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Sample records for dopamine da transporter

  1. Brominated and radioiodinated derivatives of methylphenidate (MP): Potential imaging agents for the dopamine (DA) transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, D.; Gatley, S.J.; Dewey, S.L.

    1994-05-01

    MP (Ritalin) is a psychomotor stimulant used in the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. The therapeutic properties of MP are thought to be mediated by its binding to a site on the DA transporter, resulting in inhibition of DA reuptake and enhanced levels of synaptic dopamine. MP also inhibits reuptake of norepinephrine (NE) in vitro. MP has two chiral centers, but its pharmacological activity is believed due solely to the d-threo isomer. We have found that d,l-threo-C-11 MP has favorable properties for PET studies, and therefore examined the effects of incorporating halogen atoms into the phenyl ring of MP, with a view to preparing C-11 and I-123 MP analogs as potential PET/SPECT tracers. We synthesized the 2-, 3- and 4-bromo MP analogs from the corresponding bromophenylacetonitriles by modification of the original synthesis of MP. In in vitro binding assays all three d,l-threo bromo compounds had higher affinities than MP for DA transporter sites labeled with tritiated WIN 35,428 (3->4-, 2->MP). They also showed high activity with NE reuptake sites labeled with tritiated nisoxetine. They were active in vivo as demonstrated by inhibition of heart uptake of tritiated NE in the mouse, and elevation of striatal extracellular DA (microdialysis) and stimulation of locomotor activity in the rat.

  2. Phosphorylation mechanisms in dopamine transporter regulation.

    PubMed

    Foster, James D; Vaughan, Roxanne A

    2016-11-09

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a plasma membrane phosphoprotein that actively translocates extracellular dopamine (DA) into presynaptic neurons. The transporter is the primary mechanism for control of DA levels and subsequent neurotransmission, and is the target for abused and therapeutic drugs that exert their effects by suppressing reuptake. The transport capacity of DAT is acutely regulated by signaling systems and drug exposure, providing neurons the ability to fine-tune DA clearance in response to specific conditions. Kinase pathways play major roles in these mechanisms, and this review summarizes the current status of DAT phosphorylation characteristics and the evidence linking transporter phosphorylation to control of reuptake and other functions. Greater understanding of these processes may aid in elucidation of their possible contributions to DA disease states and suggest specific phosphorylation sites as targets for therapeutic manipulation of reuptake.

  3. Palmitoylation mechanisms in dopamine transporter regulation.

    PubMed

    Rastedt, Danielle E; Vaughan, Roxanne A; Foster, James D

    2017-10-01

    The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) plays a key role in several biological processes including reward, mood, motor activity and attention. Synaptic DA homeostasis is controlled by the dopamine transporter (DAT) which transports extracellular DA into the presynaptic neuron after release and regulates its availability to receptors. Many neurological disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Parkinson disease and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder are associated with imbalances in DA homeostasis that may be related to DAT dysfunction. DAT is also a target of psychostimulant and therapeutic drugs that inhibit DA reuptake and lead to elevated dopaminergic neurotransmission. We have recently demonstrated the acute and chronic modulation of DA reuptake activity and DAT stability through S-palmitoylation, the linkage of a 16-carbon palmitate group to cysteine via a thioester bond. This review summarizes the properties and regulation of DAT palmitoylation and describes how it serves to affect various transporter functions. Better understanding of the role of palmitoylation in regulation of DAT function may lead to identification of therapeutic targets for modulation of DA homeostasis in the treatment of dopaminergic disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A basic smell test is as sensitive as a dopamine transporter scan: comparison of olfaction, taste and DaTSCAN in the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Deeb, J; Shah, M; Muhammed, N; Gunasekera, R; Gannon, K; Findley, L J; Hawkes, C H

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate relationship between odour identification, taste threshold, dopamine transporter scan (DaTSCAN) and motor function in early Parkinson's disease (PD) and their diagnostic accuracy. Seventy-three patients with early parkinsonism were evaluated by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), DaTSCAN, electrogustometry (EGM) threshold and University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT). Olfactory Event-Related potentials (OERP) were performed on 49 patients. At follow-up (mean 15.3 months), patients were diagnosed as 'PD' or 'non-PD'. DaTSCAN images were assessed visually and semi-quantitatively by QuantiSPECT. The sensitivity of UPSIT (86%) was not significantly different from that of the DaTSCAN (92%). UPSIT correlated moderately with DaTSCAN uptake (r = 0.44; P < 0.005) and UPDRS score (r = 0.43; P < 0.05) and weakly with symptom duration (r = 0.25; P < 0.05). In the PD group, OERP showed increased latency but no change in amplitude and no correlation with DaTSCAN. EGM thresholds were impaired in 22% of the PD group but they did not correlate with any other test parameters. DaTSCAN-UPSIT discordance was found in nine patients with PD, but neither was diagnostically superior. Our patients with early PD have a frequent and severe olfactory deficit that correlates with disease severity, symptom duration and DaTSCAN but not EGM. The sensitivities of UPSIT and DaTSCAN are high at 86% and 92%, respectively. Although DaTSCAN is superior for 'localization', UPSIT is considerably 'cheaper', and neither is disease specific. EGM threshold impairment in PD is independent of the smell deficit, and probably signifies advanced disease.

  5. Recovery of dopamine transporters with methamphetamine detoxification is not linked to changes in dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Volkow, Nora D; Wang, Gene-Jack; Smith, Lisa; Fowler, Joanna S; Telang, Frank; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-11-01

    Methamphetamine's widepread abuse and concerns that it might increase Parkinson's disease led us to assess if the reported loss of dopamine transporters (DAT) in methamphetamine abusers (MA) reflected damage to dopamine neurons. Using PET with [(11)C]cocaine to measure DAT, and with [(11)C]raclopride to measure dopamine release (assessed as changes in specific binding of [(11)C]raclopride between placebo and methylphenidate), which was used as a marker of dopamine neuronal function, we show that MA (n=16), tested during early detoxification, had lower DAT (20-30%) but overall normal DA release in striatum (except for a small decrease in left putamen), when compared to controls (n=15). In controls, DAT were positively correlated with DA release (higher DAT associated with larger DA increases), consistent with DAT serving as markers of DA terminals. In contrast, MA showed a trend for a negative correlation (p=0.07) (higher DAT associated with lower DA increases), consistent with reduced DA re-uptake following DAT downregulation. MA who remained abstinent nine-months later (n=9) showed significant increases in DAT (20%) but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases did not change. In contrast, in controls, DAT did not change when retested 9 months later but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases in ventral striatum were reduced (p=0.05). Baseline D2/D3 receptors in caudate were lower in MA than in controls and did not change with detoxification, nor did they change in the controls upon retest. The loss of DAT in the MA, which was not associated with a concomitant reduction in dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT loss reflected DA terminal degneration; as well as the recovery of DAT after protracted detoxification, which was not associated with increased dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT increases reflected terminal regeneration, indicate that the loss of DAT in these MA does not reflect degeneration of dopamine terminals.

  6. Clinical utility of dopamine transporter single photon emission CT (DaT-SPECT) with (123I) ioflupane in diagnosis of parkinsonian syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Nin; Hauser, Robert A; Grachev, Igor D

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of movement disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD) and essential tremor is determined through clinical assessment. The difficulty with diagnosis of early PD has been highlighted in several recent clinical trials. Studies have suggested relatively high clinical diagnostic error rates for PD and essential tremor. This review was undertaken to clarify the utility of DaT-SPECT imaging with (123I)ioflupane (DaTSCAN or DaTscan or (123I)FP-CIT) in assisting practitioners in their clinical decision making by visualising the dopamine transporter in parkinsonian cases. In some patients with suspected parkinsonian syndromes, SPECT imaging with (123I)ioflupane is useful to assist in the diagnosis and to help guide prognosis and treatment decisions, including avoiding medications that are unlikely to provide benefit. Clinicians ordering (123I)ioflupane SPECT should be aware of its limitations and pitfalls and should order scans when there is diagnostic uncertainty or when the scan will be helpful in clinical decision making. PMID:23486993

  7. Mechanisms of dopamine transporter regulation in normal and disease states.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Roxanne A; Foster, James D

    2013-09-01

    The dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) controls the spatial and temporal dynamics of DA neurotransmission by driving reuptake of extracellular transmitter into presynaptic neurons. Many diseases such as depression, bipolar disorder, Parkinson's disease (PD), and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are associated with abnormal DA levels, implicating DAT as a factor in their etiology. Medications used to treat these disorders and many addictive drugs target DAT and enhance dopaminergic signaling by suppressing transmitter reuptake. We now understand that the transport and binding properties of DAT are regulated by complex and overlapping mechanisms that provide neurons with the ability to modulate DA clearance in response to physiological demands. These processes are controlled by endogenous signaling pathways and affected by exogenous transporter ligands, demonstrating their importance for normal neurotransmission, drug abuse, and disease treatments. Increasing evidence supports the disruption of these mechanisms in DA disorders, implicating dysregulation of transport in disease etiologies and suggesting these processes as potential points for therapeutic manipulation of DA availability.

  8. Reciprocal Phosphorylation and Palmitoylation Control Dopamine Transporter Kinetics*

    PubMed Central

    Moritz, Amy E.; Rastedt, Danielle E.; Stanislowski, Daniel J.; Shetty, Madhur; Smith, Margaret A.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.; Foster, James D.

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine transporter is a neuronal protein that drives the presynaptic reuptake of dopamine (DA) and is the major determinant of transmitter availability in the brain. Dopamine transporter function is regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) and other signaling pathways through mechanisms that are complex and poorly understood. Here we investigate the role of Ser-7 phosphorylation and Cys-580 palmitoylation in mediating steady-state transport kinetics and PKC-stimulated transport down-regulation. Using both mutational and pharmacological approaches, we demonstrate that these post-translational modifications are reciprocally regulated, leading to transporter populations that display high phosphorylation-low palmitoylation or low phosphorylation-high palmitoylation. The balance between the modifications dictates transport capacity, as conditions that promote high phosphorylation or low palmitoylation reduce transport Vmax and enhance PKC-stimulated down-regulation, whereas conditions that promote low phosphorylation or high palmitoylation increase transport Vmax and suppress PKC-stimulated down-regulation. Transitions between these functional states occur when endocytosis is blocked or undetectable, indicating that the modifications kinetically regulate the velocity of surface transporters. These findings reveal a novel mechanism for control of DA reuptake that may represent a point of dysregulation in DA imbalance disorders. PMID:26424792

  9. Decreased lymphocyte dopamine transporter in romantic lovers.

    PubMed

    Marazziti, Donatella; Baroni, Stefano; Giannaccini, Gino; Piccinni, Armando; Mucci, Federico; Catena-Dell'Osso, Mario; Rutigliano, Grazia; Massimetti, Gabriele; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2017-06-01

    The role of dopamine (DA) in romantic love is suggested by different evidence and is supported by the findings of some brain imaging studies. The DA transporter (DAT) is a key structure in regulating the concentration of the neurotransmitter in the synaptic cleft. Given the presence of DAT in blood cells, the present study aimed to explore it in resting lymphocytes of 30 healthy subjects of both sexes in the early stage of romantic love (no longer than 6 months), as compared with 30 subjects involved in a long-lasting relationship. All subjects had no physical or psychiatric illness. The DAT was measured by means of the [3H]-WIN 35,428 binding and the [3H]-DA reuptake to resting lymphocytes membranes. Romantic love was assessed by a specific questionnaire developed by us. The results showed that the subjects in the early phase of romantic love had a global alteration of the lymphocyte DAT involving both a decreased number of proteins (Bmax) and a reduced functionality (Vmax). Taken together, these findings would indicate the presence of increased levels of DA in romantic love that, if paralleled by similar concentrations in the brain, would explain some peculiar features of this human feeling.

  10. De novo mutation in the dopamine transporter gene associates dopamine dysfunction with autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Peter J.; Campbell, Nicholas G.; Sharma, Shruti; Erreger, Kevin; Hansen, Freja Herborg; Saunders, Christine; Belovich, Andrea N.; Sahai, Michelle A.; Cook, Edwin H.; Gether, Ulrik; Mchaourab, Hassane S.; Matthies, Heinrich J.G.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Galli, Aurelio

    2014-01-01

    De novo genetic variation is an important class of risk factors for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Recently, whole exome sequencing of ASD families has identified a novel de novo missense mutation in the human dopamine (DA) transporter (hDAT) gene, which results in a Thr to Met substitution at site 356 (hDAT T356M). The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a presynaptic membrane protein that regulates dopaminergic tone in the central nervous system by mediating the high-affinity re-uptake of synaptically released DA, making it a crucial regulator of DA homeostasis. Here, we report the first functional, structural, and behavioral characterization of an ASD-associated de novo mutation in the hDAT. We demonstrate that the hDAT T356M displays anomalous function, characterized as a persistent reverse transport of DA (substrate efflux). Importantly, in the bacterial homolog leucine transporter, substitution of A289 (the homologous site to T356) with a Met promotes an outward-facing conformation upon substrate binding. In the substrate-bound state, an outward-facing transporter conformation is a required for substrate efflux. In Drosophila melanogaster, expression of hDAT T356M in DA neurons lacking Drosophila DAT leads to hyperlocomotion, a trait associated with DA dysfunction and ASD. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that alterations in DA homeostasis, mediated by aberrant DAT function, may confer risk for ASD and related neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:23979605

  11. Recovery of dopamine transporters with methamphetamine detoxification is not linked to changes in dopamine release

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, Nora D.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Smith, Lisa; Fowler, Joanna S.; Telang, Frank; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-07-21

    Metamphetamine’s widepread abuse and concerns that it may increase Parkinson’s disease led us to assess if the reported loss of dopamine transporters (DAT) in methamphetamine abusers (MA) reflected damage to dopamine neurons. Using PET with [11C]cocaine to measure DAT, and with [11C]raclopride to measure dopamine release (assessed as changes in specific binding of [11C]raclopride between placebo and methylphenidate), which was used as marker of dopamine neuronal function, we show that MA (n=16), tested during early detoxification, had lower DAT (20-30%) but overall normal DA release in striatum (except for a small decrease in left putamen), when compared to controls (n=15). In controls, DAT were positively correlated with DA release (higher DAT associated with larger DA increases), consistent with DAT serving as markers of DA terminals. In contrast, MA showed a trend for a negative correlation (p=0.07) (higher DAT associated with lower DA increases), consistent with reduced DA re-uptake following DAT downregulation. MA who remained abstinent nine-months later (n=9) showed significant increases in DAT (20%) but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases did not change. In contrast, in controls, DAT did not change when retested 9 months later but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases in ventral striatum were reduced (p=0.05). Baseline D2/D3 receptors in caudate were lower in MA than in controls and did not change with detoxification, nor did they change in the controls upon retest. The loss of DAT in the MA, which was not associated with a concomitant reduction in dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT loss reflected DA terminal degneration; as well as the recovery of DAT after protracted detoxification, which was not associated with increased dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT increases reflected terminal regeneration, indicate that the loss of DAT in these MA does not reflect degeneration of

  12. Recovery of dopamine transporters with methamphetamine detoxification is not linked to changes in dopamine release

    DOE PAGES

    Volkow, Nora D.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Smith, Lisa; ...

    2015-07-21

    Metamphetamine’s widepread abuse and concerns that it may increase Parkinson’s disease led us to assess if the reported loss of dopamine transporters (DAT) in methamphetamine abusers (MA) reflected damage to dopamine neurons. Using PET with [11C]cocaine to measure DAT, and with [11C]raclopride to measure dopamine release (assessed as changes in specific binding of [11C]raclopride between placebo and methylphenidate), which was used as marker of dopamine neuronal function, we show that MA (n=16), tested during early detoxification, had lower DAT (20-30%) but overall normal DA release in striatum (except for a small decrease in left putamen), when compared to controls (n=15).more » In controls, DAT were positively correlated with DA release (higher DAT associated with larger DA increases), consistent with DAT serving as markers of DA terminals. In contrast, MA showed a trend for a negative correlation (p=0.07) (higher DAT associated with lower DA increases), consistent with reduced DA re-uptake following DAT downregulation. MA who remained abstinent nine-months later (n=9) showed significant increases in DAT (20%) but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases did not change. In contrast, in controls, DAT did not change when retested 9 months later but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases in ventral striatum were reduced (p=0.05). Baseline D2/D3 receptors in caudate were lower in MA than in controls and did not change with detoxification, nor did they change in the controls upon retest. The loss of DAT in the MA, which was not associated with a concomitant reduction in dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT loss reflected DA terminal degneration; as well as the recovery of DAT after protracted detoxification, which was not associated with increased dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT increases reflected terminal regeneration, indicate that the loss of DAT in these MA does not reflect degeneration of dopamine terminals.« less

  13. Mechanism of action of methylmercury on in vivo striatal dopamine release. Possible involvement of dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Faro, L R F; do Nascimento, J L M; Alfonso, M; Durán, R

    2002-04-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) produces significant increases in the spontaneous output of dopamine (DA) from rat striatal tissue. The mechanism through MeHg produces such increase in the extracellular DA levels could be due to increased DA release or decreased DA uptake into DA terminals. One of the aims of this study was to investigate the role of DA transporter (DAT) in the MeHg-induced DA release. Coinfusion of 400 microM MeHg and nomifensine (50 microM) or amphetamine (50 microM) produced increases in the release of DA similar to those produced by nomifensine and amphetamine alone. In the same way, MeHg-induced DA release was not attenuated under Ca(2+)-free conditions or after pretreatment with reserpine (10 mg/kg i.p.) or tetrodotoxin (TTX), suggesting that the DA release was independent of calcium and vesicular stores, as well as it was not affected by the blockade of voltage sensitive sodium channels. Thus, to investigate whether depolarization of dopaminergic terminal was able to affect MeHg-induced DA release, we infused 75 mM KCl through the dialysis membrane. Our results clearly showed a decrease induced by MeHg in the KCl-evoked DA release. Taken together, these results suggest that MeHg induces release of DA via transporter-dependent, calcium- and vesicular-independent mechanism and it decreases the KCl-evoked DA release.

  14. Thermal Stability of Dopamine Transporters.

    PubMed

    Kukk, Siim; Stepanov, Vladimir; Järv, Jaak

    2015-08-01

    The thermal stabilities of the rat and mouse dopamine transporter (DAT) proteins were studied within the temperature range of 0-37°C. The inactivation of the protein was followed by monitoring changes in radioligand-specific binding. We found that the process followed a rate equation with first-order kinetics and was characterized by having a single rate constant k inact. The activation energies (E a) that were calculated from the Arrhenius plots (ln k inact vs. 1/T) were 43 ± 5 and 45 ± 6 kJ/mol for the rat (rDAT) and mouse (mDAT) transporters, respectively, and 44 ± 7 kJ/mol for rDAT from PC-6.3 cell line. These E a values were similar to the E a values of thermal inactivation of the muscarinic receptor from rat brain cortex and to the thermal inactivation of other transmembrane proteins. However, all of these activation energy values were significantly lower than the E a values for soluble single-subunit proteins of similar size. These results therefore suggest that the thermal stability of transmembrane proteins may be governed to a significant extent by cell membrane properties and by interactions between the membrane components and the protein. In contrast, the stability of soluble proteins seems to be mostly governed by protein structure and size, which determine the sum of the stabilizing intramolecular interactions within the protein molecule. It is therefore not surprising that cell membrane properties and composition may have significant effects on the functional properties of transmembrane proteins.

  15. β-phenylethylamine Requires the Dopamine Transporter to Increase Extracellular Dopamine in C. elegans Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Murad; Wickramasekara, Rochelle N.; Carvelli, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    β-phenylethylamine (βPEA) is an endogenous amine that has been shown to increase the synaptic levels of dopamine (DA). A number of in vitro and behavioral studies suggest the dopamine transporter (DAT) plays a role in the effects generated by βPEA, however the mechanism through which βPEA affects DAT has not yet been elucidated. Here, we used Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans DAT (DAT-1) expressing LLC-pk1 cells and neuronal cultures to investigate whether the βPEA-induced increase of extracellular DA required DAT-1. Our data show that βPEA increases extracellular dopamine both in DAT-1 transfected cells and cultures of differentiated neurons. RTI-55, a cocaine homologue and DAT inhibitor, completely blocked the βPEA-induced effect in transfected cells. However in neuronal cultures, RTI-55 only partly inhibited the increase of extracellular DA generated by βPEA. These results suggest that βPEA requires DAT-1 and other, not yet identified proteins, to increase extracellular DA when tested in a native system. Furthermore, our results suggest that βPEA-induced increase of extracellular DA does not require functional monoamine vesicles as genetic ablation of the C. elegans homologue vesicular monoamine transporter, cat-1, did not compromise the ability of βPEA to increase extracellular DA. Finally, our electrophysiology data show that βPEA caused fast-rising and self-inactivating amperometric currents in a subset of wild-type DA neurons but not in neurons isolated from dat-1 knockout animals. Taken together, these data demonstrate that in both DA neurons and heterogeneous cultures of differentiated C. elegans neurons, βPEA releases cytoplasmic DA through DAT-1 to ultimately increase the extracellular concentration of DA. PMID:24161617

  16. β-Phenylethylamine requires the dopamine transporter to increase extracellular dopamine in Caenorhabditis elegans dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Murad; Wickramasekara, Rochelle N; Carvelli, Lucia

    2014-07-01

    β-Phenylethylamine (βPEA) is an endogenous amine that has been shown to increase the synaptic levels of dopamine (DA). A number of in vitro and behavioral studies suggest the dopamine transporter (DAT) plays a role in the effects generated by βPEA, however the mechanism through which βPEA affects DAT has not yet been elucidated. Here, we used Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans DAT (DAT-1) expressing LLC-pk1 cells and neuronal cultures to investigate whether the βPEA-induced increase of extracellular DA required DAT-1. Our data show that βPEA increases extracellular dopamine both in DAT-1 transfected cells and cultures of differentiated neurons. RTI-55, a cocaine homologue and DAT inhibitor, completely blocked the βPEA-induced effect in transfected cells. However in neuronal cultures, RTI-55 only partly inhibited the increase of extracellular DA generated by βPEA. These results suggest that βPEA requires DAT-1 and other, not yet identified proteins, to increase extracellular DA when tested in a native system. Furthermore, our results suggest that βPEA-induced increase of extracellular DA does not require functional monoamine vesicles as genetic ablation of the C. elegans homologue vesicular monoamine transporter, cat-1, did not compromise the ability of βPEA to increase extracellular DA. Finally, our electrophysiology data show that βPEA caused fast-rising and self-inactivating amperometric currents in a subset of wild-type DA neurons but not in neurons isolated from dat-1 knockout animals. Taken together, these data demonstrate that in both DA neurons and heterogeneous cultures of differentiated C. elegans neurons, βPEA releases cytoplasmic DA through DAT-1 to ultimately increase the extracellular concentration of DA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dopamine transporter mutant animals: a translational perspective

    PubMed Central

    Efimova, Evgenia V.; Gainetdinov, Raul R.; Budygin, Evgeny A.; Sotnikova, Tatiana D.

    2016-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) plays an important homeostatic role in the control of both the extracellular and intraneuronal concentrations of dopamine, thereby providing effective control over activity of dopaminergic transmission. Since brain dopamine is known to be involved in numerous neuropsychiatric disorders, investigations using mice with genetically altered DAT function and thus intensity of dopamine-mediated signaling have provided numerous insights into the pathology of these disorders and highlight novel pathological mechanisms that could be targeted to provide new therapeutic approaches for these disorders. In this brief overview we discuss recent investigations involving animals with genetically altered DAT function, particularly focusing on translational studies providing new insights into pathology and pharmacology of dopamine-related disorders. Perspective applications of these and newly developed models of DAT dysfunction are also discussed. PMID:27276191

  18. Dopamine transporter: expression in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Uhl, G R; O'Hara, B; Shimada, S; Zaczek, R; DiGiorgianni, J; Nishimori, T

    1991-01-01

    Xenopus oocytes can express biologically relevant transport activity after injection of mRNAs encoding several carrier molecules. mRNA from PC12 cells, as well as transcripts from a rat ventral midbrain library, can be expressed in these oocytes and allow them to display pharmacologically specific dopamine uptake. mRNA-injected oocytes incubated with tritiated dopamine contain tritiated dopamine and metabolites; lower amounts of radiolabeled dopamine and more radiolabeled metabolites are found in oocytes co-incubated with cocaine or in water-injected oocytes. Tritiated dopamine uptake into mRNA-injected oocytes is time, sodium, and temperature dependent. It is blocked by cocaine and mazindol, but not by haloperidol. It is not found after injection of mRNA from other brain regions. A size-selected rat midbrain library constructed in the plasma vector pCDM8 yields mRNA transcripts whose injection into oocytes causes cocaine-blockable [3H]dopamine uptake. These findings provide an assay for purification of the dopamine transporter cDNA by sib selection techniques.

  19. Good riddance to dopamine: roles for the dopamine transporter in synaptic function and dopamine-associated brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Gowrishankar, Raajaram; Hahn, Maureen K; Blakely, Randy D

    2014-07-01

    The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) plays a critical role in CNS circuits that provide for attention, executive function, reward responses, motivation and movement. DA is inactivated by the cocaine- and amphetamine-sensitive DA transporter (DAT), a protein that also provides a pathway for non-vesicular DA release. After a brief review of DAT function and psychostimulant actions, we consider the importance DAT in relation to the distinct firing patterns of DA neurons that permit awareness of novelty and reward. Finally, we review recent efforts to gather direct support for DAT-linked disorders, with a specific focus on DAT mutations recently identified in subjects with ADHD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. SKF-83566, a D1-dopamine receptor antagonist, inhibits the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, Melissa A; Ali, Solav; Reith, Maarten E A; Patel, Jyoti C; Sarti, Federica; Carr, Kenneth D; Rice, Margaret E

    2011-09-01

    Dopamine (DA) is an important transmitter in both motor and limbic pathways. We sought to investigate the role of D(1)-receptor activation in axonal DA release regulation in dorsal striatum using a D(1)-receptor antagonist, SKF-83566. Evoked DA release was monitored in rat striatal slices using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. SKF-83566 caused a concentration-dependent increase in peak single-pulse evoked extracellular DA concentration, with a maximum increase of ∼ 65% in 5 μM SKF-83566. This was accompanied by a concentration-dependent increase in extracellular DA concentration clearance time. Both effects were occluded by nomifensine (1 μM), a dopamine transporter (DAT) inhibitor, suggesting that SKF-83566 acted via the DAT. We tested this by examining [(3)H]DA uptake into LLc-PK cells expressing rat DAT, and confirmed that SKF-83566 is a competitive DAT inhibitor with an IC(50) of 5.7 μM. Binding studies with [(3)H]CFT, a cocaine analog, showed even more potent action of SKF-83566 at the DAT cocaine binding site (IC(50) = 0.51 μM). Thus, data obtained using SKF-83566 as a D(1) DA-receptor antagonist may be confounded by concurrent DAT inhibition. More positively, however, SKF-83566 might be a candidate to attenuate cocaine effects in vivo because of the greater potency of this drug at the cocaine versus DA binding site of the DAT.

  1. Molecular model of the neural dopamine transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravna, Aina Westrheim; Sylte, Ingebrigt; Dahl, Svein G.

    2003-05-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) regulates the action of dopamine by reuptake of the neurotransmitter into presynaptic neurons, and is the main molecular target of amphetamines and cocaine. DAT and the Na+/H+ antiporter (NhaA) are secondary transporter proteins that carry small molecules across a cell membrane against a concentration gradient, using ion gradients as energy source. A 3-dimensional projection map of the E. coli NhaA has confirmed a topology of 12 membrane spanning domains, and was previously used to construct a 3-dimensional NhaA model with 12 trans-membrane α-helices (TMHs). The NhaA model, and site directed mutagenesis data on DAT, were used to construct a detailed 3-dimensional DAT model using interactive molecular graphics and empiric force field calculations. The model proposes a dopamine transport mechanism involving TMHs 1, 3, 4, 5, 7 and 11. Asp79, Tyr252 and Tyr274 were the primary cocaine binding residues. Binding of cocaine or its analogue, (-)-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane (CFT), seemed to lock the transporter in an inactive state, and thus inhibit dopamine transport. The present model may be used to design further experimental studies of the molecular structure and mechanisms of DAT and other secondary transporter proteins.

  2. ANOMALOUS DOPAMINE RELEASE ASSOCIATED WITH A HUMAN DOPAMINE TRANSPORTER CODING VARIANT

    PubMed Central

    Mazei-Robison, M.S.; Bowton, E.; Holy, M.; Schmudermaier, M.; Freissmuth, M.; Sitte, H.H.; Galli, A.; Blakely, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) signaling at synapses is tightly coordinated through opposing mechanisms of vesicular fusion-mediated DA release and transporter-mediated DA clearance. Altered brain DA signaling is suspected to underlie multiple brain disorders including schizophrenia, Parkinson’s disease, bipolar disorder and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We identified a pedigree containing two male children diagnosed with ADHD who share a rare human DA transporter (DAT, SLC6A3) coding variant, Ala559Val. Among over 1000 control and affected subjects, the Val559 variant has only been isolated once previously, in a female subject with bipolar disorder. Although hDAT Ala559Val supports normal DAT protein and cell surface expression, as well as normal DA uptake, the variant exhibits anomalous DA efflux from DA loaded cells. We also demonstrate that hDAT Ala599Val exhibits increased sensitivity to intracellular Na+, but not intracellular DA, and displays exaggerated DA efflux at depolarized potentials. Remarkably, the two most common ADHD medications, amphetamine and methylphenidate, both block hDAT Ala559Val-mediated DA efflux, whereas these drugs have opposite actions at wildtype hDAT. Our findings reveal that DA efflux, typically associated with amphetamine-like psychostimulants, can be produced through a heritable change in hDAT structure. As multiple gene products are known to coordinate to support amphetamine-mediated DA efflux, the properties of hDAT Ala559Val may have broader significance in identifying a new mechanism through which DA signaling disorders arise. Additionally, they suggest that block of inappropriate neurotransmitter efflux may be an unsuspected mechanism supporting the therapeutic actions of existing transporter-directed medications. PMID:18614672

  3. Molecular mechanism: the human dopamine transporter histidine 547 regulates basal and HIV-1 Tat protein-inhibited dopamine transport

    PubMed Central

    Quizon, Pamela M.; Sun, Wei-Lun; Yuan, Yaxia; Midde, Narasimha M.; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal dopaminergic transmission has been implicated as a risk determinant of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. HIV-1 Tat protein increases synaptic dopamine (DA) levels by directly inhibiting DA transporter (DAT) activity, ultimately leading to dopaminergic neuron damage. Through integrated computational modeling prediction and experimental validation, we identified that histidine547 on human DAT (hDAT) is critical for regulation of basal DA uptake and Tat-induced inhibition of DA transport. Compared to wild type hDAT (WT hDAT), mutation of histidine547 (H547A) displayed a 196% increase in DA uptake. Other substitutions of histidine547 showed that DA uptake was not altered in H547R but decreased by 99% in H547P and 60% in H547D, respectively. These mutants did not alter DAT surface expression or surface DAT binding sites. H547 mutants attenuated Tat-induced inhibition of DA transport observed in WT hDAT. H547A displays a differential sensitivity to PMA- or BIM-induced activation or inhibition of DAT function relative to WT hDAT, indicating a change in basal PKC activity in H547A. These findings demonstrate that histidine547 on hDAT plays a crucial role in stabilizing basal DA transport and Tat-DAT interaction. This study provides mechanistic insights into identifying targets on DAT for Tat binding and improving DAT-mediated dysfunction of DA transmission. PMID:27966610

  4. Molecular mechanism: the human dopamine transporter histidine 547 regulates basal and HIV-1 Tat protein-inhibited dopamine transport.

    PubMed

    Quizon, Pamela M; Sun, Wei-Lun; Yuan, Yaxia; Midde, Narasimha M; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Zhu, Jun

    2016-12-14

    Abnormal dopaminergic transmission has been implicated as a risk determinant of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. HIV-1 Tat protein increases synaptic dopamine (DA) levels by directly inhibiting DA transporter (DAT) activity, ultimately leading to dopaminergic neuron damage. Through integrated computational modeling prediction and experimental validation, we identified that histidine547 on human DAT (hDAT) is critical for regulation of basal DA uptake and Tat-induced inhibition of DA transport. Compared to wild type hDAT (WT hDAT), mutation of histidine547 (H547A) displayed a 196% increase in DA uptake. Other substitutions of histidine547 showed that DA uptake was not altered in H547R but decreased by 99% in H547P and 60% in H547D, respectively. These mutants did not alter DAT surface expression or surface DAT binding sites. H547 mutants attenuated Tat-induced inhibition of DA transport observed in WT hDAT. H547A displays a differential sensitivity to PMA- or BIM-induced activation or inhibition of DAT function relative to WT hDAT, indicating a change in basal PKC activity in H547A. These findings demonstrate that histidine547 on hDAT plays a crucial role in stabilizing basal DA transport and Tat-DAT interaction. This study provides mechanistic insights into identifying targets on DAT for Tat binding and improving DAT-mediated dysfunction of DA transmission.

  5. Neurotransmitter and psychostimulant recognition by the dopamine transporter

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kevin H.; Penmatsa, Aravind; Gouaux, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Na+/Cl−-coupled biogenic amine transporters are the primary targets of therapeutic and abused drugs, ranging from antidepressants to the psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamines, and to their cognate substrates. Here we determine x-ray crystal structures of the Drosophila melanogaster dopamine transporter (dDAT) bound to its substrate dopamine (DA), a substrate analogue 3,4-dichlorophenethylamine, the psychostimulants D-amphetamine, methamphetamine, or to cocaine and cocaine analogues. All ligands bind to the central binding site, located approximately halfway across the membrane bilayer, in close proximity to bound sodium and chloride ions. The central binding site recognizes three chemically distinct classes of ligands via conformational changes that accommodate varying sizes and shapes, thus illustrating molecular principles that distinguish substrates from inhibitors in biogenic amine transporters. PMID:25970245

  6. Psychostimulants affect dopamine transmission through both dopamine transporter-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    dela Peña, Ike; Gevorkiana, Ruzanna; Shi, Wei-Xing

    2015-10-05

    The precise mechanisms by which cocaine and amphetamine-like psychostimulants exert their reinforcing effects are not yet fully defined. It is widely believed, however, that these drugs produce their effects by enhancing dopamine neurotransmission in the brain, especially in limbic areas such as the nucleus accumbens, by inducing dopamine transporter-mediated reverse transport and/or blocking dopamine reuptake though the dopamine transporter. Here, we present the evidence that aside from dopamine transporter, non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanisms also participate in psychostimulant-induced dopamine release and contribute to the behavioral effects of these drugs, such as locomotor activation and reward. Accordingly, psychostimulants could increase norepinephrine release in the prefrontal cortex, the latter then alters the firing pattern of dopamine neurons resulting in changes in action potential-dependent dopamine release. These alterations would further affect the temporal pattern of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, thereby modifying information processing in that area. Hence, a synaptic input to a nucleus accumbens neuron may be enhanced or inhibited by dopamine depending on its temporal relationship to dopamine release. Specific temporal patterns of dopamine release may also be required for certain forms of synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens. Together, these effects induced by psychostimulants, mediated through a non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanism involving norepinephrine and the prefrontal cortex, may also contribute importantly to the reinforcing properties of these drugs.

  7. Psychostimulants affect dopamine transmission through both dopamine transporter-dependent and independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    dela Peña, Ike; Gevorkiana, Ruzanna; Shi, Wei-Xing

    2015-01-01

    The precise mechanisms by which cocaine and amphetamine-like psychostimulants exert their reinforcing effects are not yet fully defined. It is widely believed, however, that these drugs produce their effects by enhancing dopamine neurotransmission in the brain, especially in limbic areas such as the nucleus accumbens, by inducing dopamine transporter-mediated reverse transport and/or blocking dopamine reuptake though the dopamine transporter. Here, we present the evidence that aside from dopamine transporter, non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanisms also participate in psychostimulant-induced dopamine release and contribute to the behavioral effects of these drugs, such as locomotor activation and reward. Accordingly, psychostimulants could increase norepinephrine release in the prefrontal cortex, the latter then alters the firing pattern of dopamine neurons resulting in changes in action potential-dependent dopamine release. These alterations would further affect the temporal pattern of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, thereby modifying information processing in that area. Hence, a synaptic input to a nucleus accumbens neuron may be enhanced or inhibited by dopamine depending on its temporal relationship to dopamine release. Specific temporal patterns of dopamine release may also be required for certain forms of synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens. Together, these effects induced by psychostimulants, mediated through a non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanism involving norepinephrine and the prefrontal cortex, may also contribute importantly to the reinforcing properties of these drugs. PMID:26209364

  8. Atypical dopamine efflux caused by 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) via the human dopamine transporter

    PubMed Central

    Shekar, Aparna; Aguilar, Jenny I.; Galli, Greta; Cozzi, Nicholas V.; Brandt, Simon D.; Ruoho, Arnold E.; Baumann, Michael H.; Matthies, Heinrich J.G.; Galli, Aurelio

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic cathinones are similar in chemical structure to amphetamines, and their behavioral effects are associated with enhanced dopaminergic signaling. The past ten years of research on the common constituent of bath salts, MDPV (the synthetic cathinone 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone), has aided the understanding of how synthetic cathinones act at the dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT). Several groups have described the ability of MDPV to block the DAT with high-affinity. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time, a new mode of action of MDPV, namely its ability to promote DAT-mediated DA efflux. Using single cell amperometric assays, we determined that low concentrations of MDPV (1 nM) can cause reverse transport of DA via DAT. Notably, administration of MDPV leads to hyperlocomotion in Drosophila melanogaster. These data describe further how MDPV acts at the DAT possibly paving the way for novel treatment strategies for individuals who abuse bath salts. PMID:28163218

  9. Dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome: phenotypic spectrum from infancy to adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Joanne; Zhen, Juan; Meyer, Esther; Erreger, Kevin; Li, Yan; Kakar, Naseebullah; Ahmad, Jamil; Thiele, Holger; Kubisch, Christian; Rider, Nicholas L.; Holmes Morton, D.; Strauss, Kevin A.; Puffenberger, Erik G.; D’Agnano, Daniela; Anikster, Yair; Carducci, Claudia; Hyland, Keith; Rotstein, Michael; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Borck, Guntram; Reith, Maarten E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome due to SLC6A3 mutations is the first inherited dopamine ‘transportopathy’ to be described, with a classical presentation of early infantile-onset progressive parkinsonism dystonia. In this study we have identified a new cohort of patients with dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome, including, most significantly, atypical presentation later in childhood with a milder disease course. We report the detailed clinical features, molecular genetic findings and in vitro functional investigations undertaken for adult and paediatric cases. Patients presenting with parkinsonism dystonia or a neurotransmitter profile characteristic of dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome were recruited for study. SLC6A3 mutational analysis was undertaken in all patients. The functional consequences of missense variants on the dopamine transporter were evaluated by determining the effect of mutant dopamine transporter on dopamine uptake, protein expression and amphetamine-mediated dopamine efflux using an in vitro cellular heterologous expression system. We identified eight new patients from five unrelated families with dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome. The median age at diagnosis was 13 years (range 1.5–34 years). Most significantly, the case series included three adolescent males with atypical dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome of juvenile onset (outside infancy) and progressive parkinsonism dystonia. The other five patients in the cohort presented with classical infantile-onset parkinsonism dystonia, with one surviving into adulthood (currently aged 34 years) and labelled as having ‘juvenile parkinsonism’. All eight patients harboured homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in SLC6A3, of which the majority are previously unreported variants. In vitro studies of mutant dopamine transporter demonstrated multifaceted loss of dopamine transporter function. Impaired dopamine uptake was universally present, and more

  10. Raman Spectroscopic Signature Markers of Dopamine-Human Dopamine Transporter Interaction in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Silwal, Achut Prasad; Yadav, Rajeev; Sprague, Jon E; Lu, H Peter

    2017-04-04

    Dopamine (DA) controls many psychological and behavioral activities in the central nervous system (CNS) through interactions with the human dopamine transporter (hDAT) and dopamine receptors. The roles of DA in the function of the CNS are affected by the targeted binding of drugs to hDAT; thus, hDAT plays a critical role in neurophysiology and neuropathophysiology. An effective experimental method is necessary to study the DA-hDAT interaction and effects of variety of drugs like psychostimulants and anti-depressants that are dependent on this interaction. In searching for obtaining and identifying the Raman spectral signatures, we have used surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy to record SERS spectrum from DA, Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells (HEK293), hDAT-HEK293, DA-HEK293, and DA-hDAT-HEK293. We have demonstrated a specific 2D-distribution SERS spectral analytical approach to analyze DA-hDAT interaction. Our study shows that the Raman modes at 807, 839, 1076, 1090, 1538, and 1665 cm-1 are related to DA-hDAT interaction, where Raman shift at 807 and 1076 cm-1 are the signature marker for bound state of DA to probe DA-hDAT interaction. On the basis of density function theory (DFT) calculation, Raman shift of bound state of DA at 807 cm-1 is related to combination of bending modes α(C3-O10-H21), α(C2-O11-H22), α(C7-C8-H18), α(C6-C4-H13), α(C7-C8-H19), α(C7-C8-N9), and Raman shift at 1076 cm-1 is related to combination of bending modes α(H19-N9-C8), γ(N9-H19), γ(C8-H19), γ(N9-H20), γ(C8-H18), and α(C7-C8-H18). These findings demonstrate that protein-ligand interactions can be confirmed by probing change in Raman shift of ligand molecules, which could be crucial to understanding molecular interactions between neurotransmitters and their receptors or transporters.

  11. Mitochondrial stress-induced dopamine efflux and neuronal damage by malonate involves the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Moy, Lily Y; Wang, Sheng-Ping; Sonsalla, Patricia K

    2007-02-01

    Endogenous striatal dopamine (DA) overflow has been associated with neuropathological conditions resulting from ischemia, psychostimulants, and metabolic inhibition. Malonate, a reversible inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase, models the effects of energy impairment in neurodegenerative disorders. We have previously reported that the striatal DA efflux and damage to DA nerve terminals resulting from intrastriatal malonate infusions is prevented by prior DA depletion, suggesting that DA plays a role in the neuronal damage. We presently report that the malonate-induced DA efflux is partially mediated by reverse transport of DA from the cytosol to the extracellular space via the DA transporter (DAT). Pharmacological blockade of the DAT with a series of structurally different inhibitors [cocaine, mazindol, 1-(2-(bis(4-fluophenyl methoxy) ethyl)-4-(3-(4-fluorophenyl)-propyl)piperazine) dimethane sulfonate (GBR 13098) and methyl(-)-3beta-(p-fluorophenyl)-1alphaH,5alphaH-tropane-2beta-carboxylate1,5-naphthalene (Win 35,428)] attenuated malonate-induced DA overflow in vivo and protected mice against subsequent damage to DA nerve terminals. Consistent with these findings, the DAT inhibitors prevented malonate-induced damage to DA neurons in mesencephalic cultures and also protected against the loss of GABA neurons in this system. The DAT inhibitors did not modify malonate-induced formation of reactive oxygen species or lactate production, indicating that the DAT inhibitors neither exert antioxidant effects nor interfere with the actions of malonate. Taken together, these findings provide direct evidence that mitochondrial impairment and metabolic stress cause striatal DA efflux via the DAT and suggest that disruptions in DA homeostasis resulting from energy impairment may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Unraveling neuronal dopamine transporter mechanisms with rotating disk electrode voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Schenk, James O; Wright, Cortney; Bjorklund, Nicole

    2005-04-15

    Herein we describe how the rotating disk electrode voltammetric technique can be used to examine the mechanism(s) of the inward transport of dopamine by the neuronal transporter for dopamine (DAT). The usefulness of making measurements kinetically resolving dopamine transport, interpretations of changes in Km and Vmax, approaches to defining pre-steady-state binding of dopamine to DAT, interactions between competing inhibitors, chemical modification of functional groups within DAT, and a presentation of a hypothetical multi-state model of dopamine transport are presented and discussed.

  13. Simultaneous measurement of extracellular dopamine and dopamine transporter occupancy by cocaine analogs in squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Heather L; Nye, Jonathon A; Voll, Ronald; Mun, Jiyoung; Stehouwer, Jeffrey; Goodman, Mark M; Votaw, John R; Carroll, F I; Howell, Leonard L

    2012-06-01

    Several classes of drugs bind to the dopamine transporter (DAT) with high affinity, but some are weaker positive reinforcers than cocaine, suggesting that affinity for and occupancy of the DAT is not the only determinant of a drug's reinforcing effectiveness. Other factors such as the rate of onset have been positively and strongly correlated with the reinforcing effects of DAT inhibitors in nonhuman primates. In the current studies, we examined the effects of acute systemic administration of cocaine and three cocaine analogs (RTI-150, RTI-177, and RTI-366) on binding to DAT in squirrel monkey brain using positron emission tomography (PET) neuroimaging. During the PET scan, we also measured drug effects on dopamine (DA) levels in the caudate using in vivo microdialysis. In general, our results suggest a lack of concordance between drug occupancy at DAT and changes in DA levels. These studies also indicate that acute cocaine administration decreases the availability of plasma membrane DAT for binding, even after cocaine is no longer blocking DA uptake as evidence by a return to basal DA levels.

  14. Working memory plasticity modulated by dopamine transporter genotype.

    PubMed

    Brehmer, Yvonne; Westerberg, Helena; Bellander, Martin; Fürth, Daniel; Karlsson, Sari; Bäckman, Lars

    2009-12-25

    Dopamine (DA) is implicated in working memory (WM) functioning. Variations in the DA transporter (DAT1) gene (SLC6A3) regulate DA availability in striatum. Compared to DAT1 9/10-repeat carriers, homozygosity of the DAT1 10-repeat allele has been related to less active dopaminergic pathways. A group of younger adults received 4 weeks of computerized adaptive training on several WM tasks. All participants improved their performance as a function of training. However, DAT1 9/10-repeat carriers showed larger training-related gains than DAT1 10-repeat carriers in visuospatial WM. By contrast, the two groups were indistinguishable in baseline WM performance as well as in a variety of tasks assessing different cognitive abilities. This pattern of results provides novel evidence that WM plasticity is a more sensitive indicator of DAT1 gene-related cognitive differences than single-assessment performance scores.

  15. Cloning of the cocaine-sensitive bovine dopamine transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Usdin, T.B.; Chen, C.; Brownstein, M.J.; Hoffman, B.J. ); Mezey, E. )

    1991-12-15

    A cDNA encoding the dopamine transporter from bovine brain substantia nigra was identified on the basis of its structural homology to other, recently cloned, neurotransmitter transporters. The sequence of the 693-amino acid protein is quite similar to those of the rat {gamma}-aminobutyric acid, human norepinephrine, and rat serotonin transporters. Dopamine transporter mRNA was detected by in situ hybridization in the substantia nigra but not in the locus coeruleus, raphe, caudate, or other brain areas. ({sup 3}H)Dopamine accumulation in tissue culture cells transfected with the cDNA was inhibited by amphetamine, cocaine, and specific inhibitors of dopamine transports, including GBR12909.

  16. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Dopamine Tubular Transport by Organic Cation Transporters: A Novel Mechanism to Enhance Renal Sodium Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Kouyoumdzian, Nicolás M.; Rukavina Mikusic, Natalia L.; Kravetz, María C.; Lee, Brenda M.; Carranza, Andrea; Del Mauro, Julieta S.; Pandolfo, Marcela; Gironacci, Mariela M.; Gorzalczany, Susana; Toblli, Jorge E.; Fernández, Belisario E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on organic cation transporters (OCTs) expression and activity, and its consequences on dopamine urinary levels, Na+, K+-ATPase activity and renal function. Male Sprague Dawley rats were infused with isotonic saline solution during 120 minutes and randomized in nine different groups: control, pargyline plus tolcapone (P+T), ANP, dopamine (DA), D-22, DA+D-22, ANP+D-22, ANP+DA and ANP+DA+D-22. Renal functional parameters were determined and urinary dopamine concentration was quantified by HPLC. Expression of OCTs and D1-receptor in membrane preparations from renal cortex tissues were determined by western blot and Na+, K+-ATPase activity was determined using in vitro enzyme assay. 3H-DA renal uptake was determined in vitro. Compared to P+T group, ANP and dopamine infusion increased diuresis, urinary sodium and dopamine excretion significantly. These effects were more pronounced in ANP+DA group and reversed by OCTs blockade by D-22, demonstrating that OCTs are implied in ANP stimulated-DA uptake and transport in renal tissues. The activity of Na+, K+-ATPase exhibited a similar fashion when it was measured in the same experimental groups. Although OCTs and D1-receptor protein expression were not modified by ANP, OCTs-dependent-dopamine tubular uptake was increased by ANP through activation of NPR-A receptor and protein kinase G as signaling pathway. This effect was reflected by an increase in urinary dopamine excretion, natriuresis, diuresis and decreased Na+, K+-ATPase activity. OCTs represent a novel target that links the activity of ANP and dopamine together in a common mechanism to enhance their natriuretic and diuretic effects. PMID:27392042

  17. The dopamine transporter: role in neurotoxicity and human disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bannon, Michael J. . E-mail: mbannon@med.wayne.edu

    2005-05-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a plasma membrane transport protein expressed exclusively within a small subset of CNS neurons. It plays a crucial role in controlling dopamine-mediated neurotransmission and a number of associated behaviors. This review focuses on recent data elucidating the role of the dopamine transporter in neurotoxicity and a number of CNS disorders, including Parkinson disease, drug abuse, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

  18. Amphetamine and Methamphetamine Reduce Striatal Dopamine Transporter Function Without Concurrent Dopamine Transporter Relocalization

    PubMed Central

    German, Christopher L.; Hanson, Glen R.; Fleckenstein, Annette E.

    2014-01-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) and methamphetamine (METH) alter dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) function. In vitro heterologous cell line and synaptosome studies demonstrate AMPH-induced DAT internalization, implicating relocalization in reduced DAT uptake following drug exposure. However, few studies have evaluated DAT localization following in vivo AMPH/METH administration. To determine DAT subcellular localization following drug administration, a centrifugation technique was developed to isolate striatal synaptosomal membrane and vesicle fractions. DAT was distributed between the synaptosomal membrane (60%) and endosomal vesicles (40%), and in vitro application of the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to striatal synaptosomes caused DAT internalization into the vesicle fractions. In contrast, neither single nor repeated in vivo AMPH and/or METH administrations altered DAT localization 5, 15, 30 or 60 min post-treatment, despite reduced DAT uptake. Importantly, repeated METH injections uniformly decreased total DAT immunoreactivity within all fractions 7 d post-treatment. These findings suggest factors other than internalization can contribute to the observed acute and persistent DAT dysfunction and dopaminergic deficits following in vivo AMPH or METH administration. PMID:22804716

  19. Ethics of Preclinical Dopamine Transporter Imaging.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Thomas I

    2016-08-01

    While dopamine transporter single-photon emission computed tomography (DAT-SPECT) imaging is sensitive and specific when performed in patients with signs or symptoms of parkinsonism, its predictive value is uncertain in healthy subjects, even with patients who have first-degree relatives affected by Parkinson disease. In deciding whether to honor a patient's request for a DAT-SPECT, neurologists must balance a patient's autonomy rights with beneficence and nonmaleficence and also consider the distributive justice implications of ordering the test. Generally speaking, the benefits of a DAT-SPECT will be too small to justify its use in an asymptomatic patient concerned about developing Parkinson disease.

  20. Effects of Ketamine and Ketamine Metabolites on Evoked Striatal Dopamine Release, Dopamine Receptors, and Monoamine Transporters.

    PubMed

    Can, Adem; Zanos, Panos; Moaddel, Ruin; Kang, Hye Jin; Dossou, Katinia S S; Wainer, Irving W; Cheer, Joseph F; Frost, Douglas O; Huang, Xi-Ping; Gould, Todd D

    2016-10-01

    Following administration at subanesthetic doses, (R,S)-ketamine (ketamine) induces rapid and robust relief from symptoms of depression in treatment-refractory depressed patients. Previous studies suggest that ketamine's antidepressant properties involve enhancement of dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. Ketamine is rapidly metabolized to (2S,6S)- and (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK), which have antidepressant actions independent of N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor inhibition. These antidepressant actions of (2S,6S;2R,6R)-HNK, or other metabolites, as well as ketamine's side effects, including abuse potential, may be related to direct effects on components of the dopaminergic (DAergic) system. Here, brain and blood distribution/clearance and pharmacodynamic analyses at DA receptors (D1-D5) and the DA, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters were assessed for ketamine and its major metabolites (norketamine, dehydronorketamine, and HNKs). Additionally, we measured electrically evoked mesolimbic DA release and decay using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry following acute administration of subanesthetic doses of ketamine (2, 10, and 50 mg/kg, i.p.). Following ketamine injection, ketamine, norketamine, and multiple hydroxynorketamines were detected in the plasma and brain of mice. Dehydronorketamine was detectable in plasma, but concentrations were below detectable limits in the brain. Ketamine did not alter the magnitude or kinetics of evoked DA release in the nucleus accumbens in anesthetized mice. Neither ketamine's enantiomers nor its metabolites had affinity for DA receptors or the DA, noradrenaline, and serotonin transporters (up to 10 μM). These results suggest that neither the side effects nor antidepressant actions of ketamine or ketamine metabolites are associated with direct effects on mesolimbic DAergic neurotransmission. Previously observed in vivo changes in DAergic neurotransmission following ketamine administration are likely indirect. U.S. Government

  1. Effects of Ketamine and Ketamine Metabolites on Evoked Striatal Dopamine Release, Dopamine Receptors, and Monoamine Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Can, Adem; Zanos, Panos; Moaddel, Ruin; Kang, Hye Jin; Dossou, Katinia S. S.; Wainer, Irving W.; Cheer, Joseph F.; Frost, Douglas O.; Huang, Xi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Following administration at subanesthetic doses, (R,S)-ketamine (ketamine) induces rapid and robust relief from symptoms of depression in treatment-refractory depressed patients. Previous studies suggest that ketamine’s antidepressant properties involve enhancement of dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. Ketamine is rapidly metabolized to (2S,6S)- and (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK), which have antidepressant actions independent of N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor inhibition. These antidepressant actions of (2S,6S;2R,6R)-HNK, or other metabolites, as well as ketamine’s side effects, including abuse potential, may be related to direct effects on components of the dopaminergic (DAergic) system. Here, brain and blood distribution/clearance and pharmacodynamic analyses at DA receptors (D1–D5) and the DA, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters were assessed for ketamine and its major metabolites (norketamine, dehydronorketamine, and HNKs). Additionally, we measured electrically evoked mesolimbic DA release and decay using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry following acute administration of subanesthetic doses of ketamine (2, 10, and 50 mg/kg, i.p.). Following ketamine injection, ketamine, norketamine, and multiple hydroxynorketamines were detected in the plasma and brain of mice. Dehydronorketamine was detectable in plasma, but concentrations were below detectable limits in the brain. Ketamine did not alter the magnitude or kinetics of evoked DA release in the nucleus accumbens in anesthetized mice. Neither ketamine’s enantiomers nor its metabolites had affinity for DA receptors or the DA, noradrenaline, and serotonin transporters (up to 10 μM). These results suggest that neither the side effects nor antidepressant actions of ketamine or ketamine metabolites are associated with direct effects on mesolimbic DAergic neurotransmission. Previously observed in vivo changes in DAergic neurotransmission following ketamine administration are likely indirect. PMID

  2. Intranasal Dopamine Reduces In Vivo [123I]FP-CIT Binding to Striatal Dopamine Transporter: Correlation with Behavioral Changes and Evidence for Pavlovian Conditioned Dopamine Response

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Silva, Maria A.; Mattern, Claudia; Decheva, Cvetana; Huston, Joseph P.; Sadile, Adolfo G.; Beu, Markus; Müller, H.-W.; Nikolaus, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Dopamine (DA), which does not cross the blood-brain barrier, has central and behavioral effects when administered via the nasal route. Neither the mechanisms of central action of intranasal dopamine (IN-DA), nor its mechanisms of diffusion and transport into the brain are well understood. We here examined whether IN-DA application influences dopamine transporter (DAT) binding in the dorsal striatum and assessed the extent of binding in relation to motor and exploratory behaviors. We hypothesized that, based on the finding of increased extracellular DA in the striatum induced by application of IN-DA, binding of [123I]FP-CIT to the DAT should be decreased due to competition at the receptor. Methods: Rats were administered 3 mg/kg IN-DA and vehicle (VEH), with IN-DA injection either preceding or following VEH. Then motor and exploratory behaviors (traveled distance, velocity, center time, sitting, rearing, head-shoulder motility, grooming) were assessed for 30 min in an open field prior to administration of [123I]FP-CIT. DAT binding after IN-DA and VEH was measured with small animal SPECT 2 h following administration of the radioligand. Results: (1) After IN-DA application, striatal DAT binding was significantly lower as compared to VEH, indicating that the nasally delivered DA had central action and increased DA levels comparable to that found previously with L-DOPA administration; and (2) DAT binding in response to intranasal VEH was lower when IN-DA application preceded VEH treatment. This finding is suggestive of Pavlovian conditioning of DA at the level of the DAT, since the DA treatment modified (decreased) the binding in response to the subsequent VEH treatment. VEH treatment also reduced motor and exploratory behaviors more when applied before, as compared to when it followed IN-DA application, also indicative of behavioral Pavlovian conditioning akin to that found upon application of various psychostimulant drugs. Conclusions: The results: (a

  3. A heterocyclic compound CE-103 inhibits dopamine reuptake and modulates dopamine transporter and dopamine D1-D3 containing receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Sase, Ajinkya; Aher, Yogesh D; Saroja, Sivaprakasam R; Ganesan, Minu Karthika; Sase, Sunetra; Holy, Marion; Höger, Harald; Bakulev, Vasiliy; Ecker, Gerhard F; Langer, Thierry; Sitte, Harald H; Leban, Johann; Lubec, Gert

    2016-03-01

    A series of compounds have been reported to enhance memory via the DA system and herein a heterocyclic compound was tested for working memory (WM) enhancement. 2-((benzhydrylsulfinyl)methyl)thiazole (CE-103) was synthesized in a six-step synthesis. Binding of CE-103 to the dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters and dopamine reuptake inhibition was tested as well as blood brain permeation and a screen for GPCR targets. 60 male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into six groups: CE-103 treated 1-10 mg/kg body weight, trained (TDI) and yoked (YDI) and vehicle treated, trained (TVI) and yoked (YVI) rats. Daily single intraperitoneal injections for a period of 10 days were administered and rats were tested in a radial arm maze (RAM). Hippocampi were taken 6 h following the last day of training and complexes containing the unphosphorylated or phosphorylated dopamine transporter (DAT) and complexes containing the D1-3 dopamine receptor subunits were determined. CE-103 was binding to the DAT but insignificantly to SERT or NET and dopamine reuptake was blocked specifically (IC50 = 14.73 μM). From day eight the compound was decreasing WM errors in the RAM significantly at both doses tested as compared to the vehicle controls. In the trained CE-103-treated group levels of the complex containing the phosphorylated dopamine transporter (pDAT) as well as D1R were decreased while levels of complexes containing D2R and D3R were significantly increased. CE-103 was shown to enhance spatial WM and DA reuptake inhibition with subsequent modulation of D1-3 receptors is proposed as a possible mechanism of action.

  4. Atypical dopamine efflux caused by 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) via the human dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Shekar, Aparna; Aguilar, Jenny I; Galli, Greta; Cozzi, Nicholas V; Brandt, Simon D; Ruoho, Arnold E; Baumann, Michael H; Matthies, Heinrich J G; Galli, Aurelio

    2017-10-01

    Synthetic cathinones are similar in chemical structure to amphetamines, and their behavioral effects are associated with enhanced dopaminergic signaling. The past ten years of research on the common constituent of bath salts, MDPV (the synthetic cathinone 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone), has aided the understanding of how synthetic cathinones act at the dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT). Several groups have described the ability of MDPV to block the DAT with high-affinity. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time a new mode of action of MDPV, namely its ability to promote DAT-mediated DA efflux. Using single cell amperometric assays, we determined that low concentrations of MDPV (1nM) can cause reverse transport of DA via DAT. Notably, administration of MDPV leads to hyperlocomotion in Drosophila melanogaster. These data describe further how MDPV acts at the DAT, possibly paving the way for novel treatment strategies for individuals who abuse bath salts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of Modafinil on Dopamine and Dopamine Transporters in the Male Human Brain: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Volkow, Nora D.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Alexoff, David; Zhu, Wei; Telang, Frank; Wang, Gene-Jack; Jayne, Millard; Hooker, Jacob M.; Wong, Christopher; Hubbard, Barbara; Carter, Pauline; Warner, Donald; King, Payton; Shea, Colleen; Xu, Youwen; Muench, Lisa; Apelskog-Torres, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Context Modafinil, a wake-promoting drug used to treat narcolepsy, is increasingly being used as a cognitive enhancer. Although initially launched as distinct from stimulants that increase extracellular dopamine by targeting dopamine transporters, recent preclinical studies suggest otherwise. Objective To measure the acute effects of modafinil at doses used therapeutically (200 mg and 400 mg given orally) on extracellular dopamine and on dopamine transporters in the male human brain. Design, Setting, and Participants Positron emission tomography with [11C]raclopride (D2/D3 radioligand sensitive to changes in endogenous dopamine) and [11C]cocaine (dopamine transporter radioligand) was used to measure the effects of modafinil on extracellular dopamine and on dopamine transporters in 10 healthy male participants. The study took place over an 8-month period (2007–2008) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Main Outcome Measures Primary outcomes were changes in dopamine D2/D3 receptor and dopamine transporter availability (measured by changes in binding potential) after modafinil when compared with after placebo. Results Modafinil decreased mean (SD) [11C]raclopride binding potential in caudate (6.1% [6.5%]; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5% to 10.8%; P=.02), putamen (6.7% [4.9%]; 95% CI, 3.2% to 10.3%; P=.002), and nucleus accumbens (19.4% [20%]; 95% CI, 5% to 35%; P=.02), reflecting increases in extracellular dopamine. Modafinil also decreased [11C]cocaine binding potential in caudate (53.8% [13.8%]; 95% CI, 43.9% to 63.6%; P<.001), putamen (47.2% [11.4%]; 95% CI, 39.1% to 55.4%; P<.001), and nucleus accumbens (39.3% [10%]; 95% CI, 30% to 49%; P=.001), reflecting occupancy of dopamine transporters. Conclusions In this pilot study, modafinil blocked dopamine transporters and increased dopamine in the human brain (including the nucleus accumbens). Because drugs that increase dopamine in the nucleus accumbens have the potential for abuse, and considering the increasing

  6. Brain Region-Specific Trafficking of the Dopamine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Block, Ethan R.; Nuttle, Jacob; Balcita-Pedicino, Judith Joyce; Caltagarone, John; Watkins, Simon C.

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) controls dopaminergic neurotransmission by removing extracellular DA. Although DA reuptake is proposed to be regulated by DAT traffic to and from the cell surface, the membrane trafficking system involved in the endocytic cycling of DAT in the intact mammalian brain has not been characterized. Hence, we performed immunolabeling and quantitative analysis of the subcellular and regional distribution of DAT using the transgenic knock-in mouse expressing hemagglutinin (HA) epitope-tagged DAT (HA-DAT) and by using a combination of electron microscopy and a novel method for immunofluorescence labeling of HA-DAT in acute sagittal brain slices. Both approaches demonstrated that, in midbrain somatodendritic regions, HA-DAT was present in the plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi complex, with a small fraction in early and recycling endosomes and an even smaller fraction in late endosomes and lysosomes. In the striatum and in axonal tracts between the midbrain and striatum, HA-DAT was detected predominantly in the plasma membrane, and quantitative analysis revealed increased DAT density in striatal compared with midbrain plasma membranes. Endosomes were strikingly rare and lysosomes were absent in striatal axons, in which there was little intracellular HA-DAT. Acute administration of amphetamine in vivo (60 min) or to slices ex vivo (10–60 min) did not result in detectable changes in DAT distribution. Altogether, these data provide evidence for regional differences in DAT plasma membrane targeting and retention and suggest a surprisingly low level of endocytic trafficking of DAT in the striatum along with limited DAT endocytic activity in somatodendritic areas. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The dopamine transporter (DAT) is the key regulator of the dopamine neurotransmission in the CNS. In the present study, we developed a new approach for studying DAT localization and dynamics in intact neurons in acute sagittal brain slices from

  7. Impact of disruption of secondary binding site S2 on dopamine transporter function.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Juan; Reith, Maarten E A

    2016-09-01

    The structures of the leucine transporter, drosophila dopamine transporter, and human serotonin transporter show a secondary binding site (designated S2 ) for drugs and substrate in the extracellular vestibule toward the membrane exterior in relation to the primary substrate recognition site (S1 ). The present experiments are aimed at disrupting S2 by mutating Asp476 and Ile159 to Ala. Both mutants displayed a profound decrease in [(3) H]DA uptake compared with wild-type associated with a reduced turnover rate kcat . This was not caused by a conformational bias as the mutants responded to Zn(2+) (10 μM) similarly as WT. The dopamine transporters with either the D476A or I159A mutation both displayed a higher Ki for dopamine for the inhibition of [3H](-)-2-β-carbomethoxy-3-β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane binding than did the WT transporter, in accordance with an allosteric interaction between the S1 and S2 sites. The results provide evidence in favor of a general applicability of the two-site allosteric model of the Javitch/Weinstein group from LeuT to dopamine transporter and possibly other monoamine transporters. X-ray structures of transporters closely related to the dopamine (DA) transporter show a secondary binding site S2 in the extracellular vestibule proximal to the primary binding site S1 which is closely linked to one of the Na(+) binding sites. This work examines the relationship between S2 and S1 sites. We found that S2 site impairment severely reduced DA transport and allosterically reduced S1 site affinity for the cocaine analog [(3) H]CFT. Our results are the first to lend direct support for the application of the two-site allosteric model, advanced for bacterial LeuT, to the human DA transporter. The model states that, after binding of the first DA molecule (DA1 ) to the primary S1 site (along with Na(+) ), binding of a second DA (DA2 ) to the S2 site triggers, through an allosteric interaction, the release of DA1 and Na(+) into the cytoplasm.

  8. Prolonged treatment with pramipexole promotes physical interaction of striatal dopamine D3 autoreceptors with dopamine transporters to reduce dopamine uptake.

    PubMed

    Castro-Hernández, Javier; Afonso-Oramas, Domingo; Cruz-Muros, Ignacio; Salas-Hernández, Josmar; Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Moratalla, Rosario; Millan, Mark J; González-Hernández, Tomás

    2015-02-01

    The dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT), a membrane glycoprotein expressed in dopaminergic neurons, clears DA from extracellular space and is regulated by diverse presynaptic proteins like protein kinases, α-synuclein, D2 and D3 autoreceptors. DAT dysfunction is implicated in Parkinson's disease and depression, which are therapeutically treated by dopaminergic D2/D3 receptor (D2/D3R) agonists. It is, then, important to improve our understanding of interactions between D3R and DAT. We show that prolonged administration of pramipexole (0.1mg/kg/day, 6 to 21 days), a preferential D3R agonist, leads to a decrease in DA uptake in mouse striatum that reflects a reduction in DAT affinity for DA in the absence of any change in DAT density or subcellular distribution. The effect of pramipexole was absent in mice with genetically-deleted D3R (D3R(-/-)), yet unaffected in mice genetically deprived of D2R (D2R(-/-)). Pramipexole treatment induced a physical interaction between D3R and DAT, as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation and in situ proximity ligation assay. Furthermore, it promoted the formation of DAT dimers and DAT association with both D2R and α-synuclein, effects that were abolished in D3R(-/-) mice, yet unaffected in D2R(-/-) mice, indicating dependence upon D3R. Collectively, these data suggest that prolonged treatment with dopaminergic D3 agonists provokes a reduction in DA reuptake by dopaminergic neurons related to a hitherto-unsuspected modification of the DAT interactome. These observations provide novel insights into the long-term antiparkinson, antidepressant and additional clinical actions of pramipexole and other D3R agonists. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Normative data of dopaminergic neurotransmission functions in substantia nigra measured with MRI and PET: Neuromelanin, dopamine synthesis, dopamine transporters, and dopamine D2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Kodaka, Fumitoshi; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Ikoma, Yoko; Shimada, Hitoshi; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Seki, Chie; Kubo, Hitoshi; Ishii, Shiro; Takano, Harumasa; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2017-09-01

    The central dopaminergic system is of major importance in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and other neuropsychiatric disorders. In the present study, the normative data of dopaminergic neurotransmission functions in the midbrain, consisting of neuromelanin, dopamine synthesis, dopamine transporters and dopamine D2 receptors, were constructed using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and positron emission tomography (PET). PET studies with L-[β-(11)C]DOPA, [(18)F]FE-PE2I and [(11)C]FLB457 and MRI studies were performed on healthy young men. Neuromelanin accumulation measured by MRI was compared with dopaminergic functions, dopamine synthesis capacity, dopamine transporter binding and dopamine D2 receptor binding measured by PET in the substantia nigra. Although neuromelanin is synthesized from DOPA and dopamine in dopaminergic neurons, neuromelanin accumulation did not correlate with dopamine synthesis capacity in young healthy subjects. The role of dopamine transporters in the substantia nigra is considered to be the transport of dopamine into neurons, and therefore dopamine transporter binding might be related to neuromelanin accumulation; however, no significant correlation was observed between them. A positive correlation between dopamine D2 receptor binding and neuromelanin accumulation was observed, indicating a feedback mechanism by dopaminergic autoreceptors. Discrepancies in regional distribution between neuromelanin accumulation and dopamine synthesis capacity, dopamine transporter binding or dopamine D2 receptor binding were observed in the substantia nigra. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 2'-Substitution of cocaine selectively enhances dopamine and norepinephrine transporter binding.

    PubMed

    Seale, T W; Avor, K; Singh, S; Hall, N; Chan, H M; Basmadjian, G P

    1997-11-10

    Few studies have characterized the effect of substituents at the 2'-position of cocaine on transporter binding potency and selectivity. We synthesized 2'-OH-, 2'-F- and 2'-acetoxy-cocaines and compared their binding potencies for rat dopamine, norepinephrine and 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters to cocaine, 3'-OH-, 4'-OH-, 2'-OH,4'-I-cocaine derivatives, and to the transporter selective ligands WIN 35,428, nisoxetine and paroxetine. Unlike most substitutions, 2'-OH- and 2'-acetoxy-groups increased cocaine's binding potency for the dopamine transporter (10- and 4-fold, respectively). These substituents also enhanced binding to the norepinephrine transporter (52- and 35-fold, respectively) but had less effect on 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter binding. 2'-Hydroxylation also enhanced binding of 4'-I cocaine, an analog with low DA binding potency. The ability of 2'-substituents to substantially increase cocaine binding potency and to alter selectivity for brain transporters indicates the potential importance of the 2'-position in transporter binding.

  11. Amphetamine activates calcium channels through dopamine transporter-mediated depolarization.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Krasnodara N; Solis, Ernesto; Ruchala, Iwona; De Felice, Louis J; Eltit, Jose M

    2015-11-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) and its more potent enantiomer S(+)AMPH are psychostimulants used therapeutically to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and have significant abuse liability. AMPH is a dopamine transporter (DAT) substrate that inhibits dopamine (DA) uptake and is implicated in DA release. Furthermore, AMPH activates ionic currents through DAT that modify cell excitability presumably by modulating voltage-gated channel activity. Indeed, several studies suggest that monoamine transporter-induced depolarization opens voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (CaV), which would constitute an additional AMPH mechanism of action. In this study we co-express human DAT (hDAT) with Ca(2+) channels that have decreasing sensitivity to membrane depolarization (CaV1.3, CaV1.2 or CaV2.2). Although S(+)AMPH is more potent than DA in transport-competition assays and inward-current generation, at saturating concentrations both substrates indirectly activate voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channels (CaV1.3 and CaV1.2) but not the N-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV2.2). Furthermore, the potency to achieve hDAT-CaV electrical coupling is dominated by the substrate affinity on hDAT, with negligible influence of L-type channel voltage sensitivity. In contrast, the maximal coupling-strength (defined as Ca(2+) signal change per unit hDAT current) is influenced by CaV voltage sensitivity, which is greater in CaV1.3- than in CaV1.2-expressing cells. Moreover, relative to DA, S(+)AMPH showed greater coupling-strength at concentrations that induced relatively small hDAT-mediated currents. Therefore S(+)AMPH is not only more potent than DA at inducing hDAT-mediated L-type Ca(2+) channel currents but is a better depolarizing agent since it produces tighter electrical coupling between hDAT-mediated depolarization and L-type Ca(2+) channel activation.

  12. Association between amygdala reactivity and a dopamine transporter gene polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, O; Åhs, F; Furmark, T; Appel, L; Linnman, C; Faria, V; Bani, M; Pich, E M; Bettica, P; Henningsson, S; Manuck, S B; Ferrell, R E; Nikolova, Y S; Hariri, A R; Fredrikson, M; Westberg, L; Eriksson, E

    2014-01-01

    Essential for detection of relevant external stimuli and for fear processing, the amygdala is under modulatory influence of dopamine (DA). The DA transporter (DAT) is of fundamental importance for the regulation of DA transmission by mediating reuptake inactivation of extracellular DA. This study examined if a common functional variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in the 3′ untranslated region of the DAT gene (SLC6A3) influences amygdala function during the processing of aversive emotional stimuli. Amygdala reactivity was examined by comparing regional cerebral blood flow, measured with positron emission tomography and [15O]water, during exposure to angry and neutral faces, respectively, in a Swedish sample comprising 32 patients with social anxiety disorder and 17 healthy volunteers. In a separate US sample, comprising 85 healthy volunteers studied with blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging, amygdala reactivity was assessed by comparing the activity during exposure to threatening faces and neutral geometric shapes, respectively. In both the Swedish and the US sample, 9-repeat carriers displayed higher amygdala reactivity than 10-repeat homozygotes. The results suggest that this polymorphism contributes to individual variability in amygdala reactivity. PMID:25093598

  13. Dopamine transporters participate in the physiological regulation of prolactin.

    PubMed

    Demaria, J E; Nagy, G M; Lerant, A A; Fekete, M I; Levenson, C W; Freeman, M E

    2000-01-01

    Three populations of hypothalamic neuroendocrine dopaminergic (NEDA) neurons, arising from the arcuate and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus release dopamine (DA) that acts at the pituitary gland to regulate the secretion of PRL. It is generally accepted that NEDA neurons lack functional DA transporters (DATs), which are responsible for uptake of DA from the synaptic cleft into the presynaptic axon terminal. This study localized DATs to the hypothalamo-pituitary axis and evaluated the effect of DAT blockade on the hypothalamo-pituitary regulation of PRL. After 7 days of treatment with cocaine (a nonspecific amine transporter blocker) or mazindol (a specific DAT blocker), the relative abundance of PRL messenger RNA (mRNA) in the anterior lobe (AL) of OVX rats was significantly decreased, whereas the relative abundance of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA in the hypothalamus was significantly increased. The effect of cocaine or mazindol administration on DA turnover and serum PRL concentration was examined in estradiol (E2)-treated OVX rats. E2 administration (i.v.) resulted in a significant increase in serum PRL within 4 h; however, cocaine or mazindol administration abolished the E2-induced increase of PRL. Cocaine or mazindol significantly increased the concentration of DA at the site of the axon terminals within the median eminence (ME), intermediate lobe (IL) and neural lobe (NL), indicating blockade of uptake. Because formation of DOPAC requires uptake of DA, concentrations of DOPAC in the ME, IL and NL decreased following treatment with either cocaine or mazindol. These data, together with the presence of immunopositive DAT in the ME, pituitary stalk, IL, and NL, suggest that a functional DAT system is present within all three populations of NEDA neurons. Moreover, similarity between the effects of cocaine and mazindol treatment indicate that blockade of the DAT, but not other amine transporters, is responsible for suppression of PRL gene expression and

  14. Hypoinsulinemia Regulates Amphetamine-Induced Reverse Transport of Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jason M; Owens, W. Anthony; Turner, Gregory H; Saunders, Christine; Dipace, Concetta; Blakely, Randy D; France, Charles P; Gore, John C; Daws, Lynette C; Avison, Malcolm J; Galli, Aurelio

    2007-01-01

    The behavioral effects of psychomotor stimulants such as amphetamine (AMPH) arise from their ability to elicit increases in extracellular dopamine (DA). These AMPH-induced increases are achieved by DA transporter (DAT)-mediated transmitter efflux. Recently, we have shown that AMPH self-administration is reduced in rats that have been depleted of insulin with the diabetogenic agent streptozotocin (STZ). In vitro studies suggest that hypoinsulinemia may regulate the actions of AMPH by inhibiting the insulin downstream effectors phosphotidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase B (PKB, or Akt), which we have previously shown are able to fine-tune DAT cell-surface expression. Here, we demonstrate that striatal Akt function, as well as DAT cell-surface expression, are significantly reduced by STZ. In addition, our data show that the release of DA, determined by high-speed chronoamperometry (HSCA) in the striatum, in response to AMPH, is severely impaired in these insulin-deficient rats. Importantly, selective inhibition of PI3K with LY294002 within the striatum results in a profound reduction in the subsequent potential for AMPH to evoke DA efflux. Consistent with our biochemical and in vivo electrochemical data, findings from functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments reveal that the ability of AMPH to elicit positive blood oxygen level–dependent signal changes in the striatum is significantly blunted in STZ-treated rats. Finally, local infusion of insulin into the striatum of STZ-treated animals significantly recovers the ability of AMPH to stimulate DA release as measured by high-speed chronoamperometry. The present studies establish that PI3K signaling regulates the neurochemical actions of AMPH-like psychomotor stimulants. These data suggest that insulin signaling pathways may represent a novel mechanism for regulating DA transmission, one which may be targeted for the treatment of AMPH abuse and potentially other dopaminergic disorders. PMID

  15. The dopamine transporter and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Madras, Bertha K; Miller, Gregory M; Fischman, Alan J

    2005-06-01

    The high incidence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and escalating use of ADHD medications present a compelling case for clarifying the pathophysiology of, and developing laboratory or radiologic tests for, ADHD. Currently, the majority of specific genes implicated in ADHD encode components of catecholamine signaling systems. Of these, the dopamine transporter (DAT) is a principal target of the most widely used antihyperactivity medications (amphetamine and methylphenidate); the DAT gene is associated with ADHD, and some studies have detected abnormal levels of the DAT in brain striatum of ADHD subjects. Medications for ADHD interfere with dopamine transport by brain-region- and drug-specific mechanisms, indirectly activating dopamine- and possibly norepinephrine-receptor subtypes that are implicated in enhancing attention and experiential salience. The most commonly used DAT-selective ADHD medications raise extracellular dopamine levels in DAT-rich brain regions. In brain regions expressing both the DAT and the norepinephrine transporter (NET), the relative contributions of dopamine and norepinephrine to ADHD pathophysiology and therapeutic response are obfuscated by the capacity of the NET to clear dopamine as well as norepinephrine. Thus, ADHD medications targeting DAT or NET might disperse dopamine widely and consign dopamine storage and release to regulation by noradrenergic, as well as dopaminergic neurons.

  16. Enhanced Dopamine Release by Dopamine Transport Inhibitors Described by a Restricted Diffusion Model and Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Alexander F; Spivak, Charles E; Lupica, Carl R

    2016-06-15

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) using carbon fiber electrodes is widely used to rapidly monitor changes in dopamine (DA) levels in vitro and in vivo. Current analytical approaches utilize parameters such as peak oxidation current amplitude and decay times to estimate release and uptake processes, respectively. However, peak amplitude changes are often observed with uptake inhibitors, thereby confounding the interpretation of these parameters. To overcome this limitation, we demonstrate that a simple five-parameter, two-compartment model mathematically describes DA signals as a balance of release (r/ke) and uptake (ku), summed with adsorption (kads and kdes) of DA to the carbon electrode surface. Using nonlinear regression, we demonstrate that our model precisely describes measured DA signals obtained in brain slice recordings. The parameters extracted from these curves were then validated using pharmacological manipulations that selectively alter vesicular release or DA transporter (DAT)-mediated uptake. Manipulation of DA release through altering the Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) ratio or adding tetrodotoxin reduced the release parameter with no effect on the uptake parameter. DAT inhibitors methylenedioxypyrovalerone, cocaine, and nomifensine significantly reduced uptake and increased vesicular DA release. In contrast, a low concentration of amphetamine reduced uptake but had no effect on DA release. Finally, the kappa opioid receptor agonist U50,488 significantly reduced vesicular DA release but had no effect on uptake. Together, these data demonstrate a novel analytical approach to distinguish the effects of manipulations on DA release or uptake that can be used to interpret FSCV data.

  17. Dopamine transport sites selectively labeled by a novel photoaffinity probe: 125I-DEEP

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriadis, D.E.; Wilson, A.A.; Lew, R.; Sharkey, J.S.; Kuhar, M.J. )

    1989-08-01

    The dopamine transporter was labeled using a photosensitive compound related to GBR-12909, {sup 125}I-1-(2-(diphenylmethoxy)ethyl)-4-(2- (4-azido-3-iodophenyl)ethyl)piperazine ({sup 125}I-DEEP). {sup 125}I-DEEP bound reversibly and with high affinity to the dopamine transport protein in the absence of light and could be covalently attached to the protein following exposure to UV light. In rat striatal homogenates, {sup 125}I-DEEP was found to incorporate covalently into a protein with apparent molecular weight of 58,000 Da. The properties of this binding protein were characteristic of the dopamine transporter since covalent attachment could be inhibited by dopamine-uptake blockers with the proper pharmacological rank order of potencies. Covalent binding was also inhibited in a stereospecific manner by (+) and (-) cocaine, as well as other cocaine analogs. The protein was not found in the cerebellum. The dopamine transporter appears to exist in a glycosylated form since photoaffinity-labeled transport sites could adsorb to wheat germ-agglutinin and could be specifically eluted from the column by beta-N-acetylglucosamine.

  18. Dopamine Transporters, D2 Receptors, and Dopamine Release in Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Schneier, Franklin R.; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Martinez, Diana; Slifstein, Mark; Hwang, Dah-Ren; Liebowitz, Michael R.; Laruelle, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Background Dopamine D2 receptor and dopamine transporter availability in the striatum have each been reported abnormal in generalized social anxiety disorder (GSAD) in studies using single photon computerized tomography (SPECT). D2 receptors and dopamine transporters have not previously been studied within the same GSAD subjects, however, and prior GSAD studies have not assessed dopamine release or subdivided striatum into functional subregions. Methods Unmedicated adults with GSAD (N=17) and matched healthy comparison subjects (HC, N=13) participated in this study. Of these, 15 GSAD and 13 HC subjects completed baseline assessment of D2 receptor availability using positron emission tomography (PET) with the radiotracer [11C] raclopride. Twelve GSAD and 13 HC subjects completed a repeat scan after intravenous administration of D-amphetamine, to study dopamine release. Twelve of the GSAD subjects and 10 of the HC subjects also completed SPECT with the radiotracer [123I] methyl 3ß-(4-iodophenyl) tropane-2ß-carboxylate ([123I] ß-CIT) to assess dopamine transporter availability. Results GSAD and HC groups did not differ significantly in striatal dopamine transporter availability, overall striatal or striatal subregion D2 receptor availability at baseline, or change in D2 receptor availability after D-amphetamine. Receptor availability and change after D-amphetamine were not significantly associated with severity of social anxiety or trait detachment. Conclusions These findings do not replicate previous findings of altered striatal dopamine transporter and D2 receptor availability in GSAD subjects assessed with SPECT. The differences from results of prior studies may be due to differences in imaging methods or characteristics of samples. PMID:19180583

  19. Dopamine, vesicular transporters, and dopamine receptor expression in rat major salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Tomassoni, Daniele; Traini, Enea; Mancini, Manuele; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Mahdi, Syed Sarosh; Amenta, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    The localization of dopamine stores and the expression and localization of dopamine (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT) type-1 and -2 and of dopamine D1-like and D2-like receptor subtypes were investigated in rat submandibular, sublingual, and parotid salivary glands by HPLC with electrochemical detection, as well as immunochemical and immunohistochemical techniques. Male Wistar rats of 2 mo of age were used. The highest dopamine levels were measured in the parotid gland, followed by the submandibular and sublingual glands. Western blot analysis revealed DAT, VMAT-1, VMAT-2, and dopamine receptors immunoreactivity in membrane preparations obtained from the three glands investigated. Immunostaining for dopamine and transporters was developed within striated ducts. Salivary glands processed for dopamine receptors immunohistochemistry developed an immunoreaction primarily in striated and excretory ducts. In the submandibular gland, acinar cells displayed strong immunoreactivity for the D2 receptor, while cells of the convoluted granular tubules were negative for both D1-like and D2-like receptors. Parotid glands acinar cells displayed the highest immunoreactivity for both D1 and D2 receptors compared with other salivary glands. The above localization of dopamine and dopaminergic markers investigated did not correspond closely with neuron-specific enolase (NSE) localization. This indicates that at least in part, catecholamine stores and dopaminergic markers are independent from glandular innervation. These findings suggest that rat major salivary glands express a dopaminergic system probably involved in salivary secretion. The stronger immunoreactivity for dopamine transporters and receptors in striated duct cells suggests that the dopaminergic system could regulate not only quality, but also volume and ionic concentration of saliva. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Clinical and molecular characterisation of hereditary dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome: an observational cohort and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Manju A; Li, Yan; Zhen, Juan; Meyer, Esther; Hai, Nebula; Christen, Hans-Jürgen; Hoffmann, Georg F; Jardine, Philip; von Moers, Arpad; Mordekar, Santosh R; O'Callaghan, Finbar; Wassmer, Evangeline; Wraige, Elizabeth; Dietrich, Christa; Lewis, Timothy; Hyland, Keith; Heales, Simon; Sanger, Terence; Gissen, Paul; Assmann, Birgit E; Reith, Maarten E A; Maher, Eamonn R

    2011-01-01

    dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome is the first identified parkinsonian disorder caused by genetic alterations of the dopamine transporter. We describe a cohort of children with mutations in the gene encoding the dopamine transporter (SLC6A3) with the aim to improve clinical and molecular characterisation, reduce diagnostic delay and misdiagnosis, and provide insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms. 11 children with a biochemical profile suggestive of dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome were enrolled from seven paediatric neurology centres in the UK, Germany, and the USA from February, 2009, and studied until June, 2010. The syndrome was characterised by detailed clinical phenotyping, biochemical and neuroradiological studies, and SLC6A3 mutation analysis. Mutant constructs of human dopamine transporter were used for in-vitro functional analysis of dopamine uptake and cocaine-analogue binding. children presented in infancy (median age 2·5 months, range 0·5-7) with either hyperkinesia (n=5), parkinsonism (n=4), or a mixed hyperkinetic and hypokinetic movement disorder (n=2). Seven children had been initially misdiagnosed with cerebral palsy. During childhood, patients developed severe parkinsonism-dystonia associated with an eye movement disorder and pyramidal tract features. All children had raised ratios of homovanillic acid to 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in cerebrospinal fluid, of range 5·0-13·2 (normal range 1·3-4·0). Homozygous or compound heterozygous SLC6A3 mutations were detected in all cases. Loss of function in all missense variants was recorded from in-vitro functional studies, and was supported by the findings of single photon emission CT DaTSCAN imaging in one patient, which showed complete loss of dopamine transporter activity in the basal nuclei. dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome is a newly recognised, autosomal recessive disorder related to impaired dopamine transporter function. Careful characterisation of patients

  1. Clinical and molecular characterisation of hereditary dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome: an observational cohort and experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Kurian, Manju A; Li, Yan; Zhen, Juan; Meyer, Esther; Hai, Nebula; Christen, Hans-Jürgen; Hoffmann, Georg F; Jardine, Philip; von Moers, Arpad; Mordekar, Santosh R; O'Callaghan, Finbar; Wassmer, Evangeline; Wraige, Elizabeth; Dietrich, Christa; Lewis, Timothy; Hyland, Keith; Heales, Simon JR; Sanger, Terence; Gissen, Paul; Assmann, Birgit E; Reith, Maarten EA; Maher, Eamonn R

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome is the first identified parkinsonian disorder caused by genetic alterations of the dopamine transporter. We describe a cohort of children with mutations in the gene encoding the dopamine transporter (SLC6A3) with the aim to improve clinical and molecular characterisation, reduce diagnostic delay and misdiagnosis, and provide insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms. Methods 11 children with a biochemical profile suggestive of dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome were enrolled from seven paediatric neurology centres in the UK, Germany, and the USA from February, 2009, and studied until June, 2010. The syndrome was characterised by detailed clinical phenotyping, biochemical and neuroradiological studies, and SLC6A3 mutation analysis. Mutant constructs of human dopamine transporter were used for in-vitro functional analysis of dopamine uptake and cocaine-analogue binding. Findings Children presented in infancy (median age 2·5 months, range 0·5–7) with either hyperkinesia (n=5), parkinsonism (n=4), or a mixed hyperkinetic and hypokinetic movement disorder (n=2). Seven children had been initially misdiagnosed with cerebral palsy. During childhood, patients developed severe parkinsonism-dystonia associated with an eye movement disorder and pyramidal tract features. All children had raised ratios of homovanillic acid to 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in cerebrospinal fluid, of range 5·0–13·2 (normal range 1·3–4·0). Homozygous or compound heterozygous SLC6A3 mutations were detected in all cases. Loss of function in all missense variants was recorded from in-vitro functional studies, and was supported by the findings of single photon emission CT DaTSCAN imaging in one patient, which showed complete loss of dopamine transporter activity in the basal nuclei. Interpretation Dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome is a newly recognised, autosomal recessive disorder related to impaired dopamine

  2. Loss of dopamine transporters in methamphetamine abusers recovers with protracted abstinence.

    PubMed

    Volkow, N D; Chang, L; Wang, G J; Fowler, J S; Franceschi, D; Sedler, M; Gatley, S J; Miller, E; Hitzemann, R; Ding, Y S; Logan, J

    2001-12-01

    Methamphetamine is a popular drug of abuse that is neurotoxic to dopamine (DA) terminals when administered to laboratory animals. Studies in methamphetamine abusers have also documented significant loss of DA transporters (used as markers of the DA terminal) that are associated with slower motor function and decreased memory. The extent to which the loss of DA transporters predisposes methamphetamine abusers to neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinsonism is unclear and may depend in part on the degree of recovery. Here we assessed the effects of protracted abstinence on the loss of DA transporters in striatum, in methamphetamine abusers using positron emission tomography and [(11)C]d-threo-methylphenidate (DA transporter radioligand). Brain DA transporters in five methamphetamine abusers evaluated during short abstinence (<6 months) and then retested during protracted abstinence (12-17 months) showed significant increases with protracted abstinence (caudate, +19%; putamen, +16%). Although performance in some of the tests for which we observed an association with DA transporters showed some improvement, this effect was not significant. The DA transporter increases with abstinence could indicate that methamphetamine-induced DA transporter loss reflects temporary adaptive changes (i.e., downregulation), that the loss reflects DA terminal damage but that terminals can recover, or that remaining viable terminals increase synaptic arborization. Because neuropsychological tests did not improve to the same extent, this suggests that the increase of the DA transporters was not sufficient for complete function recovery. These findings have treatment implications because they suggest that protracted abstinence may reverse some of methamphetamine-induced alterations in brain DA terminals.

  3. Extracellular dopamine and alterations on dopamine transporter are related to reserpine toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Reckziegel, Patrícia; Chen, Pan; Caito, Sam; Gubert, Priscila; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes; Fachinetto, Roselei; Aschner, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Reserpine is used as an animal model of parkinsonism. We hypothesized that the involuntary movements induced by reserpine in rodents are induced by dopaminergic toxicity caused by extracellular dopamine accumulation. The present study tested the effects of reserpine on the dopaminergic system in Caenorhabditis elegans. Reserpine was toxic to worms (decreased the survival, food intake, development and changed egg laying and defecation cycles). In addition, reserpine increased the worms' locomotor rate on food and decreased dopamine levels. Morphological evaluations of dopaminergic CEP neurons confirmed neurodegeneration characterized by decreased fluorescence intensity and the number of worms with intact CEP neurons, and increased number of shrunken somas per worm. These effects were unrelated to reserpine's effect on decreased expression of the dopamine transporter, dat-1. Interestingly, the locomotor rate on food and the neurodegenerative parameters fully recovered to basal conditions upon reserpine withdrawal. Furthermore, reserpine decreased survival in vesicular monoamine transporter and dat-1 loss-of-function mutant worms. In addition, worms pre-exposed to dopamine followed by exposure to reserpine had decreased survival. Reserpine activated gst-4, which controls a phase II detoxification enzymes downstream of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived-2)-like 2. Our findings establish that the dopamine transporter, dat-1, plays an important role in reserpine toxicity, likely by increasing extracellular dopamine concentrations.

  4. Regulation of the Dopamine and Vesicular Monoamine Transporters: Pharmacological Targets and Implications for Disease

    PubMed Central

    German, Christopher L.; Baladi, Michelle G.; McFadden, Lisa M.; Hanson, Glen R.

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) plays a well recognized role in a variety of physiologic functions such as movement, cognition, mood, and reward. Consequently, many human disorders are due, in part, to dysfunctional dopaminergic systems, including Parkinson’s disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and substance abuse. Drugs that modify the DA system are clinically effective in treating symptoms of these diseases or are involved in their manifestation, implicating DA in their etiology. DA signaling and distribution are primarily modulated by the DA transporter (DAT) and by vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT)-2, which transport DA into presynaptic terminals and synaptic vesicles, respectively. These transporters are regulated by complex processes such as phosphorylation, protein–protein interactions, and changes in intracellular localization. This review provides an overview of 1) the current understanding of DAT and VMAT2 neurobiology, including discussion of studies ranging from those conducted in vitro to those involving human subjects; 2) the role of these transporters in disease and how these transporters are affected by disease; and 3) and how selected drugs alter the function and expression of these transporters. Understanding the regulatory processes and the pathologic consequences of DAT and VMAT2 dysfunction underlies the evolution of therapeutic development for the treatment of DA-related disorders. PMID:26408528

  5. Dopamine transporter; solubilization and characterization of ( sup 3 H) GBR-12935 binding in canine caudate

    SciTech Connect

    Sallee, F.R.

    1988-01-01

    The dopamine (DA) transporter protein, as indexed by ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935 binding, was solubilized from canine striatal membranes with the detergent digitonin. This solubilized protein retained the same pharmacological characteristics as membrane attached uptake sites. The binding of ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935 to solubilized preparations was specific, saturable and reversible with an equilibrium dissociation constant of approximately 3 nM and a maximum ligand binding (B{sub max}) of 3.4 pmol/mg protein. ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935 also bound to solubilized sites in a sodium-independent manner with a K{sub D} of approximately 6 nM and a B{sub max} of 1.2 {plus minus} 0.2 pmol/mg protein. Dopamine uptake inhibitors and substrates of DA uptake inhibited ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935 binding in a stereoselective and concentration dependent manner. For these compounds rank order of potency for inhibition of ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935 binding correlated with their potency for inhibition of dopamine uptake. K{sub D} values for DA uptake inhibitors in solubilized preparations correlated with those obtained on ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935 binding in the native state. The dopamine transporter appears to be a transmembrane glycoprotein by virtue of its absorption and specific elution from wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-lectin column. Solubilization of the putative dopamine transporter with full retention of binding activity now allows for the purification and biochemical characterization of this important membrane protein.

  6. The action of dopamine and vascular dopamine (DA1) receptor agonists on human isolated subcutaneous and omental small arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, A. D.; Sever, P. S.

    1989-01-01

    1. Human small arteries were obtained from surgical specimens and studied in vitro by use of a myograph technique. Following induction of tone with a potassium depolarizing solution, dopamine in the presence of beta-adrenoceptor and catecholamine uptake blockade relaxed isolated omental and subcutaneous arteries. Preincubation of tissues with phentolamine increased the maximum relaxation in response to dopamine. 2. The selective vascular dopamine receptor agonists, fenoldopam and SKF 38393 also relaxed isolated subcutaneous and omental arteries in a concentration-dependent manner. The order of potency for agonists was dopamine greater than fenoldopam greater than SKF 38393. 3. Dopamine-induced relaxation was competitively antagonized by SCH 23390, (R)- and (S)-sulpiride, and fenoldopam induced relaxation by SCH 23390 and (+)- but not (-)-butaclamol. 4. These results indicate the presence of vascular dopamine receptors (DA1 subtype) on human isolated resistance arteries from omental and subcutaneous sites. PMID:2474354

  7. Lobelane Inhibits Methamphetamine-Evoked Dopamine Release via Inhibition of the Vesicular Monoamine Transporter-2S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Nickell, Justin R.; Krishnamurthy, Sairam; Norrholm, Seth; Deaciuc, Gabriela; Siripurapu, Kiran B.; Zheng, Guangrong; Crooks, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Lobeline is currently being evaluated in clinical trials as a methamphetamine abuse treatment. Lobeline interacts with nicotinic receptor subtypes, dopamine transporters (DATs), and vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT2s). Methamphetamine inhibits VMAT2 and promotes dopamine (DA) release from synaptic vesicles, resulting ultimately in increased extracellular DA. The present study generated structure-activity relationships by defunctionalizing the lobeline molecule and determining effects on [3H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding, inhibition of [3H]DA uptake into striatal synaptic vesicles and synaptosomes, the mechanism of VMAT2 inhibition, and inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release. Compared with lobeline, the analogs exhibited greater potency inhibiting DA transporter (DAT) function. Saturated analogs, lobelane and nor-lobelane, exhibited high potency (Ki = 45 nM) inhibiting vesicular [3H]DA uptake, and lobelane competitively inhibited VMAT2 function. Lobeline and lobelane exhibited 67- and 35-fold greater potency, respectively, in inhibiting VMAT2 function compared to DAT function. Lobelane potently decreased (IC50 = 0.65 μM; Imax = 73%) methamphetamine-evoked DA overflow, and with a greater maximal effect compared with lobeline (IC50 = 0.42 μM, Imax = 56.1%). These results provide support for VMAT2 as a target for inhibition of methamphetamine effects. Both trans-isomers and demethylated analogs of lobelane had reduced or unaltered potency inhibiting VMAT2 function and lower maximal inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release compared with lobelane. Thus, defunctionalization, cis-stereochemistry of the side chains, and presence of the piperidino N-methyl are structural features that afford greatest inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release and enhancement of selectivity for VMAT2. The current results reveal that lobelane, a selective VMAT2 inhibitor, inhibits methamphetamine-evoked DA release and is a promising lead for the development of a

  8. Lobelane inhibits methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release via inhibition of the vesicular monoamine transporter-2.

    PubMed

    Nickell, Justin R; Krishnamurthy, Sairam; Norrholm, Seth; Deaciuc, Gabriela; Siripurapu, Kiran B; Zheng, Guangrong; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2010-02-01

    Lobeline is currently being evaluated in clinical trials as a methamphetamine abuse treatment. Lobeline interacts with nicotinic receptor subtypes, dopamine transporters (DATs), and vesicular monoamine transporters (VMAT2s). Methamphetamine inhibits VMAT2 and promotes dopamine (DA) release from synaptic vesicles, resulting ultimately in increased extracellular DA. The present study generated structure-activity relationships by defunctionalizing the lobeline molecule and determining effects on [(3)H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding, inhibition of [(3)H]DA uptake into striatal synaptic vesicles and synaptosomes, the mechanism of VMAT2 inhibition, and inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release. Compared with lobeline, the analogs exhibited greater potency inhibiting DA transporter (DAT) function. Saturated analogs, lobelane and nor-lobelane, exhibited high potency (K(i) = 45 nM) inhibiting vesicular [(3)H]DA uptake, and lobelane competitively inhibited VMAT2 function. Lobeline and lobelane exhibited 67- and 35-fold greater potency, respectively, in inhibiting VMAT2 function compared to DAT function. Lobelane potently decreased (IC(50) = 0.65 microM; I(max) = 73%) methamphetamine-evoked DA overflow, and with a greater maximal effect compared with lobeline (IC(50) = 0.42 microM, I(max) = 56.1%). These results provide support for VMAT2 as a target for inhibition of methamphetamine effects. Both trans-isomers and demethylated analogs of lobelane had reduced or unaltered potency inhibiting VMAT2 function and lower maximal inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release compared with lobelane. Thus, defunctionalization, cis-stereochemistry of the side chains, and presence of the piperidino N-methyl are structural features that afford greatest inhibition of methamphetamine-evoked DA release and enhancement of selectivity for VMAT2. The current results reveal that lobelane, a selective VMAT2 inhibitor, inhibits methamphetamine-evoked DA release and is a promising lead for

  9. Enhanced dopamine release by dopamine transport inhibitors described by a restricted diffusion model and fast scan cyclic voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Alexander F.; Spivak, Charles E.; Lupica, Carl R.

    2016-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) using carbon fiber electrodes is widely used to rapidly monitor changes in dopamine (DA) levels in vitro and in vivo. Current analytical approaches utilize parameters such as peak oxidation current amplitude and decay times to estimate release and uptake processes, respectively. However, peak amplitude changes are often observed with uptake inhibitors, thereby confounding the interpretation of these parameters. To overcome this limitation, we demonstrate that a simple, 5 parameter, two compartment model mathematically describes DA signals as a balance of release (r/ke) and uptake (ku), summed with adsorption (kads and kdes) of DA to the carbon electrode surface. Using non-linear regression, we demonstrate that our model precisely describes measured DA signals obtained in brain slice recordings. The parameters extracted from these curves were then validated using pharmacological manipulations that selectively alter vesicular release or DA transporter (DAT)-mediated uptake. Manipulation of DA release through altered Ca2+/Mg2+ ratio or tetrodotoxin (TTX), reduced the release parameter with no effect on the uptake parameter. The DAT inhibitors methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), cocaine, and nomifensine significantly reduced uptake and increased vesicular DA release. In contrast, a low concentration of amphetamine reduced uptake but had no effect on DA release. Finally, the kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) agonist U50,488 significantly reduced vesicular DA release but had no effect on uptake. Together, these data demonstrate a novel analytical approach to distinguish the effects of manipulations on DA release or uptake that can be used to interpret FSCV data. PMID:27018734

  10. Conformational changes in dopamine transporter intracellular regions upon cocaine binding and dopamine translocation.

    PubMed

    Dehnes, Yvette; Shan, Jufang; Beuming, Thijs; Shi, Lei; Weinstein, Harel; Javitch, Jonathan A

    2014-07-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT), a member of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter family, mediates the reuptake of dopamine at the synaptic cleft. DAT is the primary target for psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine. We previously demonstrated that cocaine binding and dopamine transport alter the accessibility of Cys342 in the third intracellular loop (IL3). To study the conformational changes associated with the functional mechanism of the transporter, we made cysteine substitution mutants, one at a time, from Phe332 to Ser351 in IL3 of the background DAT construct, X7C, in which 7 endogenous cysteines were mutated. The accessibility of the 20 engineered cysteines to polar charged sulfhydryl reagents was studied in the absence and presence of cocaine or dopamine. Of the 11 positions that reacted with methanethiosulfonate ethyl ammonium, as evidenced by inhibition of ligand binding, 5 were protected against this inhibition by cocaine and dopamine (S333C, S334C, N336C, M342C and T349C), indicating that reagent accessibility is affected by conformational changes associated with inhibitor and substrate binding. In some of the cysteine mutants, transport activity is disrupted, but can be rescued by the presence of zinc, most likely because the distribution between inward- and outward-facing conformations is restored by zinc binding. The experimental data were interpreted in the context of molecular models of DAT in both the inward- and outward-facing conformations. Differences in the solvent accessible surface area for individual IL3 residues calculated for these states correlate well with the experimental accessibility data, and suggest that protection by ligand binding results from the stabilization of the outward-facing configuration. Changes in the residue interaction networks observed from the molecular dynamics simulations also revealed the critical roles of several positions during the conformational transitions. We conclude that the IL3 region of DAT

  11. The parkinsonian mimetic, MPP+, specifically impairs mitochondrial transport in dopamine axons.

    PubMed

    Kim-Han, Jeong Sook; Antenor-Dorsey, Jo Ann; O'Malley, Karen L

    2011-05-11

    Impaired axonal transport may play a key role in Parkinson's disease. To test this notion, a microchamber system was adapted to segregate axons from cell bodies using green fluorescent protein-labeled mouse dopamine (DA) neurons. Transport was examined in axons challenged with the DA neurotoxin, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+). MPP+ rapidly reduced overall mitochondrial motility in DA axons; among motile mitochondria, anterograde transport was slower yet retrograde transport was increased. Transport effects were specific for DA mitochondria, which were smaller and transported more slowly than their non-DA counterparts. MPP+ did not affect synaptophysin-tagged vesicles or any other measureable moving particle. Toxin effects on DA mitochondria were not dependent upon ATP, calcium, free radical species, JNK, or caspase3/PKC pathways but were completely blocked by the thiol-anti-oxidant N-acetyl-cysteine or membrane-permeable glutathione. Since these drugs also rescued processes from degeneration, these findings emphasize the need to develop therapeutics aimed at axons as well as cell bodies to preserve "normal" circuitry and function as long as possible.

  12. Atypical Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors that Provide Clues About Cocaine's Mechanism at the Dopamine Transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck Newman, Amy; Katz, Jonathan L.

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) has been a primary target for cocaine abuse/addiction medication discovery. However predicted addiction liability and limited clinical evaluation has provided a formidable challenge for development of these agents for human use. The unique and atypical pharmacological profile of the benztropine (BZT) class of dopamine uptake inhibitors, in preclinical models of cocaine effects and abuse, has encouraged further development of these agents. Moreover, in vivo studies have challenged the original DAT hypothesis and demonstrated that DAT occupancy and subsequent increases in dopamine produced by BZT analogues are significantly delayed and long lasting, as compared to cocaine. These important and distinctive elements are critical to the lack of abuse liability among BZT analogues, and improve their potential for development as treatments for cocaine abuse and possibly other neuropsychiatric disorders.

  13. Membrane potential shapes regulation of dopamine transporter trafficking at the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Ben D.; Saha, Kaustuv; Krout, Danielle; Cabrera, Elizabeth; Felts, Bruce; Henry, L. Keith; Swant, Jarod; Zou, Mu-Fa; Newman, Amy Hauck; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2016-01-01

    The dopaminergic system is essential for cognitive processes, including reward, attention and motor control. In addition to DA release and availability of synaptic DA receptors, timing and magnitude of DA neurotransmission depend on extracellular DA-level regulation by the dopamine transporter (DAT), the membrane expression and trafficking of which are highly dynamic. Data presented here from real-time TIRF (TIRFM) and confocal microscopy coupled with surface biotinylation and electrophysiology suggest that changes in the membrane potential alone, a universal yet dynamic cellular property, rapidly alter trafficking of DAT to and from the surface membrane. Broadly, these findings suggest that cell-surface DAT levels are sensitive to membrane potential changes, which can rapidly drive DAT internalization from and insertion into the cell membrane, thus having an impact on the capacity for DAT to regulate extracellular DA levels. PMID:26804245

  14. A Physical Interaction between the Dopamine Transporter and DJ-1 Facilitates Increased Dopamine Reuptake.

    PubMed

    Luk, Beryl; Mohammed, Mohinuddin; Liu, Fang; Lee, Frank J S

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of the dopamine transporter (DAT) impacts extracellular dopamine levels after release from dopaminergic neurons. Furthermore, a variety of protein partners have been identified that can interact with and modulate DAT function. In this study we show that DJ-1 can potentially modulate DAT function. Co-expression of DAT and DJ-1 in HEK-293T cells leads to an increase in [3H] dopamine uptake that does not appear to be mediated by increased total DAT expression but rather through an increase in DAT cell surface localization. In addition, through a series of GST affinity purifications and co-immunoprecipitations, we provide evidence that the DAT can be found in a complex with DJ-1, which involve distinct regions within both DAT and DJ-1. Using in vitro binding experiments we also show that this complex can be formed in part by a direct interaction between DAT and DJ-1. Co-expression of a mini-gene that can disrupt the DAT/DJ-1 complex appears to block the increase in [3H] dopamine uptake by DJ-1. Mutations in DJ-1 have been linked to familial forms of Parkinson's disease, yet the normal physiological function of DJ-1 remains unclear. Our study suggests that DJ-1 may also play a role in regulating dopamine levels by modifying DAT activity.

  15. A Physical Interaction between the Dopamine Transporter and DJ-1 Facilitates Increased Dopamine Reuptake

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Beryl; Mohammed, Mohinuddin; Liu, Fang; Lee, Frank J. S.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of the dopamine transporter (DAT) impacts extracellular dopamine levels after release from dopaminergic neurons. Furthermore, a variety of protein partners have been identified that can interact with and modulate DAT function. In this study we show that DJ-1 can potentially modulate DAT function. Co-expression of DAT and DJ-1 in HEK-293T cells leads to an increase in [3H] dopamine uptake that does not appear to be mediated by increased total DAT expression but rather through an increase in DAT cell surface localization. In addition, through a series of GST affinity purifications and co-immunoprecipitations, we provide evidence that the DAT can be found in a complex with DJ-1, which involve distinct regions within both DAT and DJ-1. Using in vitro binding experiments we also show that this complex can be formed in part by a direct interaction between DAT and DJ-1. Co-expression of a mini-gene that can disrupt the DAT/DJ-1 complex appears to block the increase in [3H] dopamine uptake by DJ-1. Mutations in DJ-1 have been linked to familial forms of Parkinson’s disease, yet the normal physiological function of DJ-1 remains unclear. Our study suggests that DJ-1 may also play a role in regulating dopamine levels by modifying DAT activity. PMID:26305376

  16. Dopamine transporter regulates the enhancement of novelty processing by a negative emotional context.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Garcia, Manuel; Clemente, Immaculada; Domínguez-Borràs, Judith; Escera, Carles

    2010-04-01

    The dopaminergic (DA) system has been recently related the emotional modulation of cognitive processes. Moreover, patients with midbrain DA depletion, such as Parkinson's Disease (PD), have shown diminished reactivity during unpleasant events. Here, we examined the role of DA in the enhancement of novelty processing during negative emotion. Forty healthy volunteers were genotyped for the dopamine transporter (DAT) gene SLC6A3 or DAT1 and performed an auditory-visual distraction paradigm in negative and neutral emotional context conditions. 9R- individuals, associated to a lesser striatal DA display, failed to show increased distraction during negative emotion, but experienced an enhancement of the early phase of the novelty-P3 brain response, associated to the evaluation of novel events, in the negative relative to the neutral context. However, 9R+ individuals (associated to larger striatal DA display) showed larger distraction during negative emotion and larger amplitudes of the novelty-P3, irrespective of the condition. These results suggest a blunted reactivity to novelty during negative emotion in 9R- individuals due to a lesser DA display and stronger activation of the representation of novel events in the 9R+ group, due to a larger DA availability, thus reaching a ceiling effect in the neutral context condition with no further enhancement during negative emotion. The present results might help to understand the functional implications of dopamine in some neuropsychiatric disorders.

  17. Dopamine Transporter Genotype Predicts Attentional Asymmetry in Healthy Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Daniel P.; O'Connell, Redmond G.; Nathan, Pradeep J.; Bellgrove, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    A number of recent studies suggest that DNA variation in the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1) influences spatial attention asymmetry in clinical populations such as ADHD, but confirmation in non-clinical samples is required. Since non-spatial factors such as attentional load have been shown to influence spatial biases in clinical conditions, here…

  18. Dopamine Transporter Genotype Predicts Attentional Asymmetry in Healthy Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Daniel P.; O'Connell, Redmond G.; Nathan, Pradeep J.; Bellgrove, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    A number of recent studies suggest that DNA variation in the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1) influences spatial attention asymmetry in clinical populations such as ADHD, but confirmation in non-clinical samples is required. Since non-spatial factors such as attentional load have been shown to influence spatial biases in clinical conditions, here…

  19. Amphetamine and methamphetamine reduce striatal dopamine transporter function without concurrent dopamine transporter relocalization.

    PubMed

    German, Christopher L; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2012-10-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) and methamphetamine (METH) alter dopamine transporter (DAT) function. In vitro heterologous cell line and synaptosome studies demonstrate AMPH-induced DAT internalization, implicating relocalization in reduced DAT uptake following drug exposure. However, few studies have evaluated DAT localization following in vivo AMPH/METH administration. To determine DAT subcellular localization following drug administration, a centrifugation technique was developed to isolate striatal synaptosomal membrane and vesicle fractions. DAT was distributed between the synaptosomal membrane (60%) and endosomal vesicles (40%), and in vitro application of the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate to striatal synaptosomes caused DAT internalization into the vesicle fractions. In contrast, neither single nor repeated in vivo AMPH and/or METH administrations altered DAT localization 5, 15, 30, or 60 min post-treatment, despite reduced DAT uptake. Importantly, repeated METH injections uniformly decreased total DAT immunoreactivity within all fractions 7 days post-treatment. These findings suggest that factors other than internalization can contribute to the observed acute and persistent DAT dysfunction and dopaminergic deficits following in vivo AMPH or METH administration. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  20. Presence and Function of Dopamine Transporter (DAT) in Stallion Sperm: Dopamine Modulates Sperm Motility and Acrosomal Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Alejandra A.; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan Enric; Ramírez-Reveco, Alfredo; Concha, Ilona I.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is a catecholamine with multiple physiological functions, playing a key role in nervous system; however its participation in reproductive processes and sperm physiology is controversial. High dopamine concentrations have been reported in different portions of the feminine and masculine reproductive tract, although the role fulfilled by this catecholamine in reproductive physiology is as yet unknown. We have previously shown that dopamine type 2 receptor is functional in boar sperm, suggesting that dopamine acts as a physiological modulator of sperm viability, capacitation and motility. In the present study, using immunodetection methods, we revealed the presence of several proteins important for the dopamine uptake and signalling in mammalian sperm, specifically monoamine transporters as dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters in equine sperm. We also demonstrated for the first time in equine sperm a functional dopamine transporter using 4-[4-(Dimethylamino)styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP+), as substrate. In addition, we also showed that dopamine (1 mM) treatment in vitro, does not affect sperm viability but decreases total and progressive sperm motility. This effect is reversed by blocking the dopamine transporter with the selective inhibitor vanoxerine (GBR12909) and non-selective inhibitors of dopamine reuptake such as nomifensine and bupropion. The effect of dopamine in sperm physiology was evaluated and we demonstrated that acrosome integrity and thyrosine phosphorylation in equine sperm is significantly reduced at high concentrations of this catecholamine. In summary, our results revealed the presence of monoamine transporter DAT, NET and SERT in equine sperm, and that the dopamine uptake by DAT can regulate sperm function, specifically acrosomal integrity and sperm motility. PMID:25402186

  1. Presence and function of dopamine transporter (DAT) in stallion sperm: dopamine modulates sperm motility and acrosomal integrity.

    PubMed

    Urra, Javier A; Villaroel-Espíndola, Franz; Covarrubias, Alejandra A; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan Enric; Ramírez-Reveco, Alfredo; Concha, Ilona I

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is a catecholamine with multiple physiological functions, playing a key role in nervous system; however its participation in reproductive processes and sperm physiology is controversial. High dopamine concentrations have been reported in different portions of the feminine and masculine reproductive tract, although the role fulfilled by this catecholamine in reproductive physiology is as yet unknown. We have previously shown that dopamine type 2 receptor is functional in boar sperm, suggesting that dopamine acts as a physiological modulator of sperm viability, capacitation and motility. In the present study, using immunodetection methods, we revealed the presence of several proteins important for the dopamine uptake and signalling in mammalian sperm, specifically monoamine transporters as dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters in equine sperm. We also demonstrated for the first time in equine sperm a functional dopamine transporter using 4-[4-(Dimethylamino)styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP(+)), as substrate. In addition, we also showed that dopamine (1 mM) treatment in vitro, does not affect sperm viability but decreases total and progressive sperm motility. This effect is reversed by blocking the dopamine transporter with the selective inhibitor vanoxerine (GBR12909) and non-selective inhibitors of dopamine reuptake such as nomifensine and bupropion. The effect of dopamine in sperm physiology was evaluated and we demonstrated that acrosome integrity and thyrosine phosphorylation in equine sperm is significantly reduced at high concentrations of this catecholamine. In summary, our results revealed the presence of monoamine transporter DAT, NET and SERT in equine sperm, and that the dopamine uptake by DAT can regulate sperm function, specifically acrosomal integrity and sperm motility.

  2. Salvinorin A Regulates Dopamine Transporter Function Via A Kappa Opioid Receptor and ERK1/2-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kivell, Bronwyn; Uzelac, Zeljko; Sundaramurthy, Santhanalakshmi; Rajamanickam, Jeyaganesh; Ewald, Amy; Chefer, Vladimir; Jaligam, Vanaja; Bolan, Elizabeth; Simonson, Bridget; Annamalai, Balasubramaniam; Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; Prisinzano, Thomas; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A.; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D.; Sitte, Harald H.; Ramamoorthy, Sammanda; Shippenberg, Toni S.

    2014-01-01

    Salvinorin A (SalA), a selective κ-opioid receptor (KOR) agonist, produces dysphoria and pro-depressant like effects. These actions have been attributed to inhibition of striatal dopamine release. The dopamine transporter (DAT) regulates dopamine transmission via uptake of released neurotransmitter. KORs are apposed to DAT in dopamine nerve terminals suggesting an additional target by which SalA modulates dopamine transmission. SalA produced a concentration-dependent, nor-binaltorphimine (BNI)- and pertussis toxin-sensitive increase of ASP+ accumulation in EM4 cells coexpressing myc-KOR and YFP-DAT, using live cell imaging and the fluorescent monoamine transporter substrate, trans 4-(4-(dimethylamino)-styryl)-N-methylpyridinium) (ASP+). Other KOR agonists also increased DAT activity that was abolished by BNI pretreatment. While SalA increased DAT activity, SalA treatment decreased serotonin transporter (SERT) activity and had no effect on norepinephrine transporter (NET) activity. In striatum, SalA increased the Vmax for DAT mediated DA transport and DAT surface expression. SalA up-regulation of DAT function is mediated by KOR activation and the KOR-linked extracellular signal regulated kinase-½ (ERK1/2) pathway. Co-immunoprecipitation and BRET studies revealed that DAT and KOR exist in a complex. In live cells, DAT and KOR exhibited robust FRET signals under basal conditions. SalA exposure caused a rapid and significant increase of the FRET signal. This suggests that the formation of KOR and DAT complexes is promoted in response to KOR activation. Together, these data suggest that enhanced DA transport and decreased DA release resulting in decreased dopamine signaling may contribute to the dysphoric and pro-depressant like effects of SalA and other KOR agonists. PMID:25107591

  3. Salvinorin A regulates dopamine transporter function via a kappa opioid receptor and ERK1/2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kivell, Bronwyn; Uzelac, Zeljko; Sundaramurthy, Santhanalakshmi; Rajamanickam, Jeyaganesh; Ewald, Amy; Chefer, Vladimir; Jaligam, Vanaja; Bolan, Elizabeth; Simonson, Bridget; Annamalai, Balasubramaniam; Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D; Sitte, Harald H; Ramamoorthy, Sammanda; Shippenberg, Toni S

    2014-11-01

    Salvinorin A (SalA), a selective κ-opioid receptor (KOR) agonist, produces dysphoria and pro-depressant like effects. These actions have been attributed to inhibition of striatal dopamine release. The dopamine transporter (DAT) regulates dopamine transmission via uptake of released neurotransmitter. KORs are apposed to DAT in dopamine nerve terminals suggesting an additional target by which SalA modulates dopamine transmission. SalA produced a concentration-dependent, nor-binaltorphimine (BNI)- and pertussis toxin-sensitive increase of ASP(+) accumulation in EM4 cells coexpressing myc-KOR and YFP-DAT, using live cell imaging and the fluorescent monoamine transporter substrate, trans 4-(4-(dimethylamino)-styryl)-N-methylpyridinium) (ASP(+)). Other KOR agonists also increased DAT activity that was abolished by BNI pretreatment. While SalA increased DAT activity, SalA treatment decreased serotonin transporter (SERT) activity and had no effect on norepinephrine transporter (NET) activity. In striatum, SalA increased the Vmax for DAT mediated DA transport and DAT surface expression. SalA up-regulation of DAT function is mediated by KOR activation and the KOR-linked extracellular signal regulated kinase-½ (ERK1/2) pathway. Co-immunoprecipitation and BRET studies revealed that DAT and KOR exist in a complex. In live cells, DAT and KOR exhibited robust FRET signals under basal conditions. SalA exposure caused a rapid and significant increase of the FRET signal. This suggests that the formation of KOR and DAT complexes is promoted in response to KOR activation. Together, these data suggest that enhanced DA transport and decreased DA release resulting in decreased dopamine signalling may contribute to the dysphoric and pro-depressant like effects of SalA and other KOR agonists.

  4. SYNTAXIN 1A REGULATES DOPAMINE TRANSPORTER ACTIVITY, PHOSPHORYLATION AND SURFACE EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Cervinski, Mark A.; Foster, James D.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the functional relationship between the SNARE protein syntaxin 1A (syn 1A) and the dopamine transporter (DAT) by treating rat striatal tissue with Botulinum Neurotoxin C (BoNT/C) and co-transfecting syn 1A with DAT in non-neuronal cells, followed by analysis of DAT activity, phosphorylation, and regulation. Treatment of striatal slices with BoNT/C resulted in elevated dopamine (DA) transport Vmax and reduced DAT phosphorylation, while heterologous co-expression of syn 1A led to reduction in DAT surface expression and transport Vmax. Syn 1A was present in DAT immunoprecipitation complexes, supporting a direct or indirect interaction between the proteins. Phorbol ester regulation of DA transport activity was retained in BoNT/C-treated synaptosomes and syn 1A transfected cells, demonstrating that PKC and syn 1A effects occur through independent processes. These findings reveal a novel mechanism for regulation of DAT activity and phosphorylation, and suggest the potential for syn 1A to impact DA neurotransmission through effects on reuptake. PMID:20643191

  5. Lipopolysaccharide mitagates methamphetamine-induced striatal dopamine depletion via modulating local TNF-alpha and dopamine transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Ting; Tsai, Yen-Ping N; Cherng, Chianfang G; Ke, Jing-Jer; Ho, Ming-Che; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Yu, Lung

    2009-04-01

    Systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment may affect methamphetamine (MA)-induced nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) depletion. This study was undertaken to determine the critical time window for the protective effects of LPS treatment and the underlying mechanisms. An LPS injection (1 mg/kg) 72 h before or 2 h after MA treatment [three consecutive, subcutaneous injections of MA (10 mg/kg each) at 2-h intervals] diminished the MA-induced DA depletion in mouse striatum. Such an LPS-associated effect was independent of MA-produced hyperthermia. TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 expressions were all elevated in striatal tissues following a systemic injection with LPS, indicating that peripheral LPS treatment affected striatal pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Striatal TNF-alpha expression was dramatically increased at 72 and 96 h after the MA treatment, while such TNF-alpha elevation was abolished by the LPS pretreatment protocol. Moreover, MA-produced activation of nuclear NFkappaB, a transcription factor following TNF-alpha activation, in striatum was abolished by the LPS (1 mg/kg) pretreatment. Furthermore, thalidomide, a TNF-alpha antagonist, treatment abolished the LPS pretreatment-associated protective effects. Pretreatment with mouse recombinant TNF-alpha in striatum diminished the MA-produced DA depletion. Finally, single LPS treatment caused a rapid down-regulation of dopamine transporter (DAT) in striatum. Taken together, we conclude that peripheral LPS treatment protects nigrostriatal DA neurons against MA-induced toxicity, in part, by reversing elevated TNF-alpha expression and subsequent signaling cascade and causing a rapid DAT down-regulation in striatum.

  6. Enhanced Dopamine Transporter Activity in Middle-Aged Gdnf Heterozygous Mice

    PubMed Central

    Littrell, Ofelia M.; Pomerleau, Francois; Huettl, Peter; Surgener, Stewart; McGinty, Jacqueline F.; Middaugh, Lawrence D.; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte; Gerhardt, Greg A.; Boger, Heather A.

    2010-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) supports the viability of midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons that degenerate in Parkinson’s disease. Middle aged, 12-month-old, Gdnf heterozygous (Gdnf+/−) mice have diminished spontaneous locomotor activity and enhanced synaptosomal DA uptake compared to wildtype mice. In this study, dopamine transporter (DAT) function in middle-aged, 12-month-old Gdnf+/− mice was more thoroughly investigated using in vivo electrochemistry. Gdnf+/− mice injected with the DAT inhibitor, nomifensine, exhibited significantly more locomotor activity than wildtype mice. In vivo electrochemistry with carbon fiber microelectrodes demonstrated enhanced clearance of DA in the striatum of Gdnf+/− mice, suggesting greater surface expression of DAT than in wildtype littermates. Additionally, 12 month old Gdnf+/− mice expressed greater D2 receptor mRNA and protein in the striatum than wildtype mice. Neurochemical analyses of striatal tissue samples indicated significant reductions in DA and a faster DA metabolic rate in Gdnf+/− mice than in wildtype mice. Altogether, these data support an important role for GDNF in the regulation of uptake, synthesis, and metabolism of DA during aging. PMID:21144620

  7. Dopamine denervation of the prefrontal cortex increases expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1

    PubMed Central

    Vollbrecht, Peter J.; Simmler, Linda D.; Blakely, Randy D.; Deutch, Ariel Y.

    2014-01-01

    Both dopamine and glutamate are critically involved in cognitive processes such as working memory. Astrocytes, which express dopamine receptors, are essential elements in the termination of glutamatergic signaling: the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1 is responsible for >90% of cortical glutamate uptake. The effect of dopamine depletion on glutamate transporters in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is unknown. In an effort to determine if astrocytes are a locus of cortical dopamine-glutamate interactions, we examined the effects of chronic dopamine denervation on PFC protein and mRNA levels of glutamate transporters. PFC dopamine denervation elicited a marked increase in GLT-1 protein levels, but had no effect on levels of other glutamate transporters; high affinity glutamate transport was positively correlated with the extent of dopamine depletion. GLT-1 gene expression was not altered. Our data suggests that dopamine depletion may lead to post-translational modifications that result in increased expression and activity of GLT-1 in PFC astrocytes. PMID:24611756

  8. Increased dopamine transporter function as a mechanism for dopamine hypoactivity in the adult infralimbic medial prefrontal cortex following adolescent social stress.

    PubMed

    Novick, Andrew M; Forster, Gina L; Hassell, James E; Davies, Daniel R; Scholl, Jamie L; Renner, Kenneth J; Watt, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    Being bullied during adolescence is associated with later mental illnesses characterized by deficits in cognitive tasks mediated by prefrontal cortex (PFC) dopamine (DA). Social defeat of adolescent male rats, as a model of teenage bullying victimization, results in medial PFC (mPFC) dopamine (DA) hypofunction in adulthood that is associated with increased drug seeking and working memory deficits. Increased expression of the DA transporter (DAT) is also seen in the adult infralimbic mPFC following adolescent defeat. We propose the functional consequence of this increased DAT expression is enhanced DA clearance and subsequently decreased infralimbic mPFC DA availability. To test this, in vivo chronoamperometry was used to measure changes in accumulation of the DA signal following DAT blockade, with increased DAT-mediated clearance being reflected by lower DA signal accumulation. Previously defeated rats and controls were pre-treated with the norepinephrine transporter (NET) inhibitor desipramine (20 mg/kg, ip.) to isolate infralimbic mPFC DA clearance to DAT, then administered the selective DAT inhibitor GBR-12909 (20 or 40 mg/kg, sc.). Sole NET inhibition with desipramine produced no differences in DA signal accumulation between defeated rats and controls. However, rats exposed to adolescent social defeat demonstrated decreased DA signal accumulation compared to controls in response to both doses of GBR-12909, indicating greater DAT-mediated clearance of infralimbic mPFC DA. These results suggest that protracted increases in infralimbic mPFC DAT function represent a mechanism by which adolescent social defeat stress produces deficits in adult mPFC DA activity and corresponding behavioral and cognitive dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Increased dopamine transporter function as a mechanism for dopamine hypoactivity in the adult infralimbic medial prefrontal cortex following adolescent social stress

    PubMed Central

    Novick, Andrew M.; Forster, Gina L.; Hassell, James E.; Davies, Daniel R.; Scholl, Jamie L.; Renner, Kenneth J.; Watt, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Being bullied during adolescence is associated with later mental illnesses characterized by deficits in cognitive tasks mediated by prefrontal cortex (PFC) dopamine (DA). Social defeat of adolescent male rats, as a model of teenage bullying victimization, results in medial PFC (mPFC) dopamine (DA) hypofunction in adulthood that is associated with increased drug seeking and working memory deficits. Increased expression of the DA transporter (DAT) is also seen in the adult infralimbic mPFC following adolescent defeat. We propose the functional consequence of this increased DAT expression is enhanced DA clearance and subsequently decreased infralimbic mPFC DA availability. To test this, in vivo chronoamperometry was used to measure changes in accumulation of the DA signal following DAT blockade, with increased DAT-mediated clearance being reflected by lower DA signal accumulation. Previously defeated rats and controls were pre-treated with the norepinephrine transporter (NET) inhibitor desipramine (20mg/kg, ip.) to isolate infralimbic mPFC DA clearance to DAT, then administered the selective DAT inhibitor GBR-12909 (20 or 40mg/kg, sc.). Sole NET inhibition with desipramine produced no differences in DA signal accumulation between defeated rats and controls. However, rats exposed to adolescent social defeat demonstrated decreased DA signal accumulation compared to controls in response to both doses of GBR-12909, indicating greater DAT-mediated clearance of infralimbic mPFC DA. These results suggest that protracted increases in infralimbic mPFC DAT function represent a mechanism by which adolescent social defeat stress produces deficits in adult mPFC DA activity and corresponding behavioral and cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26056032

  10. Identification of an intronic cis-acting element in the human dopamine transporter gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Zhou, Yanhong; Lin, Zhicheng

    2017-01-01

    The human dopamine transporter gene (hDAT) encodes the dopamine transporter in dopamine (DA) neurons to regulate DA transmission. hDAT expression varies significantly from neuron to neuron, and from individual to individual so that dysregulation of hDAT is related to many neuropsychiatric disorders. It is critical to identify hDAT-specific cis-acting elements that regulate the hDAT expression. Previous studies showed that hDAT Intron 1 displayed inhibitory activity for reporter gene expression. Here we report that the hDAT Intron 1 contains a 121-bp fragment that down-regulated both SV40 and hDAT promoter activities by 80% in vitro. Subfragments of 121-bp still down-regulated the SV40 promoter but not the hDAT promoter, as supported by nuclear protein-binding activities. Collectively, 121-bp is a silencer in vitro that might coordinate with transcriptional activities both inside and outside 121-bp in regulation of hDAT. PMID:22160470

  11. Genetics Home Reference: dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... dystonia and parkinsonism, described below) usually start in infancy and worsen over time. However, the features of ... Affected individuals who develop movement problems starting in infancy most often have transporter activity that is less ...

  12. Pyrethroid pesticide-induced alterations in dopamine transporter function

    SciTech Connect

    Elwan, Mohamed A.; Richardson, Jason R.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Caudle, W. Michael; Miller, Gary W. . E-mail: gary.miller@emory.edu

    2006-03-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between pesticide exposure and the incidence of PD. Studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that certain pesticides increase levels of the dopamine transporter (DAT), an integral component of dopaminergic neurotransmission and a gateway for dopaminergic neurotoxins. Here, we report that repeated exposure (3 injections over 2 weeks) of mice to two commonly used pyrethroid pesticides, deltamethrin (3 mg/kg) and permethrin (0.8 mg/kg), increases DAT-mediated dopamine uptake by 31 and 28%, respectively. Using cells stably expressing DAT, we determined that exposure (10 min) to deltamethrin and permethrin (1 nM-100 {mu}M) had no effect on DAT-mediated dopamine uptake. Extending exposures to both pesticides for 30 min (10 {mu}M) or 24 h (1, 5, and 10 {mu}M) resulted in significant decrease in dopamine uptake. This reduction was not the result of competitive inhibition, loss of DAT protein, or cytotoxicity. However, there was an increase in DNA fragmentation, an index of apoptosis, in cells exhibiting reduced uptake at 30 min and 24 h. These data suggest that up-regulation of DAT by in vivo pyrethroid exposure is an indirect effect and that longer-term exposure of cells results in apoptosis. Since DAT can greatly affect the vulnerability of dopamine neurons to neurotoxicants, up-regulation of DAT by deltamethrin and permethrin may increase the susceptibility of dopamine neurons to toxic insult, which may provide insight into the association between pesticide exposure and PD.

  13. Living without DAT: Loss and compensation of the dopamine transporter gene in sauropsids (birds and reptiles)

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, P. V.; Kasimi, B.; Carleton, J.; Velho, T. A.; Mello, C. V.

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a major regulator of synaptic dopamine (DA) availability. It plays key roles in motor control and motor learning, memory formation, and reward-seeking behavior, is a major target of cocaine and methamphetamines, and has been assumed to be conserved among vertebrates. We have found, however, that birds, crocodiles, and lizards lack the DAT gene. We also found that the unprecedented loss of this important gene is compensated for by the expression of the noradrenaline transporter (NAT) gene, and not the serotonin transporter genes, in dopaminergic cells, which explains the peculiar pharmacology of the DA reuptake activity previously noted in bird striatum. This unexpected pattern contrasts with that of ancestral vertebrates (e.g. fish) and mammals, where the NAT gene is selectively expressed in noradrenergic cells. DA circuits in birds/reptiles and mammals thus operate with an analogous reuptake mechanism exerted by different genes, bringing new insights into gene expression regulation in dopaminergic cells and the evolution of a key molecular player in reward and addiction pathways. PMID:26364979

  14. Living without DAT: Loss and compensation of the dopamine transporter gene in sauropsids (birds and reptiles).

    PubMed

    Lovell, P V; Kasimi, B; Carleton, J; Velho, T A; Mello, C V

    2015-09-14

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a major regulator of synaptic dopamine (DA) availability. It plays key roles in motor control and motor learning, memory formation, and reward-seeking behavior, is a major target of cocaine and methamphetamines, and has been assumed to be conserved among vertebrates. We have found, however, that birds, crocodiles, and lizards lack the DAT gene. We also found that the unprecedented loss of this important gene is compensated for by the expression of the noradrenaline transporter (NAT) gene, and not the serotonin transporter genes, in dopaminergic cells, which explains the peculiar pharmacology of the DA reuptake activity previously noted in bird striatum. This unexpected pattern contrasts with that of ancestral vertebrates (e.g. fish) and mammals, where the NAT gene is selectively expressed in noradrenergic cells. DA circuits in birds/reptiles and mammals thus operate with an analogous reuptake mechanism exerted by different genes, bringing new insights into gene expression regulation in dopaminergic cells and the evolution of a key molecular player in reward and addiction pathways.

  15. MSI-1436 reduces acute food intake without affecting dopamine transporter activity.

    PubMed

    Roitman, Mitchell F; Wescott, Seth; Cone, Jackson J; McLane, Michael P; Wolfe, Henry R

    2010-11-01

    Many therapies designed to reduce food intake and body weight act, in part, by blocking the dopamine transporter (DAT) - a protein responsible for clearing extracellular dopamine (DA) after release thereby terminating its action. Here, we found that a single injection of the drug trodusquemine (MSI-1436) decreased food intake in rats. To assess the effects of MSI-1436 on DAT function, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry was used to measure DA concentration changes in the ventral striatum. DA release was evoked by electrical stimulation of the ventral tegmental area every 5 min. After 3 baseline measurements, rats were injected with MSI-1436 (10 mg/kg), the known DAT blocker bupropion (80 mg/kg) or saline and evoked DA release and reuptake were monitored for an additional hour. Neither saline nor MSI-1436 caused a significant change in the magnitude of evoked release from baseline values whereas bupropion caused a significant increase. In addition, neither saline nor MSI-1436 significantly increased DA decay rates while such an increase was observed with bupropion. Thus, over a time course when MSI-1436 suppresses food intake it does not affect DAT function. The results support MSI-1436 as an anti-obesity treatment which spares DAT. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A biochemical and functional protein complex involving dopamine synthesis and transport into synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Cartier, Etienne A; Parra, Leonardo A; Baust, Tracy B; Quiroz, Marisol; Salazar, Gloria; Faundez, Victor; Egaña, Loreto; Torres, Gonzalo E

    2010-01-15

    Synaptic transmission depends on neurotransmitter pools stored within vesicles that undergo regulated exocytosis. In the brain, the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT(2)) is responsible for the loading of dopamine (DA) and other monoamines into synaptic vesicles. Prior to storage within vesicles, DA synthesis occurs at the synaptic terminal in a two-step enzymatic process. First, the rate-limiting enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) converts tyrosine to di-OH-phenylalanine. Aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) then converts di-OH-phenylalanine into DA. Here, we provide evidence that VMAT(2) physically and functionally interacts with the enzymes responsible for DA synthesis. In rat striata, TH and AADC co-immunoprecipitate with VMAT(2), whereas in PC 12 cells, TH co-immunoprecipitates with the closely related VMAT(1) and with overexpressed VMAT(2). GST pull-down assays further identified three cytosolic domains of VMAT(2) involved in the interaction with TH and AADC. Furthermore, in vitro binding assays demonstrated that TH directly interacts with VMAT(2). Additionally, using fractionation and immunoisolation approaches, we demonstrate that TH and AADC associate with VMAT(2)-containing synaptic vesicles from rat brain. These vesicles exhibited specific TH activity. Finally, the coupling between synthesis and transport of DA into vesicles was impaired in the presence of fragments involved in the VMAT(2)/TH/AADC interaction. Taken together, our results indicate that DA synthesis can occur at the synaptic vesicle membrane, where it is physically and functionally coupled to VMAT(2)-mediated transport into vesicles.

  17. Diet-induced obesity: dopamine transporter function, impulsivity and motivation

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswami, V; Thompson, AC; Cassis, LA; Bardo, MT; Dwoskin, LP

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) was used to determine dopamine transporter (DAT) function, impulsivity and motivation as neurobehavioral outcomes and predictors of obesity. DESIGN To evaluate neurobehavioral alterations following the development of DIO induced by an 8-week high-fat diet (HF) exposure, striatal D2-receptor density, DAT function and expression, extracellular dopamine concentrations, impulsivity, and motivation for high- and low-fat reinforcers were determined. To determine predictors of DIO, neurobehavioral antecedents including impulsivity, motivation for high-fat reinforcers, DAT function and extracellular dopamine were evaluated before the 8-week HF exposure. METHODS Striatal D2-receptor density was determined by in vitro kinetic analysis of [3H]raclopride binding. DAT function was determined using in vitro kinetic analysis of [3H]dopamine uptake, methamphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine overflow and no-net flux in vivo microdialysis. DAT cell-surface expression was determined using biotinylation and western blotting. Impulsivity and food-motivated behavior were determined using a delay discounting task and progressive ratio schedule, respectively. RESULTS Relative to obesity-resistant (OR) rats, obesity-prone (OP) rats exhibited 18% greater body weight following an 8-week HF-diet exposure, 42% lower striatal D2-receptor density, 30% lower total DAT expression, 40% lower in vitro and in vivo DAT function, 45% greater extracellular dopamine and twofold greater methamphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine overflow. OP rats exhibited higher motivation for food, and surprisingly, were less impulsive relative to OR rats. Impulsivity, in vivo DAT function and extracellular dopamine concentration did not predict DIO. Importantly, motivation for high-fat reinforcers predicted the development of DIO. CONCLUSION Human studies are limited by their ability to determine if impulsivity, motivation and DAT function are causes or consequences of DIO. The

  18. Diet-induced obesity: dopamine transporter function, impulsivity and motivation.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswami, V; Thompson, A C; Cassis, L A; Bardo, M T; Dwoskin, L P

    2013-08-01

    A rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) was used to determine dopamine transporter (DAT) function, impulsivity and motivation as neurobehavioral outcomes and predictors of obesity. To evaluate neurobehavioral alterations following the development of DIO induced by an 8-week high-fat diet (HF) exposure, striatal D2-receptor density, DAT function and expression, extracellular dopamine concentrations, impulsivity, and motivation for high- and low-fat reinforcers were determined. To determine predictors of DIO, neurobehavioral antecedents including impulsivity, motivation for high-fat reinforcers, DAT function and extracellular dopamine were evaluated before the 8-week HF exposure. Striatal D2-receptor density was determined by in vitro kinetic analysis of [(3)H]raclopride binding. DAT function was determined using in vitro kinetic analysis of [(3)H]dopamine uptake, methamphetamine-evoked [(3)H]dopamine overflow and no-net flux in vivo microdialysis. DAT cell-surface expression was determined using biotinylation and western blotting. Impulsivity and food-motivated behavior were determined using a delay discounting task and progressive ratio schedule, respectively. Relative to obesity-resistant (OR) rats, obesity-prone (OP) rats exhibited 18% greater body weight following an 8-week HF-diet exposure, 42% lower striatal D2-receptor density, 30% lower total DAT expression, 40% lower in vitro and in vivo DAT function, 45% greater extracellular dopamine and twofold greater methamphetamine-evoked [(3)H]dopamine overflow. OP rats exhibited higher motivation for food, and surprisingly, were less impulsive relative to OR rats. Impulsivity, in vivo DAT function and extracellular dopamine concentration did not predict DIO. Importantly, motivation for high-fat reinforcers predicted the development of DIO. Human studies are limited by their ability to determine if impulsivity, motivation and DAT function are causes or consequences of DIO. The current animal model shows that

  19. Decreased vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) and dopamine transporter (DAT) function in knockout mice affects aging of dopaminergic systems

    PubMed Central

    Hall, F. S.; Itokawa, K.; Schmitt, A.; Moessner, R.; Sora, I.; Lesch, K. P.; Uhl, G. R.

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is accumulated and compartmentalized by the dopamine transporter (DAT; SLC3A6) and the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2; SLC18A2). These transporters work at the plasma and vesicular membranes of dopaminergic neurons, respectively, and thus regulate levels of DA in neuronal compartments that include the extravesicular cytoplasmic compartment. DA in this compartment has been hypothesized to contribute to oxidative damage that can reduce the function of dopaminergic neurons in aging brains and may contribute to reductions in dopaminergic neurochemical markers, locomotor behavior and responses to dopaminergic drugs that are found in aged animals. The studies reported here examined aged mice with heterozygous deletions of VMAT2 or of DAT, which each reduce transporter expression to about 50% of levels found in wild-type (WT) mice. Aged mice displayed reduced locomotor responses under a variety of circumstances, including in response to locomotor stimulants, as well as changes in monoamine levels and metabolites in a regionally dependent manner. Several effects of aging were more pronounced in heterozygous VMAT2 knockout (KO) mice, including aging induced reductions in locomotion and reduced locomotor responses to cocaine. By contrast, some effects of aging were reduced or not observed in heterozygous DAT KO mice. These findings support the idea that altered DAT and VMAT2 expression affect age-related changes in dopaminergic function. These effects are most likely mediated by alterations in DA compartmentalization, and might be hypothesized to be more exacerbated by other factors that affect the metabolism of cytosolic DA. PMID:23978383

  20. Missense dopamine transporter mutations associate with adult parkinsonism and ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Freja H.; Skjørringe, Tina; Yasmeen, Saiqa; Arends, Natascha V.; Sahai, Michelle A.; Erreger, Kevin; Andreassen, Thorvald F.; Holy, Marion; Hamilton, Peter J.; Neergheen, Viruna; Karlsborg, Merete; Newman, Amy H.; Pope, Simon; Heales, Simon J.R.; Friberg, Lars; Law, Ian; Pinborg, Lars H.; Sitte, Harald H.; Loland, Claus; Shi, Lei; Weinstein, Harel; Galli, Aurelio; Hjermind, Lena E.; Møller, Lisbeth B.; Gether, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    Parkinsonism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are widespread brain disorders that involve disturbances of dopaminergic signaling. The sodium-coupled dopamine transporter (DAT) controls dopamine homeostasis, but its contribution to disease remains poorly understood. Here, we analyzed a cohort of patients with atypical movement disorder and identified 2 DAT coding variants, DAT-Ile312Phe and a presumed de novo mutant DAT-Asp421Asn, in an adult male with early-onset parkinsonism and ADHD. According to DAT single-photon emission computed tomography (DAT-SPECT) scans and a fluoro-deoxy-glucose-PET/MRI (FDG-PET/MRI) scan, the patient suffered from progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration. In heterologous cells, both DAT variants exhibited markedly reduced dopamine uptake capacity but preserved membrane targeting, consistent with impaired catalytic activity. Computational simulations and uptake experiments suggested that the disrupted function of the DAT-Asp421Asn mutant is the result of compromised sodium binding, in agreement with Asp421 coordinating sodium at the second sodium site. For DAT-Asp421Asn, substrate efflux experiments revealed a constitutive, anomalous efflux of dopamine, and electrophysiological analyses identified a large cation leak that might further perturb dopaminergic neurotransmission. Our results link specific DAT missense mutations to neurodegenerative early-onset parkinsonism. Moreover, the neuropsychiatric comorbidity provides additional support for the idea that DAT missense mutations are an ADHD risk factor and suggests that complex DAT genotype and phenotype correlations contribute to different dopaminergic pathologies. PMID:24911152

  1. meso-Transdiene analogs inhibit vesicular monoamine transporter-2 function and methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Horton, David B; Siripurapu, Kiran B; Norrholm, Seth D; Culver, John P; Hojahmat, Marhaba; Beckmann, Joshua S; Harrod, Steven B; Deaciuc, Agripina G; Bardo, Michael T; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2011-03-01

    Lobeline, a nicotinic receptor antagonist and neurotransmitter transporter inhibitor, is a candidate pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine abuse. meso-Transdiene (MTD), a lobeline analog, lacks nicotinic receptor affinity, retains affinity for vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2), and, surprisingly, has enhanced affinity for dopamine (DA) and serotonin transporters [DA transporter (DAT) and serotonin transporter (SERT), respectively]. In the current study, MTD was evaluated for its ability to decrease methamphetamine self-administration in rats relative to food-maintained responding. MTD specifically decreased methamphetamine self-administration, extending our previous work. Classical structure-activity relationships revealed that more conformationally restricted MTD analogs enhanced VMAT2 selectivity and drug likeness, whereas affinity at the dihydrotetrabenazine binding and DA uptake sites on VMAT2 was not altered. Generally, MTD analogs exhibited 50- to 1000-fold lower affinity for DAT and were equipotent or had 10-fold higher affinity for SERT, compared with MTD. Representative analogs from the series potently and competitively inhibited [(3)H]DA uptake at VMAT2. (3Z,5Z)-3,5-bis(2,4-dichlorobenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidine (UKMH-106), the 3Z,5Z-2,4-dichlorophenyl MTD analog, had improved selectivity for VMAT2 over DAT and importantly inhibited methamphetamine-evoked DA release from striatal slices. In contrast, (3Z,5E)-3,5-bis(2,4-dichlorobenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidine (UKMH-105), the 3Z,5E-geometrical isomer, inhibited DA uptake at VMAT2, but did not inhibit methamphetamine-evoked DA release. Taken together, these results suggest that these geometrical isomers interact at alternate sites on VMAT2, which are associated with distinct pharmacophores. Thus, structural modification of the MTD molecule resulted in analogs exhibiting improved drug likeness and improved selectivity for VMAT2, as well as the ability to decrease methamphetamine-evoked DA release

  2. Increased expression of the dopamine transporter leads to loss of dopamine neurons, oxidative stress and l-DOPA reversible motor deficits.

    PubMed

    Masoud, S T; Vecchio, L M; Bergeron, Y; Hossain, M M; Nguyen, L T; Bermejo, M K; Kile, B; Sotnikova, T D; Siesser, W B; Gainetdinov, R R; Wightman, R M; Caron, M G; Richardson, J R; Miller, G W; Ramsey, A J; Cyr, M; Salahpour, A

    2015-02-01

    The dopamine transporter is a key protein responsible for regulating dopamine homeostasis. Its function is to transport dopamine from the extracellular space into the presynaptic neuron. Studies have suggested that accumulation of dopamine in the cytosol can trigger oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. Previously, ectopic expression of the dopamine transporter was shown to cause damage in non-dopaminergic neurons due to their inability to handle cytosolic dopamine. However, it is unknown whether increasing dopamine transporter activity will be detrimental to dopamine neurons that are inherently capable of storing and degrading dopamine. To address this issue, we characterized transgenic mice that over-express the dopamine transporter selectively in dopamine neurons. We report that dopamine transporter over-expressing (DAT-tg) mice display spontaneous loss of midbrain dopamine neurons that is accompanied by increases in oxidative stress markers, 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine and 5-S-cysteinyl-DOPAC. In addition, metabolite-to-dopamine ratios are increased and VMAT2 protein expression is decreased in the striatum of these animals. Furthermore, DAT-tg mice also show fine motor deficits on challenging beam traversal that are reversed with l-DOPA treatment. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that even in neurons that routinely handle dopamine, increased uptake of this neurotransmitter through the dopamine transporter results in oxidative damage, neuronal loss and l-DOPA reversible motor deficits. In addition, DAT over-expressing animals are highly sensitive to MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. The effects of increased dopamine uptake in these transgenic mice could shed light on the unique vulnerability of dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease.

  3. Increased expression of the dopamine transporter leads to loss of dopamine neurons, oxidative stress and L-DOPA reversible motor deficits

    PubMed Central

    Masoud, ST; Vecchio, LM; Bergeron, Y; Hossain, MM; Nguyen, LT; Bermejo, MK; Kile, B; Sotnikova, TD; Siesser, WB; Gainetdinov, RR; Wightman, RM; Caron, MG; Richardson, JR; Miller, GW; Ramsey, AJ; Cyr, M; Salahpour, A

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine transporter is a key protein responsible for regulating dopamine homeostasis. Its function is to transport dopamine from the extracellular space into the presynaptic neuron. Studies have suggested that accumulation of dopamine in the cytosol can trigger oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. Previously, ectopic expression of the dopamine transporter was shown to cause damage in non-dopaminergic neurons due to their inability to handle cytosolic dopamine. However, it is unknown whether increasing dopamine transporter activity will be detrimental to dopamine neurons that are inherently capable of storing and degrading dopamine. To address this issue, we characterized transgenic mice that over-express the dopamine transporter selectively in dopamine neurons. We report that dopamine transporter over-expressing (DAT-tg) mice display spontaneous loss of midbrain dopamine neurons that is accompanied by increases in oxidative stress markers, 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine and 5-S-cysteinyl-DOPAC. In addition, metabolite-to-dopamine ratios are increased and VMAT2 protein expression is decreased in the striatum of these animals. Furthermore, DAT-tg mice also show fine motor deficits on challenging beam traversal that are reversed with L-DOPA treatment. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that even in neurons that routinely handle dopamine, increased uptake of this neurotransmitter through the dopamine transporter results in oxidative damage, neuronal loss and LDOPA reversible motor deficits. In addition, DAT over-expressing animals are highly sensitive to MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. The effects of increased dopamine uptake in these transgenic mice could shed light on the unique vulnerability of dopamine neurons in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25447236

  4. Dopamine Transporter Activity Is Modulated by α-Synuclein.

    PubMed

    Butler, Brittany; Saha, Kaustuv; Rana, Tanu; Becker, Jonas P; Sambo, Danielle; Davari, Paran; Goodwin, J Shawn; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2015-12-04

    The duration and strength of the dopaminergic signal are regulated by the dopamine transporter (DAT). Drug addiction and neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases have all been associated with altered DAT activity. The membrane localization and the activity of DAT are regulated by a number of intracellular proteins. α-Synuclein, a protein partner of DAT, is implicated in neurodegenerative disease and drug addiction. Little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of the interaction between DAT and α-synuclein, the cellular location of this interaction, and the functional consequences of this interaction on the basal, amphetamine-induced DAT-mediated dopamine efflux, and membrane microdomain distribution of the transporter. Here, we found that the majority of DAT·α-synuclein protein complexes are found at the plasma membrane of dopaminergic neurons or mammalian cells and that the amphetamine-mediated increase in DAT activity enhances the association of these proteins at the plasma membrane. Further examination of the interaction of DAT and α-synuclein revealed a transient interaction between these two proteins at the plasma membrane. Additionally, we found DAT-induced membrane depolarization enhances plasma membrane localization of α-synuclein, which in turn increases dopamine efflux and enhances DAT localization in cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains.

  5. Dopamine Transporter Activity Is Modulated by α-Synuclein*

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Brittany; Saha, Kaustuv; Rana, Tanu; Becker, Jonas P.; Sambo, Danielle; Davari, Paran; Goodwin, J. Shawn; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2015-01-01

    The duration and strength of the dopaminergic signal are regulated by the dopamine transporter (DAT). Drug addiction and neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases have all been associated with altered DAT activity. The membrane localization and the activity of DAT are regulated by a number of intracellular proteins. α-Synuclein, a protein partner of DAT, is implicated in neurodegenerative disease and drug addiction. Little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of the interaction between DAT and α-synuclein, the cellular location of this interaction, and the functional consequences of this interaction on the basal, amphetamine-induced DAT-mediated dopamine efflux, and membrane microdomain distribution of the transporter. Here, we found that the majority of DAT·α-synuclein protein complexes are found at the plasma membrane of dopaminergic neurons or mammalian cells and that the amphetamine-mediated increase in DAT activity enhances the association of these proteins at the plasma membrane. Further examination of the interaction of DAT and α-synuclein revealed a transient interaction between these two proteins at the plasma membrane. Additionally, we found DAT-induced membrane depolarization enhances plasma membrane localization of α-synuclein, which in turn increases dopamine efflux and enhances DAT localization in cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains. PMID:26442590

  6. Dopamine denervation of the prefrontal cortex increases expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1.

    PubMed

    Vollbrecht, Peter J; Simmler, Linda D; Blakely, Randy D; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2014-07-01

    Both dopamine and glutamate are critically involved in cognitive processes such as working memory. Astrocytes, which express dopamine receptors, are essential elements in the termination of glutamatergic signaling: the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1 is responsible for > 90% of cortical glutamate uptake. The effect of dopamine depletion on glutamate transporters in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) remains unknown. In an effort to determine if astrocytes are a locus of cortical dopamine-glutamate interactions, we examined the effects of chronic dopamine denervation on PFC protein and mRNA levels of glutamate transporters. PFC dopamine denervation elicited a marked increase in GLT-1 protein levels, but had no effect on levels of other glutamate transporters; high-affinity glutamate transport was positively correlated with the extent of dopamine depletion. GLT-1 gene expression was not altered. Our data suggest that dopamine depletion may lead to post-translational modifications that result in increased expression and activity of GLT-1 in PFC astrocytes. The glutamate transporter GLT-1 is expressed by astrocytes, which also express dopamine receptors. Regulation of prefrontal cortical (PFC) GLT-1 potentially offers a novel treatment approach to the cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. Partial PFC dopamine deafferentation increased membrane expression of GLT-1 protein and glutamate uptake, but did not alter levels of the other two neocortical glutamate transporters, GLAST and EAAC1.

  7. Relationship between cocaine-induced subjective effects and dopamine transporter occupancy

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fischman, M.; Wang, G.J.

    1997-05-01

    The ability of cocaine to occupy the dopamine transporter has been linked to its reinforcing properties. However, such a relationship has not been demonstrated in humans. Methods: Positron Emission Tomography and [C-11]cocaine were used to estimate dopamine transporter occupancies after different doses of cocaine in 18 active cocaine abusers. The ratio of the distribution volume of [C-11]cocaine in striatum to that in cerebellum, which corresponds to Bmax/Kd +1 and is insensitive to changes in cerebral blood flow, was our measure of dopamine transporter availability. In parallel subjective effects were measured to assess the relationship between dopamine transporter occupancy and cocaines behavioral effects. Intravenous cocaine produced a significant dose,-dependent blockade of dopamine transporters: 73 % for 0.6 mg/kg; 601/6 for 0.3 mg/kg; 48 % for 0.1 mg/kg iv and 40 % for 0.05 mg/kg. In addition, dopamine transporter occupancies were significantly correlated with cocaine plasma concentration (r = 0.55 p < 0.001). Cocaine also produced dose-dependent increases in self-reported ratings of {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} which were significantly correlated with the levels of dopamine transporter blockade. Discussion: These results provide the first documentation in humans that dopamine transporter occupancy is associated with cocaine induced subjective effects. They also suggest that dopamine transporter occupancies equal to or greater than 60% are required to produce significant effects on ratings of {open_quotes}high{close_quotes}.

  8. Guidelines for Homology Modeling of Dopamine, Norepinephrine, and Serotonin Transporters.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Yazan; Heger, Zbynek; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-11-16

    The human dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters (hDAT, hNET, and hSERT) are carriers of neurotransmitters and targets for many drugs. Pioneering works in the past three years to elucidate experimental models of the Drosophila dDAT and human hSERT structures will rapidly impact the field of neuroscience. Here, we evaluated automated homology-based human models of these transporters, employing systematic physics-based, knowledge-based, and empirical-based check. Modeling guidelines were conveyed with attention to the central binding site (S1), secondary binding site (S2), and the extracellular loops EL2 and EL4. Application of new experimental models (dDAT and hSERT) will improve the accuracy of homology models, previously utilizing prokaryotic leucine transporter (LeuT) structure, and provide better predictions of ligand interactions, which is required for understanding of cellular mechanisms and for development of novel therapeutics.

  9. Dopamine transporter SPECT in patients with mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Minnerop, M; Kornblum, C; Joe, A; Tatsch, K; Kunz, W; Klockgether, T; Wullner, U; Reinhardt, M

    2005-01-01

    Objective : To investigate the dopaminergic system in patients with known mitochondrial disorders and complex I deficiency. Methods: Dopamine transporter density was studied in 10 female patients with mitochondrial complex I deficiency by 123I-FP-CIT (N-ß-fluoropropyl-2ß-carbomethyl-3ß-(4-iodophenyl)-nortropane) SPECT. Results: No differences in 123I-FP-CIT striatal binding ratios were observed and no correlation of the degree of complex I deficiency and striatal binding ratios could be detected. Conclusions: These data argue against the possibility that mitochondrial complex I deficiency by itself is sufficient to elicit dopaminergic cell loss. PMID:15608010

  10. Neurotransplantation of stem cells genetically modified to express human dopamine transporter reduces alcohol consumption

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Regulated neurotransmitter actions in the mammalian central nervous system determine brain function and control peripheral organs and behavior. Although drug-seeking behaviors, including alcohol consumption, depend on central neurotransmission, modification of neurotransmitter actions in specific brain nuclei remains challenging. Herein, we report a novel approach for neurotransmission modification in vivo by transplantation of stem cells engineered to take up the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) efficiently through the action of the human dopamine transporter (hDAT). As a functional test in mice, we used voluntary alcohol consumption, which is known to release DA in nucleus accumbens (NAC), an event hypothesized to help maintain drug-seeking behavior. We reasoned that reducing extracellular DA levels, by engrafting into NAC DA-sequestering stem cells expressing hDAT, would alter alcohol intake. Methods We have generated a neural stem cell line stably expressing the hDAT. Uptake kinetics of DA were determined to select a clone for transplantation. These genetically modified stem cells (or cells transfected with a construct lacking the hDAT sequence) were transplanted bilaterally into the NAC of wild-type mice trained to consume 10% alcohol in a two-bottle free-choice test for alcohol consumption. Alcohol intake was then ascertained for 1 week after transplantation, and brain sections through the NAC were examined for surviving grafted cells. Results Modified stem cells expressed hDAT and uptaken DA selectively via hDAT. Mice accustomed to drinking 10% ethanol by free choice reduced their alcohol consumption after being transplanted with hDAT-expressing stem cells. By contrast, control stem cells lacked that effect. Histologic examination revealed surviving stem cells in the NAC of all engrafted brains. Conclusions Our findings represent proof of principle suggesting that genetically engineered stem cells can be useful for exploring the role of

  11. The binding sites for benztropines and dopamine in the dopamine transporter overlap

    PubMed Central

    Bisgaard, Heidi; Larsen, M. Andreas B.; Mazier, Sonia; Beuming, Thijs; Newman, Amy Hauck; Weinstein, Harel; Shi, Lei; Loland, Claus J.; Gether, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Analogues of benztropines (BZTs) are potent inhibitors of the dopamine transporter (DAT) but are less effective than cocaine as behavioral stimulants. As a result, there have been efforts to evaluate these compounds as leads for potential medication for cocaine addiction. Here we use computational modeling together with site-directed mutagenesis to characterize the binding site for BZTs in DAT. Docking into molecular models based on the structure of the bacterial homologue LeuT supported a BZT binding site that overlaps with the substrate binding pocket. In agreement, mutations of residues within the pocket, including Val1523.46* to Ala or Ile, Ser4228.60 to Ala and Asn1573.51 to Cys or Ala, resulted in decreased affinity for BZT and the analog JHW007, as assessed in [3H]dopamine uptake inhibition assays and/or [3H]CFT competition binding assay. A putative polar interaction of one of the phenyl ring fluorine substituents in JHW007 with Asn1573.51 was used as a criterion for determining likely binding poses and establish a structural context for the mutagenesis findings. The analysis positioned the other fluorine substituted phenyl ring of JHW007 in close proximity to Ala47910.51/Ala48010.52 in transmembrane segment (TM) 10. The lack of such an interaction for BZT led to a more tilted orientation, as compared to JHW007, bringing one of the phenyl rings even closer to Ala47910.51/Ala48010.52. Mutation of Ala47910.51 and Ala48010.52 to valines supported these predictions with a larger decrease in the affinity for BZT than for JHW007. Summarized, our data suggest that BZTs display a classical competitive binding mode with binding sites overlapping those of cocaine and dopamine. PMID:20816875

  12. Altered Neurocircuitry in the Dopamine Transporter Knockout Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Bearer, Elaine L.; Boulat, Benoit; Hall, F. Scott; Uhl, George R.; Jacobs, Russell E.

    2010-01-01

    The plasma membrane transporters for the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine modulate the dynamics of these monoamine neurotransmitters. Thus, activity of these transporters has significant consequences for monoamine activity throughout the brain and for a number of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Gene knockout (KO) mice that reduce or eliminate expression of each of these monoamine transporters have provided a wealth of new information about the function of these proteins at molecular, physiological and behavioral levels. In the present work we use the unique properties of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to probe the effects of altered dopaminergic dynamics on meso-scale neuronal circuitry and overall brain morphology, since changes at these levels of organization might help to account for some of the extensive pharmacological and behavioral differences observed in dopamine transporter (DAT) KO mice. Despite the smaller size of these animals, voxel-wise statistical comparison of high resolution structural MR images indicated little morphological change as a consequence of DAT KO. Likewise, proton magnetic resonance spectra recorded in the striatum indicated no significant changes in detectable metabolite concentrations between DAT KO and wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, alterations in the circuitry from the prefrontal cortex to the mesocortical limbic system, an important brain component intimately tied to function of mesolimbic/mesocortical dopamine reward pathways, were revealed by manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI). Analysis of co-registered MEMRI images taken over the 26 hours after introduction of Mn2+ into the prefrontal cortex indicated that DAT KO mice have a truncated Mn2+ distribution within this circuitry with little accumulation beyond the thalamus or contralateral to the injection site. By contrast, WT littermates exhibit Mn2+ transport into more posterior midbrain nuclei and contralateral mesolimbic structures at

  13. Locomotor hyperactivity in 14-3-3ζ KO mice is associated with dopamine transporter dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Ramshaw, H; Xu, X; Jaehne, E J; McCarthy, P; Greenberg, Z; Saleh, E; McClure, B; Woodcock, J; Kabbara, S; Wiszniak, S; Wang, Ting-Yi; Parish, C; van den Buuse, M; Baune, B T; Lopez, A; Schwarz, Q

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission requires a complex series of enzymatic reactions that are tightly linked to catecholamine exocytosis and receptor interactions on pre- and postsynaptic neurons. Regulation of dopaminergic signalling is primarily achieved through reuptake of extracellular DA by the DA transporter (DAT) on presynaptic neurons. Aberrant regulation of DA signalling, and in particular hyperactivation, has been proposed as a key insult in the presentation of schizophrenia and related neuropsychiatric disorders. We recently identified 14-3-3ζ as an essential component of neurodevelopment and a central risk factor in the schizophrenia protein interaction network. Our analysis of 14-3-3ζ-deficient mice now shows that baseline hyperactivity of knockout (KO) mice is rescued by the antipsychotic drug clozapine. 14-3-3ζ KO mice displayed enhanced locomotor hyperactivity induced by the DA releaser amphetamine. Consistent with 14-3-3ζ having a role in DA signalling, we found increased levels of DA in the striatum of 14-3-3ζ KO mice. Although 14-3-3ζ is proposed to modulate activity of the rate-limiting DA biosynthesis enzyme, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), we were unable to identify any differences in total TH levels, TH localization or TH activation in 14-3-3ζ KO mice. Rather, our analysis identified significantly reduced levels of DAT in the absence of notable differences in RNA or protein levels of DA receptors D1–D5. Providing insight into the mechanisms by which 14-3-3ζ controls DAT stability, we found a physical association between 14-3-3ζ and DAT by co-immunoprecipitation. Taken together, our results identify a novel role for 14-3-3ζ in DA neurotransmission and provide support to the hyperdopaminergic basis of pathologies associated with schizophrenia and related disorders. PMID:24301645

  14. Electrophysiological and amperometric evidence that modafinil blocks the dopamine uptake transporter to induce behavioral activation.

    PubMed

    Federici, M; Latagliata, E C; Rizzo, F R; Ledonne, A; Gu, H H; Romigi, A; Nisticò, R; Puglisi-Allegra, S; Mercuri, N B

    2013-11-12

    Although the wake-promoting drug modafinil has been shown to bind quite exclusively to the dopamine transporter (DAT), its action in the brain has been thought to be partially independent from the facilitation of the dopaminergic signals. Here we used electrophysiological and amperometric techniques to investigate the effects of modafinil on the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and on the synaptic overflow of dopamine in the dorsal striatum from the sliced tissue of wild-type and cocaine-insensitive genetically modified mice (DAT-CI). Moreover, we examined the consequences of modafinil administration on the locomotor behavior of wild-type and DAT-CI mice. In in vitro experiments, modafinil inhibited the spontaneous firing discharge of the dopaminergic neurons. More consistently, it potentiated firing inhibition and the membrane responses caused by exogenously applied dopamine on these cells. Furthermore, it augmented the stimulus-evoked outflow of DA in the striatum. Noteworthy, modafinil caused locomotor activation in wild-type mice. On the other hand, neither the electrophysiological nor the behavioral effects of modafinil were detected in DAT-CI animals. These results demonstrate that modafinil potentiates brain dopaminergic signals via DAT inhibition by acting at the same binding site of cocaine. Therefore, this mechanism of action explains most of the pharmacological properties of this compound in the clinical setting.

  15. Restoration of the Dopamine Transporter through Cell Therapy Improves Dyskinesia in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Tomas, D; Stanic, D; Chua, H K; White, K; Boon, W C; Horne, M

    2016-01-01

    The dyskinesia of Parkinson's Disease is most likely due to excess levels of dopamine in the striatum. The mechanism may be due to aberrant synthesis but also, a deficiency or absence of the Dopamine Transporter. In this study we have examined the proposition that reinstating Dopamine Transporter expression in the striatum would reduce dyskinesia. We transplanted c17.2 cells that stably expressed the Dopamine Transporter into dyskinetic rats. There was a reduction in dyskinesia in rats that received grafts expressing the Dopamine Transporter. Strategies designed to increase Dopamine Transporter in the striatum may be useful in treating the dyskinesia associated with human Parkinson's Disease.

  16. Mechanism for cocaine blocking the transport of dopamine: insights from molecular modeling and dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoqin; Gu, Howard H; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2009-11-12

    Molecular modeling and dynamics simulations have been performed to study how cocaine inhibits dopamine transporter (DAT) for the transport of dopamine. The computationally determined DAT-ligand binding mode is totally different from the previously proposed overlap binding mode in which cocaine- and dopamine-binding sites are the same (Beuming, T.; et al. Nat. Neurosci. 2008, 11, 780-789). The new cocaine-binding site does not overlap with, but is close to, the dopamine-binding site. Analysis of all results reveals that when cocaine binds to DAT, the initial binding site is likely the one modeled in this study because this binding site can naturally accommodate cocaine. Then cocaine may move to the dopamine-binding site after DAT makes some necessary conformational change and expands the binding site cavity. It has been demonstrated that cocaine may inhibit the transport of dopamine through both blocking the initial DAT-dopamine binding and reducing the kinetic turnover of the transporter following the DAT-dopamine binding. The relative contributions to the phenomenological inhibition of the transport of dopamine from blocking the initial binding and reducing the kinetic turnover can be different in different types of assays. The obtained general structural and mechanistic insights are consistent with available experimental data and could be valuable for guiding future studies toward understanding cocaine's inhibiting of other transporters.

  17. Dopamine transporter mRNA content in human substantia nigra decreases precipitously with age.

    PubMed Central

    Bannon, M J; Poosch, M S; Xia, Y; Goebel, D J; Cassin, B; Kapatos, G

    1992-01-01

    The dopamine transporter is the primary means of inactivating synaptic dopamine as well as a major site of action for psychostimulants (such as cocaine and amphetamine) and for neurotoxins that induce parkinsonism. In the present study, a human dopamine transporter partial cDNA clone obtained by polymerase chain reaction exhibited 87% and 89% identity at the nucleic acid and amino acid levels, respectively, with transmembrane domains 3-5 of the rat homolog. This clone was used to quantitate human dopamine transporter mRNA by nuclease protection assay. The postmortem content of dopamine transporter mRNA in the substantia nigrae of 18- to 57-yr-old subjects was relatively constant, while in subjects greater than 57 yr old, a precipitous (greater than 95%) decline in substantia nigra dopamine transporter mRNA was evident. In contrast, tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA in the same samples declined in a linear manner with increasing age. In situ hybridization experiments confirmed the profound loss of dopamine transporter gene expression in melanin-positive (presumptive dopamine) nigral neurons. These data may begin to shed light on compensatory changes occurring in human dopamine neurons during normal aging. Images PMID:1353885

  18. Effects of diet and insulin on dopamine transporter activity and expression in rat caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, and midbrain.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kymry T; Woods, Catherine; Zhen, Juan; Antonio, Tamara; Carr, Kenneth D; Reith, Maarten E A

    2017-03-01

    Food restriction (FR) and obesogenic (OB) diets are known to alter brain dopamine transmission and exert opposite modulatory effects on behavioral responsiveness to psychostimulant drugs of abuse. Mechanisms underlying these diet effects are not fully understood. In this study, we examined diet effects on expression and function of the dopamine transporter (DAT) in caudate-putamen (CPu), nucleus accumbens (NAc), and midbrain regions. Dopamine (DA) uptake by CPu, NAc or midbrain synapto(neuro)somes was measured in vitro with rotating disk electrode voltammetry or with [(3) H]DA uptake and was found to correlate with DAT surface expression, assessed by maximal [(3) H](-)-2-β-carbomethoxy-3-β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane binding and surface biotinylation assays. FR and OB diets were both found to decrease DAT activity in CPu with a corresponding decrease in surface expression but had no effects in the NAc and midbrain. Diet treatments also affected sensitivity to insulin-induced enhancement of DA uptake, with FR producing an increase in CPu and NAc, likely mediated by an observed increase in insulin receptor expression, and OB producing a decrease in NAc. The increased expression of insulin receptor in NAc of FR rats was accompanied by increased DA D2 receptor expression, and the decreased DAT expression and function in CPu of OB rats was accompanied by decreased DA D2 receptor expression. These results are discussed as partial mechanistic underpinnings of diet-induced adaptations that contribute to altered behavioral sensitivity to psychostimulants that target the DAT.

  19. Role of Histidine 547 of Human Dopamine Transporter in Molecular Interaction with HIV-1 Tat and Dopamine Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yaxia; Quizon, Pamela M.; Sun, Wei-Lun; Yao, Jianzhuang; Zhu, Jun; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat plays an important role in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) by disrupting neurotransmission including dopamine uptake by human dopamine transporter (hDAT). Previous studies have demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat directly binds to hDAT and some amino-acid mutations that attenuate the hDAT-Tat binding also significantly decreased dopamine uptake activity of hDAT. This combined computational-experimental study demonstrates that histidine-547 (H547) of hDAT plays a crucial role in the hDAT-Tat binding and dopamine uptake by hDAT, and that the H547A mutation can not only considerably attenuate Tat-induced inhibition of dopamine uptake, but also significantly increase the Vmax of hDAT for dopamine uptake. The finding of such an unusual hDAT mutant capable of both increasing the Vmax of hDAT for dopamine uptake and disrupting the hDAT-Tat binding may provide an exciting knowledge basis for development of novel concepts for therapeutic treatment of the HAND. PMID:27250920

  20. Role of Histidine 547 of Human Dopamine Transporter in Molecular Interaction with HIV-1 Tat and Dopamine Uptake.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yaxia; Quizon, Pamela M; Sun, Wei-Lun; Yao, Jianzhuang; Zhu, Jun; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2016-06-02

    HIV-1 Tat plays an important role in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) by disrupting neurotransmission including dopamine uptake by human dopamine transporter (hDAT). Previous studies have demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat directly binds to hDAT and some amino-acid mutations that attenuate the hDAT-Tat binding also significantly decreased dopamine uptake activity of hDAT. This combined computational-experimental study demonstrates that histidine-547 (H547) of hDAT plays a crucial role in the hDAT-Tat binding and dopamine uptake by hDAT, and that the H547A mutation can not only considerably attenuate Tat-induced inhibition of dopamine uptake, but also significantly increase the Vmax of hDAT for dopamine uptake. The finding of such an unusual hDAT mutant capable of both increasing the Vmax of hDAT for dopamine uptake and disrupting the hDAT-Tat binding may provide an exciting knowledge basis for development of novel concepts for therapeutic treatment of the HAND.

  1. 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone prevents while methylone enhances methamphetamine-induced damage to dopamine nerve endings: β-ketoamphetamine modulation of neurotoxicity by the dopamine transporter

    PubMed Central

    Anneken, John H.; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    Methylone, 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), and mephedrone are psychoactive ingredients of ‘bath salts’ and their abuse represents a growing public health care concern. These drugs are cathinone derivatives and are classified chemically as β-ketoamphetamines. Because of their close structural similarity to the amphetamines, methylone, MDPV, and mephedrone share most of their pharmacological, neurochemical, and behavioral properties. One point of divergence in their actions is the ability to cause damage to the CNS. Unlike methamphetamine, the β-ketoamphetamines do not damage dopamine (DA) nerve endings. However, mephedrone has been shown to significantly accentuate methamphetamine neurotoxicity. Bath salt formulations contain numerous different psychoactive ingredients, and individuals who abuse bath salts also coabuse other illicit drugs. Therefore, we have evaluated the effects of methylone, MDPV, mephedrone, and methamphetamine on DA nerve endings. The β-ketoamphetamines alone or in all possible two-drug combinations do not result in damage to DA nerve endings but do cause hyperthermia. MDPV completely protects against the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine while methylone accentuates it. Neither MDPV nor methylone attenuates the hyperthermic effects of methamphetamine. The potent neuroprotective effects of MDPV extend to amphetamine-, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-, and MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. These results indicate that β-ketoamphetamine drugs that are non-substrate blockers of the DA transporter (i.e., MDPV) protect against methamphetamine neurotoxicity, whereas those that are substrates for uptake by the DA transporter and which cause DA release (i.e., methylone, mephedrone) accentuate neurotoxicity. PMID:25626880

  2. Oral Administration of Methylphenidate Blocks the Effect of Cocaine on Uptake at the Drosophila Dopamine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although our understanding of the actions of cocaine in the brain has improved, an effective drug treatment for cocaine addiction has yet to be found. Methylphenidate binds the dopamine transporter and increases extracellular dopamine levels in mammalian central nervous systems similar to cocaine, but it is thought to elicit fewer addictive and reinforcing effects owing to slower pharmacokinetics for different routes of administration between the drugs. This study utilizes the fruit fly model system to quantify the effects of oral methylphenidate on dopamine uptake during direct cocaine exposure to the fly CNS. The effect of methylphenidate on the dopamine transporter has been explored by measuring the uptake of exogenously applied dopamine. The data suggest that oral consumption of methylphenidate inhibits the Drosophila dopamine transporter and the inhibition is concentration dependent. The peak height increased to 150% of control when cocaine was used to block the dopamine transporter for untreated flies but only to 110% for methylphenidate-treated flies. Thus, the dopamine transporter is mostly inhibited for the methylphenidate-fed flies before the addition of cocaine. The same is true for the rate of the clearance of dopamine measured by amperometry. For untreated flies the rate of clearance changes 40% when the dopamine transporter is inhibited with cocaine, and for treated flies the rate changes only 10%. The results were correlated to the in vivo concentration of methylphenidate determined by CE-MS. Our data suggest that oral consumption of methylphenidate inhibits the Drosophila dopamine transporter for cocaine uptake, and the inhibition is concentration dependent. PMID:23402315

  3. Choline transporter hemizygosity results in diminished basal extracellular dopamine levels in nucleus accumbens and blunts dopamine elevations following cocaine or nicotine.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yu; Dani, John A; Blakely, Randy D

    2013-10-15

    Dopamine (DA) signaling in the central nervous system mediates the addictive capacities of multiple commonly abused substances, including cocaine, amphetamine, heroin and nicotine. The firing of DA neurons residing in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and the release of DA by the projections of these neurons in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), is under tight control by cholinergic signaling mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors (nAChRs). The capacity for cholinergic signaling is dictated by the availability and activity of the presynaptic, high-affinity, choline transporter (CHT, SLC5A7) that acquires choline in an activity-dependent matter to sustain ACh synthesis. Here, we present evidence that a constitutive loss of CHT expression, mediated by genetic elimination of one copy of the Slc5a7 gene in mice (CHT+/-), leads to a significant reduction in basal extracellular DA levels in the NAc, as measured by in vivo microdialysis. Moreover, CHT heterozygosity results in blunted DA elevations following systemic nicotine or cocaine administration. These findings reinforce a critical role of ACh signaling capacity in both tonic and drug-modulated DA signaling and argue that genetically imposed reductions in CHT that lead to diminished DA signaling may lead to poor responses to reinforcing stimuli, possibly contributing to disorders linked to perturbed cholinergic signaling including depression and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

  4. Dopamine transporter site-directed mutations differentially alter substrate transport and cocaine binding.

    PubMed Central

    Kitayama, S; Shimada, S; Xu, H; Markham, L; Donovan, D M; Uhl, G R

    1992-01-01

    Polar amino acids lying within three hydrophobic regions of the dopamine transporter (DAT) are analogous to those important for ligand recognition by catecholamine receptors. Possible functional significance of these amino acids was examined by expressing DAT cDNAs mutated in these polar residues. Replacement of aspartate at position 79 with alanine, glycine, or glutamate dramatically reduced uptake of [3H]dopamine and the tritium-labeled Parkinsonism-inducing neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) and reduced the mutants' affinity for the tritium-labeled cocaine analog (-)-2 beta-carbomethoxy-3 beta-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane (CFT) without affecting Bmax. Replacement of the serine residues at positions 356 and 359 in the seventh hydrophobic region by alanine or glycine caused reductions in [3H]dopamine and [3H]MPP+ uptake, whereas [3H]CFT binding was less affected. Substitution of two serines in the eighth hydrophobic region yielded wild-type values for [3H]dopamine and [3H]MPP+ uptake and [3H]CFT binding. These results demonstrate that aspartate and serine residues lying within the first and seventh hydrophobic putative transmembrane regions are crucial for DAT function and provide identification of residues differentially important for cocaine binding and for dopamine uptake. PMID:1502198

  5. Studies of the Biogenic Amine Transporters 15. Identification of Novel Allosteric Dopamine Transporter Ligands with Nanomolar Potency

    PubMed Central

    Ananthan, Subramaniam; Partilla, John S.; Saini, Surendra K.; Moukha-Chafiq, Omar; Pathak, Vibha; Baumann, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Novel allosteric modulators of the dopamine transporter (DAT) have been identified. We have shown previously that SRI-9804 [N-(diphenylmethyl)-2-phenyl-4-quinazolinamine], SRI-20040 [N-(2,2-diphenylethyl)-2-phenyl-4-quinazolinamine], and SRI-20041 [N-(3,3-diphenylpropyl)-2-phenyl-4-quinazolinamine] partially inhibit [125I]RTI-55 ([125I]3β-(4′-iodophenyl)tropan-2β-carboxylic acid methyl ester) binding and [3H]dopamine ([3H]DA) uptake, slow the dissociation rate of [125I]RTI-55 from the DAT, and allosterically modulate d-amphetamine–induced, DAT-mediated DA release. We synthesized and evaluated the activity of >500 analogs of these ligands and report here on 36 selected compounds. Using synaptosomes prepared from rat caudate, we conducted [3H]DA uptake inhibition assays, DAT binding assays with [3H]WIN35428 ([3H]2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane), and DAT-mediated release assays with either [3H]MPP+ ([3H]1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium) or [3H]DA. We observed three groups of [3H]DA uptake inhibitors: 1) full-efficacy agents with a one-site fit, 2) full-efficacy agents with a two-site fit, and 3) partial-efficacy agents with a one-site fit—the focus of further studies. These agents partially inhibited DA, serotonin, and norepinephrine uptake, yet were much less potent at inhibiting [3H]WIN35428 binding to the DAT. For example, SRI-29574 [N-(2,2-diphenylethyl)-2-(imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-6-yl)quinazolin-4-amine] partially inhibited DAT uptake, with an IC50 = 2.3 ± 0.4 nM, without affecting binding to the DAT. These agents did not alter DAT-mediated release of [3H]MPP+ in the absence or presence of 100 nM d-amphetamine. SRI-29574 had no significant effect on the d-amphetamine EC50 or Emax value for DAT-mediated release of [3H]MPP+. These studies demonstrate the existence of potent DAT ligands that partially block [3H]DA uptake, without affecting DAT binding or d-amphetamine–induced [3H]MPP+ release. These compounds may prove to be useful probes of

  6. Individual Variation in Incentive Salience Attribution and Accumbens Dopamine Transporter Expression and Function

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Bryan F.; Guptaroy, Bipasha; Austin, Curtis J.; Wohl, Isabella; Lovic, Vedran; Seiler, Jillian L; Vaughan, Roxanne A.; Gnegy, Margaret E.; Robinson, Terry E.; Aragona, Brandon J.

    2015-01-01

    Cues (conditioned stimuli; CSs) associated with rewards can come to motivate behavior, but there is considerable individual variation in their ability to do so. For example, a lever-CS that predicts food reward becomes attractive, wanted, and elicits reward-seeking behavior to a greater extent in some rats (“sign-trackers”; STs), than others (“goal-trackers”; GTs). Variation in dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) core is thought to contribute to such individual variation. Given that the DA transporter (DAT) exerts powerful regulation over DA signaling, we characterized the expression and function of the DAT in the accumbens of STs and GTs. STs showed greater DAT surface expression in ventral striatal synaptosomes than GTs, and ex vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry recordings of electrically-evoked DA release confirmed enhanced DAT function in STs, as indicated by faster DA uptake, specifically in the NAc core. Consistent with this, systemic amphetamine (AMPH) produced greater inhibition of DA uptake in STs than in GTs. Furthermore, injection of AMPH directly into the NAc core enhanced lever-directed approach in STs, presumably by amplifying the incentive value of the CS, but had no effect on goal tracking behavior. On the other hand, there were no differences between STs and GTs in electrically-evoked DA release in slices, or in total ventral striatal DA content. We conclude that greater DAT surface expression may facilitate the attribution of incentive salience to discrete reward cues. Investigating this variability in animal sub-populations may help explain why some people abuse drugs, while others do not. PMID:26613374

  7. Individual variation in incentive salience attribution and accumbens dopamine transporter expression and function.

    PubMed

    Singer, Bryan F; Guptaroy, Bipasha; Austin, Curtis J; Wohl, Isabella; Lovic, Vedran; Seiler, Jillian L; Vaughan, Roxanne A; Gnegy, Margaret E; Robinson, Terry E; Aragona, Brandon J

    2016-03-01

    Cues (conditioned stimuli; CSs) associated with rewards can come to motivate behavior, but there is considerable individual variation in their ability to do so. For example, a lever-CS that predicts food reward becomes attractive and wanted, and elicits reward-seeking behavior, to a greater extent in some rats ('sign-trackers'; STs) than others ('goal-trackers'; GTs). Variation in dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) core is thought to contribute to such individual variation. Given that the DA transporter (DAT) exerts powerful regulation over DA signaling, we characterized the expression and function of the DAT in the accumbens of STs and GTs. STs showed greater DAT surface expression in ventral striatal synaptosomes than GTs, and ex vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry recordings of electrically evoked DA release confirmed enhanced DAT function in STs, as indicated by faster DA uptake, specifically in the NAc core. Consistent with this, systemic amphetamine (AMPH) produced greater inhibition of DA uptake in STs than in GTs. Furthermore, injection of AMPH directly into the NAc core enhanced lever-directed approach in STs, presumably by amplifying the incentive value of the CS, but had no effect on goal-tracking behavior. On the other hand, there were no differences between STs and GTs in electrically-evoked DA release in slices, or in total ventral striatal DA content. We conclude that greater DAT surface expression may facilitate the attribution of incentive salience to discrete reward cues. Investigating this variability in animal sub-populations may help explain why some people abuse drugs while others do not. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Characterization of reduced and oxidized dopamine and 3,4-dihydrophenylacetic acid, on brain mitochondrial electron transport chain activities.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Alpa H; Zeevalk, Gail D

    2011-07-01

    Loss of dopamine (DA) homeostasis may be a contributing factor to cell damage in Parkinson's disease (PD). Past studies showing deleterious effects of DA on mitochondrial function, however, have been inconsistent raising questions about mitochondria as a downstream target for DA. Issues such as the dopamine species i.e., reduced or oxidized, time of exposure and the effect of major metabolites such as 3,4-dihydrophenylacetic acid (DOPAC) may contribute to the disparate findings. The present study used isolated, lysed rat brain mitochondria to characterize the effects of oxidized or reduced DA and DOPAC on complex activities of the electron transport chain (ETC). Time of exposure and quantitation of reduced or oxidized catachols for DA and DOPAC were monitored for all experiments. Reduced DA and DOPAC with or without a 30min preincubation had no affect on NADH oxidase activity which monitors the activities of complexes I, III and IV. Complex II activity was inhibited by reduced DA (≥500μM), but not by reduced DOPAC and was significantly attenuated by SOD suggesting reactive oxygen species involvement. In contrast, fully oxidized DA and DOPAC dose dependently inhibited NADH oxidase, complex I and complex III activities with IC(50s) in the 50-200μM range. No preincubation was required for inhibition with the catechols when they were fully oxidized. Oxidized DA inhibited complex I only when exposure occurred during stimulated electron flow, suggesting covalent binding of quinones to proteins within active sites of the complex. In intact, well coupled mitochondria, extramitochondrial DA was shown to access the mitochondrial matrix in a dose, time and energy-dependent fashion. The findings suggest that many of the reported inconsistencies with regards to the effects of DA and DOPAC on ETC function can be attributed to the oxidized state of the catechol at the time of exposure. In addition, the findings provide possible downstream targets for DA that could contribute

  9. Amphetamine modulates excitatory neurotransmission through endocytosis of the glutamate transporter EAAT3 in dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Underhill, Suzanne M; Wheeler, David S; Li, Minghua; Watts, Spencer D; Ingram, Susan L; Amara, Susan G

    2014-07-16

    Amphetamines modify the brain and alter behavior through mechanisms generally attributed to their ability to regulate extracellular dopamine concentrations. However, the actions of amphetamine are also linked to adaptations in glutamatergic signaling. We report here that when amphetamine enters dopamine neurons through the dopamine transporter, it stimulates endocytosis of an excitatory amino acid transporter, EAAT3, in dopamine neurons. Consistent with this decrease in surface EAAT3, amphetamine potentiates excitatory synaptic responses in dopamine neurons. We also show that the process of internalization is dynamin- and Rho-mediated and requires a unique sequence in the cytosolic C terminus of EAAT3. Introduction of a peptide based on this motif into dopamine neurons blocks the effects of amphetamine on EAAT3 internalization and its action on excitatory responses. These data indicate that the internalization of EAAT3 triggered by amphetamine increases glutamatergic signaling and thus contributes to the effects of amphetamine on neurotransmission.

  10. The metal transporter SMF-3/DMT-1 mediates aluminum-induced dopamine neuron degeneration.

    PubMed

    VanDuyn, Natalia; Settivari, Raja; LeVora, Jennifer; Zhou, Shaoyu; Unrine, Jason; Nass, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum (Al(3+)) is the most prevalent metal in the earth's crust and is a known human neurotoxicant. Al(3+) has been shown to accumulate in the substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), and epidemiological studies suggest correlations between Al(3+) exposure and the propensity to develop both PD and the amyloid plaque-associated disorder Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although Al(3+) exposures have been associated with the development of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, the molecular mechanism involved in Al(3+) transport in neurons and subsequent cellular death has remained elusive. In this study, we show that a brief exposure to Al(3+) decreases mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular ATP levels, and confers dopamine (DA) neuron degeneration in the genetically tractable nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). Al(3+) exposure also exacerbates DA neuronal death conferred by the human PD-associated protein α-synuclein. DA neurodegeneration is dependent on SMF-3, a homologue to the human divalent metal transporter (DMT-1), as a functional null mutation partially inhibits the cell death. We also show that SMF-3 is expressed in DA neurons, Al(3+) exposure results in a significant decrease in protein levels, and the neurodegeneration is partially dependent on the PD-associated transcription factor Nrf2/SKN-1 and caspase Apaf1/CED-4. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the deletion of SMF-3 confers Al(3+) resistance due to sequestration of Al(3+) into an intracellular compartment. This study describes a novel model for Al(3+)-induced DA neurodegeneration and provides the first molecular evidence of an animal Al(3+) transporter. © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  11. Reduced dopamine transporter binding predates impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vriend, Chris; Nordbeck, Anna H; Booij, Jan; van der Werf, Ysbrand D; Pattij, Tommy; Voorn, Pieter; Raijmakers, Pieter; Foncke, Elisabeth M J; van de Giessen, Elsmarieke; Berendse, Henk W; van den Heuvel, Odile A

    2014-06-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICD) are relatively common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and generally are regarded as adverse effects of dopamine replacement therapy, although certain demographic and clinical risk factors are also involved. Previous single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies showed reduced ventral striatal dopamine transporter binding in Parkinson patients with ICD compared with patients without. Nevertheless, these studies were performed in patients with preexisting impulse control impairments, which impedes clear-cut interpretation of these findings. We retrospectively procured follow-up data from 31 medication-naïve PD patients who underwent dopamine transporter SPECT imaging at baseline and were subsequently treated with dopamine replacement therapy. We used questionnaires and a telephone interview to assess medication status and ICD symptom development during the follow-up period (31.5 ± 12.0 months). Eleven patients developed ICD symptoms during the follow-up period, eight of which were taking dopamine agonists. The PD patients with ICD symptoms at follow-up had higher baseline depressive scores and lower baseline dopamine transporter availability in the right ventral striatum, anterior-dorsal striatum, and posterior putamen compared with PD patients without ICD symptoms. No baseline between-group differences in age and disease stage or duration were found. The ICD symptom severity correlated negatively with baseline dopamine transporter availability in the right ventral and anterior-dorsal striatum. The results of this preliminary study show that reduced striatal dopamine transporter availability predates the development of ICD symptoms after dopamine replacement therapy and may constitute a neurobiological risk factor related to a lower premorbid dopamine transporter availability or a more pronounced dopamine denervation in PD patients susceptible to ICD. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  12. Insights into the Modulation of Dopamine Transporter Function by Amphetamine, Orphenadrine, and Cocaine Binding

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Mary Hongying; Block, Ethan; Hu, Feizhuo; Cobanoglu, Murat Can; Sorkin, Alexander; Bahar, Ivet

    2015-01-01

    Human dopamine (DA) transporter (hDAT) regulates dopaminergic signaling in the central nervous system by maintaining the synaptic concentration of DA at physiological levels, upon reuptake of DA into presynaptic terminals. DA translocation involves the co-transport of two sodium ions and the channeling of a chloride ion, and it is achieved via alternating access between outward-facing (OF) and inward-facing states of DAT. hDAT is a target for addictive drugs, such as cocaine, amphetamine (AMPH), and therapeutic antidepressants. Our recent quantitative systems pharmacology study suggested that orphenadrine (ORPH), an anticholinergic agent and anti-Parkinson drug, might be repurposable as a DAT drug. Previous studies have shown that DAT-substrates like AMPH or -blockers like cocaine modulate the function of DAT in different ways. However, the molecular mechanisms of modulation remained elusive due to the lack of structural data on DAT. The newly resolved DAT structure from Drosophila melanogaster opens the way to a deeper understanding of the mechanism and time evolution of DAT–drug/ligand interactions. Using a combination of homology modeling, docking analysis, molecular dynamics simulations, and molecular biology experiments, we performed a comparative study of the binding properties of DA, AMPH, ORPH, and cocaine and their modulation of hDAT function. Simulations demonstrate that binding DA or AMPH drives a structural transition toward a functional form predisposed to translocate the ligand. In contrast, ORPH appears to inhibit DAT function by arresting it in the OF open conformation. The analysis shows that cocaine and ORPH competitively bind DAT, with the binding pose and affinity dependent on the conformational state of DAT. Further assays show that the effect of ORPH on DAT uptake and endocytosis is comparable to that of cocaine. PMID:26106364

  13. Amphetamine and Methamphetamine Differentially Affect Dopamine Transporters in Vitro and in Vivo*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, J. Shawn; Larson, Gaynor A.; Swant, Jarod; Sen, Namita; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Zahniser, Nancy R.; De Felice, Louis J.; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2009-01-01

    The psychostimulants d-amphetamine (AMPH) and methamphetamine (METH) release excess dopamine (DA) into the synaptic clefts of dopaminergic neurons. Abnormal DA release is thought to occur by reverse transport through the DA transporter (DAT), and it is believed to underlie the severe behavioral effects of these drugs. Here we compare structurally similar AMPH and METH on DAT function in a heterologous expression system and in an animal model. In the in vitro expression system, DAT-mediated whole-cell currents were greater for METH stimulation than for AMPH. At the same voltage and concentration, METH released five times more DA than AMPH and did so at physiological membrane potentials. At maximally effective concentrations, METH released twice as much [Ca2+]i from internal stores compared with AMPH. [Ca2+]i responses to both drugs were independent of membrane voltage but inhibited by DAT antagonists. Intact phosphorylation sites in the N-terminal domain of DAT were required for the AMPH- and METH-induced increase in [Ca2+]i and for the enhanced effects of METH on [Ca2+]i elevation. Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and protein kinase C inhibitors alone or in combination also blocked AMPH- or METH-induced Ca2+ responses. Finally, in the rat nucleus accumbens, in vivo voltammetry showed that systemic application of METH inhibited DAT-mediated DA clearance more efficiently than AMPH, resulting in excess external DA. Together these data demonstrate that METH has a stronger effect on DAT-mediated cell physiology than AMPH, which may contribute to the euphoric and addictive properties of METH compared with AMPH. PMID:19047053

  14. Amphetamine and methamphetamine differentially affect dopamine transporters in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, J Shawn; Larson, Gaynor A; Swant, Jarod; Sen, Namita; Javitch, Jonathan A; Zahniser, Nancy R; De Felice, Louis J; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2009-01-30

    The psychostimulants d-amphetamine (AMPH) and methamphetamine (METH) release excess dopamine (DA) into the synaptic clefts of dopaminergic neurons. Abnormal DA release is thought to occur by reverse transport through the DA transporter (DAT), and it is believed to underlie the severe behavioral effects of these drugs. Here we compare structurally similar AMPH and METH on DAT function in a heterologous expression system and in an animal model. In the in vitro expression system, DAT-mediated whole-cell currents were greater for METH stimulation than for AMPH. At the same voltage and concentration, METH released five times more DA than AMPH and did so at physiological membrane potentials. At maximally effective concentrations, METH released twice as much [Ca(2+)](i) from internal stores compared with AMPH. [Ca(2+)](i) responses to both drugs were independent of membrane voltage but inhibited by DAT antagonists. Intact phosphorylation sites in the N-terminal domain of DAT were required for the AMPH- and METH-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) and for the enhanced effects of METH on [Ca(2+)](i) elevation. Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and protein kinase C inhibitors alone or in combination also blocked AMPH- or METH-induced Ca(2+) responses. Finally, in the rat nucleus accumbens, in vivo voltammetry showed that systemic application of METH inhibited DAT-mediated DA clearance more efficiently than AMPH, resulting in excess external DA. Together these data demonstrate that METH has a stronger effect on DAT-mediated cell physiology than AMPH, which may contribute to the euphoric and addictive properties of METH compared with AMPH.

  15. Dopamine transporter occupancy by RTI-55, inhibition of dopamine transport and stimulation of locomotor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gatley, S.J.; Gifford, A.N.; Volkow, N.D.

    1997-05-01

    Cocaine analogs such as RTI-55 (or {beta}CIT) with a higher affinity for the DAT are potentially useful as therapeutic drugs in cocaine abuse as well as for radiopharmaceutical use. Previously we showed that in mice RTI-55 (2 mg/Kg, i/p) reduced H-3 cocaine striatum-to-cerebellum ratios (St/Cb, {lg_bullet}) from 1.6 to 1.2 at 3 h after administration, with recovery by 12 h. In the present study we demonstrate a very similar time-course for transport {triangle} measured in striatal homo within 2 min of sacrifice. The maximum inhibition of uptake at about 1 h corresponded to about 80% of the control uptake rate, similar to the percent reduction in St/Cb. The time-course of the effect of this dose of RTI-55 on locomotor activity ({sq_bullet}) was complex, with a drop in the activity measure at 7 h, after a further injection of RTI-55, but activity remained higher than in saline controls. In spite of this complexity, which may be associated with stereotypies and/or exhaustion, the duration of increased activity is consistent with the duration of transporter blockade. These experiments support the notion that PET/SPECT measures of transporter occupancy accurately reflect transporter inhibition.

  16. An acute, epitope-specific modification in the dopamine transporter associated with methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Fricks-Gleason, Ashley N; German, Christopher L; Hoonakker, Amanda J; Friend, Danielle M; Ganesh, Kamala K; Carver, Aaron S; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E; Keefe, Kristen A

    2016-04-01

    Preclinical studies demonstrate that repeated, high-dose methamphetamine administrations rapidly decrease plasmalemmal dopamine uptake, which may contribute to aberrant dopamine accumulation, reactive species generation, and long-term dopaminergic deficits. The present study extends these findings by demonstrating a heretofore unreported, epitope-specific modification in the dopamine transporter caused by a methamphetamine regimen that induces these deficits. Specifically, repeated, high-dose methamphetamine injections (4 × 10 mg/kg/injection, 2-h intervals) rapidly decreased immunohistochemical detection of striatal dopamine transporter as assessed 1 h after the final methamphetamine exposure. In contrast, neither a single high dose (1 × 10 mg/kg) nor repeated injections of a lower dose (4 × 2 mg/kg/injection) induced this change. The high-dose regimen-induced alteration was only detected using antibodies directed against the N-terminus. Immunohistochemical staining using antibodies directed against the C-terminus did not reveal any changes. The high-dose regimen also did not alter dopamine transporter expression as assessed using [(125) I]RTI-55 autoradiography. These data suggest that the repeated, high-dose methamphetamine regimen alters the N-terminus of the dopamine transporter. Further, these data may be predictive of persistent dopamine deficits caused by the stimulant. Future studies of the signaling cascades involved should provide novel insight into potential mechanisms underlying the physiological and pathophysiological regulation of the dopamine transporter. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Phosphorylation of Dopamine Transporter Serine 7 Modulates Cocaine Analog Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Moritz, Amy E.; Foster, James D.; Gorentla, Balachandra K.; Mazei-Robison, Michelle S.; Yang, Jae-Won; Sitte, Harald H.; Blakely, Randy D.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.

    2013-01-01

    As an approach to elucidating dopamine transporter (DAT) phosphorylation characteristics, we examined in vitro phosphorylation of a recombinant rat DAT N-terminal peptide (NDAT) using purified protein kinases. We found that NDAT becomes phosphorylated at single distinct sites by protein kinase A (Ser-7) and calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (Ser-13) and at multiple sites (Ser-4, Ser-7, and Ser-13) by protein kinase C (PKC), implicating these residues as potential sites of DAT phosphorylation by these kinases. Mapping of rat striatal DAT phosphopeptides by two-dimensional thin layer chromatography revealed basal and PKC-stimulated phosphorylation of the same peptide fragments and comigration of PKC-stimulated phosphopeptide fragments with NDAT Ser-7 phosphopeptide markers. We further confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis and mass spectrometry that Ser-7 is a site for PKC-stimulated phosphorylation in heterologously expressed rat and human DATs. Mutation of Ser-7 and nearby residues strongly reduced the affinity of rat DAT for the cocaine analog (−)-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl) tropane (CFT), whereas in rat striatal tissue, conditions that promote DAT phosphorylation caused increased CFT affinity. Ser-7 mutation also affected zinc modulation of CFT binding, with Ala and Asp substitutions inducing opposing effects. These results identify Ser-7 as a major site for basal and PKC-stimulated phosphorylation of native and expressed DAT and suggest that Ser-7 phosphorylation modulates transporter conformational equilibria, shifting the transporter between high and low affinity cocaine binding states. PMID:23161550

  18. Altered dopamine transporter function and phosphorylation following chronic cocaine self-administration and extinction in rats.

    PubMed

    Ramamoorthy, Sammanda; Samuvel, Devadoss J; Balasubramaniam, Annamalai; See, Ronald E; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D

    2010-01-15

    Cocaine binds with the dopamine transporter (DAT), an effect that has been extensively implicated in its reinforcing effects. However, persisting adaptations in DAT regulation after cocaine self-administration have not been extensively investigated. Here, we determined the changes in molecular mechanisms of DAT regulation in the caudate-putamen (CPu) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc) of rats with a history of cocaine self-administration, followed by 3weeks of withdrawal under extinction conditions (i.e., no cocaine available). DA uptake was significantly higher in the CPu of cocaine-experienced animals as compared to saline-yoked controls. DAT V(max) was elevated in the CPu without changes in apparent affinity for DA. In spite of elevated CPu DAT activity, total and surface DAT density and DAT-PP2Ac (protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit) interaction remained unaltered, although p-Ser- DAT phosphorylation was elevated. In contrast to the CPu, there were no differences between cocaine and saline rats in the levels of DA uptake, DAT V(max) and K(m) values, total and surface DAT, p-Ser-DAT phosphorylation, or DAT-PP2Ac interactions in the NAcc. These results show that chronic cocaine self-administration leads to lasting, regionally specific alterations in striatal DA uptake and DAT-Ser phosphorylation. Such changes may be related to habitual patterns of cocaine-seeking observed during relapse. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. GABA, glutamate, dopamine and serotonin transporters expression on forgetting.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Ruth; Gómez-Viquez, Leticia; Liy-Salmeron, Gustavo; Meneses, Alfredo

    2012-07-01

    Notwithstanding several neurotransmission systems are frequently related to memory formation; forgetting process and neurotransmission systems or their transporters; the role of γ-aminobutyric acid (GAT1), glutamate (EACC1), dopamine (DAT) and serotonin (SERT) is poorly understood. Hence, in this paper western-blot analysis was used to evaluate expression of GAT1, EAAC1, DAT and SERT during forgetting in trained and untrained rats treated with the selective serotonin transporter inhibitor fluoxetine, the amnesic drug d-methamphetamine (METH) and fluoxetine plus METH. Transporters expression was determined in the hippocampus (HIP), prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatum (STR). Results indicated that forgetting of Pavlovian/instrumental autoshaping was associated to up-regulation of GAT1 (PFC and HIP) and DAT (PFC) while SERT (HIP) was down-regulated; no-changes were observed in striatum. Methamphetamine administration did not affect forgetting at 216 h post-training but up-regulated hippocampal DAT and EACC, prefrontal cortex DAT and striatal GAT1 or EACC1. Fluoxetine alone prevented forgetting, which was associated to striatal GAT1 and hippocampal DAT up-regulation, but prefrontal cortex GAT1 down-regulation. Fluoxetine plus METH administration was also able to prevent forgetting, which was associated to hippocampal DAT, prefrontal cortex SERT and striatal GAT1, DAT or SERT up-regulation, but prefrontal cortex GAT1 down-regulation. Together these data show that forgetting provokes primarily hippocampal and prefrontal cortex transporters changes; forgetting represent a behavioral process hardly modifiable and its prevention could causes different transporters expression patterns.

  20. Blockade of dopamine D1-family receptors attenuates the mania-like hyperactive, risk-preferring, and high motivation behavioral profile of mice with low dopamine transporter levels.

    PubMed

    Milienne-Petiot, Morgane; Groenink, Lucianne; Minassian, Arpi; Young, Jared W

    2017-10-01

    Patients with bipolar disorder mania exhibit poor cognition, impulsivity, risk-taking, and goal-directed activity that negatively impact their quality of life. To date, existing treatments for bipolar disorder do not adequately remediate cognitive dysfunction. Reducing dopamine transporter expression recreates many bipolar disorder mania-relevant behaviors (i.e. hyperactivity and risk-taking). The current study investigated whether dopamine D1-family receptor blockade would attenuate the risk-taking, hypermotivation, and hyperactivity of dopamine transporter knockdown mice. Dopamine transporter knockdown and wild-type littermate mice were tested in mouse versions of the Iowa Gambling Task (risk-taking), Progressive Ratio Breakpoint Test (effortful motivation), and Behavioral Pattern Monitor (activity). Prior to testing, the mice were treated with the dopamine D1-family receptor antagonist SCH 23390 hydrochloride (0.03, 0.1, or 0.3 mg/kg), or vehicle. Dopamine transporter knockdown mice exhibited hyperactivity and hyperexploration, hypermotivation, and risk-taking preference compared with wild-type littermates. SCH 23390 hydrochloride treatment decreased premature responding in dopamine transporter knockdown mice and attenuated their hypermotivation. SCH 23390 hydrochloride flattened the safe/risk preference, while reducing activity and exploratory levels of both genotypes similarly. Dopamine transporter knockdown mice exhibited mania-relevant behavior compared to wild-type mice. Systemic dopamine D1-family receptor antagonism attenuated these behaviors in dopamine transporter knockdown, but not all effects were specific to only the knockdown mice. The normalization of behavior via blockade of dopamine D1-family receptors supports the hypothesis that D1 and/or D5 receptors could contribute to the mania-relevant behaviors of dopamine transporter knockdown mice.

  1. The functioning neuronal transporter for dopamine: kinetic mechanisms and effects of amphetamines, cocaine and methylphenidate.

    PubMed

    Schenk, James O

    2002-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a transmembrane spanning protein that catalyzes the transport of dopamine across the neuronal membrane to concentrate the neurotransmitter inside the cell. Although the uptake of dopamine has been studied since the 1960s, more recent advances in knowledge of the protein itself and in making kinetically resolved measurements of its action have led to more insights into its mechanism and pharmacology. The literature of the kinetics of transporters and kinetic measurements of DAT activity is reviewed to provide an overview of the multisubstrate mechanism of DAT activity, its pharmacology with regard to amphetamine, cocaine and methylphenidate, and correlations of DAT activity with some behavioral outputs.

  2. Dampened Amphetamine-Stimulated Behavior and Altered Dopamine Transporter Function in the Absence of Brain GDNF.

    PubMed

    Kopra, Jaakko J; Panhelainen, Anne; Af Bjerkén, Sara; Porokuokka, Lauriina L; Varendi, Kärt; Olfat, Soophie; Montonen, Heidi; Piepponen, T Petteri; Saarma, Mart; Andressoo, Jaan-Olle

    2017-02-08

    Midbrain dopamine neuron dysfunction contributes to various psychiatric and neurological diseases, including drug addiction and Parkinson's disease. Because of its well established dopaminotrophic effects, the therapeutic potential of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has been studied extensively in various disorders with disturbed dopamine homeostasis. However, the outcomes from preclinical and clinical studies vary, highlighting a need for a better understanding of the physiological role of GDNF on striatal dopaminergic function. Nevertheless, the current lack of appropriate animal models has limited this understanding. Therefore, we have generated novel mouse models to study conditional Gdnf deletion in the CNS during embryonic development and reduction of striatal GDNF levels in adult mice via AAV-Cre delivery. We found that both of these mice have reduced amphetamine-induced locomotor response and striatal dopamine efflux. Embryonic GDNF deletion in the CNS did not affect striatal dopamine levels or dopamine release, but dopamine reuptake was increased due to increased levels of both total and synaptic membrane-associated dopamine transporters. Collectively, these results suggest that endogenous GDNF plays an important role in regulating the function of dopamine transporters in the striatum.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Delivery of ectopic glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes the function, plasticity, and survival of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, the dysfunction of which contributes to various neurological and psychiatric diseases. However, how the deletion or reduction of GDNF in the CNS affects the function of dopaminergic neurons has remained unknown. Using conditional Gdnf knock-out mice, we found that endogenous GDNF affects striatal dopamine homeostasis and regulates amphetamine-induced behaviors by regulating the level and function of dopamine transporters. These data regarding the physiological role of GDNF are

  3. Dissociable Roles of Dopamine and Serotonin Transporter Function in a Rat Model of Negative Urgency

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Justin R.; Darna, Mahesh; Gipson, Cassandra D.; Dwoskin, Linda P.; Bardo, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Negative urgency is a facet of impulsivity that reflects mood-based rash action and is associated with various maladaptive behaviors in humans. However, the underlying neural mechanisms of negative urgency are not fully understood. Several brain regions within the mesocorticolimbic pathway, as well as the neurotransmitters dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT), have been implicated in impulsivity. Extracellular DA and 5-HT concentrations are regulated by DA transporters (DAT) and 5-HT transporters (SERT); thus, these transporters may be important molecular mechanisms underlying individual differences in negative urgency. The current study employed a reward omission task to model negative urgency in rats. During reward trials, a cue light signaled the non-contingent delivery of one sucrose pellet; immediately following the non-contingent reward, rats responded on a lever to earn sucrose pellets (operant phase). Omission trials were similar to reward trials, except that non-contingent sucrose was omitted following the cue light prior to the operant phase. As expected, contingent responding was higher following omission of expected reward than following delivery of expected reward, thus reflecting negative urgency. Upon completion of behavioral training, Vmax and Km were obtained from kinetic analysis of [3H]DA and [3H]5-HT uptake using synaptosomes prepared from nucleus accumbens (NAc), dorsal striatum (Str), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) isolated from individual rats. Vmax for DAT in NAc and for SERT in OFC were positively correlated with negative urgency scores. The current findings suggest that mood-based impulsivity (negative urgency) is associated with enhanced DAT function in NAc and SERT function in OFC. PMID:26005123

  4. Dissociable roles of dopamine and serotonin transporter function in a rat model of negative urgency.

    PubMed

    Yates, Justin R; Darna, Mahesh; Gipson, Cassandra D; Dwoskin, Linda P; Bardo, Michael T

    2015-09-15

    Negative urgency is a facet of impulsivity that reflects mood-based rash action and is associated with various maladaptive behaviors in humans. However, the underlying neural mechanisms of negative urgency are not fully understood. Several brain regions within the mesocorticolimbic pathway, as well as the neurotransmitters dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT), have been implicated in impulsivity. Extracellular DA and 5-HT concentrations are regulated by DA transporters (DAT) and 5-HT transporters (SERT); thus, these transporters may be important molecular mechanisms underlying individual differences in negative urgency. The current study employed a reward omission task to model negative urgency in rats. During reward trials, a cue light signaled the non-contingent delivery of one sucrose pellet; immediately following the non-contingent reward, rats responded on a lever to earn sucrose pellets (operant phase). Omission trials were similar to reward trials, except that non-contingent sucrose was omitted following the cue light prior to the operant phase. As expected, contingent responding was higher following omission of expected reward than following delivery of expected reward, thus reflecting negative urgency. Upon completion of behavioral training, Vmax and Km were obtained from kinetic analysis of [(3)H]DA and [(3)H]5-HT uptake using synaptosomes prepared from nucleus accumbens (NAc), dorsal striatum (Str), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) isolated from individual rats. Vmax for DAT in NAc and for SERT in OFC were positively correlated with negative urgency scores. The current findings suggest that mood-based impulsivity (negative urgency) is associated with enhanced DAT function in NAc and SERT function in OFC.

  5. Sequence determinants of the Caenhorhabditis elegans dopamine transporter dictating in vivo axonal export and synaptic localization.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sarah B; Hardaway, J Andrew; Hardie, Shannon L; Wright, Jane; Glynn, Ryan M; Bermingham, Daniel P; Han, Qiao; Sturgeon, Sarah M; Freeman, Phyllis; Blakely, Randy D

    2017-01-01

    The monoamine neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) acts across phylogeny to modulate both simple and complex behaviors. The presynaptic DA transporter (DAT) is a major determinant of DA signaling capacity in ensuring efficient extracellular DA clearance. In humans, DAT is also a major target for prescribed and abused psychostimulants. Multiple structural determinants of DAT function and regulation have been defined, though largely these findings have arisen from heterologous expression or ex vivo cell culture studies. Loss of function mutations in the gene encoding the Caenhorhabditis elegans DAT (dat-1) produces rapid immobility when animals are placed in water, a phenotype termed swimming-induced paralysis (Swip). The ability of a DA neuron-expressed, GFP-tagged DAT-1 fusion protein (GFP::DAT-1) to localize to synapses and rescue Swip in these animals provides a facile approach to define sequences supporting DAT somatic export and function in vivo. In prior studies, we found that truncation of the last 25 amino acids of the DAT-1 C-terminus (Δ25) precludes Swip rescue, supported by a deficit in GFP::DAT-1 synaptic localization. Here, we further defined the elements within Δ25 required for DAT-1 export and function in vivo. We identified two conserved motifs ((584)KW(585) and (591)PYRKR(595)) where mutation results in a failure of GFP::DAT-1 to be efficiently exported to synapses and restore DAT-1 function. The (584)KW(585) motif conforms to a sequence proposed to support SEC24 binding, ER export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and surface expression of mammalian DAT proteins, whereas the (591)PYRKR(595) sequence conforms to a 3R motif identified as a SEC24 binding site in vertebrate G-protein coupled receptors. Consistent with a potential role of SEC24 orthologs in DAT-1 export, we demonstrated DA neuron-specific expression of a sec-24.2 transcriptional reporter. Mutations of the orthologous C-terminal sequences in human DAT (hDAT) significantly reduced

  6. Relationship between psychostimulant-induced "high" and dopamine transporter occupancy.

    PubMed Central

    Volkow, N D; Wang, G J; Fowler, J S; Gatley, S J; Ding, Y S; Logan, J; Dewey, S L; Hitzemann, R; Lieberman, J

    1996-01-01

    The ability of cocaine to inhibit the dopamine transporter (DAT) appears to be crucial for its reinforcing properties. The potential use of drugs that produce long-lasting inhibition of the DAT as a mean of preventing the "high" and reducing drug-seeking behavior has become a major strategy in medication development. However, neither the relation between the high and DAT inhibition nor the ability to block the high by prior DAT blockade have ever been demonstrated. To evaluate if DAT could prevent the high induced by methylphenidate (MP), a drug which like cocaine inhibits the DAT, we compared the responses in eight non-drug-abusing subjects between the first and the second of two MP doses (0.375 mg/kg, i.v.) given 60 min apart. At 60 min the high from MP has returned to baseline, but 75-80% of the drug remains in brain. Positron-emission tomography and [11C]d-threo-MP were used to estimate DAT occupancies at different times after MP. DAT inhibition by MP did not block or attenuate the high from a second dose of MP given 60 min later, despite a 80% residual transporter occupancy from the first dose. Furthermore some subjects did not perceive a high after single or repeated administration despite significant DAT blockade. These results indicate that DAT occupancy is not sufficient to account for the high, and that for DAT inhibitors to be therapeutically effective, occupancies > 80% may be required. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8816810

  7. 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone prevents while methylone enhances methamphetamine-induced damage to dopamine nerve endings: β-ketoamphetamine modulation of neurotoxicity by the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Anneken, John H; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M

    2015-04-01

    Methylone, 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), and mephedrone are psychoactive ingredients of 'bath salts' and their abuse represents a growing public health care concern. These drugs are cathinone derivatives and are classified chemically as β-ketoamphetamines. Because of their close structural similarity to the amphetamines, methylone, MDPV, and mephedrone share most of their pharmacological, neurochemical, and behavioral properties. One point of divergence in their actions is the ability to cause damage to the CNS. Unlike methamphetamine, the β-ketoamphetamines do not damage dopamine (DA) nerve endings. However, mephedrone has been shown to significantly accentuate methamphetamine neurotoxicity. Bath salt formulations contain numerous different psychoactive ingredients, and individuals who abuse bath salts also coabuse other illicit drugs. Therefore, we have evaluated the effects of methylone, MDPV, mephedrone, and methamphetamine on DA nerve endings. The β-ketoamphetamines alone or in all possible two-drug combinations do not result in damage to DA nerve endings but do cause hyperthermia. MDPV completely protects against the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine while methylone accentuates it. Neither MDPV nor methylone attenuates the hyperthermic effects of methamphetamine. The potent neuroprotective effects of MDPV extend to amphetamine-, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-, and MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. These results indicate that β-ketoamphetamine drugs that are non-substrate blockers of the DA transporter (i.e., MDPV) protect against methamphetamine neurotoxicity, whereas those that are substrates for uptake by the DA transporter and which cause DA release (i.e., methylone, mephedrone) accentuate neurotoxicity. METH (a) enters DA nerve endings via the DAT, causes leakage of DA into the cytoplasm and then into the synapse via DAT-mediated reverse transport. Methylone (METHY) and mephedrone (MEPH; b), like METH, are substrates for the DAT but release

  8. Dopamine Transporter Blockade Increases LTP in the CA1 Region of the Rat Hippocampus via Activation of the D3 Dopamine Receptor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swant, Jarod; Wagner, John J.

    2006-01-01

    Dopamine has been demonstrated to be involved in the modulation of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. As monoamine transporter blockade will increase the actions of endogenous monoamine neurotransmitters, the effect of a dopamine transporter (DAT) antagonist on LTP was assessed using field excitatory postsynaptic…

  9. Dopamine Transporter Blockade Increases LTP in the CA1 Region of the Rat Hippocampus via Activation of the D3 Dopamine Receptor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swant, Jarod; Wagner, John J.

    2006-01-01

    Dopamine has been demonstrated to be involved in the modulation of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. As monoamine transporter blockade will increase the actions of endogenous monoamine neurotransmitters, the effect of a dopamine transporter (DAT) antagonist on LTP was assessed using field excitatory postsynaptic…

  10. ADHD and the dopamine transporter: are there reasons to pay attention?

    PubMed

    Mazei-Robinson, M S; Blakely, R D

    2006-01-01

    The catecholamine dopamine (DA) plays an important role as a neurotransmitter in the brain in circuits linked to motor function, reward, and cognition. The presynaptic DA transporter (DAT) inactivates DA following release and provides a route for non-exocytotic DA release (efflux) triggered by amphetamines. The synaptic role of DATs first established through antagonist studies and more recently validated through mouse gene-knockout experiments, raises questions as to whether altered DAT structure or regulation support clinical disorders linked to compromised DA signaling, including drug abuse, schizophrenia, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). As ADHD appears to have highly heritable components and the most commonly prescribed therapeutics for ADHD target DAT, studies ranging from brain imaging to genomic and genetic analyses have begun to probe the DAT gene and its protein for possible contributions to the disorder and/or its treatment. In this review, after a brief overview of ADHD prevalence and diagnostic criteria, we examine the rationale and experimental findings surrounding a role for human DAT in ADHD. Based on the available evidence from our lab and labs of workers in the field, we suggest that although a common variant within the human DAT (hDAT) gene (SLC6A3) is unlikely to play a major role in the ADHD, contributions of hDAT to risk maybe most evident in phenotypic subgroups. The in vitro and in vivo validation of functional variants, pursued for contributions to endophenotypes in a within family approach, may help elucidate DAT and DA contributions to ADHD and its treatment.

  11. Bath salts components mephedrone and methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) act synergistically at the human dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Krasnodara N; Kolanos, Renata; Solis, Ernesto; Glennon, Richard A; De Felice, Louis J

    2013-04-01

    Bath salts is the street name for drug combinations that contain synthetic cathinone analogues, among them possibly mephedrone (MEPH) and certainly methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV). In animal studies, cathinone and certain cathinone analogues release dopamine (DA), similar to the action of amphetamine (AMPH) and methamphetamine (METH). AMPH and METH act on the human DA transporter (hDAT); thus, we investigated MEPH and MDPV acting at hDAT. We recorded electrical currents mediated by hDAT expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and exposed to: DA, METH, a known hDAT stimulant and DA releaser, MEPH, MDPV, MEPH + MDPV, or cocaine, a known hDAT inhibitor. DA, METH and MEPH induce an inward current (depolarizing) when the oocyte is held near the resting potential (-60 mV), therefore acting as excitatory hDAT substrates. Structurally analogous MDPV induces an outward (hyperpolarizing) current similar to cocaine, therefore acting as an inhibitory non-substrate blocker. Two components of bath salts, MEPH and MDPV, produce opposite effects at hDAT that are comparable with METH and cocaine, respectively. In our assay, MEPH is nearly as potent as METH; however, MDPV is much more potent than cocaine and its effect is longer lasting. When applied in combination, MEPH exhibits faster kinetics than MDPV, viz., the MEPH depolarizing current occurs seconds before the slower MDPV hyperpolarizing current. Bath salts containing MEPH (or a similar drug) and MDPV might then be expected initially to release DA and subsequently prevent its reuptake via hDAT. Such combined action possibly underlies some of the reported effects of bath salts abuse. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. Bath salts components mephedrone and methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) act synergistically at the human dopamine transporter

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Krasnodara N; Kolanos, Renata; Solis, Ernesto; Glennon, Richard A; De Felice, Louis J

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Bath salts is the street name for drug combinations that contain synthetic cathinone analogues, among them possibly mephedrone (MEPH) and certainly methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV). In animal studies, cathinone and certain cathinone analogues release dopamine (DA), similar to the action of amphetamine (AMPH) and methamphetamine (METH). AMPH and METH act on the human DA transporter (hDAT); thus, we investigated MEPH and MDPV acting at hDAT. Experimental Approach We recorded electrical currents mediated by hDAT expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and exposed to: DA, METH, a known hDAT stimulant and DA releaser, MEPH, MDPV, MEPH + MDPV, or cocaine, a known hDAT inhibitor. Key Results DA, METH and MEPH induce an inward current (depolarizing) when the oocyte is held near the resting potential (–60 mV), therefore acting as excitatory hDAT substrates. Structurally analogous MDPV induces an outward (hyperpolarizing) current similar to cocaine, therefore acting as an inhibitory non-substrate blocker. Conclusions and Implications Two components of bath salts, MEPH and MDPV, produce opposite effects at hDAT that are comparable with METH and cocaine, respectively. In our assay, MEPH is nearly as potent as METH; however, MDPV is much more potent than cocaine and its effect is longer lasting. When applied in combination, MEPH exhibits faster kinetics than MDPV, viz., the MEPH depolarizing current occurs seconds before the slower MDPV hyperpolarizing current. Bath salts containing MEPH (or a similar drug) and MDPV might then be expected initially to release DA and subsequently prevent its reuptake via hDAT. Such combined action possibly underlies some of the reported effects of bath salts abuse. PMID:23170765

  13. MATERNAL ATRAZINE (ATR) ALTERS HYPOTHALAMIC DOPAMINE (HYP-DA) AND SERUM PROLACTIN (SPRL) IN MALE PUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Maternal Atrazine (ATR) alters hypothalamic dopamine (HYP-DA) and serum prolactin (sPRL) in male pups. 1Christopher Langdale, 2Tammy Stoker and 2Ralph Cooper. 1 Dept. of Cell Biology, North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC. 2 Endocrinology ...

  14. MATERNAL ATRAZINE (ATR) ALTERS HYPOTHALAMIC DOPAMINE (HYP-DA) AND SERUM PROLACTIN (SPRL) IN MALE PUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Maternal Atrazine (ATR) alters hypothalamic dopamine (HYP-DA) and serum prolactin (sPRL) in male pups. 1Christopher Langdale, 2Tammy Stoker and 2Ralph Cooper. 1 Dept. of Cell Biology, North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC. 2 Endocrinology ...

  15. Molecular Mechanism of HIV-1 Tat Interacting with Human Dopamine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Midde, Narasimha M.; Quizon, Pamela M.; Sun, Wei-Lun; Zhu, Jun; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 70% of HIV-infected individuals suffer from HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein is known to synergize with abused drugs and exacerbate the progression of central nervous system (CNS) pathology. Cumulative evidences suggest that the HIV-1 Tat protein exerts the neurotoxicity through interaction with human dopamine transporter (hDAT) in the CNS. Through computational modeling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we develop a three-dimensional (3D) structural model for HIV-1 Tat binding with hDAT. The model provides novel mechanistic insights concerning how HIV-1 Tat interacts with hDAT and inhibits dopamine uptake in hDAT. In particular, according to the computational modeling, Tat binds most favorably with the outward-open state of hDAT. Residues Y88, K92, and Y470 of hDAT are predicted to be key residues involved in the interaction between hDAT and Tat. The roles of these hDAT residues in the interaction with Tat are validated by experimental tests through site-directed mutagensis and DA uptake assays. The agreement between the computational and experimental data suggests that the computationally predicted hDAT-Tat binding mode and mechanistic insights are reasonable and provide a new starting point to design further pharmacological studies on the molecular mechanism of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. PMID:25695767

  16. Dopamine Transporter Genotype Conveys Familial Risk of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder through Striatal Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durston, Sarah; Fossella, John A.; Mulder, Martijn J.; Casey B. J.; Ziermans, Tim B.; Vessaz, M. Nathalie; Van Engeland, Herman

    2008-01-01

    The study examines the effect of the dopamine transporter (DAT1) genotype in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The results confirm that DAT1 translates the genetic risk of ADHD through striatal activation.

  17. Dopamine Transporter Genotype Conveys Familial Risk of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder through Striatal Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durston, Sarah; Fossella, John A.; Mulder, Martijn J.; Casey B. J.; Ziermans, Tim B.; Vessaz, M. Nathalie; Van Engeland, Herman

    2008-01-01

    The study examines the effect of the dopamine transporter (DAT1) genotype in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The results confirm that DAT1 translates the genetic risk of ADHD through striatal activation.

  18. Individual differences in impulsive action and dopamine transporter function in rat orbitofrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Yates, J R; Darna, M; Beckmann, J S; Dwoskin, L P; Bardo, M T

    2016-01-28

    Impulsivity, which can be subdivided into impulsive action and impulsive choice, is implicated as a factor underlying drug abuse vulnerability. Although previous research has shown that dopamine (DA) systems in prefrontal cortex are involved in impulsivity and substance abuse, it is not known if inherent variation in DA transporter (DAT) function contributes to impulsivity. The current study determined if individual differences in either impulsive action or impulsive choice are related to DAT function in orbitofrontal (OFC) and/or medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Rats were first tested both for impulsive action in a cued go/no-go task and for impulsive choice in a delay-discounting task. Following behavioral evaluation, in vitro [(3)H]DA uptake assays were performed in OFC and mPFC isolated from individual rats. Vmax in OFC, but not mPFC, was correlated with performance in the cued go/no-go task, with decreased OFC DAT function being associated with high impulsive action. In contrast, Vmax in OFC and mPFC was not correlated with performance in the delay-discounting task. The current results demonstrate that impulsive behavior in cued go/no-go performance is associated with decreased DAT function in OFC, suggesting that hyperdopaminergic tone in this prefrontal subregion mediates, at least in part, increased impulsive action.

  19. Dopamine transporters are markedly reduced in Lesch-Nyhan disease in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, D F; Harris, J C; Naidu, S; Yokoi, F; Marenco, S; Dannals, R F; Ravert, H T; Yaster, M; Evans, A; Rousset, O; Bryan, R N; Gjedde, A; Kuhar, M J; Breese, G R

    1996-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) deficiency has been implicated in Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND), a genetic disorder that is characterized by hyperuricemia, choreoathetosis, dystonia, and compulsive self-injury. To establish that DA deficiency is present in LND, the ligand WIN-35,428, which binds to DA transporters, was used to estimate the density of DA-containing neurons in the caudate and putamen of six patients with classic LND. Comparisons were made with 10 control subjects and 3 patients with Rett syndrome. Three methods were used to quantify the binding of the DA transporter so that its density could be estimated by a single dynamic positron emission tomography study. These approaches included the caudate- or putamen-to-cerebellum ratio of ligand at 80-90 min postinjection, kinetic analysis of the binding potential [Bmax/(Kd x Vd)] using the assumption of equal partition coefficients in the striatum and the cerebellum, and graphical analysis of the binding potential. Depending on the method of analysis, a 50-63% reduction of the binding to DA transporters in the caudate, and a 64-75% reduction in the putamen of the LND patients was observed compared to the normal control group. When LND patients were compared to Rett syndrome patients, similar reductions were found in the caudate (53-61%) and putamen (67-72%) in LND patients. Transporter binding in Rett syndrome patients was not significantly different from the normal controls. Finally, volumetric magnetic resonance imaging studies detected a 30% reduction in the caudate volume of LND patients. To ensure that a reduction in the caudate volume would not confound the results, a rigorous partial volume correction of the caudate time activity curve was performed. This correction resulted in an even greater decrease in the caudate-cerebellar ratio in LND patients when contrasted to controls. To our knowledge, these findings provide the first in vivo documentation of a dopaminergic reduction in LND and illustrate the role of positron

  20. Caulis Sinomenii extracts activate DA/NE transporter and inhibit 5HT transporter.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gang; Bi, Cheng; Qin, Guo-Wei; Guo, Li-He

    2009-08-01

    Caulis Sinomenii (QFT) has analgesic, sedative, and anxiolytic-like actions, and is proven effective for improving drug dependence that is known to be associated with abnormal monoaminergic transmission. We assessed whether QFT would be biologically active in functionally regulating monoamine transporters using CHO cells expressing dopamine transporter (DAT), norepinephrine transporter (NET), or serotonin transporter (SERT) (i.e. D8, N1, or S6 cells, respectively). Here, we showed that its primary extracts, such as QA, QC, QE, QD, and QB (QFT ethanol, chloroform, ethyl acetate, alkaloid-free chloroform, and alkaloid-containing chloroform extract, respectively), and secondary extracts, such as QE-2, - 3, - 5, - 7, QD-1, - 2, - 3, - 4, - 5, and QB-1, - 2, - 3, - 4, - 5 (fractioned from QE, QD, and QB, respectively), in differing degrees, either increased DA/ NE uptake by corresponding D8/N1 cells or decreased 5HT uptake by S6 cells; wherein, QE-2, QD-3, and QE-7 were potent DA/NE uptake activators while both QE-7 and QB-5 were potent 5HT uptake inhibitors. Furthermore, the enhancement of DA/NE uptake was dependent of DAT/NET activity, and the inhibition of 5HT uptake was typical of competition. Thus, QFT extracts, especially QE-2 and QE-7 (both with stronger potencies), are novel monoamine transporter modulators functioning as DAT/ NET activators and/or SERT inhibitors, and would likely improve neuropsychological disorders through regulating monoamine transporters.

  1. Cloning, pharmacological characterization, and chromosome assignment of the human dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Giros, B; el Mestikawy, S; Godinot, N; Zheng, K; Han, H; Yang-Feng, T; Caron, M G

    1992-09-01

    We have screened a human substantia nigra cDNA library with probes derived from the rat dopamine transporter. A 3.5-kilobase cDNA clone was isolated and its corresponding gene was located on the distal end of chromosome 5 (5p15.3). This human clone codes for a 620-amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 68,517. Hydropathicity analysis suggests the presence of 12 putative transmembrane domains, a characteristic feature of sodium-dependent neurotransmitter carriers. The rat and the human dopamine transporters are 92% homologous. When permanently expressed in mouse fibroblast Ltk- cells, the human clone is able to induce a saturable, time- and sodium-dependent, dopamine uptake. This transport is blocked by psychostimulant drugs (cocaine, l- and d-amphetamine, and phenyclidine), neurotoxins (6-hydroxydopamine and N-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP))+), neurotransmitters (epinephrine, norepinephrine, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and serotonin), antidepressants (amitriptyline, bupropion, desipramine, mazindol, nomifensine, and nortriptyline), and various uptake inhibitors (mazindol, GBR 12783, GBR 12909, and amfonelic acid). The rank orders of the Ki values of these substances at the human and the rat dopamine transporters are highly correlated (r = 0.998). The cloning of DNA human dopamine transporter gene has allowed establishment of a cell line stably expressing the human dopamine transporter and, for the first time, an extensive characterization of its pharmacology. Furthermore, these newly developed tools will help in the study of the regulation of dopamine transport in humans and in the clarification of the potential role of the dopamine transporter in a variety of disease states.

  2. Dual Action of Zn2+ on the Transport Cycle of the Dopamine Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Hasenhuetl, Peter S.; Schicker, Klaus; Sitte, Harald H.; Freissmuth, Michael; Sandtner, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine transporter shapes dopaminergic neurotransmission by clearing extracellular dopamine and by replenishing vesicular stores. The dopamine transporter carries an endogenous binding site for Zn2+, but the nature of the Zn2+-dependent modulation has remained elusive: both, inhibition and stimulation of DAT have been reported. Here, we exploited the high time resolution of patch-clamp recordings to examine the effects of Zn2+ on the transport cycle of DAT: we recorded peak currents associated with substrate translocation and steady-state currents reflecting the forward transport mode of DAT. Zn2+ depressed the peak current but enhanced the steady-state current through DAT. The parsimonious explanation is preferential binding of Zn2+ to the outward facing conformation of DAT, which allows for an allosteric activation of DAT, in both, the forward transport mode and substrate exchange mode. We directly confirmed that Zn2+ dissociated more rapidly from the inward- than from the outward-facing state of DAT. Finally, we formulated a kinetic model for the action of Zn2+ on DAT that emulated all current experimental observations and accounted for all previous (in part contradictory) findings. Importantly, the model predicts that the intracellular Na+ concentration determines whether substrate uptake by DAT is stimulated or inhibited by Zn2+. This prediction was directly verified. The mechanistic framework provided by the current model is of relevance for the rational design of allosteric activators of DAT. These are of interest for treating de novo loss-of-function mutations of DAT associated with neuropsychiatric disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). PMID:26504078

  3. Behavioral, biological, and chemical perspectives on atypical agents targeting the dopamine transporterɸ

    PubMed Central

    Reith, Maarten E.A.; Blough, Bruce E.; Hong, Weimin C.; Jones, Kymry T.; Schmitt, Kyle C.; Baumann, Michael H.; Partilla, John S.; Rothman, Richard B.; Katz, Jonathan L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment of Stimulant-Use Disorders remains a formidable challenge, and the dopamine transporter (DAT) remains a potential target for antagonist or agonist-like substitution therapies. Methods This review focuses on DAT ligands, such as benztropine, GBR 12909, modafinil, and DAT substrates derived from phenethylamine or cathinone that have atypical DAT-inhibitor effects, either in vitro or in vivo. The compounds are described from a molecular mechanistic, behavioral, and medicinal-chemical perspective. Results Possible mechanisms for atypicality at the molecular level can be deduced from the conformational cycle for substrate translocation. For each conformation, a crystal structure of a bacterial homolog is available, with a possible role of cholesterol, which is also present in the crystal of drosophila DAT. Although there is a direct relationship between behavioral potencies of most DAT inhibitors and their DAT affinities, a number of compounds bind to the DAT and inhibit dopamine uptake but do not share cocaine-like effects. Such atypical behavior, depending on the compound, may be related to slow DAT association, combined sigma-receptor actions, or bias for cytosol-facing DAT. Some structures are sterically small enough to serve as DAT substrates but large enough to also inhibit transport. Such compounds may display partial DA releasing effects, and may be combined with release or uptake inhibition at other monoamine transporters. Conclusions Mechanisms of atypical DAT inhibitors may serve as targets for the development of treatments for stimulant abuse. These mechanisms are novel and their further exploration may produce compounds with unique therapeutic potential as treatments for stimulant abuse. PMID:25548026

  4. Positive and negative feedback learning and associated dopamine and serotonin transporter binding after methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Stolyarova, Alexandra; O’Dell, Steve J.; Marshall, John F.; Izquierdo, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Learning from mistakes and prospectively adjusting behavior in response to reward feedback is an important facet of performance monitoring. Dopamine (DA) pathways play an important role in feedback learning and a growing literature has also emerged on the importance of serotonin (5HT) in reward learning, particularly during punishment or reward omission (negative feedback). Cognitive impairments resulting from psychostimulant exposure may arise from altered patterns in feedback learning, which in turn may be modulated by DA and 5HT transmission. We analyzed long-term, off-drug changes in learning from positive and negative feedback and associated striatal DA transporter (DAT) and frontocortical 5HT transporter (SERT) binding in rats pretreated with methamphetamine (mAMPH). Specifically, we assessed the reversal phase of pairwise visual discrimination learning in rats receiving single dose- (mAMPHsingle) vs. escalating-dose exposure (mAMPHescal). Using fine-grained trial-by-trial analyses, we found increased sensitivity to and reliance on positive feedback in mAMPH-pretreated animals, with the mAMPHsingle group showing more pronounced use of this type of feedback. In contrast, overall negative feedback sensitivity was not altered following any mAMPH treatment. In addition to validating the enduring effects of mAMPH on early reversal learning, we found more consecutive error commissions before the first correct response in mAMPH-pretreated rats. This behavioral rigidity was negatively correlated with subregional frontocortical SERT whereas positive feedback sensitivity negatively correlated with striatal DAT binding. These results provide new evidence for the overlapping, yet dissociable roles of DA and 5HT systems in overcoming perseveration and in learning new reward rules. PMID:24959862

  5. Positive and negative feedback learning and associated dopamine and serotonin transporter binding after methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Stolyarova, Alexandra; O'Dell, Steve J; Marshall, John F; Izquierdo, Alicia

    2014-09-01

    Learning from mistakes and prospectively adjusting behavior in response to reward feedback is an important facet of performance monitoring. Dopamine (DA) pathways play an important role in feedback learning and a growing literature has also emerged on the importance of serotonin (5HT) in reward learning, particularly during punishment or reward omission (negative feedback). Cognitive impairments resulting from psychostimulant exposure may arise from altered patterns in feedback learning, which in turn may be modulated by DA and 5HT transmission. We analyzed long-term, off-drug changes in learning from positive and negative feedback and associated striatal DA transporter (DAT) and frontocortical 5HT transporter (SERT) binding in rats pretreated with methamphetamine (mAMPH). Specifically, we assessed the reversal phase of pairwise visual discrimination learning in rats receiving single dose- (mAMPHsingle) vs. escalating-dose exposure (mAMPHescal). Using fine-grained trial-by-trial analyses, we found increased sensitivity to and reliance on positive feedback in mAMPH-pretreated animals, with the mAMPHsingle group showing more pronounced use of this type of feedback. In contrast, overall negative feedback sensitivity was not altered following any mAMPH treatment. In addition to validating the enduring effects of mAMPH on early reversal learning, we found more consecutive error commissions before the first correct response in mAMPH-pretreated rats. This behavioral rigidity was negatively correlated with subregional frontocortical SERT whereas positive feedback sensitivity negatively correlated with striatal DAT binding. These results provide new evidence for the overlapping, yet dissociable roles of DA and 5HT systems in overcoming perseveration and in learning new reward rules.

  6. meso-Transdiene Analogs Inhibit Vesicular Monoamine Transporter-2 Function and Methamphetamine-Evoked Dopamine ReleaseS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Horton, David B.; Siripurapu, Kiran B.; Norrholm, Seth D.; Culver, John P.; Hojahmat, Marhaba; Beckmann, Joshua S.; Harrod, Steven B.; Deaciuc, Agripina G.; Bardo, Michael T.; Crooks, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Lobeline, a nicotinic receptor antagonist and neurotransmitter transporter inhibitor, is a candidate pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine abuse. meso-Transdiene (MTD), a lobeline analog, lacks nicotinic receptor affinity, retains affinity for vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2), and, surprisingly, has enhanced affinity for dopamine (DA) and serotonin transporters [DA transporter (DAT) and serotonin transporter (SERT), respectively]. In the current study, MTD was evaluated for its ability to decrease methamphetamine self-administration in rats relative to food-maintained responding. MTD specifically decreased methamphetamine self-administration, extending our previous work. Classical structure-activity relationships revealed that more conformationally restricted MTD analogs enhanced VMAT2 selectivity and drug likeness, whereas affinity at the dihydrotetrabenazine binding and DA uptake sites on VMAT2 was not altered. Generally, MTD analogs exhibited 50- to 1000-fold lower affinity for DAT and were equipotent or had 10-fold higher affinity for SERT, compared with MTD. Representative analogs from the series potently and competitively inhibited [3H]DA uptake at VMAT2. (3Z,5Z)-3,5-bis(2,4-dichlorobenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidine (UKMH-106), the 3Z,5Z-2,4-dichlorophenyl MTD analog, had improved selectivity for VMAT2 over DAT and importantly inhibited methamphetamine-evoked DA release from striatal slices. In contrast, (3Z,5E)-3,5-bis(2,4-dichlorobenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidine (UKMH-105), the 3Z,5E-geometrical isomer, inhibited DA uptake at VMAT2, but did not inhibit methamphetamine-evoked DA release. Taken together, these results suggest that these geometrical isomers interact at alternate sites on VMAT2, which are associated with distinct pharmacophores. Thus, structural modification of the MTD molecule resulted in analogs exhibiting improved drug likeness and improved selectivity for VMAT2, as well as the ability to decrease methamphetamine-evoked DA release

  7. Atypical dopamine transporter inhibitors R-modafinil and JHW 007 differentially affect D2 autoreceptor neurotransmission and the firing rate of midbrain dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Avelar, Alicia J; Cao, Jianjing; Newman, Amy Hauck; Beckstead, Michael J

    2017-09-01

    Abuse of psychostimulants like cocaine that inhibit dopamine (DA) reuptake through the dopamine transporter (DAT) represents a major public health issue, however FDA-approved pharmacotherapies have yet to be developed. Recently a class of ligands termed "atypical DAT inhibitors" has gained attention due to their range of effectiveness in increasing extracellular DA levels without demonstrating significant abuse liability. These compounds not only hold promise as therapeutic agents to treat stimulant use disorders but also as experimental tools to improve our understanding of DAT function. Here we used patch clamp electrophysiology in mouse brain slices to explore the effects of two atypical DAT inhibitors (R-modafinil and JHW 007) on the physiology of single DA neurons in the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. Despite their commonalities of being DAT inhibitors that lack cocaine-like behavioral profiles, these compounds exhibited surprisingly divergent cellular effects. Similar to cocaine, R-modafinil slowed DA neuron firing in a D2 receptor-dependent manner and rapidly enhanced the amplitude and duration of D2 receptor-mediated currents in the midbrain. In contrast, JHW 007 exhibited little effect on firing, slow DAT blockade, and an unexpected inhibition of D2 receptor-mediated currents that may be due to direct D2 receptor antagonism. Furthermore, pretreatment with JHW 007 blunted the cellular effects of cocaine, suggesting that it may be valuable to investigate similar DAT inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents. Further exploration of these and other atypical DAT inhibitors may reveal important cellular effects of compounds that will have potential as pharmacotherapies for treating cocaine use disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Increased vesicular monoamine transporter enhances dopamine release and opposes Parkinson disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lohr, Kelly M; Bernstein, Alison I; Stout, Kristen A; Dunn, Amy R; Lazo, Carlos R; Alter, Shawn P; Wang, Minzheng; Li, Yingjie; Fan, Xueliang; Hess, Ellen J; Yi, Hong; Vecchio, Laura M; Goldstein, David S; Guillot, Thomas S; Salahpour, Ali; Miller, Gary W

    2014-07-08

    Disruption of neurotransmitter vesicle dynamics (transport, capacity, release) has been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric conditions. Here, we report a novel mouse model of enhanced vesicular function via bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-mediated overexpression of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2; Slc18a2). A twofold increase in vesicular transport enhances the vesicular capacity for dopamine (56%), dopamine vesicle volume (33%), and basal tissue dopamine levels (21%) in the mouse striatum. The elevated vesicular capacity leads to an increase in stimulated dopamine release (84%) and extracellular dopamine levels (44%). VMAT2-overexpressing mice show improved outcomes on anxiety and depressive-like behaviors and increased basal locomotor activity (41%). Finally, these mice exhibit significant protection from neurotoxic insult by the dopaminergic toxicant 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), as measured by reduced dopamine terminal damage and substantia nigra pars compacta cell loss. The increased release of dopamine and neuroprotection from MPTP toxicity in the VMAT2-overexpressing mice suggest that interventions aimed at enhancing vesicular capacity may be of therapeutic benefit in Parkinson disease.

  9. Increased vesicular monoamine transporter enhances dopamine release and opposes Parkinson disease-related neurodegeneration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, Kelly M.; Bernstein, Alison I.; Stout, Kristen A.; Dunn, Amy R.; Lazo, Carlos R.; Alter, Shawn P.; Wang, Minzheng; Li, Yingjie; Fan, Xueliang; Hess, Ellen J.; Yi, Hong; Vecchio, Laura M.; Goldstein, David S.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Salahpour, Ali; Miller, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of neurotransmitter vesicle dynamics (transport, capacity, release) has been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric conditions. Here, we report a novel mouse model of enhanced vesicular function via bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-mediated overexpression of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2; Slc18a2). A twofold increase in vesicular transport enhances the vesicular capacity for dopamine (56%), dopamine vesicle volume (33%), and basal tissue dopamine levels (21%) in the mouse striatum. The elevated vesicular capacity leads to an increase in stimulated dopamine release (84%) and extracellular dopamine levels (44%). VMAT2-overexpressing mice show improved outcomes on anxiety and depressive-like behaviors and increased basal locomotor activity (41%). Finally, these mice exhibit significant protection from neurotoxic insult by the dopaminergic toxicant 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), as measured by reduced dopamine terminal damage and substantia nigra pars compacta cell loss. The increased release of dopamine and neuroprotection from MPTP toxicity in the VMAT2-overexpressing mice suggest that interventions aimed at enhancing vesicular capacity may be of therapeutic benefit in Parkinson disease. PMID:24979780

  10. Dopamine transporter availability in clinically normal aging is associated with individual differences in white matter integrity.

    PubMed

    Rieckmann, Anna; Hedden, Trey; Younger, Alayna P; Sperling, Reisa A; Johnson, Keith A; Buckner, Randy L

    2016-02-01

    Aging-related differences in white matter integrity, the presence of amyloid plaques, and density of biomarkers indicative of dopamine functions can be detected and quantified with in vivo human imaging. The primary aim of the present study was to investigate whether these imaging-based measures constitute independent imaging biomarkers in older adults, which would speak to the hypothesis that the aging brain is characterized by multiple independent neurobiological cascades. We assessed MRI-based markers of white matter integrity and PET-based marker of dopamine transporter density and amyloid deposition in the same set of 53 clinically normal individuals (age 65-87). A multiple regression analysis demonstrated that dopamine transporter availability is predicted by white matter integrity, which was detectable even after controlling for chronological age. Further post-hoc exploration revealed that dopamine transporter availability was further associated with systolic blood pressure, mirroring the established association between cardiovascular health and white matter integrity. Dopamine transporter availability was not associated with the presence of amyloid burden. Neurobiological correlates of dopamine transporter measures in aging are therefore likely unrelated to Alzheimer's disease but are aligned with white matter integrity and cardiovascular risk. More generally, these results suggest that two common imaging markers of the aging brain that are typically investigated separately do not reflect independent neurobiological processes. Hum Brain Mapp 37:621-631, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Improvement of Learning and Increase in Dopamine Level in the Frontal Cortex by Methylphenidate in Mice Lacking Dopamine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Takamatsu, Y.; Hagino, Y.; Sato, A.; Takahashi, T.; Nagasawa, S.Y.; Kubo, Y.; Mizuguchi, M.; Uhl, G.R.; Sora, I.; Ikeda, K.

    2015-01-01

    The symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are characterized by inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity. It is a common childhood neurodevelopmental disorder that often persists into adulthood. Improvements in ADHD symptoms using psychostimulants have been recognized as a paradoxical calming effect. The psychostimulant methylphenidate (MPH) is currently used as the first-line medication for the management of ADHD. Recent studies have drawn attention to altered dopamine-mediated neurotransmission in ADHD, particularly reuptake by the dopamine transporter (DAT). This hypothesis is supported by the observation that DAT knockout mice exhibit marked hyperactivity that is responsive to acute MPH treatment. However, other behaviors relevant to ADHD have not been fully clarified. In the present study, we observed learning impairment in shuttle-box avoidance behavior together with hyperactivity in a novel environment in DAT knockout mice. Methylphenidate normalized these behaviors and enhanced escape activity in the tail suspension test. Interestingly, the effective dose of MPH increased extracellular dopamine in the prefrontal cortex but not striatum, suggesting an important role for changes in prefrontal dopamine in ADHD. Research that uses rodent models such as DAT knockout mice may be useful for elucidating the pathophysiology of ADHD. PMID:25817856

  12. Cocaine and amphetamine elicit differential effects in rats with a unilateral injection of dopamine transporter antisense oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Silvia, C P; Jaber, M; King, G R; Ellinwood, E H; Caron, M G

    1997-02-01

    We have developed an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to the dopamine transporter and used it to discriminate the behavioral properties of amphetamine and cocaine. In SK-N-MC cells permanently transfected with the dopamine transporter complementary DNA, treatment with 5 mM antisense oligodeoxynucleotide reduced dopamine uptake by 25% when compared to sense control. Unilateral intranigral administration of dopamine transporter antisense (50 microM) twice daily in freely moving rats for 2.5 days was sufficient to reduce dopamine transporter messenger RNA by 70% as measured by in situ hybridization, but not protein levels as measured by [3H]mazindol binding. However, intranigral treatment via implanted osmotic minipump over a period of seven days produced reductions in both dopamine transporter messenger RNA and protein levels (32%) at a dose of 500 pmol/day. These results indicate a longer half-life for the dopamine transporter than expected. Potassium chloride depolarization of ipsilateral striatal slices showed a greater than 200% increase in dopamine overflow on the antisense-treated side compared to the control side. Since imbalance of dopamine tone is known to induce rotational activity, we tested this behavioral paradigm in rats treated with various oligodeoxynucleotides at different doses and time-points. We have found that antisense-treated animals did not rotate spontaneously under any experimental conditions. Using various psychostimulants that target the dopamine transporter and increase dopamine levels, we found that the antisense-treated animals consistently rotated contralaterally in response to amphetamine (2 mg/kg), but not to cocaine (10 mg/kg) or nomifensine (10 mg/kg). These results bring in vivo evidence for a different mode of action of amphetamine and cocaine on the dopamine transporter and lend direct support to the view that amphetamine acts as a dopamine releaser, whereas cocaine acts by blocking dopamine transport.

  13. Tamoxifen and its active metabolites inhibit dopamine transporter function independently of the estrogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Mikelman, Sarah R; Guptaroy, Bipasha; Gnegy, Margaret E

    2017-04-01

    As one of the primary mechanisms by which dopamine signaling is regulated, the dopamine transporter (DAT) is an attractive pharmacological target for the treatment of diseases based in dopaminergic dysfunction. In this work we demonstrate for the first time that the commonly prescribed breast cancer therapeutic tamoxifen and its major metabolites, 4-hydroxytamoxifen and endoxifen, inhibit DAT function. Tamoxifen inhibits [(3) H]dopamine uptake into human DAT (hDAT)-N2A cells via an uncompetitive or mixed mechanism. Endoxifen, an active metabolite of tamoxifen, asymmetrically inhibits DAT function in hDAT-N2A cells, showing a preference for the inhibition of amphetamine-stimulated dopamine efflux as compared to dopamine uptake. Importantly, we demonstrate that the effects of tamoxifen and its metabolites on the DAT occur independently of its activity as selective estrogen receptor modulators. This work suggests that tamoxifen is inhibiting DAT function through a previously unidentified mechanism. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  14. The Atypical MAP Kinase SWIP-13/ERK8 Regulates Dopamine Transporters through a Rho-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bermingham, Daniel P; Hardaway, J Andrew; Refai, Osama; Marks, Christian R; Snider, Sam L; Sturgeon, Sarah M; Spencer, William C; Colbran, Roger J; Miller, David M; Blakely, Randy D

    2017-09-20

    The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) regulates multiple behaviors across phylogeny, with disrupted DA signaling in humans associated with addiction, attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and Parkinson's disease. The DA transporter (DAT) imposes spatial and temporal limits on DA action, and provides for presynaptic DA recycling to replenish neurotransmitter pools. Molecular mechanisms that regulate DAT expression, trafficking, and function, particularly in vivo, remain poorly understood, though recent studies have implicated rho-linked pathways in psychostimulant action. To identify genes that dictate the ability of DAT to sustain normal levels of DA clearance, we pursued a forward genetic screen in Caenorhabditis elegans based on the phenotype swimming-induced paralysis (Swip), a paralytic behavior observed in hermaphrodite worms with loss-of-function dat-1 mutations. Here, we report the identity of swip-13, which encodes a highly conserved ortholog of the human atypical MAP kinase ERK8. We present evidence that SWIP-13 acts presynaptically to insure adequate levels of surface DAT expression and DA clearance. Moreover, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence supporting a conserved pathway involving SWIP-13/ERK8 activation of Rho GTPases that dictates DAT surface expression and function.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Signaling by the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) is tightly regulated by the DA transporter (DAT), insuring efficient DA clearance after release. Molecular networks that regulate DAT are poorly understood, particularly in vivo Using a forward genetic screen in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we implicate the atypical mitogen activated protein kinase, SWIP-13, in DAT regulation. Moreover, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that SWIP-13, as well as its human counterpart ERK8, regulate DAT surface availability via the activation of Rho proteins. Our findings implicate a novel pathway that regulates DA synaptic availability and that may

  15. Occupational exposure to PCBs reduces striatal dopamine transporter densities only in women: A β-CIT imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Seegal, Richard F.; Marek, Kenneth L.; Seibyl, John P.; Jennings, Danna L.; Molho, Eric S.; Higgins, Donald S.; Factor, Stewart A.; Fitzgerald, Edward F.; Hills, Elaine A.; Korrick, Susan A.; Wolff, Mary S.; Haase, Richard F.; Todd, Andrew C.; Parsons, Patrick; McCaffrey, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesize that occupational exposure to PCBs is associated with a reduction in central dopamine (DA) similar to changes previously seen in PCB exposed adult non-human primates. To test that hypothesis we used [123I]β-CIT SPECT imaging to estimate basal ganglia DA transporter density in former capacitor workers. Women, but not men, showed an inverse relationship between lipid-adjusted total serum PCB concentrations and DA transporter densities in the absence of differences in serum PCB concentrations. These sex differences may reflect age-related reductions in the levels of gonadal hormones since these hormones have been shown experimentally to alter response to DA neurotoxicants. These findings may aid in better understanding the roles that sex and age play in modifying central DA function following exposure, not only to PCBs, but also to other DA neurotoxicants as well as further elucidating the role of gonadal hormones in influencing the initiation and/or progression of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:20096358

  16. Expression of dopamine receptors and transporter in neuroendocrine gastrointestinal tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Lemmer, K; Ahnert-Hilger, G; Höpfner, M; Hoegerle, S; Faiss, S; Grabowski, P; Jockers-Scherübl, M; Riecken, E O; Zeitz, M; Scherübl, H

    2002-06-28

    C-11- or F-18-DOPA positron emission tomography (DOPA PET) is a new sensitive imaging technique for small neuroendocrine gastrointestinal tumors which evaluates the decarboxylase activity. To further characterize the dopaminergic system in neuroendocrine gastrointestinal tumor cells, we investigated the expression of both dopamine receptors and the transmembrane dopamine transporter (DAT) in the human neuroendocrine pancreatic cell line BON and in the neuroendocrine gut cell line STC-1. Both BON and STC-1 cells expressed mRNA of the dopamine receptors D2-D5 and DAT. mRNA of the dopamine receptor D1 was detected in BON cells only. Both in BON and STC-1 cells, expression of D2 and D5 receptors and DAT was also demonstrated immunocytochemically. For functional receptor characterization intracellular cAMP levels ([cAMP]i) were determined. Whereas in STC-1 cells dopamine and the D1-like (D1/D5) receptor agonist SKF 38393 increased [cAMP]i, [cAMP]i was decreased by dopamine or the D2-like (D2-D4) receptor agonist quinpirole in BON cells. Functional DAT activity was, however, not detected in either cell line. The presence of both dopamine receptors and of the DAT suggests an autocrine and/or paracrine function of dopamine in neuroendocrine gastrointestinal tumor cells. Yet neither the transmembrane dopamine transporter nor dopamine receptors are likely to contribute to positive DOPA PET imaging of neuroendocrine gastrointestinal tumors. However, these molecules may be of diagnostic importance when applying other dopaminergic system tracers.

  17. What can be learned from studies of multisubstrate mechanisms of neuronal dopamine transport?

    PubMed

    Schenk, James O; George, Shannon E; Schumacher, Paul Dietrich

    2003-10-31

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a Na+- and Cl--dependent transporter and, with respect to its three apparent substrates, both partially random sequential as well as ordered mechanisms have been reported. Here we describe some of the features of DAT, such as the coupling of energy to concentrate dopamine and the properties of slippage and leakage. Further, in considering the regulation of transport velocities by DAT few have considered issues related to substrate regulation of DAT activity. Specifically, what effect do changes in the constants (K) for the participation of Na+ and Cl- have on dopamine transport velocity? It is shown that DAT may possess properties of slippage, an argument is made that leakage may be important in neuronal systems containing DAT, and the influence of changing values of K for the participation of Na+ and Cl- in transport is shown to produce large effects on DAT activity depending on the multisubstrate kinetic mechanism.

  18. Animal models of depression in dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine transporter knockout mice: prominent effects of dopamine transporter deletions.

    PubMed

    Perona, Maria T G; Waters, Shonna; Hall, Frank Scott; Sora, Ichiro; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Murphy, Dennis L; Caron, Marc; Uhl, George R

    2008-09-01

    Antidepressant drugs produce therapeutic actions and many of their side effects via blockade of the plasma membrane transporters for serotonin (SERT/SLC6A2), norepinephrine (NET/SLC6A1), and dopamine (DAT/SLC6A3). Many antidepressants block several of these transporters; some are more selective. Mouse gene knockouts of these transporters provide interesting models for possible effects of chronic antidepressant treatments. To examine the role of monoamine transporters in models of depression DAT, NET, and SERT knockout (KO) mice and wild-type littermates were studied in the forced swim test (FST), the tail suspension test, and for sucrose consumption. To dissociate general activity from potential antidepressant effects three types of behavior were assessed in the FST: immobility, climbing, and swimming. In confirmation of earlier reports, both DAT KO and NET KO mice exhibited less immobility than wild-type littermates whereas SERT KO mice did not. Effects of DAT deletion were not simply because of hyperactivity, as decreased immobility was observed in DAT+/- mice that were not hyperactive as well as in DAT-/- mice that displayed profound hyperactivity. Climbing was increased, whereas swimming was almost eliminated in DAT-/- mice, and a modest but similar effect was seen in NET KO mice, which showed a modest decrease in locomotor activity. Combined increases in climbing and decreases in immobility are characteristic of FST results in antidepressant animal models, whereas selective effects on swimming are associated with the effects of stimulant drugs. Therefore, an effect on climbing is thought to more specifically reflect antidepressant effects, as has been observed in several other proposed animal models of reduced depressive phenotypes. A similar profile was observed in the tail suspension test, where DAT, NET, and SERT knockouts were all found to reduce immobility, but much greater effects were observed in DAT KO mice. However, to further determine whether

  19. Impact of subcortical white matter lesions on dopamine transporter SPECT.

    PubMed

    Funke, Elisabeth; Kupsch, Andreas; Buchert, Ralph; Brenner, Winfried; Plotkin, Michail

    2013-07-01

    Subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (SAE) can affect the nigrostriatal system and presumably cause vascular parkinsonism (VP). However, in patients with SAE, the differentiation of VP from idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPS) is challenging. The aim of the present study was to examine the striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) density in patients with parkinsonism and SAE. Fifteen consecutive patients with parkinsonian symptoms displayed SAE, as detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Fifteen retrospectively chosen, matched patients with diagnosis of IPS without any abnormalities in MRI served as a reference group. DAT SPECT was performed using the tracer ¹²³I-FP-CIT. Scans were acquired on a triple-head SPECT system (Multispect 3, Siemens) and analysed using the investigator-independent BRASS™ software (HERMES). In the SAE group, a DAT deficit was observed in 9/15 patients. In contrast, all patients from the IPS group showed a reduced DAT binding (p = 0.008). The specific binding ratios (BR) of putamen contralateral to the side of the more affected limb versus occipital lobe were in trend higher in patients with SAE versus patients in the IPS-group (p = 0.053). Indices for putaminal asymmetry (p = 0.036) and asymmetry caudate-to-putamen (p = 0.026) as well as the ratio caudate-to-putamen (p = 0.048) were significantly higher in IPS patients having no SAE. DAT deficit was less pronounced in patients with SAE and parkinsonism than in patients with IPS without any abnormalities in the MRI. A potential role of DAT SPECT in the differential diagnosis of VP and IPS requires more assessments within prospective studies.

  20. Dopamine transporter genetic variants and pesticides in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Beate R; Manthripragada, Angelika D; Costello, Sadie; Lincoln, Sarah J; Farrer, Matthew J; Cockburn, Myles; Bronstein, Jeff

    2009-06-01

    Research suggests that independent and joint effects of genetic variability in the dopamine transporter (DAT) locus and pesticides may influence Parkinson's disease (PD) risk. In 324 incident PD patients and 334 population controls from our rural California case-control study, we genotyped rs2652510, rs2550956 (for the DAT 5' clades), and the 3' variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR). Using geographic information system methods, we determined residential exposure to agricultural maneb and paraquat applications. We also collected occupational pesticide use data. Employing logistic regression, we calculated odds ratios (ORs) for clade diplotypes, VNTR genotype, and number of susceptibility (A clade and 9-repeat) alleles and assessed susceptibility allele-pesticide interactions. PD risk was increased separately in DAT A clade diplotype carriers [AA vs. BB: OR = 1.66; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.08-2.57] and 3' VNTR 9/9 carriers (9/9 vs. 10/10: OR = 1.8; 95% CI, 0.96-3.57), and our data suggest a gene dosing effect. Importantly, high exposure to paraquat and maneb in carriers of one susceptibility allele increased PD risk 3-fold (OR = 2.99; 95% CI, 0.88-10.2), and in carriers of two or more alleles more than 4-fold (OR = 4.53; 95% CI, 1.70-12.1). We obtained similar results for occupational pesticide measures. Using two independent pesticide measures, we a) replicated previously reported gene-environment interactions between DAT genetic variants and occupational pesticide exposure in men and b) overcame previous limitations of nonspecific pesticide measures and potential recall bias by employing state records and computer models to estimate residential pesticide exposure. Our results suggest that DAT genetic variability and pesticide exposure interact to increase PD risk.

  1. Classic Studies on the Interaction of Cocaine and the Dopamine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine transporter is responsible for recycling dopamine after release. Inhibitors of the dopamine transporter, such as cocaine, will stop the reuptake of dopamine and allow it to stay extracellularly, causing prominent changes at the molecular, cellular, and behavioral levels. There is much left to be known about the mechanism and site(s) of binding, as well as the effect that cocaine administration does to dopamine transporter-cocaine binding sites and gene expression which also plays a strong role in cocaine abusers and their behavioral characteristics. Thus, if more light is shed on the dopamine transporter-cocaine interaction, treatments for addiction and even other diseases of the dopaminergic system may not be too far ahead. As today’s ongoing research expands on the shoulders of classic research done in the 1990s and 2000s, the foundation of core research done in that time period will be reviewed, which forms the basis of today’s work and tomorrow’s therapies. PMID:26598579

  2. DaT-SPECT assessment depicts dopamine depletion among asymptomatic G2019S LRRK2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Artzi, Moran; Even-Sapir, Einat; Lerman Shacham, Hedva; Thaler, Avner; Urterger, Avi Orr; Bressman, Susan; Marder, Karen; Hendler, Talma; Giladi, Nir

    2017-01-01

    Identification of early changes in Dopamine-Transporter (DaT) SPECT imaging expected in the prodromal phase of Parkinson’s disease (PD), are usually overlooked. Carriers of the G2019S LRRK2 mutation are known to be at high risk for developing PD, compared to non-carriers. In this work we aimed to study early changes in Dopamine uptake in non-manifesting PD carriers (NMC) of the G2019S LRRK2 mutation using quantitative DaT-SPECT analysis and to examine the potential for early prediction of PD. Eighty Ashkenazi-Jewish subjects were included in this study: eighteen patients with PD; thirty-one NMC and thirty-one non-manifesting non-carriers (NMNC). All subjects underwent a through clinical assessment including evaluation of motor, olfactory, affective and non-motor symptoms and DaT-SPECT imaging. A population based DaT-SPECT template was created based on the NMNC cohort, and data driven volumes-of-interest (VOIs) were defined. Comparisons between groups were performed based on VOIs and voxel-wise analysis. The striatum area of all three cohorts was segmented into four VOIs, corresponding to the right/left dorsal and ventral striatum. Significant differences in clinical measures were found between patients with PD and non-manifesting subjects with no differences between NMC and NMNC. Significantly lower uptake (p<0.001) was detected in the right and left dorsal striatum in the PD group (2.2±0.3, 2.3±0.4) compared to the NMC (4.2±0.6, 4.3±0.5) and NMNC (4.5±0.6, 4.6±0.6), and significantly (p = 0.05) lower uptake in the right dorsal striatum in the NMC group compared to NMNC. Converging results were obtained using voxel-wise analysis. Two NMC participants, who later phenoconverted into PD, demonstrated reduced uptake mainly in the dorsal striatum. No significant correlations were found between the DaT-SPECT uptake in the different VOIs and clinical and behavioral assessments in the non-manifesting groups. This study shows the clinical value of quantitative

  3. DaT-SPECT assessment depicts dopamine depletion among asymptomatic G2019S LRRK2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Artzi, Moran; Even-Sapir, Einat; Lerman Shacham, Hedva; Thaler, Avner; Urterger, Avi Orr; Bressman, Susan; Marder, Karen; Hendler, Talma; Giladi, Nir; Ben Bashat, Dafna; Mirelman, Anat

    2017-01-01

    Identification of early changes in Dopamine-Transporter (DaT) SPECT imaging expected in the prodromal phase of Parkinson's disease (PD), are usually overlooked. Carriers of the G2019S LRRK2 mutation are known to be at high risk for developing PD, compared to non-carriers. In this work we aimed to study early changes in Dopamine uptake in non-manifesting PD carriers (NMC) of the G2019S LRRK2 mutation using quantitative DaT-SPECT analysis and to examine the potential for early prediction of PD. Eighty Ashkenazi-Jewish subjects were included in this study: eighteen patients with PD; thirty-one NMC and thirty-one non-manifesting non-carriers (NMNC). All subjects underwent a through clinical assessment including evaluation of motor, olfactory, affective and non-motor symptoms and DaT-SPECT imaging. A population based DaT-SPECT template was created based on the NMNC cohort, and data driven volumes-of-interest (VOIs) were defined. Comparisons between groups were performed based on VOIs and voxel-wise analysis. The striatum area of all three cohorts was segmented into four VOIs, corresponding to the right/left dorsal and ventral striatum. Significant differences in clinical measures were found between patients with PD and non-manifesting subjects with no differences between NMC and NMNC. Significantly lower uptake (p<0.001) was detected in the right and left dorsal striatum in the PD group (2.2±0.3, 2.3±0.4) compared to the NMC (4.2±0.6, 4.3±0.5) and NMNC (4.5±0.6, 4.6±0.6), and significantly (p = 0.05) lower uptake in the right dorsal striatum in the NMC group compared to NMNC. Converging results were obtained using voxel-wise analysis. Two NMC participants, who later phenoconverted into PD, demonstrated reduced uptake mainly in the dorsal striatum. No significant correlations were found between the DaT-SPECT uptake in the different VOIs and clinical and behavioral assessments in the non-manifesting groups. This study shows the clinical value of quantitative

  4. Pharmacological and Behavioral Characterization of D-473, an Orally Active Triple Reuptake Inhibitor Targeting Dopamine, Serotonin and Norepinephrine Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Aloke K.; Santra, Soumava; Sharma, Horrick; Voshavar, Chandrashekhar; Xu, Liping; Mabrouk, Omar; Antonio, Tamara; Reith, Maarten E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a debilitating disease affecting a wide cross section of people around the world. The current therapy for depression is less than adequate and there is a considerable unmet need for more efficacious treatment. Dopamine has been shown to play a significant role in depression including production of anhedonia which has been one of the untreated symptoms in MDD. It has been hypothesized that drugs acting at all three monoamine transporters including dopamine transporter should provide more efficacious antidepressants activity. This has led to the development of triple reuptake inhibitor D-473 which is a novel pyran based molecule and interacts with all three monoamine transporters. The monoamine uptake inhibition activity in the cloned human transporters expressed in HEK-293 cells (70.4, 9.18 and 39.7 for DAT, SERT and NET, respectively) indicates a serotonin preferring triple reuptake inhibition profile for this drug. The drug D-473 exhibited good brain penetration and produced efficacious activity in rat forced swim test under oral administration. The optimal efficacy dose did not produce any locomotor activation. Microdialysis experiment demonstrated that systemic administration of D-473 elevated extracellular level of the three monoamines DA, 5-HT, and NE efficaciously in the dorsal lateral striatum (DLS) and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) area, indicating in vivo blockade of all three monoamine transporters by D-473. Thus, the current biological data from D-473 indicate potent antidepressant activity of the molecule. PMID:25427177

  5. Pharmacological and behavioral characterization of D-473, an orally active triple reuptake inhibitor targeting dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine transporters.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Aloke K; Santra, Soumava; Sharma, Horrick; Voshavar, Chandrashekhar; Xu, Liping; Mabrouk, Omar; Antonio, Tamara; Reith, Maarten E A

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a debilitating disease affecting a wide cross section of people around the world. The current therapy for depression is less than adequate and there is a considerable unmet need for more efficacious treatment. Dopamine has been shown to play a significant role in depression including production of anhedonia which has been one of the untreated symptoms in MDD. It has been hypothesized that drugs acting at all three monoamine transporters including dopamine transporter should provide more efficacious antidepressants activity. This has led to the development of triple reuptake inhibitor D-473 which is a novel pyran based molecule and interacts with all three monoamine transporters. The monoamine uptake inhibition activity in the cloned human transporters expressed in HEK-293 cells (70.4, 9.18 and 39.7 for DAT, SERT and NET, respectively) indicates a serotonin preferring triple reuptake inhibition profile for this drug. The drug D-473 exhibited good brain penetration and produced efficacious activity in rat forced swim test under oral administration. The optimal efficacy dose did not produce any locomotor activation. Microdialysis experiment demonstrated that systemic administration of D-473 elevated extracellular level of the three monoamines DA, 5-HT, and NE efficaciously in the dorsal lateral striatum (DLS) and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) area, indicating in vivo blockade of all three monoamine transporters by D-473. Thus, the current biological data from D-473 indicate potent antidepressant activity of the molecule.

  6. Association of polymorphisms of dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2), and dopamine transporter (DAT1) genes with schizoid/avoidant behaviors (SAB).

    PubMed

    Blum, K; Braverman, E R; Wu, S; Cull, J G; Chen, T J; Gill, J; Wood, R; Eisenberg, A; Sherman, M; Davis, K R; Matthews, D; Fischer, L; Schnautz, N; Walsh, W; Pontius, A A; Zedar, M; Kaats, G; Comings, D E

    1997-05-01

    The dopaminergic system, and in particular the dopamine D2 receptor, has been implicated in reward mechanisms in the brain. Dysfunction of the D2 dopamine receptors leads to aberrant substance-seeking behaviors (ethanol, drugs, tobacco, and food) and other related behaviors (pathological gambling, Tourette's disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder). This is the first study supporting a strong association between the dopamine D2 receptor Taq A1 allele with schizoid/avoidant behavior (SAB). Additionally, an albeit weaker association between the 480-bp VNTR 10/10 allele of the dopamine transporter (DAT1) gene with SAB was similarly found.

  7. Role of the dopamine transporter in the action of psychostimulants, nicotine, and other drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J; Reith, M E A

    2008-11-01

    A number of studies over the last two decades have demonstrated the critical importance of dopamine (DA) in the behavioral pharmacology and addictive properties of abused drugs. The DA transporter (DAT) is a major target for drugs of abuse in the category of psychostimulants, and for methylphenidate (MPH), a drug used for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), which can also be a psychostimulant drug of abuse. Other drugs of abuse such as nicotine, ethanol, heroin and morphine interact with the DAT in more indirect ways. Despite the different ways in which drugs of abuse can affect DAT function, one evolving theme in all cases is regulation of the DAT at the level of surface expression. DAT function is dynamically regulated by multiple intracellular and extracellular signaling pathways and several protein-protein interactions. In addition, DAT expression is regulated through the removal (internalization) and recycling of the protein from the cell surface. Furthermore, recent studies have demonstrated that individual differences in response to novel environments and psychostimulants can be predicted based on individual basal functional DAT expression. Although current knowledge of multiple factors regulating DAT activity has greatly expanded, many aspects of this regulation remain to be elucidated; these data will enable efforts to identify drugs that might be used therapeutically for drug dependence therapeutics.

  8. Sensitized nucleus accumbens dopamine terminal responses to methylphenidate and dopamine transporter releasers after intermittent-access self-administration.

    PubMed

    Calipari, Erin S; Jones, Sara R

    2014-07-01

    Long-access methylphenidate (MPH) self-administration has been shown to produce enhanced amphetamine potency at the dopamine transporter and concomitant changes in reinforcing efficacy, suggesting that MPH abuse may change the dopamine system in a way that promotes future drug abuse. While long-access self-administration paradigms have translational validity for cocaine, it may not be as relevant a model of MPH abuse, as it has been suggested that people often take MPH intermittently. Although previous work outlined the neurochemical and behavioral consequences of long-access MPH self-administration, it was not clear whether intermittent access (6 h session; 5 min access/30 min) would result in similar changes. For cocaine, long-access self-administration resulted in tolerance to cocaine's effects on dopamine and behavior while intermittent-access resulted in sensitization. Here we assessed the neurochemical consequences of intermittent-access MPH self-administration on dopamine terminal function. We found increased maximal rates of uptake, increased stimulated release, and subsensitive D2-like autoreceptors. Consistent with previous work using extended-access MPH paradigms, the potencies of amphetamine and MPH, but not cocaine, were increased, demonstrating that unlike cocaine, MPH effects were not altered by the pattern of intake. Although the potency results suggest that MPH may share properties with releasers, dopamine release was increased following acute application of MPH, similar to cocaine, and in contrast to the release decreasing effects of amphetamine. Taken together, these data demonstrate that MPH exhibits properties of both blockers and releasers, and that the compensatory changes produced by MPH self-administration may increase the abuse liability of amphetamines, independent of the pattern of administration.

  9. Sensitized Nucleus Accumbens Dopamine Terminal Responses to Methylphenidate and Dopamine Transporter Releasers after Intermittent-Access Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Calipari, Erin S.; Jones, Sara R.

    2014-01-01

    Long-access methylphenidate (MPH) self-administration has been shown to produce enhanced amphetamine potency at the dopamine transporter and concomitant changes in reinforcing efficacy, suggesting that MPH abuse may change the dopamine system in a way that promotes future drug abuse. While long-access self-administration paradigms have translational validity for cocaine, it may not be as relevant a model of MPH abuse, as it has been suggested that people often take MPH intermittently. Although previous work outlined the neurochemical and behavioral consequences of long-access MPH self-administration, it was not clear whether intermittent access (6 h session; 5min access/30min) would result in similar changes. For cocaine, long-access self-administration resulted in tolerance to cocaine’s effects on dopamine and behavior while intermittent-access resulted in sensitization. Here we assessed the neurochemical consequences of intermittent-access MPH self-administration on dopamine terminal function. We found increased maximal rates of uptake, increased stimulated release, and subsensitive D2-like autoreceptors. Consistent with previous work using extended-access MPH paradigms, the potencies of amphetamine and MPH, but not cocaine, were increased, demonstrating that unlike cocaine, MPH effects were not altered by the pattern of intake. Although the potency results suggest that MPH may share properties with releasers, dopamine release was increased following acute application of MPH, similar to cocaine, and in contrast to the release decreasing effects of amphetamine. Taken together, these data demonstrate that MPH exhibits properties of both blockers and releasers, and that the compensatory changes produced by MPH self-administration may increase the abuse liability of amphetamines, independent of the pattern of administration. PMID:24632529

  10. Distribution of dopamine transporter immunoreactive fibers in the human amygdaloid complex.

    PubMed

    García-Amado, María; Prensa, Lucía

    2013-12-01

    The nuclei of the human amygdaloid complex can be distinguished from each other on the basis of their cytoarchitecture, chemistry and connections, all of which process the information needed for the different functions (ranging from attention to memory and emotion) of the amygdala. This complex receives dopaminergic input that exerts modulatory effects over its intrinsic network and is critical for reward-related learning and fear conditioning. To determine the specific distribution of the dopaminergic input through the different nuclei and nuclear subdivisions of this structure we used stereological tools to quantify the fibers containing the dopamine transporter (used to signal the dopaminergic phenotype) in post-mortem samples from control individuals. Dopaminergic axons targeted every nucleus of the amygdaloid complex, and the density of dopamine transporter-containing axons varied considerably among its nuclear groups. The central group showed the greatest density of dopamine transporter-positive fibers, more than double the density of the basolateral group, the second most densely innervated structure. The dopamine transporter-positive innervation is very scant in the corticomedial group. The density of dopamine transporter-positive fibers did not vary among the nuclei of the basolateral group - i.e. basal, lateral and accessory basal nuclei - although there were significant density gradients among the subdivisions of these nuclei. These detailed quantitative data on dopamine transporter-positive innervation in the human amygdaloid complex can offer a useful reference in future studies aimed at analysing putative dysfunctions of this system in diseases involving brain dopamine, such as certain anxiety disorders, Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia.

  11. Dopamine D1, D2, D3 Receptors, Vesicular Monoamine Transporter Type-2 (VMAT2) and Dopamine Transporter (DAT) Densities in Aged Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianjun; Xu, Jinbin; Cairns, Nigel J.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Mach, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    The dopamine D1, D2, D3 receptors, vesicular monoamine transporter type-2 (VMAT2), and dopamine transporter (DAT) densities were measured in 11 aged human brains (aged 77–107.8, mean: 91 years) by quantitative autoradiography. The density of D1 receptors, VMAT2, and DAT was measured using [3H]SCH23390, [3H]dihydrotetrabenazine, and [3H]WIN35428, respectively. The density of D2 and D3 receptors was calculated using the D3-preferring radioligand, [3H]WC-10 and the D2-preferring radioligand [3H]raclopride using a mathematical model developed previously by our group. Dopamine D1, D2, and D3 receptors are extensively distributed throughout striatum; the highest density of D3 receptors occurred in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). The density of the DAT is 10–20-fold lower than that of VMAT2 in striatal regions. Dopamine D3 receptor density exceeded D2 receptor densities in extrastriatal regions, and thalamus contained a high level of D3 receptors with negligible D2 receptors. The density of dopamine D1 linearly correlated with D3 receptor density in the thalamus. The density of the DAT was negligible in the extrastriatal regions whereas the VMAT2 was expressed in moderate density. D3 receptor and VMAT2 densities were in similar level between the aged human and aged rhesus brain samples, whereas aged human brain samples had lower range of densities of D1 and D2 receptors and DAT compared with the aged rhesus monkey brain. The differential density of D3 and D2 receptors in human brain will be useful in the interpretation of PET imaging studies in human subjects with existing radiotracers, and assist in the validation of newer PET radiotracers having a higher selectivity for dopamine D2 or D3 receptors. PMID:23185343

  12. Epitope-tagged dopamine transporter knock-in mice reveal rapid endocytic trafficking and filopodia targeting of the transporter in dopaminergic axons

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Anjali; Richards, Toni L.; Simmons, Diana; Zahniser, Nancy R.; Sorkin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The plasma membrane dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) is essential for reuptake of extracellular DA. DAT function in heterologous cells is regulated by subcellular targeting, endocytosis, and intracellular trafficking, but the mechanisms regulating neuronal DAT remain poorly understood. Hence, we generated a knock-in mouse expressing a hemagglutinin (HA)-epitope-tagged DAT to study endogenous transporter trafficking. Introduction of the HA tag into the second extracellular loop of mouse DAT did not perturb its expression level, distribution pattern, or substrate uptake kinetics. Live-cell fluorescence microscopy imaging using fluorescently labeled HA-specific antibody and a quantitative HA-antibody endocytosis assay demonstrated that in axons HA-DAT was primarily located in the plasma membrane and internalized mostly in growth cones and varicosities, where synaptic vesicle markers were also concentrated. Formation of varicosities was frequently preceded or accompanied by highly dynamic filopodia-like membrane protrusions. Remarkably, HA-DAT often concentrated at the tips of these filopodia. This pool of HA-DATs exhibited low lateral membrane mobility. Thus, DAT-containing filopodia may be involved in synaptogenesis in developing DA neurons. Treatment of neurons with amphetamine increased mobility of filopodial HA-DAT and accelerated HA-DAT endocytosis in axons, suggesting that chronic amphetamine may interfere with DA synapse development. Interestingly, phorbol esters did not accelerate endocytosis of axonal DAT.—Rao, A., Richards, T. L., Simmons, D., Zahniser, N. R., Sorkin, A. Epitope-tagged dopamine transporter knock-in mice reveal rapid endocytic trafficking and filopodia targeting of the transporter in dopaminergic axons. PMID:22267337

  13. Dopamine Transporters in Striatum Correlated with Deactivation in the Default Mode Network during Visuospatial Attention

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasi, D.; Fowler, J.; Tomasi, D.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, R.L.; Telang, F.; Wang, Chang, L.; Ernst, T.; /Fowler, J.S.

    2009-06-01

    Dopamine and dopamine transporters (DAT, which regulate extracellular dopamine in the brain) are implicated in the modulation of attention but their specific roles are not well understood. Here we hypothesized that dopamine modulates attention by facilitation of brain deactivation in the default mode network (DMN). Thus, higher striatal DAT levels, which would result in an enhanced clearance of dopamine and hence weaker dopamine signals, would be associated to lower deactivation in the DMN during an attention task. For this purpose we assessed the relationship between DAT in striatum (measured with positron emission tomography and [{sup 11}C]cocaine used as DAT radiotracer) and brain activation and deactivation during a parametric visual attention task (measured with blood oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging) in healthy controls. We show that DAT availability in caudate and putamen had a negative correlation with deactivation in ventral parietal regions of the DMN (precuneus, BA 7) and a positive correlation with deactivation in a small region in the ventral anterior cingulate gyrus (BA 24/32). With increasing attentional load, DAT in caudate showed a negative correlation with load-related deactivation increases in precuneus. These findings provide evidence that dopamine transporters modulate neural activity in the DMN and anterior cingulate gyrus during visuospatial attention. Our findings suggest that dopamine modulates attention in part by regulating neuronal activity in posterior parietal cortex including precuneus (region involved in alertness) and cingulate gyrus (region deactivated in proportion to emotional interference). These findings suggest that the beneficial effects of stimulant medications (increase dopamine by blocking DAT) in inattention reflect in part their ability to facilitate the deactivation of the DMN.

  14. Characterization of a dopamine receptor (DA sub 2K ) in the kidney inner medulla

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, T.; Ye, M.Q.; Healy, D.P. )

    1991-04-15

    Dopamine (DA) produces a natriuretic/diuretic response in the kidney by mechanisms that are still not well understood. There is some indication that DA{sub 2} receptors may be involved in mediating the effects of DA, but little is known regarding the nature of this receptor in the kidney. Autoradiographic localization of ({sup 3}H)spiperone, a DA{sub 2} antagonist, indicated that high-density binding was restricted to inner medullary collecting ducts (IMCDs). ({sup 3}H)Spiperone binding was saturable, high affinity and high density. Functionally, DA stimulated prostaglandin E{sub 2} production by IMCD cells, an effect that could be blocked by the DA{sub 2} antagonist domperidone. These results indicate that the kidney inner medulla expresses a functional DA receptor that may represent a newly identified DA receptor subtype (here designated DA{sub 2K}). Moreover, these results suggest that the kidney inner medulla may be a significant site at which DA, either directly or indirectly, influences water and electrolyte excretion.

  15. Knocking out the dopamine reuptake transporter (DAT) does not change the baseline brain arachidonic acid signal in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Epolia; Chang, Lisa; Chen, Mei; Ma, Kaizong; Hall, F. Scott; Uhl, George R.; Rapoport, Stanley I.; Basselin, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Background Dopamine transporter (DAT) homozygous knockout (DAT−/−) mice have a 10-fold higher extracellular DA concentration in the caudate-putamen and nucleus accumbens than do wildtype (DAT+/+) mice, but show reduced presynaptic DA synthesis and fewer postsynaptic D2 receptors. One aspect of neurotransmission involves DA binding to postsynaptic D2-like receptors coupled to cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), releasing second messenger arachidonic acid (AA) from synaptic membrane phospholipid. We hypothesized that tonic overactivation of D2-like receptors in DAT−/− mice due to elevated DA would not increase brain AA signaling, because of compensatory downregulation of postsynaptic signaling mechanisms. Methods [1-14C]AA was infused intravenously for 3 min in unanesthetized DAT+/+, heterozygous (DAT+/−) and DAT−/− mice. AA incorporation coefficients k* and rates Jin, markers of AA metabolism and signaling, were imaged in 83 brain regions using quantitative autoradiography brain cPLA2-IV activity also was measured. Results Neither k* nor Jin for AA in any brain region, or in brain cPLA2-IV activity, differed significantly between DAT−/−, DAT+/− and DAT+/+ mice. Conclusions These results differ from reported increases in k* and Jin for AA, and brain cPLA2 expression, in serotonin reuptake transporter (5-HTT) knockout mice, and suggest that postsynaptic dopaminergic neurotransmission mechanisms involving AA are downregulated despite elevated DA in DAT−/− mice. PMID:22376027

  16. Effects of DA-Phen, a dopamine-aminoacidic conjugate, on alcohol intake and forced abstinence.

    PubMed

    Sutera, Flavia Maria; De Caro, Viviana; Cannizzaro, Carla; Giannola, Libero Italo; Lavanco, Gianluca; Plescia, Fulvio

    2016-09-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system plays a key role in drug reinforcement and is involved in the development of alcohol addiction. Manipulation of the DAergic system represents a promising strategy to control drug-seeking behavior. Previous studies on 2-amino-N-[2-(3,4-dihydroxy-phenyl)-ethyl]-3-phenyl-propionamide (DA-Phen) showed in vivo effects as a DA-ergic modulator. This study was aimed at investigate DA-Phen effects on operant behavior for alcohol seeking behavior, during reinstatement following subsequent periods of alcohol deprivation. For this purpose, male Wistar rats were tested in an operant paradigm of self-administration; behavioral reactivity and anxiety like-behavior during acute abstinence were evaluated. A characterization of DA-Phen CNS targeting by its quantification in the brain was also carried out. Our findings showed that DA-Phen administration was able to reduce relapse in alcohol drinking by 50% and reversed the alterations in behavioral reactivity and emotionality observed during acute abstinence. In conclusion, DA-Phen can reduce reinstatement of alcohol drinking in an operant-drinking paradigm following deprivation periods and reverse abstinence-induced behavioral phenotype. DA-Phen activity seems to be mediated by the modulation of the DAergic transmission. However further studies are needed to characterize DA-Phen pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, and its potential therapeutic profile in alcohol addiction.

  17. Absence of age-related dopamine transporter loss in current cocaine abusers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.J.; Volkow, N.D.; Fischman, M.

    1997-05-01

    The brain dopamine (DA) system appears to play a crucial role in the reinforcing properties of cocaine. Using PET we had previously shown significant decreases in DA D2 receptors but no changes in DA transporters (DAT) in detoxified cocaine abusers (>1 month after last cocaine use). This study evaluates DAT availability in current cocaine abusers (15 male and 5 female; age = 36.2{+-}5.3 years old) using PET and [C-11]cocaine, as a DAT ligand, and compares it to that in 18 male and 2 female age matched normal controls. Cocaine abusers had a history of abusing 4.2{+-}2.8 gm /week of cocaine for an average of 11.0{+-}4.9 years and their last use of cocaine was 5.4{+-}8 days prior to PET study. DAT availability was obtained using the ratio of the distribution volume in the region of interest (caudate, pulamen) to that in cerebellum which is a function of Bmax./Kd.+1. DAT availability in cocaine abusers did not differ to that in normals (N) (C= 1.78{+-}0.14, N= 1.77{+-}0.13). In addition, there were no differences between the groups in the distribution volume or the Kl (plasma to brain transfer constant) measures for [C-11]cocaine. However, in the normals but not in the abusers striatal DAT availability decreased with age (C: r = -0.07, p = 0.76; N: r = -0.55, p < 0.01). Though this study fails to show group differences in DAT availability between normals and current cocaine abusers it indicates a blunting of the age-related decline in DAT availability in the cocaine abusers. Future studies in older cocaine abusers at different time after detoxification arc required in order to assess if cocaine slows the loss of DAT with age or whether these changes reflect compensation to increased DAT blockade and recover with detoxification.

  18. Restoration of cocaine stimulation and reward by reintroducing wild type dopamine transporter in adult knock-in mice with a cocaine-insensitive dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiyin; O'Neill, Brian; Han, Dawn D; Thirtamara-Rajamani, Keerthi; Wang, Yanlin; Gu, Howard H

    2014-11-01

    In previous studies, we generated knock-in mice with a cocaine-insensitive dopamine transporter (DAT-CI mice) and found cocaine does not stimulate locomotion or produce reward in these mice, indicating DAT inhibition is necessary for cocaine stimulation and reward. However, DAT uptake is reduced in DAT-CI mice and thus the lack of cocaine responses could be due to adaptive changes. To test this, we used adeno-associated virus (AAV) to reintroduce the cocaine-sensitive wild type DAT (AAV-DATwt) back into adult DAT-CI mice, which restores cocaine inhibition of DAT in affected brain regions but does not reverse the adaptive changes. In an earlier study we showed that AAV-DATwt injections in regions covering the lateral nucleus accumbens (NAc) and lateral caudate-putamen (CPu) restored cocaine stimulation but not cocaine reward. In the current study, we expanded the AAV-DATwt infected areas to cover the olfactory tubercle (Tu) and the ventral midbrain (vMB) containing the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra (SN) in addition to CPu and NAc with multiple injections. These mice displayed the restoration of both locomotor stimulation and cocaine reward. We further found that AAV-DATwt injection in the vMB alone was sufficient to restore both cocaine stimulation and reward in DAT-CI mice. AAV injected in the VTA and SN resulted in DATwt expression and distribution to the DA terminal regions. In summary, cocaine induced locomotion and reward can be restored in fully developed DAT-CI mice, and cocaine inhibition of DAT expressed in dopaminergic neurons originated from the ventral midbrain mediates cocaine reward and stimulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Glycine Transporter-1 Inhibition Promotes Striatal Axon Sprouting via NMDA Receptors in Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Castagna, Candace; Mrejeru, Ana; Lizardi-Ortiz, José E.; Klein, Zoe; Lindsley, Craig W.

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptor activity is involved in shaping synaptic connections throughout development and adulthood. We recently reported that brief activation of NMDA receptors on cultured ventral midbrain dopamine neurons enhanced their axon growth rate and induced axonal branching. To test whether this mechanism was relevant to axon regrowth in adult animals, we examined the reinnervation of dorsal striatum following nigral dopamine neuron loss induced by unilateral intrastriatal injections of the toxin 6-hydroxydopamine. We used a pharmacological approach to enhance NMDA receptor-dependent signaling by treatment with an inhibitor of glycine transporter-1 that elevates levels of extracellular glycine, a coagonist required for NMDA receptor activation. All mice displayed sprouting of dopaminergic axons from spared fibers in the ventral striatum to the denervated dorsal striatum at 7 weeks post-lesion, but the reinnervation in mice treated for 4 weeks with glycine uptake inhibitor was approximately twice as dense as in untreated mice. The treated mice also displayed higher levels of striatal dopamine and a complete recovery from lateralization in a test of sensorimotor behavior. We confirmed that the actions of glycine uptake inhibition on reinnervation and behavioral recovery required NMDA receptors in dopamine neurons using targeted deletion of the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit in dopamine neurons. Glycine transport inhibitors promote functionally relevant sprouting of surviving dopamine axons and could provide clinical treatment for disorders such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:24133278

  20. Modulation of a 40-kDa catecholamine regulated protein by dopamine receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sharan, N; Nair, V D; Mishra, R K

    2001-02-09

    Previous reports have shown that catecholamine regulated proteins (CRP) are central nervous system specific and covalently bind to catecholamines. In the present study, we report the subcellular localization and differential modulation of a 40-kDa catecholamine regulated protein (CRP40) by dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists. CRP40 was found to be localized with nuclear and synaptosomal/mitochondrial and fractions. Chronic treatment with dopamine D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol in rats significantly increased the levels of CRP40 in the striatum, whereas, chronic R(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine (SCH 23390) dopamine D1 receptor antagonist administration significantly decreased striatal CRP40 levels. Moreover, acute haloperidol treatment did not alter the levels of CRP40 in any of the brain regions. Despite a sequence homology with the heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), levels of HSP70 remained unchanged after either drug treatment, suggesting a distinct function of CRP40 than HSP70. These results further suggest that CRP40 play an important role in dopaminergic neuronal function and the dopamine D1 receptor-mediated signaling pathway may be involved in the regulation of CRP40.

  1. Low dose pramipexole is neuroprotective in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease, and downregulates the dopamine transporter via the D3 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Jeffrey N; Woolsey, Cheryl; Ryoo, Han; Borwege, Sabine; Hagner, Diane

    2004-01-01

    Background Our aim was to determine if pramipexole, a D3 preferring agonist, effectively reduced dopamine neuron and fiber loss in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model when given at intraperitoneal doses corresponding to clinical doses. We also determined whether subchronic treatment with pramipexole regulates dopamine transporter function, thereby reducing intracellular transport of the active metabolite of MPTP, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+). Methods Ten 12-month old C57BL/6 mice were treated with MPTP (or saline) twice per day at 20 mg/kg s.c. (4 injections over 48 h). Mice were pretreated for 3 days and during the 2-day MPTP regimen with pramipexole (0.1 mg/kg/day) or saline. Stereological quantification of dopamine neuron number and optical density measurement of dopamine fiber loss were carried out at 1 week after treatment, using immunostaining for dopamine transporter (DAT) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Additional wild-type (WT) and D3 receptor knockout (KO) mice were treated for 5 days with pramipexole (0.1 mg/kg/day) or vehicle. The kinetics of [3H]MPP+ and [3H]DA uptake (Vmax and Km) were determined 24 h later; and at 24 h and 14 days dopamine transporter density was measured by quantitative autoradiography. Results Pramipexole treatment completely antagonized the neurotoxic effects of MPTP, as measured by substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area TH-immunoreactive cell counts. MPTP- induced loss of striatal innervation, as measured by DAT-immunoreactivity, was partially prevented by pramipexole, but not with regard to TH-IR. Pramipexole also reduced DAT- immunoreactivity in non-MPTP treated mice. Subchronic treatment with pramipexole lowered the Vmax for [3H]DA and [3H]MPP+ uptake into striatal synaptosomes of WT mice. Pramipexole treatment lowered Vmax in WT but not D3 KO mice; however, D3 KO mice had lower Vmax for [3H]DA uptake. There was no change in DAT number in WT with pramipexole treatment or D3 KO mice at

  2. Rab 11 regulates constitutive dopamine transporter trafficking and function in N2A neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Furman, Cheryse A; Lo, Charles B; Stokes, Stephanie; Esteban, Jose A; Gnegy, Margaret E

    2009-09-29

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a crucial regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission which undergoes constitutive and substrate-mediated trafficking to and from the membrane. Although, considerable research has been done to elucidate the regulation of substrate-stimulated DAT trafficking, less is known about which trafficking proteins are involved in constitutive DAT trafficking. Rab proteins are GTPases known to regulate the trafficking of proteins to and from specific endocytic compartments. Rabs 8 and 11, in particular, are involved in trafficking proteins from intracellular compartments to the plasma membrane. In this study, we sought to determine whether Rabs 8 and 11 would modulate DAT activity and trafficking in N2A neuroblastoma cells. We used Rab mutations known to confer constitutively active or dominant negative activity of these proteins to investigate the role of Rab activity in constitutive DAT trafficking and function. We found that constitutively active Rab 11 upregulates DAT function and surface expression while neither the constitutively active nor the dominant negative mutant of Rab 8 had any effect on DA uptake. Furthermore, immunofluorescence experiments revealed that dominant negative Rab 11 overexpression results in decreased surface DAT indicating a necessary function of Rab 11 in DAT trafficking to the plasma membrane. These data show for the first time a functional role of Rab proteins in the constitutive recycling of DAT to the plasma membrane.

  3. Pharmacological characterization of a dopamine transporter ligand that functions as a cocaine antagonist.

    PubMed

    Desai, Rajeev I; Grandy, David K; Lupica, Carl R; Katz, Jonathan L

    2014-01-01

    An N-butyl analog of benztropine, JHW007 [N-(n-butyl)-3α-[bis(4'-fluorophenyl)methoxy]-tropane], binds to dopamine transporters (DAT) but has reduced cocaine-like behavioral effects and antagonizes various effects of cocaine. The present study further examined mechanisms underlying these effects. Cocaine dose-dependently increased locomotion, whereas JHW007 was minimally effective but increased activity 24 hours after injection. JHW007 (3-10 mg/kg) dose-dependently and fully antagonized the locomotor-stimulant effects of cocaine (5-60 mg/kg), whereas N-methyl and N-allyl analogs and the dopamine (DA) uptake inhibitor GBR12909 [1-(2-[bis(4-fluorophenyl)methoxy]ethyl)-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine dihydrochloride] stimulated activity and failed to antagonize effects of cocaine. JHW007 also blocked the locomotor-stimulant effects of the DAT inhibitor GBR12909 but not stimulation produced by the δ-opioid agonist SNC 80 [4-[(R)-[(2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethylpiperazin-1-yl](3-methoxyphenyl)methyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide], which increases activity through nondopaminergic mechanisms. JHW007 blocked locomotor-stimulant effects of cocaine in both DA D2- and CB1-receptor knockout and wild-type mice, indicating a lack of involvement of these targets. Furthermore, JHW007 blocked effects of cocaine on stereotyped rearing but enhanced stereotyped sniffing, suggesting that interference with locomotion by enhanced stereotypies is not responsible for the cocaine-antagonist effects of JHW007. Time-course data indicate that administration of JHW007 antagonized the locomotor-stimulant effects of cocaine within 10 minutes of injection, whereas occupancy at the DAT, as determined in vivo, did not reach a maximum until 4.5 hours after injection. The σ1-receptor antagonist BD 1008 [N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)ethylamine dihydrobromide] blocked the locomotor-stimulant effects of cocaine. Overall, these findings suggest that JHW007 has cocaine-antagonist effects

  4. Dysregulation of dopamine transporter trafficking and function after abstinence from cocaine self-administration in rats: evidence for differential regulation in caudate putamen and nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Samuvel, Devadoss J; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D; Manohar, Senthilvelan; Kaliyaperumal, Kolanjiappan; See, Ronald E; Ramamoorthy, Sammanda

    2008-04-01

    The profound alterations produced by cocaine on dopamine (DA) neurotransmission raise the possibility that dopamine transporter (DAT)-expressing neurons may modify DA transport in response to repeated cocaine exposure to maintain the appropriate efficiency of DA clearance. In this study, we determined the changes in molecular mechanisms of DAT regulation in rats with a history of repeated cocaine self-administration followed by 3 weeks of abstinence. Using ex vivo caudate putamen (CPu) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc) synaptosomal preparations, we found that DA uptake was significantly higher in the CPu and NAcc of cocaine-experienced animals compared with yoked saline animals. Surface distribution, p-Ser phosphorylation, and protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac) interaction of DAT were all altered in the CPu. Maximal velocity (V(max)) values were elevated both in the CPu and NAcc of cocaine-experienced rats compared with saline controls. Although there was no change in the apparent affinity for DA in the CPu, increased DA affinity was evident in the NAcc. Consistent with elevated DAT activity in cocaine-experienced animals, a higher level of surface DAT, DAT-PP2Ac association, and decreased serine phosphorylation of DAT were observed in the CPu, but not in the NAcc. These results, for the first time, suggest that chronic cocaine self-administration followed by abstinence leads to persisting alterations in normal DAT trafficking and catalytic regulatory cascades in the CPu and NAcc in a brain region-specific manner.

  5. Long-Term Stimulant Treatment Affects Brain Dopamine Transporter Level in Patients with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.; Wigal, Timothy; Kollins, Scott H.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Telang, Frank; Logan, Jean; Jayne, Millard; Wong, Christopher T.; Han, Hao; Fowler, Joanna S.; Zhu, Wei; Swanson, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Brain dopamine dysfunction in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) could explain why stimulant medications, which increase dopamine signaling, are therapeutically beneficial. However while the acute increases in dopamine induced by stimulant medications have been associated with symptom improvement in ADHD the chronic effects have not been investigated. Method We used positron emission tomography and [11C]cocaine (dopamine transporter radioligand) to measure dopamine transporter availability in the brains of 18 never-medicated adult ADHD subjects prior to and after 12 months of treatment with methylphenidate and in 11 controls who were also scanned twice at 12 months interval but without stimulant medication. Dopamine transporter availability was quantified as non-displaceable binding potential using a kinetic model for reversible ligands. Results Twelve months of methylphenidate treatment increased striatal dopamine transporter availability in ADHD (caudate, putamen and ventral striatum: +24%, p<0.01); whereas there were no changes in control subjects retested at 12-month interval. Comparisons between controls and ADHD participants revealed no significant difference in dopamine transporter availability prior to treatment but showed higher dopamine transporter availability in ADHD participants than control after long-term treatment (caudate: p<0.007; putamen: p<0.005). Conclusion Upregulation of dopamine transporter availability during long-term treatment with methylphenidate may decrease treatment efficacy and exacerbate symptoms while not under the effects of the medication. Our findings also suggest that the discrepancies in the literature regarding dopamine transporter availability in ADHD participants (some studies reporting increases, other no changes and other decreases) may reflect, in part, differences in treatment histories. PMID:23696790

  6. Norepinephrine transporter inhibition with desipramine exacerbates L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia: role for synaptic dopamine regulation in denervated nigrostriatal terminals.

    PubMed

    Chotibut, Tanya; Fields, Victoria; Salvatore, Michael F

    2014-12-01

    Pharmacological dopamine (DA) replacement with Levodopa [L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA)] is the gold standard treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, long-term L-DOPA treatment is complicated by eventual debilitating abnormal involuntary movements termed L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID), a clinically significant obstacle for the majority of patients who rely on L-DOPA to alleviate PD-related motor symptoms. The manifestation of LID may in part be driven by excessive extracellular DA derived from L-DOPA, but potential involvement of DA reuptake in LID severity or expression is unknown. We recently reported that in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned striatum, norepinephrine transporter (NET) expression increases and may play a significant role in DA transport. Furthermore, L-DOPA preferentially inhibits DA uptake in lesioned striatum. Therefore, we hypothesized that desipramine (DMI), a NET antagonist, could affect the severity of LID in an established LID model. Whereas DMI alone elicited no dyskinetic effects in lesioned rats, DMI + L-DOPA-treated rats gradually expressed more severe dyskinesia compared with L-DOPA alone over time. At the conclusion of the study, we observed reduced NET expression and norepinephrine-mediated inhibition of DA uptake in the DMI + L-DOPA group compared with L-DOPA-alone group in lesioned striatum. LID severity positively correlated with striatal extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase phosphorylation among the three treatment groups, with increased ppERK1/2 in DMI + L-DOPA group compared with the L-DOPA- and DMI-alone groups. Taken together, these results indicate that the combination of chronic L-DOPA and NET-mediated DA reuptake in lesioned nigrostriatal terminals may have a role in LID severity in experimental Parkinsonism.

  7. The structure and function of the dopamine transporter and its role in CNS diseases.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Patrick C; Buckley, David A

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we explore the basic science of the dopamine transporter (DAT), an integral component of a system that regulates dopamine homeostasis. Dopamine is a key neurotransmitter for several brain functions including locomotor control and reward systems. The transporter structure, function, mechanism of action, localization, and distribution, in addition to gene regulation, are discussed. Over many years, a wealth of information concerning the DAT has been accrued and has led to increased interest in the role of the DAT in a plethora of central nervous system diseases. These DAT characteristics are explored in relation to a range of neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases, with a particular focus on the genetics of the DAT. In addition, we discuss the pharmacology of the DAT and how this relates to disease and addiction. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Computational and Biochemical Docking of the Irreversible Cocaine Analog RTI 82 Directly Demonstrates Ligand Positioning in the Dopamine Transporter Central Substrate-binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Rejwi Acharya; Pramod, Akula Bala; Sharma, Babita; Krout, Danielle; Foster, James D.; Cha, Joo Hwan; Cao, Jianjing; Newman, Amy Hauck; Lever, John R.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.; Henry, L. Keith

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) functions as a key regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission via re-uptake of synaptic dopamine (DA). Cocaine binding to DAT blocks this activity and elevates extracellular DA, leading to psychomotor stimulation and addiction, but the mechanisms by which cocaine interacts with DAT and inhibits transport remain incompletely understood. Here, we addressed these questions using computational and biochemical methodologies to localize the binding and adduction sites of the photoactivatable irreversible cocaine analog 3β-(p-chlorophenyl)tropane-2β-carboxylic acid, 4′-azido-3′-iodophenylethyl ester ([125I]RTI 82). Comparative modeling and small molecule docking indicated that the tropane pharmacophore of RTI 82 was positioned in the central DA active site with an orientation that juxtaposed the aryliodoazide group for cross-linking to rat DAT Phe-319. This prediction was verified by focused methionine substitution of residues flanking this site followed by cyanogen bromide mapping of the [125I]RTI 82-labeled mutants and by the substituted cysteine accessibility method protection analyses. These findings provide positive functional evidence linking tropane pharmacophore interaction with the core substrate-binding site and support a competitive mechanism for transport inhibition. This synergistic application of computational and biochemical methodologies overcomes many uncertainties inherent in other approaches and furnishes a schematic framework for elucidating the ligand-protein interactions of other classes of DA transport inhibitors. PMID:25179220

  9. Computational and biochemical docking of the irreversible cocaine analog RTI 82 directly demonstrates ligand positioning in the dopamine transporter central substrate-binding site.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Rejwi Acharya; Pramod, Akula Bala; Sharma, Babita; Krout, Danielle; Foster, James D; Cha, Joo Hwan; Cao, Jianjing; Newman, Amy Hauck; Lever, John R; Vaughan, Roxanne A; Henry, L Keith

    2014-10-24

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) functions as a key regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission via re-uptake of synaptic dopamine (DA). Cocaine binding to DAT blocks this activity and elevates extracellular DA, leading to psychomotor stimulation and addiction, but the mechanisms by which cocaine interacts with DAT and inhibits transport remain incompletely understood. Here, we addressed these questions using computational and biochemical methodologies to localize the binding and adduction sites of the photoactivatable irreversible cocaine analog 3β-(p-chlorophenyl)tropane-2β-carboxylic acid, 4'-azido-3'-iodophenylethyl ester ([(125)I]RTI 82). Comparative modeling and small molecule docking indicated that the tropane pharmacophore of RTI 82 was positioned in the central DA active site with an orientation that juxtaposed the aryliodoazide group for cross-linking to rat DAT Phe-319. This prediction was verified by focused methionine substitution of residues flanking this site followed by cyanogen bromide mapping of the [(125)I]RTI 82-labeled mutants and by the substituted cysteine accessibility method protection analyses. These findings provide positive functional evidence linking tropane pharmacophore interaction with the core substrate-binding site and support a competitive mechanism for transport inhibition. This synergistic application of computational and biochemical methodologies overcomes many uncertainties inherent in other approaches and furnishes a schematic framework for elucidating the ligand-protein interactions of other classes of DA transport inhibitors.

  10. Dopamine mediates striatal malonate toxicity via dopamine transporter-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species and D2 but not D1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Xia, X G; Schmidt, N; Teismann, P; Ferger, B; Schulz, J B

    2001-10-01

    Intrastriatal injection of the reversible succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor malonate results in both chemically induced hypoxia and striatal lesions that are similar to those seen in Huntington's disease and cerebral ischaemia. The mechanisms leading to neuronal death involve secondary excitotoxicity, the release of dopamine from nigrostriatal fibres and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) including nitric oxide (NO) and hydroxyl radicals. Here, we further investigated the contribution and mechanism of dopamine on malonate-induced striatal lesions. Prior lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway with 6-OHDA or the depletion of striatal dopamine stores by pretreatment with reserpine, an inhibitor or the vesicular monoamine transporter type-2 (VMAT2), in combination with alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine resulted in a significant reduction of malonate-induced striatal lesion volumes. This was paralleled by block or reduction of the malonate-induced generation of ROS, as measured by the conversions of salicylate to 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA) using microdialysis. Systemic or intrastriatal application of L-DOPA or dopamine, respectively, reconstituted malonate toxicity and the generation of ROS in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Block of the dopamine transporter by GBR12909 did not result in a reduction of malonate-induced dopamine release, but significantly reduced the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The D2 receptor agonist lisuride and the mixed D1 and D2 receptor agonist apomorphine, but not the D1 receptor agonist SKF38393, partially restored malonate toxicity in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats without increasing the generation of ROS. In line with these results sulpiride, an inhibitor of D2 receptors, reduced the malonate-induced lesion volume, whereas SCH23390, an inhbitor of D1 receptors, was ineffective. Our data suggest that malonate-induced dopamine toxicity to energetically impaired neurons is mediated by two independent pathways: (i) dopamine transporter uptake

  11. D-A and D-2 dopamine receptor function in the rabbit retina: a model for the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Hensler, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    Studies were done investigating the effect of the synaptic concentration of the transmitter DA, modified by changes in the frequency of electrical field stimulation and by the DA uptake inhibitor nomifensine, on the modulation of /sup 3/H-DA release by D-2 DA autoreceptors and by melatonin receptor sites. At lower synaptic concentrations of the transmitter dopamine, D-2 DA receptor agonists were more potent, while antagonists were more potent when the synaptic concentration of transmitter was higher. The potency of melatonin to inhibit DA release was not altered by the frequency of field stimulation of by frequency-dependent changes in the synaptic concentration of the transmitter.

  12. Dopamine Transporter Imaging Is Associated With Long-Term Outcomes in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ravina, Bernard; Marek, Kenneth; Eberly, Shirley; Oakes, David; Kurlan, Roger; Ascherio, Alberto; Beal, Flint; Beck, James; Flagg, Emily; Galpern, Wendy R.; Harman, Jennifer; Lang, Anthony E.; Schwarzschild, Michael; Tanner, Caroline; Shoulson, Ira

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) imaging has been studied as a diagnostic tool for degenerative parkinsonism. Our aim was to measure the prognostic value of imaging for motor and nonmotor outcomes in Parkinson’s disease (PD). We prospectively evaluated a Parkinson’s cohort after enrollment in a de novo clinical trial with a battery of motor (UPDRS), cognitive (Montreal Cognitive Assessment), and behavioral measures. DAT imaging with [123I][β]-CIT and single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) was performed at baseline and after 22 months. In total, 491 (91%) of the 537 subjects had evidence of DA deficiency on their baseline scan, consistent with PD, and were included in the analyses. The cohort was followed for 5.5 (0.8) years, with a mean duration of diagnosis of 6.3 (1.2). Lower striatal binding at baseline was independently associated with higher risk for clinical milestones and measures of disease severity, including motor-related disability, falling and postural instability, cognitive impairment, psychosis, and clinically important depressive symptoms. Subjects in the bottom quartile for striatal binding, compared to the top quartile, had an odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 3.3 (1.7, 6.7) for cognitive impairment and 12.9 (2.6, 62.4) for psychosis. Change from baseline in imaging after 22 months was also independently associated with motor, cognitive, and behavioral outcomes. DAT imaging with [123I][β]-CIT and SPECT, shortly after the diagnosis of PD, was independently associated with clinically important long-term motor and nonmotor outcomes. These results should be treated as hypothesis generating and require confirmation. PMID:22976926

  13. Function of dopamine transporter is compromised in DYT1 transgenic animal model in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hewett, Jeff; Johansen, Peter; Sharma, Nutan; Standaert, David; Balcioglu, Aygul

    2011-01-01

    Early onset torsion dystonia (DYT1), the most common form of hereditary primary dystonia, is caused by a mutation in the TOR1A gene, which codes for the protein, torsinA. We previously examined the effect of the human mutant torsinA on striatal dopaminergic function in a conventional transgenic mouse model of DYT1 dystonia (hMT1), in which human mutant torsinA is expressed under the cytomegalovirus promotor. Systemic administration of amphetamine did not increase dopamine (DA) release as efficiently in these mice as compared with wild-type transgenic and non-transgenic mice. We, now, studied the contribution of the DA transporter (DAT) to amphetamine-induced DA release in hMT1 transgenic mice using in vivo no-net flux microdialysis. This method applies different concentrations of DA through the microdialysis probe and measures DA concentration at the output of the probe following an equilibrium period. The slope (extraction fraction) is the measure of the DAT activity in vivo. The slope for hMT1 transgenic mice was 0.58 ± 0.07 and for non-transgenic animals, 0.87 ± 0.06 (p < 0.05). We further investigated the efficacy of nomifensine (a specific DAT inhibitor) in inhibiting amphetamine-induced DA release. Local application of nomifensine 80 min before the systemic application of amphetamine inhibited DA release in both transgenic mice and their non-transgenic littermates. The efficiency of the inhibition appeared to be different, with mean values of 48% for hMT1 transgenic mice versus 84% for non-transgenic littermates. Moreover, we have evaluated basal and amphetamine-induced locomotion in hMT1 transgenic mice compared with their non-transgenic littermates, using an O-maze behavioral chamber. Basal levels of locomotion in the hMT1 transgenic mice showed that they moved much less than their non-transgenic littermates (0.9 ± 0.3 m for transgenic mice vs. 2.4 ± 0.7 m for non-transgenic littermates, p < 0.05). This relative reduction in locomotion was also observed

  14. A receptor mechanism for methamphetamine action in dopamine transporter regulation in brain.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhihua; Miller, Gregory M

    2009-07-01

    This study reveals a novel receptor mechanism for methamphetamine action in dopamine transporter (DAT) regulation. Trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) is expressed in brain dopaminergic nuclei and is activated by methamphetamine in vitro. Here, we show that methamphetamine interaction with TAAR1 inhibits [(3)H]dopamine uptake, enhances or induces [(3)H]dopamine efflux, and triggers DAT internalization. In time course assays in which methamphetamine and [(3)H]dopamine were concurrently loaded into cells or synaptosomes or in pretreatment assays in which methamphetamine was washed away before [(3)H]dopamine loading, methamphetamine caused a distinct inhibition in [(3)H]dopamine uptake in TAAR1 + DAT-cotransfected cells and in wild-type mouse and rhesus monkey striatal synaptosomes. This distinct uptake inhibition was not observed in DAT-only transfected cells or in TAAR1 knockout mouse striatal synaptosomes. In [(3)H]dopamine efflux assays using the same cell and synaptosome preparations, methamphetamine enhanced [(3)H]dopamine efflux at a high loading concentration of [(3)H]dopamine (1 muM) or induced [(3)H]dopamine efflux at a low loading concentration of [(3)H]dopamine (10 nM) in a TAAR1-dependent manner. In DAT biotinylation assays using the same cell and synaptosome preparations, we observed that 1 muM methamphetamine induced DAT internalization in a TAAR1-dependent manner. All these TAAR1-mediated effects of methamphetamine were blocked by the protein kinase inhibitors H89 [N-[2-(4-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinoline] and/or 2-{8-[(dimethylamino) methyl]-6,7,8,9-tetrahydropyrido[1,2-a]indol-3-yl}-3-(1-methylindol-3-yl)maleimide (Ro32-0432), suggesting that methamphetamine interaction with TAAR1 triggers cellular phosphorylation cascades and leads to the observed effects of methamphetamine on DAT. These findings demonstrate a mediatory role of TAAR1 in methamphetamine action in DAT regulation and implicate this receptor as a potential target of

  15. Association of attention-deficit disorder and the dopamine transporter gene

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, E.H. Jr.; Stein, M.A.; Krasowski, M.D.; Cox, N.J.; Olkon, D.M.; Kieffer, J.E.; Leventhal, B.L.

    1995-04-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been shown to be familial and heritable, in previous studies. As with most psychiatric disorders, examination of pedigrees has not revealed a consistent Mendelian mode of transmission. The response of ADHD patients to medications that inhibit the dopamine transporter, including methylphenidate, amphetamine, pemoline, and bupropion, led us to consider the dopamine transporter as a primary candidate gene for ADHD. To avoid effects of population stratification and to avoid the problem of classification of relatives with other psychiatric disorders as affected or unaffected, we used the haplotype-based haplotype relative risk (HHRR) method to test for association between a VNTR polymorphism at the dopamine transporter locus (DAT1) and DSM-III-R-diagnosed ADHD (N = 49) and undifferentiated attention-deficit disorder (UADD) (N = 8) in trios composed of father, mother, and affected offspring. HHRR analysis revealed significant association between ADHS/UADD and the 480-bp DAT1 allele (X{sup 2} 7.51, 1 df, P = .006). When cases of UADD were dropped from the analysis, similar results were found (X{sup 2} 7.29, 1 df, P = .007). If these findings are replicated, molecular analysis of the dopamine transporter gene may identify mutations that increase susceptibility to ADHD/UADD. Biochemical analysis of such mutations may lead to development of more effective therapeutic interventions. 36 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. Interaction of Dopamine Transporter (DAT1) Genotype and Maltreatment for ADHD: A Latent Class Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, James J.; Lee, Steve S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although the association of the dopamine transporter (DAT1) gene and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been widely studied, far less is known about its potential interaction with environmental risk factors. Given that maltreatment is a replicated risk factor for ADHD, we explored the interaction between DAT1 and…

  17. A flow cytometry-based dopamine transporter binding assay using antagonist-conjugated quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Kovtun, Oleg; Ross, Emily J.; Tomlinson, Ian D.; Rosenthal, Sandra J.

    2012-04-05

    Here we present the development and validation of a flow cytometry-based dopamine transporter (DAT) binding assay that uses antagonist-conjugated quantum dots (QDs). Our anticipation is that our QD-based assay is of immediate value to the high throughput screening of novel DAT modulators.

  18. Interaction of Dopamine Transporter (DAT1) Genotype and Maltreatment for ADHD: A Latent Class Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, James J.; Lee, Steve S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although the association of the dopamine transporter (DAT1) gene and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been widely studied, far less is known about its potential interaction with environmental risk factors. Given that maltreatment is a replicated risk factor for ADHD, we explored the interaction between DAT1 and…

  19. Phase I Report: Technetium Radiotracers for the Dopamine Transporter. [September 1998 - March 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R.N.

    1999-03-17

    This project (a) demonstrated specific dopamine transporter (DAT) uptake in vivo and metabolic stability of a radiolabelled cycloplentadieny rhenium compound in rats and baboons, (b) showed that cyclopentadieny tricarbonyl rhenium and technetium compounds conjugated tropanel could be made by metal transfer with ferrocenes; and (c) explored new methods of synthesizing these compounds under mild conditions.

  20. Reduced striatal dopamine DA D2 receptor function in dominant-negative GSK-3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Sintes, Raquel; Bortolozzi, Analia; Artigas, Francesc; Lucas, José J

    2014-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a serine/threonine kinase with constitutive activity involved in cellular architecture, gene expression, cell proliferation, fate decision and apoptosis, among others. GSK-3 expression is particularly high in brain where it may be involved in neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer׳s disease, bipolar disorder and major depression. A link with schizophrenia is suggested by the antipsychotic drug-induced GSK-3 regulation and by the involvement of the Akt/GSK-3 pathway in dopaminergic neurotransmission. Taking advantage of the previous development of dominant negative GSK-3 transgenic mice (Tg) showing a selective reduction of GSK-3 activity in forebrain neurons but not in dopaminergic neurons, we explored the relationship between GSK-3 and dopaminergic neurotransmission in vivo. In microdialysis experiments, local quinpirole (DA D2-R agonist) in dorsal striatum reduced dopamine (DA) release significantly less in Tg mice than in wild-type (WT) mice. However, local SKF-81297 (selective DA D1-R agonist) in dorsal striatum reduced DA release equally in both control and Tg mice indicating a comparable function of DA D1-R in the direct striato-nigral pathway. Likewise, systemic quinpirole administration - acting preferentially on presynaptic DA D2- autoreceptors to modulate DA release-reduced striatal DA release similarly in both control and Tg mice. Quinpirole reduced locomotor activity and induced c-fos expression in globus pallidus (both striatal DA D2-R-mediated effects) significantly more in WT than in Tg mice. Taking together, the present results show that dominant negative GSK-3 transgenic mice show reduced DA D2-R-mediated function in striatum and further support a link between dopaminergic neurotransmission and GSK-3 activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  1. Brief intermittent cocaine self-administration and abstinence sensitizes cocaine effects on the dopamine transporter and increases drug seeking.

    PubMed

    Calipari, Erin S; Siciliano, Cody A; Zimmer, Benjamin A; Jones, Sara R

    2015-02-01

    Although traditional sensitization paradigms, which result in an augmentation of cocaine-induced locomotor behavior and dopamine (DA) overflow following repeated experimenter-delivered cocaine injections, are often used as a model to study drug addiction, similar effects have been difficult to demonstrate following cocaine self-administration. We have recently shown that intermittent access (IntA) to cocaine can result in increased cocaine potency at the DA transporter (DAT); however, traditional sensitization paradigms often show enhanced effects following withdrawal/abstinence periods. Therefore, we determined a time course of IntA-induced sensitization by examining the effects of 1 or 3 days of IntA, as well as a 7-day abstinence period on DA function, cocaine potency, and reinforcement. Here we show that cocaine potency is increased following as little as 3 days of IntA and further augmented following an abstinence period. In addition, IntA plus abstinence produced greater evoked DA release in the presence of cocaine as compared with all other groups, demonstrating that following abstinence, both cocaine's ability to increase DA release and inhibit uptake at the DAT, two separate mechanisms for increasing DA levels, are enhanced. Finally, we found that IntA-induced sensitization of the DA system resulted in an increased reinforcing efficacy of cocaine, an effect that was augmented after the 7-day abstinence period. These results suggest that sensitization of the DA system may have an important role in the early stages of drug abuse and may drive the increased drug seeking and taking that characterize the transition to uncontrolled drug use. Human data suggest that intermittency, sensitization, and periods of abstinence have an integral role in the process of addiction, highlighting the importance of utilizing pre-clinical models that integrate these phenomena, and suggesting that IntA paradigms may serve as novel models of human addiction.

  2. Brief Intermittent Cocaine Self-Administration and Abstinence Sensitizes Cocaine Effects on the Dopamine Transporter and Increases Drug Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Calipari, Erin S; Siciliano, Cody A; Zimmer, Benjamin A; Jones, Sara R

    2015-01-01

    Although traditional sensitization paradigms, which result in an augmentation of cocaine-induced locomotor behavior and dopamine (DA) overflow following repeated experimenter-delivered cocaine injections, are often used as a model to study drug addiction, similar effects have been difficult to demonstrate following cocaine self-administration. We have recently shown that intermittent access (IntA) to cocaine can result in increased cocaine potency at the DA transporter (DAT); however, traditional sensitization paradigms often show enhanced effects following withdrawal/abstinence periods. Therefore, we determined a time course of IntA-induced sensitization by examining the effects of 1 or 3 days of IntA, as well as a 7-day abstinence period on DA function, cocaine potency, and reinforcement. Here we show that cocaine potency is increased following as little as 3 days of IntA and further augmented following an abstinence period. In addition, IntA plus abstinence produced greater evoked DA release in the presence of cocaine as compared with all other groups, demonstrating that following abstinence, both cocaine's ability to increase DA release and inhibit uptake at the DAT, two separate mechanisms for increasing DA levels, are enhanced. Finally, we found that IntA-induced sensitization of the DA system resulted in an increased reinforcing efficacy of cocaine, an effect that was augmented after the 7-day abstinence period. These results suggest that sensitization of the DA system may have an important role in the early stages of drug abuse and may drive the increased drug seeking and taking that characterize the transition to uncontrolled drug use. Human data suggest that intermittency, sensitization, and periods of abstinence have an integral role in the process of addiction, highlighting the importance of utilizing pre-clinical models that integrate these phenomena, and suggesting that IntA paradigms may serve as novel models of human addiction. PMID:25212486

  3. Insights from molecular dynamics: the binding site of cocaine in the dopamine transporter and permeation pathways of substrates in the leucine and dopamine transporters

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Bonnie A.; Madura, Jeffry D.

    2012-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) facilitates the regulation of synaptic neurotransmitter levels. As a target for therapeutic and illicit psycho-stimulant drugs like antidepressants and cocaine, DAT has been studied intensively. Despite a wealth of mutational and physiological data regarding DAT, the structure remains unsolved and details of the transport mechanism, binding sites and conformational changes remain debated. A bacterial homologue of DAT, the leucine transporter (LeuTAa) has been used as a template and framework for modeling and understanding DAT. Free energy profiles obtained from Multi-Configuration Thermodynamic Integration allowed us to correctly identify the primary and secondary binding pockets of LeuTAa. A comparison of free energy profiles for dopamine and cocaine in DAT suggests that the binding site of cocaine is located in a secondary pocket, not the primary substrate site. Two recurring primary pathways for intracellular substrate release from the primary pocket are identified in both transporters using the Random Acceleration Molecular Dynamics method. One pathway appears to follow transmembranes (TMs) 1a and 6b while the other pathway follows along TMs 6b and 8. Interestingly, we observe that a single sodium ion is co-transported with leucine during both simulations types. PMID:23079638

  4. Using In Vivo Electrochemistry to Study the Physiological Effects of Cocaine and Other Stimulants on the Drosophila melanogaster Dopamine Transporter.

    PubMed

    Makos, Monique A; Han, Kyung-An; Heien, Michael L; Ewing, Andrew G

    2010-01-20

    Dopamine neurotransmission is thought to play a critical role in addiction reinforcing mechanisms of drugs of abuse. Electrochemical techniques have been employed extensively for monitoring in vivo dopamine changes in the brains of model organisms including rats, mice, and primates. Here, we investigated the effects of several stimulants on dopamine clearance using recently developed microanalytical tools for in vivo electrochemical measurements of dopamine in the central nervous system of Drosophila melanogaster. A cylindrical carbon-fiber microelectrode was placed in the protocerebral anterior medial region of the Drosophila brain (an area dense with dopamine neurons) while a micropipette injector was positioned to exogenously apply dopamine. Background-subtracted fast-scan cyclic voltammetry was carried out to quantify changes in dopamine concentration in the adult fly brain. Clearance of exogenously applied dopamine was significantly decreased in the protocerebral anterior medial area of the wild-type fly following treatment with cocaine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, or methylphenidate. In contrast, dopamine uptake remained unchanged when identical treatments were employed in fumin mutant flies that lack functional dopamine transporters. Our in vivo results support in vitro binding affinity studies that predict these four stimulants effectively block normal Drosophila dopamine transporter function. Furthermore, we found 10 muM to be a sufficient physiological cocaine concentration to significantly alter dopamine transporter uptake in the Drosophila central nervous system. Taken together, these data indicate dopamine uptake in the Drosophila brain is decreased by psychostimulants as observed in mammals. This validates the use of Drosophila as a model system for future studies into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying drug addiction in humans.

  5. Altered effect of dopamine transporter 3'UTR VNTR genotype on prefrontal and striatal function in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Prata, Diana P; Mechelli, Andrea; Picchioni, Marco M; Fu, Cynthia H Y; Toulopoulou, Timothea; Bramon, Elvira; Walshe, Muriel; Murray, Robin M; Collier, David A; McGuire, Philip

    2009-11-01

    The dopamine transporter plays a key role in the regulation of central dopaminergic transmission, which modulates cognitive processing. Disrupted dopamine function and impaired executive processing are robust features of schizophrenia. To examine the effect of a polymorphism in the dopamine transporter gene (the variable number of tandem repeats in the 3' untranslated region) on brain function during executive processing in healthy volunteers and patients with schizophrenia. We hypothesized that this variation would have a different effect on prefrontal and striatal activation in schizophrenia, reflecting altered dopamine function. Case-control study. Psychiatric research center. Eighty-five subjects, comprising 44 healthy volunteers (18 who were 9-repeat carriers and 26 who were 10-repeat homozygotes) and 41 patients with DSM-IV schizophrenia (18 who were 9-repeat carriers and 23 who were 10-repeat homozygotes). Regional brain activation during word generation relative to repetition in an overt verbal fluency task measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Main effects of genotype and diagnosis on activation and their interaction were estimated with analysis of variance in SPM5. Irrespective of diagnosis, the 10-repeat allele was associated with greater activation than the 9-repeat allele in the left anterior insula and right caudate nucleus. Trends for the same effect in the right insula and for greater deactivation in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex were also detected. There were diagnosis x genotype interactions in the left middle frontal gyrus and left nucleus accumbens, where the 9-repeat allele was associated with greater activation than the 10-repeat allele in patients but not controls. Insular, cingulate, and striatal function during an executive task is normally modulated by variation in the dopamine transporter gene. Its effect on activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum is altered in patients with schizophrenia

  6. Ctr9, a Protein in the Transcription Complex Paf1, Regulates Dopamine Transporter Activity at the Plasma Membrane*

    PubMed Central

    De Gois, Stéphanie; Slama, Patrick; Pietrancosta, Nicolas; Erdozain, Amaia M.; Louis, Franck; Bouvrais-Veret, Caroline; Daviet, Laurent; Giros, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a major regulator of sensorimotor and cognitive functions. The DA transporter (DAT) is the key protein that regulates the spatial and temporal activity of DA release into the synaptic cleft via the rapid reuptake of DA into presynaptic termini. Several lines of evidence have suggested that transporter-interacting proteins may play a role in DAT function and regulation. Here, we identified the tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing protein Ctr9 as a novel DAT binding partner using a yeast two-hybrid system. We showed that Ctr9 is expressed in dopaminergic neurons and forms a stable complex with DAT in vivo via GST pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation assays. In mammalian cells co-expressing both proteins, Ctr9 partially colocalizes with DAT at the plasma membrane. This interaction between DAT and Ctr9 results in a dramatic enhancement of DAT-mediated DA uptake due to an increased number of DAT transporters at the plasma membrane. We determined that the binding of Ctr9 to DAT requires residues YKF in the first half of the DAT C terminus. In addition, we characterized Ctr9, providing new insight into this protein. Using three-dimensional modeling, we identified three novel tetratricopeptide repeat domains in the Ctr9 sequence, and based on deletion mutation experiments, we demonstrated the role of the SH2 domain of Ctr9 in nuclear localization. Our results demonstrate that Ctr9 localization is not restricted to the nucleus, as previously described for the transcription complex Paf1. Taken together, our data provide evidence that Ctr9 modulates DAT function by regulating its trafficking. PMID:26048990

  7. FDG PET, dopamine transporter SPECT, and olfaction: Combining biomarkers in REM sleep behavior disorder.

    PubMed

    Meles, Sanne K; Vadasz, David; Renken, Remco J; Sittig-Wiegand, Elisabeth; Mayer, Geert; Depboylu, Candan; Reetz, Kathrin; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Pijpers, Angelique; Reesink, Fransje E; van Laar, Teus; Heinen, Lisette; Teune, Laura K; Höffken, Helmut; Luster, Marcus; Kesper, Karl; Adriaanse, Sofie M; Booij, Jan; Leenders, Klaus L; Oertel, Wolfgang H

    2017-07-22

    Idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder is a prodromal stage of Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. Hyposmia, reduced dopamine transporter binding, and expression of the brain metabolic PD-related pattern were each associated with increased risk of conversion to PD. The objective of this study was to study the relationship between the PD-related pattern, dopamine transporter binding, and olfaction in idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder. In this cross-sectional study, 21 idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder subjects underwent (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET, dopamine transporter imaging, and olfactory testing. For reference, we included (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET data of 19 controls, 20 PD patients, and 22 patients with dementia with Lewy bodies. PD-related pattern expression z-scores were computed from all PET scans. PD-related pattern expression was higher in idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder subjects compared with controls (P = 0.048), but lower compared with PD (P = 0.001) and dementia with Lewy bodies (P < 0.0001). PD-related pattern expression was higher in idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder subjects with hyposmia and in subjects with an abnormal dopamine transporter scan (P < 0.05, uncorrected). PD-related pattern expression, dopamine transporter binding, and olfaction may provide complementary information for predicting phenoconversion. © 2017 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  8. “Deconstruction” of the Abused Synthetic Cathinone Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and an Examination of Effects at the Human Dopamine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic cathinones, β-keto analogues of amphetamine (or, more correctly, of phenylalkylamines), represent a new and growing class of abused substances. Several such analogues have been demonstrated to act as dopamine (DA) releasing agents. Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) was the first synthetic cathinone shown to act as a cocaine-like DA reuptake inhibitor. MDPV and seven deconstructed analogues were examined to determine which of MDPV’s structural features account(s) for uptake inhibition. In voltage-clamped (−60 mV) Xenopus oocytes transfected with the human DA transporter (hDAT), all analogues elicited inhibitor-like behavior shown as hDAT-mediated outward currents. Using hDAT-expressing mammalian cells we determined the affinities of MDPV and its analogues to inhibit uptake of [3H]DA by hDAT that varied over a broad range (IC50 values ca. 135 to >25 000 nM). The methylenedioxy group of MDPV made a minimal contribution to affinity, the carbonyl group and a tertiary amine are more important, and the extended α-alkyl group seems most important. Either a tertiary amine, or the extended α-alkyl group (but not both), are required for the potent nature of MDPV as an hDAT inhibitor. PMID:24116392

  9. "Deconstruction" of the abused synthetic cathinone methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and an examination of effects at the human dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Kolanos, Renata; Solis, Ernesto; Sakloth, Farhana; De Felice, Louis J; Glennon, Richard A

    2013-12-18

    Synthetic cathinones, β-keto analogues of amphetamine (or, more correctly, of phenylalkylamines), represent a new and growing class of abused substances. Several such analogues have been demonstrated to act as dopamine (DA) releasing agents. Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) was the first synthetic cathinone shown to act as a cocaine-like DA reuptake inhibitor. MDPV and seven deconstructed analogues were examined to determine which of MDPV's structural features account(s) for uptake inhibition. In voltage-clamped (-60 mV) Xenopus oocytes transfected with the human DA transporter (hDAT), all analogues elicited inhibitor-like behavior shown as hDAT-mediated outward currents. Using hDAT-expressing mammalian cells we determined the affinities of MDPV and its analogues to inhibit uptake of [3H]DA by hDAT that varied over a broad range (IC50 values ca. 135 to >25,000 nM). The methylenedioxy group of MDPV made a minimal contribution to affinity, the carbonyl group and a tertiary amine are more important, and the extended α-alkyl group seems most important. Either a tertiary amine, or the extended α-alkyl group (but not both), are required for the potent nature of MDPV as an hDAT inhibitor.

  10. Association between reward-related activation in the ventral striatum and trait reward sensitivity is moderated by dopamine transporter genotype.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Tim; Heinzel, Sebastian; Dresler, Thomas; Plichta, Michael M; Renner, Tobias J; Markulin, Falko; Jakob, Peter M; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Fallgatter, Andreas J

    2011-10-01

    The impact of individual differences on human reward processing has been a focus of research in recent years, particularly, as they are associated with a variety of neuropsychiatric diseases including addiction and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Studies exploring the neural basis of individual differences in reward sensitivity have consistently implicated the ventral striatum (VS) as a core component of the human reward system. However, the mechanisms of dopaminergic neurotransmission underlying ventral striatal activation as well as trait reward sensitivity remain speculative. We addressed this issue by investigating the triadic interplay between VS reactivity during reward anticipation using functional magnetic resonance imaging, trait reward sensitivity, and dopamine (DA) transporter genotype (40-bp 3'VNTR of DAT, SLC6A3) affecting synaptic DA neurotransmission. Our results show that DAT variation moderates the association between VS-reactivity and trait reward sensitivity. Specifically, homozygote carriers of the DAT 10-repeat allele exhibit a strong positive correlation between reward sensitivity and reward-related VS activity whereas this relationship is absent in the DAT 9-repeat allele carriers. We discuss the possibility that this moderation of VS-trait relation might arise from DAT-dependent differences in DA availability affecting synaptic plasticity within the VS. Generally, studying the impact of dopaminergic gene variations on the relation between reward-related brain activity and trait reward sensitivity might facilitate the investigation of complex mechanisms underlying disorders linked to dysregulation of DA neurotransmission.

  11. Rats overexpressing the dopamine transporter display behavioral and neurobiological abnormalities with relevance to repetitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hadar, Ravit; Edemann-Callesen, Henriette; Reinel, Claudia; Wieske, Franziska; Voget, Mareike; Popova, Elena; Sohr, Reinhard; Avchalumov, Yosef; Priller, Josef; van Riesen, Christoph; Puls, Imke; Bader, Michael; Winter, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) plays a pivotal role in maintaining optimal dopamine signaling. DAT-overactivity has been linked to various neuropsychiatric disorders yet so far the direct pathological consequences of it has not been fully assessed. We here generated a transgenic rat model that via pronuclear microinjection overexpresses the DAT gene. Our results demonstrate that DAT-overexpression induces multiple neurobiological effects that exceeded the expected alterations in the corticostriatal dopamine system. Furthermore, transgenic rats specifically exhibited behavioral and pharmaco-therapeutic profiles phenotypic of repetitive disorders. Together our findings suggest that the DAT rat model will constitute a valuable tool for further investigations into the pathological influence of DAT overexpression on neural systems relevant to neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27974817

  12. Dopamine DA1 receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells are regulated by glucocorticoid and sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Yokokawa, K; Horio, T; Takeda, T

    1994-09-01

    The modulation of dopamine DA1 receptors of cultured rat renal arterial smooth muscle cells by glucocorticoid and sodium chloride was studied. At a concentration of 10 nM, the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone increased maximum receptor binding but had no effect on the dissociation constant. However, the maximum binding of [3H]Sch-23390 in cells treated with 100 mM sodium chloride did not change. However, the dissociation constant for DA1 receptor was increased by adding sodium chloride. The glucocorticoid effect on DA1 of arterial smooth muscle cells became apparent after hours of incubation in the presence of the steroid and was significantly inhibited by cycloheximide (10 micrograms/ml) or by the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-38486, indicating that the effect required protein synthesis through glucocorticoid receptors. Treatment of cells with 1 microM dexamethasone for 24 h increased basal and DA1-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. Basal adenylate cyclase was decreased by sodium chloride in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest differential control of DA1 receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells by glucocorticoid or sodium chloride.

  13. Assessment of the in vitro binding of JHW 007, a dopamine transport inhibitor that blocks the effects of cocaine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Benztropine (BZT) and its analogues, like cocaine, bind to the dopamine transporter and block dopamine uptake. However, while BZT analogues bind the DAT with high affinity, they generally do not have cocaine-like behavioral effects. JHW 007 is a BZT analogue that displaces [3H]WIN 35,428 from the D...

  14. PKC phosphorylates residues in the N-terminal of the DA transporter to regulate amphetamine-induced DA efflux.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Bubula, Nancy; Brown, Jason; Wang, Yunliang; Kondev, Veronika; Vezina, Paul

    2016-05-27

    The DA transporter (DAT), a phosphoprotein, controls extracellular dopamine (DA) levels in the central nervous system through transport or reverse transport (efflux). Multiple lines of evidence support the claim that PKC significantly contributes to amphetamine-induced DA efflux. Other signaling pathways, involving CaMKII and ERK, have also been shown to regulate DAT mediated efflux. Here we assessed the contribution of putative PKC residues (S4, S7, S13) in the N-terminal of the DAT to amphetamine-induced DA efflux by transfecting DATs containing different serine to alanine (S-A) point mutations into DA pre-loaded HEK-293 cells and incubating these cells in amphetamine (2μM). The effects of a S-A mutation at the non-PKC residue S12 and a threonine to alanine (T-A) mutation at the ERK T53 residue were also assessed for comparison. WT-DATs were used as controls. In an initial experiment, we confirmed that inhibiting PKC with Go6976 (130nM) significantly reduced amphetamine-induced DA efflux. In subsequent experiments, cells transfected with the S4A, S12A, S13A, T53A and S4,7,13A mutants showed a reduction in amphetamine-induced DA efflux similar to that observed with Go6976. Interestingly, cells transfected with the S7A mutant, identified by some as a PKC-PKA residue, showed unperturbed WT-DAT levels of amphetamine-induced DA efflux. These results indicate that phosphorylation by PKC of select residues in the DAT N-terminal can regulate amphetamine-induced efflux. PKC can act either independently or in concert with other kinases such as ERK to produce this effect.

  15. Development of the dopamine transporter selective RTI-336 as a pharmacotherapy for cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Carroll, F Ivy; Howard, James L; Howell, Leonard L; Fox, Barbara S; Kuhar, Michael J

    2006-03-24

    The discovery and preclinical development of selective dopamine reuptake inhibitors as potential pharmacotherapies for treating cocaine addiction are presented. The studies are based on the hypothesis that a dopamine reuptake inhibitor is expected to partially substitute for cocaine, thus decreasing cocaine self-administration and minimizing the craving for cocaine. This type of indirect agonist therapy has been highly effective for treating smoking addiction (nicotine replacement therapy) and heroin addiction (methadone). To be an effective pharmacotherapy for cocaine addiction, the potential drug must be safe, long-acting, and have minimal abuse potential. We have developed several 3-phenyltropane analogs that are potent dopamine uptake inhibitors, and some are selective for the dopamine transporter relative to the serotonin and norepinephrine transporters. In animal studies, these compounds substitute for cocaine, reduce the intake of cocaine in rats and rhesus monkeys trained to self-administer cocaine, and have demonstrated a slow onset and long duration of action and lack of sensitization. The 3-phenyltropane analogs were also tested in a rhesus monkey self-administration model to define their abuse potential relative to cocaine. Based on these studies, 3beta-(4-chlorophenyl)-2beta-[3-(4'-methylphenyl)isoxazol-5-yl]tropane (RTI-336) has been selected for preclinical development.

  16. Regulation of dopamine transporter function by protein-protein interactions: new discoveries and methodological challenges.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Jacob; Jørgensen, Trine Nygaard; Gether, Ulrik

    2010-04-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) plays a key role in regulating dopaminergic signalling in the brain by mediating rapid clearance of dopamine from the synaptic clefts. The psychostimulatory actions of cocaine and amphetamine are primarily the result of a direct interaction of these compounds with DAT leading to attenuated dopamine clearance and for amphetamine even increased dopamine release. In the last decade, intensive efforts have been directed towards understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms governing the activity and availability of DAT in the plasma membrane of the pre-synaptic neurons. This has led to the identification of a plethora of different kinases, receptors and scaffolding proteins that interact with DAT and hereby either modulate the catalytic activity of the transporter or regulate its trafficking and degradation. Several new tools for studying DAT regulation in live cells have also recently become available such as fluorescently tagged cocaine analogues and fluorescent substrates. Here we review the current knowledge about the role of protein-protein interactions in DAT regulation as well as we describe the most recent methodological developments that have been established to overcome the challenges associated with the study of DAT in endogenous systems.

  17. Nonclassical pharmacology of the dopamine transporter: atypical inhibitors, allosteric modulators, and partial substrates.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Kyle C; Rothman, Richard B; Reith, Maarten E A

    2013-07-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a sodium-coupled symporter protein responsible for modulating the concentration of extraneuronal dopamine in the brain. The DAT is a principle target of various psychostimulant, nootropic, and antidepressant drugs, as well as certain drugs used recreationally, including the notoriously addictive stimulant cocaine. DAT ligands have traditionally been divided into two categories: cocaine-like inhibitors and amphetamine-like substrates. Whereas inhibitors block monoamine uptake by the DAT but are not translocated across the membrane, substrates are actively translocated and trigger DAT-mediated release of dopamine by reversal of the translocation cycle. Because both inhibitors and substrates increase extraneuronal dopamine levels, it is often assumed that all DAT ligands possess an addictive liability equivalent to that of cocaine. However, certain recently developed ligands, such as atypical benztropine-like DAT inhibitors with reduced or even a complete lack of cocaine-like rewarding effects, suggest that addictiveness is not a constant property of DAT-affecting compounds. These atypical ligands do not conform to the classic preconception that all DAT inhibitors (or substrates) are functionally and mechanistically alike. Instead, they suggest the possibility that the DAT exhibits some of the ligand-specific pleiotropic functional qualities inherent to G-protein-coupled receptors. That is, ligands with different chemical structures induce specific conformational changes in the transporter protein that can be differentially transduced by the cell, ultimately eliciting unique behavioral and psychological effects. The present overview discusses compounds with conformation-specific activity, useful not only as tools for studying the mechanics of dopamine transport, but also as leads for medication development in addictive disorders.

  18. Nonclassical Pharmacology of the Dopamine Transporter: Atypical Inhibitors, Allosteric Modulators, and Partial Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Richard B.; Reith, Maarten E. A.

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a sodium-coupled symporter protein responsible for modulating the concentration of extraneuronal dopamine in the brain. The DAT is a principle target of various psychostimulant, nootropic, and antidepressant drugs, as well as certain drugs used recreationally, including the notoriously addictive stimulant cocaine. DAT ligands have traditionally been divided into two categories: cocaine-like inhibitors and amphetamine-like substrates. Whereas inhibitors block monoamine uptake by the DAT but are not translocated across the membrane, substrates are actively translocated and trigger DAT-mediated release of dopamine by reversal of the translocation cycle. Because both inhibitors and substrates increase extraneuronal dopamine levels, it is often assumed that all DAT ligands possess an addictive liability equivalent to that of cocaine. However, certain recently developed ligands, such as atypical benztropine-like DAT inhibitors with reduced or even a complete lack of cocaine-like rewarding effects, suggest that addictiveness is not a constant property of DAT-affecting compounds. These atypical ligands do not conform to the classic preconception that all DAT inhibitors (or substrates) are functionally and mechanistically alike. Instead, they suggest the possibility that the DAT exhibits some of the ligand-specific pleiotropic functional qualities inherent to G-protein–coupled receptors. That is, ligands with different chemical structures induce specific conformational changes in the transporter protein that can be differentially transduced by the cell, ultimately eliciting unique behavioral and psychological effects. The present overview discusses compounds with conformation-specific activity, useful not only as tools for studying the mechanics of dopamine transport, but also as leads for medication development in addictive disorders. PMID:23568856

  19. Dopamine transporter (DAT1) VNTR polymorphism and alcoholism in two culturally different populations of south India.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Lakkakula V K S; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Wasnik, Samiksha; Singh, Lalji; Raghavendra Rao, Vadlamudi

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that the central dopaminergic reward pathway is likely involved in alcohol intake and the progression of alcohol dependence. Dopamine transporter (DAT1) mediates the active re-uptake of DA from the synapse and is a principal regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission. The gene for the human DAT1 displays several polymorphisms, including a 40-bp variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) ranging from 3 to 16 copies in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of the gene. To assess the role of this gene in alcoholism, we genotyped the VNTR of DAT1 gene in a sample of 206 subjects from the Kota population (111 alcohol dependence cases and 95 controls) and 142 subjects from Badaga population (81 alcohol dependence cases and 61 controls). Both populations inhabit a similar environmental zone, but have different ethnic histories. Phenotype was defined based on the DSM-IV criteria. Genotyping was performed using PCR and electrophoresis. The association of DAT1 with alcoholism was tested by using the Clump v1.9 program which uses the Monte Carlo method. In both Kota and Badaga populations, the allele A10 was the most frequent allele followed by allele A9. The genotypic distribution is in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in both cases and control groups of Kota and Badaga populations. The DAT1 VNTR was significantly associated with alcoholism in Badaga population but not in Kota population. Our results suggest that the A9 allele of the DAT gene is involved in vulnerability to alcoholism, but that these associations are population specific.

  20. Substrates and inhibitors display different sensitivity to expression level of the dopamine transporter in heterologously expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nianhang; Reith, Maarten E A

    2007-04-01

    The use of heterologous expression systems for studying dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) function has provided important information corroborating and complementing in situ obtained knowledge. Preliminary experiments with human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) heterologously expressing varying amounts of DAT suggested fluctuations in the potency of cocaine in inhibiting DA uptake and led to the present systematic assessment of the impact of the density of DAT on its function. Transiently expressing intact HEK293 cells, transfected with increasing amounts of DAT cDNA, displayed increasing levels of surface DAT, binding of the cocaine analog [(3)H]2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane ([(3)H]CFT), and uptake of [(3)H]DA, [(3)H]N-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ([(3)H]MPP(+)), [(3)H]norepinephrine, and [(3)H]serotonin. However, the amount of DAT cDNA and the DAT expression level required to produce 50% of maximal activity was threefold higher for CFT binding than for DA uptake. Increased DAT expression was accompanied by weakened potency in inhibiting [(3)H]DA uptake for cocaine, CFT, benztropine, and its analog JHW025, GBR 12909 and mazindol; their potency in inhibiting [(3)H]CFT binding was unaffected. Inhibition of uptake by the substrates DA, m-tyramine, d-amphetamine, or MPP(+) was also unaffected. Increasing DAT in stably expressing HEK293 cells by stimulation of gene expression with sodium butyrate also decreased the uptake inhibitory potency of a number of the above blockers without affecting the interaction between substrates and DAT. The present results prompt discussion of models explaining how factors regulating DAT expression at the plasma membrane can regulate DAT function and pharmacology.

  1. Dopamine transporter is essential for the maintenance of spontaneous activity of auditory nerve neurones and their responsiveness to sound stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ruel, Jérôme; Wang, Jing; Demêmes, Danielle; Gobaille, Serge; Puel, Jean-Luc; Rebillard, Guy

    2006-04-01

    Dopamine, a neurotransmitter released by the lateral olivocochlear efferents, has been shown tonically to inhibit the spontaneous and sound-evoked activity of auditory nerve fibres. This permanent inhibition probably requires the presence of an efficient transporter to remove dopamine from the synaptic cleft. Here, we report that the dopamine transporter is located in the lateral efferent fibres both below the inner hair cells and in the inner spiral bundle. Perilymphatic perfusion of the dopamine transporter inhibitors nomifensine and N-[1-(2-benzo[b]thiophenyl)cyclohexyl]piperidine into the cochlea reduced the spontaneous neural noise and the sound-evoked compound action potential of the auditory nerve in a dose-dependent manner, leading to both neural responses being completely abolished. We observed no significant change in cochlear responses generated by sensory hair cells (cochlear microphonic, summating potential, distortion products otoacoustic emissions) or in the endocochlear potential reflecting the functional state of the stria vascularis. This is consistent with a selective action of dopamine transporter inhibitors on auditory nerve activity. Capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence (EC-LIF) measurements showed that nomifensine-induced inhibition of auditory nerve responses was due to increased extracellular dopamine levels in the cochlea. Altogether, these results show that the dopamine transporter is essential for maintaining the spontaneous activity of auditory nerve neurones and their responsiveness to sound stimulation.

  2. Interaction between a phorbol ester and dopamine DA1 receptors on vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Murakawa, K; Yokokawa, K; Horio, T; Takeda, T

    1993-01-01

    The interaction between dopamine DA1 receptors and a phorbol ester was studied to elucidate the role of protein kinase C in the response of this receptor. The in vitro binding of [3H]Sch 23390 to DA1 receptor sites on vascular smooth muscle cells was saturable. The extent of [3H]Sch 23390 binding to phorbol ester-treated cells was increased without any change in the dissociation constant. The production of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in response to DA1 receptor stimulation was enhanced by preincubation of vascular smooth muscle cells with the phorbol ester for 4 h. However, no enhancement was observed when the medium used for preincubation was supplemented with a protein kinase C inhibitor. Direct stimulation of stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein with 5-guanylylimidodiphosphate and direct stimulation of adenylate cyclase with forskolin produced no significant differences in cyclase levels between phorbol ester-treated and untreated cells. These results suggest that activation of protein kinase C triggers an increase in the membrane expression of DA1 receptors, thereby enhancing receptor-coupled cAMP generation.

  3. A Role for Accumbal Glycine Receptors in Modulation of Dopamine Release by the Glycine Transporter-1 Inhibitor Org25935

    PubMed Central

    Lidö, Helga Höifödt; Ericson, Mia; Marston, Hugh; Söderpalm, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Accumbal glycine modulates basal and ethanol-induced dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens (nAc) as well as voluntary ethanol consumption. Also, systemic administration of the glycine transporter-1 inhibitor Org25935 elevates dopamine levels in nAc, prevents a further ethanol-induced dopamine elevation and robustly and dose-dependently decreases ethanol consumption in rats. Here we investigated whether Org25935 applied locally in nAc modulates dopamine release, and whether accumbal glycine receptors or NMDA receptors are involved in this tentative effect. We also addressed whether Org25935 and ethanol applied locally in nAc interact with dopamine levels, as seen after systemic administration. We used in vivo microdialysis coupled to HPLC-ED in freely moving male Wistar rats to monitor dopamine output in nAc after local perfusion of Org25935 alone, with ethanol, or Org25935-perfusion after pre-treatment with the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine or the NMDA receptor glycine site antagonist L-701.324. Local Org25935 increased extracellular dopamine levels in a subpopulation of rats. Local strychnine, but not systemic L-701.324, antagonized the dopamine-activating effect of Org25935. Ethanol failed to induce a dopamine overflow in the subpopulation responding to Org25935 with a dopamine elevation. The study supports a role for accumbal glycine receptors rather than NMDA receptor signaling in the dopamine-activating effect of Org25935. The results further indicate that the previously reported systemic Org25935–ethanol interaction with regard to accumbal dopamine is localized to the nAc. This adds to the growing evidence for the glycine receptor as an important player in the dopamine reward circuitry and in ethanol's effects within this system. PMID:21556278

  4. Amphetamine activates Rho GTPase signaling to mediate dopamine transporter internalization and acute behavioral effects of amphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, David S.; Underhill, Suzanne M.; Stolz, Donna B.; Murdoch, Geoffrey H.; Thiels, Edda; Romero, Guillermo; Amara, Susan G.

    2015-01-01

    Acute amphetamine (AMPH) exposure elevates extracellular dopamine through a variety of mechanisms that include inhibition of dopamine reuptake, depletion of vesicular stores, and facilitation of dopamine efflux across the plasma membrane. Recent work has shown that the DAT substrate AMPH, unlike cocaine and other nontransported blockers, can also stimulate endocytosis of the plasma membrane dopamine transporter (DAT). Here, we show that when AMPH enters the cytoplasm it rapidly stimulates DAT internalization through a dynamin-dependent, clathrin-independent process. This effect, which can be observed in transfected cells, cultured dopamine neurons, and midbrain slices, is mediated by activation of the small GTPase RhoA. Inhibition of RhoA activity with C3 exotoxin or a dominant-negative RhoA blocks AMPH-induced DAT internalization. These actions depend on AMPH entry into the cell and are blocked by the DAT inhibitor cocaine. AMPH also stimulates cAMP accumulation and PKA-dependent inactivation of RhoA, thus providing a mechanism whereby PKA- and RhoA-dependent signaling pathways can interact to regulate the timing and robustness of AMPH’s effects on DAT internalization. Consistent with this model, the activation of D1/D5 receptors that couple to PKA in dopamine neurons antagonizes RhoA activation, DAT internalization, and hyperlocomotion observed in mice after AMPH treatment. These observations support the existence of an unanticipated intracellular target that mediates the effects of AMPH on RhoA and cAMP signaling and suggest new pathways to target to disrupt AMPH action. PMID:26553986

  5. The action of a dopamine (DA1) receptor agonist, fenoldopam in human vasculature in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, A; Thom, S; Martin, G; Redman, D; Hasan, S; Sever, P

    1986-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate dopaminergic mechanisms in human vasculature using the selective vascular dopamine receptor agonist fenoldopam in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, forearm blood flow was measured plethysmographically and in vitro isolated rings of human blood vessels from a variety of sites were used for tissue bath studies. Intra-arterial fenoldopam markedly increased forearm blood flow, this effect was antagonised by (R) sulpiride, a vascular dopamine (DA1) antagonist, but not by metoclopramide, a neuronal (DA2) antagonist, or by guanethidine, an adrenergic neurone blocking agent. In vitro, fenoldopam relaxed preconstricted human renal, mesenteric and lumbar arteries, but not saphenous vein in a concentration dependent manner. (RS) sulpiride and SCH 23390 competitively antagonised this effect. These studies demonstrate the presence of a vasodilatory vascular dopamine receptor in man both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:2878679

  6. Alterations in adult behavioral responses to cocaine and dopamine transporters following juvenile exposure to methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Lisa; Yamamoto, Bryan K; Matuszewich, Leslie

    2011-01-20

    The present experiment assessed whether preadolescent exposure to methamphetamine would alter adult behavioral responses to cocaine and dopamine transporter immunoreactivity in the striatum of male and female rats. Juvenile rats were injected once daily with 0 or 2 mg/kg methamphetamine from postnatal days 21 to 35 and tested in adulthood. Male rats, but not female rats, exposed to methamphetamine showed an increase in responsiveness to cocaine in the open field and an increase in dopamine transporter immunoreactivity in the striatum. These findings suggest that early exposure to methamphetamine can lead to sex specific altered responses to psychostimulants in adulthood, which may contribute to later vulnerability to drug use. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Graft-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease: High striatal serotonin/dopamine transporter ratio.

    PubMed

    Politis, Marios; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Wu, Kit; Quinn, Niall P; Pogarell, Oliver; Brooks, David J; Bjorklund, Anders; Lindvall, Olle; Piccini, Paola

    2011-09-01

    Graft-induced dyskinesias are a serious complication after neural transplantation in Parkinson's disease. One patient with Parkinson's disease, treated with fetal grafts 14 years ago and deep brain stimulation 6 years ago, showed marked improvement of motor symptoms but continued to suffer from OFF-medication graft-induced dyskinesias. The patient received a series of clinical and imaging assessments. Positron emission tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography 14 years posttransplantation revealed an elevated serotonin/dopamine transporter ratio in the grafted striatum compatible with serotonergic hyperinnervation. Inhibition of serotonin neuron activity by systemic administration of a 5-HT(1A) agonist suppressed graft-induced dyskinesias. Our data provide further evidence that serotonergic neurons mediate graft-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease. Achieving a normal striatal serotonin/dopamine transporter ratio following transplantation of fetal tissue or stem cells should be necessary to avoid the development of graft-induced dyskinesias.

  8. Dopaminergic Control of Attentional Flexibility: Inhibition of Return is Associated with the Dopamine Transporter Gene (DAT1)

    PubMed Central

    Colzato, Lorenza S.; Pratt, Jay; Hommel, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Genetic variability related to the dopamine (DA) transporter gene (DAT1) has received increasing attention as a possible modulator of human cognition. The 9-repeat allele of the DAT1 gene is presumably associated with higher striatal DA levels than the 10-repeat allele, which might support inhibitory control functions. We investigated the impact of the DAT1 gene on the inhibition of return (IOR) effect, which refers to the fact that people are slower to detect a target if it appears in a previously attended location. 140 healthy adults, genotyped for the DAT1 gene, performed an IOR task with stimulus-onset asynchronies (SOAs) between attention cue and target of 150–1200 ms. Nine-repeat carriers showed more pronounced IOR effect than 10/10 homozygous at short SOAs but both groups of subjects eventually reached the same magnitude of IOR. Our findings support the idea that striatal DA levels promote IOR, presumably by biasing the interplay between prefrontal and striatal networks towards greater cognitive flexibility. PMID:20661460

  9. SLC6A3 coding variant Ala559Val found in two autism probands alters dopamine transporter function and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Bowton, E; Saunders, C; Reddy, I A; Campbell, N G; Hamilton, P J; Henry, L K; Coon, H; Sakrikar, D; Veenstra-VanderWeele, J M; Blakely, R D; Sutcliffe, J; Matthies, H J G; Erreger, K; Galli, A

    2014-10-14

    Emerging evidence associates dysfunction in the dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) with the pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The human DAT (hDAT; SLC6A3) rare variant with an Ala to Val substitution at amino acid 559 (hDAT A559V) was previously reported in individuals with bipolar disorder or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We have demonstrated that this variant is hyper-phosphorylated at the amino (N)-terminal serine (Ser) residues and promotes an anomalous DA efflux phenotype. Here, we report the novel identification of hDAT A559V in two unrelated ASD subjects and provide the first mechanistic description of its impaired trafficking phenotype. DAT surface expression is dynamically regulated by DAT substrates including the psychostimulant amphetamine (AMPH), which causes hDAT trafficking away from the plasma membrane. The integrity of DAT trafficking directly impacts DA transport capacity and therefore dopaminergic neurotransmission. Here, we show that hDAT A559V is resistant to AMPH-induced cell surface redistribution. This unique trafficking phenotype is conferred by altered protein kinase C β (PKCβ) activity. Cells expressing hDAT A559V exhibit constitutively elevated PKCβ activity, inhibition of which restores the AMPH-induced hDAT A559V membrane redistribution. Mechanistically, we link the inability of hDAT A559V to traffic in response to AMPH to the phosphorylation of the five most distal DAT N-terminal Ser. Mutation of these N-terminal Ser to Ala restores AMPH-induced trafficking. Furthermore, hDAT A559V has a diminished ability to transport AMPH, and therefore lacks AMPH-induced DA efflux. Pharmacological inhibition of PKCβ or Ser to Ala substitution in the hDAT A559V background restores AMPH-induced DA efflux while promoting intracellular AMPH accumulation. Although hDAT A559V is a rare variant, it has been found in multiple probands with neuropsychiatric disorders associated with imbalances in DA neurotransmission

  10. Palmitoylation controls dopamine transporter kinetics, degradation, and protein kinase C-dependent regulation.

    PubMed

    Foster, James D; Vaughan, Roxanne A

    2011-02-18

    Palmitoylation is a lipid modification that confers diverse functions to target proteins and is a contributing factor for many neuronal diseases. In this study, we demonstrate using [(3)H]palmitic acid labeling and acyl-biotinyl exchange that native and expressed dopamine transporters (DATs) are palmitoylated, and using the palmitoyl acyltransferase inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate (2BP), we identify several associated functions. Treatment of rat striatal synaptosomes with 2BP using lower doses or shorter times caused robust inhibition of transport V(max) that occurred with no losses of DAT protein or changes in DAT surface levels, indicating that acute loss of palmitoylation leads to reduction of transport kinetics. Treatment of synaptosomes or cells with 2BP using higher doses or longer times resulted in DAT protein losses and production of transporter fragments, implicating palmitoylation in regulation of transporter degradation. Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that palmitoylation of rat DAT occurs at Cys-580 at the intracellular end of transmembrane domain 12 and at one or more additional unidentified site(s). Cys-580 mutation also led to production of transporter degradation fragments and to increased phorbol ester-induced down-regulation, further supporting palmitoylation in opposing DAT turnover and in opposing protein kinase C-mediated regulation. These results identify S-palmitoylation as a major regulator of DAT properties that could significantly impact acute and long term dopamine transport capacity.

  11. Serotonin and Dopamine Transporter Binding in Children with Autism Determined by SPECT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makkonen, Ismo; Riikonen, Raili; Kokki, Hannu; Airaksinen, Mauno M.; Kuikka, Jyrki T.

    2008-01-01

    Disturbances in the serotonergic system have been recognized in autism. To investigate the association between serotonin and dopamine transporters and autism, we studied 15 children (14 males, one female; mean age 8y 8mo [SD 3y 10mo]) with autism and 10 non-autistic comparison children (five males, five females; mean age 9y 10mo [SD 2y 8mo]) using…

  12. Serotonin and Dopamine Transporter Binding in Children with Autism Determined by SPECT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makkonen, Ismo; Riikonen, Raili; Kokki, Hannu; Airaksinen, Mauno M.; Kuikka, Jyrki T.

    2008-01-01

    Disturbances in the serotonergic system have been recognized in autism. To investigate the association between serotonin and dopamine transporters and autism, we studied 15 children (14 males, one female; mean age 8y 8mo [SD 3y 10mo]) with autism and 10 non-autistic comparison children (five males, five females; mean age 9y 10mo [SD 2y 8mo]) using…

  13. Cocaine Self-Administration Produces Long-Lasting Alterations in Dopamine Transporter Responses to Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Siciliano, Cody A.; Fordahl, Steve C.

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by uncontrolled cocaine intake, which is thought to be driven, at least in part, by cocaine-induced deficits in dopamine system function. A decreased ability of cocaine to elevate dopamine levels has been repeatedly observed as a consequence of cocaine use in humans, and preclinical work has highlighted tolerance to cocaine's effects as a primary determinant in the development of aberrant cocaine taking behaviors. Here we determined that cocaine self-administration in rats produced tolerance to the dopamine transporter-inhibiting effects of cocaine in the nucleus accumbens core, which was normalized following a 14 or 60 d abstinence period; however, although these rats appeared to be similar to controls, a single self-administered infusion of cocaine at the end of abstinence, even after 60 d, fully reinstated tolerance to cocaine's effects. A single cocaine infusion in a naive rat had no effect on cocaine potency, demonstrating that cocaine self-administration leaves the dopamine transporter in a “primed” state, which allows for cocaine-induced plasticity to be reinstated by a subthreshold cocaine exposure. Further, reinstatement of cocaine tolerance was accompanied by decreased cocaine-induced locomotion and escalated cocaine intake despite extended abstinence from cocaine. These data demonstrate that cocaine leaves a long-lasting imprint on the dopamine system that is activated by re-exposure to cocaine. Further, these results provide a potential mechanism for severe cocaine binge episodes, which occur even after sustained abstinence from cocaine, and suggest that treatments aimed at transporter sites may be efficacious in promoting binge termination following relapse. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Tolerance is a DSM-V criterion for substance abuse disorders. Abusers consistently show reduced subjective effects of cocaine concomitant with reduced effects of cocaine at its main site of action

  14. Antagonist-induced conformational changes in dopamine transporter extracellular loop two involve residues in a potential salt bridge.

    PubMed

    Gaffaney, Jon D; Shetty, Madhur; Felts, Bruce; Pramod, Akula-Bala; Foster, James D; Henry, L Keith; Vaughan, Roxanne A

    2014-07-01

    Ligand-induced changes in the conformation of extracellular loop (EL) 2 in the rat (r) dopamine transporter (DAT) were examined using limited proteolysis with endoproteinase Asp-N and detection of cleavage products by epitope-specific immunoblotting. The principle N-terminal fragment produced by Asp-N was a 19kDa peptide likely derived by proteolysis of EL2 residue D174, which is present just past the extracellular end of TM3. Production of this fragment was significantly decreased by binding of cocaine and other uptake blockers, but was not affected by substrates or Zn(2+), indicating the presence of a conformational change at D174 that may be related to the mechanism of transport inhibition. DA transport activity and cocaine analog binding were decreased by Asp-N treatment, suggesting a requirement for EL2 integrity in these DAT functions. In a previous study we demonstrated that ligand-induced protease resistance also occurred at R218 on the C-terminal side of rDAT EL2. Here using substituted cysteine accessibility analysis of human (h) DAT we confirm cocaine-induced alterations in reactivity of the homologous R219 and identify conformational sensitivity of V221. Focused molecular modeling of D174 and R218 based on currently available Aquifex aeolicus leucine transporter crystal structures places these residues within 2.9Å of one another, suggesting their proximity as a structural basis for their similar conformational sensitivities and indicating their potential to form a salt bridge. These findings extend our understanding of DAT EL2 and its role in transport and binding functions.

  15. Antagonist-Induced Conformational Changes in Dopamine Transporter Extracellular Loop Two Involve Residues in a Potential Salt Bridge

    PubMed Central

    Gaffaney, Jon D.; Shetty, Madhur; Felts, Bruce; Pramod, Akula-Bala; Foster, James D.; Henry, L. Keith; Vaughan, Roxanne A.

    2014-01-01

    Ligand-induced changes in the conformation of extracellular loop (EL) 2 in the rat (r) dopamine transporter (DAT) were examined using limited proteolysis with endoproteinase Asp-N and detection of cleavage products by epitope-specific immunoblotting. The principle N-terminal fragment produced by Asp-N was a 19 kDa peptide likely derived by proteolysis of EL2 residue D174, which is present just past the extracellular end of TM3. Production of this fragment was significantly decreased by binding of cocaine and other uptake blockers, but was not affected by substrates or Zn2+, indicating the presence of a conformational change at D174 that may be related to the mechanism of transport inhibition. DA transport activity and cocaine analog binding were decreased by Asp-N treatment, suggesting a requirement for EL2 integrity in these DAT functions. In a previous study we demonstrated that ligand-induced protease resistance also occurred at R218 on the C-terminal side of rDAT EL2. Here using substituted cysteine accessibility analysis of human (h) DAT we confirm cocaine-induced alterations in reactivity of the homologous R219 and identify conformational sensitivity of V221. Focused molecular modeling of D174 and R218 based on currently available Aquifex aeolicus leucine transporter crystal structures places these residues within 2.9 Å of one another, suggesting their proximity as a structural basis for their similar conformational sensitivities and indicating their potential to form a salt bridge. These findings extend our understanding of DAT EL2 and its role in transport and binding functions. PMID:24269640

  16. Maternal separation affects dopamine transporter function in the spontaneously hypertensive rat: an in vivo electrochemical study.

    PubMed

    Womersley, Jacqueline S; Hsieh, Jennifer H; Kellaway, Lauriston A; Gerhardt, Greg A; Russell, Vivienne A

    2011-12-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a developmental disorder characterised by symptoms of inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity. The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) is a well-characterised model of this disorder and has been shown to exhibit dopamine dysregulation, one of the hypothesised causes of ADHD. Since stress experienced in the early stages of life can have long-lasting effects on behaviour, it was considered that early life stress may alter development of the dopaminergic system and thereby contribute to the behavioural characteristics of SHR. It was hypothesized that maternal separation would alter dopamine regulation by the transporter (DAT) in ways that distinguish SHR from control rat strains. SHR and control Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were subjected to maternal separation for 3 hours per day from postnatal day 2 to 14. Rats were tested for separation-induced anxiety-like behaviour followed by in vivo chronoamperometry to determine whether changes had occurred in striatal clearance of dopamine by DAT. The rate of disappearance of ejected dopamine was used as a measure of DAT function. Consistent with a model for ADHD, SHR were more active than WKY in the open field. SHR entered the inner zone more frequently and covered a significantly greater distance than WKY. Maternal separation increased the time that WKY spent in the closed arms and latency to enter the open arms of the elevated plus maze, consistent with other rat strains. Of note is that, maternal separation failed to produce anxiety-like behaviour in SHR. Analysis of the chronoamperometric data revealed that there was no difference in DAT function in the striatum of non-separated SHR and WKY. Maternal separation decreased the rate of dopamine clearance (k-1) in SHR striatum. Consistent with this observation, the dopamine clearance time (T100) was increased in SHR. These results suggest that the chronic mild stress of maternal separation impaired the function of striatal

  17. SPECT imaging of dopamine transporters with (99m)Tc-TRODAT-1 in major depression and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Lou, Cen; Huang, Zhongke; Shi, Guohua

    2011-01-01

    To investigate dopamine transporter in major depressive disorder and Parkinson's disease, the authors obtained single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain images from 13 patients with major depression, 17 Parkinson's disease patients, and 10 healthy volunteers by using 99mTc-TRODAT-1. The authors found the 99mTc-TRODAT-1 radio signal in the striatum was reduced in the majority of patients with major depressive disorder, and this decrease was even more severe in patients with Parkinson's disease. The results support the hypothesis of dopamine hypofunction in major depressive disorder and suggest that deficient dopamine transporter may be involved in the etiology of severe major depressive disorder.

  18. Brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease presenting as a severe infantile hypotonic parkinsonian disorder.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Jessie C; Wilson, Callum; Cunningham, Vicki; Glamuzina, Emma; Prosser, Debra O; Love, Donald R; Burgess, Trent; Taylor, Juliet; Swan, Brendan; Hill, Rosamund; Robertson, Stephen P; Snell, Russell G; Lehnert, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Two male siblings from a consanguineous union presented in early infancy with marked truncal hypotonia, a general paucity of movement, extrapyramidal signs and cognitive delay. By mid-childhood they had made little developmental progress and remained severely hypotonic and bradykinetic. They developed epilepsy and had problems with autonomic dysfunction and oculogyric crises. They had a number of orthopaedic problems secondary to their hypotonia. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurotransmitters were initially normal, apart from mildly elevated 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid, and the children did not respond favourably to a trial of levodopa-carbidopa. The youngest died from respiratory complications at 10 years of age. Repeat CSF neurotransmitters in the older sibling at eight years of age showed slightly low homovanillic acid and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a novel mutation homozygous in both children in the monoamine transporter gene SLC18A2 (p.Pro237His), resulting in brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease. This is the second family to be described with a mutation in this gene. Treatment with the dopamine agonist pramipexole in the surviving child resulted in mild improvements in alertness, communication, and eye movements. This case supports the identification of the causal mutation in the original case, expands the clinical phenotype of brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease and confirms that pramipexole treatment may lead to symptomatic improvement in affected individuals.

  19. Methamphetamine Alters Vesicular Monoamine Transporter-2 Function and Potassium-Stimulated Dopamine Release

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Pei-Wen; Hadlock, Gregory C.; Vieira-Brock, Paula; Stout, Kristen; Hanson, Glen R.; Fleckenstein, Annette E.

    2012-01-01

    This report demonstrates that a repeated “challenge” high-dose methamphetamine (METH) injection regimen rapidly decreases striatal K+-stimulated dopamine (DA) release concurrent with decreases in both synaptosomal membrane-associated (referred to herein as membrane-associated) and previously-reported decreases in non-synaptosomal membrane-associated (presumably cytoplasmic) vesicular DA uptake and content. Resembling previously reported effects involving cytoplasmic vesicles wherein uptake was decreased 48 h after treatment, the decrease in membrane-associated uptake persisted 72 h. Cytoplasmic and membrane-associated vesicular DA uptakes were decreased 7 d after the challenge regimen. A single METH injection also rapidly decreased K+-stimulated DA release, membrane-associated DA content, and membrane-associated DA uptake; however, unlike after the challenge regimen, the decrease in uptake recovered by 24 h. Pretreatment with the D2 receptor antagonist, eticlopride, did not attenuate the decrease in membrane-associated uptake as assessed 1 h after either a single or challenge treatment. However, eticlopride attenuated the decrease in membrane-associated uptake caused by the challenge regimen as assessed 24 h later. These data reveal complex effects of METH on vesicular function that vary according to the vesicle population under study, dosing regimen, and time after treatment. These may contribute to both the decrease in K+-stimulated DA release and the persistent dopaminergic deficits caused by METH. PMID:20649837

  20. Rescue of dopamine transporter function in hypoinsulinemic rats by a D2 receptor-ERK-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Owens, W Anthony; Williams, Jason M; Saunders, Christine; Avison, Malcolm J; Galli, Aurelio; Daws, Lynette C

    2012-02-22

    The dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) is a major target for abused drugs and a key regulator of extracellular DA. A rapidly growing literature implicates insulin as an important regulator of DAT function. We showed previously that amphetamine (AMPH)-evoked DA release is markedly impaired in rats depleted of insulin with the diabetogenic agent streptozotocin (STZ). Similarly, functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments revealed that the blood oxygenation level-dependent signal following acute AMPH administration in STZ-treated rats is reduced. Here, we report that these deficits are restored by repeated, systemic administration of AMPH (1.78 mg/kg, every other day for 8 d). AMPH stimulates DA D(2) receptors indirectly by increasing extracellular DA. Supporting a role for D(2) receptors in mediating this "rescue," the effect was completely blocked by pre-treatment of STZ-treated rats with the D(2) receptor antagonist raclopride before systemic AMPH. D(2) receptors regulate DAT cell surface expression through ERK1/2 signaling. In ex vivo striatal preparations, repeated AMPH injections increased immunoreactivity of phosphorylated ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2) in STZ-treated but not control rats. These data suggest that repeated exposure to AMPH can rescue, by activating D(2) receptors and p-ERK signaling, deficits in DAT function that result from hypoinsulinemia. Our data confirm the idea that disorders influencing insulin levels and/or signaling, such as diabetes and anorexia, can degrade DAT function and that insulin-independent pathways are present that may be exploited as potential therapeutic targets to restore normal DAT function.

  1. Short-term manganese inhalation decreases brain dopamine transporter levels without disrupting motor skills in rats.

    PubMed

    Saputra, Devina; Chang, JuOae; Lee, Byeong-Jae; Yoon, Jin-Ha; Kim, Jonghan; Lee, Kyuhong

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is used in industrial metal alloys and can be released into the atmosphere during methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl combustion. Increased Mn deposition in the brain after long-term exposure to the metal by inhalation is associated with altered dopamine metabolism and neurobehavioral problems, including impaired motor skills. However, neurotoxic effects of short-term exposure to inhaled Mn are not completely characterized. The purpose of this study is to define the neurobehavioral and neurochemical effects of short-term inhalation exposure to Mn at a high concentration using rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to MnCl2 aerosol in a nose-only inhalation chamber for 3 weeks (1.2 µm, 39 mg/m(3)). Motor coordination was tested on the day after the last exposure using a rotarod device at a fixed speed of 10 rpm for 2 min. Also, dopamine transporter and dopamine receptor protein expression levels in the striatum region of the brain were determined by Western blot analysis. At a rotarod speed of 10 rpm, there were no significant differences in the time on the bar before the first fall or the number of falls during the two-minute test observed in the exposed rats, as compared with controls. The Mn-exposed group had significantly higher Mn levels in the lung, blood, olfactory bulb, prefrontal cortex, striatum, and cerebellum compared with the control group. A Mn concentration gradient was observed from the olfactory bulb to the striatum, supporting the idea that Mn is transported via the olfactory pathway. Our results demonstrated that inhalation exposure to 39 mg/m(3) Mn for 3 weeks induced mild lung injury and modulation of dopamine transporter expression in the brain, without altering motor activity.

  2. Single and Binge Methamphetamine Administrations Have Different Effects on the Levels of Dopamine D2 Autoreceptor and Dopamine Transporter in Rat Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Heli; Killinger, Bryan A.; Miller, Cheryl V.; Moszczynska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a central nervous system psychostimulant with a high potential for abuse. At high doses, METH causes a selective degeneration of dopaminergic terminals in the striatum. Dopamine D2 receptor antagonists and dopamine transporter (DAT) inhibitors protect against neurotoxicity of the drug by decreasing intracellular dopamine content and, consequently, dopamine autoxidation and production of reactive oxygen species. In vitro, amphetamines regulate D2 receptor and DAT functions via regulation of their intracellular trafficking. No data exists on axonal transport of both proteins and there is limited data on their interactions in vivo. The aim of the present investigation was to examine synaptosomal levels of presynaptic D2 autoreceptor and DAT after two different regimens of METH and to determine whether METH affects the D2 autoreceptor-DAT interaction in the rat striatum. We found that, as compared to saline controls, administration of single high-dose METH decreased D2 autoreceptor immunoreactivity and increased DAT immunoreactivity in rat striatal synaptosomes whereas binge high-dose METH increased immunoreactivity of D2 autoreceptor and had no effect on DAT immunoreactivity. Single METH had no effect on D2 autoreceptor-DAT interaction whereas binge METH increased the interaction between the two proteins in the striatum. Our results suggest that METH can affect axonal transport of both the D2 autoreceptor and DAT in an interaction-dependent and -independent manner. PMID:24717411

  3. Dopamine transporter comparative molecular modeling and binding site prediction using the LeuT(Aa) leucine transporter as a template.

    PubMed

    Indarte, Martín; Madura, Jeffry D; Surratt, Christopher K

    2008-02-15

    Pharmacological and behavioral studies indicate that binding of cocaine and the amphetamines by the dopamine transporter (DAT) protein is principally responsible for initiating the euphoria and addiction associated with these drugs. The lack of an X-ray crystal structure for the DAT or any other member of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family has hindered understanding of psychostimulant recognition at the atomic level; structural information has been obtained largely from mutagenesis and biophysical studies. The recent publication of a crystal structure for the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT(Aa), a distantly related NSS family homolog, provides for the first time a template for three-dimensional comparative modeling of NSS proteins. A novel computational modeling approach using the capabilities of the Molecular Operating Environment program MOE 2005.06 in conjunction with other comparative modeling servers generated the LeuT(Aa)-directed DAT model. Probable dopamine and amphetamine binding sites were identified within the DAT model using multiple docking approaches. Binding sites for the substrate ligands (dopamine and amphetamine) overlapped substantially with the analogous region of the LeuT(Aa) crystal structure for the substrate leucine. The docking predictions implicated DAT side chains known to be critical for high affinity ligand binding and suggest novel mutagenesis targets in elucidating discrete substrate and inhibitor binding sites. The DAT model may guide DAT ligand QSAR studies, and rational design of novel DAT-binding therapeutics.

  4. Dopamine transporter genotype dependent effects of apomorphine on cold pain tolerance in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Treister, Roi; Pud, Dorit; Ebstein, Richard P; Eisenberg, Elon

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the effects of the dopamine agonist apomorphine on experimental pain models in healthy subjects and to explore the possible association between these effects and a common polymorphism within the dopamine transporter gene. Healthy volunteers (n = 105) participated in this randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial. Heat pain threshold and intensity, cold pain threshold, and the response to tonic cold pain (latency, intensity, and tolerance) were evaluated before and for up to 120 min after the administration of 1.5 mg apomorphine/placebo. A polymorphism (3'-UTR 40-bp VNTR) within the dopamine transporter gene (SLC6A3) was investigated. Apomorphine had an effect only on tolerance to cold pain, which consisted of an initial decrease and a subsequent increase in tolerance. An association was found between the enhancing effect of apomorphine on pain tolerance (120 min after its administration) and the DAT-1 polymorphism. Subjects with two copies of the 10-allele demonstrated significantly greater tolerance prolongation than the 9-allele homozygote carriers and the heterozygote carriers (p = 0.007 and p = 0.003 in comparison to the placebo, respectively). In conclusion, apomorphine administration produced a decrease followed by a genetically associated increase in cold pain tolerance.

  5. Dissociable effects of the prodrug phendimetrazine and its metabolite phenmetrazine at dopamine transporters

    PubMed Central

    Solis, Ernesto; Suyama, Julie A.; Lazenka, Matthew F.; DeFelice, Louis J.; Negus, S. Stevens; Blough, Bruce E.; Banks, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    Phendimetrazine (PDM) is a clinically available anorectic and a candidate pharmacotherapy for cocaine addiction. PDM has been hypothesized to function as a prodrug that requires metabolism to the amphetamine-like monoamine transporter substrate phenmetrazine (PM) to produce its pharmacological effects; however, whether PDM functions as an inactive prodrug or has pharmacological activity on its own remains unclear. The study aim was to determine PDM pharmacological mechanisms using electrophysiological, neurochemical, and behavioral procedures. PDM blocked the endogenous basal hDAT (human dopamine transporter) current in voltage-clamped (−60 mV) oocytes consistent with a DAT inhibitor profile, whereas its metabolite PM induced an inward hDAT current consistent with a DAT substrate profile. PDM also attenuated the PM-induced inward current during co-application, providing further evidence that PDM functions as a DAT inhibitor. PDM increased nucleus accumbens dopamine levels and facilitated electrical brain stimulation reinforcement within 10 min in rats, providing in vivo evidence supporting PDM pharmacological activity. These results demonstrate that PDM functions as a DAT inhibitor that may also interact with the pharmacological effects of its metabolite PM. Overall, these results suggest a novel mechanism for PDM therapeutic effects via initial PDM DAT inhibition followed by PM DAT substrate-induced dopamine release. PMID:27514281

  6. Dissociable effects of the prodrug phendimetrazine and its metabolite phenmetrazine at dopamine transporters.

    PubMed

    Solis, Ernesto; Suyama, Julie A; Lazenka, Matthew F; DeFelice, Louis J; Negus, S Stevens; Blough, Bruce E; Banks, Matthew L

    2016-08-12

    Phendimetrazine (PDM) is a clinically available anorectic and a candidate pharmacotherapy for cocaine addiction. PDM has been hypothesized to function as a prodrug that requires metabolism to the amphetamine-like monoamine transporter substrate phenmetrazine (PM) to produce its pharmacological effects; however, whether PDM functions as an inactive prodrug or has pharmacological activity on its own remains unclear. The study aim was to determine PDM pharmacological mechanisms using electrophysiological, neurochemical, and behavioral procedures. PDM blocked the endogenous basal hDAT (human dopamine transporter) current in voltage-clamped (-60 mV) oocytes consistent with a DAT inhibitor profile, whereas its metabolite PM induced an inward hDAT current consistent with a DAT substrate profile. PDM also attenuated the PM-induced inward current during co-application, providing further evidence that PDM functions as a DAT inhibitor. PDM increased nucleus accumbens dopamine levels and facilitated electrical brain stimulation reinforcement within 10 min in rats, providing in vivo evidence supporting PDM pharmacological activity. These results demonstrate that PDM functions as a DAT inhibitor that may also interact with the pharmacological effects of its metabolite PM. Overall, these results suggest a novel mechanism for PDM therapeutic effects via initial PDM DAT inhibition followed by PM DAT substrate-induced dopamine release.

  7. Dopamine transporter, gender, and number of sexual partners among young adults.

    PubMed

    Guo, Guang; Tong, Yuying; Xie, Cui-Wei; Lange, Leslie A

    2007-03-01

    The dopamine transporter gene (DAT1) codes for a dopamine transporter protein, which limits the level and duration of dopamine receptor activation. The DAT1 gene is a strong candidate gene for reward-seeking behavior. This article reports compelling evidence for the association between the 40 bp variable number of tandem repeats in the DAT1 gene and the self-reported number of sexual partners among young adults in the United States using the sibling subsample of more than 2500 individuals who participated in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. We performed tests of genotype-gender interaction as well as analyses stratified by gender. Among the males, possessing one or two alleles of the 10 repeat is associated with an 80-100% increase (P<0.0001, 2df) in the number of sexual partners as compared with the homozygotes for the 9 repeat. The association holds in race/ethnicity-stratified analyses, in Allison's procedure that tests population stratification, and in within-family fixed-effects models. Covariate adjustment for a standard set of socioeconomic factors including religiosity, family structure, parental education, marital and cohabitation history, and neighborhood poverty did not attenuate these associations. Discussion is provided why this finding is absent among females.

  8. Uptake inhibitors but not substrates induce protease resistance in extracellular loop two of the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Gaffaney, Jon D; Vaughan, Roxanne A

    2004-03-01

    Changes in protease sensitivity of extracellular loop two (EL2) of the dopamine transporter (DAT) during inhibitor and substrate binding were examined using trypsin proteolysis and epitope-specific immunoblotting. In control rat striatal membranes, proteolysis of DAT in a restricted region of EL2 was produced by 0.001 to 10 microg/ml trypsin. However, in the presence of the dopamine uptake blockers [2-(diphenylmethoxyl) ethyl]-4-(3phenylpropyl) piperazine (GBR 12909), mazindol, 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-flourophenyl)tropane (beta-CFT), nomifensine, benztropine, or (-)-cocaine, 100- to 1000-fold higher concentrations of trypsin were required to produce comparable levels of proteolysis. Protease resistance induced by ligands was correlated with their affinity for DAT binding, was not observed with Zn2+, (+)-cocaine, or inhibitors of norepinephrine or serotonin transporters, and was not caused by altered catalytic activity of trypsin. Together, these results support the hypothesis that the interaction of uptake inhibitors with DAT induces a protease-resistant conformation in EL2. In contrast, binding of substrates did not induce protease resistance in EL2, suggesting that substrates and inhibitors interact with DAT differently during binding. To assess the effects of EL2 proteolysis on DAT function, the binding and transport properties of trypsin-digested DAT were assayed with [3H]CFT and [3H]dopamine. Digestion decreased the Bmax for binding and the Vmax for uptake in amounts that were proportional to the extent of proteolysis, indicating that the structural integrity of EL2 is required for maintenance of both DAT binding and transport functions. Together this data provides novel information about inhibitor and substrate interactions at EL2, possibly relating the protease resistant DAT conformation to a mechanism of transport inhibition.

  9. Population pharmacokinetics, brain distribution, and pharmacodynamics of 2nd generation dopamine transporter selective benztropine analogs developed as potential substitute therapeutics for treatment of cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Syed, Shariq A; Newman, Amy H; Othman, Ahmed A; Eddington, Natalie D

    2008-05-01

    A second generation of N-substituted 3alpha-[bis(4'-fluorophenyl)methoxy]-tropanes (GA 1-69, JHW 005 and JHW 013) binds with high affinity to the dopamine transporter (DAT) and are highly selective toward DAT compared to muscarinic receptor binding (M1). The objective of this study was to characterize brain distribution, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics [extracellular brain dopamine (DA) levels] of three novel N-substituted benztropine (BZT) analogs in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The BZT analogs displayed a higher distribution (Vd = 8.69-34.3 vs. 0.9 L/kg) along with longer elimination (t l/2: 4.1-5.4 vs. 0.5 h) than previously reported for cocaine. Brain-to-plasma partition coefficients were 1.3-2.5 vs. 2.1 for cocaine. The effect of the BZT analogs on extracellular brain (DA) levels ranged from minimal effects (GA 1-69) to several fold elevation (approximately 850% of basal DA for JHW 013) at the highest dose evaluated. PK/PD analysis of exposure-response data resulted in lower IC50 values for the BZT analogs compared to cocaine indicating their higher potency to inhibit DA reuptake (0.1-0.3 vs. 0.7 mg/L). These BZT analogs possess significantly different PK and PD profiles as compared to cocaine suggesting that further evaluation as cocaine abuse therapeutics is warranted.

  10. Lack of Association between Polymorphisms of the Dopamine Receptor D4 and Dopamine Transporter Genes and Personality Traits in a Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se Joo; Kim, Young Shin; Lee, Hong Shick

    2006-01-01

    Human personality traits have a considerable genetic component. Cloninger et al. were the first to postulate that certain personality traits, such as novelty seeking, are related to the dopamine neurotransmitter system. In this study, we investigated the associations between dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) exon III and dopamine transporter (DAT1) polymorphisms and personality traits. The DRD4 and DAT1 gene polymorphisms were genotyped in 214 healthy Korean subjects, whose personality traits were assessed with the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). There were no significant differences between scores of TCI temperament dimensions (novelty seeking, harm avoidance, reward dependence, and persistence) and DRD4 gene polymorphism. The DAT1 gene polymorphisms also showed no significant association with any of the temperament subscales of the TCI. These data suggest that DRD4 and DAT1 gene polymorphism may not associated with personality traits in a Korean population. PMID:17191306

  11. Methylphenidate amplifies the potency and reinforcing effects of amphetamines by increasing dopamine transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Calipari, Erin S; Ferris, Mark J; Salahpour, Ali; Caron, Marc G; Jones, Sara R

    2013-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is commonly diverted for recreational use, but the neurobiological consequences of exposure to MPH at high, abused doses are not well defined. Here we show that MPH self-administration in rats increases dopamine transporter (DAT) levels and enhances the potency of MPH and amphetamine on dopamine responses and drug-seeking behaviours, without altering cocaine effects. Genetic overexpression of the DAT in mice mimics these effects, confirming that MPH self-administration-induced increases in DAT levels are sufficient to induce the changes. Further, this work outlines a basic mechanism by which increases in DAT levels, regardless of how they occur, are capable of increasing the rewarding and reinforcing effects of select psychostimulant drugs, and suggests that individuals with elevated DAT levels, such as ADHD sufferers, may be more susceptible to the addictive effects of amphetamine-like drugs.

  12. Urinary Dopamine as a Potential Index of the Transport Activity of Multidrug and Toxin Extrusion in the Kidney.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Moto; Ban, Tsuyoshi; Matsubara, Kazuo; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Masuda, Satohiro

    2016-07-30

    Dopamine is a cationic natriuretic catecholamine synthesized in proximal tubular cells (PTCs) of the kidney before secretion into the lumen, a key site of its action. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying dopamine secretion into the lumen remain unclear. Multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE) is a H⁺/organic cation antiporter that is highly expressed in the brush border membrane of PTCs and mediates the efflux of organic cations, including metformin and cisplatin, from the epithelial cells into the urine. Therefore, we hypothesized that MATE mediates dopamine secretion, a cationic catecholamine, into the tubule lumen, thereby regulating natriuresis. Here, we show that [³H]dopamine uptake in human (h) MATE1-, hMATE-2K- and mouse (m) MATE-expressing cells exhibited saturable kinetics. Fluid retention and decreased urinary excretion of dopamine and Na⁺ were observed in Mate1-knockout mice compared to that in wild-type mice. Imatinib, a MATE inhibitor, inhibited [³H]dopamine uptake by hMATE1-, hMATE2-K- and mMATE1-expressing cells in a concentration-dependent manner. At clinically-relevant concentrations, imatinib inhibited [³H]dopamine uptake by hMATE1- and hMATE2-K-expressing cells. The urinary excretion of dopamine and Na⁺ decreased and fluid retention occurred in imatinib-treated mice. In conclusion, MATE transporters secrete renally-synthesized dopamine, and therefore, urinary dopamine has the potential to be an index of the MATE transporter activity.

  13. Effects of hypothalamic dopamine (DA) on salsolinol (SAL)-induced prolactin (PRL) secretion in male goats.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jin; Hara, Sayaka; Sawai, Ken; Fülöp, Ferenc; Nagy, György Miklos; Hashizume, Tsutomu

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the effects of hypothalamic dopamine (DA) on salsolinol (SAL)-induced prolactin (PRL) release in goats. The PRL-releasing response to an intravenous (i.v.) injection of SAL was examined after treatment with augmentation of central DA using carbidopa (carbi) and L-dopa in male goats under 8-h (8 h light, 16 h dark) or 16-h (16 h light, 8 h dark) photoperiod conditions. The carbi and L-dopa treatments reduced basal PRL concentrations in the 16-h photoperiod group (P < 0.05), while a reduction was not observed in the 8-h photoperiod group. The mean basal plasma PRL concentration in the control group for the 8-h photoperiod was lower than that for the 16-h photoperiod (P < 0.05). SAL significantly stimulated the release of PRL promptly after the injection in both the 8- and 16-h photoperiod groups (P < 0.05). PRL-releasing responses for the 16-h photoperiod were greater than those for the 8-h photoperiod (P < 0.05). The carbi and L-dopa treatments blunted SAL-induced PRL release in both the 8- and 16-h photoperiods (P < 0.05). These results indicate that hypothalamic DA blunts the SAL-induced release of PRL in male goats, regardless of the photoperiod, which suggests that both SAL and DA are involved in regulating the secretion of PRL in goats.

  14. The effects of cocaine on regional brain glucose metabolism is attenuated in dopamine transporter knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Thanos, Panayotis K; Michaelides, Michael; Benveniste, Helene; Wang, Gene Jack; Volkow, Nora D

    2008-05-01

    Cocaine's ability to block the dopamine transporter (DAT) is crucial for its reinforcing effects. However the brain functional consequences of DAT blockade by cocaine are less clear since they are confounded by its concomitant blockade of norepinephrineand serotonin transporters. To separate the dopaminergic from the non-dopaminergic effects of cocaine on brain function we compared the regional brain metabolic responses to cocaine between dopamine transporter deficient (DAT(-/-)) mice with that of their DAT(+/+) littermates. We measured regional brain metabolism (marker of brain function) with 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) and microPET (muPET) before and after acute cocaine administration (i.p. 10 mg/kg). Scans were conducted 2 weeks apart. At baseline DAT(-/-) mice had significantly greater metabolism in thalamus and cerebellum than DAT(+/+). Acute cocaine decreased whole brain metabolismand this effect was greater in DAT(+/+) (15%) than in DAT(-/-) mice (5%). DAT(+/+) mice showed regional decreases in the olfactory bulb, motor cortex, striatum, hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum whereas DAT(-/-) mice showed decreases only in thalamus. The differential pattern of regional responses to cocaine in DAT(-/-) and DAT(+/+) suggests that most of the brain metabolic changes from acute cocaine are due to DAT blockade. Cocaine-induced decreases in metabolism in thalamus (region with dense noradrenergic innervation) in DAT(-/-) suggest that these were mediated by cocaine's blockade of norepinephrine transporters. The greater baseline metabolism in DAT(-/-) than DAT(+/+) mice in cerebellum (brain region mostly devoid of DAT) suggests that dopamine indirectly regulates activity of these brain regions.

  15. The divalent metal transporter homologues SMF-1/2 mediate dopamine neuron sensitivity in caenorhabditis elegans models of manganism and parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Settivari, Raja; Levora, Jennifer; Nass, Richard

    2009-12-18

    Parkinson disease (PD) and manganism are characterized by motor deficits and a loss of dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Epidemiological studies indicate significant correlations between manganese exposure and the propensity to develop PD. The vertebrate divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT-1) contributes to maintaining cellular Mn(2+) homeostasis and has recently been implicated in Fe(2+)-mediated neurodegeneration in PD. In this study we describe a novel model for manganism that incorporates the genetically tractable nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that a brief exposure to Mn(2+) increases reactive oxygen species and glutathione production, decreases oxygen consumption and head mitochondria membrane potential, and confers DA neuronal death. DA neurodegeneration is partially dependent on a putative homologue to DMT-1, SMF-1, as genetic knockdown or deletion partially inhibits the neuronal death. Mn(2+) also amplifies the DA neurotoxicity of the PD-associated protein alpha-synuclein. Furthermore, both SMF-1 and SMF-2 are expressed in DA neurons and contribute to PD-associated neurotoxicant-induced DA neuron death. These studies describe a C. elegans model for manganism and show that DMT-1 homologues contribute to Mn(2+)- and PD-associated DA neuron vulnerability.

  16. Reduced Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter favors antidepressant behaviors and modulates serotonin and dopamine in female mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Pádua-Reis, Marina; Aquino, Nayara S; Oliveira, Vinícius E M; Szawka, Raphael E; Prado, Marco A M; Prado, Vânia F; Pereira, Grace S

    2017-07-14

    Depression is extremely harmful to modern society. Despite its complex spectrum of symptoms, previous studies have mostly focused on the monaminergic system in search of pharmacological targets. However, other neurotransmitter systems have also been linked to the pathophysiology of depression. In this study, we provide evidence for a role of the cholinergic system in depressive-like behavior of female mice. We evaluated mice knockdown for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT KD mice), which have been previously shown to exhibit reduced cholinergic transmission. Animals were subjected to the tail suspension and marble burying tests, classical paradigms to assess depressive-like behaviors and to screen for novel antidepressant drugs. In addition, brain levels of serotonin and dopamine were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. We found that female homozygous VAChT KD mice spent less time immobile during tail suspension and buried less marbles, indicating a less depressive phenotype. These differences in behavior were reverted by central, but not peripheral, acetylcholinesterase inhibition. Moreover, female homozygous VAChT KD mice exhibited higher levels of dopamine and serotonin in the striatum, and increased dopamine in the hippocampus. Our study thus shows a connection between depressive-like behaviors and the cholinergic system, and that the latter interacts with the monoaminergic system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Longitudinal imaging of the availability of dopamine transporter and D2 receptor in rat striatum following mild ischemia.

    PubMed

    Momosaki, Sotaro; Ito, Miwa; Yamato, Hiroko; Iimori, Hitoshi; Sumiyoshi, Hirokazu; Morimoto, Kenji; Imamoto, Natsumi; Watabe, Tadashi; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun; Abe, Kohji

    2017-02-01

    The changes in the availability of striatal dopamine transporter and dopamine D2 receptor after mild focal ischemia in rats were measured using a small animal positron emission tomography system. Mild focal ischemia was induced by 20-minute middle cerebral artery occlusion. [(11)C]PE2I binding to dopamine transporter was transiently increased on the ipsilateral side of the striatum at 2 days after middle cerebral artery occlusion. On day 7 and 14 after middle cerebral artery occlusion, [(11)C]PE2I binding levels were decreased. In contrast, [(11)C]raclopride binding to dopamine D2 receptor in the ipsilateral striatum had not changed at 2 days after middle cerebral artery occlusion. [(11)C]Raclopride binding was significantly decreased on the ischemic side of the striatum at 7 and 14 days after middle cerebral artery occlusion. Moreover, on day 1 and 2 after middle cerebral artery occlusion, significant circling behavior to the contralateral direction was induced by amphetamine challenge. This behavior disappeared at 7 days after middle cerebral artery occlusion. At 14 days, circling behavior to the ipsilateral direction (middle cerebral artery occlusion side) was significantly increased, and that to the contralateral direction also appeared again. The present study suggested that amphetamine-induced circling behavior indicated striatal dopaminergic alterations and that dopamine transporter and dopamine D2 receptor binding could be key markers for predicting motor dysfunction after mild focal ischemia.

  18. Influence of education on cognitive performance and dopamine transporter binding in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Lamotte, Guillaume; Morello, Rémy; Lebasnier, Adrien; Agostini, Denis; Bouvard, Gérard; De La Sayette, Vincent; Defer, Gilles L

    2016-07-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are the two most common forms of dementia. These two diseases share some clinical and pathological similarities, yet the loss of dopaminergic neurons confirmed by 123-I-Ioflupane Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a suggestive feature of DLB. Current evidence suggests that higher education has a protective effect on the risk of developing clinical AD. However, how education influences cognitive performance and the presynaptic dopamine transporter marker in DLB is unknown. We reviewed 56 consecutive patients with DLB who underwent a 123-I-Ioflupane SPECT from January 2009 to August 2013 at the University Hospital of Caen. We collected clinical and neuropsychological data from medical files and 123-I-Ioflupane SPECT data for all patients. There was no correlation between education and global cognitive performance in patients with DLB. However, there was a positive correlation between education and tests exploring visuoconstructive functions (Rey complex figure copy and recall) and verbal retrieval strategies (Grober and Buschke free recall test). There was also a positive correlation between education and dopamine transporter binding. Higher educated patients had higher binding in the striatum, putamen and caudate nucleus (p=0.001 for each regions of interest). Dopamine transporter binding in the striatum, putamen and caudate nucleus was lower in the subgroup of patients with REM sleep behavior disorder, but was not associated with other DLB symptoms. Higher education may have a protective effect on visuoconstructive performance and verbal retrieval strategies and may influence dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurodegeneration in patients with DLB. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of a short-course MDMA binge on dopamine transporter binding and on levels of dopamine and its metabolites in adult male rats

    PubMed Central

    Biezonski, Dominik K.; Piper, Brian J.; Shinday, Nina M.; Kim, Peter J.; Ali, Syed F.; Meyer, Jerrold S.

    2013-01-01

    Although the recreational drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is often described as a selective serotonergic neurotoxin, some research has challenged this view. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of MDMA on subsequent levels of two different markers of dopaminergic function, the dopamine transporter (DAT) as well as dopamine and its major metabolites. In experiment I, adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were administered either a low or moderate dose MDMA binge (2.5 or 5.0 mg/kg × 4 with an inter-dose interval of 1 h) or saline, and were killed 1 week later. The moderate dose dramatically reduced [3H]WIN 35,428 binding to striatal DAT by 73.7% (P ≤ 0.001). In experiment II, animals were binged with a higher dose of MDMA (10 mg/kg × 4) to determine the drug’s effects on concentrations of serotonin (5-HT), dopamine, and their respective major metabolites 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and homovanillic acid (HVA) in the striatum and frontal cortex 1 week later. As expected, MDMA significantly reduced 5-HT and 5-HIAA (≥ 50%) in these structures, while only a marginal decrease in dopamine was noted in the striatum. In contrast, levels of DOPAC (34.3%, P < 0.01) and HVA (33.5%, P < 0.001) were reduced by MDMA treatment, suggesting a decrease in dopamine turnover. Overall, these findings indicate that while serotonergic markers are particularly vulnerable to MDMA-induced depletion, significant dopaminergic deficits may also occur under some conditions. Importantly, DAT expression may be more vulnerable to perturbation by MDMA than dopamine itself. PMID:23276666

  20. Effects of a short-course MDMA binge on dopamine transporter binding and on levels of dopamine and its metabolites in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Biezonski, Dominik K; Piper, Brian J; Shinday, Nina M; Kim, Peter J; Ali, Syed F; Meyer, Jerrold S

    2013-02-15

    Although the recreational drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is often described as a selective serotonergic neurotoxin, some research has challenged this view. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of MDMA on subsequent levels of two different markers of dopaminergic function, the dopamine transporter (DAT) as well as dopamine and its major metabolites. In experiment I, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered either a low or moderate dose MDMA binge (2.5 or 5.0mg/kg×4 with an inter-dose interval of 1h) or saline, and were killed 1 week later. The moderate dose dramatically reduced [(3)H]WIN 35,428 binding to striatal DAT by 73.7% (P≤0.001). In experiment II, animals were binged with a higher dose of MDMA (10mg/kg×4) to determine the drug's effects on concentrations of serotonin (5-HT), dopamine, and their respective major metabolites 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and homovanillic acid (HVA) in the striatum and frontal cortex 1 week later. As expected, MDMA significantly reduced 5-HT and 5-HIAA (≥50%) in these structures, while only a marginal decrease in dopamine was noted in the striatum. In contrast, levels of DOPAC (34.3%, P<0.01) and HVA (33.5%, P<0.001) were reduced by MDMA treatment, suggesting a decrease in dopamine turnover. Overall, these findings indicate that while serotonergic markers are particularly vulnerable to MDMA-induced depletion, significant dopaminergic deficits may also occur under some conditions. Importantly, DAT expression may be more vulnerable to perturbation by MDMA than dopamine itself.

  1. Essential Oils from the Medicinal Herbs Upregulate Dopamine Transporter in Rat Pheochromocytoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min Sun; Choi, Bang-sub; Kim, Sang Heon; Pak, Sok Cheon; Jang, Chul Ho; Chin, Young-Won; Kim, Young-Mi; Kim, Dong-il; Jeon, Songhee; Koo, Byung-Soo

    2015-10-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) protein, a component of the dopamine system, undergoes adaptive neurobiological changes from drug abuse. Prevention of relapse and reduction of withdrawal symptoms are still the major limitations in the current pharmacological treatments of drug addiction. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of essential oils extracted from Elsholtzia ciliata, Shinchim, Angelicae gigantis Radix, and Eugenia caryophyllata, well-known traditional Korean medicines for addiction, on the modulation of dopamine system in amphetamine-treated cells and to explore the possible mechanism underlying its therapeutic effect. The potential cytotoxic effect of essential oils was evaluated in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells using cell viability assays. Quantification of DAT, p-CREB, p-MAPK, and p-Akt was done by immunoblotting. DAT was significantly reduced in cells treated with 50 μM of amphetamine in a time-dependent manner. No significant toxicity of essential oils from Elsholtzia ciliata and Shinchim was observed at doses of 10, 25, and 50 μg/mL. However, essential oils from A. gigantis Radix at a dose of 100 μg/mL and E. caryophyllata at doses of 50 and 100 μg/mL showed cytotoxicity. Treatment with GBR 12909, a highly selective DAT inhibitor, significantly increased DAT expression compared with that of amphetamine only by enhancing phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and Akt. In addition, essential oils effectively induced hyperphosphorylation of cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), MAPK, and Akt, which resulted in DAT upregulation. Our study implies that the essential oils may rehabilitate brain dopamine function through increased DAT availability in abstinent former drug users.

  2. Hybrid dopamine uptake blocker-serotonin releaser ligands: a new twist on transporter-focused therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Blough, Bruce E; Landavazo, Antonio; Partilla, John S; Baumann, Michael H; Decker, Ann M; Page, Kevin M; Rothman, Richard B

    2014-06-12

    As part of our program to study neurotransmitter releasers, we report herein a class of hybrid dopamine reuptake inhibitors that display serotonin releasing activity. Hybrid compounds are interesting since they increase the design potential of transporter related compounds and hence represent a novel and unexplored strategy for therapeutic drug discovery. A series of N-alkylpropiophenones was synthesized and assessed for uptake inhibition and release activity using rat brain synaptosomes. Substitution on the aromatic ring yielded compounds that maintained hybrid activity, with the two disubstituted analogues (PAL-787 and PAL-820) having the most potent hybrid activity.

  3. Hybrid Dopamine Uptake Blocker–Serotonin Releaser Ligands: A New Twist on Transporter-Focused Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    As part of our program to study neurotransmitter releasers, we report herein a class of hybrid dopamine reuptake inhibitors that display serotonin releasing activity. Hybrid compounds are interesting since they increase the design potential of transporter related compounds and hence represent a novel and unexplored strategy for therapeutic drug discovery. A series of N-alkylpropiophenones was synthesized and assessed for uptake inhibition and release activity using rat brain synaptosomes. Substitution on the aromatic ring yielded compounds that maintained hybrid activity, with the two disubstituted analogues (PAL-787 and PAL-820) having the most potent hybrid activity. PMID:24944732

  4. Single-quantum-dot tracking reveals altered membrane dynamics of an attention-deficit/hyperactivity-disorder-derived dopamine transporter coding variant.

    PubMed

    Kovtun, Oleg; Sakrikar, Dhananjay; Tomlinson, Ian D; Chang, Jerry C; Arzeta-Ferrer, Xochitl; Blakely, Randy D; Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2015-04-15

    The presynaptic, cocaine- and amphetamine-sensitive dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT, SLC6A3) controls the intensity and duration of synaptic dopamine signals by rapid clearance of DA back into presynaptic nerve terminals. Abnormalities in DAT-mediated DA clearance have been linked to a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including addiction, autism, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Membrane trafficking of DAT appears to be an important, albeit incompletely understood, post-translational regulatory mechanism; its dysregulation has been recently proposed as a potential risk determinant of these disorders. In this study, we demonstrate a link between an ADHD-associated DAT mutation (Arg615Cys, R615C) and variation on DAT transporter cell surface dynamics, a combination only previously studied with ensemble biochemical and optical approaches that featured limited spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we utilize high-affinity, DAT-specific antagonist-conjugated quantum dot (QD) probes to establish the dynamic mobility of wild-type and mutant DATs at the plasma membrane of living cells. Single DAT-QD complex trajectory analysis revealed that the DAT 615C variant exhibited increased membrane mobility relative to DAT 615R, with diffusion rates comparable to those observed after lipid raft disruption. This phenomenon was accompanied by a loss of transporter mobilization triggered by amphetamine, a common component of ADHD medications. Together, our data provides the first dynamic imaging of single DAT proteins, providing new insights into the relationship between surface dynamics and trafficking of both wild-type and disease-associated transporters. Our approach should be generalizable to future studies that explore the possibilities of perturbed surface DAT dynamics that may arise as a consequence of genetic alterations, regulatory changes, and drug use that contribute to the etiology or treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  5. The mechanistic basis for noncompetitive ibogaine inhibition of serotonin and dopamine transporters.

    PubMed

    Bulling, Simon; Schicker, Klaus; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Steinkellner, Thomas; Stockner, Thomas; Gruber, Christian W; Boehm, Stefan; Freissmuth, Michael; Rudnick, Gary; Sitte, Harald H; Sandtner, Walter

    2012-05-25

    Ibogaine, a hallucinogenic alkaloid proposed as a treatment for opiate withdrawal, has been shown to inhibit serotonin transporter (SERT) noncompetitively, in contrast to all other known inhibitors, which are competitive with substrate. Ibogaine binding to SERT increases accessibility in the permeation pathway connecting the substrate-binding site with the cytoplasm. Because of the structural similarity between ibogaine and serotonin, it had been suggested that ibogaine binds to the substrate site of SERT. The results presented here show that ibogaine binds to a distinct site, accessible from the cell exterior, to inhibit both serotonin transport and serotonin-induced ionic currents. Ibogaine noncompetitively inhibited transport by both SERT and the homologous dopamine transporter (DAT). Ibogaine blocked substrate-induced currents also in DAT and increased accessibility of the DAT cytoplasmic permeation pathway. When present on the cell exterior, ibogaine inhibited SERT substrate-induced currents, but not when it was introduced into the cytoplasm through the patch electrode. Similar to noncompetitive transport inhibition, the current block was not reversed by increasing substrate concentration. The kinetics of inhibitor binding and dissociation, as determined by their effect on SERT currents, indicated that ibogaine does not inhibit by forming a long-lived complex with SERT, but rather binds directly to the transporter in an inward-open conformation. A kinetic model for transport describing the noncompetitive action of ibogaine and the competitive action of cocaine accounts well for the results of the present study.

  6. The Mechanistic Basis for Noncompetitive Ibogaine Inhibition of Serotonin and Dopamine Transporters*

    PubMed Central

    Bulling, Simon; Schicker, Klaus; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Steinkellner, Thomas; Stockner, Thomas; Gruber, Christian W.; Boehm, Stefan; Freissmuth, Michael; Rudnick, Gary; Sitte, Harald H.; Sandtner, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Ibogaine, a hallucinogenic alkaloid proposed as a treatment for opiate withdrawal, has been shown to inhibit serotonin transporter (SERT) noncompetitively, in contrast to all other known inhibitors, which are competitive with substrate. Ibogaine binding to SERT increases accessibility in the permeation pathway connecting the substrate-binding site with the cytoplasm. Because of the structural similarity between ibogaine and serotonin, it had been suggested that ibogaine binds to the substrate site of SERT. The results presented here show that ibogaine binds to a distinct site, accessible from the cell exterior, to inhibit both serotonin transport and serotonin-induced ionic currents. Ibogaine noncompetitively inhibited transport by both SERT and the homologous dopamine transporter (DAT). Ibogaine blocked substrate-induced currents also in DAT and increased accessibility of the DAT cytoplasmic permeation pathway. When present on the cell exterior, ibogaine inhibited SERT substrate-induced currents, but not when it was introduced into the cytoplasm through the patch electrode. Similar to noncompetitive transport inhibition, the current block was not reversed by increasing substrate concentration. The kinetics of inhibitor binding and dissociation, as determined by their effect on SERT currents, indicated that ibogaine does not inhibit by forming a long-lived complex with SERT, but rather binds directly to the transporter in an inward-open conformation. A kinetic model for transport describing the noncompetitive action of ibogaine and the competitive action of cocaine accounts well for the results of the present study. PMID:22451652

  7. Polymorphism of the dopamine transporter type 1 gene modifies the treatment response in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Caroline; Meguig, Sayah; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Labreuche, Julien; Vasseur, Francis; Duhamel, Alain; Delval, Arnaud; Bardyn, Thomas; Devedjian, Jean-Christophe; Rouaix, Nathalie; Petyt, Gregory; Brefel-Courbon, Christine; Ory-Magne, Fabienne; Guehl, Dominique; Eusebio, Alexandre; Fraix, Valérie; Saulnier, Pierre-Jean; Lagha-Boukbiza, Ouhaid; Durif, Frank; Faighel, Mirela; Giordana, Caroline; Drapier, Sophie; Maltête, David; Tranchant, Christine; Houeto, Jean-Luc; Debû, Bettina; Azulay, Jean-Philippe; Tison, François; Destée, Alain; Vidailhet, Marie; Rascol, Olivier; Dujardin, Kathy; Defebvre, Luc; Bordet, Régis; Sablonnière, Bernard; Devos, David

    2015-05-01

    After more than 50 years of treating Parkinson's disease with l-DOPA, there are still no guidelines on setting the optimal dose for a given patient. The dopamine transporter type 1, now known as solute carrier family 6 (neurotransmitter transporter), member 3 (SLC6A3) is the most powerful determinant of dopamine neurotransmission and might therefore influence the treatment response. We recently demonstrated that methylphenidate (a dopamine transporter inhibitor) is effective in patients with Parkinson's disease with motor and gait disorders. The objective of the present study was to determine whether genetic variants of the dopamine transporter type 1-encoding gene (SLC6A3) are associated with differences in the response to treatment of motor symptoms and gait disorders with l-DOPA and methylphenidate (with respect to the demographic, the disease and the treatment parameters and the other genes involved in the dopaminergic neurotransmission). This analysis was part of a multicentre, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial of methylphenidate in Parkinson's disease (Protocol ID:2008-005801-20; ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT00914095). We scored the motor Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and the Stand-Walk-Sit Test before and after a standardized acute l-DOPA challenge before randomization and then after 3 months of methylphenidate treatment. Patients were screened for variants of genes involved in dopamine metabolism: rs28363170 and rs3836790 polymorphisms in the SLC6A3 gene, rs921451 and rs3837091 in the DDC gene (encoding the aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase involved in the synthesis of dopamine from l-DOPA), rs1799836 in the MAOB gene (coding for monoamine oxidase B) and rs4680 in the COMT gene (coding for catechol-O-methyltransferase). Investigators and patients were blinded to the genotyping data throughout the study. Eighty-one subjects were genotyped and 61 were analysed for their acute motor response to l-DOPA. The SLC6A3

  8. Additive effects of the dopamine D2 receptor and dopamine transporter genes on the error-related negativity in young children.

    PubMed

    Meyer, A; Klein, D N; Torpey, D C; Kujawa, A J; Hayden, E P; Sheikh, H I; Singh, S M; Hajcak, G

    2012-08-01

    The error-related negativity (ERN) is a negative deflection in the event-related potential that occurs approximately 50 ms following the commission of an error at fronto-central electrode sites. Previous models suggest dopamine plays a role in the generation of the ERN. We recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) while 279 children aged 5-7 years completed a simple Go/No-Go task; the ERN was examined in relation to the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) and dopamine transporter (DAT1) genes. Results suggest an additive effect of the DRD2 and DAT1 genotype on ERN magnitude such that children with at least one DRD2 A1 allele and children with at least one DAT1 9 allele have an increased (i.e. more negative) ERN. These results provide further support for the involvement of dopamine in the generation of the ERN. © 2012 The Authors. Genes, Brain and Behavior © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  9. Neural Correlates of Exposure to Cocaine Cues in Rhesus Monkeys: Modulation by the Dopamine Transporter.

    PubMed

    Porrino, Linda J; Miller, Mack D; Smith, Hilary R; Nader, Susan H; Nader, Michael A

    2016-11-01

    A major goal of treatments for cocaine addiction is to reduce relapse-associated cravings, which are typically induced by environmental stimuli associated with cocaine use and related to changes in dopamine neurotransmission. The present study used an animal model of cocaine seeking to determine functional consequences of cue exposure using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and to relate findings to juvenile levels of dopamine transporter and D2-like receptor availabilities determined before any drug exposure. Adult male rhesus monkeys (N = 11) self-administered cocaine (0.2 mg/kg per injection) under a second-order schedule of reinforcement, in which responding was maintained by conditioned reinforcers. Positron emission tomography scans assessing glucose utilization, a marker of functional activation, were conducted during cocaine-cue responding and food-reinforced responding in a context where cocaine was never available. Compared with the noncocaine condition, we found significant functional activation in the medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, precuneus region of the parietal cortex, and striatum-findings similar to those reported in humans who abuse cocaine. Furthermore, these functional activations in the prefrontal, cingulate, and parietal cortex measured during cocaine-cue responding were significantly correlated with juvenile measures of dopamine transporter availability, whereas no significant relationship with prior D2-like receptor availability was observed in any brain region. The similarity between the present findings and findings in humans who use cocaine supports the use of this model for examination of factors that affect the development and intensity of cue-induced drug seeking and provides evidence for potential biomarkers for the evaluation of potential treatments (behavioral and pharmacologic) for cocaine abuse. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular dynamics of leucine and dopamine transporter proteins in a model cell membrane lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Gedeon, Patrick C; Indarte, Martín; Surratt, Christopher K; Madura, Jeffry D

    2010-03-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) operates via facilitated diffusion, harnessing an inward Na(+) gradient to drive dopamine from the extracellular synaptic cleft to the neuron interior. The DAT is relevant to central nervous system disorders such as Parkinson disease and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and is the primary site of action for the abused psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamines. Crystallization of a DAT homolog, the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT, provided the first reliable 3-D DAT template. Here, the LeuT crystal structure and the DAT molecular model have been combined with their respective substrates, leucine and dopamine, in lipid bilayer molecular dynamics simulations toward tracking substrate movement along the protein's substrate/ion permeation pathway. Specifically, movement of residue pairs that comprise the "external gate" was followed as a function of substrate presence. The transmembrane (TM) 1 arginine-TM 10 aspartate strut formed less readily in DAT compared with LeuT, with or without substrate present. For LeuT but not DAT, the addition of substrate enhanced the chances of forming the TM 1-10 bridge. Also, movement of the fourth extracellular loop EL-4 in the presence of substrate was more pronounced for DAT, the EL-4 unwinding to a degree. The overall similarity between the LeuT and DAT molecular dynamics simulations indicated that LeuT was a legitimate model to guide DAT structure-function predictions. There were, nevertheless, differences significant enough to allow for DAT-unique insights, which may include how cocaine, methylphenidate (Ritalin, NIDA Drug Supply, Rockville, MD), and other DAT blockers are not recognized as substrates even though they can access the primary substrate binding pocket. Proteins 2010. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Studies with fenoldopam, a dopamine receptor DA1 agonist, in essential hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, J N; Worth, D P; Brown, J; Lee, M R

    1986-01-01

    A series of studies were undertaken to assess the effect of oral fenoldopam, a specific DA1 dopamine receptor agonist on blood pressure and renal function in patients with mild essential hypertension. Six patients with essential hypertension were entered into a dose-ranging study and received either placebo, 25, 50 or 100 mg fenoldopam. A significant, dose-related reduction in diastolic blood pressure, and increase in heart rate was demonstrated (both P less than 0.05), maximal at 45 min to 1 h. Fenoldopam increased plasma renin activity. In a double-blind study, seven patients received a single dose of fenoldopam 100 mg or placebo. Fenoldopam produced a significant fall in systolic (P less than 0.05) and diastolic (P less than 0.01) blood pressure and renal vascular resistance (P less than 0.01). Urine flow rate (P less than 0.05), sodium excretion (P less than 0.01), plasma renin activity (P less than 0.05) and plasma aldosterone (P less than 0.05) increased. Five patients underwent measurement of the above parameters following a single dose of fenoldopam 100 mg with a repeat of these measurements after they had taken fenoldopam 100 mg four times daily for 1 month. The acute response of blood pressure to the single dose appeared unchanged but tachyphylaxis was evident in the responses of heart rate, plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone. PMID:2868748

  12. Proline-directed phosphorylation of the dopamine transporter N-terminal domain

    PubMed Central

    Gorentla, Balachandra K.; Moritz, Amy E.; Foster, James D.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the dopamine transporter (DAT) on N-terminal serines and unidentified threonines occurs concomitantly with PKC- and substrate-induced alterations in transporter activity, subcellular distribution, and dopamine efflux, but the residues phosphorylated and identities of protein kinases and phosphatases involved are not known. As one approach to investigating these issues we recombinantly expressed the N-terminal tail of rat DAT (NDAT) and examined its phosphorylation and dephosphorylation properties in vitro. We found that NDAT could be phosphorylated to significant levels by PKCα, PKA, PKG, and CaMKII, which catalyzed serine phosphorylation, and ERK1, JNK, and p38, which catalyzed threonine phosphorylation. We identified Thr53, present in a membrane proximal proline-directed kinase motif as the NDAT site phosphorylated in vitro by ERK1, JNK and p38, and confirmed by peptide mapping and mutagenesis that Thr53 is phosphorylated in vivo. Dephosphorylation studies showed that protein phosphatase 1 catalyzed near-complete in vitro dephosphorylation of PKCα-phosphorylated NDAT, similar to its in vivo and in vitro effects on native DAT. These findings demonstrate the ability of multiple enzymes to directly recognize the DAT N-terminal domain and for kinases to act at multiple distinct sites. The strong correspondence between NDAT and rDAT phosphorylation characteristics suggests the potential for the enzymes that are active on NDAT in vitro to act on DAT in vivo and indicates the usefulness of NDAT for guiding future DAT phosphorylation analyses. PMID:19146407

  13. The tyramine-labelled vesicular transporter for dopamine: a putative target of pesticides and neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Vaccari, A; Saba, P

    1995-03-16

    This study defined the ability of a large sample of heterogeneous pesticides and neurotoxins to interact with the [3H]tyramine-labelled vesicular transporter of dopamine in rat striatum. Botanical (with rotenone as the most potent), and organochlorine (Kepone) insecticides, as well as fungicides (Zineb), as a whole, consistently inhibited [3H]tyramine binding, with Ki values ranging from 5 nM to 10 microM. ATP/Mg(2+)-dependent [3H]tyramine uptake to purified striatal synaptic vesicles was also inhibited by rotenone. Organophosphate and carbamate insecticides, and miscellaneous herbicides poorly antagonized [3H]tyramine binding, yielding Ki values exceeding 10 microM. Several, though not all, of the best recognized central neurotoxins tested were major binding antagonists. Their rank order of potency was 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+) > trimethyltin > or = 6-hydroxydopamine > N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) > 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), with Ki values ranging from 35 nM to 3 microM. Overall, the potent interaction of selected pesticides and chemicals with the vesicular transporter for dopamine, although, by itself, not synonymous with neurotoxicity, would argue for a likely impairment of transmitter homeostasis, or the putative formation of neurodegenerative toxin pools.

  14. Reversal by [D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin of the dopamine transporter loss caused by methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Tsao, L I; Cadet, J L; Su, T P

    1999-05-21

    A single administration of 40 mg/kg (i.p.) of methamphetamine caused a loss of dopamine transporter in the striatum of albino Swiss (CD-1) mouse for at least 3 weeks. The administration of a single dose of [D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin (DADLE) (18 mg/kg, i.p.), given at day 14 after the administration of methamphetamine, caused a significant, transient restoration of dopamine transporter level in the striatum. These results suggest that delta-opioid peptide DADLE is able to reverse the neuronal damage caused by methamphetamine.

  15. Striatal dopamine neurotransmission: regulation of release and uptake

    PubMed Central

    Sulzer, David; Cragg, Stephanie J.; Rice, Margaret E.

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) transmission is governed by processes that regulate release from axonal boutons in the forebrain and the somatodendritic compartment in midbrain, and by clearance by the DA transporter, diffusion, and extracellular metabolism. We review how axonal DA release is regulated by neuronal activity and by autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, and address how quantal release events are regulated in size and frequency. In brain regions densely innervated by DA axons, DA clearance is due predominantly to uptake by the DA transporter, whereas in cortex, midbrain, and other regions with relatively sparse DA inputs, the norepinephrine transporter and diffusion are involved. We discuss the role of DA uptake in restricting the sphere of influence of DA and in temporal accumulation of extracellular DA levels upon successive action potentials. The tonic discharge activity of DA neurons may be translated into a tonic extracellular DA level, whereas their bursting activity can generate discrete extracellular DA transients. PMID:27141430

  16. The effect of modafinil on the rat dopamine transporter and dopamine receptors D1–D3 paralleling cognitive enhancement in the radial arm maze

    PubMed Central

    Karabacak, Yasemin; Sase, Sunetra; Aher, Yogesh D.; Sase, Ajinkya; Saroja, Sivaprakasam R.; Cicvaric, Ana; Höger, Harald; Berger, Michael; Bakulev, Vasiliy; Sitte, Harald H.; Leban, Johann; Monje, Francisco J.; Lubec, Gert

    2015-01-01

    A series of drugs have been reported to increase memory performance modulating the dopaminergic system and herein modafinil was tested for its working memory (WM) enhancing properties. Reuptake inhibition of dopamine, serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) by modafinil was tested. Sixty male Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into six groups (modafinil-treated 1–5–10 mg/kg body weight, trained and untrained and vehicle treated trained and untrained rats; daily injected intraperitoneally for a period of 10 days) and tested in a radial arm maze (RAM), a paradigm for testing spatial WM. Hippocampi were taken 6 h following the last day of training and complexes containing the unphosphorylated or phosphorylated dopamine transporter (DAT-CC and pDAT-CC) and complexes containing the D1–3 dopamine receptor subunits (D1–D3-CC) were determined. Modafinil was binding to the DAT but insignificantly to SERT or NET and dopamine reuptake was blocked specifically (IC50 = 11.11 μM; SERT 1547 μM; NET 182 μM). From day 8 (day 9 for 1 mg/kg body weight) modafinil was decreasing WM errors (WMEs) in the RAM significantly and remarkably at all doses tested as compared to the vehicle controls. WMEs were linked to the D2R-CC and the pDAT-CC. pDAT and D1–D3-CC levels were modulated significantly and modafinil was shown to enhance spatial WM in the rat in a well-documented paradigm at all the three doses and dopamine reuptake inhibition with subsequent modulation of D1–3-CC is proposed as a possible mechanism of action. PMID:26347626

  17. The effect of modafinil on the rat dopamine transporter and dopamine receptors D1-D3 paralleling cognitive enhancement in the radial arm maze.

    PubMed

    Karabacak, Yasemin; Sase, Sunetra; Aher, Yogesh D; Sase, Ajinkya; Saroja, Sivaprakasam R; Cicvaric, Ana; Höger, Harald; Berger, Michael; Bakulev, Vasiliy; Sitte, Harald H; Leban, Johann; Monje, Francisco J; Lubec, Gert

    2015-01-01

    A series of drugs have been reported to increase memory performance modulating the dopaminergic system and herein modafinil was tested for its working memory (WM) enhancing properties. Reuptake inhibition of dopamine, serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) by modafinil was tested. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups (modafinil-treated 1-5-10 mg/kg body weight, trained and untrained and vehicle treated trained and untrained rats; daily injected intraperitoneally for a period of 10 days) and tested in a radial arm maze (RAM), a paradigm for testing spatial WM. Hippocampi were taken 6 h following the last day of training and complexes containing the unphosphorylated or phosphorylated dopamine transporter (DAT-CC and pDAT-CC) and complexes containing the D1-3 dopamine receptor subunits (D1-D3-CC) were determined. Modafinil was binding to the DAT but insignificantly to SERT or NET and dopamine reuptake was blocked specifically (IC50 = 11.11 μM; SERT 1547 μM; NET 182 μM). From day 8 (day 9 for 1 mg/kg body weight) modafinil was decreasing WM errors (WMEs) in the RAM significantly and remarkably at all doses tested as compared to the vehicle controls. WMEs were linked to the D2R-CC and the pDAT-CC. pDAT and D1-D3-CC levels were modulated significantly and modafinil was shown to enhance spatial WM in the rat in a well-documented paradigm at all the three doses and dopamine reuptake inhibition with subsequent modulation of D1-3-CC is proposed as a possible mechanism of action.

  18. Psychostimulant Effect of the Synthetic Cannabinoid JWH-018 and AKB48: Behavioral, Neurochemical, and Dopamine Transporter Scan Imaging Studies in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ossato, Andrea; Uccelli, Licia; Bilel, Sabrine; Canazza, Isabella; Di Domenico, Giovanni; Pasquali, Micol; Pupillo, Gaia; De Luca, Maria Antonietta; Boschi, Alessandra; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Rimondo, Claudia; Beggiato, Sarah; Ferraro, Luca; Varani, Katia; Borea, Pier Andrea; Serpelloni, Giovanni; De-Giorgio, Fabio; Marti, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    JWH-018 and AKB48 are two synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs) belonging to different structural classes and illegally marketed as incense, herbal preparations, or chemical supply for theirs psychoactive cannabis-like effects. Clinical reports from emergency room reported psychomotor agitation as one of the most frequent effects in people assuming SCBs. This study aimed to investigate the psychostimulant properties of JWH-018 and AKB48 in male CD-1 mice and to compare their behavioral and biochemical effects with those caused by cocaine and amphetamine. In vivo studies showed that JWH-018 and AKB48, as cocaine and amphetamine, facilitated spontaneous locomotion in mice. These effects were prevented by CB1 receptor blockade and dopamine (DA) D1/5 and D2/3 receptors inhibition. SPECT-CT studies on dopamine transporter (DAT) revealed that, as cocaine and amphetamine, JWH-018 and AKB48 decreased the [123I]-FP-CIT binding in the mouse striatum. Conversely, in vitro competition binding studies revealed that, unlike cocaine and amphetamine, JWH-018 and AKB48 did not bind to mouse or human DAT. Moreover, microdialysis studies showed that the systemic administration of JWH-018, AKB48, cocaine, and amphetamine stimulated DA release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell of freely moving mice. Finally, unlike amphetamine and cocaine, JWH-018 and AKB48 did not induce any changes on spontaneous [3H]-DA efflux from murine striatal synaptosomes. The present results suggest that SCBs facilitate striatal DA release possibly with different mechanisms than cocaine and amphetamine. Furthermore, they demonstrate, for the first time, that JWH-018 and AKB48 induce a psychostimulant effect in mice possibly by increasing NAc DA release. These data, according to clinical reports, outline the potential psychostimulant action of SCBs highlighting their possible danger to human health. PMID:28824464

  19. Phenyl ring-substituted lobelane analogs: inhibition of [³H]dopamine uptake at the vesicular monoamine transporter-2.

    PubMed

    Nickell, Justin R; Zheng, Guangrong; Deaciuc, Agripina G; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2011-03-01

    Lobeline attenuates the behavioral effects of methamphetamine via inhibition of the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2). To increase selectivity for VMAT2, chemically defunctionalized lobeline analogs, including lobelane, were designed to eliminate nicotinic acetylcholine receptor affinity. The current study evaluated the ability of lobelane analogs to inhibit [³H]dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ) binding to VMAT2 and [³H]dopamine (DA) uptake into isolated synaptic vesicles and determined the mechanism of inhibition. Introduction of aromatic substituents in lobelane maintained analog affinity for the [³H]DTBZ binding site on VMAT2 and inhibitory potency in the [³H]DA uptake assay assessing VMAT2 function. The most potent (K(i) = 13-16 nM) analogs in the series included para-methoxyphenyl nor-lobelane (GZ-252B), para-methoxyphenyl lobelane (GZ-252C), and 2,4-dichlorphenyl lobelane (GZ-260C). Affinity of the analogs for the [³H]DTBZ binding site did not correlate with inhibitory potency in the [³H]DA uptake assay. It is noteworthy that the N-benzylindole-, biphenyl-, and indole-bearing meso-analogs 2,6-bis[2-(1-benzyl-1H-indole-3-yl)ethyl]-1-methylpiperidine hemifumarate (AV-1-292C), 2,6-bis(2-(biphenyl-4-yl)ethyl)piperidine hydrochloride (GZ-272B), and 2,6-bis[2-(1H-indole-3-yl)ethyl]-1-methylpiperidine monofumarate (AV-1-294), respectively] inhibited VMAT2 function (K(i) = 73, 127, and 2130 nM, respectively), yet had little to no affinity for the [³H]DTBZ binding site. These results suggest that the analogs interact at an alternate site to DTBZ on VMAT2. Kinetic analyses of [³H]DA uptake revealed a competitive mechanism for 2,6-bis(2-(4-methoxyphenyl)ethyl)piperidine hydrochloride (GZ-252B), 2,6-bis(2-(4-methoxyphenyl)ethyl)-1-methylpiperidine hydrochloride (GZ-252C), 2,6-bis(2-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl)piperidine hydrochloride (GZ-260C), and GZ-272B. Similar to methamphetamine, these analogs released [³H]DA from the vesicles, but with higher potency. In

  20. X-ray structure of the dopamine transporter in complex with tricyclic antidepressant

    PubMed Central

    Penmatsa, Aravind; Wang, Kevin H.; Gouaux, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Antidepressants targeting Na+/Cl−-coupled neurotransmitter uptake define a major therapeutic strategy to treat clinical depression and neuropathic pain. However, identifying the molecular interactions that underlie the pharmacological activity of these transport inhibitors and thus the mechanism by which the inhibitors lead to increased synaptic neurotransmitter levels has proven elusive. Here we present the crystal structure of the Drosophila melanogaster dopamine transporter (dDAT) at 3.0 Å resolution bound to the tricyclic antidepressant nortriptyline. The transporter is locked in an outward-open conformation with nortriptyline wedged between TMs1/6 and 3/8, blocking the transporter from binding substrate and from isomerizing to an inward facing conformation. While the overall structure of dDAT is similar to that of its prokaryotic relative LeuT, there are multiple distinctions that include a kink in TM12 halfway across the membrane bilayer, a latch-like C-terminal helix that caps the cytoplasmic gate, and a cholesterol molecule wedged within a groove formed by TMs 1a, 5 and 7. Taken together, the dDAT structure reveals the molecular basis for antidepressant action on sodium-coupled neurotransmitter symporters and illuminates critical elements of eukaryotic transporter structure and modulation by lipids, thus expanding our understanding of mechanism and regulation of neurotransmitter uptake at chemical synapses. PMID:24037379

  1. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: decreased striatal dopamine transporter levels.

    PubMed

    Voon, Valerie; Rizos, Alexandra; Chakravartty, Riddhika; Mulholland, Nicola; Robinson, Stephanie; Howell, Nicholas A; Harrison, Neil; Vivian, Gill; Ray Chaudhuri, K

    2014-02-01

    Impulse control disorders are commonly associated with dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD). PD patients with impulse control disorders demonstrate enhanced dopamine release to conditioned cues and a gambling task on [(11)C]raclopride positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and enhanced ventral striatal activity to reward on functional MRI. We compared PD patients with impulse control disorders and age-matched and gender-matched controls without impulse control disorders using [(123)I]FP-CIT (2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropane) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), to assess striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) density. The [(123)I]FP-CIT binding data in the striatum were compared between 15 PD patients with and 15 without impulse control disorders using independent t tests. Those with impulse control disorders showed significantly lower DAT binding in the right striatum with a trend in the left (right: F(1,24)=5.93, p=0.02; left: F(1,24)=3.75, p=0.07) compared to controls. Our findings suggest that greater dopaminergic striatal activity in PD patients with impulse control disorders may be partly related to decreased uptake and clearance of dopamine from the synaptic cleft. Whether these findings are related to state or trait effects is not known. These findings dovetail with reports of lower DAT levels secondary to the effects of methamphetamine and alcohol. Although any regulation of DAT by antiparkinsonian medication appears to be modest, PD patients with impulse control disorders may be differentially sensitive to regulatory mechanisms of DAT expression by dopaminergic medications.

  2. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: decreased striatal dopamine transporter levels

    PubMed Central

    Voon, Valerie; Rizos, Alexandra; Chakravartty, Riddhika; Mulholland, Nicola; Robinson, Stephanie; Howell, Nicholas A; Harrison, Neil; Vivian, Gill; Ray Chaudhuri, K

    2014-01-01

    Objective Impulse control disorders are commonly associated with dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD). PD patients with impulse control disorders demonstrate enhanced dopamine release to conditioned cues and a gambling task on [11C]raclopride positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and enhanced ventral striatal activity to reward on functional MRI. We compared PD patients with impulse control disorders and age-matched and gender-matched controls without impulse control disorders using [123I]FP-CIT (2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropane) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), to assess striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) density. Methods The [123I]FP-CIT binding data in the striatum were compared between 15 PD patients with and 15 without impulse control disorders using independent t tests. Results Those with impulse control disorders showed significantly lower DAT binding in the right striatum with a trend in the left (right: F(1,24)=5.93, p=0.02; left: F(1,24)=3.75, p=0.07) compared to controls. Conclusions Our findings suggest that greater dopaminergic striatal activity in PD patients with impulse control disorders may be partly related to decreased uptake and clearance of dopamine from the synaptic cleft. Whether these findings are related to state or trait effects is not known. These findings dovetail with reports of lower DAT levels secondary to the effects of methamphetamine and alcohol. Although any regulation of DAT by antiparkinsonian medication appears to be modest, PD patients with impulse control disorders may be differentially sensitive to regulatory mechanisms of DAT expression by dopaminergic medications. PMID:23899625

  3. Dopamine-transporter levels drive striatal responses to apomorphine in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Passamonti, Luca; Salsone, Maria; Toschi, Nicola; Cerasa, Antonio; Giannelli, Marco; Chiriaco, Carmelina; Cascini, Giuseppe Lucio; Fera, Francesco; Quattrone, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD) can improve some cognitive functions while worsening others. These opposite effects might reflect different levels of residual dopamine in distinct parts of the striatum, although the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to address how apomorphine, a potent dopamine agonist, influences brain activity associated with working memory in PD patients with variable levels of nigrostriatal degeneration, as assessed via dopamine-transporter (DAT) scan. Twelve PD patients underwent two fMRI sessions (Off-, On-apomorphine) and one DAT-scan session. Twelve sex-, age-, and education-matched healthy controls underwent one fMRI session. The core fMRI analyses explored: (1) the main effect of group; (2) the main effect of treatment; and (3) linear and nonlinear interactions between treatment and DAT levels. Relative to controls, PD-Off patients showed greater activations within posterior attentional regions (e.g., precuneus). PD-On versus PD-Off patients displayed reduced left superior frontal gyrus activation and enhanced striatal activation during working-memory task. The relation between DAT levels and striatal responses to apomorphine followed an inverted-U-shaped model (i.e., the apomorphine effect on striatal activity in PD patients with intermediate DAT levels was opposite to that observed in PD patients with higher and lower DAT levels). Previous research in PD demonstrated that the nigrostriatal degeneration (tracked via DAT scan) is associated with inverted-U-shaped rearrangements of postsynaptic D2-receptors sensitivity. Hence, it can be hypothesized that individual differences in DAT levels drove striatal responses to apomorphine via D2-receptor-mediated mechanisms. PMID:23785657

  4. Differential Influence of Dopamine Transport Rate on the Potencies of Cocaine, Amphetamine, and Methylphenidate

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine transporter (DAT) levels vary across brain regions and individuals, and are altered by drug history and disease states; however, the impact of altered DAT expression on psychostimulant effects in brain has not been systematically explored. Using fast scan cyclic voltammetry, we measured the effects of elevated DAT levels on presynaptic dopamine parameters as well as the uptake inhibition potency of the blockers cocaine and methylphenidate (MPH) and the releaser amphetamine (AMPH) in the nucleus accumbens core. Here we found that increases in DAT levels, resulting from either genetic overexpression or MPH self-administration, caused markedly increased maximal rates of uptake (Vmax) that were positively correlated with the uptake inhibition potency of AMPH and MPH, but not cocaine. AMPH and MPH were particularly sensitive to DAT changes, with a 100% increase in Vmax resulting in a 200% increase in potency. The relationship between Vmax and MPH potency was the same as that for AMPH, but was different from that for cocaine, indicating that MPH more closely resembles a releaser with regard to uptake inhibition. Conversely, the effects of MPH on stimulated dopamine release were similar to those of cocaine, with inverted U-shaped increases in release over a concentration–response curve. This was strikingly different from the release profile of AMPH, which showed only reductions at high concentrations, indicating that MPH is not a pure releaser. These data indicate that although MPH is a DAT blocker, its uptake-inhibitory actions are affected by DAT changes in a similar manner to releasers. Together, these data show that fluctuations in DAT levels alter the potency of releasers and MPH but not blockers and suggest an integral role of the DAT in the addictive potential of AMPH and related compounds. PMID:25474655

  5. Characterization of the dopamine transporter gene expression and binding sites in cultured human amniotic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Elwan, Mohamed A; Ishii, Takashi; Sakuragawa, Norio

    2003-05-15

    In this study we sought to investigate whether the dopamine transporter, DAT, and its binding sites are expressed in the human amniotic epithelial cells (HAEC) using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and radioligand binding studies, respectively. The RT-PCR findings showed that HAEC expressed DAT mRNA with 100% homology to the human brain DAT. Saturation binding studies using [3H]mazindol showed a high affinity DAT binding site with K(D) and B(max) values of 12.32+/-1.67 nM and 82.7+/-9.74 fmol/mg protein, respectively. Competition experiments showed that selective DAT blockers are potent displacers of [3H]mazindol binding. The rank order of potency of the competing drugs is consistent with the pharmacology of the DAT. The present results provide compelling evidence that HAEC natively express the DAT mRNA and binding sites. More importantly, these results may suggest that HAEC is an appropriate human cell model for studying dopamine release and uptake processes and potential ligands at these sites.

  6. Striatal dopamine transporters correlate with simple reaction time in elderly subjects

    PubMed Central

    van Dyck, Christopher H.; Avery, Robert A.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Marek, Kenneth L.; Quinlan, Donald M.; Baldwin, Ronald M.; Seibyl, John P.; Innis, Robert B.; Arnsten, Amy F. T.

    2011-01-01

    The decline in motor performance that accompanies advanced age has unclear neurobiological substrates but may relate, in part, to degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system. This research tested the hypothesis that striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) availability in healthy elderly individuals was related to measures of motor performance. Thirty-six healthy volunteers (18 male, 18 female) who ranged in age from 68 to 88 (75.4±4.9 years) received a neuropsychological evaluation that included two primary motor measures (tested with dominant hand): 1) Simple Reaction Time (SRT); and 2) Finger Tapping (FT). Subjects underwent SPECT scanning with [123I]2ß-carbomethoxy-3ß-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ([123I]ß-CIT) for measurement of striatal DAT availability. A ratio of specific to nondisplaceable brain uptake (i.e., V3″=[striatal−occipital]/occipital), a measure proportional to the binding potential (Bmax/KD), was derived. SRT was significantly correlated with striatal DAT availability with or without controlling for the contribution of age. However, contrary to hypothesis, FT was not correlated with striatal DAT availability. Comparison measures, including episodic memory and general intelligence, were also unrelated to striatal DAT availability. These results demonstrate that a loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic function likely contributes to slowing of reaction speed with advancing age. PMID:17363113

  7. Nurr1 enhances transcription of the human dopamine transporter gene through a novel mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, P; Mitchell, T R; Granneman, J G; Bannon, M J

    2001-03-01

    The importance of the nuclear receptor nurr1 for the appropriate development of mesencephalic dopamine-synthesizing neurons has been clearly demonstrated through the targeted disruption of the nurr1 gene. The persistence of nurr1 expression in adult tissue suggests a possible role for this transcription factor in the maintenance, as well as development, of the dopaminergic phenotype. To address this issue, we analyzed the effects of nurr1 on the transcriptional expression of the human dopamine transporter gene (hDAT), one of the most specific phenotypic markers for dopaminergic neurons. Nurr1 enhanced the transcriptional activity of hDAT gene constructs transiently transfected into a newly described cell line (SN4741) that expresses a dopaminergic phenotype, whereas other members of the NGFI-B subfamily of nuclear receptors had lesser or no effects. Nurr1 activation of hDAT was not dependent upon heterodimerization with the retinoid X receptor. Unexpectedly, functional analysis of a series of gene constructs revealed that a region of the hDAT 5'-flanking sequence devoid of NGFI-B response element (NBRE)-like sites mediated nurr1 activation. Additional experiments using a nurr1 mutant construct suggest that nurr1 activates hDAT transcription via a novel NBRE-independent mechanism.

  8. Predicting childhood effortful control from interactions between early parenting quality and children's dopamine transporter gene haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Sulik, Michael J; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Stover, Daryn A; Verrelli, Brian C

    2016-02-01

    Children's observed effortful control (EC) at 30, 42, and 54 months (n = 145) was predicted from the interaction between mothers' observed parenting with their 30-month-olds and three variants of the solute carrier family C6, member 3 (SLC6A3) dopamine transporter gene (single nucleotide polymorphisms in intron8 and intron13, and a 40 base pair variable number tandem repeat [VNTR] in the 3'-untranslated region [UTR]), as well as haplotypes of these variants. Significant moderating effects were found. Children without the intron8-A/intron13-G, intron8-A/3'-UTR VNTR-10, or intron13-G/3'-UTR VNTR-10 haplotypes (i.e., haplotypes associated with the reduced SLC6A3 gene expression and thus lower dopamine functioning) appeared to demonstrate altered levels of EC as a function of maternal parenting quality, whereas children with these haplotypes demonstrated a similar EC level regardless of the parenting quality. Children with these haplotypes demonstrated a trade-off, such that they showed higher EC, relative to their counterparts without these haplotypes, when exposed to less supportive maternal parenting. The findings revealed a diathesis-stress pattern and suggested that different SLC6A3 haplotypes, but not single variants, might represent different levels of young children's sensitivity/responsivity to early parenting.

  9. Age-related decline in motor behavior and striatal dopamine transporter in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Yue, Feng; Zeng, Sien; Wu, Di; Yi, Deqiao; Alex Zhang, Y; Chan, Piu

    2012-08-01

    Advanced human aging is associated with progressive declines of motor function and a risk factor for Parkinson's disease, which mainly involves central nigrostriatal dopaminergic system. The present study investigated age-related changes in motor behaviors and alterations of the number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic terminals in non-human primates. A total of 30 cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) of age 3.5-15.5 years were studied. Motor behaviors including upper limb movement time and the amount of overall home cage activity were quantitatively assessed using a modified movement assessment panel and a newly developed webcam-based monitoring system. The function of the dopaminergic system was semi-quantitatively measured by (99m)Tc-TRODAT-1 uptake rates, a dopamine transporter (DAT) specific radiopharmaceutical with SPECT imaging. The results showed a significant decline in motor behaviors associated with aging which were significantly correlated with age-related decreases of (99m)Tc-TRODAT-1 uptake. A further partial correlation analysis independent of age indicated that age contributed to the relationship between striatal DAT levels and motor behaviors. Our results indicate that normal aging-related dopamine physiology influences certain aspects of motor behaviors and suggest that aging-associated dysfunction in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system may be an important factor contributing to the decline of motor behaviors in aging cynomolgus monkeys.

  10. Dopamine transporter gene susceptibility to methylation is associated with impulsivity in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Rajala, Abigail Z.; Zaitoun, Ismail; Henriques, Jeffrey B.; Converse, Alexander K.; Murali, Dhanabalan; Epstein, Miles L.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity, the predisposition to act without regard for negative consequences, is a characteristic of several psychiatric disorders and is thought to result in part from genetic variation in the untranslated region of the dopamine transporter (DAT) gene. As the exact link between genetic mutations and impulsivity has not been established, we used oculomotor behavior to characterize rhesus monkeys as impulsive or calm and genetic/epigenetic analysis and positron emission tomography (PET) to correlate phenotype to DAT genotype, DAT gene methylation, and DAT availability. We found three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 3′-UTR of the DAT gene, one of which provided a potential site for methylation in the impulsive group. Bisulfite analysis showed that the DNA of the impulsive but not the calm subjects was methylated at one SNP. Because genetic/epigenetic modifications could lead to differences in protein expression, we measured DAT availability using [18F]2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-chlorophenyl)-8-(2-fluoroethyl)-nortropane ([18F]FECNT) PET and found higher DAT availability in the internal globus pallidus, an output nucleus of the basal ganglia, of the impulsive group. Higher DAT availability lowers dopamine levels, potentially altering neuronal circuits involved in the initiation of action, thus contributing to the impulsive phenotype. The association between increased methylation in the DAT gene and greater DAT availability suggests that mutations to the regulatory portion of the DAT gene lead to a susceptibility to epigenetic modification resulting in a discrete behavioral phenotype. PMID:25122707

  11. A Markov State-based Quantitative Kinetic Model of Sodium Release from the Dopamine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Asghar M.; Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2017-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) belongs to the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family of membrane proteins that are responsible for reuptake of neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft to terminate a neuronal signal and enable subsequent neurotransmitter release from the presynaptic neuron. The release of one sodium ion from the crystallographically determined sodium binding site Na2 had been identified as an initial step in the transport cycle which prepares the transporter for substrate translocation by stabilizing an inward-open conformation. We have constructed Markov State Models (MSMs) from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of human DAT (hDAT) to explore the mechanism of this sodium release. Our results quantify the release process triggered by hydration of the Na2 site that occurs concomitantly with a conformational transition from an outward-facing to an inward-facing state of the transporter. The kinetics of the release process are computed from the MSM, and transition path theory is used to identify the most probable sodium release pathways. An intermediate state is discovered on the sodium release pathway, and the results reveal the importance of various modes of interaction of the N-terminus of hDAT in controlling the pathways of release. PMID:28059145

  12. A Markov State-based Quantitative Kinetic Model of Sodium Release from the Dopamine Transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Asghar M.; Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2017-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) belongs to the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family of membrane proteins that are responsible for reuptake of neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft to terminate a neuronal signal and enable subsequent neurotransmitter release from the presynaptic neuron. The release of one sodium ion from the crystallographically determined sodium binding site Na2 had been identified as an initial step in the transport cycle which prepares the transporter for substrate translocation by stabilizing an inward-open conformation. We have constructed Markov State Models (MSMs) from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of human DAT (hDAT) to explore the mechanism of this sodium release. Our results quantify the release process triggered by hydration of the Na2 site that occurs concomitantly with a conformational transition from an outward-facing to an inward-facing state of the transporter. The kinetics of the release process are computed from the MSM, and transition path theory is used to identify the most probable sodium release pathways. An intermediate state is discovered on the sodium release pathway, and the results reveal the importance of various modes of interaction of the N-terminus of hDAT in controlling the pathways of release.

  13. Interaction of Dopamine Transporter Gene and Observed Parenting Behaviors on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, James J.; Lee, Steve S.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that some individuals may be simultaneously more responsive to the effects from environmental adversity "and" enrichment (i.e., differential susceptibility). Given that parenting behavior and a variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in the 3'untranslated region of the dopamine transporter (DAT1) gene are…

  14. Interaction of Dopamine Transporter Gene and Observed Parenting Behaviors on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, James J.; Lee, Steve S.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that some individuals may be simultaneously more responsive to the effects from environmental adversity "and" enrichment (i.e., differential susceptibility). Given that parenting behavior and a variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in the 3'untranslated region of the dopamine transporter (DAT1) gene are…

  15. miR-137 and miR-491 Negatively Regulate Dopamine Transporter Expression and Function in Neural Cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaojian; Wang, Feng; Han, Ying; Geng, Xuewen; Li, Minghua; Shi, Yu; Lu, Lin; Chen, Yun

    2016-12-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is involved in the regulation of extracellular dopamine levels. A 40-bp variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of the DAT has been reported to be associated with various phenotypes that are involved in the aberrant regulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission. In the present study, we found that miR-137 and miR-491 caused a marked reduction of DAT expression, thereby influencing neuronal dopamine transport. Moreover, the regulation of miR-137 and miR-491 on this transport disappeared after the DAT was silenced. The miR-491 seed region that is located on the VNTR sequence in the 3'UTR of the DAT and the regulatory effect of miR-491 on the DAT depended on the VNTR copy-number. These data indicate that miR-137 and miR-491 regulate DAT expression and dopamine transport at the post-transcriptional level, suggesting that microRNA may be targeted for the treatment of diseases associated with DAT dysfunction.

  16. Maternal unresponsiveness and child disruptive problems: the interplay of uninhibited temperament and dopamine transporter genes.

    PubMed

    Davies, Patrick; Cicchetti, Dante; Hentges, Rochelle F

    2015-01-01

    This study examined how and why dopamine transporter (DAT1) susceptibility alleles moderate the relation between maternal unresponsiveness and young children's behavior problems in a disadvantaged, predominantly minority sample of 201 two-year-old children and their mothers. Using a multimethod, multisource design, the findings indicated that a genetic composite of DAT1 susceptibility alleles (rs27072, rs40184) potentiated associations between maternal unresponsive caregiving and increases in children's behavior problems 2 years later. Moderator-mediated-moderation analyses further revealed that the DAT1 diathesis was more proximally mediated by the potentiating effects of children's uninhibited temperament in the pathway between maternal unresponsiveness and disruptive behavior problems. Results are interpreted in the context of supporting and advancing the biosocial developmental model (Beauchaine & Gatzke-Kopp, 2012). © 2014 The Authors. Child Development © 2014 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  17. Chronic nicotine and smoking treatment increases dopamine transporter mRNA expression in the rat midbrain.

    PubMed

    Li, Shupeng; Kim, Kun Yang; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Jin Hoi; Park, Moon Seok; Bahk, Jong Yoon; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2004-06-03

    Previous pharmacokinetics and electrophysiological results indicated an important role of nicotine in the modulation of dopamine transporter (DAT). To elucidate the expression changes of DAT on chronic nicotine and smoke administration, the effects of nicotine and passive cigarette smoke on DAT mRNA expression in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the substantia nigra (SN) area were examined using in situ hybridization and RNase protection assay. The results showed that chronic nicotine and smoke exposure highly unregulated DAT mRNA in the VTA and SN areas, including the dorsal part of substantia nigra pars compacta. Smoke for 30 min showed the highest increasing effect, whereas nicotine and smoke for 10 min only had slightly increasing effects. However, smoke for 1 h showed an increasing effect to a lesser extent than 30 min. These results revealed a new aspect of nicotine's modulation on the DAT, and may have important roles in neuropsychological disorders related to the midbrain abnormalities such as drugs addiction.

  18. Evolution of a Compact Photoprobe for the Dopamine Transporter Based on (±)-threo-Methylphenidate

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The development of photoaffinity ligands for determining covalent points of attachment to the dopamine transporter (DAT) has predominantly focused on tropane-based compounds bearing variable-length linkers between the photoreactive group and the inhibitor pharmacophore. To expand the array of photoprobes useful for mapping inhibitor-binding pockets within the DAT, a compact nontropane ligand was synthesized featuring a photoreactive azide and iodine tag directly attached to the aromatic ring of (±)-threo-methylphenidate. (±)-threo-4-Azido-3-iodomethylphenidate [(±)-6; Ki = 4.0 ± 0.8 nM] displayed high affinity for hDAT. Moreover, a radioiodinated analogue of (±)-6 demonstrated covalent ligation to the DAT in cultured cells and rat striatal membranes, thus suggesting the potential utility of this photoprobe in DAT structure–function studies. PMID:23066448

  19. Influence of striatal dopamine transporter availability on the response to methylphenidate in adult patients with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Krause, Johanna; la Fougere, Christian; Krause, Klaus-Henning; Ackenheil, Manfred; Dresel, Stefan H

    2005-12-01

    In this study, we investigated whether availability of striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) may have an influence on the response of adult patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on methylphenidate (MPH). In 18 non-smoking and non-medicated adult patients with ADHD, availability of DAT was measured with [(99m)Tc] TRODAT-1 SPECT. Then, the patients received methylphenidate (MPH), individually titrated up to 60 mg per day. Ten weeks later, clinical improvement was rated by Clinical Global Impressions scale. In all, 6 patients were classified as non-responders, and 12 responded to MPH. From the non-responders, 5 presented with a DAT availability below that of normal controls of the same age, whereas in the group of responders all patients had elevated DAT availability. There was a significant negative correlation between values for global clinical improvement and striatal DAT availability. In conclusion, ADHD patients with low DAT availability seem not to respond to therapy with MPH.

  20. Dopamine transporter gene polymorphism and psychiatric symptoms seen in schizophrenic patients at their first episode

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, Toshiya; Sugita, Tetsuyoshi; Dobashi, Izumi

    1996-07-26

    To investigate the possible role of the dopamine transporter (DAT) gene in determining the phenotype in human subjects, allele frequencies for the 40-bp variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism at this site were compared between 117 Japanese normal controls and 118 schizophrenic patients, including six subgroups: early-onset, those with a family history, and those suffering from one of the following psychiatric symptoms at their first episode: delusion and hallucination; disorganization; bizarre behavior; and negative symptoms. No significant differences were observed between the group as a whole or any subgroup of schizophrenic patients and controls. The results indicate that VNTR polymorphism in the DAT gene is unlikely to be a major contributor to any of the psychiatric parameters examined in the present population of schizophrenic subjects. 12 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  1. Study of the link between dopamine transporter gene polymorphisms and response to paroxetin and escitalopram in patients with lifelong premature ejaculation.

    PubMed

    Eltonsi, T K; Tawfik, T M; Rashed, L A; GamalEl Din, S F; Mahmoud, M A

    2017-09-14

    We evaluated the role of dopamine (DA) transporter gene polymorphism in lifelong premature ejaculation (LPE) and its role in determining the response to paroxetine and escitalopram. Eighty consecutive patients and controls were recruited. Sixty of them suffered from LPE. They were divided into two equal groups. One group received paroxetine 20 mg daily for 3 months and the other one received ecistalopram 20 mg daily for 3 months. Their wives were instructed to measure the intra-vaginal ejaculation latency time using stopwatch. Five milliliters of blood was withdrawn from patients and controls for PCR analysis. The present study revealed that the mean ages of the patients and controls were 41.42 and 36.4 years, respectively. The majority of the patients were of (10R/10R) genotypes of the DA transporter gene polymorphism, whereas the controls were of (6R/6R) genotypes and this revealed statistically significant result (P-value=0.001). Both paroxitine and escitalopram significantly delayed ejaculation in the responders (P-values=0.001 and 0.001, respectively). The study revealed significant association between such response and DA transporter gene polymorphism (P-values of fold increase and log FI were 0.019 and 0.010, respectively). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate a highly significant association between such response and DA transporter gene polymorphism in patients with LPE.International Journal of Impotence Research advance online publication, 14 September 2017; doi:10.1038/ijir.2017.29.

  2. Direct evidence that two cysteines in the dopamine transporter form a disulfide bond.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Wei, Hua; Hill, Erik R; Chen, Lucy; Jiang, Liying; Han, Dawn D; Gu, Howard H

    2007-04-01

    We have generated a fully functional dopamine transporter (DAT) mutant (dmDATx7) with all cysteines removed except the two cysteines in extracellular loop 2 (EL2). Random mutagenesis at either or both EL2 cysteines did not produce any functional transporter mutants, suggesting that the two cysteines cannot be replaced by any other amino acids. The cysteine-specific reagent MTSEA-biotin labeled dmDATx7 only after a DTT treatment which reduces disulfide bond. Since there are no other cysteines in dmDATx7, the MTSEA-biotin labeling must be on the EL2 cysteines made available by the DTT treatment. This result provides the first direct evidence that the EL2 cysteines form a disulfide bond. Interestingly, the DTT treatment had little effect on transport activity suggesting that the disulfide bond is not necessary for the uptake function of DAT. Our results and previous results are consistent with the notion that the disulfide bond between EL2 cysteines is required for DAT biosynthesis and/or its delivery to the cell surface.

  3. Genetic targeting of the amphetamine and methylphenidate-sensitive dopamine transporter: On the path to an animal model of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mergy, Marc A.; Gowrishankar, Raajaram; Davis, Gwynne L.; Jessen, Tammy N.; Wright, Jane; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Hahn, Maureen K.; Blakely, Randy D.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in dopamine (DA) signaling underlie the most widely held theories of molecular and circuit level perturbations that lead to risk for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The DA transporter (DAT), a presynaptic reuptake protein whose activity provides critical support for DA signaling by limiting DA action at pre- and postsynaptic receptors, has been consistently associated with ADHD through pharmacological, behavioral, brain imaging and genetic studies. Currently, the animal models of ADHD exhibit significant limitations, stemming in large part from their lack of construct validity. To remedy this situation, we have pursued the creation of a mouse model derived from a functional nonsynonymous variant in the DAT gene (SLC6A3) of ADHD probands. We trace our path from the identification of these variants to in vitro biochemical and physiological studies to the production of the DAT Val559 mouse model. We discuss our initial findings with these animals and their promise in the context of existing rodent models of ADHD. PMID:24332984

  4. Mephedrone and Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), Major Constituents of Bath Salts, Produce Opposite Effects at the Human Dopamine Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Krasnodara; Kolanos, Renata; Verkariya, Rakesh; De Felice, Louis; Glennon, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Psychoactive ‘bath salts’ represents a relatively new drug of abuse combination that was placed in Schedule I in October 2011. Two common ingredients of ‘bath salts’ include the cathinone analogs: mephedrone and methylenedioxy-pyrovalerone (MDPV). The mechanism of action of these synthetic cathinone analogs has not been well investigated. Materials and methods Because cathinone and methcathinone are known to act as releasing agents at the human dopamine transporter (hDAT), mephedrone and MDPV were investigated at hDAT expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Results Whereas mephedrone was found to have the signature of a dopamine releasing agent similar to methamphetamine or methcathinone, MDPV behaved as a cocaine-like reuptake inhibitor of dopamine. Conclusions Mephedrone and MDPV produce opposite electrophysiological signatures through hDAT expressed in oocytes. Implications are that the combination (as found in ‘bath salts’) might produce effects similar to a combination of methamphetamine and cocaine. PMID:23371489

  5. Mephedrone and methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), major constituents of "bath salts," produce opposite effects at the human dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Krasnodara; Kolanos, Renata; Vekariya, Rakesh; Verkariya, Rakesh; De Felice, Louis; Glennon, Richard A

    2013-06-01

    Psychoactive "bath salts" represent a relatively new drug of abuse combination that was placed in Schedule I in October 2011. Two common ingredients of bath salts include the cathinone analogs: mephedrone and methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV). The mechanism of action of these synthetic cathinone analogs has not been well investigated. Because cathinone and methcathinone are known to act as releasing agents at the human dopamine transporter (hDAT), mephedrone and MDPV were investigated at hDAT expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Whereas mephedrone was found to have the signature of a dopamine-releasing agent similar to methamphetamine or methcathinone, MDPV behaved as a cocaine-like reuptake inhibitor of dopamine. Mephedrone and MDPV produce opposite electrophysiological signatures through hDAT expressed in oocytes. Implications are that the combination (as found in bath salts) might produce effects similar to a combination of methamphetamine and cocaine.

  6. GABA, glutamate, dopamine and serotonin transporters expression on memory formation and amnesia.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Ruth; Gómez-Víquez, Leticia; Meneses, Alfredo

    2012-02-01

    Notwithstanding several neurotransmission systems are frequently related to memory formation, amnesia and/or therapeutic targets for memory alterations, the role of transporters γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, GAT1), glutamate (neuronal glutamate transporter excitatory amino acid carrier; EACC1), dopamine (DAT) and serotonin (SERT) is poorly understood. Hence, in this paper Western-blot analysis was used to evaluate expression changes on them during memory formation in trained and untrained rats treated with the selective serotonin transporter inhibitor fluoxetine, the amnesic drug d-methamphetamine (METH) and fluoxetine plus METH. Transporters expression was evaluated in the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and striatum. Data indicated that in addition of memory performance other behavioral parameters (e.g., explorative behavior, food-intake, etc.) that memory formation was recorded. Thus, memory formation in a Pavlovian/instrumental autoshaping was associated to up-regulation of prefrontal cortex GAT1 and EAAC1, striatal SERT, DAT and EACC1; while, hippocampal EACC1, GAT1 and SERT were down-regulated. METH impaired short (STM) and long-term memory (LTM), at 24 or 48h. The METH-induced amnesia down-regulated SERT, DAT, EACC1 and GAT1 in hippocampus and the GAT1 in striatum; no-changes were observed in prefrontal cortex. Post-training administration of fluoxetine improved LTM (48h), which was associated to DAT, GAT1 (prefrontal cortex) up-regulation, but GAT1 (striatum) and SERT (hippocampus) down-regulation. Fluoxetine plus METH administration was able to prevent amnesia, which was associated to DAT, EACC1 and GAT1 (prefrontal cortex), SERT and DAT (hippocampus) and EACC1 or DAT (striatal) up-regulation. Together these data show that memory formation, amnesia and anti-amnesic effects are associated to specific patters of transporters expression.

  7. The association between heroin expenditure and dopamine transporter availability--a single-photon emission computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Hsien; Chen, Kao Chin; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chiu, Nan Tsing; Lee, I Hui; Chen, Po See; Yeh, Tzung Lieh; Lu, Ru-Band; Chen, Chia-Chieh; Liao, Mei-Hsiu; Yang, Yen Kuang

    2015-03-30

    One of the consequences of heroin dependency is a huge expenditure on drugs. This underlying economic expense may be a grave burden for heroin users and may lead to criminal behavior, which is a huge cost to society. The neuropsychological mechanism related to heroin purchase remains unclear. Based on recent findings and the established dopamine hypothesis of addiction, we speculated that expenditure on heroin and central dopamine activity may be associated. A total of 21 heroin users were enrolled in this study. The annual expenditure on heroin was assessed, and the availability of the dopamine transporter (DAT) was assessed by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using [(99m)TC]TRODAT-1. Parametric and nonparametric correlation analyses indicated that annual expenditure on heroin was significantly and negatively correlated with the availability of striatal DAT. After adjustment for potential confounders, the predictive power of DAT availability was significant. Striatal dopamine function may be associated with opioid purchasing behavior among heroin users, and the cycle of spiraling dysfunction in the dopamine reward system could play a role in this association.

  8. Putamen-midbrain functional connectivity is related to striatal dopamine transporter availability in patients with Lewy body diseases.

    PubMed

    Rieckmann, A; Gomperts, S N; Johnson, K A; Growdon, J H; Van Dijk, K R A

    2015-01-01

    Prior work has shown that functional connectivity between the midbrain and putamen is altered in patients with impairments in the dopamine system. This study examines whether individual differences in midbrain-striatal connectivity are proportional to the integrity of the dopamine system in patients with nigrostriatal dopamine loss (Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies). We assessed functional connectivity of the putamen during resting state fMRI and dopamine transporter (DAT) availability in the striatum using 11C-Altropane PET in twenty patients. In line with the hypothesis that functional connectivity between the midbrain and the putamen reflects the integrity of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system, putamen-midbrain functional connectivity was significantly correlated with striatal DAT availability even after stringent control for effects of head motion. DAT availability did not relate to functional connectivity between the caudate and thalamus/prefrontal areas. As such, resting state functional connectivity in the midbrain-striatal pathway may provide a useful indicator of underlying pathology in patients with nigrostriatal dopamine loss.

  9. THE MODERATING ROLE OF THE DOPAMINE TRANSPORTER 1 GENE ON P50 SENSORY GATING AND ITS MODULATION BY NICOTINE

    PubMed Central

    MILLAR, A.; SMITH, D.; CHOUEIRY, J.; FISHER, D.; ALBERT, P.; KNOTT, V.

    2015-01-01

    Although schizophrenia has been considered primarily a disease of dopaminergic neurotransmission, the role of dopamine in auditory sensory gating deficits in this disorder and their amelioration by smoking/nicotine is unclear. Hypothesizing that individual differences in striatal dopamine levels may moderate auditory gating and its modulation by nicotine, this preliminary study used the mid-latency (P50) auditory event-related potential (ERP) to examine the single dose (6 mg) effects of nicotine (vs. placebo) gum on sensory gating in 24 healthy nonsmokers varying in the genetic expression of the dopamine transporter (DAT). Consistent with an inverted-U relationship between dopamine level and the drug effects, individuals carrying the 9R (lower gene expression) allele, which is related to greater striatal dopamine levels, tended to evidence increased baseline gating compared to 10R (higher gene expression) allele carriers and showed a reduction in gating with acute nicotine. The present results may help to understand the link between excessive smoking and sensory gating deficits in schizophrenia and to explain the potential functional implications of genetic disposition on nicotinic treatment in schizophrenia. PMID:21315807

  10. Regulation of ethanol intake under chronic mild stress: roles of dopamine receptors and transporters

    PubMed Central

    Delis, Foteini; Rombola, Christina; Bellezza, Robert; Rosko, Lauren; Grandy, David K.; Volkow, Nora D.; Thanos, Panayotis K.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that exposure to chronic mild stress decreases ethanol intake and preference in dopamine D2 receptor wild-type mice (Drd2+/+), while it increases intake in heterozygous (Drd2+/−) and knockout (Drd2−/−) mice. Dopaminergic neurotransmission in the basal forebrain plays a major role in the reinforcing actions of ethanol as well as in brain responses to stress. In order to identify neurochemical changes associated with the regulation of ethanol intake, we used in vitro receptor autoradiography to measure the levels and distribution of dopamine D1 and D2 receptors and dopamine transporters (DAT). Receptor levels were measured in the basal forebrain of Drd2+/+, Drd2+/−, and Drd2−/− mice belonging to one of four groups: control (C), ethanol intake (E), chronic mild stress exposure (S), and ethanol intake under chronic mild stress (ES). D2 receptor levels were higher in the lateral and medial striatum of Drd2+/+ ES mice, compared with Drd2+/+ E mice. Ethanol intake in Drd2+/+ mice was negatively correlated with striatal D2 receptor levels. D2 receptor levels in Drd2+/− mice were the same among the four treatment groups. DAT levels were lower in Drd2+/− C and Drd2−/− C mice, compared with Drd2+/+ C mice. Among Drd2+/− mice, S and ES groups had higher DAT levels compared with C and E groups in most regions examined. In Drd2−/− mice, ethanol intake was positively correlated with DAT levels in all regions studied. D1 receptor levels were lower in Drd2+/− and Drd2−/− mice, compared with Drd2+/+, in all regions examined and remained unaffected by all treatments. The results suggest that in normal mice, ethanol intake is associated with D2 receptor-mediated neurotransmission, which exerts a protective effect against ethanol overconsumption under stress. In mice with low Drd2 expression, where DRD2 levels are not further modulated, ethanol intake is associated with DAT function which is upregulated under stress leading to ethanol

  11. The Association of a Novel Haplotype in the Dopamine Transporter with Preschool Age Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Brett, Zoë H.; Henry, Caitlin; Scheeringa, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective Significant evidence supports a genetic contribution to the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Three previous studies have demonstrated an association between PTSD and the nine repeat allele of the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) in the dopamine transporter (DAT, rs28363170). Recently a novel, functionally significant C/T single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 3′UTR (rs27072) with putative interactions with the 3′VNTR, has been identified. To provide enhanced support for the role of DAT and striatal dopamine regulation in the development of PTSD, this study examined the impact of a haplotype defined by the C allele of rs27072 and the nine repeat allele of the 3′VNTR on PTSD diagnosis in young trauma-exposed children. Methods DAT haplotypes were determined in 150 trauma-exposed 3–6 year-old children. PTSD was assessed with a semistructured interview. After excluding double heterozygotes, analysis was performed on 143 total subjects. Haplotype was examined in relation to categorical and continuous measures of PTSD, controlling for trauma type and race. Additional analysis within the two largest race categories was performed, as other means of controlling for ethnic stratification were not available. Results The number of haplotypes (0, 1, or 2) defined by the presence of the nine repeat allele of rs28363170 (VNTR in the 3′UTR) and the C allele of rs27072 (SNP in the 3′UTR) was significantly associated with both the diagnosis of PTSD and total PTSD symptoms. Specifically, children with one or two copies of the haplotype had significantly more PTSD symptoms and were more likely to be diagnosed with PTSD than were children without this haplotype. Conclusions These findings extend previous findings associating genetic variation in the DAT with PTSD. The association of a haplotype in DAT with PTSD provides incremental traction for a model of genetic vulnerability to PTSD, a

  12. Incident impulse control disorder symptoms and dopamine transporter imaging in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kara M; Xie, Sharon X; Weintraub, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    To describe the incidence of, and clinical and neurobiological risk factors for, new-onset impulse control disorder (ICD) symptoms and related behaviours in early Parkinson disease (PD). The Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative is an international, multicenter, prospective study of de novo patients with PD untreated at baseline and assessed annually, including serial dopamine transporter imaging (DAT-SPECT) and ICD assessment (Questionnaire for Impulsive-Compulsive Disorders in Parkinson's Disease short form, QUIP). Participants were included if they screened negative on the QUIP at baseline. Kaplan-Meier curves and generalised estimating equations examined frequency and predictors of incident ICD symptoms. Participants were seen at baseline (n=320), year 1 (n=284), year 2 (n=217) and year 3 (n=96). Estimated cumulative incident rates of ICD symptoms and related behaviours were 8% (year 1), 18% (year 2) and 25% (year 3) and increased each year in those on dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) and decreased in those not on DRT. In participants on DRT, risk factors for incident ICD symptoms were younger age (OR=0.97, p=0.05), a greater decrease in right caudate (OR=4.03, p=0.01) and mean striatal (OR=6.90, p=0.04) DAT availability over the first year, and lower right putamen (OR=0.06, p=0.01) and mean total striatal (OR=0.25, p=0.04) DAT availability at any post-baseline visit. The rate of incident ICD symptoms increases with time and initiation of DRT in early PD. In this preliminary study, a greater decrease or lower DAT binding over time increases risk of incident ICD symptoms, conferring additional risk to those taking DRT. NCT01141023. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Serotonergic involvement in the amelioration of behavioral abnormalities in dopamine transporter knockout mice by nicotine.

    PubMed

    Uchiumi, Osamu; Kasahara, Yoshiyuki; Fukui, Asami; Hall, F Scott; Uhl, George R; Sora, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine transporter knockout (DAT KO) mice exhibit elevated extracellular dopamine levels in brain regions that include the striatum and the nucleus accumbens, but not the prefrontal cortex. DAT KO mice model some aspects of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. Smoking is more common in patients with schizophrenia, suggesting that nicotine might ameliorate aspects of the behavioral abnormalities and/or treatment side effects seen in these individuals. We report nicotine-induced normalization of effects on locomotion and prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle (PPI) in DAT KO mice that require intact serotonin 5-HT1A systems. First, we observed that the marked hyperactivity displayed by DAT KO mice was reduced by administration of nicotine. This nicotine effect was blocked by pretreatment with the non-specific nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor antagonist mecamylamine, or the 5-HT1A antagonist WAY100635. Secondly, we examined the effects of nicotine on PPI in DAT KO mice. Treatment with nicotine significantly ameliorated the PPI deficits observed in DAT KO mice. The ameliorating action of nicotine on PPI deficits in DAT KO mice was blocked by mecamylamine, the α₇ nACh receptor antagonist methyllycaconitine or WAY100635, while the α₄β₂ nACh receptor antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidinehydrobromide (DHβE) produced only a non-significant trend toward attenuation of nicotine effects. Finally, we observed that administration of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT also ameliorated the deficit in PPI observed in DAT KO mice. This amelioration was antagonized by pretreatment with WAY100635. These data support the idea that nicotine might ameliorate some of the cognitive dysfunctions found in schizophrenia in a 5-HT1A-dependent fashion. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Cognitive Enhancers'.

  14. Protection of malonate-induced GABA but not dopamine loss by GABA transporter blockade in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Zeevalk, Gail D; Manzino, Lawrence; Sonsalla, Patricia K

    2002-07-01

    Previous work has shown that overstimulation of GABA(A) receptors can potentiate neuronal cell damage during excitotoxic or metabolic stress in vitro and that GABA(A) antagonists or GABA transport blockers are neuroprotective under these situations. Malonate, a reversible succinate dehydrogenase/mitochondrial complex II inhibitor, is frequently used in animals to model cell loss in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. To determine if GABA transporter blockade during mitochondrial impairment can protect neurons in vivo as compared with in vitro studies, rats received a stereotaxic infusion of malonate (2 micromol) into the left striatum to induce a metabolic stress. The nonsubstrate GABA transport blocker, NO711 (20 nmol) was infused in some rats 30 min before and 3 h following malonate infusion. After 1 week, dopamine and GABA levels in the striata were measured. Malonate caused a significant loss of striatal dopamine and GABA. Blockade of the GABA transporter significantly attenuated GABA, but not dopamine loss. In contrast with several in vitro reports, GABA(A) receptors were not a downstream mediator of protection by NO711. Intrastriatal infusion of malonate (2 micromol) plus or minus the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol (1 micromol), the GABA(A) Cl- binding site antagonist picrotoxin (50 nmol) or the GABA(B) receptor antagonist saclofen (33 nmol) did not modify loss of striatal dopamine or GABA when examined 1 week following infusion. These data show that GABA transporter blockade during mitochondrial impairment in the striatum provides protection to GABAergic neurons. GABA transporter blockade, which is currently a pharmacological strategy for the treatment of epilepsy, may thus also be beneficial in the treatment of acute and chronic conditions involving energy inhibition such as stroke/ischemia or Huntington's disease. These findings also point to fundamental differences between immature and adult neurons in the

  15. Effect of Gingerol on Cisplatin-Induced Pica Analogous to Emesis Via Modulating Expressions of Dopamine 2 Receptor, Dopamine Transporter and Tyrosine Hydroxylase in the Vomiting Model of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Weibin; Cai, Xinrui; Wang, Yingying; Zhang, Xinying; Zhao, Hongmin; Qian, Qiuhai; Yang, Zhihong; Liu, Zhantao; Hasegawa, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Background Gingerol, the generic term for pungent constituents in ginger, has been used for treating vomiting in China. We are going to investigate the mechanisms of inhibitive effect of gingerol on cisplatin-induced pica behaviour by studying on both peripheral and central levels, and the effects of gingerol on homeostasis of dopamine (DA) transmission: dopamine D2 receptor (D2R), dopamine transporter (DAT) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Methods The antiemetic effect of gingerol was investigated on a vomiting model in rats induced by cisplatin 3 mg·kg−1 intraperitoneal injection (i.p.). Rats were randomly divided into the normal control group (C), simple gingerol control group (CG), cisplatin control group (V), cisplatin + metoclopramide group (M), cisplatin + low-dose gingerol group (GL), cisplatin + middle-dose gingerol group (GM) and cisplatin + high-dose gingerol group (GH). In observation period, rats in Groups C and V were pretreated with sterile saline 3 mL i.g.; rats in Group CG were pretreated with gingerol 40 mg·kg−1 i.g.; rats in Group M were pretreated with metoclopramide 2.5 mg·kg−1 i.g.; rats in Groups GL, GM and GH were pretreated with gingerol 10, 20 and 40 mg·kg−1 i.g. for 3 days, respectively. Cisplatin (3 mg·kg−1, i.p.) was administered one time after each treatment with the antiemetic agent or its vehicle except the Groups C and CG. The distribution of D2R, DAT and TH in the area postrema and ileum were measured by immunohistochemistry and quantitated based on the image analysis, and the expression of DAT and TH in the area postrema and ileum were measured by RT-PCR. The weights of kaolin eaten of the remaining rats were observed in every 6 h continuously for 72 h. Results The weight of kaolin eaten in rats induced by cisplatin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with gingerol in a dose-dependent manner during the 0–24 h and 24–72 h periods (P < 0.05). Gingerol markedly improved gastric emptying induced by cisplatin in

  16. Novel N-1,2-dihydroxypropyl analogs of lobelane inhibit vesicular monoamine transporter-2 function and methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Horton, David B; Siripurapu, Kiran B; Zheng, Guangrong; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2011-10-01

    Lobelane, a chemically defunctionalized saturated analog of lobeline, has increased selectivity for the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) compared with the parent compound. Lobelane inhibits methamphetamine-evoked dopamine (DA) release and decreases methamphetamine self-administration. Unfortunately, tolerance develops to the ability of lobelane to decrease these behavioral effects of methamphetamine. Lobelane has low water solubility, which is problematic for drug development. The aim of the current study was to determine the pharmacological effect of replacement of the N-methyl moiety with a chiral N-1,2-dihydroxypropyl (N-1,2-diol) moiety, which enhances water solubility, altering the configuration of the N-1,2-diol moiety and incorporating phenyl ring substituents into the analogs. To determine VMAT2 selectivity, structure-activity relationships also were generated for inhibition of DA and serotonin transporters. Analogs with the highest potency for inhibiting DA uptake at VMAT2 and at least 10-fold selectivity were evaluated further for ability to inhibit methamphetamine-evoked DA release from superfused striatal slices. (R)-3-[2,6-cis-di(4-methoxyphenethyl)piperidin-1-yl]propane-1,2-diol (GZ-793A), the (R)-4-methoxyphenyl-N-1,2-diol analog, and (R)-3-[2,6-cis-di(1-naphthylethyl)piperidin-1-yl]propane-1,2-diol (GZ-794A), the (R)-1-naphthyl-N-1,2-diol analog, exhibited the highest potency (K(i) ∼30 nM) inhibiting VMAT2, and both analogs inhibited methamphetamine-evoked endogenous DA release (IC(50) = 10.6 and 0.4 μM, respectively). Thus, the pharmacophore for VMAT2 inhibition accommodates the N-1,2-diol moiety, which improves drug-likeness and enhances the potential for the development of these clinical candidates as treatments for methamphetamine abuse.

  17. Novel N-1,2-Dihydroxypropyl Analogs of Lobelane Inhibit Vesicular Monoamine Transporter-2 Function and Methamphetamine-Evoked Dopamine Release

    PubMed Central

    Horton, David B.; Siripurapu, Kiran B.; Zheng, Guangrong; Crooks, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Lobelane, a chemically defunctionalized saturated analog of lobeline, has increased selectivity for the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) compared with the parent compound. Lobelane inhibits methamphetamine-evoked dopamine (DA) release and decreases methamphetamine self-administration. Unfortunately, tolerance develops to the ability of lobelane to decrease these behavioral effects of methamphetamine. Lobelane has low water solubility, which is problematic for drug development. The aim of the current study was to determine the pharmacological effect of replacement of the N-methyl moiety with a chiral N-1,2-dihydroxypropyl (N-1,2-diol) moiety, which enhances water solubility, altering the configuration of the N-1,2-diol moiety and incorporating phenyl ring substituents into the analogs. To determine VMAT2 selectivity, structure-activity relationships also were generated for inhibition of DA and serotonin transporters. Analogs with the highest potency for inhibiting DA uptake at VMAT2 and at least 10-fold selectivity were evaluated further for ability to inhibit methamphetamine-evoked DA release from superfused striatal slices. (R)-3-[2,6-cis-di(4-methoxyphenethyl)piperidin-1-yl]propane-1,2-diol (GZ-793A), the (R)-4-methoxyphenyl-N-1,2-diol analog, and (R)-3-[2,6-cis-di(1-naphthylethyl)piperidin-1-yl]propane-1,2-diol (GZ-794A), the (R)-1-naphthyl-N-1,2-diol analog, exhibited the highest potency (Ki ∼30 nM) inhibiting VMAT2, and both analogs inhibited methamphetamine-evoked endogenous DA release (IC50 = 10.6 and 0.4 μM, respectively). Thus, the pharmacophore for VMAT2 inhibition accommodates the N-1,2-diol moiety, which improves drug-likeness and enhances the potential for the development of these clinical candidates as treatments for methamphetamine abuse. PMID:21778282

  18. Binding site residues control inhibitor selectivity in the human norepinephrine transporter but not in the human dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jacob; Ringsted, Kristoffer B; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Strømgaard, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders S

    2015-10-27

    The transporters for norepinephrine and dopamine (NET and DAT, respectively) constitute the molecular targets for recreational drugs and therapeutics used in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Despite a strikingly similar amino acid sequence and predicted topology between these transporters, some inhibitors display a high degree of selectivity between NET and DAT. Here, a systematic mutational analysis of non-conserved residues within the extracellular entry pathway and the high affinity binding site in NET and DAT was performed to examine their role for selective inhibitor recognition. Changing the six diverging residues in the central binding site of NET to the complementary residues in DAT transferred a DAT-like pharmacology to NET, showing that non-conserved binding site residues in NET are critical determinants for inhibitor selectivity. In contrast, changing the equivalent residues in the central site of DAT to the corresponding residues in NET had modest effects on the same inhibitors, suggesting that non-conserved binding site residues in DAT play a minor role for selective inhibitor recognition. Our data points towards distinct structural determinants governing inhibitor selectivity in NET and DAT, and provide important new insight into the molecular basis for NET/DAT selectivity of therapeutic and recreational drugs.

  19. Binding site residues control inhibitor selectivity in the human norepinephrine transporter but not in the human dopamine transporter

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jacob; Ringsted, Kristoffer B.; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Strømgaard, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders S.

    2015-01-01

    The transporters for norepinephrine and dopamine (NET and DAT, respectively) constitute the molecular targets for recreational drugs and therapeutics used in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Despite a strikingly similar amino acid sequence and predicted topology between these transporters, some inhibitors display a high degree of selectivity between NET and DAT. Here, a systematic mutational analysis of non-conserved residues within the extracellular entry pathway and the high affinity binding site in NET and DAT was performed to examine their role for selective inhibitor recognition. Changing the six diverging residues in the central binding site of NET to the complementary residues in DAT transferred a DAT-like pharmacology to NET, showing that non-conserved binding site residues in NET are critical determinants for inhibitor selectivity. In contrast, changing the equivalent residues in the central site of DAT to the corresponding residues in NET had modest effects on the same inhibitors, suggesting that non-conserved binding site residues in DAT play a minor role for selective inhibitor recognition. Our data points towards distinct structural determinants governing inhibitor selectivity in NET and DAT, and provide important new insight into the molecular basis for NET/DAT selectivity of therapeutic and recreational drugs. PMID:26503701

  20. The sigma-1 receptor modulates dopamine transporter conformation and cocaine binding and may thereby potentiate cocaine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Hong, Weimin Conrad; Yano, Hideaki; Hiranita, Takato; Chin, Frederick T; McCurdy, Christopher R; Su, Tsung-Ping; Amara, Susan G; Katz, Jonathan L

    2017-07-07

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) regulates dopamine (DA) neurotransmission by recapturing DA into the presynaptic terminals and is a principal target of the psychostimulant cocaine. The sigma-1 receptor (σ1R) is a molecular chaperone, and its ligands have been shown to modulate DA neuronal signaling, although their effects on DAT activity are unclear. Here, we report that the prototypical σ1R agonist (+)-pentazocine potentiated the dose response of cocaine self-administration in rats, consistent with the effects of the σR agonists PRE-084 and DTG (1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine) reported previously. These behavioral effects appeared to be correlated with functional changes of DAT. Preincubation with (+)-pentazocine or PRE-084 increased the Bmax values of [(3)H]WIN35428 binding to DAT in rat striatal synaptosomes and transfected cells. A specific interaction between σ1R and DAT was detected by co-immunoprecipitation and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays. Mutational analyses indicated that the transmembrane domain of σ1R likely mediated this interaction. Furthermore, cysteine accessibility assays showed that σ1R agonist preincubation potentiated cocaine-induced changes in DAT conformation, which were blocked by the specific σ1R antagonist CM304. Moreover, σ1R ligands had distinct effects on σ1R multimerization. CM304 increased the proportion of multimeric σ1Rs, whereas (+)-pentazocine increased monomeric σ1Rs. Together these results support the hypothesis that σ1R agonists promote dissociation of σ1R multimers into monomers, which then interact with DAT to stabilize an outward-facing DAT conformation and enhance cocaine binding. We propose that this novel molecular mechanism underlies the behavioral potentiation of cocaine self-administration by σ1R agonists in animal models. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Dopamine and Angiotensin Type 2 Receptors Cooperatively Inhibit Sodium Transport in Human Renal Proximal Tubule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gildea, John J.; Wang, Xiaoli; Shah, Neema; Tran, Hanh; Spinosa, Michael; Van Sciver, Robert; Sasaki, Midori; Yatabe, Junichi; Carey, Robert M.; Jose, Pedro A.; Felder, Robin A.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known regarding how the kidney shifts from a sodium and water reclaiming state (antinatriuresis) to a state where sodium and water are eliminated (natriuresis). In human renal proximal tubule cells (RPTCs), sodium reabsorption is decreased by the dopamine D1-like receptors (D1R/D5R) and the angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R), while the angiotensin type 1 receptor increases sodium reabsorption. Aberrant control of these opposing systems is thought to lead to sodium retention and subsequently hypertension. We show that D1R/D5R stimulation increased plasma membrane AT2R 4-fold via a D1R-mediated, cAMP-coupled, and PP2A-dependent specific signaling pathway. D1R/D5R stimulation also reduced the ability of angiotensin II to stimulate phospho-ERK, an effect that was partially reversed by an AT2R antagonist. Fenoldopam did not increase AT2R recruitment in RPTCs with D1Rs uncoupled from adenylyl cyclase, suggesting a role of cAMP in mediating these events. D1Rs and AT2Rs heterodimerized and cooperatively increased cAMP and cGMP production, PP2A activation, sodium-potassium-ATPase internalization and sodium transport inhibition. These studies shed new light on the regulation of renal sodium transport by the dopaminergic and angiotensin systems and potential new therapeutic targets for selectively treating hypertension. PMID:22710646

  2. Dopamine and angiotensin type 2 receptors cooperatively inhibit sodium transport in human renal proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Gildea, John J; Wang, Xiaoli; Shah, Neema; Tran, Hanh; Spinosa, Michael; Van Sciver, Robert; Sasaki, Midori; Yatabe, Junichi; Carey, Robert M; Jose, Pedro A; Felder, Robin A

    2012-08-01

    Little is known regarding how the kidney shifts from a sodium and water reclaiming state (antinatriuresis) to a state where sodium and water are eliminated (natriuresis). In human renal proximal tubule cells, sodium reabsorption is decreased by the dopamine D(1)-like receptors (D(1)R/D(5)R) and the angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT(2)R), whereas the angiotensin type 1 receptor increases sodium reabsorption. Aberrant control of these opposing systems is thought to lead to sodium retention and, subsequently, hypertension. We show that D(1)R/D(5)R stimulation increased plasma membrane AT(2)R 4-fold via a D(1)R-mediated, cAMP-coupled, and protein phosphatase 2A-dependent specific signaling pathway. D(1)R/D(5)R stimulation also reduced the ability of angiotensin II to stimulate phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase, an effect that was partially reversed by an AT(2)R antagonist. Fenoldopam did not increase AT(2)R recruitment in renal proximal tubule cells with D(1)Rs uncoupled from adenylyl cyclase, suggesting a role of cAMP in mediating these events. D(1)Rs and AT(2)Rs heterodimerized and cooperatively increased cAMP and cGMP production, protein phosphatase 2A activation, sodium-potassium-ATPase internalization, and sodium transport inhibition. These studies shed new light on the regulation of renal sodium transport by the dopaminergic and angiotensin systems and potential new therapeutic targets for selectively treating hypertension.

  3. 2beta-Substituted analogues of 4'-iodococaine: synthesis and dopamine transporter binding potencies.

    PubMed

    Avor, K S; Singh, S; Seale, T W; Pouw, B; Basmadjian, G P

    1998-06-18

    A series of 2beta-substituted analogues of 4'-iodococaine (3) was synthesized and evaluated in an in vitro dopamine transporter (DAT) binding assay. Selective hydrolysis at the 2beta-position of 3 gave the carboxylic acid 15 that served as the intermediate for the synthesis of compounds 4, 5, and 6-11. The 2beta-alkyl derivatives were obtained from ecgonine methyl ester (17) through a series of reactions leading to the aldehyde 20. Wittig reaction of 20 with methyltriphenylphosphorane followed by hydrogenation and benzoylation gave the products 12 and 13. The binding affinity of 4'-iodococaine (3) was 10-fold less than that of cocaine. The hydroxymethane, acetate, amide, benzyl ester, oxidazole, and ethane derivatives of 3 exhibited decreased binding while the vinyl, phenyl, and ethyl esters showed a moderate increase in binding affinity. Only the isopropyl derivative 8 exhibited a 2-fold increase in binding affinity compared with 4'-iodococaine (3). Hydroxylation of 8 at the 2'-position gave 14 which enhanced not only the binding potency at the DAT by another 2-fold but also the selectivity at the DAT over the norepinephrine and serotonin transporters. Compound 14 failed to stimulate locomotor activity in C57BL/6J mice over a wide dose range and blocked cocaine-induced locomotor stimulant action.

  4. Dopamine reuptake transporter (DAT) "inverse agonism"--a novel hypothesis to explain the enigmatic pharmacology of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Heal, David J; Gosden, Jane; Smith, Sharon L

    2014-12-01

    The long held view is cocaine's pharmacological effects are mediated by monoamine reuptake inhibition. However, drugs with rapid brain penetration like sibutramine, bupropion, mazindol and tesofensine, which are equal to or more potent than cocaine as dopamine reuptake inhibitors, produce no discernable subjective effects such as drug "highs" or euphoria in drug-experienced human volunteers. Moreover they are dysphoric and aversive when given at high doses. In vivo experiments in animals demonstrate that cocaine's monoaminergic pharmacology is profoundly different from that of other prescribed monoamine reuptake inhibitors, with the exception of methylphenidate. These findings led us to conclude that the highly unusual stimulant profile of cocaine and related compounds, eg methylphenidate, is not mediated by monoamine reuptake inhibition alone. We describe the experimental findings which suggest cocaine serves as a negative allosteric modulator to alter the function of the dopamine reuptake transporter (DAT) and reverse its direction of transport. This results in a firing-dependent, retro-transport of dopamine into the synaptic cleft. The proposed mechanism of cocaine is, therefore, different from other small molecule negative allostereric modulators of the monoamine reuptake transporters, eg SoRI-6238, which merely reduce the rate of inward transport. Because the physiological role of DAT is to remove dopamine from the synapse and the action of cocaine is the opposite of this, we have postulated that cocaine's effect is analogous to an inverse agonist. If this hypothesis is validated then cocaine is the prototypical compound that exemplifies a new class of monoaminergic drugs; DAT "inverse agonists". This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The legacy pesticide dieldrin acts as a teratogen and alters the expression of dopamine transporter and dopamine receptor 2a in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos.

    PubMed

    Sarty, Kathleena I; Cowie, Andrew; Martyniuk, Christopher J

    2017-04-01

    Dieldrin (DLD) is a lipophilic pesticide that shows environmental persistence. The objectives were to determine the effects of DLD on GABAergic and dopaminergic systems in developing zebrafish. Both chorionated and dechorionated embryos (~24h post-hatch) were exposed to a single concentration of DLD (0.347-3470μM) for 48h. Following exposure, a subset of larvae was placed into clean water for 6days (i.e. depuration phase). Chorionated embryos showed <15% mortality while dechorionated embryos showed higher mortality (>30%), suggesting that the chorion protected the embryos. Over a 6day depuration phase, there was a dose dependent effect observed in both the "dechorionated and chorionated embryo" treatments for larval mortality (>60%). At the end of depuration, there was no detectable change in neuro-morphological endpoints that included the ratio of notochord length to body length (%) and the ratio of head area to body area (%). However, DLD did induce cardiac edema, skeletal deformities, and tremors. GABA-related transcripts were not affected in abundance by DLD. Conversely, the relative mRNA levels of dopamine transporter (dat1) and dopamine receptor drd2a mRNA were decreased in dechorionated, but not chorionated, embryos. These data suggest that DLD can alter the expression of transcripts related to dopaminergic signaling. Lastly, GABAA receptor subunits gabrB1 and gabrB2, as well as dopamine receptors drd1 and drd2a, were inherently higher in abundance in dechorionated embryos compared to chorionated embryos. This is an important consideration when incorporating transcriptomics into embryo testing as expression levels can change with removal of the chorion prior to exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dosimetry of an iodine-123-labeled tropane to image dopamine transporters

    SciTech Connect

    Mozley, P.D.; Stubbs, J.B.; Kim, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    N-(3-iodopropen-2-yl)-2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}(4-chlorophenyl)tropane (IPT) is an analog of cocaine that selectively binds the presynaptic dopamine transporter. The present study sought to measure the radiation dosimetry of IPT in seven healthy human volunteers. Dynamic renal scans were acquired immediately after the intravenous administration of 165 {+-} 16 MBq (4.45 {+-} 0.42 mCi) of [{sup 123}I]IPT. Between 7 and 12 sets of whole-body scans were acquired over the next 24 hr. The 24-hr renal excretion fractions were measured from conjugate emission scans of 7-11 discreet voided urine specimens. The fraction of the administered dose in 11 organs and each urine specimen was quantified from the attenuation-corrected geometric mean counts in opposing views. Subject-specific residence times were evaluated for each subject independently by fitting the time-activity curves to a multicompartmental model. The radiation doses were estimated with the MIRD technique from the residence times for each subject individually before any results were averaged. The findings showed that IPT was excreted rapidly by the renal system. There were no reservoirs of retained activity outside the basal ganglia, where SPECT images in these subjects showed that the mean ratio of caudate to calcarine cortex averaged 25:1 at 3 hr after injection (range 19.6-32 hr). The basal ganglia received a radiation dose of 0.028 mGy/MBq (0.10 rad/mCi). The dose-limiting organ in men was the stomach, which received an estimated 0.11 mGy/MBq (0.37 rad/mCi). In women, the critical organ was the urinary bladder at 0.14 mGy/MBq (0.51 rad/mCi). Relatively high-contrast images of the presynaptic dopamine transporters in the basal ganglia can be acquired with 185 MBq (5 mCi) of [{sup 123}I]IPT. The radiation exposure that results is significantly less than the maximum allowed by current safety guidelines for research volunteers. 33 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Comparison of two I-123 labeled SPECT probes, for the dopamine transporter in non-human primate brain

    SciTech Connect

    Gandelman, M.S.; Scanley, B.E.; Al-Tikrite, M.S.

    1994-05-01

    A comparative SPECT evaluation of the regional uptake of 28-carboisopropoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane (IP-CIT) and 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ({beta}-CIT) was performed to assess the improved specificity of IP-CIT over {beta}-CIT for the dopamine (DE) transporter, as shown previously by in vitro studies (n=10), ranging from 7 to 10 hours with 6.9 to 15 mCi injected dose, were completed in 3 baboons. Peripheral metabolism of the two ligands were similar The SPECT images utilized ROIs over striatum (which reflect DA transporters), midbrain (previously shown for {beta}-CIT to reflect primarily serotonin transporters), and the occipital lobe (a region of non-specific uptake). The time to peak specific striatal uptake (striatal minus occipital activity) was similar for IP-CIT and {beta}-CIT (377{plus_minus}60 and 410{plus_minus}60 min, respectively); whereas midbrain peak activity occurred at a significantly earlier time for IP-CIT (21{plus_minus}4 min) as compared to {beta}-CIT (60{plus_minus}17 min). At time of peak specific striatal activity, striatal to occipital ratios were 2.7+0.6 for IP-CIT and 7.6{plus_minus}0.7 for {beta}-CIT, and at time of peak midbrain activity, midbrain to occipital ratios were 1.1{plus_minus}0.1 for IP-CIT, and 1.7{plus_minus}0.2 for {beta}-CIT. At peak specific striatal time, normalized regional uptake values ({mu}Ci/cc per {mu}Ci injected dose per g body mass) for the striatum were 4.9{plus_minus}1.1 IP-CIT and 5.2{plus_minus}0.7 {beta}-CIT, whereas for the occipital lobe normalized regional uptake values were 1.9{plus_minus}0.4 IP-CIT and 0.7{plus_minus}0.2 for {beta}-CIT. Similar regional kinetics in the striatum were observed, as both ligands demonstrate comparable peak striatal uptake and time to peak.

  8. Slow-onset, long-duration, alkyl analogues of methylphenidate with enhanced selectivity for the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Froimowitz, Mark; Gu, Yonghong; Dakin, Les A; Nagafuji, Pamela M; Kelley, Charles J; Parrish, Damon; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Janowsky, Aaron

    2007-01-25

    Methylphenidate analogues, in which the carbomethoxy has been replaced by an alkyl group and with different phenyl substituents, have been synthesized and tested in monoamine transporter assays. As predicted from a pharmacophore model, most of the RR/SS diastereomers showed high potency as dopamine reuptake inhibitors. Analogues with a 4-chlorophenyl group and an unbranched initial alkyl atom had consistently enhanced selectivity for the dopamine transporter. The most potent compounds were those with a three- or four-carbon chain. The "inactive" RS/SR diastereomers showed substantial activity when the phenyl substituent was 3,4-dichloro. On a locomotor assay, one compound was found to have a slow onset and a long duration of action. The activity of these compounds provides additional evidence for a conformational/superposition model of methylphenidate with cocaine-like structures. A ketone analogue, obtained by hydrogenating a previously described vinylogous amide, had activity similar to that of methylphenidate.

  9. Dopamine Transporter Neuroimaging as an Enrichment Biomarker in Early Parkinson's Disease Clinical Trials: A Disease Progression Modeling Analysis.

    PubMed

    Conrado, Daniela J; Nicholas, Timothy; Tsai, Kuenhi; Macha, Sreeraj; Sinha, Vikram; Stone, Julie; Corrigan, Brian; Bani, Massimo; Muglia, Pierandrea; Watson, Ian A; Kern, Volker D; Sheveleva, Elena; Marek, Kenneth; Stephenson, Diane T; Romero, Klaus

    2017-07-27

    Given the recognition that disease-modifying therapies should focus on earlier Parkinson's disease stages, trial enrollment based purely on clinical criteria poses significant challenges. The goal herein was to determine the utility of dopamine transporter neuroimaging as an enrichment biomarker in early motor Parkinson's disease clinical trials. Patient-level longitudinal data of 672 subjects with early-stage Parkinson's disease in the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) observational study and the Parkinson Research Examination of CEP-1347 Trial (PRECEPT) clinical trial were utilized in a linear mixed-effects model analysis. The rate of worsening in the motor scores between subjects with or without a scan without evidence of dopamine transporter deficit was different both statistically and clinically. The average difference in the change from baseline of motor scores at 24 months between biomarker statuses was -3.16 (90% confidence interval [CI] = -0.96 to -5.42) points. Dopamine transporter imaging could identify subjects with a steeper worsening of the motor scores, allowing trial enrichment and 24% reduction of sample size. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Clinical and Translational Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  10. Synthesis and ligand binding studies of 4'-iodobenzoyl esters of tropanes and piperidines at the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Singh, S; Basmadjian, G P; Avor, K S; Pouw, B; Seale, T W

    1997-08-01

    Four analogs and two homologs of cocaine, designed as potent cocaine antagonists, were synthesized. The SN2 reaction between ecgonine methyl ester (13) or appropriately substituted piperidinol (19, 21) and appropriately substituted 4-iodobenzoyl chloride gave 4-iodobenzoyl esters of tropanes and piperidines (5-8). 2'-Hydroxycocaine (9) was obtained from 2'-acetoxycocaine (12) by selective transesterification with MeOH saturated with dry HCl gas. 2'-Acetoxycocaine (12) was synthesized from acetylsalicyloyl chloride (23) and ecgonine methyl ester (13). The binding affinities of these compounds were determined at the dopamine transporter for the displacement of [3H]WIN-35428. An iodo group substitution at the 4'-position of cocaine decreased dopamine transporter binding potency, while a hydroxy or acetoxy group at the 2'-position exhibited increased binding potency for the dopamine transporter compared to cocaine (10- and 3.58-fold, respectively). 2'-Hydroxylation also enhanced the bidning potency of 4'-iodococaine (5) by 10-fold. Replacement of the tropane ring with piperidine led to poor binding affinities.

  11. Comparison of striatal dopamine transporter levels in chronic heroin-dependent and methamphetamine-dependent subjects.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jie; Liu, Xing Dang; Han, Mei; Lv, Rong Bin; Wang, Yuan Kai; Zhang, Guang Ming; Li, Yu

    2017-01-01

    To compare the effects of heroin and methamphetamine (METH) addiction on dopamine transporters (DATs) in the same dose and duration, we assessed DAT levels in the striatum by (99m) Tc-TRODAT-1 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain images in people with heroin and METH dependence. We recruited 21 healthy human controls, 23 heroin-dependent subjects and 25 METH abusers. The heroin- and METH-dependent subjects exhibited negative urine toxicology after undergoing physiological detoxification. All subjects underwent SPECT brain imaging, and specific tracer uptake ratios (SURs) were assessed bilaterally in the regions of interest. A significant SUR reduction in heroin-dependent subjects and METH-dependent subjects compared with healthy controls was found in the left striatum, right striatum, left caudate nucleus, right caudate nucleus, left putamen and right putamen. There were no significant differences in the heroin group and METH group for the left striatum, right striatum, left caudate nucleus, right caudate nucleus, left putamen and right putamen. The scores of craving, HAMA (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale), in heroin abusers were lower than in the METH abusers. Our results show that people with heroin and METH dependence who are currently abstinent had lower DAT levels in the striatum than healthy controls. There were no differences in striatal DAT in heroin and METH users. These results suggest that chronic heroin and METH abuse appears to produce similar effects in striatal DAT in humans. METH users may have more serious craving and anxiety symptoms than heroin users with prolonged abstinence.

  12. Effects of chronic cocaine administration on dopamine transporter mRNA and protein in the rat.

    PubMed

    Letchworth, S R; Daunais, J B; Hedgecock, A A; Porrino, L J

    1997-03-07

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered cocaine (10, 15 or 25 mg/kg) or vehicle, i.p., once daily for 8 consecutive days and killed 1 h after the last injection. Acute cocaine administration produced dose-dependent increases in spontaneous locomotor activity. These levels of activity were further enhanced by 8 days of chronic treatment, indicating the emergence of behavioral sensitization. Chronic cocaine administration resulted in dose-dependent decreases in the density of dopamine transporter (DAT) mRNA in both the substantia nigra pars compacta and ventral tegmental area as shown by in situ hybridization histochemistry. Changes in DAT binding sites were assessed using [3H]mazindol quantitative autoradiography. In contrast to the levels of mRNA, there were few changes in the number of [3H]mazindol binding sites. Although the density of binding sites was unaltered in most regions, [3H]mazindol binding was increased in the anterior nucleus accumbens. This study extends previous findings by demonstrating the dose-dependent nature of the changes in DAT mRNA that accompanies chronic cocaine administration. The levels of DAT binding sites within the dorsal and ventral striatum, however, were largely unchanged. This mismatch suggests that cocaine may differentially influence the gene expression of DAT in the ventral midbrain as compared to the density of DAT binding sites in the basal forebrain.

  13. Persistent Drug-Induced Parkinsonism in Patients with Normal Dopamine Transporter Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sunwoo, Mun Kyung; Oh, Jungsu S.; Kim, Jae Seung; Sohn, Young H.; Lee, Phil Hyu

    2016-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging for the dopamine transporter (DAT) is used to distinguish drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP) from subclinical Parkinson’s disease (PD). Although DIP patients who show a normal DAT image are expected to recover completely, some do not. We investigated whether these patients showed changes in striatal DAT activity using semi-quantitative analysis of 18F-FP-CIT PET data. DIP patients with visually normal DAT images were selected from medical records. The subjects were classified as patients who recovered partially (PR) or completely within 12 months (CR). The 18F-FP-CIT uptake in each striatal subregion was compared between the CR and the PR groups. In total, 41 and 9 patients of the CR and PR groups were assessed, respectively. The two patient groups were comparable in terms of clinical characteristics including age, sex, and severity of parkinsonism. From semi-quantitative analysis of the PET image, the PR patients showed a relatively lower ligand uptake in the ventral striatum, the anterior putamen and the posterior putamen compared with the CR patients. This result suggests that persistent DIP in patients with visually normal DAT imaging may be associated with subtle decrement of DAT activity. PMID:27294367

  14. Dopamine transporter availability in motor subtypes of de novo drug-naïve Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Moccia, Marcello; Pappatà, Sabina; Picillo, Marina; Erro, Roberto; Coda, Anna Rita Daniela; Longo, Katia; Vitale, Carmine; Amboni, Marianna; Brunetti, Arturo; Capo, Giuseppe; Salvatore, Marco; Barone, Paolo; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Tremor dominant (TD) and akinetic-rigid type (ART) are two motor subtypes of Parkinson's disease associated with different disease progression and neurochemical/neuropathological features. The role of presynaptic nigrostriatal dopaminergic damage is still controversial, poorly explored, and only assessed in medicated patients. In this study, we investigated with FP-CIT SPECT the striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) availability in drug-naïve PD patients with ART and TD phenotypes. Fifty-one de novo, drug-naïve patients with PD underwent FP-CIT SPECT studies. Patients were evaluated with Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) part III and Hoehn and Yahr scale (H&Y) and divided into ART (24/51) and TD (27/51) according to UPDRS part III. ART and TD patients were not different with regard to age, gender, and disease duration. However, compared to TD, ART patients presented higher UPDRS part III (p = 0.01) and H&Y (p = 0.02) and lower DAT availability in affected and unaffected putamen (p = 0.008 and p = 0.007, respectively), whereas no differences were found in caudate. Moreover, in the whole group of patients, rigidity and bradykinesia, but not tremor scores of UPDRS part III were significantly related to FP-CIT binding in the putamen. These results suggest that in newly diagnosed drug-naïve PD patients DAT availability might be different between ART and TD in relation to different disease severity.

  15. Child dopamine active transporter 1 genotype and parenting: evidence for evocative gene-environment correlations.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Elizabeth P; Hanna, Brigitte; Sheikh, Haroon I; Laptook, Rebecca S; Kim, Jiyon; Singh, Shiva M; Klein, Daniel N

    2013-02-01

    The dopamine active transporter 1 (DAT1) gene is implicated in psychopathology risk. Although the processes by which this gene exerts its effects on risk are poorly understood, a small body of research suggests that the DAT1 gene influences early emerging negative emotionality, a marker of children's psychopathology risk. As child negative emotionality evokes negative parenting practices, the DAT1 gene may also play a role in gene-environment correlations. To test this model, children (N = 365) were genotyped for the DAT1 gene and participated in standardized parent-child interaction tasks with their primary caregiver. The DAT1 gene 9-repeat variant was associated with child negative affect expressed toward the parent during parent-child interactions, and parents of children with a 9-repeat allele exhibited more hostility and lower guidance/engagement than parents of children without a 9-repeat allele. These gene-environment associations were partially mediated by child negative affect toward the parent. The findings implicate a specific polymorphism in eliciting negative parenting, suggesting that evocative associations play a role in elevating children's risk for emotional trajectories toward psychopathology risk.

  16. Gene-dose dependent effects of methamphetamine on interval timing in dopamine-transporter knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Meck, Warren H; Cheng, Ruey-Kuang; MacDonald, Christopher J; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Caron, Marc G; Cevik, Münire Özlem

    2012-03-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is the major regulator of the spatial and temporal resolution of dopaminergic neurotransmission in the brain. Hyperdopaminergic mice with DAT gene deletions were evaluated for their ability to perform duration discriminations in the seconds-to-minutes range. DAT -/- mice were unable to demonstrate temporal control of behavior in either fixed-interval or peak-interval timing procedures, whereas DAT +/- mice were similar to DAT +/+ mice under normal conditions. Low to moderate-dose methamphetamine (MAP) challenges indicated that DAT +/- mice were less sensitive to the clock-speed enhancing effects of MAP compared with DAT +/+ mice. In contrast, DAT +/- mice were more vulnerable than DAT +/+ mice to the disruptive effects of MAP at high doses as revealed by the elevation of response rate in the right hand tail of the Gaussian-shaped timing functions. Moreover, this treatment made DAT +/- mice functionally equivalent to DAT -/- mice in terms of the loss of temporal control. Taken together, these results demonstrate the importance of dopaminergic control of interval timing in cortico-striatal circuits and the potential link of timing dysfunctions to schizophrenia and drug abuse. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tissue Specific Expression of Cre in Rat Tyrosine Hydroxylase and Dopamine Active Transporter-Positive Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenyi; Brown, Andrew; Fisher, Dan; Wu, Yumei; Warren, Joe; Cui, Xiaoxia

    2016-01-01

    The rat is a preferred model system over the mouse for neurological studies, and cell type-specific Cre expression in the rat enables precise ablation of gene function in neurons of interest, which is especially valuable for neurodegenerative disease modeling and optogenetics. Yet, few such Cre rats are available. Here we report the characterization of two Cre rats, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-Cre and dopamine active transporter (DAT or Slc6a3)-Cre, by using a combination of immunohistochemistry (IHC) and mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as well as a fluorescent reporter for Cre activity. We detected Cre expression in expected neurons in both Cre lines. Interestingly, we also found that in Th-Cre rats, but not DAT-Cre rats, Cre is expressed in female germ cells, allowing germline excision of the floxed allele and hence the generation of whole-body knockout rats. In summary, our data demonstrate that targeted integration of Cre cassette lead to faithful recapitulation of expression pattern of the endogenous promoter, and mRNA FISH, in addition to IHC, is an effective method for the analysis of the spatiotemporal gene expression patterns in the rat brain, alleviating the dependence on high quality antibodies that are often not available against rat proteins. The Th-Cre and the DAT-Cre rat lines express Cre in selective subsets of dopaminergic neurons and should be particularly useful for researches on Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26886559

  18. Epigenetic Regulation of Dopamine Transporter mRNA Expression in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Green, Ashley L.; Hossain, Muhammad M.; Tee, Siew C.; Zarbl, Helmut; Guo, Grace L.; Richardson, Jason R.

    2016-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a key regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission. As such, proper regulation of DAT expression is important to maintain homeostasis, and disruption of DAT expression can lead to neurobehavioral dysfunction. Based on genomic features within the promoter of the DAT gene, there is potential for DAT expression to be regulated through epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation and histone acetylation. However, the relative contribution of these mechanisms to DAT expression has not been empirically determined. Using pharmacologic and genetic approaches, we demonstrate that inhibition of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity increased DAT mRNA approximately 1.5–2 fold. This effect was confirmed by siRNA knockdown of DNMT1. Likewise, the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors valproate and butyrate also increased DAT mRNA expression, but the response was much more robust with expression increasing over tenfold. Genetic knockdown of HDAC1 by siRNA also increased DAT expression, but not to the extent seen with pharmacological inhibition, suggesting additional isoforms of HDAC or other targets may contribute to the observed effect. Together, these data identify the relative contribution of DNMTs and HDACs in regulating expression. These finding may aid in understanding the mechanistic basis for changes in DAT expression in normal and pathophysiological states. PMID:25963949

  19. Refining diagnosis of Parkinson's disease with deep learning-based interpretation of dopamine transporter imaging.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hongyoon; Ha, Seunggyun; Im, Hyung Jun; Paek, Sun Ha; Lee, Dong Soo

    2017-01-01

    Dopaminergic degeneration is a pathologic hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD), which can be assessed by dopamine transporter imaging such as FP-CIT SPECT. Until now, imaging has been routinely interpreted by human though it can show interobserver variability and result in inconsistent diagnosis. In this study, we developed a deep learning-based FP-CIT SPECT interpretation system to refine the imaging diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. This system trained by SPECT images of PD patients and normal controls shows high classification accuracy comparable with the experts' evaluation referring quantification results. Its high accuracy was validated in an independent cohort composed of patients with PD and nonparkinsonian tremor. In addition, we showed that some patients clinically diagnosed as PD who have scans without evidence of dopaminergic deficit (SWEDD), an atypical subgroup of PD, could be reclassified by our automated system. Our results suggested that the deep learning-based model could accurately interpret FP-CIT SPECT and overcome variability of human evaluation. It could help imaging diagnosis of patients with uncertain Parkinsonism and provide objective patient group classification, particularly for SWEDD, in further clinical studies.

  20. Dopamine Transporter Gene Variant Affecting Expression in Human Brain is Associated with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pinsonneault, Julia K; Han, Dawn D; Burdick, Katherine E; Kataki, Maria; Bertolino, Alessandro; Malhotra, Anil K; Gu, Howard H; Sadee, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    The gene encoding the dopamine transporter (DAT) has been implicated in CNS disorders, but the responsible polymorphisms remain uncertain. To search for regulatory polymorphisms, we measured allelic DAT mRNA expression in substantia nigra of human autopsy brain tissues, using two marker SNPs (rs6347 in exon 9 and rs27072 in the 3′-UTR). Allelic mRNA expression imbalance (AEI), an indicator of cis-acting regulatory polymorphisms, was observed in all tissues heterozygous for either of the two marker SNPs. SNP scanning of the DAT locus with AEI ratios as the phenotype, followed by in vitro molecular genetics studies, demonstrated that rs27072 C>T affects mRNA expression and translation. Expression of the minor T allele was dynamically regulated in transfected cell cultures, possibly involving microRNA interactions. Both rs6347 and rs3836790 (intron8 5/6 VNTR) also seemed to affect DAT expression, but not the commonly tested 9/10 VNTR in the 3′UTR (rs28363170). All four polymorphisms (rs6347, intron8 5/6 VNTR, rs27072 and 3′UTR 9/10 VNTR) were genotyped in clinical cohorts, representing schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, and controls. Only rs27072 was significantly associated with bipolar disorder (OR=2.1, p=0.03). This result was replicated in a second bipolar/control population (OR=1.65, p=0.01), supporting a critical role for DAT regulation in bipolar disorder. PMID:21525861

  1. 2'-substituted analogs of cocaine: synthesis and dopamine transporter binding potencies.

    PubMed

    el-Moselhy, T F; Avor, K S; Basmadjian, G P

    2001-09-01

    A series of 2'-substituted cocaine analogs (4-8) was prepared and evaluated in an in vitro dopamine transporter (DAT) binding assay. Compounds 4-7 were prepared by esterifying the 3 beta-hydroxyl group of ecgonine methyl ester (3) using the appropriate acid chloride in the presence of Et3N and benzene. Compound 3 was obtained from cocaine (1) by hydrolysis using 1N HCl to afford ecgonine.HCl which was subjected to acid catalyzed esterification using methanol saturated with HCl gas. Compound 8 was obtained by hydrogenation of 7 using H2/Pd-C. The IC50 values were calculated from displacement experiment of the radioligand [3H]WIN-35,428 (2). 2'-Aminococaine (8) showed high binding affinity to the DAT (14- and 1.3-fold more active than cocaine and the radioligand 2, respectively). These results, along with previous results, emphasize the importance of a hydrogen-bond donor group at the 2'-position of cocaine to enhance binding affinity to the DAT.

  2. Child Dopamine Transporter Genotype and Parenting: Evidence for Evocative Gene-Environment Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Elizabeth P.; Hanna, Brigitte; Sheikh, Haroon I.; Laptook, Rebecca S.; Kim, Jiyon; Singh, Shiva M.; Klein, Daniel N.

    2017-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT1) gene is implicated in psychopathology risk. While the processes by which this gene exerts its effects on risk are poorly understood, a small body of research suggests that DAT1 influences early emerging negative emotionality (NE), a marker of children’s psychopathology risk. As child NE evokes negative parenting practices, the DAT1 may also play a role in gene-environment correlations. To test this model, children (N = 365) were genotyped for DAT1 and participated in standardized parent-child interaction tasks with their primary caregiver. The DAT1 9-repeat variant was associated with child negative affect expressed toward the parent during parent-child interactions, and parents of children with a 9-repeat allele exhibited more hostility and lower guidance/engagement than parents of children without a 9-repeat allele. These gene-environment associations were partially mediated by child negative affect toward the parent. Findings implicate a specific polymorphism in eliciting negative parenting, suggesting that evocative associations play a role in elevating children’s risk for emotional trajectories toward psychopathology risk. PMID:23398760

  3. Intermittent cocaine self-administration produces sensitization of stimulant effects at the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Calipari, Erin S; Ferris, Mark J; Siciliano, Cody A; Zimmer, Benjamin A; Jones, Sara R

    2014-05-01

    Previous literature investigating neurobiological adaptations following cocaine self-administration has shown that high, continuous levels of cocaine intake (long access; LgA) results in reduced potency of cocaine at the dopamine transporter (DAT), whereas an intermittent pattern of cocaine administration (intermittent access; IntA) results in sensitization of cocaine potency at the DAT. Here, we aimed to determine whether these changes are specific to cocaine or translate to other psychostimulants. Psychostimulant potency was assessed by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in brain slices containing the nucleus accumbens following IntA, short access, and LgA cocaine self-administration, as well as in brain slices from naive animals. We assessed the potency of amphetamine (a releaser), and methylphenidate (a DAT blocker, MPH). MPH was selected because it is functionally similar to cocaine and structurally related to amphetamine. We found that MPH and amphetamine potencies were increased following IntA, whereas neither was changed following LgA or short access cocaine self-administration. Therefore, whereas LgA-induced tolerance at the DAT is specific to cocaine as shown in previous work, the sensitizing effects of IntA apply to cocaine, MPH, and amphetamine. This demonstrates that the pattern with which cocaine is administered is important in determining the neurochemical consequences of not only cocaine effects but potential cross-sensitization/cross-tolerance effects of other psychostimulants as well.

  4. Intermittent Cocaine Self-Administration Produces Sensitization of Stimulant Effects at the Dopamine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Calipari, Erin S.; Ferris, Mark J.; Siciliano, Cody A.; Zimmer, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous literature investigating neurobiological adaptations following cocaine self-administration has shown that high, continuous levels of cocaine intake (long access; LgA) results in reduced potency of cocaine at the dopamine transporter (DAT), whereas an intermittent pattern of cocaine administration (intermittent access; IntA) results in sensitization of cocaine potency at the DAT. Here, we aimed to determine whether these changes are specific to cocaine or translate to other psychostimulants. Psychostimulant potency was assessed by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in brain slices containing the nucleus accumbens following IntA, short access, and LgA cocaine self-administration, as well as in brain slices from naive animals. We assessed the potency of amphetamine (a releaser), and methylphenidate (a DAT blocker, MPH). MPH was selected because it is functionally similar to cocaine and structurally related to amphetamine. We found that MPH and amphetamine potencies were increased following IntA, whereas neither was changed following LgA or short access cocaine self-administration. Therefore, whereas LgA-induced tolerance at the DAT is specific to cocaine as shown in previous work, the sensitizing effects of IntA apply to cocaine, MPH, and amphetamine. This demonstrates that the pattern with which cocaine is administered is important in determining the neurochemical consequences of not only cocaine effects but potential cross-sensitization/cross-tolerance effects of other psychostimulants as well. PMID:24566123

  5. [Role of dopamine transporter gene (DAT1) polymorphisms in personality traits variation].

    PubMed

    Kazantseva, A V; Gaĭsina, D A; Malykh, S B; Khusnutdinova, E K

    2009-08-01

    According to psychobiological model of personality proposed by Cloninger, personality traits characterizing enhanced tendency to novel stimuli, impulsivity and sociability are influenced by dopaminergic system functioning. The present study considered both the main effect of two polymorphic loci (VNTR and 2319G>A) in dopamine transporter gene (DAT1) and the role of distinct DAT1 gene haplotypes in personality traits variation in 592 healthy individuals belonging to different ethnicities (men and women). The results of the study revealed the involvement of VNTR and 2319G>A polymorphisms in Novelty Seeking variation and the main effect of 2319G>A polymorphism on Reward Dependence (TCI) observed in Russian females. Moreover, DAT1 gene haplotype effect on Novelty Seeking in Russian females and on Persistence (TCI) in Tatar females was demonstrated. Reported in the current study results pointed to the involvement of dopaminergic system (DAT1 gene in particular) in variation of personality traits characterizing the tendency to novel stimuli, purposefulness, and sociability specifically in women.

  6. Extended access to methamphetamine self-administration up-regulates dopamine transporter levels 72 hours after withdrawal in rats.

    PubMed

    D'Arcy, Christina; Luevano, Joe E; Miranda-Arango, Manuel; Pipkin, Joseph A; Jackson, Jonathan A; Castañeda, Eddie; Gosselink, Kristin L; O'Dell, Laura E

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that there are persistent changes in dopamine systems following withdrawal from methamphetamine (METH). This study examined changes in striatal dopamine transporter (DAT), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine receptor 2 (D2) 72 h after withdrawal from METH intravenous self- administration (IVSA). Rats were given limited (1h) or extended (6h) access to METH IVSA (0.05 mg/kg/0.1 ml infusion) for 22 days. Controls did not receive METH IVSA. The rats given extended access to IVSA displayed higher METH intake during the first hour of drug access compared to rats given limited access. Extended access to METH also produced a concomitant increase in striatal DAT levels relative to drug-naïve controls. There were no changes in TH or D2 levels across groups. Previous studies have reported a decrease in striatal DAT levels during protracted periods (>7 days) of withdrawal from METH IVSA. This study extends previous work by showing an increase in striatal DAT protein expression during an earlier time point of withdrawal from this drug. These results are an important step toward understanding the dynamic changes in dopamine systems that occur during different time points of withdrawal from METH IVSA.

  7. Allosteric modulatory effects of SRI-20041 and SRI-30827 on cocaine and HIV-1 Tat protein binding to human dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei-Lun; Quizon, Pamela M; Yuan, Yaxia; Zhang, Wei; Ananthan, Subramaniam; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Zhu, Jun

    2017-06-16

    Dopamine transporter (DAT) is the target of cocaine and HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein. Identifying allosteric modulatory molecules with potential attenuation of cocaine and Tat binding to DAT are of great scientific and clinical interest. We demonstrated that tyrosine 470 and 88 act as functional recognition residues in human DAT (hDAT) for Tat-induced inhibition of DA transport and transporter conformational transitions. Here we investigated the allosteric modulatory effects of two allosteric ligands, SRI-20041 and SRI-30827 on cocaine binding on wild type (WT) hDAT, Y470 H and Y88 F mutants. Effect of SRI-30827 on Tat-induced inhibition of [(3)H]WIN35,428 binding was also determined. Compared to a competitive DAT inhibitor indatraline, both SRI-compounds displayed a similar decrease (30%) in IC50 for inhibition of [(3)H]DA uptake by cocaine in WT hDAT. The addition of SRI-20041 or SRI-30827 following cocaine slowed the dissociation rate of [(3)H]WIN35,428 binding in WT hDAT relative to cocaine alone. Moreover, Y470H and Y88F hDAT potentiate the inhibitory effect of cocaine on DA uptake and attenuate the effects of SRI-compounds on cocaine-mediated dissociation rate. SRI-30827 attenuated Tat-induced inhibition of [(3)H]WIN35,428 binding. These observations demonstrate that tyrosine 470 and 88 are critical for allosteric modulatory effects of SRI-compounds on the interaction of cocaine with hDAT.

  8. [C-11]{beta}CNT: A new monoamine uptake ligand for studying serotonin and dopamine transporter sites in the living brain with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, G.K.; Zheng, Q.H.; Zhou, F.C.

    1996-05-01

    There is considerable interest in measuring serotonin (5HT) and dopamine (DA) function in the human brain. Altered levels of 5HT and DA are recognized in drug abuse, neurotoxicities, psychiatric disorders, and neurodegenerative conditions including Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s disease. Several phenyltropane analogs of cocaine bind tightly to both DA and 5HT uptake proteins. We have made a new agent from this class called {beta}CNT, 2{beta}-carboxymethyl-3{beta}-(2-naphthyl)-tropane, the isosteric O-for-CH{sub 2} analog of a compound reported to have among the highest measured affinities for DA and 5HT transporters and studied its in vivo brain distributions in animals for the first time. Optically pure {beta}CNT was made from cocaine, and labeled at the O-methyl position by esterification of {beta}CNT-acid with [C-11]CH{sub 3}OTfl under conditions similar to Wilson`s. HPLC-purified (99+%) final products (15-50% eob yield from CO{sub 2}, 40 min synth) had specific activities 0.1-1.2 Ci/{mu}mol at the time of injection. Preliminary [C-11]{beta}{beta}CNT rodent distribution showed very high brain uptake (3% ID at 60 min) and localization (striat: fr cort: hypo: cer: blood, 11: 5: 4: 1: 06). {beta}CNT-PET studies in juvenile pigs (5-20 mCi, 20-35 kg) found rapid brain uptake, and prominent retention (85 min) in midbrain, anterior brainstem and striatum, followed by cortex and olfactory bulb. Paroxetine pretreatment (5HT uptake blocker, 2mg/kg), diminished retention in most brain areas; nomifensine (DA/NE uptake blocker, 6 mg/kg) reduced striatum selectively. Direct comparisons of [C-11]{beta}CNT with other PET transporter radioligands {beta}CFT, {beta}CIT, and {beta}CTT (RTI-32) in the same pig found {beta}CNT had highest overall brain uptake among the agents. These initial results suggest {beta}CNT has favorable properties for imaging both 5HT and DA transporters in vivo, and further evaluation of its potential as a human PET agent is warranted.

  9. Structural Modification of the Designer Stimulant α-Pyrrolidinovalerophenone (α-PVP) Influences Potency at Dopamine Transporters.

    PubMed

    Kolanos, R; Sakloth, F; Jain, A D; Partilla, J S; Baumann, M H; Glennon, R A

    2015-10-21

    α-Pyrrolidinovalerophenone (α-PVP, 7) is an illegal synthetic stimulant that is being sold on the clandestine market as "flakka" and "gravel". The potent pharmacological effects of α-PVP are presumably mediated by inhibition of dopamine uptake at the dopamine transporter (DAT). However, little is known about how structural modification of α-PVP influences activity at DAT. Eleven analogs of α-PVP were synthesized and examined for their ability to inhibit uptake of [(3)H]dopamine and [(3)H]serotonin in rat brain synaptosomes. None of the analogs significantly inhibited [(3)H]serotonin uptake when tested at 10 μM at the serotonin transporter (SERT). All of the analogs behaved as DAT reuptake inhibitors, but potencies varied over a >1500-fold range. Potency was primarily associated with the nature of the α-substituent, with the more bulky substituents imparting the highest potency. Expansion of the pyrrolidine ring to a piperidine reduced potency up to 10-fold, whereas conformational constraint in the form of an aminotetralone resulted in the least potent compound. Our study provides the first systematic and comparative structure-activity investigation on the ability of α-PVP analogs to act as inhibitors of DAT.

  10. Serotonin and dopamine transporters in relation to neuropsychological functioning, personality traits and mood in young adult healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Burke, S M; van de Giessen, E; de Win, M; Schilt, T; van Herk, M; van den Brink, W; Booij, J

    2011-02-01

    Serotonin and dopamine neurotransmitter systems are implicated in the regulation of mood, cognition and personality traits and their dysfunction is thought to be implicated in diverse psychopathologies. However, in healthy subjects the relationship between the serotonin and dopamine systems and neuropsychological functioning and personality traits is not clearly established. In the present study we investigated whether neuropsychological functioning, personality traits and mood states of a group of healthy subjects are associated with in vivo measures of serotonin transporters (SERTs) and dopamine transporters (DATs). A total of 188 young healthy subjects underwent neuropsychological and subjective measurements of memory function, depression and impulsivity. Participants' SERT and DAT availability in predefined regions of interest were assessed using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with the radiotracer [123I]β-CIT. Individual magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans served as anatomic reference. We did not find any significant association between SERT or DAT availability and neuropsychological test performance or self-reported impulsivity and mood. There were no significant sex differences in SERT or DAT availability, but men performed significantly better on some tests of visuospatial functioning than women. Robust negative findings for striatal DAT availability seriously question earlier findings of positive associations between DAT availability and cognitive functions in healthy subjects. Our results also suggest that subcortical SERT availability is not associated with the neuropsychological functions and personality traits assessed. In summary, the present study suggests that neuropsychological and personality measurements in young healthy people are not associated with subcortical SERT or striatal DAT availabilities in the brain.

  11. A Conserved Salt Bridge between Transmembrane Segments 1 and 10 Constitutes an Extracellular Gate in the Dopamine Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Anders V.; Andreassen, Thorvald F.; Loland, Claus J.

    2014-01-01

    Neurotransmitter transporters play an important role in termination of synaptic transmission by mediating reuptake of neurotransmitter, but the molecular processes behind translocation are still unclear. The crystal structures of the bacterial homologue, LeuT, provided valuable insight into the structural and dynamic requirements for substrate transport. These structures support the existence of gating domains controlling access to a central binding site. On the extracellular side, access is controlled by the “thin gate” formed by an interaction between Arg-30 and Asp-404. In the human dopamine transporter (DAT), the corresponding residues are Arg-85 and Asp-476. Here, we present results supporting the existence of a similar interaction in DAT. The DAT R85D mutant has a complete loss of function, but the additional insertion of an arginine in opposite position (R85D/D476R), causing a charge reversal, results in a rescue of binding sites for the cocaine analogue [3H]CFT. Also, the coordination of Zn2+ between introduced histidines (R85H/D476H) caused a ∼2.5-fold increase in [3H]CFT binding (Bmax). Importantly, Zn2+ also inhibited [3H]dopamine transport in R85H/D476H, suggesting that a dynamic interaction is required for the transport process. Furthermore, cysteine-reactive chemistry shows that mutation of the gating residues causes a higher proportion of transporters to reside in the outward facing conformation. Finally, we show that charge reversal of the corresponding residues (R104E/E493R) in the serotonin transporter also rescues [3H](S)-citalopram binding, suggesting a conserved feature. Taken together, these data suggest that the extracellular thin gate is present in monoamine transporters and that a dynamic interaction is required for substrate transport. PMID:25339174

  12. Expression of a D1 dopamine receptor dDA1/DmDOP1 in the central nervous system of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Cho; Lee, Hyun-Gwan; Seong, Chang-Soo; Han, Kyung-An

    2003-05-01

    The diverse physiological effects of dopamine are mediated by multiple receptor systems. The dDA1 represents one of the Drosophila dopamine receptors that activate the cAMP cascade. To gain insight into the role of dDA1, we generated a polyclonal antibody against the unique sequence in dDA1 and investigated dDA1 distribution in the central nervous system (CNS) of Drosophila melanogaster. In both larval and adult CNS pronounced dDA1 immunoreactivity was present in the neuropil of the mushroom bodies, a brain structure crucial for learning and memory in insects, and four unpaired neurons in each thoracic segment. In addition, the larval abdominal ganglion contained two dDA1 cells in each segment. This expression pattern appeared to be maintained in the condensed adult abdominal ganglion although the precise number and the intensity of staining were somewhat variable. The adult CNS also exhibited intense dDA1 immunoreactivity in the central complex, a structure controlling higher-order motor function, moderate expression in several neurosecretory cells, and weak staining in two unpaired neurons in the mesothoracic neuromere. The dDA1 expression in these areas was only detected in adult, but not in third instar larval CNS.

  13. Pregnenolone rescues schizophrenia-like behavior in dopamine transporter knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Wong, Peiyan; Chang, Cecilia Chin Roei; Marx, Christine E; Caron, Marc G; Wetsel, William C; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    Pregnenolone belongs to a class of endogenous neurosteroids in the central nervous system (CNS), which has been suggested to enhance cognitive functions through GABA(A) receptor signaling by its metabolites. It has been shown that the level of pregnenolone is altered in certain brain areas of schizophrenic patients, and clozapine enhances pregnenolone in the CNS in rats, suggesting that pregnenolone could be used to treat certain symptoms of schizophrenia. In addition, early phase proof-of-concept clinical trials have indicated that pregnenolone is effective in reducing the negative symptoms and cognitive deficits of schizophrenia patients. Here, we evaluate the actions of pregnenolone on a mouse model for schizophrenia, the dopamine transporter knockout mouse (DAT KO). DAT KO mice mirror certain symptoms evident in patients with schizophrenia, such as the psychomotor agitation, stereotypy, deficits of prepulse inhibition and cognitive impairments. Following acute treatment, pregnenolone was found to reduce the hyperlocomotion, stereotypic bouts and pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) deficits in DAT KO mice in a dose-dependent manner. At 60 mg/kg of pregnenolone, there were no significant differences in locomotor activities and stereotypy between wild-type and DAT KO mice. Similarly, acute treatment of 60 mg/kg of pregnenolone fully rescued PPI deficits of DAT KO mice. Following chronic treatment with pregnenolone at 60 mg/kg, the cognitive deficits of DAT KO mice were rescued in the paradigms of novel object recognition test and social transmission of food preference test. Pregnenolone thus holds promise as a therapeutic candidate in schizophrenia.

  14. Pregnenolone Rescues Schizophrenia-Like Behavior in Dopamine Transporter Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Peiyan; Chang, Cecilia Chin Roei; Marx, Christine E.; Caron, Marc G.; Wetsel, William C.; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    Pregnenolone belongs to a class of endogenous neurosteroids in the central nervous system (CNS), which has been suggested to enhance cognitive functions through GABAA receptor signaling by its metabolites. It has been shown that the level of pregnenolone is altered in certain brain areas of schizophrenic patients, and clozapine enhances pregnenolone in the CNS in rats, suggesting that pregnenolone could be used to treat certain symptoms of schizophrenia. In addition, early phase proof-of-concept clinical trials have indicated that pregnenolone is effective in reducing the negative symptoms and cognitive deficits of schizophrenia patients. Here, we evaluate the actions of pregnenolone on a mouse model for schizophrenia, the dopamine transporter knockout mouse (DAT KO). DAT KO mice mirror certain symptoms evident in patients with schizophrenia, such as the psychomotor agitation, stereotypy, deficits of prepulse inhibition and cognitive impairments. Following acute treatment, pregnenolone was found to reduce the hyperlocomotion, stereotypic bouts and pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) deficits in DAT KO mice in a dose-dependent manner. At 60 mg/kg of pregnenolone, there were no significant differences in locomotor activities and stereotypy between wild-type and DAT KO mice. Similarly, acute treatment of 60 mg/kg of pregnenolone fully rescued PPI deficits of DAT KO mice. Following chronic treatment with pregnenolone at 60 mg/kg, the cognitive deficits of DAT KO mice were rescued in the paradigms of novel object recognition test and social transmission of food preference test. Pregnenolone thus holds promise as a therapeutic candidate in schizophrenia. PMID:23240026

  15. The dopamine transporter haplotype and reward-related striatal responses in adult ADHD.

    PubMed

    Hoogman, Martine; Onnink, Marten; Cools, Roshan; Aarts, Esther; Kan, Cornelis; Arias Vasquez, Alejandro; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara

    2013-06-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly heritable disorder and several genes increasing disease risk have been identified. The dopamine transporter gene, SLC6A3/DAT1, has been studied most extensively in ADHD research. Interestingly, a different haplotype of this gene (formed by genetic variants in the 3' untranslated region and intron 8) is associated with childhood ADHD (haplotype 10-6) and adult ADHD (haplotype 9-6). The expression of DAT1 is highest in striatal regions in the brain. This part of the brain is of interest to ADHD because of its role in reward processing is altered in ADHD patients; ADHD patients display decreased striatal activation during reward processing. To better understand how the DAT1 gene exerts effects on ADHD, we studied the effect of this gene on reward-related brain functioning in the area of its highest expression in the brain, the striatum, using functional magnetic resonance imaging. In doing so, we tried to resolve inconsistencies observed in previous studies of healthy individuals and ADHD-affected children. In a sample of 87 adult ADHD patients and 77 healthy comparison subjects, we confirmed the association of the 9-6 haplotype with adult ADHD. Striatal hypoactivation during the reward anticipation phase of a monetary incentive delay task in ADHD patients was again shown, but no significant effects of DAT1 on striatal activity were found. Although the importance of the DAT1 haplotype as a risk factor for adult ADHD was again demonstrated in this study, the mechanism by which this gene increases disease risk remains largely unknown. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  16. Epigenetic alteration of the dopamine transporter gene in alcohol-dependent patients is associated with age.

    PubMed

    Nieratschker, Vanessa; Grosshans, Martin; Frank, Josef; Strohmaier, Jana; von der Goltz, Christoph; El-Maarri, Osman; Witt, Stephanie H; Cichon, Sven; Nöthen, Markus M; Kiefer, Falk; Rietschel, Marcella

    2014-03-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse and dependence are associated with dysfunctional dopaminergic neurotransmission in mesocorticolimbic circuits. Genetic and environmental factors have been shown to modulate susceptibility to alcohol dependence, and both may act through epigenetic mechanisms that can modulate gene expression, e.g. DNA methylation at CpG sites. Recent studies have suggested that DNA methylation patterns may change over time. However, few data are available concerning the rate of these changes in specific genes. A recent study found that hypermethylation of the promoter of the dopamine transporter (DAT) gene was positively correlated with alcohol dependence and negatively correlated with alcohol craving. The aim of the present study was to replicate these findings in a larger sample of alcohol-dependent patients and population-based controls matched for age and sex. No difference in methylation level was observed between patients and controls, and no difference in methylation level was observed before and after alcohol withdrawal in patients. However, patients with more severe craving showed a trend towards lower DAT methylation levels (P = 0.07), which is consistent with previous findings. Furthermore, in our overall sample, DAT methylation levels increased with age. Interestingly, a separate analysis of patients suggested that this finding was mainly driven by the patient group. Although the present data do not clarify whether chronic alcohol abuse is responsible for this phenomenon or merely enhances an ageing-specific process, our findings suggest that hypermethylation in alcohol-dependent patients is a consequence, rather than a cause, of the disorder. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  17. Association of Dopamine Transporter Gene Variants with Childhood ADHD Features in Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Tiffany A.; Joo, Eun-Jeong; Shektman, Tatyana; Sadovnick, A. Dessa; Remick, Ronald A.; Keck, Paul E.; McElroy, Susan L.; Kelsoe, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar Disorder (BD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) exhibit remarkably high rates of comorbidity, as well as patterns of familial co-segregation. Epidemiological data suggests that these disorders either share a common genetic architecture or that ADHD features in BD may represent an etiologically distinct subtype. We previously used the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS) to assess ADHD features in BD families and identified three heritable factors relating to impulsivity, mood instability, and inattention. Linkage analysis revealed a LOD score of 1.33 for the inattention factor on 5p15.3 near the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1), which has been associated with both BD and ADHD. Pharmacological evidence also suggests a role for DAT in both disorders. We have now evaluated the association of ten DAT1 variants for the WURS total score and factors in an overlapping sample of 87 BD families. Significant associations for three SNPs were observed across the WURS measures, notably for a SNP in intron 8 with the WURS total score (p=0.007) and for variants in introns 9 and 13 with mood instability (p=0.009 and 0.004, respectively). Analysis of an independent sample of 52 BD cases and 46 healthy controls further supported association of the intron 8 variant with mood instability (p=0.005), and a combined analysis confirmed the associations of this SNP with WURS total score. Impulsivity, and mood instability (p= 0.002, 0.007, and 8×10−4, respectively). These data suggest that variants within DAT1 may predispose to a subtype of BD characterized by early prodromal features that include attentional deficits. PMID:23255304

  18. Reduced Dopamine Transporter Functioning Induces High-Reward Risk-Preference Consistent with Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    van Enkhuizen, Jordy; Henry, Brook L; Minassian, Arpi; Perry, William; Milienne-Petiot, Morgane; Higa, Kerin K; Geyer, Mark A; Young, Jared W

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with bipolar disorder (BD) exhibit deleterious decision making, negatively impacting their lives. Such aberrant decision making can be quantified using the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), which requires choosing between advantageous and disadvantageous options based on different reward/punishment schedules. The mechanisms underlying this behavioral deficit are unknown, but may include the reduced dopamine transporter (DAT) functioning reported in BD patients. Using both human and mouse IGTs, we tested whether reduced DAT functioning would recreate patterns of deficient decision making of BD patients. We assessed the IGT performance of 16 BD subjects (7 female) and 17 healthy control (HC) subjects (12 female). We recorded standard IGT performance measures and novel post-reward and post-punishment decision-making strategies. We characterized a novel single-session mouse IGT using C57BL/6J mice (n=44). The BD and HC IGT performances were compared with the effects of chronic (genetic knockdown (KD; n=31) and wild-type (n=28) mice) and acute (C57BL/6J mice (n=89) treated with the DAT inhibitor GBR12909) reductions of DAT functioning in mice performing this novel IGT. BD patients exhibited impaired decision making compared with HC subjects. Both the good-performing DAT KD and GBR12909-treated mice exhibited poor decision making in the mouse IGT. The deficit of each population was driven by high-reward sensitivity. The single-session mouse IGT measures dynamic risk-based decision making similar to humans. Chronic and acute reductions of DAT functioning in mice impaired decision-making consistent with poor IGT performance of BD patients. Hyperdopaminergia caused by reduced DAT may impact poor decision making in BD patients, which should be confirmed in future studies. PMID:25005251

  19. Synthesis and dopamine transporter binding of 2beta-isopropyl ester analogs of cocaine.

    PubMed

    El-Moselhy, Tarek F; Avor, Kwasi S; Basmadjian, Garo P

    2002-02-01

    A series of 2beta-isopropyl ester analogs of cocaine (7-11) was synthesised and evaluated in an in vitro dopamine transporter (DAT) binding assays. Ecgonine HCl (5) was obtained from (-)-cocaine (1) by hydrolysis using 1 N HCl. Acid catalysed esterification of 5 using 2-propanol and HCl gas afforded 2beta-isopropyl ecgonine (6). Compounds 7-9 were obtained via esterification of the 3beta-hydroxyl group of 6 using the appropriate acid chloride. Compound 10 was obtained via selective hydrolysis and re-esterification of 7 using 2-propanol and HCl gas. Compound 11 was obtained by reduction of 9 using H(2)/Pd-C. Compounds 7, 10 and 11 showed high binding affinity to the DAT (as indicated from the inhibition of the binding of [(3)H]WIN 35,428 (3)) with IC(50) values (mean +/- S.E.M.) 208.5 +/- 9.5, 47.43 +/- 1.79 and 11.25 +/- 3.37 nM, respectively). Compound 7 is comparatively as active as cocaine, 10 is ca. fivefold more active than cocaine and 11 is ca. 20-fold more active than cocaine and even twice more active than the radioligand 3. Compound 11, like its methyl ester analog (2' aminococaine), exhibited the highest affinity to the DAT. These results, along with previous results, emphasise the importance of a hydrogen-bond donor group at the 2'-position of cocaine and its isopropyl ester analogs to enhance binding affinity to the DAT.

  20. Greater striatal dopamine transporter density may be associated with major depressive episode.

    PubMed

    Amsterdam, Jay D; Newberg, Andrew B; Soeller, Irene; Shults, Justine

    2012-12-10

    We examined striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) distribution volume ratio (DVR) values in subjects with unipolar or bipolar major depressive episode (versus non-depressed healthy volunteers) using the selective DAT radioligand [(99m)Tc]TRODAT-1 and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We hypothesized that striatal DVR values would be greater in depressed versus non-depressed subjects, and that greater DVR values may represent a possible clinical biomarker of depression. [(99m)Tc]TRODAT-1 spect images were acquired from 39 depressed and 103 non-depressed drug-free subjects. The primary outcome measure was the DVR value of [(99m)Tc]TRODAT-1 binding for the putamen region and the combined putamen plus caudate region. DVR values were significantly correlated across all striatal regions within both subject groups (p<0.005). Depressed subjects had significantly greater DVR values (versus non-depressed subjects) in the putamen (p<0.0005) and the combined putamen plus caudate (p<0.0005) regions. There was no difference in DVR values between unipolar (n=24) and bipolar (n=15) depressed subjects, and no difference in DVR values for depressed subjects with or without prior antidepressant exposure. The predictive probability of the putamen or combined putamen plus caudate DVR value to distinguish depressed from non-depressed subjects was significant (p<0.0005). DAT values could potentially be influenced by age, gender, diagnosis, prior psychotropic dug exposure, illness length, or symptom severity. Results confirm prior observations of greater striatal DAT density in depressed versus non-depressed subjects, and suggest that greater DVR values may possibly represent a potential diagnostic biomarker for distinguish depressed from non-depressed individuals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Differential effects of dopamine transporter inhibitors in the rodent Iowa Gambling Task: Relevance to mania

    PubMed Central

    van Enkhuizen, Jordy; Geyer, Mark A.; Young, Jared W.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) can be used to quantify impulsive and risky choice behaviors in psychiatric patients, e.g. Bipolar Disorder (BD) sufferers. Although developing treatments for these behaviors is important, few predictive animal models exist. Inhibition of the dopamine transporter (DAT) can model profiles of altered motor activity and exploration seen in patients with BD. The effect of DAT inhibition on impulsive choices related to BD has received limited study however. We used a rodent IGT to elucidate the effects of similarly acting drugs on risky choice behavior. Objectives We hypothesized that 1) C57BL/6 mice could adopt the ‘safe’ choice options in the IGT and 2) DAT inhibition would alter risk preference. Methods Mice were trained in the IGT to a stable risk-preference and then administered the norepinephrine/DAT inhibitor amphetamine, or the more selective DAT inhibitors modafinil or GBR12909. Results Mice developed a preference for the ‘safe’ option, which was potentiated by amphetamine administration. GBR12909 or modafinil administration increased motor impulsivity, motivation significantly, and risk preference subtly. Conclusions The rodent IGT can measure different impulse-related behaviors and differentiate similarly acting BD-related drugs. The contrasting effects of amphetamine and modafinil in mice are similar to effects in rats and humans in corresponding IGT tasks, supporting the translational validity of the task. GBR12909 and modafinil elicited similar behaviors in the IGT, likely through a shared mechanism. Future studies using a within-session IGT are warranted to confirm the suitability of DAT inhibitors to model risk-preference in BD. PMID:22945515

  2. Double dissociation between lab measures of inattention and impulsivity and the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1) and dopamine D4 receptor gene (DRD4).

    PubMed

    Gizer, Ian R; Waldman, Irwin D

    2012-11-01

    Studies examining the biological and neuropsychological processes underlying attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) suggest that error indices from the A-X Continuous Performance Test (A-X CPT) might represent useful endophenotypes for ADHD. The current study extended such findings by evaluating the utility of these putative endophenotypes in the context of a molecular genetic study. One hundred and forty-eight clinic-referred ADHD probands and 56 siblings were recruited as part of an ongoing study. Between- and within-family tests of association were conducted to test for relations between polymorphisms in two candidate genes, the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1) and the dopamine D4 receptor gene (DRD4), and indices of inattention and impulsivity derived from the A-X CPT. Association analyses of these polymorphisms with the A-X CPT indices suggested a double dissociation such that an index of inattention was associated with DRD4 but not DAT1, and an index of impulsivity was associated with DAT1 but not DRD4. Further analyses suggested that an A-X CPT index of impulsivity partially mediated previously observed associations between hyperactive-impulsive ADHD symptoms and DAT1. Additionally, an A-X CPT index of inattention moderated the relation between inattentive ADHD symptoms and DRD4 such that children with high levels of the endophenotype showed a stronger association between inattentive symptoms and DRD4. The potential utility of endophenotypes derived from the A-X CPT in molecular genetic studies of ADHD is discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Interaction between serotonin transporter and dopamine D2/D3 receptor radioligand measures is associated with harm avoidant symptoms in anorexia and bulimia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Bailer, Ursula F.; Frank, Guido K.; Price, Julie C.; Meltzer, Carolyn C.; Becker, Carl; Mathis, Chester A.; Wagner, Angela; Barbarich-Marsteller, Nicole C.; Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Putnam, Karen; Schork, Nicholas J.; Gamst, Anthony; Kaye, Walter H.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Individuals with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) have alterations of measures of serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) function, which persist after long-term recovery and are associated with elevated harm avoidance (HA), a measure of anxiety and behavioral inhibition. Objective Based on theories that 5-HT is an aversive motivational system that may oppose a DA-related appetitive system, we explored interactions of positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand measures that reflect portions of these systems. Methods Twenty-seven individuals recovered (REC) from eating disorders (EDs) (7 AN-BN, 11 AN, 9 BN) and 9 control women (CW) were analyzed for correlations between [11C]McN5652 and [11C]raclopride binding. Results There was a positive correlation between [11C]McN5652 binding potential BPnon displaceable(ND)) and [11C]raclopride BPND for the dorsal caudate (r(27) = .62; p < .001), antero-ventral striatum (r(27) = .55, p = .003), middle caudate (r(27) = .68; p < .001), ventral (r(27) = .64; p < .001) and dorsal putamen (r(27) = .42; p = .03). No significant correlations were found in CW. [11C]raclopride BPND, but not [11C]McN5652 BPND, was significantly related to HA in REC EDs. A linear regression analysis showed that the interaction between [11C]McN5652 BPND and [11C]raclopride BPND in the dorsal putamen significantly (b = 140.04; t (22) = 2.21; p = .04) predicted HA. Conclusions This is the first study using PET and the radioligands [11C]McN5652 and [11C]raclopride to show a direct relationship between 5-HT transporter and striatal DA D2/D3 receptor binding in humans, supporting the possibility that 5-HT and DA interactions contribute to HA behaviors in EDs. PMID:23154100

  4. Quinolyl analogues of norlobelane: novel potent inhibitors of [(3)H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding and [(3)H]dopamine uptake at the vesicular monoamine transporter-2.

    PubMed

    Ding, Derong; Nickell, Justin R; Dwoskin, Linda P; Crooks, Peter A

    2015-07-01

    We have previously shown that quinolyl moieties are attractive structural replacements for the phenyl groups in lobelane. These quinolyl analogues had improved water-solubility over lobelane and retained the potent vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2) inhibitory properties of the parent compound, with quinlobelane (4) exhibiting potent inhibition of uptake at VMAT-2 (Ki=51nM). However, the VMAT-2 inhibitory properties of quinolyl analogues of norlobelane, which is equipotent with lobeline as an inhibitor of [(3)H]dopamine (DA) uptake at VMAT-2, have not been reported. In the current communication, we describe the synthesis of some novel des-methyl quinolyl analogues of lobelane that exhibit greater affinity (Ki=178-647nM) for the dihydrotetrabenazine binding site located on VMAT-2 compared with lobelane (Ki=970nM), norlobelane (Ki=2310nM) and quinlobelane (Ki=2640nM). The most potent compounds, 14 and 15, also exhibited inhibition of [(3)H]DA uptake at VMAT-2 (Ki=42nM) which was comparable to both lobelane (Ki=45nM) and norlobelane (Ki=43nM). Results reveal that binding affinity at VMAT-2 serves as an accurate predictor of inhibition of the function of VMAT-2 for the majority of these analogues. These novel analogues are under consideration for further development as treatments for methamphetamine abuse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Haplotypes of dopamine and serotonin transporter genes are associated with antisocial personality disorder in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Reese, Jörn; Kraschewski, Adrian; Anghelescu, Ion; Winterer, Georg; Schmidt, Lutz G; Gallinat, Jürgen; Rüschendorf, Franz; Rommelspacher, Hans; Wernicke, Catrin

    2010-08-01

    A different genetic background is postulated for alcoholics with early onset and with antisocial personality disorder (type 2 alcoholics) compared with those with late onset and without antisocial personality disorder (type 1 alcoholics). The dopamine transporter (DAT) and the serotonin transporter (SERT) are involved in endophenotypes that are associated with these subtypes. Our study was aimed at investigating whether distinct haplotypes, defined by polymorphisms associated with the expressions of DAT and SERT, were associated with subgroups of alcohol dependence. Intron 8 variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR), exon 15 rs27072 and VNTR (DAT), promoter VNTR and rs25531, and intron 2 VNTR (SERT) were genotyped in a case-control sample comprising 360 alcoholics and 368 controls, and in a family-based sample of 65 trios, all of German origin. DAT: The haplogenotypes 6-A-10/6-G-10 and 5-G-9/5-G-9 were more often present in type 2 alcoholics as compared with type 1 alcoholics [odds ratio (OR): 2.8], and controls (OR: 5.8), respectively. The daily ethanol consumption was associated with haplogenotypes. SERT: haplotypes SA-10 (OR: 2.3) and LG-12 (OR: 2.5) were more often present in type 2 alcoholics compared with controls. Haplotype LA-10 was less often present in type 2 alcoholics (OR: 0.5), and was more often transmitted, in families, to the affected offspring (transmission disequilibrium test: OR: 5.2; family-based association test: Z: 1.9). The haplotype LA-12 was significantly undertransmitted to affected offspring in the whole group (transmission disequilibrium test: OR: 0.216; family-based association test: Z: -2.2). A gene by environment interaction was observed with respect to the time course of the depression score after alcohol withdrawal and with respect to the positive family history of alcohol dependence. Haplotype analysis, sub-grouping with respect to more homogeneous endophenotypes, and inclusion of quantifiable characteristics are sensible strategies

  6. 2-Isoxazol-3-Phenyltropane Derivatives of Cocaine: Molecular and Atypical System Effects at the Dopamine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Hiranita, Takato; Wilkinson, Derek S.; Hong, Weimin C.; Zou, Mu-Fa; Kopajtic, Theresa A.; Soto, Paul L.; Lupica, Carl R.; Newman, Amy H.

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined RTI-371 [3β-(4-methylphenyl)-2β-[3-(4-chlorophenyl)-isoxazol-5-yl]tropane], a phenyltropane cocaine analog with effects distinct from cocaine, and assessed potential mechanisms for those effects by comparison with its constitutional isomer, RTI-336 [3β-(4-chlorophenyl)-2β-[3-(4-methylphenyl)-isoxazol-5-yl]tropane]. In mice, RTI-371 was less effective than cocaine and RTI-336 in stimulating locomotion, and incompletely substituted (∼60% maximum at 5 minutes or 1 hour after injection) in a cocaine (10 mg/kg i.p.)/saline discrimination procedure; RTI-336 completely substituted. In contrast to RTI-336, RTI-371 was not self-administered, and its pretreatment (1.0–10 mg/kg i.p.) dose-dependently decreased maximal cocaine self-administration more potently than food-maintained responding. RTI-336 pretreatment dose-dependently left-shifted the cocaine self-administration dose-effect curve. Both RTI-336 and RTI-371 displaced [3H]WIN35,428 [[3H](−)-3β-(4-fluorophenyl)-tropan-2β-carboxylic acid methyl ester tartrate] binding to striatal dopamine transporters (DATs) with Ki values of 10.8 and 7.81 nM, respectively, and had lower affinities at serotonin or norepinephrine transporters, or muscarinic and σ receptors. The relative low affinity at these sites suggests the DAT as the primary target of RTI-371 with minimal contributions from these other targets. In biochemical assays probing the outward-facing DAT conformation, both RTI-371 and RTI-336 had effects similar to cocaine, suggesting little contribution of DAT conformation to the unique pharmacology of RTI-371. The locomotor-stimulant effects of RTI-371 (3.0–30 mg/kg i.p.) were comparable in wild-type and knockout cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) mice, indicating that previously reported CB1 allosteric effects do not decrease cocaine-like effects of RTI-371. DAT occupancy in vivo was most rapid with cocaine and least with RTI-371. The slow apparent association rate may allow

  7. Endogenous dopamine (DA) modulates (3H)spiperone binding in vivo in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Bischoff, S.; Krauss, J.; Grunenwald, C.; Gunst, F.; Heinrich, M.; Schaub, M.; Stoecklin, K.V.; Vassout, A.; Waldmeier, P.; Maitre, L. )

    1991-01-01

    (3H)spiperone (SPI) binding in vivo, biochemical parameters and behavior were measured after modulating DA levels by various drug treatments. DA releasers and uptake inhibitors increased SPI binding in rat striatum. In other brain areas, the effects were variable, but only the pituitary remained unaffected. Surprisingly, nomifensine decreased SPI binding in frontal cortex. The effects of these drugs were monitored by measuring DA, serotonin (5-HT) and their metabolites in the same rats. The increased SPI binding in striatum was parallel to the locomotor stimulation with the following rank order: amfonelic acid greater than nomifensine greater than D-amphetamine greater than or equal to methylphenidate greater than amineptine greater than bupropion. Decreasing DA levels with reserpine or alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine reduced SPI binding by 45% in striatum only when both drugs were combined. In contrast, reserpine enhanced SPI binding in pituitary. Thus, the amount of releasable DA seems to modulate SPI binding characteristics. It is suggested that in vivo, DA receptors are submitted to dynamic regulation in response to changes in intrasynaptic concentrations of DA.

  8. A C-terminal PDZ domain binding sequence is required for striatal distribution of the dopamine transporter

    PubMed Central

    Rickhag, Mattias; Hansen, Freja Herborg; Sørensen, Gunnar; Strandfelt, Kristine Nørgaard; Andresen, Bjørn; Gotfryd, Kamil; Madsen, Kenneth L.; Vestergaard-Klewe, Ib; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Eriksen, Jacob; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Gomeza, Jesus; Woldbye, David P.D.; Wörtwein, Gitta; Gether, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) mediates reuptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft. The cellular mechanisms controlling DAT levels in striatal nerve terminals remain poorly understood. DAT contains a C-terminal PDZ (PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1) domain binding sequence believed to bind synaptic scaffolding proteins, but its functional significance is uncertain. Here we demonstrate that two different DAT knock-in mice with disrupted PDZ-binding motifs (DAT-AAA and DAT+Ala) are characterized by dramatic loss of DAT expression in the striatum, causing hyperlocomotion and attenuated response to amphetamine. In cultured dopaminergic neurons and striatal slices from DAT-AAA mice, we find markedly reduced DAT surface levels and evidence for enhanced constitutive internalization. In DAT-AAA neurons, but not in wild type neurons, surface levels are rescued in part by expression of a dominant-negative dynamin mutation (K44A). Our findings suggest that PDZ domain interactions are critical for synaptic distribution of DAT in vivo and thereby for proper maintenance of dopamine homeostasis. PMID:23481388

  9. Novel morpholine scaffolds as selective dopamine (DA) D3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Micheli, Fabrizio; Cremonesi, Susanna; Semeraro, Teresa; Tarsi, Luca; Tomelleri, Silvia; Cavanni, Paolo; Oliosi, Beatrice; Perdonà, Elisabetta; Sava, Anna; Zonzini, Laura; Feriani, Aldo; Braggio, Simone; Heidbreder, Christian

    2016-02-15

    A new series of morpholine derivatives has been identified as selective DA D3 receptor antagonists; their in vitro profile and pharmacokinetic data are provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of environmental enrichment on dopamine and serotonin transporters and glutamate neurotransmission in medial prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Darna, Mahesh; Beckmann, Joshua S.; Gipson, Cassandra D.; Bardo, Michael T.; Dwoskin, Linda P.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that rats raised in an enriched condition (EC) have decreased dopamine transporter (DAT) function and expression in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), as well as increased d-amphetamine-induced glutamate release in nucleus accumbens compared to rats raised in an isolated condition (IC). In these previous studies, DAT function and expression were evaluated using mPFC pooled from four rats for each condition to obtain kinetic parameters due to sparse DAT expression in mPFC. In contrast, accumbal glutamate release was determined using individual rats. The current study extends the previous work and reports on the optimization of DAT and serotonin transporter (SERT) functional assays, as well as cell surface expression assays using both mPFC and orbital frontal cortex (OFC) from individual EC or IC rats. In addition, the effect of d-amphetamine on glutamate release in mPFC and OFC of EC and IC rats was determined using in vivo microdialysis. Results show that environmental enrichment decreased maximal transport velocity (Vmax) for [3H]dopamine uptake in mPFC, but increased Vmax for [3H]dopamine uptake in OFC. Corresponding changes in DAT cell surface expression were not found. In contrast, Vmax for [3H]serotonin uptake and cellular localization of SERT in mPFC and OFC were not different between EC and IC rats. Further, acute d-amphetamine (2 mg/kg, s.c.) increased extracellular glutamate concentrations in mPFC of EC rats only and in OFC of IC rats only. Overall, these results suggest that enrichment produces long-lasting alterations in mPFC and OFC DAT function via a trafficking-independent mechanism, as well as differential glutamate release in mPFC and OFC. Rearing-induced modulation of DAT function and glutamate release in prefrontal cortical subregions may contribute to the known protective effects of enrichment on drug abuse vulnerability. PMID:25536304

  11. Methylphenidate treatment in adolescent rats with an attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder phenotype: cocaine addiction vulnerability and dopamine transporter function.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Roxann C; Sen, Sucharita; Deaciuc, Agripina; Dwoskin, Linda P; Kantak, Kathleen M

    2011-03-01

    Appropriate animal models of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and drug reinforcement allow investigation of possible underlying biological bases of ADHD and its comorbidity with cocaine addiction. Toward this end, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) exhibiting an ADHD phenotype were compared with Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and Wistar (WIS) rats. Initially, 1.5 mg/kg oral methylphenidate or vehicle was administered between postnatal days 28 and 55, and acquisition of visual discrimination learning was examined. After discontinuing adolescent treatments, adult rats were evaluated for cocaine self-administration and dopamine transporter (DAT) function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatum. During adolescence, SHRs showed deficits in visual discrimination relative to WKY and WIS rats when non-medicated. Methylphenidate improved visual discrimination only in SHRs. Compared with WKY and WIS rats, SHRs with previous methylphenidate treatment acquired cocaine self-administration faster, identified cocaine as a highly efficacious reinforcer by displaying an upward shift in the cocaine dose-response function, and showed the greatest motivation to self-administer cocaine by exhibiting the highest progressive ratio breakpoints. In the PFC, the maximal dopamine uptake (V(max)) at DAT was decreased in SHRs and increased in WKY and WIS rats by previous methylphenidate treatment. The affinity (K(m)) for dopamine at DAT in the PFC was not different between strains, nor was V(max) or K(m) altered in the striatum by previous methylphenidate treatment in any strain. Methylphenidate-induced decreases in dopamine clearance by DAT in the PFC may underlie increased cocaine self-administration in SHRs. These preclinical findings suggest that caution should be exercised when methylphenidate is prescribed for first-time treatment of ADHD in adolescent patients, as cocaine addiction vulnerability may be augmented.

  12. Methylphenidate Treatment in Adolescent Rats with an Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Phenotype: Cocaine Addiction Vulnerability and Dopamine Transporter Function

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Roxann C; Sen, Sucharita; Deaciuc, Agripina; Dwoskin, Linda P; Kantak, Kathleen M

    2011-01-01

    Appropriate animal models of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and drug reinforcement allow investigation of possible underlying biological bases of ADHD and its comorbidity with cocaine addiction. Toward this end, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) exhibiting an ADHD phenotype were compared with Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and Wistar (WIS) rats. Initially, 1.5 mg/kg oral methylphenidate or vehicle was administered between postnatal days 28 and 55, and acquisition of visual discrimination learning was examined. After discontinuing adolescent treatments, adult rats were evaluated for cocaine self-administration and dopamine transporter (DAT) function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatum. During adolescence, SHRs showed deficits in visual discrimination relative to WKY and WIS rats when non-medicated. Methylphenidate improved visual discrimination only in SHRs. Compared with WKY and WIS rats, SHRs with previous methylphenidate treatment acquired cocaine self-administration faster, identified cocaine as a highly efficacious reinforcer by displaying an upward shift in the cocaine dose–response function, and showed the greatest motivation to self-administer cocaine by exhibiting the highest progressive ratio breakpoints. In the PFC, the maximal dopamine uptake (Vmax) at DAT was decreased in SHRs and increased in WKY and WIS rats by previous methylphenidate treatment. The affinity (Km) for dopamine at DAT in the PFC was not different between strains, nor was Vmax or Km altered in the striatum by previous methylphenidate treatment in any strain. Methylphenidate-induced decreases in dopamine clearance by DAT in the PFC may underlie increased cocaine self-administration in SHRs. These preclinical findings suggest that caution should be exercised when methylphenidate is prescribed for first-time treatment of ADHD in adolescent patients, as cocaine addiction vulnerability may be augmented. PMID:21150910

  13. Structure-activity studies of 3'-4'-dichloro-meperidine analogues at dopamine and serotonin transporters.

    PubMed

    Rhoden, Jill B; Bouvet, Maud; Izenwasser, Sari; Wade, Dean; Lomenzo, Stacey A; Trudell, Mark L

    2005-10-01

    The structure-activity relationships of 3',4'-dichloro-meperidine were investigated at dopamine (DAT) and serotonin transporters (SERT). Large ester substituents and lipophilic groups at the 4-position favored molecular recognition at the SERT. The benzyl ester of 3',4'-dichloro-meperidine exhibited high potency and high selectivity for the SERT (DAT/SERT=760). Chemical modification of the ester group and N-substitution generally led to compounds with decreased DAT affinity. Only small esters and alkyl groups were tolerated at the 4-position of the meperidine ring system by the DAT. Overall, the meperidine analogues were generally more selective for the SERT than for the DAT.

  14. Conversion to Parkinson Disease in the PARS Hyposmic and Dopamine Transporter-Deficit Prodromal Cohort.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Danna; Siderowf, Andrew; Stern, Matthew; Seibyl, John; Eberly, Shirley; Oakes, David; Marek, Kenneth

    2017-08-01

    Detecting individuals at risk for Parkinson disease (PD) during the prodromal phase could clarify disease mechanisms and allow for treatment earlier in the disease process to possibly slow or prevent the onset of motor PD. To determine if the combination of smell identification testing followed by dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging can accurately and efficiently identify individuals from the general population at risk for conversion to a clinical diagnosis of PD. Participants were identified from the community by olfactory testing assessed longitudinally with DAT imaging 2 and 4 years after baseline and by annual clinical follow-up to determine whether they had clinical evidence to establish a PD diagnosis. Participants were contacted by mail and completed olfactory testing at home. Longitudinal follow-up of clinical measures and DAT imaging occurred at specialty centers. There were 203 hyposmic and 100 normosmic participants. A total of 185 hyposmic and 95 normosmic individuals had at least 1 follow-up visit, and 152 hyposmic participants (82.2%) were either observed for 4 years or converted to PD during follow-up. Percentage of individuals with hyposmia and a DAT deficit that converted to PD and the change in PD clinical scale scores (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale) and DAT imaging during 4-year follow-up. Of 280 total participants, 140 (50.0%) were male, and the mean (SD) age of the cohort was 63 (8.7) years. Among 21 participants with hyposmia and a DAT deficit (65% or less of age-expected lowest putamen binding ratio) at baseline, 14 (67%) converted to PD at 4 years compared with 2 of 22 participants (9%) with a DAT in an indeterminate range (greater than 65%-80%) and 3 of 109 participants (2.8%) with no DAT deficit (greater than 80%) at baseline. Individuals with a baseline DAT deficit experienced a 4-year decline in DAT binding of 20.23% (SD, 15.04%) compared with 3.68% (SD, 18.36%) and 5.45% (SD, 13.58%) for participants with an indeterminate and

  15. Characterization of a dopamine transporter polymorphism and behavior in Belgian Malinois

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Belgian Malinois dog breed (MAL) is frequently used in law enforcement and military environments. Owners have reported seizures and unpredictable behavioral changes including dogs’ eyes “glazing over,” dogs’ lack of response to environmental stimuli, and loss of behavioral inhibition including owner-directed biting behavior. Dogs with severe behavioral changes may be euthanized as they can represent a danger to humans and other dogs. In the dog, the dopamine transporter gene (DAT) contains a 38-base pair variable number tandem repeat (DAT-VNTR); alleles have either one or two copies of the 38-base pair sequence. The objective of this study was to assess frequency of DAT-VNTR alleles, and characterize the association between DAT-VNTR alleles and behavior in MAL and other breeds. Results In an American sample of 280 dogs comprising 26 breeds, most breeds are predominantly homozygous for the DAT-VNTR two-tandem-repeat allele (2/2). The one-tandem-repeat allele is over-represented in American MAL (AM-MAL) (n = 144), both as heterozygotes (1/2) and homozygotes (1/1). All AM-MAL with reported seizures (n = 5) were 1/1 genotype. For AM-MAL with at least one “1” allele (1/1 or 1/2 genotype, n = 121), owners reported higher levels of attention, increased frequency of episodic aggression, and increased frequency of loss of responsiveness to environmental stimuli. In behavior observations, Belgian Military Working Dogs (MWD) with 1/1 or 1/2 genotypes displayed fewer distracted behaviors and more stress-related behaviors such as lower posture and increased yawning. Handlers’ treatment of MWD varied with DAT-VNTR genotype as did dogs’ responses to handlers’ behavior. For 1/1 or 1/2 genotype MWD, 1) lower posture after the first aversive stimulus given by handlers was associated with poorer obedience performance; 2) increased aversive stimuli during protection exercises were associated with decreased performance; 3) more aversive

  16. Quantification of dopamine transporter density with [18F]FECNT PET in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Nye, Jonathon A.; Votaw, John R.; Bremner, J. Douglas; Davis, Margaret R.; Voll, Ronald J.; Camp, Vernon M.; Goodman, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Fluorine-18 labeled 2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-chlorophenyl)-8-(2-fluoroethyl)nortropane ([18 F]FECNT) binds reversibly to the dopamine transporter (DAT) with high selectivity. [18 F]FECNT has been used extensively in the quantification of DAT occupancy in non-human primate brain and can distinguish between Parkinson's and healthy controls in humans. The purpose of this work was to develop a compartment model to characterize the kinetics of [18 F]FECNT for quantification of DAT density in healthy human brain. Methods Twelve healthy volunteers underwent 180 min dynamic [18 F]FECNT PET imaging including sampling of arterial blood. Regional time-activity curves were extracted from the caudate, putamen and midbrain including a reference region placed in the cerebellum. Binding potential, BPND, was calculated for all regions using kinetic parameters estimated from compartmental and Logan graphical model fits to the time-activity data. Simulations were performed to determine whether the compartment model could reliably fit time-activity data over a range of BPND values. Results The kinetics of [18 F]FECNT were well-described by the reversible 2-tissue arterial input and full reference tissue compartment models. Calculated binding potentials in the caudate, putamen and midbrain were in good agreement between the arterial input model, reference tissue model and the Logan graphical model. The distribution volume in the cerebellum did not reach a plateau over the duration of the study, which may be a result of non-specific binding in the cerebellum. Simulations that included non-specific binding show that the reference and arterial input models are able to estimate BPND for DAT densities well below that observed in normal volunteers. Conclusion The kinetics of [18 F]FECNT in human brain are well-described by arterial input and reference tissue compartment models. Measured and simulated data show that BPND calculated with reference tissue model is proportional to

  17. Relationship between dopamine transporter occupancy and methylphenidate induced high in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.J.; Fowler, J.S. |

    1996-05-01

    The inhibition of the dopamine transporter (DAT) by cocaine has been shown to be indispensable for its reinforcing properties. The development of drugs that inibit the DAT has become a major target to prevent cocaine`s effects. However prevention of the {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} by DAT inhibitors has never been demonstrated. This study evaluates the ability to block methylphenidate (MP), a DAT inhibitor drug with similar reinforcing properties to cocaine, induced {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} by prior DAT inhibition. It uses PET and [{sup 11}C]d-threo-methylphenidate to measure the relationship between DAT occupancy prior to administration of MP and the intensity of the subjective perception of the {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} in 8 controls. MP (0.375 mg/kg iv) which was administered as a single injection and also as two sequential doses given 60 minutes apart significantly reduced the ratio of the distribution volume for [{sup 11}C]d-threo-methylphenidate in striatum to that in cerebellum from a baseline of 2.83 {plus_minus} 0.2 to 1.29 {plus_minus} 0.1 at 7 minutes and to 1.37 {plus_minus} 0.2 at 60 minutes after a single injection of MP and to 1.14 {plus_minus} 0.1 at 7 minutes after the second of two sequential MP doses. This corresponds to a DAT occupancy by MP of 84% {plus_minus} 7 at 7 minutes and of 77% {plus_minus} 6 at 60 minutes after a single injection of MP and of 93% {plus_minus} 7 at 7 after the second of two sequential MP doses. The subjective perception of {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} experienced after the second injection of MP was of a similar magnitude to that experienced after the first injection of MP was of a similar magnitude to that experienced after the first injection, in spite of the very different starting DAT occupancies (0 and 77%, respectively). DAT occupancy was not correlated with the {open_quotes}high{close_quotes}; and one subject with 100% DAT occupancy did not perceive the {open_quotes}high{close_quotes}.

  18. Decreases in Cocaine Self-Administration with Dual Inhibition of the Dopamine Transporter and σ Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hiranita, Takato; Soto, Paul L.; Kohut, Stephen J.; Kopajtic, Theresa; Cao, Jianjing; Newman, Amy H.; Tanda, Gianluigi

    2011-01-01

    Sigma receptor (σR) antagonists attenuate many behavioral effects of cocaine but typically not its reinforcing effects in self-administration procedures. However, the σR antagonist rimcazole and its N-propylphenyl analogs, [3-(cis-3,5-dimethyl-4-[3-phenylpropyl]-1-piperazinyl)-propyl]diphenylamine hydrochloride (SH 3-24) and 9-[3-(cis-3,5-dimethyl-4-[3-phenylpropyl]-1-piperazinyl)-propyl]carbazole hydrobromide (SH 3-28), dose-dependently decreased the maximal rates of cocaine self-administration without affecting comparable responding maintained by food reinforcement. In contrast, a variety of σR antagonists [N-phenethylpiperidine oxalate (AC927), N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)ethylamine dihydrobromide (BD 1008), N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(dimethylamino) ethylamine dihydrobromide (BD 1047), N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl) ethyl]-4-methylpiperazine dihydrochloride (BD 1063), and N,N-dipropyl-2-[4-methoxy-3-(2-phenylethoxy)phenyl]-ethylamine monohydrochloride (NE-100)] had no effect on cocaine self-administration across the range of doses that decreased rates of food-maintained responding. Rimcazole analogs differed from selective σR antagonists in their dual affinities for σRs and the dopamine transporter (DAT) assessed with radioligand binding. Selective DAT inhibitors and σR antagonists were studied alone and in combination on cocaine self-administration to determine whether actions at both σRs and the DAT were sufficient to reproduce the effects of rimcazole analogs. Typical DAT inhibitors [2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane (WIN 35,428), methylphenidate, and nomifensine] dose-dependently shifted the cocaine dose-effect curve leftward. Combinations of DAT inhibitor and σR antagonist doses that were behaviorally inactive alone decreased cocaine self-administration without effects on food-maintained responding. In addition, whereas the DAT inhibitors were self-administered at rates similar to those of

  19. Cocaine Occupancy of Sigma1 Receptors and Dopamine Transporters in Mice

    PubMed Central

    LEVER, JOHN R.; FERGASON-CANTRELL, EMILY A.; WATKINSON, LISA D.; CARMACK, TERRY L.; LORD, SARAH A.; XU, RONG; MILLER, DENNIS K.; LEVER, SUSAN Z.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of sigma1 (σ1) receptors contributes to the behavioral and toxic effects of (−)-cocaine. We studied a key step, the ability of (−)-cocaine to occupy σ1 receptors in vivo, using CD-1® mice and the novel radioligand [125I]E-N-1-(3′-iodoallyl)-N′-4-(3″,4″-dimethoxyphenethyl)-piperazine ([125I]E-IA-DM-PE-PIPZE). (−)-Cocaine displayed an ED50 of 68 μmol/kg for inhibition of specific radioligand binding in whole brain, with values between 73 – 80 μmol/kg for heart, lung and spleen. For comparison, an ED50 of 26 μmol/kg for (−)-cocaine occupancy of striatal dopamine transporters (DAT) was determined by inhibition of [125I]3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2β-carboxylic acid isopropyl ester ([125I]RTI-121) binding. A chief finding is the relatively small potency difference between (−)-cocaine occupancy of σ1 receptors and the DAT, although the DAT occupancy is likely underestimated. Interactions of (−)-cocaine with σ1 receptors were assessed further using [125I]E-IA-DM-PE-PIPZE for regional cerebral biodistribution studies and quantitative ex vivo autoradiography of brain sections. (−)-Cocaine binding to cerebral σ1 receptors proved directly proportional to the relative site densities known for the brain regions. Non-radioactive E-IA-DM-PE-PIPZE gave an ED50 of 0.23 μmol/kg for occupancy of cerebral σ1 receptors, and a 3.16 μmol/kg (i.p.) dose attenuated (−)-cocaine induced locomotor hyperactivity by 30%. This effect did not reach statistical significance, but suggests that E-IA-DM-PE-PIPZE is a probable σ1 receptor antagonist. As groundwork for the in vivo studies, we used standard techniques in vitro to determine ligand affinities, site densities and pharmacological profiles for the σ1 and σ2 receptors expressed in CD-1® mouse brain. PMID:26618331

  20. Cocaine occupancy of sigma1 receptors and dopamine transporters in mice.

    PubMed

    Lever, John R; Fergason-Cantrell, Emily A; Watkinson, Lisa D; Carmack, Terry L; Lord, Sarah A; Xu, Rong; Miller, Dennis K; Lever, Susan Z

    2016-03-01

    Activation of sigma1 (σ1) receptors contributes to the behavioral and toxic effects of (-)-cocaine. We studied a key step, the ability of (-)-cocaine to occupy σ1 receptors in vivo, using CD-1(®) mice and the novel radioligand [(125) I]E-N-1-(3'-iodoallyl)-N'-4-(3",4"-dimethoxyphenethyl)-piperazine ([(125) I]E-IA-DM-PE-PIPZE). (-)-Cocaine displayed an ED50 of 68 μmol/kg for inhibition of specific radioligand binding in whole brain, with values between 73 and 80 μmol/kg for heart, lung, and spleen. For comparison, an ED50 of 26 μmol/kg for (-)-cocaine occupancy of striatal dopamine transporters (DAT) was determined by inhibition of [(125) I]3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2β-carboxylic acid isopropyl ester ([(125) I]RTI-121) binding. A chief finding is the relatively small potency difference between (-)-cocaine occupancy of σ1 receptors and the DAT, although the DAT occupancy is likely underestimated. Interactions of (-)-cocaine with σ1 receptors were assessed further using [(125) I]E-IA-DM-PE-PIPZE for regional cerebral biodistribution studies and quantitative ex vivo autoradiography of brain sections. (-)-Cocaine binding to cerebral σ1 receptors proved directly proportional to the relative site densities known for the brain regions. Nonradioactive E-IA-DM-PE-PIPZE gave an ED50 of 0.23 μmol/kg for occupancy of cerebral σ1 receptors, and a 3.16 μmol/kg (i.p.) dose attenuated (-)-cocaine-induced locomotor hyperactivity by 30%. This effect did not reach statistical significance, but suggests that E-IA-DM-PE-PIPZE is a probable σ1 receptor antagonist. As groundwork for the in vivo studies, we used standard techniques in vitro to determine ligand affinities, site densities, and pharmacological profiles for the σ1 and σ2 receptors expressed in CD-1(®) mouse brain. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Inbred Lewis and Fischer 344 rat strains differ not only in novelty- and amphetamine-induced behaviors, but also in dopamine transporter activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gulley, Joshua M.; Everett, Carson V.; Zahniser, Nancy R.

    2007-01-01

    Inbred Lewis (LEW) and Fischer 344 (F344) rats are differentially sensitive to drugs of abuse, making them useful for studying addiction-related neural mechanisms. Here, we investigated whether strain differences in dopamine transporters (DATs) in dorsal striatum (dSTR) and/or nucleus accumbens (NAc) may help to explain their behavioral differences. The behavior of male LEW and F344 rats was assessed in an open-field arena during habituation to novelty and after an i.v. infusion of saline and/or 0.5 mg/kg d-amphetamine (AMPH). In vitro measures of DAT binding, protein and cell-surface expression, as well as in vitro and in vivo measures of function, were used to compare DATs in dSTR and NAc of these two strains. We found that LEW rats exhibited higher novelty- and AMPH-induced locomotion, but F344 rats exhibited greater AMPH-induced rearing and stereotypy. An initial habituation session with i.v. saline minimized the strain differences in AMPH-induced behaviors except that the more frequent AMPH-induced rearing in F344 rats persisted. Strain differences in DAT total protein and basal activity were also observed, with LEW rats having less protein and slower in vivo clearance of locally-applied DA in dSTR and NAc. AMPH inhibited in vivo DA clearance in dSTR and NAc of both strains, but to a greater extent in F344 rats. Taken together, the lower basal DAT function in LEW rats is consistent with their greater novelty-induced locomotor activation, whereas the greater inhibition of DA clearance by AMPH in F344 rats is consistent with their marked AMPH-induced rearing behavior. PMID:17395161

  2. Ascorbic acid and striatal transport of (/sup 3/H)1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP/sup +/) and (/sup 3/H)dopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Debler, E.A.; Hashim, A.; Lajtha, A.; Sershen, H.

    1988-01-01

    The inhibition of uptake of (/sup 3/H)dopamine and (/sup 3/H)1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP/sup +/) was examined in mouse striatal synaptosomal preparations. Kinetic analysis indicated that ascorbic acid is a noncompetitive inhibitor of (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ uptake. No inhibition of (/sup 3/H)dopamine uptake is observed. The dopamine uptake blockers, GBR-12909, cocaine, and mazindol strongly inhibit (IC/sub 50/ < 1 ..mu..M) both (/sup 3/H)dopamine and (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ transport. Nicotine, its metabolites, and other tobacco alkaloids are weak inhibitors except 4-phenylpyridine and lobeline, which are moderate inhibitors of both (/sup 3/H)dopamine and (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ uptake. These similarities in potencies are in agreement with the suggestion that (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ and (/sup 3/H) are transported by the same carrier. The differences observed in the alteration of dopaminergic transport and mazindol binding by ascorbic acid suggest that ascorbic acid's effects on (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ transport are related to translocation and/or dissociation processes occurring subsequent to the initial binding event.

  3. Graphical, kinetic, and equilibrium analyses of in vivo [123I] beta-CIT binding to dopamine transporters in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Laruelle, M; Wallace, E; Seibyl, J P; Baldwin, R M; Zea-Ponce, Y; Zoghbi, S S; Neumeyer, J L; Charney, D S; Hoffer, P B; Innis, R B

    1994-11-01

    The in vivo kinetics of the dopamine (DA) transporter probe 123I-labeled 2 beta-carboxymethoxy-3 beta-(4-iodophenyl) tropane ([123I] beta-CIT) in striatum was investigated with single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) in five healthy human subjects. The aim of this study was to derive an adequate measure of the DA transporter density that would not be affected by regional cerebral blood flow or peripheral clearance of the tracer. SPECT data were acquired on the day of injection (day 1) from 0 to 7 h and on the following day (day 2) from 19 to 25 h. Arterial sampling on day 1 was used to measure the input function. Graphical, kinetic, and equilibrium analyses were evaluated. Graphical analysis of day 1 data, with the assumption of negligible dissociation of the tracer-receptor complex (k4 = 0), was found to be blood flow-dependent. A three-compartment kinetic analysis of day 1 data were performed using a three (k4 = 0)- and a four (k4 > 0)-parameter model. The three-parameter model estimated the konBmax product at 0.886 +/- 0.087 min-1. The four-parameter model gave a binding potential (BP) of 476 ml g-1, a value consistent with in vitro measurements. The stability of the regional uptake on day 2 allowed direct measurement of the specific to nonspecific equilibrium partition coefficient (V3" = k3/k4 = 6.66 +/- 1.54). Results of day 1 kinetic analysis and day 2 equilibrium analysis were well correlated among subjects. Simulations indicated that the error associated with the day 2 equilibrium analysis was acceptable for plasma tracer terminal half-lives > 10 h. We propose the equilibrium analysis on day 2 as the method of choice for clinical studies since it does not require multiple scans or the measurement of the arterial plasma tracer concentrations.

  4. In vivo activity of modafinil on dopamine transporter measured with positron emission tomography and [¹⁸F]FE-PE2I.

    PubMed

    Kim, WooChan; Tateno, Amane; Arakawa, Ryosuke; Sakayori, Takeshi; Ikeda, Yumiko; Suzuki, Hidenori; Okubo, Yoshiro

    2014-05-01

    Modafinil, a wake-promoting drug used to treat narcolepsy, is a dopamine transporter inhibitor and is said to have very low abuse liability; this, however, is still up for debate. We conducted a dopamine transporter (DAT) occupancy study with modafinil (200 or 300 mg) in ten healthy volunteers using positron emission tomography (PET) with [¹⁸F]FE-PE2I, a new PET radioligand with high affinity and selectivity for the dopamine transporter, to characterize its relation to abuse liability. Mean striatal DAT occupancies were 51.4% at 200 mg and 56.9% at 300 mg. There was a significant correlation between occupancy and plasma concentration, indicating dose dependency of DAT inhibition by modafinil in the striatum, and especially in the nucleus accumbens. This study showed that DAT occupancy by modafinil was close to that of methylphenidate, indicating that modafinil may be near the same level as methylphenidate in relation to abuse liability in terms of dopaminergic transmission.

  5. Spontaneous Inward Opening of the Dopamine Transporter Is Triggered by PIP2-Regulated Dynamics of the N-Terminus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present the dynamic mechanism of concerted motions in a full-length molecular model of the human dopamine transporter (hDAT), a member of the neurotransmitter/sodium symporter (NSS) family, involved in state-to-state transitions underlying function. The findings result from an analysis of unbiased atomistic molecular dynamics simulation trajectories (totaling >14 μs) of the hDAT molecule immersed in lipid membrane environments with or without phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) lipids. The N-terminal region of hDAT (N-term) is shown to have an essential mechanistic role in correlated rearrangements of specific structural motifs relevant to state-to-state transitions in the hDAT. The mechanism involves PIP2-mediated electrostatic interactions between the N-term and the intracellular loops of the transporter molecule. Quantitative analyses of collective motions in the trajectories reveal that these interactions correlate with the inward-opening dynamics of hDAT and are allosterically coupled to the known functional sites of the transporter. The observed large-scale motions are enabled by specific reconfiguration of the network of ionic interactions at the intracellular end of the protein. The isomerization to the inward-facing state in hDAT is accompanied by concomitant movements in the extracellular vestibule and results in the release of an Na+ ion from the Na2 site and destabilization of the substrate dopamine in the primary substrate binding S1 site. The dynamic mechanism emerging from the findings highlights the involvement of the PIP2-regulated interactions between the N-term and the intracellular loop 4 in the functionally relevant conformational transitions that are also similar to those found to underlie state-to-state transitions in the leucine transporter (LeuT), a prototypical bacterial homologue of the NSS. PMID:26255829

  6. Spontaneous inward opening of the dopamine transporter is triggered by PIP2-regulated dynamics of the N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Khelashvili, George; Stanley, Nathaniel; Sahai, Michelle A; Medina, Jaime; LeVine, Michael V; Shi, Lei; De Fabritiis, Gianni; Weinstein, Harel

    2015-11-18

    We present the dynamic mechanism of concerted motions in a full-length molecular model of the human dopamine transporter (hDAT), a member of the neurotransmitter/sodium symporter (NSS) family, involved in state-to-state transitions underlying function. The findings result from an analysis of unbiased atomistic molecular dynamics simulation trajectories (totaling >14 μs) of the hDAT molecule immersed in lipid membrane environments with or without phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) lipids. The N-terminal region of hDAT (N-term) is shown to have an essential mechanistic role in correlated rearrangements of specific structural motifs relevant to state-to-state transitions in the hDAT. The mechanism involves PIP2-mediated electrostatic interactions between the N-term and the intracellular loops of the transporter molecule. Quantitative analyses of collective motions in the trajectories reveal that these interactions correlate with the inward-opening dynamics of hDAT and are allosterically coupled to the known functional sites of the transporter. The observed large-scale motions are enabled by specific reconfiguration of the network of ionic interactions at the intracellular end of the protein. The isomerization to the inward-facing state in hDAT is accompanied by concomitant movements in the extracellular vestibule and results in the release of an Na(+) ion from the Na2 site and destabilization of the substrate dopamine in the primary substrate binding S1 site. The dynamic mechanism emerging from the findings highlights the involvement of the PIP2-regulated interactions between the N-term and the intracellular loop 4 in the functionally relevant conformational transitions that are also similar to those found to underlie state-to-state transitions in the leucine transporter (LeuT), a prototypical bacterial homologue of the NSS.

  7. Changes in dopamine transporter binding in nucleus accumbens following chronic self-administration cocaine: heroin combinations.

    PubMed

    Pattison, Lindsey P; McIntosh, Scot; Sexton, Tammy; Childers, Steven R; Hemby, Scott E

    2014-10-01

    Concurrent use of cocaine and heroin (speedball) has been shown to exert synergistic effects on dopamine neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), as observed by significant increases in extracellular dopamine levels and compensatory elevations in the maximal reuptake rate of dopamine. The present studies were undertaken to determine whether chronic self-administration of cocaine, heroin or a combination of cocaine:heroin led to compensatory changes in the abundance and/or affinity of high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Saturation binding of the cocaine analog [(125) I] 3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2β-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([(125) I]RTI-55) in rat NAc membranes resulted in binding curves that were best fit to two-site binding models, allowing calculation of dissociation constant (Kd ) and binding density (Bmax ) values corresponding to high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Scatchard analysis of the saturation binding curves clearly demonstrate the presence of high- and low- affinity binding sites in the NAc, with low-affinity sites comprising 85 to 94% of the binding sites. DAT binding analyses revealed that self-administration of cocaine and a cocaine:heroin combination increased the affinity of the low-affinity site for the cocaine congener RTI-55 compared to saline. These results indicate that the alterations observed following chronic speedball self-administration are likely due to the cocaine component alone; thus further studies are necessary to elaborate upon the synergistic effect of cocaine:heroin combinations on the dopamine system in the NAc.

  8. Principal Component Analysis of Multimodal Neuromelanin MRI and Dopamine Transporter PET Data Provides a Specific Metric for the Nigral Dopaminergic Neuronal Density

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Shimada, Hitoshi; Kodaka, Fumitoshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Shinotoh, Hitoshi; Hirano, Shigeki; Kershaw, Jeff; Inoue, Yuichi; Nakamura, Masaki; Sasai, Taeko; Kobayashi, Mina; Suhara, Tetsuya; Ito, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) is a major pathophysiological feature of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). As nigral DA neurons contain both neuromelanin (NM) and dopamine transporter (DAT), decreased intensities in both NM-sensitive MRI and DAT PET reflect decreased DA neuronal density. This study demonstrates that a more specific metric for the nigral DA neuronal density can be derived with multimodal MRI and PET. Participants were 11 clinically diagnosed PD patients and 10 age and gender matched healthy controls (HCs). Two quantities, the NM-related index (RNM) and the binding potential of the radiotracer [18F]FE-PE2I to DAT (BPND) in SN, were measured for each subject using MRI and PET, respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to the multimodal data set to estimate principal components. One of the components, PCP, corresponds to a basis vector oriented in a direction where both BPND and RNM increase. The ability of BPND, RNM and PCP to discriminate between HC and PD groups was compared. Correlation analyses between the motor score of the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale and each metric were also performed. PCP, BPND and RNM for PD patients were significantly lower than those for HCs (F = 16.26, P<0.001; F = 6.05, P = 0.008; F = 7.31, P = 0.034, respectively). The differential diagnostic performance between the HC and PD groups as assessed by the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve was best for PCP (0.94, 95% CI: 0.66–1.00). A significant negative correlation was found between the motor severity score and PCp (R = -0.70, P<0.001) and RNM (R = -0.52, P = 0.015), but not for BPND (R = -0.36, P = 0.110). PC