    PubMed Central

    Aracava, Yasco; Pereira, Edna F. R.; Akkerman, Miriam; Adler, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Galantamine, a centrally acting cholinesterase (ChE) inhibitor and a nicotinic allosteric potentiating ligand used to treat Alzheimer's disease, is an effective and safe antidote against poisoning with nerve agents, including soman. Here, the effectiveness of galantamine was compared with that of the centrally active ChE inhibitors donepezil, rivastigmine, and (±)huperzine A as a pre- and/or post-treatment to counteract the acute toxicity of soman. In the first set of experiments, male prepubertal guinea pigs were treated intramuscularly with one of the test drugs and 30 min later challenged with 1.5 × LD50 soman (42 μg/kg s.c.). All animals that were pretreated with galantamine (6–8 mg/kg), 3 mg/kg donepezil, 6 mg/kg rivastigmine, or 0.3 mg/kg (±)huperzine A survived the soman challenge, provided that they were also post-treated with atropine (10 mg/kg i.m.). However, only galantamine was well tolerated. In subsequent experiments, the effectiveness of specific treatment regimens using 8 mg/kg galantamine, 3 mg/kg donepezil, 6 mg/kg rivastigmine, or 0.3 mg/kg (±)huperzine A was compared in guinea pigs challenged with soman. In the absence of atropine, only galantamine worked as an effective and safe pretreatment in animals challenged with 1.0 × LD50 soman. Galantamine was also the only drug to afford significant protection when given to guinea pigs after 1.0 × LD50 soman. Finally, all test drugs except galantamine reduced the survival of the animals when administered 1 or 3 h after the challenge with 0.6 or 0.7 × LD50 soman. Thus, galantamine emerges as a superior antidotal therapy against the toxicity of soman. PMID:19741148

  5. Effectiveness and Tolerability of High-Dose (23 mg/d) Versus Standard-Dose (10 mg/d) Donepezil in Moderate to Severe Alzheimer’s Disease: A 24-Week, Randomized, Double-Blind Study

    PubMed Central

    Farlow, Martin R.; Salloway, Stephen; Tariot, Pierre N.; Yardley, Jane; Moline, Margaret L.; Wang, Qin; Brand-Schieber, Elimor; Zou, Heng; Hsu, Timothy; Satlin, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Background Currently approved Alzheimer’s disease (AD) treatments have been reported to provide symptomatic benefit, without proven impact on clinical progression. We hypothesized that the loss of initial therapeutic benefit over time may be mitigated by higher doses of a cholinesterase inhibitor. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness and tolerability of increasing donepezil from 10 to 23 mg/d in patients with moderate to severe AD. Methods This randomized, double-blind study was conducted at 219 sites in Asia, Europe, Australia, North America, South Africa, and South America from June 6, 2007, to March 27, 2009. Patients aged 45 to 90 years with probable AD, Mini-Mental State Examination score 0 to 20 (moderate to severe impairment), and who were receiving donepezil 10 mg once daily for ≥12 weeks before the start of the study were eligible. Patients (n = 1467) were randomly assigned to receive high-dose donepezil (23 mg once daily) or standard-dose donepezil (10 mg once daily) for 24 weeks. Coprimary effectiveness measures were changes in cognition and global functioning, as assessed using least squares mean changes from baseline (LSM [SE] Δ) scores (last observation carried forward) on the Severe Impairment Battery (SIB; cognition) and the Clinician’s Interview-Based Impression of Change Plus Caregiver Input scale (CIBIC+; global function rating) overall change score (mean [SD]) at week 24. Treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were assessed using spontaneous patient/caregiver reporting and open-ended questioning; clinical laboratory testing (hematology, biochemistry, and urinalysis panels analyzed by a central laboratory); 12-lead ECG; and physical and neurologic examinations, including vital sign measurements. Results The effectiveness analyses included 1371 patients (mean age, 73.8 years; 62.8% female; 73.5% white; weight range, 34.0–138.7 kg). A total of 296 of 981 patients (30.2%) withdrew from the donepezil 23-mg

  6. Vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1987-02-01

    A vasovasostomy may be performed on an outpatient basis with local anesthesia, but also may be performed on an outpatient basis with epidural or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia is preferred by most of my patients, the majority of whom choose this technique. With proper preoperative and intraoperative sedation, patients sleep lightly through most of the procedure. Because of the length of time often required for bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy, epidural or general anesthesia and overnight hospitalization are usually necessary. Factors influencing the preoperative choice for vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy in patients undergoing vasectomy reversal are considered. The preoperative planned choice of vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy for patients having vasectomy reversal described herein does not have the support of all urologists who regularly perform these procedures. My present approach has evolved as the data reported in Tables 1 and 2 have become available, but it may change as new information is evaluated. However, it offers a logical method for planning choices of anesthesia and inpatient or outpatient status for patients undergoing vasectomy reversal procedures. PMID:3811050

  7. Vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1987-02-01

    A vasovasostomy may be performed on an outpatient basis with local anesthesia, but also may be performed on an outpatient basis with epidural or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia is preferred by most of my patients, the majority of whom choose this technique. With proper preoperative and intraoperative sedation, patients sleep lightly through most of the procedure. Because of the length of time often required for bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy, epidural or general anesthesia and overnight hospitalization are usually necessary. Factors influencing the preoperative choice for vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy in patients undergoing vasectomy reversal are considered. The preoperative planned choice of vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy for patients having vasectomy reversal described herein does not have the support of all urologists who regularly perform these procedures. My present approach has evolved as the data reported in Tables 1 and 2 have become available, but it may change as new information is evaluated. However, it offers a logical method for planning choices of anesthesia and inpatient or outpatient status for patients undergoing vasectomy reversal procedures.

  8. Use of a novel radiometric method to assess the inhibitory effect of donepezil on acetylcholinesterase activity in minimally diluted tissue samples

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Okamura, Toshimitsu; Arai, Takuya; Obata, Takayuki; Fukushi, Kiyoshi; Irie, Toshiaki; Shiraishi, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Cholinesterase inhibitors have been widely used for the treatment of patients with dementia. Monitoring of the cholinesterase activity in the blood is used as an indicator of the effect of the cholinesterase inhibitors in the brain. The selective measurement of cholinesterase with low tissue dilution is preferred for accurate monitoring; however, the methods have not been established. Here, we investigated the effect of tissue dilution on the action of cholinesterase inhibitors using a novel radiometric method with selective substrates, N-[14C]methylpiperidin-4-yl acetate ([14C]MP4A) and (R)-N-[14C]methylpiperidin-3-yl butyrate ([14C]MP3B_R), for AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) respectively. Experimental approach: We investigated the kinetics of hydrolysis of [14C]-MP4A and [14C]-MP3B_R by cholinesterases, and evaluated the selectivity of [14C]MP4A and [14C]MP3B_R for human AChE and BChE, respectively, compared with traditional substrates. Then, IC50 values of cholinesterase inhibitors in minimally diluted and highly diluted tissues were measured with [14C]MP4A and [14C]MP3B_R. Key results: AChE and BChE activities were selectively measured as the first-order hydrolysis rates of [14C]-MP4A and [14C]MP3B_R respectively. The AChE selectivity of [14C]MP4A was an order of magnitude higher than traditional substrates used for the AChE assay. The IC50 values of specific AChE and BChE inhibitors, donepezil and ethopropazine, in 1.2-fold diluted human whole blood were much higher than those in 120-fold diluted blood. In addition, the IC50 values of donepezil in monkey brain were dramatically decreased as the tissue was diluted. Conclusions and implications: This method would effectively monitor the activity of cholinesterase inhibitors used for therapeutics, pesticides and chemical warfare agents. PMID:20401964

  9. Electroanalytical determination of donepezil HCl in tablets and human serum by differential pulse and osteryoung square wave voltammetry at a glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Golcu, A; Ozkan, S A

    2006-09-01

    Donepezil hydrochloride (DNP) is used for the treatment of mild to moderate dementia of the Alzheimer's type. The voltammetric behavior of DNP was studied at a glassy carbon electrode using cyclic, linear sweep, differential pulse (DPV) and square-wave (OSWV) voltammetric techniques. DNP exhibited irreversible anodic waves within the pH range 1.80 and 9.00 in different supporting electrolytes. The peak was characterized as being irreversible and diffusion-controlled. The possible mechanism of the oxidation process is discussed. The current-concentration plot was rectilinear over the range from 1 x 10(-6) to 1 x 10(-4) M in Britton-Robinson buffer at pH 7.0 with a correlation coefficient between 0.997 and 0.999 in supporting electrolyte and human serum samples using the DPV and SWV techniques. The repeatability and reproducibility of the methods for both media (supporting electrolyte and serum sample) were determined. Precision and accuracy of the developed methods were demonstrated by recovery studies. The standard addition method was used for the recovery studies. No electroactive interferences were found in biological fluids from endogenous substances or additives present in tablets. The methods developed were successfully applied to the determination of DNP in tablets and in spiked human serum.

  10. Inhibitory effect of ebselen on cerebral acetylcholinesterase activity in vitro: kinetics and reversibility of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Martini, Franciele; Bruning, César Augusto; Soares, Suelen Mendonca; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne; Zeni, Gilson

    2015-01-01

    Ebselen is a synthetic organoselenium compound that has been considered a potential pharmacological agent with low toxicity, showing antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. It is bioavailable, blood-brain barrier permeant and safe based on cellular toxicity and Phase I-III clinical trials. There is evidence that ebselen inhibits acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, an enzyme that plays a key role in the cholinergic system by hydrolyzing acetylcholine (ACh), in vitro and ex vivo. This system has a well-known relationship with cognitive process, and AChE inhibitors, such as donepezil and galantamine, have been used to treat cognitive deficits, mainly in the Alzheimer's Disease (AD). However, these drugs have poor bioavailability and a number of side effects, including gastrointestinal upsets and hepatotoxicity. In this way, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of ebselen on cerebral AChE activity in vitro and to determine the kinetic profile and the reversibility of inhibition by dialysis. Ebselen inhibited the cerebral AChE activity with an IC50 of 29 µM, similar to IC50 found with pure AChE from electric eel, demonstrating a mixed and reversible inhibition of AChE, since it increased Km and decreased Vmax. The AChE activity was recovered within 60 min of dialysis. Therefore, the use of ebselen as a therapeutic agent for treatment of AD should be considered, although memory behavior tasks are needed to support such hypothesis. PMID:25312723

  11. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  12. Impacts of thyroxine combined with donepezil on hippocampal ultrastructures and expressions of synaptotagmin-1 and SNAP-25 in adult rats with hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hao; Zha, Xiaoxue; Cai, Yaojun; Wang, Fen; Wu, Zhangbi; Wu, Bo; Jia, Xuemei; Zhu, Defa

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to observe the impacts of thyroxine (T4) combined with donepezil (DON) on hippocampal ultrastructures and expressions of synaptotagmin-1 and SNAP-25 in adult rats with hypothyroidism. All rats were randomly divided into five groups: the normal control group (CON), the hypothyroidism group (Hypo), the T4 treatment group (T4), the DON treatment group (DON) and the T4+DON combined treatment group (T4+DON). Technique of Electron Microscope (TEM) was used to observe the hippocampal ultrastructures of each group, Western blot and real-time RT-PCR were performed to analyze the protein and mRNA expressions of syt-1 and SNAP-25 in the hippocampus of each group. TEM revealed that the Hypo group exhibited the significant vacuolar degeneration of mitochondria in the hippocampal neurons, the free ribosomes were sparse, the synaptic structures were damaged, and the number of synaptic vesicles was reduced, the above injuries in the T4 or DON group were improved, and the performance of the T4+DON group was the most close to the CON group. From the protein and mRNA levels, the dorsal hippocampal syt-1 expression of the Hypo group was significantly reduced, while SNAP-25 was significantly increased, the expressions were partially recovered after the T4 treatment, and the T4+DON combined treatment made the expression return to normal. The adult hypothyroid rats exhibited pathological damages in the hippocampal ultrastructures, the expression of syt-1 was downregulated, while that of SNAP-25 was upregulated, the T4+DON combined therapy could repair the above injuries, and the roles were better than the single drug treatment. PMID:26770386

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of multi-target-directed ligands for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease based on the fusion of donepezil and melatonin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Wang, Zhi-Min; Li, Xue-Mei; Li, Fan; Wu, Jia-Jia; Kong, Ling-Yi; Wang, Xiao-Bing

    2016-09-15

    A novel series of compounds obtained by fusing the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor donepezil and the antioxidant melatonin were designed as multi-target-directed ligands for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In vitro assay indicated that most of the target compounds exhibited a significant ability to inhibit acetylcholinesterase (eeAChE and hAChE), butyrylcholinesterase (eqBuChE and hBuChE), and β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregation, and to act as potential antioxidants and biometal chelators. Especially, 4u displayed a good inhibition of AChE (IC50 value of 193nM for eeAChE and 273nM for hAChE), strong inhibition of BuChE (IC50 value of 73nM for eqBuChE and 56nM for hBuChE), moderate inhibition of Aβ aggregation (56.3% at 20μM) and good antioxidant activity (3.28trolox equivalent by ORAC assay). Molecular modeling studies in combination with kinetic analysis revealed that 4u was a mixed-type inhibitor, binding simultaneously to catalytic anionic site (CAS) and the peripheral anionic site (PAS) of AChE. In addition, 4u could chelate metal ions, reduce PC12 cells death induced by oxidative stress and penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Taken together, these results strongly indicated the hybridization approach is an efficient strategy to identify novel scaffolds with desired bioactivities, and further optimization of 4u may be helpful to develop more potent lead compound for AD treatment. PMID:27460699

  14. Impacts of thyroxine combined with donepezil on hippocampal ultrastructures and expressions of synaptotagmin-1 and SNAP-25 in adult rats with hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Zha, Xiaoxue; Cai, Yaojun; Wang, Fen; Wu, Zhangbi; Wu, Bo; Jia, Xuemei; Zhu, Defa

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to observe the impacts of thyroxine (T4) combined with donepezil (DON) on hippocampal ultrastructures and expressions of synaptotagmin-1 and SNAP-25 in adult rats with hypothyroidism. All rats were randomly divided into five groups: the normal control group (CON), the hypothyroidism group (Hypo), the T4 treatment group (T4), the DON treatment group (DON) and the T4+DON combined treatment group (T4+DON). Technique of Electron Microscope (TEM) was used to observe the hippocampal ultrastructures of each group, Western blot and real-time RT-PCR were performed to analyze the protein and mRNA expressions of syt-1 and SNAP-25 in the hippocampus of each group. TEM revealed that the Hypo group exhibited the significant vacuolar degeneration of mitochondria in the hippocampal neurons, the free ribosomes were sparse, the synaptic structures were damaged, and the number of synaptic vesicles was reduced, the above injuries in the T4 or DON group were improved, and the performance of the T4+DON group was the most close to the CON group. From the protein and mRNA levels, the dorsal hippocampal syt-1 expression of the Hypo group was significantly reduced, while SNAP-25 was significantly increased, the expressions were partially recovered after the T4 treatment, and the T4+DON combined treatment made the expression return to normal. The adult hypothyroid rats exhibited pathological damages in the hippocampal ultrastructures, the expression of syt-1 was downregulated, while that of SNAP-25 was upregulated, the T4+DON combined therapy could repair the above injuries, and the roles were better than the single drug treatment.

  15. Effects of thyroxine and donepezil on hippocampal acetylcholine content, acetylcholinesterase activity, synaptotagmin-1 and SNAP-25 expression in hypothyroid adult rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fen; Zeng, Xianzhong; Zhu, Yangbo; Ning, Dan; Liu, Junxia; Liu, Chunlei; Jia, Xuemei; Zhu, Defa

    2015-02-01

    A growing number of studies have revealed that neurocognitive impairment, induced by adult-onset hypothyroidism, may not be fully restored by traditional hormone substitution therapies, including thyroxine (T4). The present study has investigated the effect of T4 and donepezil (DON; an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor) treatment on the hypothyroidism-induced alterations of acetylcholine (ACh) content and AChE activity. Furthermore, we examined synaptotagmin-1 (syt-1) and SNAP-25 expression in the hippocampus of adult rats. Adding 0.05% propylthiouracil to their drinking water for five weeks induced hypothyroidism in the rat models. From the fourth week, the rats were treated with T4, DON or a combination of both. Concentration of ACh and the activity of AChE was determined colorimetrically. The results demonstrated that hypothyroidism induced a significant decrease of Ach content and AChE activity (by 17 and 34%, respectively), which were restored to control values by T4 administration. DON treatment also restored Ach to the normal level. Protein levels of syt-1 and SNAP-25 were determined by immunohistochemistry. The results demonstrated that syt-1 was expressed at significantly lower levels in hypothyroid rats, while SNAP-25 levels were notably higher compared with the controls. Two-week treatment with T4 alone failed to normalize the expression levels of these two proteins, while co-administration of T4 and DON was able to induce this effect. These data suggested that the thyroid hormone, T4, may have a direct effect on the metabolism of hippocampal ACh in adult rats, and that the DON treatment may facilitate the recovery of synaptic protein impairments induced by hypothyroidism.

  16. Quantum Operation Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-03-25

    The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation: A linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes toward equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

  17. Vasectomy reversal in humans.

    PubMed

    Bernie, Aaron M; Osterberg, E Charles; Stahl, Peter J; Ramasamy, Ranjith; Goldstein, Marc

    2012-10-01

    Vasectomy is the most common urological procedure in the United States with 18% of men having a vasectomy before age 45. A significant proportion of vasectomized men ultimately request vasectomy reversal, usually due to divorce and/or remarriage. Vasectomy reversal is a commonly practiced but technically demanding microsurgical procedure that restores patency of the male excurrent ductal system in 80-99.5% of cases and enables unassisted pregnancy in 40-80% of couples. The discrepancy between the anastomotic patency rates and clinical pregnancy rates following vasectomy reversal suggests that some of the biological consequences of vasectomy may not be entirely reversible in all men. Herein we review what is known about the biological sequelae of vasectomy and vasectomy reversal in humans, and provide a succinct overview of the evaluation and surgical management of men desiring vasectomy reversal.

  18. The neurotrophic compound J147 reverses cognitive impairment in aged Alzheimer's disease mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Despite years of research, there are no disease-modifying drugs for Alzheimer's disease (AD), a fatal, age-related neurodegenerative disorder. Screening for potential therapeutics in rodent models of AD has generally relied on testing compounds before pathology is present, thereby modeling disease prevention rather than disease modification. Furthermore, this approach to screening does not reflect the clinical presentation of AD patients which could explain the failure to translate compounds identified as beneficial in animal models to disease modifying compounds in clinical trials. Clearly a better approach to pre-clinical drug screening for AD is required. Methods To more accurately reflect the clinical setting, we used an alternative screening strategy involving the treatment of AD mice at a stage in the disease when pathology is already advanced. Aged (20-month-old) transgenic AD mice (APP/swePS1ΔE9) were fed an exceptionally potent, orally active, memory enhancing and neurotrophic molecule called J147. Cognitive behavioral assays, histology, ELISA and Western blotting were used to assay the effect of J147 on memory, amyloid metabolism and neuroprotective pathways. J147 was also investigated in a scopolamine-induced model of memory impairment in C57Bl/6J mice and compared to donepezil. Details on the pharmacology and safety of J147 are also included. Results Data presented here demonstrate that J147 has the ability to rescue cognitive deficits when administered at a late stage in the disease. The ability of J147 to improve memory in aged AD mice is correlated with its induction of the neurotrophic factors NGF (nerve growth factor) and BDNF (brain derived neurotrophic factor) as well as several BDNF-responsive proteins which are important for learning and memory. The comparison between J147 and donepezil in the scopolamine model showed that while both compounds were comparable at rescuing short term memory, J147 was superior at rescuing spatial

  19. Effects of thyroxin and donepezil on hippocampal acetylcholine content and syntaxin-1 and munc-18 expression in adult rats with hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    WANG, NAN; CAI, YAOJUN; WANG, FEN; ZENG, XIANZHONG; JIA, XUEMEI; TAO, FANGBIAO; ZHU, DEFA

    2014-01-01

    Adult-onset hypothyroidism induces various impairments in hippocampus-dependent cognitive function, in which numerous synaptic proteins and neurotransmitters are involved. Donepezil (DON), an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, has been shown to be efficient in improving cognitive function. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of adult-onset hypothyroidism on the expression levels of the synaptic proteins syntaxin-1 and munc-18, as well as the content of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) in the hippocampus. In addition, the study explored the effects of thyroxin (T4) and DON treatment on the altered parameters. The study involved 55 Sprague-Dawley rats that were randomly divided into five groups: Control, hypothyroid (0.05% 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil; added to the drinking water), hypothyroid treated with T4 (6 μg/100 g body weight once daily; intraperitoneal injection), hypothyroid treated with DON (0.005%; added to the drinking water) and hypothyroid treated with a combination of the two drugs (6 μg/100 g T4 and 0.005% DON). The concentration of ACh was determined in the homogenized hippocampus of each animal by alkaline hydroxylamine colorimetry. The protein levels of syntaxin-1 and munc-18 were determined by immunohistochemistry. The results showed that the content of ACh in the hippocampi of the hypothyroid rats was significantly decreased compared with that in the controls and that T4 monotherapy and DON administration restored the ACh content to normal values. In the hippocampi of the hypothyroid group, munc-18 was expressed at significantly lower levels, while the expression levels of syntaxin-1 were increased compared with the levels in the control group. Treatment with T4 alone restored the expression of syntaxin-1 but failed to normalize munc-18 expression levels. The co-administration of T4 and DON returned the munc-18 levels to normal values. These observations indicate that adult-onset hypothyroidism induces alterations in the

  20. Distribution of Intravenously Administered Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitor and Acetylcholinesterase Activity in the Adrenal Gland: 11C-Donepezil PET Study in the Normal Rat

    PubMed Central

    Watabe, Tadashi; Naka, Sadahiro; Ikeda, Hayato; Horitsugi, Genki; Kanai, Yasukazu; Isohashi, Kayako; Ishibashi, Mana; Kato, Hiroki; Shimosegawa, Eku; Watabe, Hiroshi; Hatazawa, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors have been used for patients with Alzheimer's disease. However, its pharmacokinetics in non-target organs other than the brain has not been clarified yet. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the whole-body distribution of intravenously administered 11C-Donepezil (DNP) and the AChE activity in the normal rat, with special focus on the adrenal glands. Methods The distribution of 11C-DNP was investigated by PET/CT in 6 normal male Wistar rats (8 weeks old, body weight  = 220±8.9 g). A 30-min dynamic scan was started simultaneously with an intravenous bolus injection of 11C-DNP (45.0±10.7 MBq). The whole-body distribution of the 11C-DNP PET was evaluated based on the Vt (total distribution volume) by Logan-plot analysis. A fluorometric assay was performed to quantify the AChE activity in homogenized tissue solutions of the major organs. Results The PET analysis using Vt showed that the adrenal glands had the 2nd highest level of 11C-DNP in the body (following the liver) (13.33±1.08 and 19.43±1.29 ml/cm3, respectively), indicating that the distribution of 11C-DNP was the highest in the adrenal glands, except for that in the excretory organs. The AChE activity was the third highest in the adrenal glands (following the small intestine and the stomach) (24.9±1.6, 83.1±3.0, and 38.5±8.1 mU/mg, respectively), indicating high activity of AChE in the adrenal glands. Conclusions We demonstrated the whole-body distribution of 11C-DNP by PET and the AChE activity in the major organs by fluorometric assay in the normal rat. High accumulation of 11C-DNP was observed in the adrenal glands, which suggested the risk of enhanced cholinergic synaptic transmission by the use of AChE inhibitors. PMID:25225806

  1. Justice and Reverse Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Alan H.

    Defining reverse discrimination as hiring or admissions decisions based on normally irrelevant criteria, this book develops principles of rights, compensation, and equal opportunity applicable to the reverse discrimination issue. The introduction defines the issue and discusses deductive and inductive methodology as applied to reverse…

  2. Quantum reverse hypercontractivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cubitt, Toby; Kastoryano, Michael; Montanaro, Ashley; Temme, Kristan

    2015-10-15

    We develop reverse versions of hypercontractive inequalities for quantum channels. By generalizing classical techniques, we prove a reverse hypercontractive inequality for tensor products of qubit depolarizing channels. We apply this to obtain a rapid mixing result for depolarizing noise applied to large subspaces and to prove bounds on a quantum generalization of non-interactive correlation distillation.

  3. Reverse Discrimination: Recent Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinhilber, August W.

    This paper discusses reverse discrimination cases with particular emphasis on Bakke v. Regents of University of California and those cases which preceded it. A brief history is given of court cases used by opponents and proponents in the discussion of reverse discrimination. Legal theory and a discussion of court cases that preceded Bakke follow.…

  4. Multipotent cholinesterase/monoamine oxidase inhibitors for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease: design, synthesis, biochemical evaluation, ADMET, molecular modeling, and QSAR analysis of novel donepezil-pyridyl hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Aguilera, Oscar M; Esteban, Gerard; Chioua, Mourad; Nikolic, Katarina; Agbaba, Danica; Moraleda, Ignacio; Iriepa, Isabel; Soriano, Elena; Samadi, Abdelouahid; Unzeta, Mercedes; Marco-Contelles, José

    2014-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and biochemical evaluation of donepezil-pyridyl hybrids (DPHs) as multipotent cholinesterase (ChE) and monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors for the potential treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is reported. The 3D-quantitative structure-activity relationship study was used to define 3D-pharmacophores for inhibition of MAO A/B, acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) enzymes and to design DPHs as novel multi-target drug candidates with potential impact in the therapy of AD. DPH14 (Electrophorus electricus AChE [EeAChE]: half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50] =1.1±0.3 nM; equine butyrylcholinesterase [eqBuChE]: IC50 =600±80 nM) was 318-fold more potent for the inhibition of AChE, and 1.3-fold less potent for the inhibition of BuChE than the reference compound ASS234. DPH14 is a potent human recombinant BuChE (hBuChE) inhibitor, in the same range as DPH12 or DPH16, but 13.1-fold less potent than DPH15 for the inhibition of human recombinant AChE (hAChE). Compared with donepezil, DPH14 is almost equipotent for the inhibition of hAChE, and 8.8-fold more potent for hBuChE. Concerning human monoamine oxidase (hMAO) A inhibition, only DPH9 and 5 proved active, compound DPH9 being the most potent (IC50 [MAO A] =5,700±2,100 nM). For hMAO B, only DPHs 13 and 14 were moderate inhibitors, and compound DPH14 was the most potent (IC50 [MAO B] =3,950±940 nM). Molecular modeling of inhibitor DPH14 within EeAChE showed a binding mode with an extended conformation, interacting simultaneously with both catalytic and peripheral sites of EeAChE thanks to a linker of appropriate length. Absortion, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity analysis showed that structures lacking phenyl-substituent show better druglikeness profiles; in particular, DPHs13–15 showed the most suitable absortion, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity properties. Novel donepezil-pyridyl hybrid DPH14 is a potent, moderately selective h

  5. Reversing the arms race

    SciTech Connect

    von Hippel, F. ); Sagdeev, R.Z. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper contains proceedings of Reversing The Arms Race. Topics covered include: Verifying Reductions of Nuclear Warheads; Verifying Limits on Nuclear-Armed Cruise Missiles; and The Technical Basis for Warhead Detection.

  6. Reversibility of antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although theoretically attractive, the reversibility of resistance has proven difficult in practice, even though antibiotic resistance mechanisms induce a fitness cost to the bacterium. Associated resistance to other antibiotics and compensatory mutations seem to ameliorate the effect of antibiotic interventions in the community. In this paper the current understanding of the concepts of reversibility of antibiotic resistance and the interventions performed in hospitals and in the community are reviewed. PMID:24836051

  7. Adaptive Pairing Reversible Watermarking.

    PubMed

    Dragoi, Ioan-Catalin; Coltuc, Dinu

    2016-05-01

    This letter revisits the pairwise reversible watermarking scheme of Ou et al., 2013. An adaptive pixel pairing that considers only pixels with similar prediction errors is introduced. This adaptive approach provides an increased number of pixel pairs where both pixels are embedded and decreases the number of shifted pixels. The adaptive pairwise reversible watermarking outperforms the state-of-the-art low embedding bit-rate schemes proposed so far.

  8. On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2011-07-12

    The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa.

  9. Histamine reverses a memory deficit induced in rats by early postnatal maternal deprivation.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Fernando; da Silveira, Clarice Kras Borges; da Silva, Weber Cláudio; Cammarota, Martín; Izquierdo, Iván

    2012-01-01

    Early partial maternal deprivation causes long-lasting neurochemical, behavioral and brain structural effects. In rats, it causes a deficit in memory consolidation visible in adult life. Some of these deficits can be reversed by donepezil and galantamine, which suggests that they may result from an impairment of brain cholinergic transmission. One such deficit, representative of all others, is an impairment of memory consolidation, clearly observable in a one-trial inhibitory avoidance task. Recent data suggest a role of brain histaminergic systems in the regulation of behavior, particularly inhibitory avoidance learning. Here we investigate whether histamine itself, its analog SKF-91844, or various receptor-selective histamine agonists and antagonists given into the CA1 region of the hippocampus immediately post-training can affect retention of one-trial inhibitory avoidance in rats submitted to early postnatal maternal deprivation. We found that histamine, SKF-91844 and the H2 receptor agonist, dimaprit enhance consolidation on their own and reverse the consolidation deficit induced by maternal deprivation. The enhancing effect of histamine was blocked by the H2 receptor antagonist, ranitidine, but not by the H1 receptor antagonist pyrilamine or by the H3 antagonist thioperamide given into CA1 at doses known to have other behavioral actions, without altering locomotor and exploratory activity or the anxiety state of the animals. The present results suggest that the memory deficit induced by early postnatal maternal deprivation in rats may in part be due to an impairment of histamine mediated mechanisms in the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus.

  10. Reversible digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, Keith T.

    1999-04-01

    A method has been developed to hide one image inside another with little loss in image quality. If the second image is a logo or watermark, then this method may be used to protect the ownership rights of the first image and to guarantee the authenticity of the image. The two images to be combined may be either black & white or color continuous tone images. A reversible image is created by incorporating the first image in the upper 4 bits and the second image in the lower 4 bits. When viewed normally, the reversible image appears to be the first image. To view the hidden image, the bits of the combined image are reversed, exchanging all of the lower and higher order bits. When viewed in the reversed mode, the image appears to be the second or hidden image. To maintain a high level of image quality for both images, two simultaneous error diffusion calculations are run to ensure that both views of the reversible image have the same visual appearance as the originals. Any alteration of one of the images locally destroys the other image at the site of the alterations. This provides a method to detect alterations of the original image.

  11. Reversible collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.

    2013-10-15

    Reversible magnetic reconnection is demonstrated for the first time by means of gyrokinetic numerical simulations of a collisionless magnetized plasma. Growth of a current-driven instability in a sheared magnetic field is accompanied by magnetic reconnection due to electron inertia effects. Following the instability growth, the collisionless reconnection is accelerated with development of a cross-shaped structure of current density, and then all field lines are reconnected. The fully reconnected state is followed by the secondary reconnection resulting in a weakly turbulent state. A time-reversed simulation starting from the turbulent state manifests that the collisionless reconnection process proceeds inversely leading to the initial state. During the reversed reconnection, the kinetic energy is reconverted into the original magnetic field energy. In order to understand the stability of reversed process, an external perturbation is added to the fully reconnected state, and it is found that the accelerated reconnection is reversible when the deviation of the E × B streamlines due to the perturbation is comparable with or smaller than a current layer width.

  12. Sequential Polarity-Reversing Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed circuit reverses polarity of electric power supplied to bidirectional dc motor, reversible electro-mechanical actuator, or other device operating in direction depending on polarity. Circuit reverses polarity each time power turned on, without need for additional polarity-reversing or direction signals and circuitry to process them.

  13. Reversible Chemochromic Hydrogen Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), affiliated with the University of Central Florida, has invented a reversible pigment that changes from light beige to blue when exposed to hydrogen and back to light beige when exposed to atmospheric oxygen. In laboratory and environmental studies, the FSEC pigment in its tape form failed to change color adequately when exposed to hydrogen after one day of exposure at Kennedy Space Center's Beach Corrosion Test Facility. The reversible hydrogen-detecting tape also lost its ability to change color after being placed in an environmental chamber at 45 C for one day. The first attempts at extruding the reversible pigment into various polymers were unsuccessful because of the pigment's poor thermal stability. The goal of this project was to formulate a pigment with improved thermal and environmental stability for extrusion into a variety of appropriate polymer matrices. The formulation of the reversible hydrogen-detecting pigment was modified by removing one reagent and chemically modifying the hydrogen sensitive ingredient. This was intended to improve the hydrophobicity of the pigment and alter the thermal degradation mechanism.

  14. Reversing Discrimination: A Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pati, Gopal; Reilly, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    Examines the debate over affirmative action and reverse discrimination, and discusses how and why the present dilemma has developed. Suggests that organizations can best address the problem through an honest, in-depth analysis of their organizational structure and management practices. (JG)

  15. Reverse Coherent Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Patrón, Raúl; Pirandola, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2009-04-01

    We define a family of entanglement distribution protocols assisted by classical feedback communication that gives an operational interpretation to reverse coherent information, i.e., the symmetric counterpart of the well-known coherent information. This protocol family leads to the definition of a new entanglement distribution capacity that exceeds the unassisted entanglement distribution capacity for some interesting channels.

  16. Reverse Coherent Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Patrón, Raúl; Pirandola, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2009-05-01

    In this Letter we define a family of entanglement distribution protocols assisted by feedback classical communication that gives an operational interpretation to reverse coherent information, i.e., the symmetric counterpart of the well-known coherent information. This leads to the definition of a new entanglement distribution capacity that exceeds the unassisted capacity for some interesting channels.

  17. Time reversal communication system

    DOEpatents

    Candy, James V.; Meyer, Alan W.

    2008-12-02

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  18. Reversing Underachievement through Enrichment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renzulli, Joseph S.; Baum, Susan M.; Hebert, Thomas; McCluskey, Ken W.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses problems of underachievement, especially among potentially high ability students, and the difficulties inherent in reversing this process. Presents new perspective and strategies that promote success. Describes Type III enrichment experiences as a means to unleash students' potential. Speculates as to what causes turnaround within an…

  19. Reverse coherent information.

    PubMed

    García-Patrón, Raúl; Pirandola, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth; Shapiro, Jeffrey H

    2009-05-29

    In this Letter we define a family of entanglement distribution protocols assisted by feedback classical communication that gives an operational interpretation to reverse coherent information, i.e., the symmetric counterpart of the well-known coherent information. This leads to the definition of a new entanglement distribution capacity that exceeds the unassisted capacity for some interesting channels.

  20. Justice and Reverse Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strike, Kenneth A.

    1976-01-01

    Although this article does not necessarily recommend policies of reverse discrimination, arguments indicating that such policies are not contradictory to accepted concepts of justice are presented. The necessity of dispersing any consequent injury to society as a whole rather than to individuals is stressed. (RW)

  1. Gridded electron reversal ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A gridded electron reversal ionizer forms a three dimensional cloud of zero or near-zero energy electrons in a cavity within a filament structure surrounding a central electrode having holes through which the sample gas, at reduced pressure, enters an elongated reversal volume. The resultant negative ion stream is applied to a mass analyzer. The reduced electron and ion space-charge limitations of this configuration enhances detection sensitivity for material to be detected by electron attachment, such as narcotic and explosive vapors. Positive ions may be generated by generating electrons having a higher energy, sufficient to ionize the target gas and pulsing the grid negative to stop the electron flow and pulsing the extraction aperture positive to draw out the positive ions.

  2. Reversed field pinch diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    The Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) is a toroidal, axisymmetric magnetic confinement configuration characterized by a magnetic field configuration in which the toroidal magnetic field is of similar strength to the poloidal field, and is reversed at the edge compared to the center. The RFP routinely operates at high beta, and is a strong candidate for a compact fusion device. Relevant attributes of the configuration will be presented, together with an overview of present and planned experiments and their diagnostics. RFP diagnostics are in many ways similar to those of other magnetic confinement devices (such as tokamaks); these lectures will point out pertinent differences, and will present some diagnostics which provide special insights into unique attributes of the RFP.

  3. Reverse genetics of mononegavirales.

    PubMed

    Conzelmann, K K

    2004-01-01

    "Reverse genetics" or de novo synthesis of nonsegmented negative-sense RNA viruses (Mononegavirales) from cloned cDNA has become a reliable technique to study this group of medically important viruses. Since the first generation of a negative-sense RNA virus entirely from cDNA in 1994, reverse genetics systems have been established for members of most genera of the Rhabdo-, Paramyxo-, and Filoviridae families. These systems are based on intracellular transcription of viral full-length RNAs and simultaneous expression of viral proteins required to form the typical viral ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP). These systems are powerful tools to study all aspects of the virus life cycle as well as the roles of virus proteins in virus-host interplay and pathogenicity. In addition, recombinant viruses can be designed to have specific properties that make them attractive as biotechnological tools and live vaccines. PMID:15298166

  4. Reversible watermarking for images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leest, Arno J.; van der Veen, Michiel; Bruekers, Fons

    2004-06-01

    Reversible watermarking is a technique for embedding data in a digital host signal in such a manner that the original host signal can be restored in a bit-exact manner in the restoration process. In this paper, we present a general framework for reversible watermarking in multi-media signals. A mapping function, which is in general neither injective nor surjective, is used to map the input signal to a perceptually equivalent output signal. The resulting unused sample values of the output signal are used to encode additional (watermark) information and restoration data. At the 2003 SPIE conference, examples of this technique applied to digital audio were presented. In this paper we concentrate on color and gray-scale images. A particular challenge in this context is not only the optimization of rate-distortion, but also the measure of perceptual quality (i.e. the distortion). In literature distortion is often expressed in terms of PSNR, making comparison among different techniques relatively straightforward. We show that our general framework for reversible watermarking applies to digital images and that results can be presented in terms of PSNR rate-distortions. However, the framework allows for more subtle signal manipulations that are not easily expressed in terms of PSNR distortion. These changes involve manipulations of contrast and/or saturation.

  5. Reversible DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    In this review we summarize and discuss the different methods we can use to achieve reversible DNA compaction in vitro. Reversible DNA compaction is a natural process that occurs in living cells and viruses. As a result these process long sequences of DNA can be concentrated in a small volume (compacted) to be decompacted only when the information carried by the DNA is needed. In the current work we review the main artificial compacting agents looking at their suitability for decompaction. The different approaches used for decompaction are strongly influenced by the nature of the compacting agent that determines the mechanism of compaction. We focus our discussion on two main artificial compacting agents: multivalent cations and cationic surfactants that are the best known compacting agents. The reversibility of the process can be achieved by adding chemicals like divalent cations, alcohols, anionic surfactants, cyclodextrins or by changing the chemical nature of the compacting agents via pH modifications, light induced conformation changes or by redox-reactions. We stress the relevance of electrostatic interactions and self-assembly as a main approach in order to tune up the DNA conformation in order to create an on-off switch allowing a transition between coil and compact states. The recent advances to control DNA conformation in vitro, by means of molecular self-assembly, result in a better understanding of the fundamental aspects involved in the DNA behavior in vivo and serve of invaluable inspiration for the development of potential biomedical applications. PMID:24444152

  6. Affirmative Action, or Reverse Discrimination?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dansby, Ike

    1996-01-01

    Determines the impact of affirmative action programs in response to charges that they are policies of reverse discrimination. Reviewing affirmative action programs submitted by Michigan State departments, researchers determined no reverse discrimination was apparent based on low numbers of reverse discrimination complaints filed by whites. (GR)

  7. Reversal bending fatigue testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Tan, Ting

    2014-10-21

    Embodiments for apparatuses for testing reversal bending fatigue in an elongated beam are disclosed. Embodiments are configured to be coupled to first and second end portions of the beam and to apply a bending moment to the beam and create a pure bending condition in an intermediate portion of the beam. Embodiments are further configured to cyclically alternate the direction of the bending moment applied to the beam such that the intermediate portion of the beam cyclically bends in opposite directions in a pure bending condition.

  8. Biochemical Reversal of Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, John T. A.

    2006-03-01

    We cite our progress on biochemical reversal of aging. However, it may be circa 2 years before we have necessary substances at low cost. Meanwhile, without them, a number of measures can be adopted providing marked improvement for the problems of aging in modern societies. For example, enzymes are needed to excrete toxins that accelerate aging; Hg is the ultimate toxin that disables all enzymes (including those needed to excrete Hg itself). Low Hg level in the urine, due to loss of excretory ability, causes the diagnosis of Hg toxicity to almost always be missed. Hg sources must be removed from the body! Another example is excess sugar; hyperglycemia decreases intracellular ascorbic acid (AA) by competitively inhibiting the insulin- mediated active transport of AA into cells. Thus, immunity is impaired by low leucocyte AA. AA is needed for new proteins in aging tissues. Humans must supplement AA; their need same as in AA-synthesizing mammals.

  9. Reverse slapper detonator

    SciTech Connect

    Weingart, Richard C.

    1990-01-01

    A reverse slapper detonator (70), and methodology related thereto, are provided. The detonator (70) is adapted to be driven by a pulse of electric power from an external source (80). A conductor (20) is disposed along the top (14), side (18), and bottom (16) surfaces of a sheetlike insulator (12). Part of the conductor (20) comprises a bridge (28), and an aperture (30) is positioned within the conductor (20), with the bridge (28) and the aperture (30) located on opposite sides of the insulator (12). A barrel (40) and related explosive charge (50) are positioned adjacent to and in alignment with the aperture (30), and the bridge (28) is buttressed with a backing layer (60). When the electric power pulse vaporizes the bridge (28), a portion of the insulator (12) is propelled through the aperture (30) and barrel (40), and against the explosive charge (50), thereby detonating it.

  10. Multiple stimulus reversible hydrogels

    DOEpatents

    Gutowska, Anna; Krzyminski, Karol J.

    2006-04-25

    A polymeric solution capable of gelling upon exposure to a critical minimum value of a plurality of environmental stimuli is disclosed. The polymeric solution may be an aqueous solution utilized in vivo and capable of having the gelation reversed if at least one of the stimuli fall below, or outside the range of, the critical minimum value. The aqueous polymeric solution can be used either in industrial or pharmaceutical environments. In the medical environment, the aqueous polymeric solution is provided with either a chemical or radioisotopic therapeutic agent for delivery to a specific body part. The primary advantage of the process is that exposure to one environmental stimuli alone will not cause gelation, thereby enabling the therapeutic agent to be conducted through the body for relatively long distances without gelation occurring.

  11. Multiple stimulus reversible hydrogels

    DOEpatents

    Gutowska, Anna; Krzyminski, Karol J.

    2003-12-09

    A polymeric solution capable of gelling upon exposure to a critical minimum value of a plurality of environmental stimuli is disclosed. The polymeric solution may be an aqueous solution utilized in vivo and capable of having the gelation reversed if at least one of the stimuli fall below, or outside the range of, the critical minimum value. The aqueous polymeric solution can be used either in industrial or pharmaceutical environments. In the medical environment, the aqueous polymeric solution is provided with either a chemical or radioisotopic therapeutic agent for delivery to a specific body part. The primary advantage of the process is that exposure to one environmental stimuli alone will not cause gelation, thereby enabling the therapeutic agent to be conducted through the body for relatively long distances without gelation occurring.

  12. Reversed-polarity regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, F.

    1982-01-01

    It is found by a statistical study of 58 reversed-polarity regions (RPRs) covering the 11-year period 1969-1979 that RPRs (1) have a lifespan comparable to normal active regions, (2) do not show a tendency to rotate toward a more normal alignment, and (3) have stable configurations that do not suggest stress due to their anomalous magnetic alignment. As in normal regions, RPR magnetic complexity is found to be the primary factor in flare productivity. Weak-field RPRs produce no flares, and regions with complex spots produce more flares than regions with non-complex spots by a factor of five. The main difference between RPRs and normal regions lies in complex spot frequency, with less that 17% of normal active regions having such spots and fewer than 1.8% having long-lived complex ones, while 41% of RPRs have complex spots and 24% have long-lived complex spots.

  13. Properly apply reverse osmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kucera, J.

    1997-02-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) is a water purification technique used to reduce the loading of dissolved solids in solution. The popularity of RO for treating boiler feedwater is growing because of the rising cost of ion-exchange-based demineralization as well as safety concerns associated with handling acid and caustic. A properly designed and operated RO-based boiler-feedwater-treatment system can reduce the load to, and costs associated with, ion exchange demineralization. This article discusses RO feedwater quality recommendations, pretreatment techniques, and system monitoring necessary to achieve optimum RO system performance in the most cost-effective manner. Regardless of the application--whether it is the treatment of boiler feedwater, industrial wastewater, or process water--the approach to pretreatment and the other design and operating guidance offered here remains the same.

  14. Reverse Osmosis Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Duan, Xiaoli; Wendel, Emily M.

    2013-08-26

    This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). ¬The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.¬

  15. Reverse Osmosis Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-01

    This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.

  16. Reverse photoacoustic standoff spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Van Neste, Charles W.; Senesac, Lawrence R.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2011-04-12

    A system and method are disclosed for generating a reversed photoacoustic spectrum at a greater distance. A source may emit a beam to a target and a detector measures signals generated as a result of the beam being emitted on the target. By emitting a chopped/pulsed light beam to the target, it may be possible to determine the target's optical absorbance by monitoring the intensity of light collected at the detector at different wavelengths. As the wavelength of light is changed, the target may absorb or reject each optical frequency. Rejection may increase the intensity at the sensing element and absorption may decrease the intensity. Accordingly, an identifying spectrum of the target may be made with the intensity variation of the detector as a function of illuminating wavelength.

  17. Defining the Polar Field Reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upton, Lisa; Hathaway, David H.

    2013-01-01

    The polar fields on the Sun are directly related to solar cycle variability. Recently there has been interest in studying an important characteristic of the polar fields: the timing of the polar field reversals. However this characteristic has been poorly defined, mostly due to the limitations of early observations. In the past, the reversals have been calculated by averaging the flux above some latitude (i.e. 55deg or 75deg). Alternatively, the reversal could be defined by the time in which the previous polarity is completely canceled and replaced by the new polarity at 90de, precisely at the pole. We will use a surface flux transport model to illustrate the differences in the timing of the polar field reversal based on each of these definitions and propose standardization in the definition of the polar field reversal. The ability to predict the timing of the polar field reversal using a surface flux transport model will also be discussed.

  18. Geomagnetic Reversals during the Phanerozoic.

    PubMed

    McElhinny, M W

    1971-04-01

    An antalysis of worldwide paleomagnetic measurements suggests a periodicity of 350 x 10(6) years in the polarity of the geomagnetic field. During the Mesozoic it is predominantly normal, whereas during the Upper Paleozoic it is predominantly reversed. Although geomagnetic reversals occur at different rates throughout the Phanerozoic, there appeaars to be no clear correlation between biological evolutionary rates and reversal frequency. PMID:17735224

  19. Time-Reversal Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabéu, José; Martínez-Vidal, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    The violation of CP symmetry between matter and antimatter in the neutral K and B meson systems is well established, with a high degree of consistency between all available experimental measurements and with the Standard Model of particle physics. On the basis of the up-to-now-unbroken CPT symmetry, the violation of CP symmetry strongly suggests that the behavior of these particles under weak interactions must also be asymmetric under time reversal T. Many searches for T violation have been performed and proposed using different observables and experimental approaches. These include T-odd observables, such as triple products in weak decays, and genuine observables, such as permanent electric dipole moments of nondegenerate stationary states and the breaking of the reciprocity relation. We discuss the conceptual basis of the required exchange of initial and final states with unstable particles, using quantum entanglement and the decay as a filtering measurement, for the case of neutral B and K mesons. Using this method, the BaBar experiment at SLAC has clearly observed T violation in B mesons.

  20. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOEpatents

    Salzer, Leander J.; Foreman, Larry R.

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved.

  1. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOEpatents

    Salzer, L.J.; Foreman, L.R.

    1999-08-31

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved. 7 figs.

  2. Time Reversal Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, H; /SLAC

    2009-01-27

    This talk briefly reviews three types of time-asymmetry in physics, which I classify as universal, macroscopic and microscopic. Most of the talk is focused on the latter, namely the violation of T-reversal invariance in particle physics theories. In sum tests of microscopic T-invariance, or observations of its violation, are limited by the fact that, while we can measure many processes, only in very few cases can we construct a matched pair of process and inverse process and observe it with sufficient sensitivity to make a test. In both the cases discussed here we can achieve an observable T violation making use of flavor tagging, and in the second case also using the quantum properties of an antisymmetric coherent state of two B mesons to construct a CP-tag. Both these tagging properties depend only on very general properties of the flavor and/or CP quantum numbers and so provide model independent tests for T-invariance violations. The microscopic laws of physics are very close to T-symmetric. There are small effects that give CP- and T-violating processes in three-generation-probing weak decays. Where a T-violating observable can be constructed we see the relationships between T-violation and CP-violation expected in a CPT conserving theory. These microscopic effects are unrelated to the 'arrow of time' that is defined by increasing entropy, or in the time direction defined by the expansion of our Universe.

  3. Reverse hierarchical PIV processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohály, J.; Frigerio, F.; Hart, D. P.

    2002-07-01

    A novel hierarchical processing scheme is proposed to efficiently increase the spatial resolution and dynamic range of detecting particle image displacements in PIV images. The technique takes full advantage of the multi-resolution characteristic of the discrete correlation function by starting the processing at the smallest scale and, if necessary, gradually building correlation planes into larger interrogation areas based on the result of inter-level correlation correction and validation. It is shown that the algorithm can be implemented in both direct and FFT based correlation algorithms with greatly reduced computational complexity. The technique opens new perspectives for locally adaptive super-resolution processing taking flow field, seeding, and imaging anomalies into account. Processing at the lowest scale (e.g. pixel or particle image size) allows the combination of correlation planes on any shape. Hence the proposed reverse hierarchical processing represents interrogation area optimization both in size and shape in order to maximize the correlation plane signal-to-noise ratio. The method is successfully demonstrated on experimentally obtained images.

  4. Reverse Transfer Project, Summer 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Elizabeth

    In 1986, a Reverse Transfer Project was initiated at Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) in order to promote the summer school attendance at MVCC of "reverse transfer" students (i.e., students who attended another institution during the regular academic year). A mailing, containing a cover letter, informational brochure, summer catalog, and…

  5. Preference Reversal in Multiattribute Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Usher, Marius; Chater, Nick

    2010-01-01

    A central puzzle for theories of choice is that people's preferences between options can be reversed by the presence of decoy options (that are not chosen) or by the presence of other irrelevant options added to the choice set. Three types of reversal effect reported in the decision-making literature, the attraction, compromise, and similarity…

  6. Classical Analog to Entanglement Reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitambar, Eric; Fortescue, Ben; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2015-08-01

    In this Letter we study the problem of secrecy reversibility. This asks when two honest parties can distill secret bits from some tripartite distribution pX Y Z and transform secret bits back into pX Y Z at equal rates using local operation and public communication. This is the classical analog to the well-studied problem of reversibly concentrating and diluting entanglement in a quantum state. We identify the structure of distributions possessing reversible secrecy when one of the honest parties holds a binary distribution, and it is possible that all reversible distributions have this form. These distributions are more general than what is obtained by simply constructing a classical analog to the family of quantum states known to have reversible entanglement. An indispensable tool used in our analysis is a conditional form of the Gács-Körner common information.

  7. The Geomagnetic Field During a Reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heirtzler, James R.

    2003-01-01

    By modifying the IGRF it is possible to learn what may happen to the geomagnetic field during a geomagnetic reversal. If the entire IGRF reverses then the declination and inclination only reverse when the field strength is zero. If only the dipole component of the IGRF reverses a large geomagnetic field remains when the dipole component is zero and he direction of the field at the end of the reversal is not exactly reversed from the directions at the beginning of the reversal.

  8. Reverse osmosis reverses conventional wisdom with Superfund cleanup success

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, M. ); Miller, K. )

    1994-09-01

    Although widely recognized as the most efficient means of water purification, reverse osmosis has not been considered effective for remediating hazardous wastewater. Scaling and fouling, which can cause overruns and downtime, and require membrane replacement, have inhibited success in high-volume wastewater applications. Despite this background, a reverse osmosis technology developed in Europe recently was used successfully to treat large volumes of contaminated water at a major Superfund site in Texas. The technology's success there may increase the chances for reverse osmosis to find wider use in future cleanups and other waste treatment applications.

  9. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W.sub.o that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W.sub.o of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions.

  10. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1993-11-30

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W[sub o] that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W[sub o] of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions. 27 figures.

  11. Lanczos iterated time-reversal.

    PubMed

    Oberai, Assad A; Feijóo, Gonzalo R; Barbone, Paul E

    2009-02-01

    A new iterative time-reversal algorithm capable of identifying and focusing on multiple scatterers in a relatively small number of iterations is developed. It is recognized that the traditional iterated time-reversal method is based on utilizing power iterations to determine the dominant eigenpairs of the time-reversal operator. The convergence properties of these iterations are known to be suboptimal. Motivated by this, a new method based on Lanczos iterations is developed. In several illustrative examples it is demonstrated that for the same number of transmitted and received signals, the Lanczos iterations based approach is substantially more accurate. PMID:19206835

  12. Reverse mortgage decision-making.

    PubMed

    Leviton, R

    2001-01-01

    Reverse mortgages have been suggested as a promising financial tool to help low-income older homeowners who want to remain in their houses. However, actual use of this option has been much below early estimates of potential demand. This study explored response to the new option through open-ended interviews of homeowners who had received reverse mortgage counseling. Decision-making was influenced by attachment to home, family input, and financial attitudes, including desire to leave a legacy. In general, homeowners took reverse mortgages only as a "last resort" that enabled them to maintain their independence.

  13. Reverse Discrimination and Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    White subjects were aggressive toward Black opponents when contest results appeared to reflect elements of reverse discrimination; but they showed less aggressive behavior toward Black opponents when they thought their loss was due to their opponents' superior ability. (RL)

  14. Deciphering records of geomagnetic reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Fournier, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Polarity reversals of the geomagnetic field are a major feature of the Earth's dynamo. Questions remain regarding the dynamical processes that give rise to reversals and the properties of the geomagnetic field during a polarity transition. A large number of paleomagnetic reversal records have been acquired during the past 50 years in order to better constrain the structure and geometry of the transitional field. In addition, over the past two decades, numerical dynamo simulations have also provided insights into the reversal mechanism. Yet despite the large paleomagnetic database, controversial interpretations of records of the transitional field persist; they result from two characteristics inherent to all reversals, both of which are detrimental to an ambiguous analysis. On the one hand, the reversal process is rapid and requires adequate temporal resolution. On the other hand, weak field intensities during a reversal can affect the fidelity of magnetic recording in sedimentary records. This paper is aimed at reviewing critically the main reversal features derived from paleomagnetic records and at analyzing some of these features in light of numerical simulations. We discuss in detail the fidelity of the signal extracted from paleomagnetic records and pay special attention to their resolution with respect to the timing and mechanisms involved in the magnetization process. Records from marine sediments dominate the database. They give rise to transitional field models that often lead to overinterpret the data. Consequently, we attempt to separate robust results (and their subsequent interpretations) from those that do not stand on a strong observational footing. Finally, we discuss new avenues that should favor progress to better characterize and understand transitional field behavior.

  15. Reverse Current in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. W., III

    1978-01-01

    An idealized steady state model of a stream of energetic electrons neutralized by a reverse current in the pre-flare solar plasma was developed. These calculations indicate that, in some cases, a significant fraction of the beam energy may be dissipated by the reverse current. Joule heating by the reverse current is a more effective mechanism for heating the plasma than collisional losses from the energetic electrons because the Ohmic losses are caused by thermal electrons in the reverse current which have much shorter mean free paths than the energetic electrons. The heating due to reverse currents is calculated for two injected energetic electron fluxes. For the smaller injected flux, the temperature of the coronal plasma is raised by about a factor of two. The larger flux causes the reverse current drift velocity to exceed the critical velocity for the onset of ion cyclotron turbulence, producing anomalous resistivity and an order of magnitude increase in the temperature. The heating is so rapid that the lack of ionization equilibrium may produce a soft X-ray and EUV pulse from the corona.

  16. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... This test may be scheduled as part of the endurance run. (b) 175 reversals must be made from flight-idle forward thrust to maximum reverse thrust and 25 reversals must be made from rated takeoff...

  17. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... This test may be scheduled as part of the endurance run. (b) 175 reversals must be made from flight-idle forward thrust to maximum reverse thrust and 25 reversals must be made from rated takeoff...

  18. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... This test may be scheduled as part of the endurance run. (b) 175 reversals must be made from flight-idle forward thrust to maximum reverse thrust and 25 reversals must be made from rated takeoff...

  19. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... This test may be scheduled as part of the endurance run. (b) 175 reversals must be made from flight-idle forward thrust to maximum reverse thrust and 25 reversals must be made from rated takeoff...

  20. Reverse shift mechanism for automotive manual transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, M.; Ogawa, S.

    1987-03-03

    A reverse shift mechanism is described for an automotive manual transmission of a type having a reverse idler gear which is movable to selectively complete a reverse gear train, the reverse shift mechanism comprising: a reverse shift arm having a portion disposed adjacent the reverse idler gear and pivotally carried with respect to a transmission casing so that the portion rocks along a direction of axis of the reverse idler gear in response to shifting operation. The portion of the reverse shift arm is provided with a blind hole which is open at a first end toward the reverse idler gear and is closed at a second end away from the reverse idler gear; and a shift arm shoe carried by the portion of the reverse shift arm adjacent the reverse idler gear for pushing the reverse idler gear. The shift arm shoe has an end adapted to engage with a circumferential groove formed in the reverse idler gear and an opposing end shaped to fit in the blind hole of the reverse shift arm; whereby the shift arm shoe is prevented from coming off during assembly by virtue of a vacuum effect created by air confined in the blind hole by fitting engagement between the opposing end and the blind hole, and is held in place after assembly by being clamped between the groove of the reverse idler gear and the blind hole of the reverse shift arm.

  1. Dynamics and timing of reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, J.-P.; Fournier, A.

    2012-04-01

    Information provided by records of geomagnetic reversals from lava sequences is constrained by irregular volcanic activity. We show that, despite different resolution, the ten most detailed volcanic records match surprisingly well and display the same dynamical characteristics after tuning to a common eruption rate. We thus infer that the reversal process has remained unchanged over the past 180Ma with the same time constants and duration. The reversing field is characterized by 3 successive episodes, a precursory event, a 180° polarity switch and a rebound. The first and third phases depict a large amplitude directional change which, by comparison with the archeological record, is estimated to last between 2 and 2.5 kyr. The transit between the two polarities does not exceed 1ka and is thus too fast for being properly recorded by most sediments. Similar results are obtained after reducing the directional clusters that are present at different periods in each record. These features and time constants are compatible with models that do not require any mantle control on reversals processes, which is also supported by the absence of preferred longitude of the pole. Lastly, based on the chronology of the successive reversal phases, the eruption rates are found to be at least twice larger for hot spots (<1flow/100yr) than for large flood basaltic provinces.

  2. Vasectomy reversal: a clinical update.

    PubMed

    Patel, Abhishek P; Smith, Ryan P

    2016-01-01

    Vasectomy is a safe and effective method of contraception used by 42-60 million men worldwide. Approximately 3%-6% of men opt for a vasectomy reversal due to the death of a child or divorce and remarriage, change in financial situation, desire for more children within the same marriage, or to alleviate the dreaded postvasectomy pain syndrome. Unlike vasectomy, vasectomy reversal is a much more technically challenging procedure that is performed only by a minority of urologists and places a larger financial strain on the patient since it is usually not covered by insurance. Interest in this procedure has increased since the operating microscope became available in the 1970s, which consequently led to improved patency and pregnancy rates following the procedure. In this clinical update, we discuss patient evaluation, variables that may influence reversal success rates, factors to consider in choosing to perform vasovasostomy versus vasoepididymostomy, and the usefulness of vasectomy reversal to alleviate postvasectomy pain syndrome. We also review the use of robotics for vasectomy reversal and other novel techniques and instrumentation that have emerged in recent years to aid in the success of this surgery. PMID:26975488

  3. Vasectomy reversal: a clinical update

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Abhishek P; Smith, Ryan P

    2016-01-01

    Vasectomy is a safe and effective method of contraception used by 42–60 million men worldwide. Approximately 3%–6% of men opt for a vasectomy reversal due to the death of a child or divorce and remarriage, change in financial situation, desire for more children within the same marriage, or to alleviate the dreaded postvasectomy pain syndrome. Unlike vasectomy, vasectomy reversal is a much more technically challenging procedure that is performed only by a minority of urologists and places a larger financial strain on the patient since it is usually not covered by insurance. Interest in this procedure has increased since the operating microscope became available in the 1970s, which consequently led to improved patency and pregnancy rates following the procedure. In this clinical update, we discuss patient evaluation, variables that may influence reversal success rates, factors to consider in choosing to perform vasovasostomy versus vasoepididymostomy, and the usefulness of vasectomy reversal to alleviate postvasectomy pain syndrome. We also review the use of robotics for vasectomy reversal and other novel techniques and instrumentation that have emerged in recent years to aid in the success of this surgery. PMID:26975488

  4. Ice ages and geomagnetic reversals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    There have been speculations on the relationship between climatic cooling and polarity reversals of the earth's magnetic field during the Pleistocene. Two of the common criticisms on this relationship have been the reality of these short duration geomagnetic events and the accuracy of their dates. Champion et al. (1988) have reviewed recent progress in this area. They identified a total of 10 short-duration polarity events in the last 1 Ma and 6 of these events have been found in volcanic rocks, which also have K-Ar dates. Supposing that the speculated relationship between climatic cooling and geomagnetic reversals actually exist, two mechanisms that assume climatic cooling causes short period magnetic reversals will be investigated. These two methods are core-mantle boundary topography and transfer of the rotational energy to the core.

  5. Time-reversed, flow-reversed ballistics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zernow, L.; Chapyak, E. J.; Scheffler, D. R.

    2001-01-01

    Two-dimensional simulations of planar sheet jet formation are studied to examine the hydrodynamic issues involved when simulations are carried out in the inverse direction, that is, with reversed time and flow. Both a realistic copper equation of state and a shockless equation of state were used. These studies are an initial step in evaluating this technique as a ballistics design tool.

  6. Marburg Virus Reverse Genetics Systems

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Kristina Maria; Mühlberger, Elke

    2016-01-01

    The highly pathogenic Marburg virus (MARV) is a member of the Filoviridae family and belongs to the group of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses. Reverse genetics systems established for MARV have been used to study various aspects of the viral replication cycle, analyze host responses, image viral infection, and screen for antivirals. This article provides an overview of the currently established MARV reverse genetic systems based on minigenomes, infectious virus-like particles and full-length clones, and the research that has been conducted using these systems. PMID:27338448

  7. Stagnation point reverse flow combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinn, Ben T. (Inventor); Neumeier, Yedidia (Inventor); Seitzman, Jerry M. (Inventor); Jagoda, Jechiel (Inventor); Weksler, Yoav (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method for combusting a combustible fuel includes providing a vessel having an opening near a proximate end and a closed distal end defining a combustion chamber. A combustible reactants mixture is presented into the combustion chamber. The combustible reactants mixture is ignited creating a flame and combustion products. The closed end of the combustion chamber is utilized for directing combustion products toward the opening of the combustion chamber creating a reverse flow of combustion products within the combustion chamber. The reverse flow of combustion products is intermixed with combustible reactants mixture to maintain the flame.

  8. Reversing: A Fundamental Idea in Computer Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armoni, Michal; Ginat, David

    2008-01-01

    Reversing is the notion of thinking or working in reverse. Computer science textbooks and tutors recognize it primarily in the form of recursion. However, recursion is only one form of reversing. Reversing appears in the computer science curriculum in many other forms, at various intellectual levels, in a variety of fundamental courses. As such,…

  9. A Note on Reverse Derivations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samman, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this note, the notion of reverse derivation is studied. It is shown that in the class of semiprime rings, this notion coincides with the usual derivation when it maps a semiprime ring into its centre. However, we provide some examples to show that it is not the case in general.

  10. CAPSULE REPORT: REVERSE OSMOSIS PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A failure analysis has been completed for the reverse osmosis (RO) process. The focus was on process failures that result in releases of liquids and vapors to the environment. The report includes the following: 1) A description of RO and coverage of the principles behind the proc...

  11. Reversible colour change in Arthropoda.

    PubMed

    Umbers, Kate D L; Fabricant, Scott A; Gawryszewski, Felipe M; Seago, Ainsley E; Herberstein, Marie E

    2014-11-01

    The mechanisms and functions of reversible colour change in arthropods are highly diverse despite, or perhaps due to, the presence of an exoskeleton. Physiological colour changes, which have been recorded in 90 arthropod species, are rapid and are the result of changes in the positioning of microstructures or pigments, or in the refractive index of layers in the integument. By contrast, morphological colour changes, documented in 31 species, involve the anabolism or catabolism of components (e.g. pigments) directly related to the observable colour. In this review we highlight the diversity of mechanisms by which reversible colour change occurs and the evolutionary context and diversity of arthropod taxa in which it has been observed. Further, we discuss the functions of reversible colour change so far proposed, review the limited behavioural and ecological data, and argue that the field requires phylogenetically controlled approaches to understanding the evolution of reversible colour change. Finally, we encourage biologists to explore new model systems for colour change and to engage scientists from other disciplines; continued cross-disciplinary collaboration is the most promising approach to this nexus of biology, physics, and chemistry.

  12. Can luteal regression be reversed?

    PubMed Central

    Telleria, Carlos M

    2006-01-01

    The corpus luteum is an endocrine gland whose limited lifespan is hormonally programmed. This debate article summarizes findings of our research group that challenge the principle that the end of function of the corpus luteum or luteal regression, once triggered, cannot be reversed. Overturning luteal regression by pharmacological manipulations may be of critical significance in designing strategies to improve fertility efficacy. PMID:17074090

  13. Law: Reverse Discrimination, Legal Briefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation's Schools and Colleges, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Just as schools and colleges are starting to hire more black and female faculty members through affirmative action programs, there is a new battle cry on the civil rights front: "reverse discrimination." Qualified whites claim they are being shoved aside in the scramble for less-qualified blacks, Chicanos, American Indians, and members of other…

  14. Quotas Are Not Reverse Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Gabrielle K.

    1975-01-01

    The findings of the Morrow v. Crisler and NAACP v. Allen civil rights cases are discussed. It is concluded from these employment discrimination cases that quotas are not reverse discrimination because no one has the right to continue to receive the benefits of racial discrimination at the expense of others. (LBH)

  15. Reversion phenomena of Cu-Cr alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, S.; Nagata, K.; Kobayashi, S.

    1985-01-01

    Cu-Cr alloys which were given various aging and reversion treatments were investigated in terms of electrical resistivity and hardness. Transmission electron microscopy was one technique employed. Some results obtained are as follows: the increment of electrical resistivity after the reversion at a constant temperature decreases as the aging temperature rises. In a constant aging condition, the increment of electrical resistivity after the reversion increases, and the time required for a maximum reversion becomes shorter as the reversion temperature rises. The reversion phenomena can be repeated, but its amount decreases rapidly by repetition. At first, the amount of reversion increases with aging time and reaches its maximum, and then tends to decrease again. Hardness changes by the reversion are very small, but the hardness tends to soften slightly. Any changes in transmission electron micrographs by the reversion treatment cannot be detected.

  16. Reversal agents in anaesthesia and critical care

    PubMed Central

    Pani, Nibedita; Dongare, Pradeep A; Mishra, Rajeeb Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advent of short and ultra-short acting drugs, an in-depth knowledge of the reversal agents used is a necessity for any anaesthesiologist. Reversal agents are defined as any drug used to reverse the effects of anaesthetics, narcotics or potentially toxic agents. The controversy on the routine reversal of neuromuscular blockade still exists. The advent of newer reversal agents like sugammadex have made the use of steroidal neuromuscular blockers like rocuronium feasible in rapid sequence induction situations. We made a review of the older reversal agents and those still under investigation for drugs that are regularly used in our anaesthesia practice. PMID:26644615

  17. [Reverse genetics and prenatal diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Plauchu, H

    1988-05-01

    "Reverse" genetics is a research process consisting in finding the gene of a disease, then in "descending" toward the final product that it codes. This reasoning is the reverse of the one normally used which "ascends from the protein to the gene" and can be applied to the discovery of the pathogenic mechanism of a disease. There are numerous spin-offs of this new type of approach for prenatal diagnosis (PND). Thus, the discovery of polymorphic tracers surrounding the gene enables an indirect PND in informative families. Reliability is great if we have many probes at our disposal. Then, discovery of the gene itself permits a direct PND with the use of intragenic probes and synthetic oligonucleotides.

  18. Reverse osmosis water purification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlstrom, H. G.; Hames, P. S.; Menninger, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    A reverse osmosis water purification system, which uses a programmable controller (PC) as the control system, was designed and built to maintain the cleanliness and level of water for various systems of a 64-m antenna. The installation operates with other equipment of the antenna at the Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex. The reverse osmosis system was designed to be fully automatic; with the PC, many complex sequential and timed logic networks were easily implemented and are modified. The PC monitors water levels, pressures, flows, control panel requests, and set points on analog meters; with this information various processes are initiated, monitored, modified, halted, or eliminated as required by the equipment being supplied pure water.

  19. Reversing the Brazil Nut Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewig, F.; Vandewalle, N.

    2005-12-01

    We propose a lattice model for studying the Brazil Nut Effect (BNE), i.e. the phase segregation occuring when a granular material is vertically shaked. The model considers the tap intensity and the mobility μ of the grains as the main physical parameters. Different mobilities for different grain species lead to segregation (BNE) patterns, reverse segregation (RBNE) patterns, “sandwhich" layered structures or vertical domains. A phase diagram (decompaction χ, mobility difference between both species Δ μ) is obtained in which the different phases are emphasized. In a narrow region of the diagram, different phases coexist. It is shown that the BNE segregation could be reversed by increasing the tap intensity or the characteristics of the grains. Numerical results are compared with earlier experimental works.

  20. A reversible nanoconfined chemical reaction.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Thomas K; Bösenberg, Ulrike; Gosalawit, Rapee; Dornheim, Martin; Cerenius, Yngve; Besenbacher, Flemming; Jensen, Torben R

    2010-07-27

    Hydrogen is recognized as a potential, extremely interesting energy carrier system, which can facilitate efficient utilization of unevenly distributed renewable energy. A major challenge in a future "hydrogen economy" is the development of a safe, compact, robust, and efficient means of hydrogen storage, in particular, for mobile applications. Here we report on a new concept for hydrogen storage using nanoconfined reversible chemical reactions. LiBH4 and MgH2 nanoparticles are embedded in a nanoporous carbon aerogel scaffold with pore size Dmax approximately 21 nm and react during release of hydrogen and form MgB2. The hydrogen desorption kinetics is significantly improved compared to bulk conditions, and the nanoconfined system has a high degree of reversibility and stability and possibly also improved thermodynamic properties. This new scheme of nanoconfined chemistry may have a wide range of interesting applications in the future, for example, within the merging area of chemical storage of renewable energy.

  1. Eyespots in a reversible setting.

    PubMed

    Deregowski, Jan B; Gray, Colin D

    2013-01-01

    When eyespots were presented on a reversible figure, the total duration for which elements bearing the eyespots were seen as closer to the observer was found to be greater than the total for counterpart elements. It is speculated that the tendency to see eyespots as nearer than they really are is related to the manner in which they are responded to in nature. PMID:23700964

  2. Reverse engineering of integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Chisholm, Gregory H.; Eckmann, Steven T.; Lain, Christopher M.; Veroff, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    Software and a method therein to analyze circuits. The software comprises several tools, each of which perform particular functions in the Reverse Engineering process. The analyst, through a standard interface, directs each tool to the portion of the task to which it is most well suited, rendering previously intractable problems solvable. The tools are generally used iteratively to produce a successively more abstract picture of a circuit, about which incomplete a priori knowledge exists.

  3. Reversible Seeding in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, Daniel; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    We propose to generate steady-state microbunching in a storage ring with a reversible seeding scheme. High gain harmonic generation (HGHG) and echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) are two promising methods for microbunching linac electron beams. Because both schemes increase the energy spread of the seeded beam, they cannot drive a coherent radiator turn-by-turn in a storage ring. However, reversing the seeding process following the radiator minimizes the impact on the electron beam and may allow coherent radiation at or near the storage ring repetition rate. In this paper we describe the general idea and outline a proof-of-principle experiment. Electron storage rings can drive high average power light sources, and free-electron lasers (FELs) are now producing coherent light sources of unprecedented peak brightness While there is active research towards high repetition rate FELs (for example, using energy recovery linacs), at present there are still no convenient accelerator-based sources of high repetition rate, coherent radiation. As an alternative avenue, we recently proposed to establish steady-state microbunching (SSMB) in a storage ring. By maintaining steady-state coherent microbunching at one point in the storage ring, the beam generates coherent radiation at or close to the repetition rate of the storage ring. In this paper, we propose a method of generating a microbunched beam in a storage ring by using reversible versions of linac seeding schemes.

  4. Reversible fluorescence photoswitching in DNA.

    PubMed

    Smith, Darren A; Holliger, Philipp; Flors, Cristina

    2012-08-30

    We describe the engineering of reversible fluorescence photoswitching in DNA with high-density substitution, and its applications in advanced fluorescence microscopy methods. High-density labeling of DNA with cyanine dyes can be achieved by polymerase chain reaction using a modified DNA polymerase that has been evolved to efficiently incorporate Cy3- and Cy5-labeled cytosine base analogues into double-stranded DNA. The resulting biopolymer, "CyDNA", displays hundreds of fluorophores per DNA strand and is strongly colored and highly fluorescent, although previous observations suggest that fluorescence quenching at such high density might be a concern, especially for Cy5. Herein, we first investigate the mechanisms of fluorescence quenching in CyDNA and we suggest that two different mechanisms, aggregate formation and resonance energy transfer, are responsible for fluorescence quenching at high labeling densities. Moreover, we have been able to re-engineer CyDNA into a reversible fluorescence photoswitchable biopolymer by using the properties of the Cy3-Cy5 pair. This novel biopolymer constitutes a new class of photoactive DNA-based nanomaterial and is of great interest for advanced microscopy applications. We show that reversible fluorescence photoswitching in CyDNA can be exploited in optical lock-in detection imaging. It also lays the foundations for improved and sequence-specific super-resolution fluorescence microscopy of DNA. PMID:22861666

  5. Three distinct reversing modes in the geodynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Y.; Pavlov, V. E.

    2016-03-01

    The data that describe the long-term reversing behavior of the geodynamo show strong and sudden changes in magnetic reversal frequency. This concerns both the onset and the end of superchrons and most probably the occurrence of episodes characterized by extreme geomagnetic reversal frequency (>10-15 rev./Myr). To account for the complexity observed in geomagnetic reversal frequency evolution, we propose a simple scenario in which the geodynamo operates in three distinct reversing modes: i—a "normal" reversing mode generating geomagnetic polarity reversals according to a stationary random process, with on average a reversal rate of ˜3 rev./Myr; ii—a non-reversing "superchron" mode characterizing long time intervals without reversal; iii—a hyper-active reversing mode characterized by an extreme geomagnetic reversal frequency. The transitions between the different reversing modes would be sudden, i.e., on the Myr time scale. Following previous studies, we suggest that in the past, the occurrence of these transitions has been modulated by thermal conditions at the core-mantle boundary governed by mantle dynamics. It might also be possible that they were more frequent during the Precambrian, before the nucleation of the inner core, because of a stronger influence on geodynamo activity of the thermal conditions at the core-mantle boundary.

  6. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.97 Thrust reversers. (a) If the engine incorporates a reverser, the endurance calibration, operation, and vibration tests prescribed...

  7. Rapid evaluation of reverse-osmosis membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollahan, J. R.; Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    Simultaneous reverse-osmosis tests conducted with centrifuges having multiple compartment heads are discussed. Equipment for retaining reverse-osmosis membrane is illustrated. Method of conducting tests is described.

  8. A Reverse Shock in GRB 160509A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, T.; Alexander, K. D.; Berger, E.

    2016-10-01

    Through detailed multi-wavelength observations and modeling, we present the discovery and characterization a reverse shock in GRB 160509A. This result highlights the unique power of radio observations in the study of GRB reverse shocks.

  9. Ancient Magnetic Reversals: Clues to the Geodynamo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Kenneth A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the question posed by some that the earth's magnetic field may reverse. States that rocks magnetized by ancient fields may offer clues to the underlying reversal mechanism in the earth's core. (TW)

  10. Cleaning Our World through Reverse Graffiti

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randazzo, Gabe; LaJevic, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade artists have begun to experiment with "reverse pollution" techniques, such as reverse graffiti, which focuses on cleaning environmental surfaces. Having recently been introduced to the works of Moose, the artist known for inventing the reverse graffiti technique, the authors decided to design a curriculum to increase…

  11. Statistical Learning, Letter Reversals, and Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treiman, Rebecca; Gordon, Jessica; Boada, Richard; Peterson, Robin L.; Pennington, Bruce F.

    2014-01-01

    Reversal errors play a prominent role in theories of reading disability. We examined reversal errors in the writing of letters by 5- to 6-year-old children. Of the 130 children, 92 had a history of difficulty in producing speech sounds, a risk factor for reading problems. Children were more likely to reverse letter forms that face left, such as…

  12. Categorizing and Promoting Reversibility of Mathematical Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Martin A.; Kara, Melike; Placa, Nicora; Sandir, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Reversibility of concepts, a key aspect of mathematical development, is often problematic for learners. In this theoretical paper, we present a typology we have developed for categorizing the different reverse concepts that can be related to a particular initial concept and explicate the relationship among these different reverse concepts. We…

  13. Remote Whispering Applying Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brian Eric

    2015-07-16

    The purpose of this project was to explore the use of time reversal technologies as a means for communication to a targeted individual or location. The idea is to have the privacy of whispering in one’s ear, but to do this remotely from loudspeakers not located near the target. Applications of this work include communicating with hostages and survivors in rescue operations, communicating imaging and operational conditions in deep drilling operations, monitoring storage of spent nuclear fuel in storage casks without wires, or clandestine activities requiring signaling between specific points. This technology provides a solution in any application where wires and radio communications are not possible or not desired. It also may be configured to self calibrate on a regular basis to adjust for changing conditions. These communications allow two people to converse with one another in real time, converse in an inaudible frequency range or medium (i.e. using ultrasonic frequencies and/or sending vibrations through a structure), or send information for a system to interpret (even allowing remote control of a system using sound). The time reversal process allows one to focus energy to a specific location in space and to send a clean transmission of a selected signal only to that location. In order for the time reversal process to work, a calibration signal must be obtained. This signal may be obtained experimentally using an impulsive sound, a known chirp signal, or other known signals. It may also be determined from a numerical model of a known environment in which the focusing is desired or from passive listening over time to ambient noise.

  14. Retroviral recombination during reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, D W; Duesberg, P H

    1990-03-01

    After mixed infection, up to half of related retroviruses are recombinants. During infection, retroviral RNA genomes are first converted to complementary DNA (cDNA) and then to double-stranded DNA. Thus recombination could occur during reverse transcription, by RNA template switching, or after reverse transcription, by breakage and reunion of DNA. It has not been possible to distinguish between these two potential mechanisms of recombination because both single-stranded cDNA and double-stranded proviral DNA exist in infected cells during the eclipse period. Therefore we have analyzed for recombinant molecules among cDNA products transcribed in vitro from RNA of disrupted virions. Since recombinants from allelic parents can only be distinguished from parental genomes by point mutations, we have examined the cDNAs from virions with distinct genetic structures for recombinant-specific size and sequence markers. The parents share a common internal allele that allows homology-directed recombination, but each contains specific flanking sequences. One parent is a synthetically altered Harvey murine sarcoma virus RNA that lacks a retroviral 3' terminus but carries a Moloney murine retrovirus-derived envelope gene (env) fragment 3' of its transforming ras gene. The other parent is intact Moloney virus. Using a Harvey-specific 5' primer and a Moloney-specific 3' primer, we have found recombinant cDNAs with the polymerase chain reaction, proving directly that retroviruses can recombine during reverse transcription unassisted by cellular enzymes, probably by template switching during cDNA synthesis. The recombinants that were obtained in vitro were identical with those obtained in parallel experiments in vivo.

  15. Reversible Photoswitching of Carbon Dots

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Syamantak; Verma, Navneet Chandra; Gupta, Abhishek; Nandi, Chayan Kanti

    2015-01-01

    We present a method of reversible photoswitching in carbon nanodots with red emission. A mechanism of electron transfer is proposed. The cationic dark state, formed by the exposure of red light, is revived back to the bright state with the very short exposure of blue light. Additionally, the natural on-off state of carbon dot fluorescence was tuned using an electron acceptor molecule. Our observation can make the carbon dots as an excellent candidate for the super-resolution imaging of nanoscale biomolecules within the cell. PMID:26078266

  16. Time reversal of water waves.

    PubMed

    Przadka, A; Feat, S; Petitjeans, P; Pagneux, V; Maurel, A; Fink, M

    2012-08-10

    We present time reversal experiments demonstrating refocusing of gravity-capillary waves in a water tank cavity. Owing to the reverberating effect of the cavity, only a few channels are sufficient to reconstruct the surface wave at the point source, even if the absorption is not negligible. Space-time-resolved measurements of the waves during the refocusing allow us to quantitatively demonstrate that the quality of the refocusing increases linearly with the number of reemitting channels. Numerical simulations corresponding to water waves at larger scales, with negligible damping, indicate the possibility of very high quality refocusing.

  17. Reversal Agents for the Direct Oral Anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Ansell, Jack E

    2016-10-01

    The vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) are associated with a significant rate of major and fatal bleeding complications. The new direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), even though having a better bleeding profile than the VKAs, are still associated with serious bleeding. The anticoagulation induced by the VKAs can be reversed with both vitamin K and prothrombin complex concentrates, whereas the DOACs were developed without specific reversal agents. Although there is controversy around the necessity of a reversal agent, most clinicians agree that having a reversal agent for the DOACs would be beneficial. Three reversal agents are currently in development. PMID:27637309

  18. Ideal stability limits of reverse shear equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.W.; Hughes, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    The dependence on various plasma parameters of the ideal stability limit of reverse shear current profiles in TFTR and other tokamaks has been thoroughly explored. Profiles with reverse shear allow core access to the second ballooning stability region. In addition, for sufficient shear reversal, modes with n = 2 and greater are also stabilized. The n = 1 stability threshold is only slightly affected by reverse shear and becomes the limiting instability. The mode is predominately an infernal mode with a significant external contribution. Particular emphasis will be on analysis of recent experimental results of enhanced reverse shear (ERS) profiles in TFTR and a study of those profile characteristics which optimize TFTR performance.

  19. Steganography using reversible texture synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kuo-Chen; Wang, Chung-Ming

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel approach for steganography using a reversible texture synthesis. A texture synthesis process resamples a smaller texture image, which synthesizes a new texture image with a similar local appearance and an arbitrary size. We weave the texture synthesis process into steganography to conceal secret messages. In contrast to using an existing cover image to hide messages, our algorithm conceals the source texture image and embeds secret messages through the process of texture synthesis. This allows us to extract the secret messages and source texture from a stego synthetic texture. Our approach offers three distinct advantages. First, our scheme offers the embedding capacity that is proportional to the size of the stego texture image. Second, a steganalytic algorithm is not likely to defeat our steganographic approach. Third, the reversible capability inherited from our scheme provides functionality, which allows recovery of the source texture. Experimental results have verified that our proposed algorithm can provide various numbers of embedding capacities, produce a visually plausible texture images, and recover the source texture.

  20. Preference reversal in multiattribute choice.

    PubMed

    Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Usher, Marius; Chater, Nick

    2010-10-01

    A central puzzle for theories of choice is that people's preferences between options can be reversed by the presence of decoy options (that are not chosen) or by the presence of other irrelevant options added to the choice set. Three types of reversal effect reported in the decision-making literature, the attraction, compromise, and similarity effects, have been explained by a number of theoretical proposals. Yet a major theoretical challenge is capturing all 3 effects simultaneously. We review the range of mechanisms that have been proposed to account for decoy effects and analyze in detail 2 computational models, decision field theory (Roe, Busemeyer, & Townsend, 2001) and leaky competing accumulators (Usher & McClelland, 2004), that aim to combine several such mechanisms into an integrated account. By simulating the models, we examine differences in the ways the decoy effects are predicted. We argue that the LCA framework, which follows on Tversky's relational evaluation with loss aversion (Tversky & Kahneman, 1991), provides a more robust account, suggesting that common mechanisms are involved in both high-level decision making and perceptual choice, for which LCA was originally developed.

  1. Reversible optical doping of graphene

    PubMed Central

    Tiberj, A.; Rubio-Roy, M.; Paillet, M.; Huntzinger, J. -R.; Landois, P.; Mikolasek, M.; Contreras, S.; Sauvajol, J. -L.; Dujardin, E.; Zahab, A. -A.

    2013-01-01

    The ultimate surface exposure provided by graphene monolayer makes it the ideal sensor platform but also exposes its intrinsic properties to any environmental perturbations. In this work, we demonstrate that the charge carrier density of graphene exfoliated on a SiO2/Si substrate can be finely and reversibly tuned between hole and electron doping with visible photons. This photo-induced doping happens under moderate laser power conditions but is significantly affected by the substrate cleaning method. In particular, it requires hydrophilic substrates and vanishes for suspended graphene. These findings suggest that optically gated graphene devices operating with a sub-second time scale can be envisioned and that Raman spectroscopy is not always as non-invasive as generally assumed. PMID:23912707

  2. Reversibly assembled cellular composite materials.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Kenneth C; Gershenfeld, Neil

    2013-09-13

    We introduce composite materials made by reversibly assembling a three-dimensional lattice of mass-produced carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composite parts with integrated mechanical interlocking connections. The resulting cellular composite materials can respond as an elastic solid with an extremely large measured modulus for an ultralight material (12.3 megapascals at a density of 7.2 milligrams per cubic centimeter). These materials offer a hierarchical decomposition in modeling, with bulk properties that can be predicted from component measurements and deformation modes that can be determined by the placement of part types. Because site locations are locally constrained, structures can be produced in a relative assembly process that merges desirable features of fiber composites, cellular materials, and additive manufacturing.

  3. Process of forming compounds using reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion systems

    DOEpatents

    Linehan, John C.; Fulton, John L.; Bean, Roger M.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for producing a nanometer-sized metal compound. The process comprises forming a reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system comprising a polar fluid in a non-polar or low-polarity fluid. A first reactant comprising a multi-component, water-soluble metal compound is introduced into the polar fluid in a non-polar or low-polarity fluid. This first reactant can be introduced into the reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system during formation thereof or subsequent to the formation of the reverse micelle or microemulsion system. The water-soluble metal compound is then reacted in the reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system to form the nanometer-sized metal compound. The nanometer-sized metal compound is then precipitated from the reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system.

  4. Periodicity of the earth's magnetic reversals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R. B.

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented from an attempt to perform a relatively comprehensive analysis of the evidence for a periodicity, with harmonics, of the observed regular reversals of the earth's magnetic field. The database considered covers 296 reversals over the past 165 Myr. Histograms with bins 1 Myr apart reveal only 30 Myr reversal patterns. The reversal dates are fitted to a linear periodic function and a spectrum is computed for the residuals at the adopted dates. The possible presence of multiple periodicities is evaluated and over various time intervals. The analysis shows that a recently observed 15 Myr periodicity is probably a harmonic of the 29.5-30.5 Myr period. The calculations do not confirm an inherent magnetic reversal property of the earth. The reversals may arise from tectonic events or from impacts from extraterrestrial objects.

  5. Neural correlates of response reversal: considering acquisition.

    PubMed

    Budhani, S; Marsh, A A; Pine, D S; Blair, R J R

    2007-02-15

    Previous work on response reversal has typically used a single pair of stimuli that serially reverse. This conflation of acquisition and reversal processes has prevented an examination of the functional role of neural systems implicated in response reversal during acquisition despite the relevance of such data in evaluating accounts of response reversal. In the current study, participants encountered 16 independent reversing stimulus pairs in the context of a probabilistic response reversal paradigm. Functional regions of interest identified as involved in response reversal through a contrast used in the previous literature (punished errors made in the reversal phase versus rewarded correct responses), were interrogated across conditions. Consistent with suggestions that middle frontal cortex codes reward, this region showed significantly greater responses to rewarded rather than punished trials irrespective of accuracy or learning phase (acquisition or reversal). Consistent with the suggestion that this coding of the expectation of reinforcement is acquired via input from the amygdala, we observed significant positive connectivity between activity within the amygdala and a region of rostral anterior cingulate cortex highly proximal to this region of middle frontal/mesial prefrontal cortex. In contrast, inferior frontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and caudate showed greater responses to punished errors than to the rewarded correct responses. These three regions also showed significant activation to rewarded errors during acquisition, in contrast to positions suggesting that inferior frontal cortex represents punishment or suppresses previously rewarded responses. Moreover, a connectivity analysis with an anterior cingulate cortex seed revealed highly significant positive connectivity among them. The implications of these data for recent accounts of response reversal and of response reversal impairments in specific neuropsychiatric populations are discussed.

  6. Gravity controlled anti-reverse rotation device

    DOEpatents

    Dickinson, Robert J.; Wetherill, Todd M.

    1983-01-01

    A gravity assisted anti-reverse rotation device for preventing reverse rotation of pumps and the like. A horizontally mounted pawl is disposed to mesh with a fixed ratchet preventing reverse rotation when the pawl is advanced into intercourse with the ratchet by a vertically mounted lever having a lumped mass. Gravitation action on the lumped mass urges the pawl into mesh with the ratchet, while centrifugal force on the lumped mass during forward, allowed rotation retracts the pawl away from the ratchet.

  7. Serial reversal learning in bumblebees (Bombus impatiens).

    PubMed

    Strang, Caroline G; Sherry, David F

    2014-05-01

    Bumblebees are capable of rapidly learning discriminations, but flexibility in bumblebee learning is less well understood. We tested bumblebees (Bombus impatiens) on a serial reversal learning task. A serial reversal task requires learning of an initial discrimination between two differentially rewarded stimuli, followed by multiple reversals of the reward contingency between stimuli. A reduction in errors with repeated reversals in a serial reversal task is an indicator of behavioural flexibility. Bees were housed in a large indoor environment and tested during foraging flights. Testing free-flying bees allowed for large numbers of trials and reversals. All bees were trained to perform a simultaneous discrimination between two colours for a nectar reward, followed by nine reversals of this discrimination. Results showed that bumblebees reduced errors and improved their performance across successive reversals. A reduction in perseverative errors was the major cause of the improvement in performance. Bees showed a slight increase in error rate in their final trials, perhaps as a consequence of increasing proactive interference, but proactive interference may also have contributed to the overall improvement in performance across reversals. Bumblebees are thus capable of behavioural flexibility comparable to that of other animals and may use proactive interference as a mechanism of behavioural flexibility in varying environments.

  8. High Performance Field Reversed Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binderbauer, Michl

    2014-10-01

    The field-reversed configuration (FRC) is a prolate compact toroid with poloidal magnetic fields. FRCs could lead to economic fusion reactors with high power density, simple geometry, natural divertor, ease of translation, and possibly capable of burning aneutronic fuels. However, as in other high-beta plasmas, there are stability and confinement concerns. These concerns can be addressed by introducing and maintaining a significant fast ion population in the system. This is the approach adopted by TAE and implemented for the first time in the C-2 device. Studying the physics of FRCs driven by Neutral Beam (NB) injection, significant improvements were made in confinement and stability. Early C-2 discharges had relatively good confinement, but global power losses exceeded the available NB input power. The addition of axially streaming plasma guns, magnetic end plugs as well as advanced surface conditioning leads to dramatic reductions in turbulence driven losses and greatly improved stability. As a result, fast ion confinement significantly improved and allowed for build-up of a dominant fast particle population. Under such appropriate conditions we achieved highly reproducible, long-lived, macroscopically stable FRCs with record lifetimes. This demonstrated many beneficial effects of large orbit particles and their performance impact on FRCs Together these achievements point to the prospect of beam-driven FRCs as a path toward fusion reactors. This presentation will review and expand on key results and present context for their interpretation.

  9. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  10. Reversing expectations during discourse comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Ming; Kuperberg, Gina

    2014-01-01

    In two ERP experiments, we asked whether comprehenders used the concessive connective, even so, to predict upcoming events. Participants read coherent and incoherent scenarios, with and without even so, e.g. “Elizabeth had a history exam on Monday. She took the test and aced/failed it. (Even so), she went home and celebrated wildly.”, as they rated coherence (Experiment 1) or simply answered intermittent comprehension questions (Experiment 2). The semantic function of even so was used to reverse real-world knowledge predictions, leading to an attenuated N400 to coherent versus incoherent target words (“celebrated”). Moreover, its pragmatic communicative function enhanced predictive processing, leading to more N400 attenuation to coherent targets in scenarios with than without even so. This benefit however, did not come for free: the detection of failed event predictions triggered a later posterior positivity and/or an anterior negativity effect, and costs of maintaining alternative likelihood relations manifest as a sustained negativity effect on sentence-final words. PMID:25914891

  11. Entropic uncertainty and measurement reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, Mario; Wehner, Stephanie; Wilde, Mark M.

    2016-07-01

    The entropic uncertainty relation with quantum side information (EUR-QSI) from (Berta et al 2010 Nat. Phys. 6 659) is a unifying principle relating two distinctive features of quantum mechanics: quantum uncertainty due to measurement incompatibility, and entanglement. In these relations, quantum uncertainty takes the form of preparation uncertainty where one of two incompatible measurements is applied. In particular, the ‘uncertainty witness’ lower bound in the EUR-QSI is not a function of a post-measurement state. An insightful proof of the EUR-QSI from (Coles et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 210405) makes use of a fundamental mathematical consequence of the postulates of quantum mechanics known as the non-increase of quantum relative entropy under quantum channels. Here, we exploit this perspective to establish a tightening of the EUR-QSI which adds a new state-dependent term in the lower bound, related to how well one can reverse the action of a quantum measurement. As such, this new term is a direct function of the post-measurement state and can be thought of as quantifying how much disturbance a given measurement causes. Our result thus quantitatively unifies this feature of quantum mechanics with the others mentioned above. We have experimentally tested our theoretical predictions on the IBM quantum experience and find reasonable agreement between our predictions and experimental outcomes.

  12. Reverse Genetics in Ecological Research

    PubMed Central

    Schwachtje, Jens; Kutschbach, Susan; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2008-01-01

    By precisely manipulating the expression of individual genetic elements thought to be important for ecological performance, reverse genetics has the potential to revolutionize plant ecology. However, untested concerns about possible side-effects of the transformation technique, caused by Agrobacterium infection and tissue culture, on plant performance have stymied research by requiring onerous sample sizes. We compare 5 independently transformed Nicotiana attenuata lines harboring empty vector control (EVC) T-DNA lacking silencing information with isogenic wild types (WT), and measured a battery of ecologically relevant traits, known to be important in plant-herbivore interactions: phytohormones, secondary metabolites, growth and fitness parameters under stringent competitive conditions, and transcriptional regulation with microarrays. As a positive control, we included a line silenced in trypsin proteinase inhibitor gene (TPI) expression, a potent anti-herbivore defense known to exact fitness costs in its expression, in the analysis. The experiment was conducted twice, with 10 and 20 biological replicates per genotype. For all parameters, we detected no difference between any EVC and WT lines, but could readily detect a fitness benefit of silencing TPI production. A statistical power analyses revealed that the minimum sample sizes required for detecting significant fitness differences between EVC and WT was 2–3 orders of magnitude larger than the 10 replicates required to detect a fitness effect of TPI silencing. We conclude that possible side-effects of transformation are far too low to obfuscate the study of ecologically relevant phenotypes. PMID:18253491

  13. 14 CFR 25.933 - Reversing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... reversal in flight the engine will produce no more than flight idle thrust. In addition, it must be shown by analysis or test, or both, that— (i) Each operable reverser can be restored to the forward thrust position; and (ii) The airplane is capable of continued safe flight and landing under any possible...

  14. 14 CFR 25.933 - Reversing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... reversal in flight the engine will produce no more than flight idle thrust. In addition, it must be shown by analysis or test, or both, that— (i) Each operable reverser can be restored to the forward thrust position; and (ii) The airplane is capable of continued safe flight and landing under any possible...

  15. 14 CFR 25.933 - Reversing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... reversal in flight the engine will produce no more than flight idle thrust. In addition, it must be shown by analysis or test, or both, that— (i) Each operable reverser can be restored to the forward thrust position; and (ii) The airplane is capable of continued safe flight and landing under any possible...

  16. 14 CFR 25.933 - Reversing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... reversal in flight the engine will produce no more than flight idle thrust. In addition, it must be shown by analysis or test, or both, that— (i) Each operable reverser can be restored to the forward thrust position; and (ii) The airplane is capable of continued safe flight and landing under any possible...

  17. 14 CFR 25.933 - Reversing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... reversal in flight the engine will produce no more than flight idle thrust. In addition, it must be shown by analysis or test, or both, that— (i) Each operable reverser can be restored to the forward thrust position; and (ii) The airplane is capable of continued safe flight and landing under any possible...

  18. The Rate Laws for Reversible Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Edward L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the rate laws for reversible reactions. Indicates that although prediction of the form of the rate law for a reverse reaction given the rate law for the forward reaction is not certain, the number of possibilities is limited because of relationships described. (JN)

  19. Empirical Evidence for Reversibility by Inversion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gladstone, Roy; Palazzo, Richard

    1974-01-01

    This study demonstrates that, given the assumption that the child does have some understanding of both height and amount, many nonconservers do give correct reversal judgments for both. Also, reversibility data from this study do not support the theory that a new stage appears when water conservation judgments appear. (Author/ED)

  20. Neuronal Activation for Semantically Reversible Sentences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Fiona M.; Thomas, Michael S. C.; Price, Cathy J.

    2010-01-01

    Semantically reversible sentences are prone to misinterpretation and take longer for typically developing children and adults to comprehend; they are also particularly problematic for those with language difficulties such as aphasia or Specific Language Impairment. In our study, we used fMRI to compare the processing of semantically reversible and…

  1. 14 CFR 23.933 - Reversing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... testing, or both, for propeller systems that allow the propeller blades to move from the flight low-pitch... systems. (a) For turbojet and turbofan reversing systems. (1) Each system intended for ground operation only must be designed so that, during any reversal in flight, the engine will produce no more...

  2. 14 CFR 23.933 - Reversing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... testing, or both, for propeller systems that allow the propeller blades to move from the flight low-pitch... systems. (a) For turbojet and turbofan reversing systems. (1) Each system intended for ground operation only must be designed so that, during any reversal in flight, the engine will produce no more...

  3. 14 CFR 23.933 - Reversing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... testing, or both, for propeller systems that allow the propeller blades to move from the flight low-pitch... systems. (a) For turbojet and turbofan reversing systems. (1) Each system intended for ground operation only must be designed so that, during any reversal in flight, the engine will produce no more...

  4. 14 CFR 23.933 - Reversing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... testing, or both, for propeller systems that allow the propeller blades to move from the flight low-pitch... systems. (a) For turbojet and turbofan reversing systems. (1) Each system intended for ground operation only must be designed so that, during any reversal in flight, the engine will produce no more...

  5. Reversible logic gates on Physarum Polycephalum

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, Andrew

    2015-03-10

    In this paper, we consider possibilities how to implement asynchronous sequential logic gates and quantum-style reversible logic gates on Physarum polycephalum motions. We show that in asynchronous sequential logic gates we can erase information because of uncertainty in the direction of plasmodium propagation. Therefore quantum-style reversible logic gates are more preferable for designing logic circuits on Physarum polycephalum.

  6. Nonidentified Kikuchi lines with reverse contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakhanyan, K. R.

    2009-03-01

    Electron diffraction patterns of silicon in transmission with contrast reversal from bright to dark for an unidentified Kikuchi line along its length have been obtained. The contrast reversal of an unidentified line is explained within the elementary mechanism of Kikuchi pattern formation taking into account the Kikuchi electron double diffraction.

  7. The New Reverse Transfer: A National Landscape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedel, Janice Nahra; Wilson, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    For decades, higher education professionals and researchers have used the term reverse transfer to describe a specific group of students. A current review of community college literature and higher education policy reflects a contextual change of the term, and today reverse transfer has grown to include students who transfer from a two-year…

  8. Reverse Transfer Students: Characteristics, Motivations, and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowrey, Kathryn Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The reverse transfer literature contains studies investigating the demographic characteristics of postsecondary students that attended a community college after attending a four-year institution, and their proportion in the community college student population. A few researchers have investigated reverse transfer student motives for enrolling in…

  9. Orthographic similarity: the case of "reversed anagrams".

    PubMed

    Morris, Alison L; Still, Mary L

    2012-07-01

    How orthographically similar are words such as paws and swap, flow and wolf, or live and evil? According to the letter position coding schemes used in models of visual word recognition, these reversed anagrams are considered to be less similar than words that share letters in the same absolute or relative positions (such as home and hose or plan and lane). Therefore, reversed anagrams should not produce the standard orthographic similarity effects found using substitution neighbors (e.g., home, hose). Simulations using the spatial coding model (Davis, Psychological Review 117, 713-758, 2010), for example, predict an inhibitory masked-priming effect for substitution neighbor word pairs but a null effect for reversed anagrams. Nevertheless, we obtained significant inhibitory priming using both stimulus types (Experiment 1). We also demonstrated that robust repetition blindness can be obtained for reversed anagrams (Experiment 2). Reversed anagrams therefore provide a new test for models of visual word recognition and orthographic similarity.

  10. Three component vibrational time reversal communication

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anderson, Brian E.; Ulrich, Timothy J.; Ten Cate, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Time reversal provides an optimal prefilter matched signal to apply to a communication signal before signal transmission. Time reversal allows compensation for wave speed dispersion and can function well in reverberant environments. Time reversal can be used to focus elastic energy to each of the three components of motion independently. A pipe encased in concrete was used to demonstrate the ability to conduct communications of information using three component time reversal. Furthermore, the ability of time reversal to compensate for multi-path distortion (overcoming reverberation) will be demonstrated and the rate of signal communication will be presented. [The U.S. Department ofmore » Energy, through the LANL/LDRD Program, is gratefully acknowledged for supporting this work.]« less

  11. Improving the Convergence of Reversible Samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey-Bellet, Luc; Spiliopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-08-01

    In Monte-Carlo methods the Markov processes used to sample a given target distribution usually satisfy detailed balance, i.e. they are time-reversible. However, relatively recent results have demonstrated that appropriate reversible and irreversible perturbations can accelerate convergence to equilibrium. In this paper we present some general design principles which apply to general Markov processes. Working with the generator of Markov processes, we prove that for some of the most commonly used performance criteria, i.e., spectral gap, asymptotic variance and large deviation functionals, sampling is improved for appropriate reversible and irreversible perturbations of some initially given reversible sampler. Moreover we provide specific constructions for such reversible and irreversible perturbations for various commonly used Markov processes, such as Markov chains and diffusions. In the case of diffusions, we make the discussion more specific using the large deviations rate function as a measure of performance.

  12. Parkinson’s disease managing reversible neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Marty; Stein, Alvin; Cole, Ted; McDougall, Beth; Westaway, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the Parkinson’s disease (PD) symptom course has been classified as an irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disease. This paper documents 29 PD and treatment-induced systemic depletion etiologies which cause and/or exacerbate the seven novel primary relative nutritional deficiencies associated with PD. These reversible relative nutritional deficiencies (RNDs) may facilitate and accelerate irreversible progressive neurodegeneration, while other reversible RNDs may induce previously undocumented reversible pseudo-neurodegeneration that is hiding in plain sight since the symptoms are identical to the symptoms being experienced by the PD patient. Documented herein is a novel nutritional approach for reversible processes management which may slow or halt irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disease and correct reversible RNDs whose symptoms are identical to the patient’s PD symptoms. PMID:27103805

  13. Estimation and uncertainty of reversible Markov models.

    PubMed

    Trendelkamp-Schroer, Benjamin; Wu, Hao; Paul, Fabian; Noé, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Reversibility is a key concept in Markov models and master-equation models of molecular kinetics. The analysis and interpretation of the transition matrix encoding the kinetic properties of the model rely heavily on the reversibility property. The estimation of a reversible transition matrix from simulation data is, therefore, crucial to the successful application of the previously developed theory. In this work, we discuss methods for the maximum likelihood estimation of transition matrices from finite simulation data and present a new algorithm for the estimation if reversibility with respect to a given stationary vector is desired. We also develop new methods for the Bayesian posterior inference of reversible transition matrices with and without given stationary vector taking into account the need for a suitable prior distribution preserving the meta-stable features of the observed process during posterior inference. All algorithms here are implemented in the PyEMMA software--http://pyemma.org--as of version 2.0. PMID:26547152

  14. Three component vibrational time reversal communication

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brian E.; Ulrich, Timothy J.; Ten Cate, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Time reversal provides an optimal prefilter matched signal to apply to a communication signal before signal transmission. Time reversal allows compensation for wave speed dispersion and can function well in reverberant environments. Time reversal can be used to focus elastic energy to each of the three components of motion independently. A pipe encased in concrete was used to demonstrate the ability to conduct communications of information using three component time reversal. Furthermore, the ability of time reversal to compensate for multi-path distortion (overcoming reverberation) will be demonstrated and the rate of signal communication will be presented. [The U.S. Department of Energy, through the LANL/LDRD Program, is gratefully acknowledged for supporting this work.

  15. Estimation and uncertainty of reversible Markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendelkamp-Schroer, Benjamin; Wu, Hao; Paul, Fabian; Noé, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Reversibility is a key concept in Markov models and master-equation models of molecular kinetics. The analysis and interpretation of the transition matrix encoding the kinetic properties of the model rely heavily on the reversibility property. The estimation of a reversible transition matrix from simulation data is, therefore, crucial to the successful application of the previously developed theory. In this work, we discuss methods for the maximum likelihood estimation of transition matrices from finite simulation data and present a new algorithm for the estimation if reversibility with respect to a given stationary vector is desired. We also develop new methods for the Bayesian posterior inference of reversible transition matrices with and without given stationary vector taking into account the need for a suitable prior distribution preserving the meta-stable features of the observed process during posterior inference. All algorithms here are implemented in the PyEMMA software — http://pyemma.org — as of version 2.0.

  16. Laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's procedure.

    PubMed

    Fiscon, Valentino; Portale, Giuseppe; Mazzeo, Antonio; Migliorini, Giovanni; Frigo, Flavio

    2014-12-01

    Reestablishing continuity after a Hartmann's procedure is considered a major surgical procedure with high morbidity/mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the short-/long-term outcome of laparoscopic restoration of bowel continuity after HP. A prospectively collected database of colorectal laparoscopic procedures (>800) performed between June 2005 and June 2013 was used to identify 20 consecutive patients who had undergone laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's procedure (LHR). Median age was 65.4. Ten patients (50 %) had undergone surgery for perforated diverticulitis, 3 (15 %) for cancer, and 7 (35 %) for other reasons (volvulus, posttraumatic perforation, and sigmoid perforation from foreign body). Previous HP had been performed laparoscopically in only 3 patients. Median operative time was 162.5 min. All the procedures were completed laparoscopically. Intraoperative complication rate was nil. Post-operative mortality and morbidity were respectively 0 and 10 % (1 pneumonia, 1 bowel obstruction from post-anastomotic stenosis which required resection and redo of the anastomosis). Median time to first flatus was 3 days, to normal diet 5 days. Median hospital stay was 9 days without readmissions. We followed up the patients for a median of 44 months: when asked, all 20 (100 %) said they would undergo the operation (LHR) again; 3 (15 %) had been re-operated of laparoscopic mesh repair for incisional hernia. When performed by experienced surgeons, LHR is a feasible, safe, reproducible operation, which allows early return of bowel function, early discharge and fast return to work for the patient. It has a low morbidity rate.

  17. Inhaled magnesium fluoride reverse bronchospasma.

    PubMed

    Gandia, Fedoua; Rouatbi, Sonia; Latiri, Imed; Guénard, Hervé; Tabka, Zouhair

    2010-01-01

    Asthma is a global health problem. Asthma attacks are becoming more severe and more resistant to usual treatment by beta(2) agonists nebulisation. The search for a new product that could reduce the morbidity of asthmatic disease seems necessary. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of inhaled magnesium fluoride (MgF(2)) with that of magnesium sulphate (MgSO(4)) 15% alone and sodium fluoride (NaF) 0.5 M alone in rats pre-contracted by methacholine (MeCh). Fifty six adult male Wistar rats of medium weight 259 +/- 15 g were divided randomly into five groups. They inhaled respectively: MeCh, MgF(2) + NaCl 0.9%, MgF(2) + acetic acid, MgSO(4) 15% single and NaF (0.5 M) single. Airway resistances were measured after each dose of MeCh by pneumomultitest equipment. Results indicated that (1) MgF(2) + NaCl 0.9%, MgF(2) + acetic acid and MgSO(4) reversed significantly the methacholine-induced bronchial constriction in rats and had a bronchodilating effect at the moment of its administration (2) MgF(2) + acetic acid led to a greater decrease (P<0.05) of bronchial resistances when compared to that obtained from MgF(2) + NaCl 0.9%, NaF exclusively and MgSO(4) alone (3) inhaled NaF alone led to a significant bronchorelaxing effect (P<0.05) that starts at the sixth dose of MeCh (17 mg/L). As a matter of fact, MgF(2) dissolved in acetic acid and delivered in aerosol form reduces significantly bronchial spasm. In conclusion, MgF(2) can be used as a bronchodilator for diseases with bronchospasma such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

  18. Chemical reactions in reverse micelle systems

    DOEpatents

    Matson, Dean W.; Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.; Consani, Keith A.

    1993-08-24

    This invention is directed to conducting chemical reactions in reverse micelle or microemulsion systems comprising a substantially discontinuous phase including a polar fluid, typically an aqueous fluid, and a microemulsion promoter, typically a surfactant, for facilitating the formation of reverse micelles in the system. The system further includes a substantially continuous phase including a non-polar or low-polarity fluid material which is a gas under standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and which is generally a water-insoluble fluid in a near critical or supercritical state. Thus, the microemulsion system is maintained at a pressure and temperature such that the density of the non-polar or low-polarity fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. The method of carrying out chemical reactions generally comprises forming a first reverse micelle system including an aqueous fluid including reverse micelles in a water-insoluble fluid in the supercritical state. Then, a first reactant is introduced into the first reverse micelle system, and a chemical reaction is carried out with the first reactant to form a reaction product. In general, the first reactant can be incorporated into, and the product formed in, the reverse micelles. A second reactant can also be incorporated in the first reverse micelle system which is capable of reacting with the first reactant to form a product.

  19. Why Contextual Preference Reversals Maximize Expected Value

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Contextual preference reversals occur when a preference for one option over another is reversed by the addition of further options. It has been argued that the occurrence of preference reversals in human behavior shows that people violate the axioms of rational choice and that people are not, therefore, expected value maximizers. In contrast, we demonstrate that if a person is only able to make noisy calculations of expected value and noisy observations of the ordinal relations among option features, then the expected value maximizing choice is influenced by the addition of new options and does give rise to apparent preference reversals. We explore the implications of expected value maximizing choice, conditioned on noisy observations, for a range of contextual preference reversal types—including attraction, compromise, similarity, and phantom effects. These preference reversal types have played a key role in the development of models of human choice. We conclude that experiments demonstrating contextual preference reversals are not evidence for irrationality. They are, however, a consequence of expected value maximization given noisy observations. PMID:27337391

  20. Why contextual preference reversals maximize expected value.

    PubMed

    Howes, Andrew; Warren, Paul A; Farmer, George; El-Deredy, Wael; Lewis, Richard L

    2016-07-01

    Contextual preference reversals occur when a preference for one option over another is reversed by the addition of further options. It has been argued that the occurrence of preference reversals in human behavior shows that people violate the axioms of rational choice and that people are not, therefore, expected value maximizers. In contrast, we demonstrate that if a person is only able to make noisy calculations of expected value and noisy observations of the ordinal relations among option features, then the expected value maximizing choice is influenced by the addition of new options and does give rise to apparent preference reversals. We explore the implications of expected value maximizing choice, conditioned on noisy observations, for a range of contextual preference reversal types-including attraction, compromise, similarity, and phantom effects. These preference reversal types have played a key role in the development of models of human choice. We conclude that experiments demonstrating contextual preference reversals are not evidence for irrationality. They are, however, a consequence of expected value maximization given noisy observations. (PsycINFO Database Record

  1. Novel Designs of Quantum Reversible Counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xuemei; Zhu, Haihong; Chen, Fulong; Zhu, Junru; Zhang, Ziyang

    2016-08-01

    Reversible logic, as an interesting and important issue, has been widely used in designing combinational and sequential circuits for low-power and high-speed computation. Though a significant number of works have been done on reversible combinational logic, the realization of reversible sequential circuit is still at premature stage. Reversible counter is not only an important part of the sequential circuit but also an essential part of the quantum circuit system. In this paper, we designed two kinds of novel reversible counters. In order to construct counter, the innovative reversible T Flip-flop Gate (TFG), T Flip-flop block (T_FF) and JK flip-flop block (JK_FF) are proposed. Based on the above blocks and some existing reversible gates, the 4-bit binary-coded decimal (BCD) counter and controlled Up/Down synchronous counter are designed. With the help of Verilog hardware description language (Verilog HDL), these counters above have been modeled and confirmed. According to the simulation results, our circuits' logic structures are validated. Compared to the existing ones in terms of quantum cost (QC), delay (DL) and garbage outputs (GBO), it can be concluded that our designs perform better than the others. There is no doubt that they can be used as a kind of important storage components to be applied in future low-power computing systems.

  2. Why contextual preference reversals maximize expected value.

    PubMed

    Howes, Andrew; Warren, Paul A; Farmer, George; El-Deredy, Wael; Lewis, Richard L

    2016-07-01

    Contextual preference reversals occur when a preference for one option over another is reversed by the addition of further options. It has been argued that the occurrence of preference reversals in human behavior shows that people violate the axioms of rational choice and that people are not, therefore, expected value maximizers. In contrast, we demonstrate that if a person is only able to make noisy calculations of expected value and noisy observations of the ordinal relations among option features, then the expected value maximizing choice is influenced by the addition of new options and does give rise to apparent preference reversals. We explore the implications of expected value maximizing choice, conditioned on noisy observations, for a range of contextual preference reversal types-including attraction, compromise, similarity, and phantom effects. These preference reversal types have played a key role in the development of models of human choice. We conclude that experiments demonstrating contextual preference reversals are not evidence for irrationality. They are, however, a consequence of expected value maximization given noisy observations. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27337391

  3. Vasectomy: clinical aspects and reversibility.

    PubMed

    Muangman, V

    1979-12-01

    studies involved 185 men who had a vasectomy performed at Ramathibodi Hospital. The postvasectomized man usually feels scrotal ache or discomfort for a few days. The testicular size will not change. Approximately 50% of vasectomized men showed sperm antibodies in their serum after 6 months to 1 year, which gradually diminished at 1 1/2-2 years. The studies did not reveal any significant changes in psychosexual behavior. With the standard method of vasovasostomy the rate of pregnancy of 30% is acceptable by many. Microsurgery is introduced into this field as there is a high rate of pregnancy requirement after vasectomy reversal.

  4. Reversibility and efficiency in coding protein information.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Boaz; Priel, Avner

    2010-12-21

    Why the genetic code has a fixed length? Protein information is transferred by coding each amino acid using codons whose length equals 3 for all amino acids. Hence the most probable and the least probable amino acid get a codeword with an equal length. Moreover, the distributions of amino acids found in nature are not uniform and therefore the efficiency of such codes is sub-optimal. The origins of these apparently non-efficient codes are yet unclear. In this paper we propose an a priori argument for the energy efficiency of such codes resulting from their reversibility, in contrast to their time inefficiency. Such codes are reversible in the sense that a primitive processor, reading three letters in each step, can always reverse its operation, undoing its process. We examine the codes for the distributions of amino acids that exist in nature and show that they could not be both time efficient and reversible. We investigate a family of Zipf-type distributions and present their efficient (non-fixed length) prefix code, their graphs, and the condition for their reversibility. We prove that for a large family of such distributions, if the code is time efficient, it could not be reversible. In other words, if pre-biotic processes demand reversibility, the protein code could not be time efficient. The benefits of reversibility are clear: reversible processes are adiabatic, namely, they dissipate a very small amount of energy. Such processes must be done slowly enough; therefore time efficiency is non-important. It is reasonable to assume that early biochemical complexes were more prone towards energy efficiency, where forward and backward processes were almost symmetrical. PMID:20868696

  5. An insightful approach for understanding solvatochromic reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoni, Vinicius; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have shown that organic dyes may show solvatochromic reversal with respect to the solvent polarity. This controversial non-monotonic behavior is still not well understood. This has been analyzed here using the merocyanine of Brooker as the working example. Associating a continuous variable to model the solvent polarity a solvatochromic reversal is obtained with a single solute without aggregation. This reversal is in excellent agreement with the experimental results and is shown to be the outcome of a competition between structural change and intramolecular charge transfer.

  6. Time reversibility in the quantum frame

    SciTech Connect

    Masot-Conde, Fátima

    2014-12-04

    Classic Mechanics and Electromagnetism, conventionally taken as time-reversible, share the same concept of motion (either of mass or charge) as the basis of the time reversibility in their own fields. This paper focuses on the relationship between mobile geometry and motion reversibility. The goal is to extrapolate the conclusions to the quantum frame, where matter and radiation behave just as elementary mobiles. The possibility that the asymmetry of Time (Time’s arrow) is an effect of a fundamental quantum asymmetry of elementary particles, turns out to be a consequence of the discussion.

  7. Reverse logistics in the Brazilian construction industry.

    PubMed

    Nunes, K R A; Mahler, C F; Valle, R A

    2009-09-01

    In Brazil most Construction and Demolition Waste (C&D waste) is not recycled. This situation is expected to change significantly, since new federal regulations oblige municipalities to create and implement sustainable C&D waste management plans which assign an important role to recycling activities. The recycling organizational network and its flows and components are fundamental to C&D waste recycling feasibility. Organizational networks, flows and components involve reverse logistics. The aim of this work is to introduce the concepts of reverse logistics and reverse distribution channel networks and to study the Brazilian C&D waste case. PMID:19481331

  8. Methane Screening in JET Reverse Field Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan; B. Alper; G. Corrigan; S.K. Erents; C. Giroud; A. Korotkov; H. Leggate; G.F. Mathews; R.A. Pitts; M. Stamp; J. Spence

    2004-05-17

    JET plasmas with reverse magnetic field feature a different SOL flow than those with normal field. The observed carbon fueling efficiency from injecting methane gas was similar in reverse and normal field. EDGE2D modeling used an externally applied force to create the SOL flows, without specifying the origin of the force. The resulting flow agreed reasonably with the experimental values between the separatrix and 4 cm mid-plane depth in the SOL. The effect of the flow on the calculated carbon screening was 5 to 15% higher carbon fueling efficiency for the low flow velocity with reverse field.

  9. Cheaper Adjoints by Reversing Address Computations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hascoët, L.; Utke, J.; Naumann, U.

    2008-01-01

    The reverse mode of automatic differentiation is widely used in science and engineering. A severe bottleneck for the performance of the reverse mode, however, is the necessity to recover certain intermediate values of the program in reverse order. Among these values are computed addresses, which traditionally are recovered through forward recomputation and storage in memory. We propose an alternative approach for recovery that uses inverse computation based on dependency information. Address storage constitutes a significant portion of the overall storage requirements. An example illustrates substantial gains that the proposed approach yields, and we show use cases in practical applications.

  10. Extending the boundaries of reverse engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrie, Chris

    2002-04-01

    In today's market place the potential of Reverse Engineering as a time compression tool is commonly lost under its traditional definition. The term Reverse Engineering was coined way back at the advent of CMM machines and 3D CAD systems to describe the process of fitting surfaces to captured point data. Since these early beginnings, downstream hardware scanning and digitising systems have evolved in parallel with an upstream demand, greatly increasing the potential of a point cloud data set within engineering design and manufacturing processes. The paper will discuss the issues surrounding Reverse Engineering at the turn of the millennium.

  11. Constraining the reversing and non-reversing modes of the geodynamo. New insights from magnetostratigraphy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Y.; Pavlov, V.; Shatsillo, A.; Hulot, G.

    2015-12-01

    Constraining the evolution in the geomagnetic reversal frequency over hundreds of million years is not a trivial matter. Beyond the fact that there are long periods without reversals, known as superchrons, and periods with many reversals, the way the reversal frequency changes through time during reversing periods is still debated. A smooth evolution or a succession of stationary segments have both been suggested to account for the geomagnetic polarity time scale since the Middle-Late Jurassic. Sudden changes from a reversing mode to a non-reversing mode of the geodynamo may also well have happened, the switch between the two modes having then possibly been controlled by the thermal conditions at the core-mantle boundary. There is, nevertheless, a growing set of magnetostratigraphic data, which could help decipher a proper interpretation of the reversal history, in particular in the early Paleozoic and even during the Precambrian. Although yielding a fragmentary record, these data reveal the occurrence of both additional superchrons and periods characterized by extremely high, not to say extraordinary, magnetic reversal frequencies. In this talk, we will present a synthesis of these data, mainly obtained from Siberia, and discuss their implication for the magnetic reversal behavior over the past billion years.

  12. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways in Ecotoxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or incompletely characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, meabolic, signaling) t...

  13. The reverse laser drilling of transparent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, T. R.; Lindner, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    Within a limited range of incident laser-beam intensities, laser drilling of a sapphire wafer initiates on the surface of the wafer where the laser beam exits and proceeds upstream in the laser beam to the surface where the laser beam enters the wafer. This reverse laser drilling is the result of the constructive interference between the laser beam and its reflected component on the exit face of the wafer. Constructive interference occurs only at the exit face of the sapphire wafer because the internally reflected laser beam suffers no phase change there. A model describing reverse laser drilling predicts the ranges of incident laser-beam intensity where no drilling, reverse laser drilling, and forward laser drilling can be expected in various materials. The application of reverse laser drilling in fabricating feed-through conductors in silicon-on-sapphire wafers for a massively parallel processer is described.

  14. Reverse-osmosis membranes by plasma polymerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollahan, J. R.; Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    Thin allyl amine polymer films were developed using plasma polymerization. Resulting dry composite membranes effectively reject sodium chloride during reverse osmosis. Films are 98% sodium chloride rejective, and 46% urea rejective.

  15. Reversibility of hyperhidrosis post axillary depilatory laser.

    PubMed

    Helou, Josiane; Habre, Maya; Soutou, Boutros; Maatouk, Ismael; Ibrahim, Tony; Tomb, Roland

    2014-03-01

    Hyperhidrosis and bromhidrosis were lately reported as novel side effects of laser-assisted removal of axillary hair. The goal of our study was to evaluate the reversibility of these two side effects. An observational, single-center cohort study included over a 30-month screening period 30 patients with newly reported hyperhidrosis and/or bromhidrosis related to axillary depilatory laser. After 26 weeks of follow-up, each patient was assessed for spontaneous reversibility. A 12-week duration treatment with topical aluminum chloride was evaluated in patients with persisting hyperhidrosis. Hyperhidrosis was assessed using the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale (HDSS). Spontaneous reversibility was observed in 20% of patients. In total, 23 out of 30 patients recovered normal axillary transpiration either spontaneously or after treatment. Mean HDSS score was significantly lower in the treated group. It appears that axillary hyperhidrosis and bromhidrosis, secondary to laser depilation, reverse either spontaneously or after using topical antiperspirant. PMID:23887660

  16. Galen: developer of the reversal design?

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert T

    2007-01-01

    Galen, known to psychologists largely for his personality theory of the four temperaments, diagnosed the cause of a patient's symptoms with a form of reversal design long before its formal description (e.g., Sidman, 1960).

  17. Flow reversal power limit for the HFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lap Y.; Tichler, P.R.

    1995-10-01

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) undergoes a buoyancy-driven reversal of flow in the reactor core following certain postulated accidents. Uncertainties about the afterheat removal capability during the flow reversal has limited the reactor operating power to 30 MW. An experimental and analytical program to address these uncertainties is described in this report. The experiments were single channel flow reversal tests under a range of conditions. The analytical phase involved simulations of the tests to benchmark the physical models and development of a criterion for dryout. The criterion is then used in simulations of reactor accidents to determine a safe operating power level. It is concluded that the limit on the HFBR operating power with respect to the issue of flow reversal is in excess of 60 MW.

  18. Galen: Developer of the Reversal Design?

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Robert T

    2007-01-01

    Galen, known to psychologists largely for his personality theory of the four temperaments, diagnosed the cause of a patient's symptoms with a form of reversal design long before its formal description (e.g., Sidman, 1960). PMID:22478486

  19. Reversible Oxygenation of Oxygen Transport Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drain, C. M.; Corden, Barry B.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration which illustrates changes in the visible spectra of oxygen transport proteins upon reversible oxygen binding. Provides a comparison of the physical characteristics of oxygen storage and transport proteins. Reviews essentials for preparation of the materials. (ML)

  20. Optical reversible programmable Boolean logic unit.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Tanay

    2012-07-20

    Computing with reversibility is the only way to avoid dissipation of energy associated with bit erase. So, a reversible microprocessor is required for future computing. In this paper, a design of a simple all-optical reversible programmable processor is proposed using a polarizing beam splitter, liquid crystal-phase spatial light modulators, a half-wave plate, and plane mirrors. This circuit can perform 16 logical operations according to three programming inputs. Also, inputs can be easily recovered from the outputs. It is named the "reversible programmable Boolean logic unit (RPBLU)." The logic unit is the basic building block of many complex computational operations. Hence the design is important in sense. Two orthogonally polarized lights are defined here as two logical states, respectively.

  1. Local heating realization by reverse thermal cloak

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Run; Wei, Xuli; Hu, Jinyan; Luo, Xiaobing

    2014-01-01

    Transformation thermodynamics, as one of the important branches among the extensions of transformation optics, has attracted plentiful attentions and interests recently. The result of transformation thermodynamics, or called as “thermal cloak”, can realize isothermal region and hide objects from heat. In this paper, we presented the concept of “reverse thermal cloak” to correspond to the thermal cloak and made a simple engineering definition to identify them. By full-wave simulations, we verified that the reverse thermal cloak can concentrate heat and realize local heating. The performance of local heating depends on the anisotropic dispersion of the cloaking layer's thermal conductivity. Three-dimensional finite element simulations demonstrated that the reverse thermal cloak can be used to heat up objects. Besides pre-engineered metamaterials, such reverse thermal cloak can even be realized with homogenous materials by alternating spoke-like structure or Hashin coated-sphere structure. PMID:24398592

  2. Reversibility of hyperhidrosis post axillary depilatory laser.

    PubMed

    Helou, Josiane; Habre, Maya; Soutou, Boutros; Maatouk, Ismael; Ibrahim, Tony; Tomb, Roland

    2014-03-01

    Hyperhidrosis and bromhidrosis were lately reported as novel side effects of laser-assisted removal of axillary hair. The goal of our study was to evaluate the reversibility of these two side effects. An observational, single-center cohort study included over a 30-month screening period 30 patients with newly reported hyperhidrosis and/or bromhidrosis related to axillary depilatory laser. After 26 weeks of follow-up, each patient was assessed for spontaneous reversibility. A 12-week duration treatment with topical aluminum chloride was evaluated in patients with persisting hyperhidrosis. Hyperhidrosis was assessed using the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale (HDSS). Spontaneous reversibility was observed in 20% of patients. In total, 23 out of 30 patients recovered normal axillary transpiration either spontaneously or after treatment. Mean HDSS score was significantly lower in the treated group. It appears that axillary hyperhidrosis and bromhidrosis, secondary to laser depilation, reverse either spontaneously or after using topical antiperspirant.

  3. Reversible Michael additions: covalent inhibitors and prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Martin H

    2012-11-01

    Covalent inhibition is an efficient molecular mechanism for inhibiting enzymes or modulating the function of proteins and is found in the action of many drugs and biologically active natural products. However, it is has been less appreciated that the formation of covalent bonds can be reversible or irreversible. This review focuses on biologically active compounds that are Michael acceptors and how the reversible nature of the Michael addition reaction influences biological activity and how this can be exploited in designing prodrugs.

  4. Predicting trend reversals using market instantaneous state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bury, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Collective behaviors taking place in financial markets reveal strongly correlated states especially during a crisis period. A natural hypothesis is that trend reversals are also driven by mutual influences between the different stock exchanges. Using a maximum entropy approach, we find coordinated behavior during trend reversals dominated by the pairwise component. In particular, these events are predicted with high significant accuracy by the ensemble's instantaneous state.

  5. MODIFIED BOROHYDRIDES FOR REVERSIBLE HYDROGEN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Au, Ming

    2006-05-10

    This paper reports the results in the effort to destabilize lithium borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage. A number of metals, metal hydrides, metal chlorides and complex hydrides were selected and evaluated as the destabilization agents for reducing dehydriding temperature and generating dehydriding-rehydriding reversibility. It is found that some additives are effective. The Raman spectroscopic analysis shows the change of B-H binding nature.

  6. Miniature Reversal Electron-Attachment Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara

    1994-01-01

    Miniature reversal electron-attachment detector (miniREAD) enables direct injection of air or vapor at atmospheric pressure from monitored area into mass-spectrometric instrument to detect explosives, narcotics, or other substances, vapors of which suspected of being present in low concentrations. In comparison with older reversal electron-attachment detector, miniREAD simpler in design; more rugged; and easier to build, repair, and maintain. In addition, probably more sensitive.

  7. How the geomagnetic field vector reverses polarity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prevot, M.; Mankinen, E.A.; Gromme, C.S.; Coe, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    A highly detailed record of both the direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field as it reverses has been obtained from a Miocene volcanic sequence. The transitional field is low in intensity and is typically non-axisymmetric. Geomagnetic impulses corresponding to astonishingly high rates of change of the field sometimes occur, suggesting that liquid velocity within the Earth's core increases during geomagnetic reversals. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  8. Another look at children's symbol reversals.

    PubMed

    Patton, J E; Yarbrough, D B; Thursby, D

    2000-04-01

    In a previously reported longitudinal study of reversal errors for static and kinetic written symbols we found no compelling support for their academic importance in kindergarten (n = 201), Grade 1 (n = 156), or Grade 2 (n = 129); however, for Grade 3 (n = 105), kinetic reversals became a significant predictor of tested reading achievement. If reliable, this finding might have implications for the identification of children with long-term reading impairment. PMID:10833756

  9. RNA virus reverse genetics and vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Stobart, Christopher C; Moore, Martin L

    2014-06-25

    RNA viruses are capable of rapid spread and severe or potentially lethal disease in both animals and humans. The development of reverse genetics systems for manipulation and study of RNA virus genomes has provided platforms for designing and optimizing viral mutants for vaccine development. Here, we review the impact of RNA virus reverse genetics systems on past and current efforts to design effective and safe viral therapeutics and vaccines.

  10. RNA Virus Reverse Genetics and Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Stobart, Christopher C.; Moore, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    RNA viruses are capable of rapid spread and severe or potentially lethal disease in both animals and humans. The development of reverse genetics systems for manipulation and study of RNA virus genomes has provided platforms for designing and optimizing viral mutants for vaccine development. Here, we review the impact of RNA virus reverse genetics systems on past and current efforts to design effective and safe viral therapeutics and vaccines. PMID:24967693

  11. Geomagnetic reversal in brunhes normal polarity epoch.

    PubMed

    Smith, J D; Foster, J H

    1969-02-01

    The magnetic stratigraphly of seven cores of deep-sea sediment established the existence of a short interval of reversed polarity in the upper part of the Brunches epoch of normal polarity. The reversed zone in the cores correlates well with paleontological boundaries and is named the Blake event. Its boundaries are estimated to be 108,000 and 114,000 years ago +/- 10 percent. PMID:17750890

  12. Emerging Indications for Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Urch, Ekaterina; Dines, Joshua S; Dines, David M

    2016-01-01

    Historically, reverse shoulder arthroplasty was reserved for older, low-demand patients in whom rotator cuff arthropathy was diagnosed. Other common indications included sequelae of previously treated proximal humerus fractures, failed anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty, tumor resection, and rheumatoid arthritis in the elderly population. Unpredictable implant durability and high complication rates have limited the use of reverse shoulder arthroplasty to a narrow group of patients. Over the past decade, however, research has led to an improved understanding of the biomechanics behind reverse shoulder prostheses, which has improved implant design and surgical techniques. Consequently, orthopaedic surgeons have slowly begun to expand the indications for reverse shoulder arthroplasty to include a wider spectrum of shoulder pathologies. Recent studies have shown promising results for patients who undergo reverse shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of acute proximal humerus fractures, massive rotator cuff tears without arthropathy, primary osteoarthritis, and chronic anterior dislocation, as well as for younger patients who have rheumatoid arthritis. These data suggest that, with judicious patient selection, reverse shoulder arthroplasty can be an excellent treatment option for a growing patient cohort. PMID:27049188

  13. Time reversals of irreversible quantum maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurell, Erik; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Życzkowski, Karol

    2015-09-01

    We propose an alternative notion of time reversal in open quantum systems as represented by linear quantum operations, and a related generalization of classical entropy production in the environment. This functional is the ratio of the probability to observe a transition between two states under the forward and the time reversed dynamics, and leads, as in the classical case, to fluctuation relations as tautological identities. As in classical dynamics in contact with a heat bath, time reversal is not unique, and we discuss several possibilities. For any bistochastic map its dual map preserves the trace and describes a legitimate dynamics reversed in time, in that case the entropy production in the environment vanishes. For a generic stochastic map we construct a simple quantum operation which can be interpreted as a time reversal. For instance, the decaying channel, which sends the excited state into the ground state with a certain probability, can be reversed into the channel transforming the ground state into the excited state with the same probability.

  14. Rotating Reverse-Osmosis for Water Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueptow, RIchard M.

    2004-01-01

    A new design for a water-filtering device combines rotating filtration with reverse osmosis to create a rotating reverse- osmosis system. Rotating filtration has been used for separating plasma from whole blood, while reverse osmosis has been used in purification of water and in some chemical processes. Reverse- osmosis membranes are vulnerable to concentration polarization a type of fouling in which the chemicals meant not to pass through the reverse-osmosis membranes accumulate very near the surfaces of the membranes. The combination of rotating filtration and reverse osmosis is intended to prevent concentration polarization and thereby increase the desired flux of filtered water while decreasing the likelihood of passage of undesired chemical species through the filter. Devices based on this concept could be useful in a variety of commercial applications, including purification and desalination of drinking water, purification of pharmaceutical process water, treatment of household and industrial wastewater, and treatment of industrial process water. A rotating filter consists of a cylindrical porous microfilter rotating within a stationary concentric cylindrical outer shell (see figure). The aqueous suspension enters one end of the annulus between the inner and outer cylinders. Filtrate passes through the rotating cylindrical microfilter and is removed via a hollow shaft. The concentrated suspension is removed at the end of the annulus opposite the end where the suspension entered.

  15. The "van Zijl" Jurassic geomagnetic reversal revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtillot, V.; Moulin, M.; fluteau, F.; Valet, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    In 1962, van Zijl and colleagues published the first record of one of the oldest reversals available in some detail. This was a Jurassic reversal recorded in the basaltic sequence of the Lesotho, part of the Karoo large igneous province. In 2003, Prévot and colleagues provided a second more accurate record (Bushmen's Pass section - BP). We have recently obtained two other detailed records from two sections (Naude's Nek NN and Oxbow-Moteng Pass OM). The reversal is therefore now recorded in some detail in three sections which are up to 200km away from each other (the age being at ~180Ma). The reversal is recorded as 23 transitional directions over 130m in NN. When lava flows having recorded the (statistically) same direction to within a few degrees, which likely belong to the same cooling unit, are regrouped (directional groups or DG), we are left with 10 independent directions. There are 13 transitional directions over 160m in OM, and 8 distinct, independent directions. And in the BP section, there are 35 transitional directions over 200m, and 21 independent directions. The three records are remarkably similar and at the same time complementary. They can be used to retrace the VGP reversal path in a unique and robust way. Directions display 4 strong clusters which are interpreted as times of slow secular variation and/or fast extrusion rate of the lava. The path jumps from transitional reversed to transitional normal directions with no intermediate directions between 30°S and 30°N (once the path has been restored to proper geographical coordinates applicable to the ~180Ma reconstruction of the continents). We have applied several techniques to determine the evolution of relative paleo-intensities during the reversal; all these methods converge to the same conclusion, with intensities lower by a factor close to 10 between the core of the reversal and the time when full normal polarity has been regained, with intermediate intensities just before and after the core

  16. Reverse logistics in the construction industry.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, M Reza; Rameezdeen, Raufdeen; Chileshe, Nicholas; Lehmann, Steffen

    2015-06-01

    Reverse logistics in construction refers to the movement of products and materials from salvaged buildings to a new construction site. While there is a plethora of studies looking at various aspects of the reverse logistics chain, there is no systematic review of literature on this important subject as applied to the construction industry. Therefore, the objective of this study is to integrate the fragmented body of knowledge on reverse logistics in construction, with the aim of promoting the concept among industry stakeholders and the wider construction community. Through a qualitative meta-analysis, the study synthesises the findings of previous studies and presents some actions needed by industry stakeholders to promote this concept within the real-life context. First, the trend of research and terminology related with reverse logistics is introduced. Second, it unearths the main advantages and barriers of reverse logistics in construction while providing some suggestions to harness the advantages and mitigate these barriers. Finally, it provides a future research direction based on the review. PMID:26018543

  17. Effects of thrust reversing in ground proximity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, P. B.; Hughes, R. V.

    1987-01-01

    The changes in stability and control characteristics encountered by a thrust reversing aircraft during its final approach, landing, and ground roll are described. These changes include a strong pitch-up accompanied by the loss of horizontal tail and aileron control effectiveness. The magnitude of reverser induced changes in ground effect are much larger than corresponding changes in free air. Some unexpected unsteady motions exhibited in wind tunnel by an aircraft model with reversers operating in ground proximity are also described. The cause of this oscillatory behavior was determined to be an unsteady interaction between the wall jets formed by impingement of reverser jets on the ground and the on-coming free stream. Time histories of rolling moments measured by the wind tunnel balance or support system were removed and frequencies were scaled by Strouhal number to full scale. Corrected time series were used to simulate the motion of a fighter aircraft with thrust reversers in ground effect. The simulation predicted large roll angles and nose down attitude at touchdown. Some phenomena of jet attachment to solid surfaces are discussed and areas for future research are recommended.

  18. Reverse logistics in the construction industry.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, M Reza; Rameezdeen, Raufdeen; Chileshe, Nicholas; Lehmann, Steffen

    2015-06-01

    Reverse logistics in construction refers to the movement of products and materials from salvaged buildings to a new construction site. While there is a plethora of studies looking at various aspects of the reverse logistics chain, there is no systematic review of literature on this important subject as applied to the construction industry. Therefore, the objective of this study is to integrate the fragmented body of knowledge on reverse logistics in construction, with the aim of promoting the concept among industry stakeholders and the wider construction community. Through a qualitative meta-analysis, the study synthesises the findings of previous studies and presents some actions needed by industry stakeholders to promote this concept within the real-life context. First, the trend of research and terminology related with reverse logistics is introduced. Second, it unearths the main advantages and barriers of reverse logistics in construction while providing some suggestions to harness the advantages and mitigate these barriers. Finally, it provides a future research direction based on the review.

  19. Conditional reversibility in nonequilibrium stochastic systems.

    PubMed

    Bonança, Marcus V S; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    For discrete-state stochastic systems obeying Markovian dynamics, we establish the counterpart of the conditional reversibility theorem obtained by Gallavotti for deterministic systems [Ann. de l'Institut Henri Poincaré (A) 70, 429 (1999)]. Our result states that stochastic trajectories conditioned on opposite values of entropy production are related by time reversal, in the long-time limit. In other words, the probability of observing a particular sequence of events, given a long trajectory with a specified entropy production rate σ, is the same as the probability of observing the time-reversed sequence of events, given a trajectory conditioned on the opposite entropy production, -σ, where both trajectories are sampled from the same underlying Markov process. To obtain our result, we use an equivalence between conditioned ("microcanonical") and biased ("canonical") ensembles of nonequilibrium trajectories. We provide an example to illustrate our findings. PMID:26986282

  20. Influenza reverse genetics: dissecting immunity and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Siying; Evans, Justin G; Stambas, John

    2014-02-14

    Reverse genetics systems allow artificial generation of non-segmented and segmented negative-sense RNA viruses, like influenza viruses, entirely from cloned cDNA. Since the introduction of reverse genetics systems over a decade ago, the ability to generate 'designer' influenza viruses in the laboratory has advanced both basic and applied research, providing a powerful tool to investigate and characterise host-pathogen interactions and advance the development of novel therapeutic strategies. The list of applications for reverse genetics has expanded vastly in recent years. In this review, we discuss the development and implications of this technique, including the recent controversy surrounding the generation of a transmissible H5N1 influenza virus. We will focus on research involving the identification of viral protein function, development of live-attenuated influenza virus vaccines, host-pathogen interactions, immunity and the generation of recombinant influenza virus vaccine vectors for the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases and cancer.

  1. Conditional reversibility in nonequilibrium stochastic systems.

    PubMed

    Bonança, Marcus V S; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    For discrete-state stochastic systems obeying Markovian dynamics, we establish the counterpart of the conditional reversibility theorem obtained by Gallavotti for deterministic systems [Ann. de l'Institut Henri Poincaré (A) 70, 429 (1999)]. Our result states that stochastic trajectories conditioned on opposite values of entropy production are related by time reversal, in the long-time limit. In other words, the probability of observing a particular sequence of events, given a long trajectory with a specified entropy production rate σ, is the same as the probability of observing the time-reversed sequence of events, given a trajectory conditioned on the opposite entropy production, -σ, where both trajectories are sampled from the same underlying Markov process. To obtain our result, we use an equivalence between conditioned ("microcanonical") and biased ("canonical") ensembles of nonequilibrium trajectories. We provide an example to illustrate our findings.

  2. Importance of Reversibility in the Quantum Formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, François

    2011-10-01

    In this Letter I stress the role of causal reversibility (time symmetry), together with causality and locality, in the justification of the quantum formalism. First, in the algebraic quantum formalism, I show that the assumption of reversibility implies that the observables of a quantum theory form an abstract real C⋆ algebra, and can be represented as an algebra of operators on a real Hilbert space. Second, in the quantum logic formalism, I emphasize which axioms for the lattice of propositions (the existence of an orthocomplementation and the covering property) derive from reversibility. A new argument based on locality and Soler’s theorem is used to derive the representation as projectors on a regular Hilbert space from the general quantum logic formalism. In both cases it is recalled that the restriction to complex algebras and Hilbert spaces comes from the constraints of locality and separability.

  3. Time reversal signal processing for communication.

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Derek P.; Jacklin, Neil; Punnoose, Ratish J.; Counsil, David T.

    2011-09-01

    Time-reversal is a wave focusing technique that makes use of the reciprocity of wireless propagation channels. It works particularly well in a cluttered environment with associated multipath reflection. This technique uses the multipath in the environment to increase focusing ability. Time-reversal can also be used to null signals, either to reduce unintentional interference or to prevent eavesdropping. It does not require controlled geometric placement of the transmit antennas. Unlike existing techniques it can work without line-of-sight. We have explored the performance of time-reversal focusing in a variety of simulated environments. We have also developed new algorithms to simultaneously focus at a location while nulling at an eavesdropper location. We have experimentally verified these techniques in a realistic cluttered environment.

  4. Optimal design of reverse osmosis module networks

    SciTech Connect

    Maskan, F.; Wiley, D.E.; Johnston, L.P.M.; Clements, D.J.

    2000-05-01

    The structure of individual reverse osmosis modules, the configuration of the module network, and the operating conditions were optimized for seawater and brackish water desalination. The system model included simple mathematical equations to predict the performance of the reverse osmosis modules. The optimization problem was formulated as a constrained multivariable nonlinear optimization. The objective function was the annual profit for the system, consisting of the profit obtained from the permeate, capital cost for the process units, and operating costs associated with energy consumption and maintenance. Optimization of several dual-stage reverse osmosis systems were investigated and compared. It was found that optimal network designs are the ones that produce the most permeate. It may be possible to achieve economic improvements by refining current membrane module designs and their operating pressures.

  5. Investigation into reversion of polyurethane encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, C. R.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of high humidity (95% RH) at 60 C, 70 C, 85 C and 100 C on the solid-to-liquid reversion of polyurethane elastomers (used for potting electrical connectors and conformal coating printed circuit boards) was investigated. Hardness measurements were conducted on eleven elastomers to track reversion for a 101-day period. The primary purpose of the tests was to provide data to predict service life for the polyurethane elastomers. This was not accomplished as the hardness did not deteriorate rapidly enough at the lower test temperatures. The tests did determine that the potting and coating materials most widely used on the S-1C Program are susceptible to reversion but appear adequate for service in the S-1C environment.

  6. How Uganda Reversed Its HIV Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Okware, Sam; Naamara, Warren; Sutherland, Don; Flanagan, Donna; Carael, Michel; Blas, Erik; Delay, Paul; Tarantola, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Uganda is one of only two countries in the world that has successfully reversed the course of its HIV epidemic. There remains much controversy about how Uganda's HIV prevalence declined in the 1990s. This article describes the prevention programs and activities that were implemented in Uganda during critical years in its HIV epidemic, 1987 to 1994. Multiple resources were aggregated to fuel HV prevention campaigns at multiple levels to a far greater degree than in neighboring countries. We conclude that the reversed direction of the HIV epidemic in Uganda was the direct result of these interventions and that other countries in the developing world could similarly prevent or reverse the escalation of HIV epidemics with greater availability of HIV prevention resources, and well designed programs that take efforts to a critical breadth and depth of effort. PMID:16858635

  7. Vibrational dynamics of ice in reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Dokter, Adriaan M; Petersen, Christian; Woutersen, Sander; Bakker, Huib J

    2008-01-28

    The ultrafast vibrational dynamics of HDO:D(2)O ice at 180 K in anionic reverse micelles is studied by midinfrared femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. Solutions containing reverse micelles are cooled to low temperatures by a fast-freezing procedure. The heating dynamics of the micellar solutions is studied to characterize the micellar structure. Small reverse micelles with a water content up to approximately 150 water molecules contain an amorphous form of ice that shows remarkably different vibrational dynamics compared to bulk hexagonal ice. The micellar amorphous ice has a much longer vibrational lifetime than bulk hexagonal ice and micellar liquid water. The vibrational lifetime is observed to increase linearly from 0.7 to 4 ps with the resonance frequency ranging from 3100 to 3500 cm(-1). From the pump dependence of the vibrational relaxation the homogeneous linewidth of the amorphous ice is determined (55+/-5 cm(-1)).

  8. Conditional reversibility in nonequilibrium stochastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonança, Marcus V. S.; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    For discrete-state stochastic systems obeying Markovian dynamics, we establish the counterpart of the conditional reversibility theorem obtained by Gallavotti for deterministic systems [Ann. de l'Institut Henri Poincaré (A) 70, 429 (1999)]. Our result states that stochastic trajectories conditioned on opposite values of entropy production are related by time reversal, in the long-time limit. In other words, the probability of observing a particular sequence of events, given a long trajectory with a specified entropy production rate σ , is the same as the probability of observing the time-reversed sequence of events, given a trajectory conditioned on the opposite entropy production, -σ , where both trajectories are sampled from the same underlying Markov process. To obtain our result, we use an equivalence between conditioned ("microcanonical") and biased ("canonical") ensembles of nonequilibrium trajectories. We provide an example to illustrate our findings.

  9. Origin of reversed vortex ratchet motion.

    PubMed

    Gillijns, W; Silhanek, A V; Moshchalkov, V V; Reichhardt, C J Olson; Reichhardt, C

    2007-12-14

    We experimentally demonstrate that the origin of multiply reversed rectified vortex motion in an asymmetric pinning landscape not only is a consequence of the vortex-vortex interactions but also essentially depends on the ratio between the characteristic interaction distance and the period of the asymmetric pinning potential. We study four samples with different periods d of the asymmetric potential. For large d the dc voltage V(dc) recorded under a ac excitation indicates that the average vortex drift is from bigger to smaller dots for all explored positive fields. As d is reduced, a series of sign reversals in the dc response are observed as a function of field. We show that the number of sign reversals increases as d decreases. These findings are in agreement with recent computer simulations and illustrate the relevance of the different characteristic lengths for the vortex rectification effects.

  10. Total laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's procedure.

    PubMed

    Masoni, Luigi; Mari, Francesco Saverio; Nigri, Giuseppe; Favi, Francesco; Pindozzi, Fioralba; Dall'Oglio, Anna; Pancaldi, Alessandra; Brescia, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Hartmann's procedure is still performed in those cases in which colorectal anastomosis might be unsafe. Reversal of Hartmann's procedure (HR) is considered a major surgical procedure with a high morbidity (55 to 60%) and mortality rate (0 to 4%). To decrease these rates, laparoscopic Hartmann's reversal procedure was successfully experienced. We report our totally laparoscopic Hartmann's reversal technique. Between 2004 and 2010 we performed 27 HRs with a totally laparoscopic approach. The efficacy and safety of this technique were demonstrated evaluating the operative data, postoperative complications, and the outcome of the patients. There were no open conversions or major intraoperative complications. Anastomotic leaking occurred in one patient requiring an ileostomy; one patient needed a blood transfusion and one had a nosocomial pneumonia. The mean postoperative hospitalization was 5.7 days. Laparoscopic HR is a feasible and safe procedure and can be considered a valid alternative to open HR.

  11. Factors influencing the algebra ``reversal error''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Elaine; Kanim, Stephen E.

    2005-11-01

    Given a written problem statement about a proportional relationship between two quantities, many students will place the constant of proportionality on the wrong side of the equals sign. Introductory physics is one of the first courses in which students encounter multiple-step problems that require algebraic (rather than numeric) solutions, and this "reversal error" is relatively common in student solutions to these types of problems. We describe an investigation into three possible influences on students who make this reversal error: variable symbol choice, sentence structure, and context familiarity. Our results, from a calculus-based physics course and an intermediate algebra course, show that sentence structure is the most significant of these three possibilities. However, sentence structure alone does not provide a complete explanation for the reversal error.

  12. AKAP149 binds to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and is involved in the reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Lemay, Julie; Maidou-Peindara, Priscilla; Cancio, Reynel; Ennifar, Eric; Coadou, Gaël; Maga, Giovanni; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Benarous, Richard; Liu, Lang Xia

    2008-11-21

    Like all retroviruses, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) undergoes reverse transcription during its replication cycle. The cellular cofactors potentially involved in this process still remain to be identified. We show here that A-kinase anchoring protein 149 (AKAP149) interacts with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in both the yeast two-hybrid system and human cells. The AKAP149 binding site has been mapped to the RNase H domain of HIV-1 RT. AKAP149 silencing by RNA interference in HIV-1-infected cells inhibited viral replication at the reverse transcription step. We selected single-point mutants of RT defective for AKAP149 binding and demonstrated that mutant G462R, despite retaining significant intrinsic RT activity in vitro, failed to carry out HIV-1 reverse transcription correctly in infected cells. This suggests that the interaction between RT and AKAP149 in infected cells may play an important role in HIV-1 reverse transcription.

  13. Reverse mutations in fragile X syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.T.; Nolin, S.; Houck, G.E.

    1994-09-01

    The fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited form of mental retardation. Yet new mutations have not been described and no affected child has been born to a carrier mother having less than 60 FMR-1 CGG triplet repeats. Reverse mutations also appear to be very rare. We have previously identified the daughter of a premutation mother (95 CGGs) who inherited a normal repeat size of 35 as a reverse mutation. In the process of carrier testing by PCR, we have now identified two additional females with reverse mutations. All three of these reverse mutation women were previously tested by linkage as part of known fragile X families (subsequently confirmed by direct analysis), and assigned a > 99% risk as a carrier. In the second family, the mother carries a premutation allele of 95 repeats and the daughter inherited a 43 repeat allele. Prior to direct DNA testing, she had a positive prenatal diagnosis by linkage (> 99% risk) and cytogenetics with 3/450 cells apparently positive. Subsequent retesting of the products of conception by PCR now reveals a 43 repeat allele from her carrier mother with an 82 repeat allele. Testing with close CA markers (FRAXAC1 and DXS548) confirmed that these women inherited the same chromosome and their full mutation brothers. Further analysis is pending. These examples of reverse mutations are the only ones we have identified in our study of offspring of more than 200 carriers (400+ meioses) examined to date. Therefore, we conclude the frequency of fragile X back mutations is likely to be less than 1%. Retesting of linkage positive carriers is recommended to detect reverse mutations and assure accurate genetic counseling.

  14. A Reverse Shock in GRB 130427A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, Tanmoy; Berger, Edo; Zauderer, B. Ashley; Margutti, Raffaella; Soderberg, Alicia Margarita; Lunnan, Ragnhild; Chornock, Ryan

    2014-06-01

    We present extensive radio and millimeter observations of the unusually bright GRB 130427A at z=0.340, spanning 0.67 to 12 days after the burst. Taken in conjunction with detailed multi-band UV, optical, NIR, and X-ray observations we find that the broad-band afterglow emission is composed of distinct reverse shock and forward shock contributions. The reverse shock emission dominates in the radio/millimeter and at <0.1 days in the UV/optical/NIR, while the forward shock emission dominates in the X-rays and at >0.1 days in the UV/optical/NIR. We further find that the optical and X-ray data require a Wind circumburst environment, pointing to a massive star progenitor. Using the combined forward and reverse shock emission we find that the parameters of the burst are an isotropic kinetic energy of E_Kis 2e53 erg, a mass loss rate of Mdo 3e-8 Msun/yr (for a wind velocity of 1,000 km/s), and a Lorentz factor at the deceleration time of Gamma(200s 130. Due to the low density and large isotropic energy, the absence of a jet break to ~15 days places only a weak constraint on the opening angle of theta_j>2.5 deg, and therefore a total energy of E_gamma+E_K>1.2e51 erg, similar to other GRBs. The reverse shock emission is detectable in this burst due to the low circumburst density, which leads to a slow cooling shock. We speculate that this is a required property for the detectability of reverse shocks in the radio and millimeter bands. Following on GRB 130427A as a benchmark event, observations of future GRBs with the exquisite sensitivity of VLA and ALMA, coupled with detailed modeling of the reverse and forward shock contributions will test this hypothesis.

  15. Polar Field Reversals and Active Region Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon; Ettinger, Sophie

    2015-07-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. We summarize the published evidence from observation and modeling of the influence of meridional flow variations and decaying active region flux's spatial distribution, such as the Joy's law tilt angle. Using NSO Kitt Peak synoptic magnetograms covering cycles 21-24, we investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of the synoptic magnetograms, the dispersal of flux from low to high latitudes is tracked, and the timing of this dispersal is compared to the polar field changes. In the most abrupt cases of polar field reversal, a few activity complexes (systems of active regions) are identified as the main cause. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed trailing-polarity flux from these complexes is found to correlate well in time with the abrupt polar field changes. In each case, significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with trailing-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. The activity complexes of the cycle 21 and 22 maxima were larger and longer-lived than those of the cycle 23 and 24 maxima, and the poleward surges were stronger and more unipolar and the polar field changes larger and faster. The cycle 21 and 22 polar reversals were dominated by only a few long-lived complexes whereas the cycle 23 and 24 reversals were the cumulative effects of more numerous, shorter-lived regions. We conclude that sizes and lifetimes of activity complexes are key to

  16. Oxidant Sensing by Reversible Disulfide Bond Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Claudia M.; Jakob, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of the cellular redox balance is crucial for cell survival. An increase in reactive oxygen, nitrogen, or chlorine species can lead to oxidative stress conditions, potentially damaging DNA, lipids, and proteins. Proteins are very sensitive to oxidative modifications, particularly methionine and cysteine residues. The reversibility of some of these oxidative protein modifications makes them ideally suited to take on regulatory roles in protein function. This is especially true for disulfide bond formation, which has the potential to mediate extensive yet fully reversible structural and functional changes, rapidly adjusting the protein's activity to the prevailing oxidant levels. PMID:23861395

  17. Reverse preferential spread in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoizumi, Hiroshi; Tani, Seiichi; Miyoshi, Naoto; Okamoto, Yoshio

    2012-08-01

    Large-degree nodes may have a larger influence on the network, but they can be bottlenecks for spreading information since spreading attempts tend to concentrate on these nodes and become redundant. We discuss that the reverse preferential spread (distributing information inversely proportional to the degree of the receiving node) has an advantage over other spread mechanisms. In large uncorrelated networks, we show that the mean number of nodes that receive information under the reverse preferential spread is an upper bound among any other weight-based spread mechanisms, and this upper bound is indeed a logistic growth independent of the degree distribution.

  18. Anti-reverse siphon solar heating system

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, W. J.

    1985-05-28

    A solar heater which is adapted for liquid heating and space heating, or both, utilizes a passive anti-reverse siphon concept in which fresh air or water is required to traverse upwardly along a passageway and then descend along a descending passageway insulated from the ascending passageway before it enters the solar heating chamber, with the result that the pressure heads generated in the ascending and descending passageways and the heating chamber offset one another such that forward, passive solar heating convection occurs, but in the evening when the heating chamber becomes cool, the normal reverse convection that occurs in passive units is stopped.

  19. STOL landing thrust: Reverser jet flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotansky, D. R.; Glaze, L. W.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis tools and modeling concepts for jet flow fields encountered upon use of thrust reversers for high performance military aircraft are described. A semi-empirical model of the reverser ground wall jet interaction with the uniform cross flow due to aircraft forward velocity is described. This ground interaction model is used to demonstrate exhaust gas ingestion conditions. The effects of control of exhaust jet vector angle, lateral splay, and moving versus fixed ground simulation are discussed. The Adler/Baron jet-in-cross flow model is used in conjunction with three dimensional panel methods to investigate the upper surface jet induced flow field.

  20. Low distortion transform for reversible watermarking.

    PubMed

    Coltuc, Dinu

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a low-distortion transform for prediction-error expansion reversible watermarking. The transform is derived by taking a simple linear predictor and by embedding the expanded prediction error not only into the current pixel but also into its prediction context. The embedding ensures the minimization of the square error introduced by the watermarking. The proposed transform introduces less distortion than the classical prediction-error expansion for complex predictors such as the median edge detector or the gradient-adjusted predictor. Reversible watermarking algorithms based on the proposed transform are analyzed. Experimental results are provided.

  1. Efficiency of Rectification: Reversible vs. Irreversible Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, I. M.

    2002-11-01

    Both man-made locomotive devices and molecular motors use gears to transform a reciprocating motion into a directed one. One of the most common gears is a rectifier, a mechanically irreversible appliance. The maximal energetic efficiency of an isothermic gear is bounded by unity, as a consequence of the Second Law. However, approaching this ideal efficiency does not imply approaching reversibility. We discuss what properties of a rectifier mostly influence the transduction efficiency and show that an appliance which locks under backward force is just the one which can approach the ideal efficiency either in the reversible or in the irreversible regime.

  2. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth HIV Reverse Transcriptase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    HIV Reverse Transcriptase crystals grown during the USML-1 (STS-50) mission using Commercial Refrigerator/Incubator Module (CR/IM) at 4 degrees C and the Vapor Diffusion Apparatus (VDA). Reverse transcriptase is an enzyme responsible for copying the nucleic acid genome of the AIDS virus from RNA to DNA. Studies indicated that the space-grown crystals were larger and better ordered (beyond 4 angstroms) than were comparable Earth-grown crystals. Principal Investigators were Charles Bugg and Larry DeLucas.

  3. Reversed Doppler effect in photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Reed, Evan J; Soljacić, Marin; Joannopoulos, John D

    2003-09-26

    Nonrelativistic reversed Doppler shifts have never been observed in nature and have only been speculated to occur in pathological systems with simultaneously negative effective permittivity and permeability. This Letter presents a different, new physical phenomenon that leads to a nonrelativistic reversed Doppler shift in light. It arises when light is reflected from a moving shock wave propagating through a photonic crystal. In addition to reflection of a single frequency, multiple discrete reflected frequencies or a 10 GHz periodic modulation can also be observed when a single carrier frequency of wavelength 1 microm is incident.

  4. Topological locking restrains replication fork reversal

    PubMed Central

    Fierro-Fernández, Marta; Hernández, Pablo; Krimer, Dora B.; Stasiak, Andrzej; Schvartzman, Jorge B.

    2007-01-01

    Two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, psoralen cross-linking, and electron microscopy were used to study the effects of positive supercoiling on fork reversal in isolated replication intermediates of bacterial DNA plasmids. The results obtained demonstrate that the formation of Holliday-like junctions at both forks of a replication bubble creates a topological constraint that prevents further regression of the forks. We propose that this topological locking of replication intermediates provides a biological safety mechanism that protects DNA molecules against extensive fork reversals. PMID:17242356

  5. Joint reversible data hiding and image encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bian; Busch, Christoph; Niu, Xiamu

    2010-01-01

    Image encryption process is jointed with reversible data hiding in this paper, where the data to be hided are modulated by different secret keys selected for encryption. To extract the hided data from the cipher-text, the different tentative decrypted results are tested against typical random distribution in both spatial and frequency domain and the goodnessof- fit degrees are compared to extract one hided bit. The encryption based data hiding process is inherently reversible. Experiments demonstrate the proposed scheme's effectiveness on natural and textural images, both in gray-level and binary forms.

  6. Reversible Chemisorption Gas-Gap Thermal Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Bard, Steven; Blue, Gary

    1991-01-01

    Gas/sorbent combinations provide means to turn heat-conduction paths on and off. Single-stage gas-gap thermal switch based on reversible chemisorption of hydrogen gas by ZrNiH. Two-stage gas-gap thermal switch based on reversible desorption of O2 from MnO2 in first stage, followed by absorption in Cu on zeolite in second stage. Requires relatively low power. Used in sorption refrigeration systems designed to operate for long times without maintenance.

  7. Time reversal communication with a mobile source.

    PubMed

    Song, H C

    2013-10-01

    Broadband underwater acoustic communication signals undergo either a compression or dilation in the presence of relative motion between a source and a receiver. Consequently, underwater acoustic communications with a mobile source/receiver require Doppler compensation through resampling. However, resampling may not be necessary when a channel-estimate-based time reversal approach is applied with frequent channel updates. Using experimental data (20-30 kHz), it is demonstrated that the performance of time reversal communication without resampling is similar to the case with resampling, along with the benefit of a modest computational saving. PMID:24116398

  8. 12 CFR 226.33 - Requirements for reverse mortgages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for reverse mortgages. 226.33....33 Requirements for reverse mortgages. (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart, reverse mortgage... addition to other disclosures required by this part, in a reverse mortgage transaction the creditor...

  9. Reverse ray tracing for transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chia-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hung

    2015-06-29

    Ray tracing is an important technique for predicting optical system performance. In the field of transformation optics, the Hamiltonian equations of motion for ray tracing are well known. The numerical solutions to the Hamiltonian equations of motion are affected by the complexities of the inhomogeneous and anisotropic indices of the optical device. Based on our knowledge, no previous work has been conducted on ray tracing for transformation optics with extreme inhomogeneity and anisotropicity. In this study, we present the use of 3D reverse ray tracing in transformation optics. The reverse ray tracing is derived from Fermat's principle based on a sweeping method instead of finding the full solution to ordinary differential equations. The sweeping method is employed to obtain the eikonal function. The wave vectors are then obtained from the gradient of that eikonal function map in the transformed space to acquire the illuminance. Because only the rays in the points of interest have to be traced, the reverse ray tracing provides an efficient approach to investigate the illuminance of a system. This approach is useful in any form of transformation optics where the material property tensor is a symmetric positive definite matrix. The performance and analysis of three transformation optics with inhomogeneous and anisotropic indices are explored. The ray trajectories and illuminances in these demonstration cases are successfully solved by the proposed reverse ray tracing method.

  10. Investigation of Finite Sources through Time Reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremers, S.; Brietzke, G.; Igel, H.; Larmat, C.; Fichtner, A.; Johnson, P. A.; Huang, L.

    2008-12-01

    Under certain conditions time reversal is a promising method to determine earthquake source characteristics without any a-priori information (except the earth model and the data). It consists of injecting flipped-in-time records from seismic stations within the model to create an approximate reverse movie of wave propagation from which the location of the source point and other information might be inferred. In this study, the backward propagation is performed numerically using a spectral element code. We investigate the potential of time reversal to recover finite source characteristics (e.g., size of ruptured area, location of asperities, rupture velocity etc.). We use synthetic data from the SPICE kinematic source inversion blind test initiated to investigate the performance of current kinematic source inversion approaches (http://www.spice- rtn.org/library/valid). The synthetic data set attempts to reproduce the 2000 Tottori earthquake with 33 records close to the fault. We discuss the influence of relaxing the ignorance to prior source information (e.g., origin time, hypocenter, fault location, etc.) on the results of the time reversal process.

  11. Investigation of Finite Sources through Time Reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremers, Simon; Brietzke, Gilbert; Igel, Heiner; Larmat, Carene; Fichtner, Andreas; Johnson, Paul A.; Huang, Lianjie

    2010-05-01

    Under certain conditions time reversal is a promising method to determine earthquake source characteristics without any a-priori information (except the earth model and the data). It consists of injecting flipped-in-time records from seismic stations within the model to create an approximate reverse movie of wave propagation from which the location of the hypocenter and other information might be inferred. In this study, the backward propagation is performed numerically using a parallel cartesian spectral element code. Initial tests using point source moment tensors serve as control for the adaptability of the used wave propagation algorithm. After that we investigated the potential of time reversal to recover finite source characteristics (e.g., size of ruptured area, rupture velocity etc.). We used synthetic data from the SPICE kinematic source inversion blind test initiated to investigate the performance of current kinematic source inversion approaches (http://www.spice-rtn.org/library/valid). The synthetic data set attempts to reproduce the 2000 Tottori earthquake with 33 records close to the fault. We discuss the influence of various assumptions made on the source (e.g., origin time, hypocenter, fault location, etc.), adjoint source weighting (e.g., correct for epicentral distance) and structure (uncertainty in the velocity model) on the results of the time reversal process. We give an overview about the quality of focussing of the different wavefield properties (i.e., displacements, strains, rotations, energies). Additionally, the potential to recover source properties of multiple point sources at the same time is discussed.

  12. Reverse ray tracing for transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chia-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hung

    2015-06-29

    Ray tracing is an important technique for predicting optical system performance. In the field of transformation optics, the Hamiltonian equations of motion for ray tracing are well known. The numerical solutions to the Hamiltonian equations of motion are affected by the complexities of the inhomogeneous and anisotropic indices of the optical device. Based on our knowledge, no previous work has been conducted on ray tracing for transformation optics with extreme inhomogeneity and anisotropicity. In this study, we present the use of 3D reverse ray tracing in transformation optics. The reverse ray tracing is derived from Fermat's principle based on a sweeping method instead of finding the full solution to ordinary differential equations. The sweeping method is employed to obtain the eikonal function. The wave vectors are then obtained from the gradient of that eikonal function map in the transformed space to acquire the illuminance. Because only the rays in the points of interest have to be traced, the reverse ray tracing provides an efficient approach to investigate the illuminance of a system. This approach is useful in any form of transformation optics where the material property tensor is a symmetric positive definite matrix. The performance and analysis of three transformation optics with inhomogeneous and anisotropic indices are explored. The ray trajectories and illuminances in these demonstration cases are successfully solved by the proposed reverse ray tracing method. PMID:26191770

  13. Reversibility of continuous-variable quantum cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Filip, Radim; Marek, Petr; Fiurasek, Jaromir

    2004-01-01

    We analyze a reversibility of optimal Gaussian 1{yields}2 quantum cloning of a coherent state using only local operations on the clones and classical communication between them and propose a feasible experimental test of this feature. Performing Bell-type homodyne measurement on one clone and anticlone, an arbitrary unknown input state (not only a coherent state) can be restored in the other clone by applying appropriate local unitary displacement operation. We generalize this concept to a partial reversal of the cloning using only local operations and classical communication (LOCC) and we show that this procedure converts the symmetric cloner to an asymmetric cloner. Further, we discuss a distributed LOCC reversal in optimal 1{yields}M Gaussian cloning of coherent states which transforms it to optimal 1{yields}M{sup '} cloning for M{sup '}reversibility can be utilized to improve the security of the link even after the attack.

  14. The Constitutionality of Reverse Racial Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ely, John Hart

    1974-01-01

    In discussing the Defunis v. Odegaard case and the busing issue in reference to reverse race discrimination, the author concludes that measures that favor racial minorities pose a difficult moral question that should be left to the states. (Author/PG)

  15. Detection of Machining Chips by Pressure Reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Inaccessible interior spaces inspected acoustically. In acoustic inspection, inlet and outlet ports of component connected to pneumatic hoses of apparatus that rapidly reverses induced pressure differential. If loose particles inside this component, they will generate noise detected by series of contact microphones attached to component. Noise indicates general location of contaminants, and its characteristic helps in identifying particles from their acoustic signatures.

  16. 14 CFR 25.507 - Reversed braking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reversed braking. 25.507 Section 25.507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... must be equal to 0.55 times the vertical load at each wheel or to the load developed by 1.2 times...

  17. Can biological complexity be reverse engineered?

    PubMed

    Green, Sara

    2015-10-01

    Concerns with the use of engineering approaches in biology have recently been raised. I examine two related challenges to biological research that I call the synchronic and diachronic underdetermination problem. The former refers to challenges associated with the inference of design principles underlying system capacities when the synchronic relations between lower-level processes and higher-level systems capacities are degenerate (many-to-many). The diachronic underdetermination problem regards the problem of reverse engineering a system where the non-linear relations between system capacities and lower-level mechanisms are changing over time. Braun and Marom argue that recent insights to biological complexity leave the aim of reverse engineering hopeless - in principle as well as in practice. While I support their call for systemic approaches to capture the dynamic nature of living systems, I take issue with the conflation of reverse engineering with naïve reductionism. I clarify how the notion of design principles can be more broadly conceived and argue that reverse engineering is compatible with a dynamic view of organisms. It may even help to facilitate an integrated account that bridges the gap between mechanistic and systems approaches.

  18. Preparation of nanoparticles in reverse microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovstun, Sergey A.; Razumov, Vladimir F.

    2011-10-01

    Experimental data and results of theoretical studies dealing with the synthesis of nanoparticles by the condensation of products of chemical reactions in reverse microemulsions are generalized. Attention is focused on the analysis of mechanisms of nanoparticle nucleation and growth. The bibliography includes 252 references.

  19. Can biological complexity be reverse engineered?

    PubMed

    Green, Sara

    2015-10-01

    Concerns with the use of engineering approaches in biology have recently been raised. I examine two related challenges to biological research that I call the synchronic and diachronic underdetermination problem. The former refers to challenges associated with the inference of design principles underlying system capacities when the synchronic relations between lower-level processes and higher-level systems capacities are degenerate (many-to-many). The diachronic underdetermination problem regards the problem of reverse engineering a system where the non-linear relations between system capacities and lower-level mechanisms are changing over time. Braun and Marom argue that recent insights to biological complexity leave the aim of reverse engineering hopeless - in principle as well as in practice. While I support their call for systemic approaches to capture the dynamic nature of living systems, I take issue with the conflation of reverse engineering with naïve reductionism. I clarify how the notion of design principles can be more broadly conceived and argue that reverse engineering is compatible with a dynamic view of organisms. It may even help to facilitate an integrated account that bridges the gap between mechanistic and systems approaches. PMID:25903121

  20. The Expertise Reversal Effect Concerning Instructional Explanations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rey, Gunter Daniel; Fischer, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The expertise reversal effect occurs when learner's expertise moderates design principles derived from cognitive load theory. Although this effect is supported by numerous empirical studies, indicating an overall large effect size, the effect was never tested by inducing expertise experimentally and using instructional explanations in a…

  1. Postscript: Contrasting Predictions for Preference Reversal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usher, Marius; Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Chater, Nick

    2010-01-01

    In this post scrit, the authors discuss an article by Hotaling, Busemeyer, and Li which provided a valuable reply to the challenges the current authors raised for the decision field theory (DFT) account of preference reversal in multiattribute choice. They agree with Hotaling, Busemeyer, and Li's observation that with the addition of an internal…

  2. Reversing the Effects of Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogren, Marilee P.; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    A research on how synaptic plasticity is abnormally regulated in fragile X syndrome and how this abnormality can be reversed by therapeutic interventions is presented. Fragile X syndrome is a disorder of synaptic plasticity that contributes to abnormal development and interferes with normal learning and memory.

  3. Desalination by osmosis--reverse osmosis couple.

    PubMed

    Popper, K; Merson, R L; Camirand, W M

    1968-03-22

    Water is separated from brines by a semipermeable membrane. Water flows by osmosis across the membrane into a sealed chamber where it creates pressure. This pressure is transmitted by a water-immiscible liquid piston to a second chamber where it effects reverse osmosis. Water-removal rates are calculated.

  4. Galen: Developer of the Reversal Design?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert T.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about Galen, a Greek physician who is known to psychologists largely for his personality theory of the four temperaments, and his method of diagnosing the basis of one of his patients' symptoms using a form of single-subject reversal design long before its formal description. Galen's method to diagnose the cause…

  5. Reverse Stroop Effects with Untranslated Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blais, Chris; Besner, Derek

    2006-01-01

    Translation accounts have argued that the presence of a Stroop effect in the context of a nonvocal untranslated response is caused by verbal mediation. In its simplest form, color-labeled buttons are translated into a verbal code that interferes with color responses. On this logic, in the reverse Stroop task (identify the word; ignore the color),…

  6. Fluid in the flute: Reversible hydromyelia.

    PubMed

    Wehner, Tim; Ross, Jeffrey S; Ransohoff, Richard M

    2005-09-15

    Non-communicating syrinx formation in association with demyelinating disease has been reported in approximately 50 patients. It has been unknown whether this is a permanent or potentially reversible phenomenon. We report a patient with acute transverse myelitis who developed a syrinx that resolved within 6 months. Mechanisms of syrinx formation in demyelinating disease are discussed.

  7. Flow reversal power limit for the HFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, L.Y.; Tichler, P.R.

    1997-01-01

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) is a pressurized heavy water moderated and cooled research reactor that began operation at 40 MW. The reactor was subsequently upgraded to 60 MW and operated at that level for several years. The reactor undergoes a buoyancy-driven reversal of flow in the reactor core following certain postulated accidents. Questions which were raised about the afterheat removal capability during the flow reversal transition led to a reactor shutdown and subsequent resumption of operation at a reduced power of 30 MW. An experimental and analytical program to address these questions is described in this report. The experiments were single channel flow reversal tests under a range of conditions. The analytical phase involved simulations of the tests to benchmark the physical models and development of a criterion for dryout. The criterion is then used in simulations of reactor accidents to determine a safe operating power level. It is concluded that the limit on the HFBR operating power with respect to the issue of flow reversal is in excess of 60 MW. Direct use of the experimental results and an understanding of the governing phenomenology supports this conclusion.

  8. 14 CFR 23.933 - Reversing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... means alone, under the most critical reversing condition expected in operation. (b) For propeller... testing, or both, for propeller systems that allow the propeller blades to move from the flight low-pitch... certification of the propeller and associated installation components. Credit will be given for...

  9. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the main reservoir air pressure. The operating valve handle for such connection shall be conveniently... automatically prevent loss of pressure in event of failure of the main reservoir air pressure. (c) Power reverse... automatically prevent the loss of pressure in the event of a failure of main air pressure and have...

  10. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the main reservoir air pressure. The operating valve handle for such connection shall be conveniently... automatically prevent loss of pressure in event of failure of the main reservoir air pressure. (c) Power reverse... automatically prevent the loss of pressure in the event of a failure of main air pressure and have...

  11. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the main reservoir air pressure. The operating valve handle for such connection shall be conveniently... automatically prevent loss of pressure in event of failure of the main reservoir air pressure. (c) Power reverse... automatically prevent the loss of pressure in the event of a failure of main air pressure and have...

  12. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the main reservoir air pressure. The operating valve handle for such connection shall be conveniently... automatically prevent loss of pressure in event of failure of the main reservoir air pressure. (c) Power reverse... automatically prevent the loss of pressure in the event of a failure of main air pressure and have...

  13. 49 CFR 230.89 - Reverse gear.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the main reservoir air pressure. The operating valve handle for such connection shall be conveniently... automatically prevent loss of pressure in event of failure of the main reservoir air pressure. (c) Power reverse... automatically prevent the loss of pressure in the event of a failure of main air pressure and have...

  14. Psychophysical Reverse Correlation with Multiple Response Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dai, Huanping; Micheyl, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Psychophysical reverse-correlation methods such as the "classification image" technique provide a unique tool to uncover the internal representations and decision strategies of individual participants in perceptual tasks. Over the past 30 years, these techniques have gained increasing popularity among both visual and auditory psychophysicists.…

  15. Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Induced by Pazopanib

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is a clinical/radiological syndrome characterized by headache, seizures, impaired vision, acute hypertension, and typical magnetic resonance imaging findings. There are several reports in the literature that depict its occurrence in cancer patients. The list of common anticancer and supportive care drugs that predispose to reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is expanding and includes not only a large number of chemotherapeutic agents but also an increased number of new targeted drugs, particularly angiogenesis inhibitors such as bevacizumab,sorefenib and sunitinib. Pazopanib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and c-Kit which after a positive phase III randomized clinical trial in patients with advanced renal cell cancer received FDA approval for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Until now no cases of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome induced by pazopanib have been reported. Case report We present the case of a 40 years old female patient with heavily pre-treated metastatic renal cell carcinoma who received pazopanib as salvage treatment. After 21 days of pazopanib therapy the patient referred to the emergency department with epileptic seizure, impaired vision at both eyes and headache. MRI of the brain revealed subcortical oedema at the occipital and parietal lobes bilaterally. She was treated with anticonvulsants, i.v. administration of mannitol and antihypertensives and she recovered completely from her symptoms and was discharged on the tenth hospital day. A brain MRI performed 3 weeks after showed that the subcortical oedema had been subsided. Conclusion In conclusion this is the first case of pazopanib induced reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. Although usually reversible, this syndrome is a serious and potentially life threatening adverse

  16. Time Reversal Experiments in Chaotic Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bo; Ott, Edwart; Antonsen, Thomas; Anlage, Steven

    2013-03-01

    Wave focusing through a strongly scattering medium has been an intriguing topic in the fields of optics, acoustics and electromagnetics. By introducing the time reversal technique, prior knowledge about each transmission channel is no longer needed since the step of sending waves through the medium measures this information. Many approaches have been explored to achieve better focusing quality, which is influenced by several factors, such as the propagation loss. We present two methods to conduct time reversal experiments in ray-chaotic billiards or cavities. The first method uses a ray-tracing algorithm to calculate orbit information from knowledge of the cavity geometry. We then use this information to generate a synthetic signal, which is then sent into the cavity as if it's the time reversed signal in the traditional time-reversal scheme. This method tries to obtain channel information numerically but has limited accuracy due to the chaotic properties of the cavity. Another method is to utilize the transmission scattering parameter, obtained from the time domain response of the cavity between two ports. We amplify the time-reversed signal for each frequency channel in proportion to the loss it experiences during the transmission. The experimental results show that the amplitude of side lobes around the reconstructed signal is reduced significantly and the correlation between the reconstruction and the initial signal is improved from 0.8 to 0.98 in a low-mode density cavity. This work is funded by the ONR/Maryland AppEl Center, the AFOSR, and Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials (CNAM).

  17. Dynamical similarity of geomagnetic field reversals.

    PubMed

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Fournier, Alexandre; Courtillot, Vincent; Herrero-Bervera, Emilio

    2012-10-01

    No consensus has been reached so far on the properties of the geomagnetic field during reversals or on the main features that might reveal its dynamics. A main characteristic of the reversing field is a large decrease in the axial dipole and the dominant role of non-dipole components. Other features strongly depend on whether they are derived from sedimentary or volcanic records. Only thermal remanent magnetization of lava flows can capture faithful records of a rapidly varying non-dipole field, but, because of episodic volcanic activity, sequences of overlying flows yield incomplete records. Here we show that the ten most detailed volcanic records of reversals can be matched in a very satisfactory way, under the assumption of a common duration, revealing common dynamical characteristics. We infer that the reversal process has remained unchanged, with the same time constants and durations, at least since 180 million years ago. We propose that the reversing field is characterized by three successive phases: a precursory event, a 180° polarity switch and a rebound. The first and third phases reflect the emergence of the non-dipole field with large-amplitude secular variation. They are rarely both recorded at the same site owing to the rapidly changing field geometry and last for less than 2,500 years. The actual transit between the two polarities does not last longer than 1,000 years and might therefore result from mechanisms other than those governing normal secular variation. Such changes are too brief to be accurately recorded by most sediments. PMID:23038471

  18. A REVERSE SHOCK IN GRB 130427A

    SciTech Connect

    Laskar, T.; Berger, E.; Zauderer, B. A.; Margutti, R.; Soderberg, A. M.; Chakraborti, S.; Lunnan, R.; Chornock, R.; Chandra, P.; Ray, A.

    2013-10-20

    We present extensive radio and millimeter observations of the unusually bright GRB 130427A at z = 0.340, spanning 0.67-12 days after the burst. We combine these data with detailed multi-band UV, optical, NIR, and Swift X-ray observations and find that the broadband afterglow emission is composed of distinct reverse shock and forward shock contributions. The reverse shock emission dominates in the radio/millimeter and at ∼< 0.1 days in the UV/optical/NIR, while the forward shock emission dominates in the X-rays and at ∼> 0.1 days in the UV/optical/NIR. We further find that the optical and X-ray data require a wind circumburst environment, pointing to a massive star progenitor. Using the combined forward and reverse shock emission, we find that the parameters of the burst include an isotropic kinetic energy of E{sub K,{sub iso}} ≈ 2 × 10{sup 53} erg, a mass loss rate of M-dot ∼3×10{sup -8} M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1} (for a wind velocity of 1000 km s{sup –1}), and a Lorentz factor at the deceleration time of Γ(200 s) ≈ 130. Due to the low density and large isotropic energy, the absence of a jet break to ≈15 days places only a weak constraint on the opening angle, θ{sub j} ∼> 2.°5, and therefore a total energy of E{sub γ} + E{sub K} ∼> 1.2 × 10{sup 51} erg, similar to other gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The reverse shock emission is detectable in this burst due to the low circumburst density, which leads to a slow cooling shock. We speculate that this property is required for the detectability of reverse shocks in radio and millimeter bands. Following on GRB 130427A as a benchmark event, observations of future GRBs with the exquisite sensitivity of the Very Large Array and ALMA, coupled with detailed modeling of the reverse and forward shock contributions, will test this hypothesis.

  19. A facile route for creating "reverse" vesicles: insights into "reverse" self-assembly in organic liquids.

    PubMed

    Tung, Shih-Huang; Lee, Hee-Young; Raghavan, Srinivasa R

    2008-07-01

    Reverse vesicles are spherical containers in organic liquids (oils) consisting of an oily core surrounded by a reverse bilayer. They are the organic counterparts to vesicles in aqueous solution and could potentially find analogous uses in encapsulation and controlled release. However, few examples of robust reverse vesicles have been reported, and general guidelines for their formation do not exist. We present a new route for forming stable unilamellar reverse vesicles in nonpolar organic liquids, such as cyclohexane and n-hexane. The recipe involves mixing short- and long-chain lipids (lecithins) with a trace of a salt such as sodium chloride. The ratio of short- to long-chain lecithin controls the type and size of self-assembled structure. As this ratio is increased, a spontaneous transition from reverse micelles to reverse vesicles occurs. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirm the presence of unilamellar vesicles in the corresponding solutions. Average vesicle diameters can be tuned from 60 to 250 nm depending on the sample composition.

  20. Reverse thrust performance of the QCSEE variable pitch turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanich, N. E.; Reemsnyder, D. C.; Blodmer, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of steady state reverse and forward to reverse thrust transient performance tests are presented. The original quiet, clean, short haul, experimental engine four segment variable fan nozzle was retested in reverse and compared with a continuous, 30 deg half angle conical exlet. Data indicated that the significantly more stable, higher pressure recovery flow with the fixed 30 deg exlet resulted in lower engine vibrations, lower fan blade stress, and approximately a 20 percent improvement in reverse thrust. Objective reverse thrust of 35 percent of takeoff thrust was reached. Thrust response of less than 1.5 sec was achieved for the approach and the takeoff to reverse thrust transients.

  1. Forward and reverse characteristics of irradiated MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect

    Paccagnella, A.; Ceschia, M.; Verzellesi, G.; Dalla Betta, G.F.; Soncini, G.; Bellutti, P.; Fuochi, P.G.

    1996-06-01

    pMOSFETs biased with V{sub gs} < V{sub gd} during Co{sup 60} {gamma} irradiation have shown substantial differences between the forward and reverse subthreshold characteristics, induced by a non-uniform charge distribution in the gate oxide. Correspondingly, modest differences have been observed in the over-threshold I-V characteristics. After irradiation, the forward subthreshold curves can shift at higher or lower gate voltages than the reverse ones. The former behavior has been observed in long-channel devices, in agreement with the classical MOS theory and numerical simulations. The latter result has been obtained in short-channel devices, and it has been correlated to a parasitic punch-through conduction mechanism.

  2. Reverse surface-polariton cherenkov radiation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jin; Wang, Qi Jie; Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The existence of reverse Cherenkov radiation for surface plasmons is demonstrated analytically. It is shown that in a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide, surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) excited by an electron moving at a speed higher than the phase velocity of SPPs can generate Cherenkov radiation, which can be switched from forward to reverse direction by tuning the core thickness of the waveguide. Calculations are performed in both frequency and time domains, demonstrating that a radiation pattern with a backward-pointing radiation cone can be achieved at small waveguide core widths, with energy flow opposite to the wave vector of SPPs. Our study suggests the feasibility of generating and steering electron radiation in simple plasmonic systems, opening the gate for various applications such as velocity-selective particle detections. PMID:27477061

  3. Time reversal and holography with spacetime transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacot, Vincent; Labousse, Matthieu; Eddi, Antonin; Fink, Mathias; Fort, Emmanuel

    2016-10-01

    Wave control is usually performed by spatially engineering the properties of a medium. Because time and space play similar roles in wave propagation, manipulating time boundaries provides a complementary approach. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the relevance of this concept by introducing instantaneous time mirrors. We show with water waves that a sudden change of the effective gravity generates time-reversed waves that refocus at the source. We generalize this concept for all kinds of waves, introducing a universal framework which explains the effect of any time disruption on wave propagation. We show that sudden changes of the medium properties generate instant wave sources that emerge instantaneously from the entire space at the time disruption. The time-reversed waves originate from these `Cauchy sources’, which are the counterpart of Huygens virtual sources on a time boundary. It allows us to revisit the holographic method and introduce a new approach for wave control.

  4. Casimir-Polder Force Reversal with Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappakrishnan, Venkatesh; Genov, Dentcho

    2010-10-01

    A promising system design aiming to demonstrate Casimir-Polder force (CPF) reversal is proposed. The constraints when using naturally available materials in designing the system with air as an intermediate medium is resolved by using artificial electromagnetic materials. The parametric space in terms of the plate's magnetic and dielectric plasma frequencies, gap thickness and temperature is investigated. The parametric domain for achieving CPF reversal is obtained. Furthermore, a simple analytical expression for the CPF is derived. The analytical expression accurately describes the large and short distance asymptotics and allows extraction of important parameters such as lower and upper cutoff gap distances that define the repulsive force window. This study could possibly lead us to design of quantum levitation system, frictionless bio-fluid transport devices, etc.

  5. Reversible Bergman cyclization by atomic manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, Bruno; Fatayer, Shadi; Mohn, Fabian; Moll, Nikolaj; Pavliček, Niko; Meyer, Gerhard; Peña, Diego; Gross, Leo

    2016-03-01

    The Bergman cyclization is one of the most fascinating rearrangements in chemistry, with important implications in organic synthesis and pharmacology. Here we demonstrate a reversible Bergman cyclization for the first time. We induced the on-surface transformation of an individual aromatic diradical into a highly strained ten-membered diyne using atomic manipulation and verified the products by non-contact atomic force microscopy with atomic resolution. The diyne and diradical were stabilized by using an ultrathin NaCl film as the substrate, and the diyne could be transformed back into the diradical. Importantly, the diradical and the diyne exhibit different reactivity, electronic, magnetic and optical properties associated with the changes in the bond topology, and spin multiplicity. With this reversible, triggered Bergman cyclization we demonstrated switching on demand between the two reactive intermediates by means of selective C-C bond formation or cleavage, which opens up the field of radical chemistry for on-surface reactions by atomic manipulation.

  6. Reverse Phase Protein Arrays for Compound Profiling.

    PubMed

    Moerke, Nathan; Fallahi-Sichani, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Reverse phase protein arrays (RPPAs), also called reverse phase lysate arrays (RPLAs), involve immobilizing cell or tissue lysates, in small spots, onto solid supports which are then probed with primary antibodies specific for proteins or post-translational modifications of interest. RPPA assays are well suited for large-scale, high-throughput measurement of protein and PTM levels in cells and tissues. RPPAs are affordable and highly multiplexable, as a large number of arrays can readily be produced in parallel and then probed separately with distinct primary antibodies. This article describes a procedure for treating cells and preparing cell lysates, as well as a procedure for generating RPPAs using these lysates. A method for probing, imaging, and analyzing RPPAs is also described. These procedures are readily adaptable to a wide range of studies of cell signaling in response to drugs and other perturbations. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27622568

  7. Reversible thermodynamic cycle for AMTEC power conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Vining, C.B.; Williams, R.M.; Underwood, M.L.; Ryan, M.A.; Suitor, J.W.

    1992-07-01

    The thermodynamic cycle appropriate to an AMTEC (alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter) cell is discussed for both liquid- and vapor-fed modes of operation, under the assumption that all processes can be performed reversibly. In the liquid-fed mode, the reversible efficiency is greater than 89.6% of Carnot efficiency for heat input and rejection temperatures (900--1300 K and 400--800 K, respectively) typical of practical devices. Vapor-fed cells can approach the efficiency of liquid-fed cells. Quantitative estimates confirm that the efficiency is insensitive to either the work required to pressurize the sodium liquid or the details of the state changes associated with cooling the low pressure sodium gas to the heat rejection temperature. 10 refs.

  8. Nanosecond magnetization reversal in nanocrystalline magnetic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, I. Z.; Gandhi, A. A.; Khaddem-Mousavi, M. V.; Lynch, T. F.; Rahman, M. A.

    2007-03-01

    This paper reports on the investigation of dynamic magnetization reversal process in electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni and Ni80Fe20 films by employing nanosecond magnetic pulse technique. The surface morphology has been investigated using SEM, EDAX, XRD and AFM analyses and static magnetic properties of the films are characterized by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Two different techniques are designed and employed to study the nanosecond magnetization reversal process in nanocrystalline thin films: Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect (MOKE) and nanosecond pulsed field magnetometer. Results of dynamical behavior as a function of several variables such as magnitude of applied bias magnetic field, amplitude and width of the pulsed magnetic field are analyzed in detail using both techniques. A computer simulation package called Object Oriented Micro-Magnetic Framework (OOMMF) has been used to simulate the magnetic domain patterns of the samples.

  9. Production Scaleup of Reverse Micelle Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison,S.; Cahill, C.; Carpenter, E.; Harris, V.

    2006-01-01

    A wide range of techniques for the successful synthesis of nanosized materials have been developed recently. These procedures are sufficient for normal scientific investigation; however, for these materials to be incorporated into any practical application, the process for making them must be scalable to a larger volume. In this work, we focus on a published recipe for manganese zinc ferrite (MZFO) nanoparticles, which uses the reverse micelle synthesis technique. The normal bench-top synthesis has been scaled by a factor of 40 and successfully adapted to a 30-L pilot plant. The product of this synthesis is similar to the bench-top sample, which is also comparable to a ceramic MZFO standard. Through this work, we have demonstrated that the reverse micelle process is scalable to larger volumes.

  10. The initiation of orogenic margin reverse faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, R. C.

    2002-04-01

    Laboratory values of rock friction coefficients suggest that reverse faulting should be very difficult to initiate by simple horizontal compression of the crust. Values of stresses required by Andersonian faulting may be an order of magnitude higher than those actually present in orogenic margins. A simple stress balance calculation shows that the effect of the excess lithostatic pressure under an elevated orogen, if transmitted laterally through a crustal ductile layer to the orogenic margin, is to provide sufficient hydraulic lift under the orogen flanks to initiate reverse faulting by direct lift, even with rock friction coefficients of order 0.8. The required orogenic elevation above surrounding ``normal'' lithosphere is about one fifth of the thickness of the brittle crust of the orogen. This elevation may be as small as 2 km in tectonically active regions. The mechanism works even in the absence of regional lithospheric compressive stresses.

  11. Arthroscopic Reverse Remplissage for Posterior Instability.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Chad D; Hanzlik, Shane R; Pearson, Sara E; Caldwell, Paul E

    2016-02-01

    Posterior shoulder dislocation is an unusual injury often associated with electrical shock or seizure. As with anterior instability, patients frequently present with an impaction injury to the anterior aspect of the humeral head known as a "reverse Hill-Sachs lesion." The treatment of this bony defect is controversial, and multiple surgical procedures to fill the defect in an effort to decrease recurrence have been described. Most of the reports have focused on an open approach using variations of lesser tuberosity and subscapularis transfers, bone allograft, and even arthroplasty to assist with persistent instability. We advocate an arthroscopic technique that involves a suture anchor-based distal tenodesis of the subscapularis tendon or a reverse remplissage procedure. PMID:27073776

  12. Genetic engineering of rotaviruses by reverse genetics.

    PubMed

    Komoto, Satoshi; Taniguchi, Koki

    2013-07-01

    The rotavirus genome is composed of 11 gene segments of dsRNA. A recent breakthrough in the field of rotaviruses is the development of a reverse genetics system for generating recombinant rotaviruses possessing a gene segment derived from cloned cDNA. Although this approach is a helper virus-driven system that is technically limited and gives low levels of recombinant viruses, it allows alteration of the rotavirus genome, thus contributing to our understanding of these medically important viruses. So far, this approach has successfully been applied to three of the 11 viral segments in our laboratory and others, and the efficiency of recovery of recombinant viruses has been improved. However, we are still waiting for the development of a helper virus-free reverse genetics system for generating an infectious rotavirus entirely from cDNAs, as has been achieved for other members of the Reoviridae family.

  13. Anomalous spontaneous reversal in magnetic heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Pan; Eisenmenger, Johannes; Miller, Casey W; Schuller, Ivan K

    2006-04-01

    We observe a thermally induced spontaneous magnetization reversal of epitaxial ferromagnet/antiferromagnet heterostructures under a constant applied magnetic field. Unlike any other magnetic system, the magnetization spontaneously reverses, aligning antiparallel to an applied field with decreasing temperature. We show that this unusual phenomenon is caused by the interfacial antiferromagnetic coupling overcoming the Zeeman energy of the ferromagnet. A significant temperature hysteresis exists, whose height and width can be tuned by the field applied during thermal cycling. The hysteresis originates from the intrinsic magnetic anisotropy in the system. The observation of this phenomenon leads to open questions in the general understanding of magnetic heterostructures. Moreover, this shows that in general heterogeneous nanostructured materials may exhibit unexpected phenomena absent in the bulk.

  14. Reversibility of red blood cell deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitz, Maria; Sens, P.

    2012-05-01

    The ability of cells to undergo reversible shape changes is often crucial to their survival. For red blood cells (RBCs), irreversible alteration of the cell shape and flexibility often causes anemia. Here we show theoretically that RBCs may react irreversibly to mechanical perturbations because of tensile stress in their cytoskeleton. The transient polymerization of protein fibers inside the cell seen in sickle cell anemia or a transient external force can trigger the formation of a cytoskeleton-free membrane protrusion of μm dimensions. The complex relaxation kinetics of the cell shape is shown to be responsible for selecting the final state once the perturbation is removed, thereby controlling the reversibility of the deformation. In some case, tubular protrusion are expected to relax via a peculiar “pearling instability.”

  15. Reverse surface-polariton cherenkov radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Jin; Wang, Qi Jie; Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu

    2016-08-01

    The existence of reverse Cherenkov radiation for surface plasmons is demonstrated analytically. It is shown that in a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide, surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) excited by an electron moving at a speed higher than the phase velocity of SPPs can generate Cherenkov radiation, which can be switched from forward to reverse direction by tuning the core thickness of the waveguide. Calculations are performed in both frequency and time domains, demonstrating that a radiation pattern with a backward-pointing radiation cone can be achieved at small waveguide core widths, with energy flow opposite to the wave vector of SPPs. Our study suggests the feasibility of generating and steering electron radiation in simple plasmonic systems, opening the gate for various applications such as velocity-selective particle detections.

  16. Reverse surface-polariton cherenkov radiation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jin; Wang, Qi Jie; Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The existence of reverse Cherenkov radiation for surface plasmons is demonstrated analytically. It is shown that in a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide, surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) excited by an electron moving at a speed higher than the phase velocity of SPPs can generate Cherenkov radiation, which can be switched from forward to reverse direction by tuning the core thickness of the waveguide. Calculations are performed in both frequency and time domains, demonstrating that a radiation pattern with a backward-pointing radiation cone can be achieved at small waveguide core widths, with energy flow opposite to the wave vector of SPPs. Our study suggests the feasibility of generating and steering electron radiation in simple plasmonic systems, opening the gate for various applications such as velocity-selective particle detections.

  17. Antiproton Production beam and Reverse Injection System

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, G.

    1981-08-16

    The objectives of this project are two fold: (1) To extract high energy protons from the Main Ring (MR) and target them to produce antiprotons which are subsequently captured in the existing Booster accelerator; and (2) to provide a channel for injecting either protons or antiprotons into the MR from the booster in a direction opposite to that of the normal proton acceleration as colliding beams can be created. The present design, therefore, is in support of two separate larger projects, viz., the collisions of protons in the Tevatron (normal circulation direction) with 'reverse injected' protons in the MR, and the collision of normal direction protons with reverse injected antiprotons either in the MR or in the Tevatron. Figure 1 shows the layout of the project area. It spans the shortest distance between possible injection/ejection points in the existing accelerator structures, hence minimizing costs. The tunnel will lie underground at the level of the MR and booster.

  18. Time-reversal asymmetry in financial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X. F.; Chen, T. T.; Zheng, B.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the large-fluctuation dynamics in financial markets, based on the minute-to-minute and daily data of the Chinese Indices and the German DAX. The dynamic relaxation both before and after the large fluctuations is characterized by a power law, and the exponents p± usually vary with the strength of the large fluctuations. The large-fluctuation dynamics is time-reversal symmetric at the time scale in minutes, while asymmetric at the daily time scale. Careful analysis reveals that the time-reversal asymmetry is mainly induced by external forces. It is also the external forces which drive the financial system to a non-stationary state. Different characteristics of the Chinese and German stock markets are uncovered.

  19. HDL Function, Dysfunction, and Reverse Cholesterol Transport

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Edward A.; Feig, Jonathan E.; Hewing, Bernd; Hazen, Stanley L.; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Although high HDL-cholesterol levels are associated with decreased cardiovascular risk in epidemiological studies, recent genetic and pharmacological findings have raised doubts about the beneficial effects of HDL. Raising HDL levels in animal models by infusion or over expression of apolipoprotein A-I has shown clear vascular improvements, such as delayed atherosclerotic lesion progression and accelerated lesion regression, along with increased reverse cholesterol transport. Inflammation and other factors, such as myeloperoxidase mediated oxidation, can impair HDL production and HDL function, in regard to its reverse cholesterol transport, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. Thus, tests of HDL function, which have not yet been developed as routine diagnostic assays, may prove useful and be a better predictor of cardiovascular risk than HDL-cholesterol levels. PMID:23152494

  20. Reverse surface-polariton cherenkov radiation

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jin; Wang, Qi Jie; Zhang, Jingjing; Luo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The existence of reverse Cherenkov radiation for surface plasmons is demonstrated analytically. It is shown that in a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide, surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) excited by an electron moving at a speed higher than the phase velocity of SPPs can generate Cherenkov radiation, which can be switched from forward to reverse direction by tuning the core thickness of the waveguide. Calculations are performed in both frequency and time domains, demonstrating that a radiation pattern with a backward-pointing radiation cone can be achieved at small waveguide core widths, with energy flow opposite to the wave vector of SPPs. Our study suggests the feasibility of generating and steering electron radiation in simple plasmonic systems, opening the gate for various applications such as velocity-selective particle detections. PMID:27477061

  1. Depth-optimized reversible circuit synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabzadeh, Mona; Saheb Zamani, Morteza; Sedighi, Mehdi; Saeedi, Mehdi

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, simultaneous reduction of circuit depth and synthesis cost of reversible circuits in quantum technologies with limited interaction is addressed. We developed a cycle-based synthesis algorithm which uses negative controls and limited distance between gate lines. To improve circuit depth, a new parallel structure is introduced in which before synthesis a set of disjoint cycles are extracted from the input specification and distributed into some subsets. The cycles of each subset are synthesized independently on different sets of ancillae. Accordingly, each disjoint set can be synthesized by different synthesis methods. Our analysis shows that the best worst-case synthesis cost of reversible circuits in the linear nearest neighbor architecture is improved by the proposed approach. Our experimental results reveal the effectiveness of the proposed approach to reduce cost and circuit depth for several benchmarks.

  2. Arthroscopic Reverse Remplissage for Posterior Instability

    PubMed Central

    Lavender, Chad D.; Hanzlik, Shane R.; Pearson, Sara E.; Caldwell, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Posterior shoulder dislocation is an unusual injury often associated with electrical shock or seizure. As with anterior instability, patients frequently present with an impaction injury to the anterior aspect of the humeral head known as a “reverse Hill-Sachs lesion.” The treatment of this bony defect is controversial, and multiple surgical procedures to fill the defect in an effort to decrease recurrence have been described. Most of the reports have focused on an open approach using variations of lesser tuberosity and subscapularis transfers, bone allograft, and even arthroplasty to assist with persistent instability. We advocate an arthroscopic technique that involves a suture anchor–based distal tenodesis of the subscapularis tendon or a reverse remplissage procedure. PMID:27073776

  3. Orifice Blocks Heat Pipe in Reverse Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alario, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    High forward-mode conductance is combined with rapid reverse-mode shutoff in a heat pipe originally developed to cool spacecraft payloads. A narrow orifice within the pipe "chokes off" the evaporator if heat sink becomes warmer than source. During normal operation, with source warmer than sink, orifice has little effect. Design is simpler and more compact than other thermal-diode heat pipes and requires no special materials, forgings, or unusual construction techniques.

  4. A Reverse Stroop Task with Mouse Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Incera, Sara; McLennan, Conor T.

    2016-01-01

    In a reverse Stroop task, observers respond to the meaning of a color word irrespective of the color in which the word is printed—for example, the word red may be printed in the congruent color (red), an incongruent color (e.g., blue), or a neutral color (e.g., white). Although reading of color words in this task is often thought to be neither facilitated by congruent print colors nor interfered with incongruent print colors, this interference has been detected by using a response method that does not give any bias in favor of processing of word meanings or processing of print colors. On the other hand, evidence for the presence of facilitation in this task has been scarce, even though this facilitation is theoretically possible. By modifying the task such that participants respond to a stimulus color word by pointing to a corresponding response word on a computer screen with a mouse, the present study investigated the possibility that not only interference but also facilitation would take place in a reverse Stroop task. Importantly, in this study, participants’ responses were dynamically tracked by recording the entire trajectories of the mouse. Arguably, this method provided richer information about participants’ performance than traditional measures such as reaction time and accuracy, allowing for more detailed (and thus potentially more sensitive) investigation of facilitation and interference in the reverse Stroop task. These trajectories showed that the mouse’s approach toward correct response words was significantly delayed by incongruent print colors but not affected by congruent print colors, demonstrating that only interference, not facilitation, was present in the current task. Implications of these findings are discussed within a theoretical framework in which the strength of association between a task and its response method plays a critical role in determining how word meanings and print colors interact in reverse Stroop tasks. PMID:27199881

  5. A Reverse Stroop Task with Mouse Tracking.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Incera, Sara; McLennan, Conor T

    2016-01-01

    In a reverse Stroop task, observers respond to the meaning of a color word irrespective of the color in which the word is printed-for example, the word red may be printed in the congruent color (red), an incongruent color (e.g., blue), or a neutral color (e.g., white). Although reading of color words in this task is often thought to be neither facilitated by congruent print colors nor interfered with incongruent print colors, this interference has been detected by using a response method that does not give any bias in favor of processing of word meanings or processing of print colors. On the other hand, evidence for the presence of facilitation in this task has been scarce, even though this facilitation is theoretically possible. By modifying the task such that participants respond to a stimulus color word by pointing to a corresponding response word on a computer screen with a mouse, the present study investigated the possibility that not only interference but also facilitation would take place in a reverse Stroop task. Importantly, in this study, participants' responses were dynamically tracked by recording the entire trajectories of the mouse. Arguably, this method provided richer information about participants' performance than traditional measures such as reaction time and accuracy, allowing for more detailed (and thus potentially more sensitive) investigation of facilitation and interference in the reverse Stroop task. These trajectories showed that the mouse's approach toward correct response words was significantly delayed by incongruent print colors but not affected by congruent print colors, demonstrating that only interference, not facilitation, was present in the current task. Implications of these findings are discussed within a theoretical framework in which the strength of association between a task and its response method plays a critical role in determining how word meanings and print colors interact in reverse Stroop tasks. PMID:27199881

  6. A reverse evidence of rotavirus vaccines impact

    PubMed Central

    Martinón-Torres, Federico; Aramburo, Angela; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Cebey, Miriam; Seoane-Pillado, María Teresa; Redondo-Collazo, Lorenzo; Martinón-Sánchez, Jose Maria

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, and due to a quality problem identified in the vaccine manufacture, the rotavirus (RV) vaccination was withheld in Spain during 5 months. Our study aimed to evaluate the impact that this sudden cease had on rotavirus acute gastroenteritis (RAGE) hospitalizations. An increase in RAGE hospitalization was observed in parallel to the drop in vaccine coverage. Here, we report the first reverse evidence of rotavirus vaccine impact. PMID:23836258

  7. Purple Rose of Cairo in Reverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Câmara, António

    In Woody Allen's Purple Rose of Cairo, an actor could leave the film and become real. There are virtual reality (VR) technologies that may enable to achieve the reverse: a spectator entering the movie and interacting with people and objects. But in VR, one needs to develop costly synthetic worlds that are not real. With augmented reality (AR), one superimposes synthetic over real images. It is less expensive and more realistic.

  8. Reversibility of strontium sorption on fracture fillings

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, D.; Eriksen, T.E.

    1995-12-31

    Granite has been chosen by several countries as a major candidate for deep geologic disposal of radioactive waste. The authors have carried out a comparative study of sorption and desorption of strontium in groundwater on separated size and magnetic fractions of fracture fillings from deep granite. Complete reversibility of the sorption process was demonstrated by identical Freundlich isotherms, isotopic exchangeability and pH dependence of the distribution coefficient R{sub d}.

  9. Tachycardia induced myocardial dysfunction. A reversible phenomenon?

    PubMed Central

    McLaran, C J; Gersh, B J; Sugrue, D D; Hammill, S C; Seward, J B; Holmes, D R

    1985-01-01

    Four patients with myocardial dysfunction related to tachycardia underwent electrophysiological studies, which showed a re-entrant supraventricular tachycardia using an accessory atrioventricular connexion. Serial assessment of left ventricular function by echocardiography before and after control of the tachycardia indicated a variable degree of reversibility. Endomyocardial biopsy in two patients detected non-specific histological changes. Because of the possible role of ischaemia in this condition effective control of prolonged tachycardia is needed to prevent deterioration of myocardial function. Images PMID:3970789

  10. 2004 Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Edward Eisenstein Nancy Ryan Gray

    2005-03-23

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2004 Gordon Research Conference on Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology was held at Four Points Sheraton, CA, 1/25-30/2004. The Conference was well attended with 82 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students.

  11. Reverse osmosis separation cuts energy use 90%

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    A producer of agricultural products sought a more economical system to replace the conventional evaporation. Approximately 4500 gal. of water had to be removed from an original 5000 gal. batch. A reverse osmosis system was selected that could handle the highly viscous product efficiently. The system is powered by a 40 hp electric motor and uses approximately one tenth of the power of the evaporator.

  12. Plutonium decontamination studies using Reverse Osmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Plock, C.E.; Travis, T.N.

    1980-06-17

    Water in batches of 45 gallons each, from a creek crossing the Rocky Flats Plant, was transferred to the Reverse Osmosis (RO) laboratory for experimental testing. The testing involved using RO for plutonium decontamination. For each test, the water was spiked with plutonium, had its pH adjusted, and was then processed by RO. At a water recovery level of 87%, the plutonium decontamination factors ranged from near 100 to 1200, depending on the pH of the processed water.

  13. A Reverse Stroop Task with Mouse Tracking.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Incera, Sara; McLennan, Conor T

    2016-01-01

    In a reverse Stroop task, observers respond to the meaning of a color word irrespective of the color in which the word is printed-for example, the word red may be printed in the congruent color (red), an incongruent color (e.g., blue), or a neutral color (e.g., white). Although reading of color words in this task is often thought to be neither facilitated by congruent print colors nor interfered with incongruent print colors, this interference has been detected by using a response method that does not give any bias in favor of processing of word meanings or processing of print colors. On the other hand, evidence for the presence of facilitation in this task has been scarce, even though this facilitation is theoretically possible. By modifying the task such that participants respond to a stimulus color word by pointing to a corresponding response word on a computer screen with a mouse, the present study investigated the possibility that not only interference but also facilitation would take place in a reverse Stroop task. Importantly, in this study, participants' responses were dynamically tracked by recording the entire trajectories of the mouse. Arguably, this method provided richer information about participants' performance than traditional measures such as reaction time and accuracy, allowing for more detailed (and thus potentially more sensitive) investigation of facilitation and interference in the reverse Stroop task. These trajectories showed that the mouse's approach toward correct response words was significantly delayed by incongruent print colors but not affected by congruent print colors, demonstrating that only interference, not facilitation, was present in the current task. Implications of these findings are discussed within a theoretical framework in which the strength of association between a task and its response method plays a critical role in determining how word meanings and print colors interact in reverse Stroop tasks.

  14. On the design of reversible QDCA systems.

    SciTech Connect

    DeBenedictis, Erik P.; Frank, Michael P. (Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL); Ottavi, Marco; Frost-Murphy, Sarah E.

    2006-10-01

    This work is the first to describe how to go about designing a reversible QDCA system. The design space is substantial, and there are many questions that a designer needs to answer before beginning to design. This document begins to explicate the tradeoffs and assumptions that need to be made and offers a range of approaches as starting points and examples. This design guide is an effective tool for aiding designers in creating the best quality QDCA implementation for a system.

  15. Crossed reflex reversal during human locomotion.

    PubMed

    Gervasio, Sabata; Farina, Dario; Sinkjær, Thomas; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie

    2013-05-01

    During human walking, precise coordination between the two legs is required in order to react promptly to any sudden hazard that could threaten stability. The networks involved in this coordination are not yet completely known, but a direct spinal connection between soleus (SOL) muscles has recently been revealed. For this response to be functional, as previously suggested, we hypothesize that it will be accompanied by a reaction in synergistic muscles, such as gastrocnemius lateralis (GL), and that a reversal of the response would occur when an opposite reaction is required. In the present study, surface EMGs of contralateral SOL and GL were analyzed after tibial nerve (TN), sural nerve (SuN), and medial plantar nerve (MpN) stimulation during two tasks in which opposite reactions are functionally expected: normal walking (NW), just before ipsilateral heel strike, and hybrid walking (HW) (legs walking in opposite directions), at ipsilateral push off and contralateral touchdown. Early crossed facilitations were observed in the contralateral GL after TN stimulation during NW, and a reversal of such responses occurred during HW. These results underline the functional significance of short-latency crossed responses and represent the first evidence for short-latency reflex reversal in the contralateral limb for humans. Muscle afferents seem to mediate the response during NW, while during HW cutaneous afferents are likely involved. It is thus possible that different afferents mediate the crossed response during different tasks.

  16. On the reversibility of mandibular symphyseal fusion.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jeremiah E; Lack, Justin B; Ravosa, Matthew J

    2012-09-01

    Experimental and comparative studies suggest that a major determinant of increased ossification of the mandibular symphysis is elevated masticatory stress related to a mechanically challenging diet. However, the morphology of this joint tracks variation in dietary properties in only some mammalian clades. Extant anthropoid primates are a notable exception: synostosis is ubiquitous in this speciose group, despite its great age and diverse array of feeding adaptations. One possible explanation for this pattern is that, once synostosis evolves, reversion to a lesser degree of fusion is unlikely or even constrained. If correct, this has important implications for functional and phylogenetic analyses of the mammalian feeding apparatus. To test this hypothesis, we generated a molecular tree for 76 vespertilionoid and noctilionoid chiropterans using Bayesian phylogenetic analysis and examined character evolution using parsimony and likelihood ancestral-state reconstructions along with the binary state speciation and extinction (BiSSE) model. Results indicate that reversals have occurred within Vespertilionoidea. In contrast, noctilionoids exhibit an anthropoid-like pattern, which suggests that more detailed comparisons of the functional and developmental bases for fusion in these bat clades may provide insight into why fusion is maintained in some lineages but not in others. Potential functional and developmental explanations for the lack of reversal are discussed. PMID:22946814

  17. Genomic sorting with length-weighted reversals.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Ron Y; Skiena, Steven

    2002-01-01

    Current algorithmic studies of genome rearrangement ignore the length of reversals (or inversions); rather, they only count their number. We introduce a new cost model in which the lengths of the reversed sequences play a role, allowing more flexibility in accounting for mutation phenomena. Our focus is on sorting unsigned (unoriented) permutations by reversals; since this problem remains difficult (NP-hard) in our new model, the best we can hope for are approximation results. We propose an efficient, novel algorithm that takes (a monotonic function f of) length into account as an optimization criterion and study its properties. Our results include an upper bound of O(fn lg2n) for any additive cost measure f on the cost of sorting any n-element permutation, and a guaranteed approximation ratio of O(lg2n) times optimal for sorting a given permutation. Our work poses some interesting questions to both biologists and computer scientists and suggests some new bioinformatic insights that are currently being studied. PMID:14571379

  18. Unsteady Airloads on Airfoils in Reverse Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lind, Andrew; Jones, Anya

    2014-11-01

    This work gives insight into the influence of airfoil characteristics on unsteady airloads for rotor applications where local airfoil sections may operate at high and/or reverse flow angles of attack. Two-dimensional wind tunnel experiments have been performed on four airfoil sections to investigate the effects of thickness, camber, and trailing edge shape on unsteady airloads (lift, pressure drag, and pitching moment). These model rotor blades were tested through 360 deg of incidence for 104 <=Re <=106 . Unsteady pressure transducers were mounted on the airfoil surface to measure the high frequency, dynamic pressure variations. The temporal evolution of chordwise pressure distributions and resulting airloads is quantified for each airfoil in each of the three unsteady wake regimes present in reverse flow. Specifically, the influence of the formation, growth, and shedding of vortices on the surface pressure distribution is quantified and compared between airfoils with a sharp geometric trailing edge and those with a blunt geometric trailing edge. These findings are integral to mitigation of rotor blade vibrations for applications where airfoil sections are subjected to reverse flow, such as high-speed helicopters and tidal turbines.

  19. MDR-reversal activity of chalcones.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Antoaneta; Batovska, Daniela; Engi, Helga; Parushev, Stoyan; Ocsovszki, Imre; Kostova, Ivanka; Molnar, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The ability of 11 chalcones with 3,4,5-trimethoxy substitution on ring A to inhibit the transport activity of P-glycoprotein was studied. Flow cytometry was applied in multidrug-resistant human mdr1 gene-transfected mouse lymphoma cells (L 5178 Y). The reversal of multidrug resistance (MDR) was investigated by measuring the accumulation of rhodamine-123 in cancer cells. Verapamil was applied as a positive control. The majority of the tested compounds were proved to be effective inhibitors of the outward transport of rhodamine-123. In the MTT test, chalcones 2, 3, 5 and 7 exhibited the strongest antiproliferative effects, with 50% inhibitory dose (ID50) =0.19, 0.19, 0.29 and 0.14 microg/mL, respectively. The least effective compounds were 1, 4, 8 and 11, with ID50 values in the range of 1.5-3.5 microg/mL. The antiproliferative effect was shown to be affected by the type of substitution at the p-position on ring B. Chalcone 7, with a p-chloro group on ring B, was the most effective in MDR reversal, causing a marked increase in drug accumulation from 0.4 to 40 microg/mL. In combination with epirubicin, compound 7 displayed synergistic properties while compound 3 exhibited an additive effect. The data presented here indicated that some calcone derivatives can be regarded as effective compounds for reversal of MDR. PMID:18610751

  20. Psychophysical reverse correlation with multiple response alternatives.

    PubMed

    Dai, Huanping; Micheyl, Christophe

    2010-08-01

    Psychophysical reverse-correlation methods such as the "classification image" technique provide a unique tool to uncover the internal representations and decision strategies of individual participants in perceptual tasks. Over the past 30 years, these techniques have gained increasing popularity among both visual and auditory psychophysicists. However, thus far, principled applications of the psychophysical reverse-correlation approach have been almost exclusively limited to two-alternative decision (detection or discrimination) tasks. Whether and how reverse-correlation methods can be applied to uncover perceptual templates and decision strategies in situations involving more than just two response alternatives remain largely unclear. Here, the authors consider the problem of estimating perceptual templates and decision strategies in stimulus identification tasks with multiple response alternatives. They describe a modified correlational approach, which can be used to solve this problem. The approach is evaluated under a variety of simulated conditions, including different ratios of internal-to-external noise, different degrees of correlations between the sensory observations, and various statistical distributions of stimulus perturbations. The results indicate that the proposed approach is reasonably robust, suggesting that it could be used in future empirical studies. PMID:20695712

  1. Reversible Projection Technique for Colon Unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jianhua; Chowdhury, Ananda S.; Aman, Javed; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    Colon unfolding provides an efficient way to navigate the colon in CT colonography. Most existing unfolding techniques only computed forward projections. When radiologists find abnormalities or conduct measurements on the unfolded view (which is often quicker and easier), it is difficult to locate the corresponding region on the 3D view for further examination (which is more accurate and reliable). To address this, we propose a reversible projection technique for colon unfolding. The method makes use of advanced algorithms including rotation-minimizing frames, recursive ring sets, mesh skinning and cylindrical projection. Both forward and reverse transformations are computed for points on the colon surface. Therefore, it allows for detecting and measuring polyps on the unfolded view and mapping them back to the 3D surface. We generated realistic colon simulation incorporating most colon characteristics such as curved centerline, variable distention, haustral folds, teniae coli and colonic polyps. Our method was tested on both the simulated data and 110 clinical CT colonography data. Comparison of polyp size measurements on the unfolded view and the 3D view clearly demonstrates the importance of our reversible projection technique. PMID:20542756

  2. Time reversal communication over doubly spread channels.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wen-Jun; Jiang, Xue

    2012-11-01

    Conventional time reversal can mitigate multipath delay dispersion by temporal focusing. But it is not applicable to time-varying channels with a Doppler spread. Although recently time reversal communication has been adapted to time-variant channels, the modified technique requires frequent channel updates to track channel variations and cannot handle large Doppler spread, which means that it cannot achieve frequency focusing. In this paper, two time reversal receivers for underwater acoustic communications over doubly spread channels are proposed. The proposed approach, which can be interpreted as time-frequency channel matching, is based on the channel spreading function rather than impulse response adopted by the existing techniques; this leads to much less frequent channel updates. Unlike existing methods that only correct a single Doppler shift, the proposed approach uses a rake-like structure to compensate for multiple Doppler shifts and hence can eliminate severe Doppler spread induced by temporal channel variations. Simulation results verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach, indicating that it can simultaneously counteract delay and Doppler spreads, achieving both temporal and frequency focusing.

  3. Coevolution can reverse predator-prey cycles.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Michael H; Weitz, Joshua S

    2014-05-20

    A hallmark of Lotka-Volterra models, and other ecological models of predator-prey interactions, is that in predator-prey cycles, peaks in prey abundance precede peaks in predator abundance. Such models typically assume that species life history traits are fixed over ecologically relevant time scales. However, the coevolution of predator and prey traits has been shown to alter the community dynamics of natural systems, leading to novel dynamics including antiphase and cryptic cycles. Here, using an eco-coevolutionary model, we show that predator-prey coevolution can also drive population cycles where the opposite of canonical Lotka-Volterra oscillations occurs: predator peaks precede prey peaks. These reversed cycles arise when selection favors extreme phenotypes, predator offense is costly, and prey defense is effective against low-offense predators. We present multiple datasets from phage-cholera, mink-muskrat, and gyrfalcon-rock ptarmigan systems that exhibit reversed-peak ordering. Our results suggest that such cycles are a potential signature of predator-prey coevolution and reveal unique ways in which predator-prey coevolution can shape, and possibly reverse, community dynamics.

  4. Time Reversal Acoustic in a flowing medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luong, Trung Dung; Arora, Manish; Hies, Thomas; Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Claus-Dieter Ohl grou Team; DHI Water; Environment (S) Pte. Ltd. Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We explore the effect of flow on time reversal acoustics (TRA). Traditionally, TRA has been studied in static conditions, while a motion of the medium is expected to degrade the spatio-temporal focussing of the sound pulse. Here, we study the effect of the flow with a TRA system at 1MHz. A controlled flow is added between the emitter and receiver. Additional, a metallic plate is utilized to increases the numerical aperture of the emitting transducer. The impulse response of the non-flowing system, is recorded and time reversed. Then, the response of the hydrophone is recorded in presence and absence of the flow. It is found that the time reversed signal focuses on at the hydrophone in both the cases. In the absence of flow, the focus signal is observed to be shifted in the time domain. Furthermore, there is a drop in the peak-to-peak value of the focus signal in the presence of flow. For a flow rate of 3 cm/s (Re ~ 1000), a distinct shift in the time domain and a reduction of the peak is obtained. The results will be discussed and compared with numerical simulation of TRA under flow conditions.

  5. Polar Field Reversals and Active Region Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon; Ettinger, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. Using NSO Kitt Peak synoptic magnetograms, we investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of the synoptic magnetograms, the dispersal of flux from low to high latitudes is tracked, and the timing of this dispersal is compared to the polar field changes. In the most abrupt cases of polar field reversal, a few activity complexes (systems of active regions) are identified as the main cause. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed lagging-polarity flux from these complexes is found to correlate well in time with the abrupt polar field changes. In each case, significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with lagging-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. This work is carried out through the National Solar Observatory Summer Research Assistantship (SRA) Program. The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  6. Model of reversible vesicular transport with exclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Karamched, Bhargav R.

    2016-08-01

    A major question in neurobiology concerns the mechanics behind the motor-driven transport and delivery of vesicles to synaptic targets along the axon of a neuron. Experimental evidence suggests that the distribution of vesicles along the axon is relatively uniform and that vesicular delivery to synapses is reversible. A recent modeling study has made explicit the crucial role that reversibility in vesicular delivery to synapses plays in achieving uniformity in vesicle distribution, so called synaptic democracy (Bressloff et al 2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 168101). In this paper we generalize the previous model by accounting for exclusion effects (hard-core repulsion) that may occur between molecular motor-cargo complexes (particles) moving along the same microtubule track. The resulting model takes the form of an exclusion process with four internal states, which distinguish between motile and stationary particles, and whether or not a particle is carrying vesicles. By applying a mean field approximation and an adiabatic approximation we reduce the system of ODEs describing the evolution of occupation numbers of the sites on a 1D lattice to a system of hydrodynamic equations in the continuum limit. We find that reversibility in vesicular delivery allows for synaptic democracy even in the presence of exclusion effects, although exclusion does exacerbate nonuniform distributions of vesicles in an axon when compared with a model without exclusion. We also uncover the relationship between our model and other models of exclusion processes with internal states.

  7. Preference reversal in quantum decision theory.

    PubMed

    Yukalov, Vyacheslav I; Sornette, Didier

    2015-01-01

    We consider the psychological effect of preference reversal and show that it finds a natural explanation in the frame of quantum decision theory. When people choose between lotteries with non-negative payoffs, they prefer a more certain lottery because of uncertainty aversion. But when people evaluate lottery prices, e.g., for selling to others the right to play them, they do this more rationally, being less subject to behavioral biases. This difference can be explained by the presence of the attraction factors entering the expression of quantum probabilities. Only the existence of attraction factors can explain why, considering two lotteries with close utility factors, a decision maker prefers one of them when choosing, but evaluates higher the other one when pricing. We derive a general quantitative criterion for the preference reversal to occur that relates the utilities of the two lotteries to the attraction factors under choosing vs. pricing and test successfully its application on experiments by Tversky et al. We also show that the planning paradox can be treated as a kind of preference reversal.

  8. Preference reversal in quantum decision theory.

    PubMed

    Yukalov, Vyacheslav I; Sornette, Didier

    2015-01-01

    We consider the psychological effect of preference reversal and show that it finds a natural explanation in the frame of quantum decision theory. When people choose between lotteries with non-negative payoffs, they prefer a more certain lottery because of uncertainty aversion. But when people evaluate lottery prices, e.g., for selling to others the right to play them, they do this more rationally, being less subject to behavioral biases. This difference can be explained by the presence of the attraction factors entering the expression of quantum probabilities. Only the existence of attraction factors can explain why, considering two lotteries with close utility factors, a decision maker prefers one of them when choosing, but evaluates higher the other one when pricing. We derive a general quantitative criterion for the preference reversal to occur that relates the utilities of the two lotteries to the attraction factors under choosing vs. pricing and test successfully its application on experiments by Tversky et al. We also show that the planning paradox can be treated as a kind of preference reversal. PMID:26500592

  9. Coevolution can reverse predator-prey cycles.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Michael H; Weitz, Joshua S

    2014-05-20

    A hallmark of Lotka-Volterra models, and other ecological models of predator-prey interactions, is that in predator-prey cycles, peaks in prey abundance precede peaks in predator abundance. Such models typically assume that species life history traits are fixed over ecologically relevant time scales. However, the coevolution of predator and prey traits has been shown to alter the community dynamics of natural systems, leading to novel dynamics including antiphase and cryptic cycles. Here, using an eco-coevolutionary model, we show that predator-prey coevolution can also drive population cycles where the opposite of canonical Lotka-Volterra oscillations occurs: predator peaks precede prey peaks. These reversed cycles arise when selection favors extreme phenotypes, predator offense is costly, and prey defense is effective against low-offense predators. We present multiple datasets from phage-cholera, mink-muskrat, and gyrfalcon-rock ptarmigan systems that exhibit reversed-peak ordering. Our results suggest that such cycles are a potential signature of predator-prey coevolution and reveal unique ways in which predator-prey coevolution can shape, and possibly reverse, community dynamics. PMID:24799689

  10. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring By Reverse Iontophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Anroop B; Goel, Ankit; Prakash, Shashi; Kumar, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic molecules possessing distinct pharmacokinetic variation, narrow therapeutic index and concentration dependent therapeutic/adverse effects demand constant monitoring. The current methods for blood sampling are invasive and possess low patient compliance. Human skin, selective and effective membrane to chemical permeation, offers an alternative route for the extraction of endogenous molecules in the body. Significant attention has been received in the application of reverse iontophoresis in extracting drugs/biomaterials from the subdermal region. This technique involves transiting of a low electric current across the skin usually with couple of skin electrodes to extract charged as well as neutral molecules. Electromigration and electroosmosis are the two basic mechanisms involved in transport of molecules. Several in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated the potential of reverse iontophoresis as a noninvasive tool in clinical chemistry and therapeutic drug monitoring. This technology is currently being used in device such as Glucowatch Biogrpaher which allows blood glucose detection across skin layers. Advances in technology and rapid progress in research has widely improved the opportunity of this system, and the recent trend indicates that several products are likely to be developed very soon. This review provides an overview about the recent developments in reverse iontophoresis for therapeutic drug monitoring. PMID:24826025

  11. Preference reversal in quantum decision theory

    PubMed Central

    Yukalov, Vyacheslav I.; Sornette, Didier

    2015-01-01

    We consider the psychological effect of preference reversal and show that it finds a natural explanation in the frame of quantum decision theory. When people choose between lotteries with non-negative payoffs, they prefer a more certain lottery because of uncertainty aversion. But when people evaluate lottery prices, e.g., for selling to others the right to play them, they do this more rationally, being less subject to behavioral biases. This difference can be explained by the presence of the attraction factors entering the expression of quantum probabilities. Only the existence of attraction factors can explain why, considering two lotteries with close utility factors, a decision maker prefers one of them when choosing, but evaluates higher the other one when pricing. We derive a general quantitative criterion for the preference reversal to occur that relates the utilities of the two lotteries to the attraction factors under choosing vs. pricing and test successfully its application on experiments by Tversky et al. We also show that the planning paradox can be treated as a kind of preference reversal. PMID:26500592

  12. Domino model for geomagnetic field reversals.

    PubMed

    Mori, N; Schmitt, D; Wicht, J; Ferriz-Mas, A; Mouri, H; Nakamichi, A; Morikawa, M

    2013-01-01

    We solve the equations of motion of a one-dimensional planar Heisenberg (or Vaks-Larkin) model consisting of a system of interacting macrospins aligned along a ring. Each spin has unit length and is described by its angle with respect to the rotational axis. The orientation of the spins can vary in time due to spin-spin interaction and random forcing. We statistically describe the behavior of the sum of all spins for different parameters. The term "domino model" in the title refers to the interaction among the spins. We compare the model results with geomagnetic field reversals and dynamo simulations and find strikingly similar behavior. The aggregate of all spins keeps the same direction for a long time and, once in a while, begins flipping to change the orientation by almost 180 degrees (mimicking a geomagnetic reversal) or to move back to the original direction (mimicking an excursion). Most of the time the spins are aligned or antialigned and deviate only slightly with respect to the rotational axis (mimicking the secular variation of the geomagnetic pole with respect to the geographic pole). Reversals are fast compared to the times in between and they occur at random times, both in the model and in the case of the Earth's magnetic field. PMID:23410284

  13. Coevolution can reverse predator–prey cycles

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Michael H.; Weitz, Joshua S.

    2014-01-01

    A hallmark of Lotka–Volterra models, and other ecological models of predator–prey interactions, is that in predator–prey cycles, peaks in prey abundance precede peaks in predator abundance. Such models typically assume that species life history traits are fixed over ecologically relevant time scales. However, the coevolution of predator and prey traits has been shown to alter the community dynamics of natural systems, leading to novel dynamics including antiphase and cryptic cycles. Here, using an eco-coevolutionary model, we show that predator–prey coevolution can also drive population cycles where the opposite of canonical Lotka–Volterra oscillations occurs: predator peaks precede prey peaks. These reversed cycles arise when selection favors extreme phenotypes, predator offense is costly, and prey defense is effective against low-offense predators. We present multiple datasets from phage–cholera, mink–muskrat, and gyrfalcon–rock ptarmigan systems that exhibit reversed-peak ordering. Our results suggest that such cycles are a potential signature of predator–prey coevolution and reveal unique ways in which predator–prey coevolution can shape, and possibly reverse, community dynamics. PMID:24799689

  14. Serial reversal learning of position discrimination in developing rats.

    PubMed

    Watson, Deborah J; Sullivan, Jesse R; Frank, Julie G; Stanton, Mark E

    2006-01-01

    The current study established a procedure to evaluate the capability of rats on postnatal days (PND) 21, 26, and 30 to perform a spatial serial reversal task using a T-maze. Training consisted of an acquisition session followed by a series of six reversal sessions. To examine the role of proactive interference in the serial reversal effect, the point of reversal was manipulated so that it occurred at the start of each session (between-sessions) or the midpoint of each session (within-sessions). Performance was initially impaired during the first reversal but improved dramatically across the series. Reversal between-sessions enhanced this serial reversal effect in comparison to reversal within-sessions. Experiment 1 showed that rats of all ages learned the between-sessions serial reversal task at a comparable rate. However, on the within-sessions task, PND21 rats were impaired relative to the PND26 and 30 rats, which did not differ. Experiment 2 revealed that the addition of a tactile cue that is correlated with each phase of reversal eliminated age and task differences in serial reversal performance. These findings suggest that higher-order cognitive processes underlying serial reversal are present during the weanling period, but there is some improvement with age under conditions involving high memory interference and/or difficulty in detecting the transition between reversal phases.

  15. Geomagnetic Dipole Strength and Reversal Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, J.; Meynadier, L.; Guyodo, Y.

    2004-12-01

    We present a first 2 million years long composite curve obtained after stacking records of relative paleointensity from a selection of sedimentary sequences. The composite Sint-2000 record was calibrated using the virtual dipole moments (VDMs) of the 2004 updated volcanic database of absolute paleointensity over 0.1 Myr long intervals. The value of the time-averaged VDM (7.46+/-1.16 x 1022 Am2) for the past 0.8Myr was used for calibration and the mean values of the successive 0.1 Myr intervals were found in very good agreement with the relative paleointensity for the same periods. A striking characteristic of this Sint-2000 curve is the succession of periods with different mean values of paleointensity. During the Brunhes chron the dipole oscillated around a value of 7.51+/-1.66 x 1022 Am2, which was significantly larger than during the previous 400 kyrs (5.3 +/- 1.5 x 1022 Am2). To provide a more quantitative picture of field strength as a function of reversal frequency, we calculated successive running averages of the field intensity over 100 kyrs long intervals and found that the time-averaged field was higher during periods without reversals. We also observe that the amplitude of the short-term oscillations remained the same. As a consequence, less intervals of very low intensity are expected during periods associated with a strong average dipole moment, whereas more excursions or other instabilities are produced during periods of weak field intensity. The relation between the mean dipole strength and the frequency of reversals suggests also the existence of a large field during long periods without reversals, under the assumption that they would be governed by the same processes. Prior to reversals, the axial dipole decays during 60 to 80 kyrs, but rebuilds itself in the opposite direction much more rapidly, in a few thousand years at most. These time constants suggest that the decay phase is caused by diffusion while advection would dominate the dipole

  16. Reverse Discrimination in Professional Schools' Admissions and in Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Frank

    1979-01-01

    Discusses equal opportunity in America, the antecedents of present reverse discrimination cases, discrimination in professional schools' admissions, and reverse discrimination in employment. Concludes that the American people are ready to accept limited affirmative action programs. (Author/IRT)

  17. Reversible catalytic dehydrogenation of alcohols for energy storage

    PubMed Central

    Bonitatibus, Peter J.; Chakraborty, Sumit; Doherty, Mark D.; Siclovan, Oltea; Jones, William D.; Soloveichik, Grigorii L.

    2015-01-01

    Reversibility of a dehydrogenation/hydrogenation catalytic reaction has been an elusive target for homogeneous catalysis. In this report, reversible acceptorless dehydrogenation of secondary alcohols and diols on iron pincer complexes and reversible oxidative dehydrogenation of primary alcohols/reduction of aldehydes with separate transfer of protons and electrons on iridium complexes are shown. This reactivity suggests a strategy for the development of reversible fuel cell electrocatalysts for partial oxidation (dehydrogenation) of hydroxyl-containing fuels. PMID:25588879

  18. A study on dynamic heat assisted magnetization reversal mechanisms under insufficient reversal field conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. J.; Yang, H. Z.; Leong, S. H.; Yu Ko, Hnin Yu; Wu, B. L.; Ng, V.; Asbahi, M.; Yang, J. K. W.

    2014-10-20

    We report an experimental study on the dynamic thermomagnetic (TM) reversal mechanisms at around Curie temperature (Tc) for isolated 60 nm pitch single-domain [Co/Pd] islands heated by a 1.5 μm spot size laser pulse under an applied magnetic reversal field (Hr). Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) observations with high resolution MFM tips clearly showed randomly trapped non-switched islands within the laser irradiated spot after dynamic TM reversal process with insufficient Hr strength. This observation provides direct experimental evidence by MFM of a large magnetization switching variation due to increased thermal fluctuation/agitation over magnetization energy at the elevated temperature of around Tc. The average percentage of non-switched islands/magnetization was further found to be inversely proportional to the applied reversal field Hr for incomplete magnetization reversal when Hr is less than 13% of the island coercivity (Hc), showing an increased switching field distribution (SFD) at elevated temperature of around Tc (where main contributions to SFD broadening are from Tc distribution and stronger thermal fluctuations). Our experimental study and results provide better understanding and insight on practical heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) process and recording performance, including HAMR writing magnetization dynamics induced SFD as well as associated DC saturation noise that limits areal density, as were previously observed and investigated by theoretical simulations.

  19. Time Reversal in Solids (Linear and Nonlinear Elasticity): Multimedia Resources in Time Reversal

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dynamic nonlinear elastic behavior, nonequilibrium dynamics, first observed as a curiosity in earth materials has now been observed in a great variety of solids. The primary manifestations of the behavior are characteristic wave distortion, and slow dynamics, a recovery process to equilibrium that takes place linearly with the logarithm of time, over hours to days after a wave disturbance. The link between the diverse materials that exhibit nonequilibrium dynamics appears to be the presence of soft regions, thought to be 'damage' at many scales, ranging from order 10-9 m to 10-1 m at least. The regions of soft matter may be distributed as in a rock sample, or isolated, as in a sample with a single crack [LANLhttp://www.lanl.gov/orgs/ees/ees11/geophysics/nonlinear/nonlinear.shtml]. The Geophysics Group (EES-11) at Los Alamos National Laboratory has posted two or more multimedia items under each of the titles below to demonstrate aspects of their work: 1) Source Reconstruction Using Time Reversal; 2) Robustness and Efficiency of Time Reversal Acoustics in Solid Media; 3) Audio Example of Time Reversal - Speech Privacy; 4) Crack Imagining with Time Reversal - Experimental Results; 5) Time Reversal of the 2004 (M9.0) Sumatra Earthquake.

  20. Reverse Pharmacognosy and Reverse Pharmacology; Two Closely Related Approaches for Drug Discovery Development.

    PubMed

    Saeidnia, Soodabeh; Gohari, Ahmad R; Manayi, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacognosy is a science, which study natural products as a source of new drug leads and effective drug development. Rational and economic search for novel lead structures could maximize the speed of drug discovery by using powerful high technology methods. Reverse pharmacognosy, a complementary to pharmacognosy, couples the high throughput screening (HTS), virtual screening and databases along with the knowledge of traditional medicines. These strategies lead to identification of numerous in vitro active and selective hits enhancing the speed of drug discovery from natural sources. Besides, reverse pharmacology is a target base drug discovery approach; in the first step, a hypothesis is made that the alteration of specific protein activity will produce beneficial curative effects. Both, reverse pharmacognosy and reverse pharmacology take advantages of high technology methods to accomplish their particular purposes. Moreover, reverse pharmacognosy effectively utilize traditional medicines and natural products as promising sources to provide new drug leads as well as promote the rational use of them by using valuable information like protein structure databases and chemical libraries which prepare pharmacological profile of traditional medicine, plant extract or natural compounds. PMID:27396403

  1. A study on dynamic heat assisted magnetization reversal mechanisms under insufficient reversal field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. J.; Yang, H. Z.; Leong, S. H.; Wu, B. L.; Asbahi, M.; Yu Ko, Hnin Yu; Yang, J. K. W.; Ng, V.

    2014-10-01

    We report an experimental study on the dynamic thermomagnetic (TM) reversal mechanisms at around Curie temperature (Tc) for isolated 60 nm pitch single-domain [Co/Pd] islands heated by a 1.5 μm spot size laser pulse under an applied magnetic reversal field (Hr). Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) observations with high resolution MFM tips clearly showed randomly trapped non-switched islands within the laser irradiated spot after dynamic TM reversal process with insufficient Hr strength. This observation provides direct experimental evidence by MFM of a large magnetization switching variation due to increased thermal fluctuation/agitation over magnetization energy at the elevated temperature of around Tc. The average percentage of non-switched islands/magnetization was further found to be inversely proportional to the applied reversal field Hr for incomplete magnetization reversal when Hr is less than 13% of the island coercivity (Hc), showing an increased switching field distribution (SFD) at elevated temperature of around Tc (where main contributions to SFD broadening are from Tc distribution and stronger thermal fluctuations). Our experimental study and results provide better understanding and insight on practical heat assisted magnetic recording (HAMR) process and recording performance, including HAMR writing magnetization dynamics induced SFD as well as associated DC saturation noise that limits areal density, as were previously observed and investigated by theoretical simulations.

  2. Theory of the time reversal cavity for electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Carminati, R; Pierrat, R; de Rosny, J; Fink, M

    2007-11-01

    We derive a general expression of the electric dyadic Green function in a time-reversal cavity, based on vector diffraction theory in the frequency domain. Our theory gives a rigorous framework to time-reversal experiments using electromagnetic waves and suggests a methodology to design structures generating subwavelength focusing after time reversal.

  3. 21 CFR 177.2550 - Reverse osmosis membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reverse osmosis membranes. 177.2550 Section 177... Use § 177.2550 Reverse osmosis membranes. Substances identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as reverse osmosis membranes intended for use in processing bulk quantities of...

  4. 21 CFR 177.2550 - Reverse osmosis membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reverse osmosis membranes. 177.2550 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2550 Reverse osmosis membranes. Substances identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as reverse osmosis membranes intended for use...

  5. 21 CFR 177.2550 - Reverse osmosis membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reverse osmosis membranes. 177.2550 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2550 Reverse osmosis membranes. Substances identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as reverse osmosis membranes intended for use...

  6. 21 CFR 177.2550 - Reverse osmosis membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reverse osmosis membranes. 177.2550 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2550 Reverse osmosis membranes. Substances identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as reverse osmosis membranes intended for use...

  7. 21 CFR 177.2550 - Reverse osmosis membranes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Reverse osmosis membranes. 177.2550 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2550 Reverse osmosis membranes. Substances identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as reverse osmosis membranes intended for use...

  8. Study of a new airfoil used in reversible axial fans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Chaojun; Wei, Baosuo; Gu, Chuangang

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of the reverse ventilation of axial flow are analyzed. An s shaped airfoil with a double circular arc was tested in a wind tunnel. The experimental results showed that the characteristics of this new airfoil in reverse ventilation are the same as those in normal ventilation, and that this airfoil is better than the existing airfoils used on reversible axial fans.

  9. Cascade Reverse Osmosis Air Conditioning System: Cascade Reverse Osmosis and the Absorption Osmosis Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    BEETIT Project: Battelle is developing a new air conditioning system that uses a cascade reverse osmosis (RO)-based absorption cycle. Analyses show that this new cycle can be as much as 60% more efficient than vapor compression, which is used in 90% of air conditioners. Traditional vapor-compression systems use polluting liquids for a cooling effect. Absorption cycles use benign refrigerants such as water, which is absorbed in a salt solution and pumped as liquid—replacing compression of vapor. The refrigerant is subsequently separated from absorbing salt using heat for re-use in the cooling cycle. Battelle is replacing thermal separation of refrigerant with a more efficient reverse osmosis process. Research has shown that the cycle is possible, but further investment will be needed to reduce the number of cascade reverse osmosis stages and therefore cost.

  10. Explaining Polarization Reversals in STEREO Wave Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, A.; Cattell, C.; Wygant, J.; Kersten, K.; Wilson, L, B., III; Dai, L.; Colpitts, C.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Paradise, A.

    2012-01-01

    Recently Breneman et al. reported observations of large amplitude lightning and transmitter whistler mode waves from two STEREO passes through the inner radiation belt (L<2). Hodograms of the electric field in the plane transverse to the magnetic field showed that the transmitter waves underwent periodic polarization reversals. Specifically, their polarization would cycle through a pattern of right-hand to linear to left-hand polarization at a rate of roughly 200 Hz. The lightning whistlers were observed to be left-hand polarized at frequencies greater than the lower hybrid frequency and less than the transmitter frequency (21.4 kHz) and right-hand polarized otherwise. Only righthand polarized waves in the inner radiation belt should exist in the frequency range of the whistler mode and these reversals were not explained in the previous paper. We show, with a combination of observations and simulated wave superposition, that these polarization reversals are due to the beating of an incident electromagnetic whistler mode wave at 21.4 kHz and linearly polarized, symmetric lower hybrid sidebands Doppler-shifted from the incident wave by +/-200 Hz. The existence of the lower hybrid waves is consistent with the parametric decay mechanism of Lee and Kuo whereby an incident whistler mode wave decays into symmetric, short wavelength lower hybrid waves and a purely growing (zero-frequency) mode. Like the lower hybrid waves, the purely growing mode is Doppler-shifted by 200 Hz as observed on STEREO. This decay mechanism in the upper ionosphere has been previously reported at equatorial latitudes and is thought to have a direct connection with explosive spread F enhancements. As such it may represent another dissipation mechanism of VLF wave energy in the ionosphere and may help to explain a deficit of observed lightning and transmitter energy in the inner radiation belts as reported by Starks et al.

  11. Thermodynamically reversible generalization of diffusion limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, R M; Margolus, N H

    1999-07-01

    We introduce a lattice gas model of cluster growth via the diffusive aggregation of particles in a closed system obeying a local, deterministic, microscopically reversible dynamics. This model roughly corresponds to placing the irreversible diffusion limited aggregation model (DLA) in contact with a heat bath. Particles release latent heat when aggregating, while singly connected cluster members can absorb heat and evaporate. The heat bath is initially empty, hence we observe the flow of entropy from the aggregating gas of particles into the heat bath, which is being populated by diffusing heat tokens. Before the population of the heat bath stabilizes, the cluster morphology (quantified by the fractal dimension) is similar to a standard DLA cluster. The cluster then gradually anneals, becoming more tenuous, until reaching configurational equilibrium when the cluster morphology resembles a quenched branched random polymer. As the microscopic dynamics is invertible, we can reverse the evolution, observe the inverse flow of heat and entropy, and recover the initial condition. This simple system provides an explicit example of how macroscopic dissipation and self-organization can result from an underlying microscopically reversible dynamics. We present a detailed description of the dynamics for the model, discuss the macroscopic limit, and give predictions for the equilibrium particle densities obtained in the mean field limit. Empirical results for the growth are then presented, including the observed equilibrium particle densities, the temperature of the system, the fractal dimension of the growth clusters, scaling behavior, finite size effects, and the approach to equilibrium. We pay particular attention to the temporal behavior of the growth process and show that the relaxation to the maximum entropy state is initially a rapid nonequilibrium process, then subsequently it is a quasistatic process with a well defined temperature. PMID:11969759

  12. Reversible (unitized) PEM fuel cell devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mitlitsky, F; Myers, B; Smith, W F; Weisberg, Molter, T M

    1999-06-01

    Regenerative fuel cells (RFCs) are enabling for many weight-critical portable applications, since the packaged specific energy (>400 Wh/kg) of properly designed lightweight RFC systems is several-fold higher than that of the lightest weight rechargeable batteries. RFC systems can be rapidly refueled (like primary fuel cells), or can be electrically recharged (like secondary batteries) if a refueling infrastructure is not conveniently available. Higher energy capacity systems with higher performance, reduced weight, and freedom from fueling infrastructure are the features that RFCs promise for portable applications. Reversible proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, also known as unitized regenerative fuel cells (URFCs), or reversible regenerative fuel cells, are RFC systems which use reversible PEM cells, where each cell is capable of operating both as a fuel cell and as an electrolyzer. URFCs further economize portable device weight, volume, and complexity by combining the functions of fuel cells and electrolyzers in the same hardware, generally without any system performance or efficiency reduction. URFCs are being made in many forms, some of which are already small enough to be portable. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has worked with industrial partners to design, develop, and demonstrate high performance and high cycle life URFC systems. LLNL is also working with industrial partners to develop breakthroughs in lightweight pressure vessels that are necessary for URFC systems to achieve the specific energy advantages over rechargeable batteries. Proton Energy Systems, Inc. (Proton) is concurrently developing and commercializing URFC systems (UNIGEN' product line), in addition to PEM electrolyzer systems (HOGEN' product line), and primary PEM fuel cell systems. LLNL is constructing demonstration URFC units in order to persuade potential sponsors, often in their own conference rooms, that advanced applications based on URFC s are feasible. Safety

  13. Time reversal invariance in polarized neutron decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, E.G.

    1994-03-01

    An experiment to measure the time reversal invariance violating (T-violating) triple correlation (D) in the decay of free polarized neutrons has been developed. The detector design incorporates a detector geometry that provides a significant improvement in the sensitivity over that used in the most sensitive of previous experiments. A prototype detector was tested in measurements with a cold neutron beam. Data resulting from the tests are presented. A detailed calculation of systematic effects has been performed and new diagnostic techniques that allow these effects to be measured have been developed. As the result of this work, a new experiment is under way that will improve the sensitivity to D to 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} or better. With higher neutron flux a statistical sensitivity of the order 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} is ultimately expected. The decay of free polarized neutrons (n {yields} p + e + {bar v}{sub e}) is used to search for T-violation by measuring the triple correlation of the neutron spin polarization, and the electron and proton momenta ({sigma}{sub n} {center_dot} p{sub p} {times} p{sub e}). This correlation changes sign under reversal of the motion. Since final state effects in neutron decay are small, a nonzero coefficient, D, of this correlation indicates the violation of time reversal invariance. D is measured by comparing the numbers of coincidences in electron and proton detectors arranged symmetrically about a longitudinally polarized neutron beam. Particular care must be taken to eliminate residual asymmetries in the detectors or beam as these can lead to significant false effects. The Standard Model predicts negligible T-violating effects in neutron decay. Extensions to the Standard Model include new interactions some of which include CP-violating components. Some of these make first order contributions to D.

  14. Reversed rainbow with a nonlocal metamaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Morgado, Tiago A. Marcos, João S.; Silveirinha, Mário G.; Costa, João T.; Costa, Jorge R.; Fernandes, Carlos A.

    2014-12-29

    One of the intriguing potentials of metamaterials is the possibility to realize a nonlocal electromagnetic reaction, such that the effective medium response at a given point is fundamentally entangled with the macroscopic field distribution at long distances. Here, it is experimentally and numerically verified that a microwave nonlocal metamaterial formed by crossed metallic wires enables a low-loss broadband anomalous material response such that the refractive index decreases with frequency. Notably, it is shown that an electromagnetic beam refracted by our metamaterial prism creates a reversed microwave rainbow.

  15. Crystallization studies on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Lesley F.; Brick, Peter; Blow, David M.; Mei-Zhen, Lou

    1992-08-01

    HIV-1 reverse transcriptase has been crystallized in a variety of forms. Various ligands used for co-crystallization are described and the results presented. All of these crystals showed disorder when examined in the X-ray beam. The best diffraction currently achieved has been approximately 7A˚. The possible reasons for crystal disorder are discussed. An example of another protein, car☐ypeptidase G 2, which initially yielded non-diffracting crystals, is used to illustrate the value of applying random or incomplete factorial screens to sample wider parameter space for conditions to grow well-ordered crystals.

  16. Engineering reverse saturable absorbers for desired wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, Yehuda B.; Scharf, Benjamin

    1986-06-01

    A variety of applications exist for reverse saturable absorbers (RSAs) in laser science (RSAs are substances whose excited-state absorption cross section is larger than their ground-state absorption cross section at a given wavelength and possess a number of other properties). We propose an approach to designing RSAs at a desired wavelength by construction of dimers of dye molecules which absorb near the wavelength of interest. The dimer ground-state absorption is to a state in which the excitation is spread over both monomeric units and the excited-state absorption commences from this state to the doubly excited electronic state in which both monomeric units are excited.

  17. Reversible quantum brownian heat engines for electrons.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, T E; Newbury, R; Taylor, R P; Linke, H

    2002-09-01

    Brownian heat engines use local temperature gradients in asymmetric potentials to move particles against an external force. The energy efficiency of such machines is generally limited by irreversible heat flow carried by particles that make contact with different heat baths. Here we show that, by using a suitably chosen energy filter, electrons can be transferred reversibly between reservoirs that have different temperatures and electrochemical potentials. We apply this result to propose heat engines based on mesoscopic semiconductor ratchets, which can quasistatically operate arbitrarily close to Carnot efficiency.

  18. Microscopic reversibility and heat for thermostatted systems.

    PubMed

    Monnai, Takaaki

    2013-04-01

    In order to test the universality of a symmetry for the trajectory obtained for Hamiltonian dynamics, we investigate the case of Nose-Hoover thermostatted dynamics with the use of a clear separation between the system and reservoir. Remarkably, the same symmetry as the Hamiltonian dynamics holds despite the presence of the dissipation, which causes the phase volume contraction. As a nontrivial application of the symmetry, we further show that the microscopic reversibility for open systems holds just as in the Hamiltonian dynamics. This bridges the first and second laws of thermodynamics under the proper definition of the work and heat.

  19. What is a Reversed Field Pinch?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escande, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Short description * Usefulness of the RFP configuration for fusion science and dynamo physics * Attractivity of the RFP configuration for a reactor * Challenges ahead * Lawson criterion * Intuitive model of magnetic self-reversal * Intuitive description of the dynamo * Necessity of a helical deformation * MHD simulations * From single to multiple helicity * Single helicity * Multiple helicity * Quasi single helicity * Experimental results * Multiple helicity * Quasi single helicity * Upgrade of the RFX device * From double to single magnetic axis * Analytical description of the single helicity RFP * Helical Grad-Shafranov equation * Parallel Ohm's law * Pinch-stellarator equation * Single helicity ohmic RFP states * Calculation of the dynamo * Conclusion * Acknowledgments * References

  20. Reverse osmosis treatment of 200-area effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Stimson, R.E.

    1984-09-19

    Reverse osmosis testing has demonstrated sufficient decontamination factors for radionuclides and hazardous metals present in 200-area effluents (routine and accidental). Test samples included actual process effluents, simulated effluents, and samples spiked with high activity wastes to simulate a cooling coil leak. No unusual behavior such as loss of flux or salt rejection was observed. Short term performance appears very good but membrane life and fouling tendencies will be determined only in long term testing scheduled at TNX and H-area with the 40 GPM pilot scale unit.

  1. Time-reversal violation in beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Herczeg, P.

    2003-01-01

    At present there is no unambigous direct evidence for time-reversal (T) violation in the fundamental interactions. But T-violation is intimately connected with CP-violation by the CPT theorem. A stringent bound on possible violation of CPT invariance comes from the properties of K{sup 0} - {bar K}{sup 0} mixing [I]. In the following we shall assume that CPT violating interactions, if present, can be neglected, and use the terms 'T-violation' and 'CP-violation' interchangably.

  2. Reversible optical-to-microwave quantum interface.

    PubMed

    Barzanjeh, Sh; Abdi, M; Milburn, G J; Tombesi, P; Vitali, D

    2012-09-28

    We describe a reversible quantum interface between an optical and a microwave field using a hybrid device based on their common interaction with a micromechanical resonator in a superconducting circuit. We show that, by employing state-of-the-art optoelectromechanical devices, one can realize an effective source of (bright) two-mode squeezing with an optical idler (signal) and a microwave signal, which can be used for high-fidelity transfer of quantum states between optical and microwave fields by means of continuous variable teleportation. PMID:23030075

  3. Reverse transcriptase: mediator of genomic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Brosius, J; Tiedge, H

    1995-01-01

    Reverse transcription has been an important mediator of genomic change. This influence dates back more than three billion years, when the RNA genome was converted into the DNA genome. While the current cellular role(s) of reverse transcriptase are not yet completely understood, it has become clear over the last few years that this enzyme is still responsible for generating significant genomic change and that its activities are one of the driving forces of evolution. Reverse transcriptase generates, for example, extra gene copies (retrogenes), using as a template mature messenger RNAs. Such retrogenes do not always end up as nonfunctional pseudogenes but form, after reinsertion into the genome, new unions with resident promoter elements that may alter the gene's temporal and/or spatial expression levels. More frequently, reverse transcriptase produces copies of nonmessenger RNAs, such as small nuclear or cytoplasmic RNAs. Extremely high copy numbers can be generated by this process. The resulting reinserted DNA copies are therefore referred to as short interspersed repetitive elements (SINEs). SINEs have long been considered selfish DNA, littering the genome via exponential propagation but not contributing to the host's fitness. Many SINEs, however, can give rise to novel genes encoding small RNAs, and are the migrant carriers of numerous control elements and sequence motifs that can equip resident genes with novel regulatory elements [Brosius J. and Gould S.J., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 89, 10706-10710, 1992]. Retrosequences, such as SINEs and portions of retroelements (e.g., long terminal repeats, LTRs), are capable of donating sequence motifs for nucleosome positioning, DNA methylation, transcriptional enhancers and silencers, poly(A) addition sequences, determinants of RNA stability or transport, splice sites, and even amino acid codons for incorporation into open reading frames as novel protein domains. Retroposition can therefore be considered as a major

  4. Kinetic Stability of the Field Reversed Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    E.V. Belova; R.C. Davidson; H. Ji; and M. Yamada

    2002-07-09

    New computational results are presented which advance the understanding of the stability properties of the Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). The FRC is an innovative confinement approach that offers a unique fusion reactor potential because of its compact and simple geometry, translation properties, and high plasma beta. One of the most important issues is FRC stability with respect to low-n (toroidal mode number) MHD modes. There is a clear discrepancy between the predictions of standard MHD theory that many modes should be unstable on the MHD time scale, and the observed macroscopic resilience of FRCs in experiments.

  5. Confinement dynamics in the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenberg, K.F.

    1988-01-01

    The study of basic transport and confinement dynamics is central to the development of the reversed field pinch (RFP) as a confinement concept. Thus, the goal of RFP research is to understand the connection between processes that sustain the RFP configuration and related transport/confinement properties. Recently, new insights into confinement have emerged from a detailed investigation of RFP electron and ion physics. These insights derive from the recognition that both magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and electron kinetic effects play an important and strongly coupled role in RFP sustainment and confinement dynamics. In this paper, we summarize the results of these studies on the ZT-40M experiment. 8 refs.

  6. Periodic Arrays of Interfacial Cylindrical reverse Micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson,M.; Cain, N.; Ocko, B.; Gin, D.; Hammond, S.; Schwartz, D.

    2005-01-01

    We report an approach for the fabrication of periodic molecular nanostructures on surfaces. The approach involves biomimetic self-organization of synthetic wedge-shaped amphiphilic molecules into multilayer arrays of cylindrical reverse micelles. The films were characterized by atomic force microscopy and X-ray reflectivity. These nanostructured films self-assemble in solution but remain stable upon removal and exposure to ambient conditions, making them potentially suitable for a variety of dry pattern transfer methods. We illustrate the generality of this approach by using two distinct molecular systems that vary in size by a factor of 2.

  7. Reverse genetics: Its origins and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, P. )

    1991-04-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a gene and its flanking segments alone will not tell us how its expression is regulated during development and differentiation, or in response to environmental changes. To comprehend the physiological significance of the molecular details requires biological analysis. Recombinant DNA techniques provide a powerful experimental approach. A strategy termed reverse genetics' utilizes the analysis of the activities of mutant and normal genes and experimentally constructed mutants to explore the relationship between gene structure and function thereby helping elucidate the relationship between genotype and phenotype.

  8. Reverse osmosis and ultrafiltration solve separation problems

    SciTech Connect

    Gooding, C.H.

    1985-01-07

    Membrane separation is discussed and analyzed in this paper. The analysis reviews the basic principles, suggests approaches to design, and briefly discusses some of the membranes and equipment available. The potential for energy saving through the use of membrane separation is enormous compared with other separation techniques, particularly evaporation. The author describes the evaporative methods in some detail. The reverse osmosis system (RO) is also described. In lowerpressure ultrafiltration systems, the energy savings are greater using this option. RO may have advantages over evaporation in terms of product quality, and because RO is not a thermal process, it can be used to concentrate temperature-sensitive materials without loss of quality.

  9. Inducing stable reversion to achieve cancer control.

    PubMed

    Powers, Scott; Pollack, Robert E

    2016-04-01

    How can we stop cancer progression? Current strategies depend on modelling progression as the balanced outcome of mutations in, and expression of, tumour suppressor genes and oncogenes. New treatments emerge from successful attempts to tip that balance, but secondary mutational escape from those treatments has become a major impediment because it leads to resistance. In this Opinion article, we argue for a return to an earlier stratagem: tumour cell reversion. Treatments based on selection and analysis of stable revertants could create more durable remissions by reducing the selective pressure that leads to rapid drug resistance. PMID:27458638

  10. Reversed field pinch: Progress and promise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprott, J. C.

    1985-05-01

    The Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) is a fusion reactor concept which, like the tokamak, confines the reacting plasma by the magnetic field produced in part by electrical currents flowing in the toroidally-confined plasma. Unlike the tokamak, the RFP requires very little externally-applied magnetic field, and thus offers the promise of a compact reactor with high power density which can be ohmically heated to ignition using non-superconducting magnet coils. Recent progress worldwide in RFP performance and physics understanding offers the promise of a new generation of devices which approach reactor conditions.

  11. Confinement of translated field-reversed configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuszewski, M.; Armstrong, W. T.; Chrien, R. E.; Klingner, P. L.; McKenna, K. F.; Rej, D. J.; Sherwood, E. G.; Siemon, R. E.

    1986-03-01

    The confinement properties of translating field-reversed configurations (FRC) in the FRX-C/T device [Phys. Fluids 29, (1986)] are analyzed and compared to previous data without translation and to available theory. Translation dynamics do not appear to appreciably modify the FRC confinement. Some empirical scaling laws with respect to various plasma parameters are extracted from the data. These are qualitatively similar to those obtained in the TRX-1 device [Phys. Fluids 28, 888 (1985)] without translation and with a different formation method. Translation with a static gas fill offers new opportunities such as improved particle confinement or refueling of the FRC particle inventory.

  12. Neonatal haemochromatosis with reversible pituitary involvement.

    PubMed

    Indolfi, Giuseppe; Bèrczes, Rita; Pelliccioli, Isabella; Bosisio, Michela; Agostinis, Cristina; Resti, Massimo; Zambelli, Marco; Lucianetti, Alessandro; Colledan, Michele; D'Antiga, Lorenzo

    2014-08-01

    Neonatal haemochromatosis is a rare alloimmune gestational disease with a high mortality. The hallmark of neonatal haemochromatosis is severe neonatal liver failure associated with extrahepatic siderosis. Thus far, no pituitary dysfunction has been reported to result from the tissue damage associated with extrahepatic siderosis. The present report describes a neonate with neonatal haemochromatosis and secondary hypothyroidism associated with pituitary iron deposition. Both the conditions were successfully treated by ABO-incompatible liver transplantation. Pituitary gland dysfunction is another possible extrahepatic manifestation of neonatal haemochromatosis, and it is reversible after liver transplantation.

  13. Nanoscale optical reinforcement for enhanced reversible holography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pengfei; Sun, Sam Qunhui; Baig, Sarfaraz; Wang, Michael R

    2012-01-30

    We demonstrate a nanoscale optical reinforcement concept for reversible holographic recording. The bone-muscle-like mechanism enables enhancement of holographic grating formation due to the collective alignment of liquid crystal (LC) molecules nearby photo-reconfigurable polymer backbones. The LC fluidity facilitates the ease of polymer chain transformation during the holographic recording while the polymer network stabilizes the LC collective orientation and the consequential optical enhancement after the recording. As such, the holographic recording possesses both long-term persistence and real-time rewritability. PMID:22330546

  14. Ordered and reversible hydrogenation of silicene.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jinglan; Fu, Huixia; Xu, Yang; Oreshkin, A I; Shao, Tingna; Li, Hui; Meng, Sheng; Chen, Lan; Wu, Kehui

    2015-03-27

    The hydrogenation of monatomic silicene sheet on Ag(111) was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations. It was observed that hydrogenation of silicene at room temperature results in a perfectly ordered γ-(3×3) superstructure. A theoretical model, which involves seven H atoms and rearranged buckling of Si atoms, was proposed and agrees with experiments very well. Moreover, by annealing to a moderate temperature, about 450 K, a dehydrogenation process occurs and the clean silicene surface can be fully recovered. Such uniformly ordered and reversible hydrogenation may be useful for tuning the properties of silicene as well as for controllable hydrogen storage.

  15. A novel reversible carry-selected adder with low latency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Cui; Zhou, Ri-Gui

    2016-07-01

    Reversible logic is getting more and more attention in quantum computing, optical computing, nanotechnology and low-power complementary metal oxide semiconductor designs since reversible circuits do not loose information during computation and have only small energy dissipation. In this paper, a novel carry-selected reversible adder is proposed primarily optimised for low latency. A 4-bit reversible full adder with two kinds of outputs, minimum delay and optimal quantum cost is presented as the building block for ?-bit reversible adder. Three new reversible gates NPG (new Peres gate), TEPG (triple extension of Peres gate) and RMUX21 (reversible 2-to-1 multiplexer) are proposed and utilised to design efficient adder units. The secondary carry propagation chain is carefully designed to reduce the time consumption. The novelty of the proposed design is the consideration of low latency. The comparative study shows that the proposed adder achieves the improvement from 61.46% to 95.29% in delay over the existing designs.

  16. Reversible stress softening of actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Ovijit; Parekh, Sapun H.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2007-01-01

    The mechanical properties of cells play an essential role in numerous physiological processes. Organized networks of semiflexible actin filaments determine cell stiffness and transmit force during mechanotransduction, cytokinesis, cell motility and other cellular shape changes. Although numerous actin-binding proteins have been identified that organize networks, the mechanical properties of actin networks with physiological architectures and concentrations have been difficult to measure quantitatively. Studies of mechanical properties in vitro have found that crosslinked networks of actin filaments formed in solution exhibit stress stiffening arising from the entropic elasticity of individual filaments or crosslinkers resisting extension. Here we report reversible stress-softening behaviour in actin networks reconstituted in vitro that suggests a critical role for filaments resisting compression. Using a modified atomic force microscope to probe dendritic actin networks (like those formed in the lamellipodia of motile cells), we observe stress stiffening followed by a regime of reversible stress softening at higher loads. This softening behaviour can be explained by elastic buckling of individual filaments under compression that avoids catastrophic fracture of the network. The observation of both stress stiffening and softening suggests a complex interplay between entropic and enthalpic elasticity in determining the mechanical properties of actin networks.

  17. Sugammadex: A Review of Neuromuscular Blockade Reversal.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2016-07-01

    Sugammadex (Bridion(®)) is a modified γ-cyclodextrin that reverses the effect of the steroidal nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents rocuronium and vecuronium. Intravenous sugammadex resulted in rapid, predictable recovery from moderate and deep neuromuscular blockade in patients undergoing surgery who received rocuronium or vecuronium. Recovery from moderate neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster with sugammadex 2 mg/kg than with neostigmine, and recovery from deep neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster with sugammadex 4 mg/kg than with neostigmine or spontaneous recovery. In addition, recovery from neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster when sugammadex 16 mg/kg was administered 3 min after rocuronium than when patients spontaneously recovered from succinylcholine. Sugammadex also demonstrated efficacy in various special patient populations, including patients with pulmonary disease, cardiac disease, hepatic dysfunction or myasthenia gravis and morbidly obese patients. Intravenous sugammadex was generally well tolerated. In conclusion, sugammadex is an important option for the rapid reversal of rocuronium- or vecuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade. PMID:27324403

  18. Comprehensive Phylogenetic Analysis of Bacterial Reverse Transcriptases

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Nicolás; Nisa-Martínez, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Much less is known about reverse transcriptases (RTs) in prokaryotes than in eukaryotes, with most prokaryotic enzymes still uncharacterized. Two surveys involving BLAST searches for RT genes in prokaryotic genomes revealed the presence of large numbers of diverse, uncharacterized RTs and RT-like sequences. Here, using consistent annotation across all sequenced bacterial species from GenBank and other sources via RAST, available from the PATRIC (Pathogenic Resource Integration Center) platform, we have compiled the data for currently annotated reverse transcriptases from completely sequenced bacterial genomes. RT sequences are broadly distributed across bacterial phyla, but green sulfur bacteria and cyanobacteria have the highest levels of RT sequence diversity (≤85% identity) per genome. By contrast, phylum Actinobacteria, for which a large number of genomes have been sequenced, was found to have a low RT sequence diversity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that bacterial RTs could be classified into 17 main groups: group II introns, retrons/retron-like RTs, diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs), Abi-like RTs, CRISPR-Cas-associated RTs, group II-like RTs (G2L), and 11 other groups of RTs of unknown function. Proteobacteria had the highest potential functional diversity, as they possessed most of the RT groups. Group II introns and DGRs were the most widely distributed RTs in bacterial phyla. Our results provide insights into bacterial RT phylogeny and the basis for an update of annotation systems based on sequence/domain homology. PMID:25423096

  19. Comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of bacterial reverse transcriptases.

    PubMed

    Toro, Nicolás; Nisa-Martínez, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Much less is known about reverse transcriptases (RTs) in prokaryotes than in eukaryotes, with most prokaryotic enzymes still uncharacterized. Two surveys involving BLAST searches for RT genes in prokaryotic genomes revealed the presence of large numbers of diverse, uncharacterized RTs and RT-like sequences. Here, using consistent annotation across all sequenced bacterial species from GenBank and other sources via RAST, available from the PATRIC (Pathogenic Resource Integration Center) platform, we have compiled the data for currently annotated reverse transcriptases from completely sequenced bacterial genomes. RT sequences are broadly distributed across bacterial phyla, but green sulfur bacteria and cyanobacteria have the highest levels of RT sequence diversity (≤85% identity) per genome. By contrast, phylum Actinobacteria, for which a large number of genomes have been sequenced, was found to have a low RT sequence diversity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that bacterial RTs could be classified into 17 main groups: group II introns, retrons/retron-like RTs, diversity-generating retroelements (DGRs), Abi-like RTs, CRISPR-Cas-associated RTs, group II-like RTs (G2L), and 11 other groups of RTs of unknown function. Proteobacteria had the highest potential functional diversity, as they possessed most of the RT groups. Group II introns and DGRs were the most widely distributed RTs in bacterial phyla. Our results provide insights into bacterial RT phylogeny and the basis for an update of annotation systems based on sequence/domain homology.

  20. Magnetization reversal in exchange biased nanocap arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guhr, I. L.; van Dijken, S.; Malinowski, G.; Fischer, P.; Springer, F.; Hellwig, O.; Albrecht, M.

    2007-05-01

    Arrays of self-assembled polystyrene spheres with various particle sizes have been used as a substrate to study the exchange bias effect along the out-of-plane direction of Pt/Co multilayers capped with IrMn layers. The evolution of the reversal process of the resulting magnetic nanocaps was investigated by magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and magnetic transmission x-ray microscopy (M-TXM). Tip-sample interaction-induced irreversible and reversible switching events have been observed during multiple scanning cycles in MFM imaging which are ascribed to the so-called training effect. During M-TXM imaging a drastic change in morphology has been found due to the x-ray exposure, leading to the formation of much larger spherical particles. Interestingly, these merged particles reveal again an exchange coupled single-domain magnetic cap with magnetic behaviour similar to magnetic films deposited directly on spheres of similar size. This paper was presented at the Materials Research Society Fall 2006 Meeting, 27 November-1 December 2006, as part of Symposium P: Nanoscale Magnets-Synthesis, Self-assembly, Properties and Applications, organized by J Fassbender, J Chapman and C A Ross.

  1. Reverse-Time Migration Based Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyong; Ding, Hao; Lu, Guijin; Bi, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrated a new optical imaging technique based on reverse-time migration (RTM) for reconstructing optical structures in homogeneous media for the first time. RTM is a powerful wave-equation-based method to reconstruct the image of the structure by modeling the wave propagation inside the media with both forward modeling and reverse-time extrapolation. While RTM is commonly used with acoustic seismic waves, this paper represents the first effort to develop optical RTM imaging method for biomedical research. To refine the image quality, we further developed new methods to suppress the low-wavenumber artifact (LWA). When compared with the conventional means for LWA suppression such as Laplacian filtering, illumination normalization, and the ratio method, our new derivative-based and power-image methods are able to significantly reduce LWA, resulting in high-quality reconstructed images with sufficient contrasts and spatial resolutions for structure identification. The optical RTM imaging technique may provide a new platform for non-invasive optical imaging of structures in deep layers of tissues for biomedical applications. PMID:26292337

  2. Flow reversal in enzymatic microfluidic pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, Henry; Ortiz-Rivera, Isamar; Agrawal, Arjun; Sen, Ayusman; Balazs, Anna

    A chemical reaction occurring at an enzyme-covered patch in a closed fluid chamber generates local solute concentration gradients and, hence, fluid density gradients. This has recently been shown to drive fluid flows with speeds of the order of microns per second. We develop and analyze a model that accounts for fluid density changes due to consumption of the reaction substrate and accumulation of products for such a fluid pump based on the enzyme urease. Hydrolysis of urea by urease produces ammonium bicarbonate, which leads to a net increase in solution density. Higher density fluid is expected to sink and spread horizontally away from the pump. Modeling reveals, however, that the local fluid density is not necessarily greatest near the pump and fluid flow can even reverse in direction after some time. The qualitative behavior depends on two dimensionless parameters, the ratio of solutal expansion coefficients and the ratio of diffusion coefficients for the reaction substrate and product. The predicted reversal of pumping direction is experimentally verified and we show that the direction of pumping also depends on the amount of enzyme present on the patch. A better understanding of these pumps will aid in the design of responsive, chemically powered microfluidic flow control.

  3. Solar anti-reverse siphon system

    SciTech Connect

    Larkin, W.J.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes an anti-reverse siphon solar heating system consisting of: (a) a fluid chamber having an inlet and an outlet; (b) a continuous flow passageway comprising in normal downstream order: (i) an ascending passageway open and originating in the lower portion of the chamber and passing up through the top of the chamber; (ii) an anti-reverse siphon loop with a rising portion insulated and connected to the top of the ascending passageway and extending upward, an uppermost transverse portion, and a falling portion descending downwardly to define a downstream loop end; (iii) an ascending heating chamber with a heating element in thermal contact; (iv) a descending passageway connected to the downstream loop end and extending downward into a connection with the bottom of the ascending heating chamber and insulated from the heating chamber; (v) a return passageway connecting between the top of the heating chamber and the top of the fluid chamber; and, (c) the uppermost portion of the loop is higher than the uppermost portion of the ascending heating chamber, and the uppermost portion of the fluid chamber being at least as high as 1 foot beneath the uppermost portion of the ascending heating chamber.

  4. Determination of metal speciation by reverse titrations.

    PubMed

    Nuester, Jochen; van den Berg, Constant M G

    2005-01-01

    A new method is proposed to determine metal speciation by varying the concentration of a competing ligand at a constant metal concentration, with detection by cathodic stripping voltammetry. The free metal ion concentration is gradually lowered from its natural level while the method probes progressively deeper into the already complexed metal fraction: it is therefore a reverse titration rather than the forward titration which is used for conventional complexing ligand titrations. The sensitivity is greatest at the lowest free metal ion concentration, where it matters most, and the method can be carried out in a single sample aliquot in the voltammetric cell. The method is applied here to copper speciation, but in principle, it can also be used for other metals. Modeling shows that this method has good sensitivity at ligand concentrations near the metal concentration (lower as well as greater). Comparative measurements of copper speciation using reverse and forward titrations of representative water samples of oceanic and coastal origin show good agreement. The data showed that these samples did not contain low levels of strong ligands in addition to the ligands detected by the forward titrations.

  5. Stereo Image Reversible Watermarking for Authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ting; Jiang, Gangyi; Peng, Zongju; Shao, Feng; Yu, Mei

    2015-03-01

    To authenticate stereo image, this paper proposes a stereo image reversible watermarking method for three dimensional television systems. The proposed method can recover the original stereo image without any distortion if stereo image is not tampered. Otherwise, it can authenticate stereo image with the capability of locating tamper. Difference expansion is used to embed authentication bits reversibly into each block for locating tamper. Pixel pairs without resulting in overflow/underflow after expansion are chosen as candidates of embedding locations. In order to avoid transmit big size of embedding location map, the same embedding locations for each block are decided in advance, which adaptively determines the block size. Moreover, in order to resist collage attack, authentication bits generated from each block embedded into its mapping blocks, so that authentication of each block is not independent. Experimental results demonstrate that stereo image can be totally recovered if watermarked stereo image is not modified. Moreover, it proves suitability and stability of the proposed method for tamper location with relationships of stereo images.

  6. Numerical simulation of reversing buoyancy gravity currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Senthil; Lenk, Erik; Boekels, Michael; Meiburg, Eckart

    2012-11-01

    Sediment laden fluid propagates as an underflow when its bulk density is higher than the density of the ambient fluid. If the density of the interstitial fluid in gravity current is smaller than the density of the ambient fluid, the gravity current can become positively buoyant after sufficient particles have settled. The current then lifts off from the bottom surface and travels as a surface gravity current over the heavier ambient fluid. These types of currents, where the buoyancy reverses its direction, have been observed when sediment laden fresh water enters the sea or during volcanic eruption that creates a pyroclastic flow. We use a lock-exchange configuration with mono-disperse and bi-disperse particles to study the lofting characteristics of reversing buoyancy currents. This talk will focus on results obtained from Large-eddy Simulation of high Reynolds number currents. In particular, the deposit profiles show a sharp decay at the lift-off point unlike a ground hugging turbidity current whose deposit profile has a slow monotonic decay from the lock region.

  7. Nematic electroconvection under time-reversed excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietschmann, Dirk; John, Thomas; Stannarius, Ralf

    2010-10-01

    We study nematic electrohydrodynamic convection (EHC) under excitation with superimposed harmonic wave forms. Within the standard model for EHC, a time reversal of the excitation does not affect threshold voltages and pattern wavelengths obtained in a linear stability analysis. This was confirmed in experiments with superimposed square waves [Heuer , Phys. Rev. E 78, 036218 (2008)10.1103/PhysRevE.78.036218]. We show here that this symmetry with respect to time reversal of the excitation breaks down close to the transition from the conduction regime to the dielectric regime. The EHC standard model without flexoelectric terms fails to predict quantitatively correct threshold curves and wavelengths in a certain parameter range below the transition. This is an indication that a more elaborate description of the EHC mechanism is necessary in this range. We suggest that the weak electrolyte model has to be employed for a correct description. This is in accordance with observations of traveling rolls and of localized structures at onset of the convection in earlier experiments described in literature.

  8. Electroosmotic Flow Reversal Outside Glass Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report observations of a striking reversal in the direction of electroosmotic flow (EOF) outside a conical glass nanopore as a function of salt concentration. At high ionic strengths (>100 mM), we observe EOF in the expected direction as predicted by classical electrokinetic theory, while at low salt concentrations (<1 mM) the direction of the flow is reversed. The critical crossover salt concentration depends on the pore diameter. Finite-element simulations indicate a competition between the EOF generated from the inner and outer walls of the pore, which drives flows in opposite directions. We have developed a simple analytical model which reveals that, as the salt concentration is reduced, the flow rates inside the pore are geometrically constrained, whereas there is no such limit for flows outside the pore. This model captures all of the essential physics of the system and explains the observed data, highlighting the key role the external environment plays in determining the overall electroosmotic behavior. PMID:25490120

  9. Reversibility in locomotion in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoie, William; Goldman, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    A recent study of a self-deforming robot [Hatton et al., PRL, 2013] demonstrated that slow movement in dry granular media resembles locomotion in low Re fluids, in part because inertia is dominated by friction. The study indicated that granular swimming was kinematically reversible, a surprise because yielding in granular flow is irreversible. To investigate if reciprocal motions lead to net displacements in granular swimmers, in laboratory experiments, we study the locomotion of a robotic ``scallop'' consisting of a square body with two flipper-like limbs controlled to flap forward and backward symmetrically (a flap cycle). The body is constrained by linear bearings to allow motion in only one dimension. We vary the the flapping frequency f, the body/flipper burial depth d, and the number of flaps N in a deep bed of 6 mm diameter plastic spheres. Over a range of f and d, the N = 1 cycle produces net translation of the body; however for large N, a cycle produces no net translation. We conclude that symmetric strokes in granular swimming are irreversible at the onset of self-deformation, but become asymptotically reversible. work supported by NSF and ARL.

  10. Reverse-Time Migration Based Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyong; Ding, Hao; Lu, Guijin; Bi, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrated a new optical imaging technique based on reverse-time migration (RTM) for reconstructing optical structures in homogeneous media for the first time. RTM is a powerful wave-equation-based method to reconstruct the image of the structure by modeling the wave propagation inside the media with both forward modeling and reverse-time extrapolation. While RTM is commonly used with acoustic seismic waves, this paper represents the first effort to develop optical RTM imaging method for biomedical research. To refine the image quality, we further developed new methods to suppress the low-wavenumber artifact (LWA). When compared with the conventional means for LWA suppression such as Laplacian filtering, illumination normalization, and the ratio method, our new derivative-based and power-image methods are able to significantly reduce LWA, resulting in high-quality reconstructed images with sufficient contrasts and spatial resolutions for structure identification. The optical RTM imaging technique may provide a new platform for non-invasive optical imaging of structures in deep layers of tissues for biomedical applications.

  11. Irreversibility in a simple reversible model

    SciTech Connect

    Kumicak, Juraj

    2005-01-01

    This paper studies a parametrized family of familiar generalized Baker maps, viewed as simple models of time-reversible evolution. Mapping the unit square onto itself, the maps are partly contracting and partly expanding, but they preserve the global measure of the definition domain. They possess periodic orbits of any period, and all maps of the set have attractors with well defined structure. The explicit construction of the attractors is described and their structure is studied in detail. There is a precise sense in which one can speak about the absolute age of a state, regardless of whether the latter is applied to a single point, a set of points, or a distribution function. One can then view the whole trajectory as a set of past, present, and future states. This viewpoint is then applied to show that it is impossible to define a priori states with very large 'negative age'. Such states can be defined only a posteriori. This gives precise sense to irreversibility - or the 'arrow of time' - in these time-reversible maps, and is suggested as an explanation of the second law of thermodynamics also for some realistic physical systems.

  12. Congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy: a reversible case.

    PubMed

    Ghamdi, M; Armstrong, D L; Miller, G

    1997-01-01

    A boy was born at 39 weeks gestation with severe weakness and hypotonia, fractured femurs, poor suck and swallow, and absent deep tendon reflexes. Electrodiagnostic studies revealed marked slowing of motor nerve conduction velocities and normal muscle electrical activity with no evidence of acute denervation. Muscle biopsy showed mild type 2 fiber predominance, and sural nerve biopsy revealed large axons without myelin, and axons with insufficient amount of myelin for their diameter. There was no evidence of inflammation or demyelination. Gradual clinical improvement in tone and strength occurred in a cephalocaudal direction. By 4 months, motor nerve conduction velocities and clinical examination were normal apart from absent deep tendon reflexes. On review at 19 months, motor development and neurological examination were completely normal. Pathogenesis of this reversible pathologically documented case of congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy is unclear. No evidence was found for an inflammatory, toxic, metabolic, or demyelinating cause. Abnormal expression of a developmental gene, as in reversible cytochrome oxidase deficiency, may be a cause of this neuropathy.

  13. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy: beyond the original description].

    PubMed

    Avecillas-Chasín, Josué M; Matías-Guiu, Jordi A; Bautista-Balbás, Luis

    2015-07-16

    Introduccion. La encefalopatia posterior reversible (EPR) es una entidad clinicorradiologica caracterizada tipicamente por cuadros de cefalea, alteraciones visuales y crisis epilepticas, asociada a edema vasogeno corticosubcortical reversible en la neuroimagen. Objetivo. Presentar una revision de los aspectos fisiopatologicos de esta entidad y tambien de las asociaciones de la EPR descritas en la bibliografia. Desarrollo. Existe una serie de factores desencadenantes bien conocidos, como las crisis hipertensivas, la eclampsia o ciertos medicamentos. La descripcion de cada vez mas casos atipicos desde un punto de vista clinico y radiologico, asi como de posibles nuevos factores desencadenantes, obliga a una redefinicion de la entidad. Conclusiones. La EPR es un conjunto de manifestaciones clinicas y radiologicas que no se pueden enmarcar dentro la palabra 'sindrome'. Aunque la EPR se ha comunicado como irreversible en ciertos casos, el concepto de reversibilidad debe mantenerse en la definicion de esta entidad, ya que, en la mayor parte de los casos, el rapido control de la condicion desencadenante de la EPR permite la reversibilidad de las lesiones.

  14. Neutrino helicity reversal and fundamental symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentschura, U. D.; Wundt, B. J.

    2014-07-01

    A rather elusive helicity reversal occurs in a gedanken experiment in which a massive left-handed Dirac neutrino, traveling at a velocity u < c, is overtaken on a highway by a speeding vehicle (traveling at velocity v with u < v < c). Namely, after passing the neutrino, looking back, one would see a right-handed neutrino (which has never been observed in nature). The Lorentz-invariant mass of the right-handed neutrino is still the same as before the passing. The gedanken experiment thus implies the existence of right-handed, light neutrinos, which are not completely sterile. Furthermore, overtaking a bunch of massive right-handed Dirac neutrinos leads to gradual de-sterilization. We discuss the helicity reversal and the concomitant sterilization and de-sterilization mechanisms by way of an illustrative example calculation, with a special emphasis on massive Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. We contrast the formalism with a modified Dirac neutrino described by a Dirac equation with a pseudoscalar mass term proportional to the fifth current.

  15. Reversing the Reverse Cohesion Effect: Good Texts Can Be Better for Strategic, High-Knowledge Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Tenaha; McNamara, Danielle S.

    2007-01-01

    Students with low knowledge have been shown to better understand and learn more from more cohesive texts, whereas high-knowledge students have been shown to learn more from lower cohesion texts; this has been called the "reverse cohesion effect". This study examines whether students' comprehension skill affects the interaction between text…

  16. Magnetic flux trapping during field reversal in the formation of a field-reversed configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, Loren C.

    1985-11-01

    The flow of plasma and magnetic flux toward a wall is examined in a slab geometry where the magnetic field is parallel to the wall. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow with a quasisteady approximation is assumed that reduces the problem to three coupled ordinary differential equations. The calculated behavior shows that a thin current sheath is established at the wall in which a variety of phenomena appear, including significant resistive heating and rapid deceleration of the plasma flow. The sheath physics determines the speed at which flux and plasma flow toward the wall. The model has been applied to the field-reversal phase of a field-reversed theta pinch, during which the reduced magnetic field near the wall drives an outward flow of plasma and magnetic flux. The analysis leads to approximate expressions for the instantaneous flow speed, the loss of magnetic flux during the field reversal phase, the integrated heat flow to the wall, and the highest possible magnetic flux retained after reversal. Predictions from this model are compared with previous time-dependent MHD calculations and with experimental results from the TRX-1 [Proceedings of the 4th Symposium on the Physics and Technology of Compact Toroids, 27-29 October 1981 (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 1982), p. 61] and TRX-2 [Proceedings of the 6th U.S. Symposium on Compact Toroid Research, 20-23 February, 1984 (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, 1984), p. 154] experiments.

  17. Single step purification of lactoperoxidase from whey involving reverse micelles-assisted extraction and its comparison with reverse micellar extraction.

    PubMed

    Nandini, K E; Rastogi, Navin K

    2010-01-01

    The extraction of lactoperoxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) from whey was studied using single step reverse micelles-assisted extraction and compared with reverse micellar extraction. The reverse micelles-assisted extraction resulted in extraction of contaminating proteins and recovery of lactoperoxidase in the aqueous phase leading to its purification. Reverse micellar extraction at the optimized condition after forward and backward steps resulted in activity recovery of lactoperoxidase and purification factor of the order of 86.60% and 3.25-fold, respectively. Whereas reverse micelles-assisted extraction resulted in higher activity recovery of lactoperoxidase (127.35%) and purification factor (3.39-fold). The sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) profiles also evidenced that higher purification was obtained in reverse micelles-assisted extraction as compared of reverse micellar extracted lactoperoxidase.

  18. Nigella Sativa reverses osteoporosis in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis poses a significant public health issue. It is a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength that predisposes to increased risk of fracture. There is a direct relationship between the lack of estrogen after menopause and the development of osteoporosis. About 33% of women over 50 will experience bone fractures as a result of osteoporosis. Nigella Sativa (NS) has been shown to have beneficial effects on bone and joint diseases. The present study was conducted to elucidate the protective effect of Nigella Sativa on osteoporosis produced by ovariectomy in rats. Methods Female Wistar rats aged 12–14 months were divided into three groups: sham-operated control (SHAM), ovariectomized (OVX), and ovariectomized supplemented with nigella sativa (OVX-NS) orally for 12 weeks; 4 weeks before ovariectomy and 8 weeks after. After 12 weeks, plasma levels of calcium (Ca+2), phosphorous (Pi), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), amino terminal collagen type 1 telopeptide, malondialdehyde (MDA), nitrates, nitric oxide surrogate, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured. Histological examination of the liver and the tibia was conducted. Histomorphometric analysis of the tibia was also performed. Results OVX rats showed significant decrease in plasma Ca+2, accompanied by a significant increase in plasma ALP, amino terminal collagen type 1 telopeptide, MDA, nitrates, TNF-α and IL-6. These changes were reversed by NS supplementation in OVX-NS group to be near SHAM levels. Histological examination of the tibias revealed discontinuous eroded bone trabeculae with widened bone marrow spaces in OVX rats accompanied by a significant decrease in both cortical and trabecular bone thickness compared to Sham rats. These parameters were markedly reversed in OVX-NS rats. Histological examination of the liver showed mononuclear cellular infiltration and congestion of blood vessels at the portal area in OVX rats which were not found

  19. Towards reversible basic linear algebra subprograms: A performance study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Perumalla, Kalyan S.; Yoginath, Srikanth B.

    2014-12-06

    Problems such as fault tolerance and scalable synchronization can be efficiently solved using reversibility of applications. Making applications reversible by relying on computation rather than on memory is ideal for large scale parallel computing, especially for the next generation of supercomputers in which memory is expensive in terms of latency, energy, and price. In this direction, a case study is presented here in reversing a computational core, namely, Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms, which is widely used in scientific applications. A new Reversible BLAS (RBLAS) library interface has been designed, and a prototype has been implemented with two modes: (1) amore » memory-mode in which reversibility is obtained by checkpointing to memory in forward and restoring from memory in reverse, and (2) a computational-mode in which nothing is saved in the forward, but restoration is done entirely via inverse computation in reverse. The article is focused on detailed performance benchmarking to evaluate the runtime dynamics and performance effects, comparing reversible computation with checkpointing on both traditional CPU platforms and recent GPU accelerator platforms. For BLAS Level-1 subprograms, data indicates over an order of magnitude better speed of reversible computation compared to checkpointing. For BLAS Level-2 and Level-3, a more complex tradeoff is observed between reversible computation and checkpointing, depending on computational and memory complexities of the subprograms.« less

  20. Towards reversible basic linear algebra subprograms: A performance study

    SciTech Connect

    Perumalla, Kalyan S.; Yoginath, Srikanth B.

    2014-12-06

    Problems such as fault tolerance and scalable synchronization can be efficiently solved using reversibility of applications. Making applications reversible by relying on computation rather than on memory is ideal for large scale parallel computing, especially for the next generation of supercomputers in which memory is expensive in terms of latency, energy, and price. In this direction, a case study is presented here in reversing a computational core, namely, Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms, which is widely used in scientific applications. A new Reversible BLAS (RBLAS) library interface has been designed, and a prototype has been implemented with two modes: (1) a memory-mode in which reversibility is obtained by checkpointing to memory in forward and restoring from memory in reverse, and (2) a computational-mode in which nothing is saved in the forward, but restoration is done entirely via inverse computation in reverse. The article is focused on detailed performance benchmarking to evaluate the runtime dynamics and performance effects, comparing reversible computation with checkpointing on both traditional CPU platforms and recent GPU accelerator platforms. For BLAS Level-1 subprograms, data indicates over an order of magnitude better speed of reversible computation compared to checkpointing. For BLAS Level-2 and Level-3, a more complex tradeoff is observed between reversible computation and checkpointing, depending on computational and memory complexities of the subprograms.