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Sample records for dopamine uptake sites

  1. Invariance of the density of dopamine uptake sites and dopamine metabolism in the rat brain after a chronic treatment with the dopamine uptake inhibitor GBR 12783.

    PubMed

    Boulay, D; Leroux-Nicollet, I; Duterte-Boucher, D; Naudon, L; Costentin, J

    1994-01-01

    A chronic treatment (10 mg/kg, twice daily during 9 days) with the dopamine uptake inhibitor GBR 12783 was performed in rats at a dose increasing their locomotor activity. Forty-eight hours after the last administration, animals were sacrificed and 3H mazindol binding was performed on brain slices. Autoradiographic analysis revealed no change in this binding relatively to control animals in regions with high dopamine contents: striatum, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, substantia nigra and ventral tegmentum area. The treatment did not either modify the levels of dopamine (DA) and metabolites (HVA, DOPAC) both in the striatum and the nucleus accumbens. Thus, early after the end of the treatment, the chronic blockade of the dopamine uptake complex regulates neither the dopamine uptake complex nor the dopamine metabolism.

  2. Dopamine uptake sites in the striatum are distributed differentially in striosome and matrix compartments.

    PubMed Central

    Graybiel, A M; Moratalla, R

    1989-01-01

    A major mechanism of neurotransmitter inactivation at catecholaminergic synapses is reuptake of released transmitter at high-affinity uptake sites on presynaptic terminals. We have analyzed the anatomical distribution of site-selective ligand binding for dopamine uptake sites in the striatum of rat, cat, and monkey. We report here that desipramine-sensitive [3H]mazindol binding sites have highly heterogeneous distributions in the dorsal and the ventral striatum. In the caudate nucleus of cat and monkey, [3H]mazindol binding observes striosomal ordering, being reduced in striosomes and heightened in the extrastriosomal matrix. Some local heterogeneity appears in the ventral caudoputamen of the rat. Different subdivisions of the nucleus accumbens also have different binding levels. These findings suggest that some functional effects of psychoactive drugs, such as cocaine, that bind to the dopamine-uptake complex could be related to the distribution of these specific uptake sites. The findings also raise the possibility that these distributions could result in selective neuronal vulnerability to neurotoxins, such as 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP+), that depend on the dopamine-uptake complex for entry into neurons. Images PMID:2813436

  3. Quantitative autoradiographic distribution of [3H]mazindol-labeled dopamine uptake sites in the brains of superoxide dismutase transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Cadet, J L; Przedborski, S; Kostic, V; Jackson-Lewis, V; Carlson, E; Epstein, C J

    1990-07-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an important enzyme which is involved in the dismutation of the toxic radical, superoxide anion. The activity of CuZnSOD is increased in patients who suffer from Down's Syndrome, Alzheimer's disease, and in Parkinson's disease. In order to evaluate the contribution of this enzyme to the neuropathology of these neurodegenerative diseases, transgenic mice have been constructed which express the human CuZnSOD gene. As a first step towards exploring these issues, we have carried out an autoradiographic binding study of the distribution of the catecholaminergic uptake blocker mazindol in the brain of these transgenic mice and of their littermates. Desmethylimipramine (DMI)-insensitive [3H]mazindol binding sites which correspond to dopamine uptake sites were located in the striatum, the nucleus accumbens, the olfactory tubercle and in the substantia nigra. Within the striatum, there was a lateromedial gradient, with higher concentration of dopamine uptake sites being found laterally. These findings suggest that subregions of the basal ganglia may be more susceptible to the deleterious effects of dopaminotoxic drugs which are taken up into the dopaminergic neurons via these uptake sites. Saturation experiments revealed no differences in the characteristics of [3H]mazindol binding sites between the two groups of mice. Thus, increased activity of SOD is not associated with diffuse changes in the molecular structures of receptors in mice brain.

  4. Dopaminergic activities in the human striatum: rostrocaudal gradients of uptake sites and of D1 and D2 but not of D3 receptor binding or dopamine.

    PubMed

    Piggott, M A; Marshall, E F; Thomas, N; Lloyd, S; Court, J A; Jaros, E; Costa, D; Perry, R H; Perry, E K

    1999-05-01

    The human striatum, which receives dopaminergic innervation from the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area (cell groups A8, A9 and A10), has structural and functional subdivisions both rostrocaudally and dorsoventrally. These relate to motor and non-motor origins of cortical projections and the specific areas of the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area providing dopaminergic innervation. In the present study, we have evaluated the distribution of a number of dopaminergic parameters in the caudate, putamen and nucleus accumbens at separate coronal levels in a post mortem study in a series of elderly normal individuals aged 55-94 years, with analysis of the effect of post mortem variables. Dopamine D1 receptor density displayed a rostrocaudally declining gradient in the putamen but not in the caudate, such that at levels posterior to the anterior commissure, there was significantly lower D1 binding in the putamen compared to the caudate. The density of dopamine D2 receptors was similar in the putamen and caudate, increasing rostrocaudally. The density of dopamine uptake sites exhibited an increasing rostrocaudal gradient in the caudate, especially ventrally, but not in the putamen, where binding was more constant. The dopamine D3 receptor was concentrated in the ventral striatum, particularly the nucleus accumbens, although there was no evidence of a rostrocaudal gradient. With respect to striosome-matrix compartmentalization, there was no complete segregation, although D1 and D3 receptors were concentrated in striosomes, whereas D2 receptors and uptake sites showed higher density in the matrix. Levels of dopamine were similar in the caudate and putamen, and were significantly elevated at levels including the nucleus accumbens and the anterior commissure. Homovanillic acid and the metabolic index (homovanillic acid/dopamine ratio) were significantly higher in the putamen compared to the caudate, especially at levels from and caudal to the anterior

  5. Dopamine Uptake in the Somatic Cell Hybrid NX31

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    AFRRI SR75-21 AUGUST 1975 AFRRI SCIENTIFIC REPORT CM CO DOPAMINE UPTAKE IN THE SOMATIC CELL HYBRID NX31 P. R. Myers W. G. Shaln, Jr...Sciences - National Research Council. AFRRI SR75-21 August 1975 DOPAMINE UPTAKE IN THE SOMATIC CELL HYBRID NX31 P. R. MYERS W. G. SHAIN...Introduction 1 II. Experimental Methods 2 Materials 2 Cell lines 2 Dopamine uptake experiments 3 Metabolism of accumulated dopamine 5

  6. Regulation of Dopamine Uptake by Vasoactive Peptides in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Gironacci, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Considering the key role of renal dopamine in tubular sodium handling, we hypothesized that c-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and Ang-(1-7) may regulate renal dopamine availability in tubular cells, contributing to Na+, K+-ATPase inhibition. Present results show that CNP did not affect either 3H-dopamine uptake in renal tissue or Na+, K+-ATPase activity; meanwhile, Ang-(1-7) was able to increase 3H-dopamine uptake and decreased Na+, K+-ATPase activity in renal cortex. Ang-(1-7) and dopamine together decreased further Na+, K+-ATPase activity showing an additive effect on the sodium pump. In addition, hydrocortisone reversed Ang-(1-7)-dopamine overinhibition on the enzyme, suggesting that this inhibition is closely related to Ang-(1-7) stimulation on renal dopamine uptake. Both anantin and cANP (4-23-amide) did not modify CNP effects on 3H-dopamine uptake by tubular cells. The Mas receptor antagonist, A-779, blocked the increase elicited by Ang-(1-7) on 3H-dopamine uptake. The stimulatory uptake induced by Ang-(1-7) was even more pronounced in the presence of losartan, suggesting an inhibitory effect of Ang-(1-7) on AT1 receptors on 3H-dopamine uptake. By increasing dopamine bioavailability in tubular cells, Ang-(1-7) enhances Na+, K+-ATPase activity inhibition, contributing to its natriuretic and diuretic effects. PMID:27635280

  7. Regulation of Dopamine Uptake by Vasoactive Peptides in the Kidney.

    PubMed

    Rukavina Mikusic, N L; Kouyoumdzian, N M; Rouvier, E; Gironacci, M M; Toblli, J E; Fernández, B E; Choi, M R

    2016-01-01

    Considering the key role of renal dopamine in tubular sodium handling, we hypothesized that c-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and Ang-(1-7) may regulate renal dopamine availability in tubular cells, contributing to Na(+), K(+)-ATPase inhibition. Present results show that CNP did not affect either (3)H-dopamine uptake in renal tissue or Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity; meanwhile, Ang-(1-7) was able to increase (3)H-dopamine uptake and decreased Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity in renal cortex. Ang-(1-7) and dopamine together decreased further Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity showing an additive effect on the sodium pump. In addition, hydrocortisone reversed Ang-(1-7)-dopamine overinhibition on the enzyme, suggesting that this inhibition is closely related to Ang-(1-7) stimulation on renal dopamine uptake. Both anantin and cANP (4-23-amide) did not modify CNP effects on (3)H-dopamine uptake by tubular cells. The Mas receptor antagonist, A-779, blocked the increase elicited by Ang-(1-7) on (3)H-dopamine uptake. The stimulatory uptake induced by Ang-(1-7) was even more pronounced in the presence of losartan, suggesting an inhibitory effect of Ang-(1-7) on AT1 receptors on (3)H-dopamine uptake. By increasing dopamine bioavailability in tubular cells, Ang-(1-7) enhances Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity inhibition, contributing to its natriuretic and diuretic effects.

  8. Dopamine uptake dynamics are preserved under isoflurane anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Brodnik, Zachary D; España, Rodrigo A

    2015-10-08

    Fast scan cyclic voltammetry is commonly used for measuring the kinetics of dopamine release and uptake. For experiments using an anesthetized preparation, urethane is preferentially used because it does not alter dopamine uptake kinetics compared to freely moving animals. Unfortunately, urethane is highly toxic, can induce premature death during experiments, and cannot be used for recovery surgeries. Isoflurane is an alternative anesthetic that is less toxic than urethane, produces a stable level of anesthesia over extended periods, and is often used for recovery surgeries. Despite these benefits, the effects of isoflurane on dopamine release and uptake have not been directly characterized. In the present studies, we assessed the utility of isoflurane for voltammetry experiments by testing dopamine signaling parameters under baseline conditions, after treatment with the dopamine uptake inhibitor cocaine, and after exposure to increasing concentrations of isoflurane. Our results indicate that surgical levels of isoflurane do not significantly alter terminal mechanisms of dopamine release and uptake over prolonged periods of time. Consequently, we propose that isoflurane is an acceptable anesthetic for voltammetry experiments, which in turn permits the design of studies in which dopamine signaling is examined under anesthesia prior to recovery and subsequent experimentation in the same animals.

  9. [C-11]{beta}CNT: A new monoamine uptake ligand for studying serotonin and dopamine transporter sites in the living brain with PET

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, G.K.; Zheng, Q.H.; Zhou, F.C.

    1996-05-01

    There is considerable interest in measuring serotonin (5HT) and dopamine (DA) function in the human brain. Altered levels of 5HT and DA are recognized in drug abuse, neurotoxicities, psychiatric disorders, and neurodegenerative conditions including Alzheimer`s and Parkinson`s disease. Several phenyltropane analogs of cocaine bind tightly to both DA and 5HT uptake proteins. We have made a new agent from this class called {beta}CNT, 2{beta}-carboxymethyl-3{beta}-(2-naphthyl)-tropane, the isosteric O-for-CH{sub 2} analog of a compound reported to have among the highest measured affinities for DA and 5HT transporters and studied its in vivo brain distributions in animals for the first time. Optically pure {beta}CNT was made from cocaine, and labeled at the O-methyl position by esterification of {beta}CNT-acid with [C-11]CH{sub 3}OTfl under conditions similar to Wilson`s. HPLC-purified (99+%) final products (15-50% eob yield from CO{sub 2}, 40 min synth) had specific activities 0.1-1.2 Ci/{mu}mol at the time of injection. Preliminary [C-11]{beta}{beta}CNT rodent distribution showed very high brain uptake (3% ID at 60 min) and localization (striat: fr cort: hypo: cer: blood, 11: 5: 4: 1: 06). {beta}CNT-PET studies in juvenile pigs (5-20 mCi, 20-35 kg) found rapid brain uptake, and prominent retention (85 min) in midbrain, anterior brainstem and striatum, followed by cortex and olfactory bulb. Paroxetine pretreatment (5HT uptake blocker, 2mg/kg), diminished retention in most brain areas; nomifensine (DA/NE uptake blocker, 6 mg/kg) reduced striatum selectively. Direct comparisons of [C-11]{beta}CNT with other PET transporter radioligands {beta}CFT, {beta}CIT, and {beta}CTT (RTI-32) in the same pig found {beta}CNT had highest overall brain uptake among the agents. These initial results suggest {beta}CNT has favorable properties for imaging both 5HT and DA transporters in vivo, and further evaluation of its potential as a human PET agent is warranted.

  10. Increased dopamine uptake in striatal synaptosomes after treatment of rats with amantadine.

    PubMed

    Page, G; Peeters, M; Maloteaux, J M; Hermans, E

    2000-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of short- and long-term treatments with amantadine on the activity of the neuronal dopamine transporter (DAT) in the rat striatum. For this purpose, the [3H]dopamine uptake was measured in striatal synaptosomes prepared from rats treated for 2, 7 and 14 days with amantadine (40 mg/kg; i.p.). After 7 days of treatment, amantadine increased the apparent V(max) by 30% without modification of the apparent K(m) of dopamine uptake whereas no change in these parameters was observed after 2 and 14 days treatment. Binding assays conducted with [3H]GBR-12935 on membranes prepared from animals treated with amantadine revealed no difference in the density and the affinity of striatal DAT binding sites as compared to control. This indicates that the increased dopamine uptake was not reflecting a modification at the level of the DAT expression. The activity of the DAT is regulated by phosphorylation and one may propose that ionotropic glutamate receptors present on presynaptic terminals directly modulate this phosphorylation. An indirect mechanism would involve presynaptic dopamine receptors that control the activity of the DAT in response to the increased dopamine concentration in the synaptic cleft.

  11. Antihistamine effect on synaptosomal uptake of serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, P. A.; Vernikos, J.

    1980-01-01

    A study on the effects of five H1 and H2 antihistamines on the synaptosomal uptake of serotonin (5HT), norepinephrine (NE), and dopamine (DA) is presented. Brain homogenates from female rats were incubated in Krebs-Ringer phosphate buffer solution in the presence of one of three radioactive neurotransmitters, and one of the five antihistamines. Low concentrations of pyrilamine competitively inhibited 5HT uptake, had little effect on NE uptake, and no effect on DA uptake. Promethazine, diphenhydramine, metiamide, and cimetidine had no effect on 5HT or DA uptake at the same concentration. Diphenhydramine had a small inhibitory effect on NE uptake. It is concluded that pyrilamine is a selective and potent competitive inhibitor of 5HT uptake at concentrations between .05 and .5 micromolars.

  12. Atypical Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors that Provide Clues About Cocaine's Mechanism at the Dopamine Transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck Newman, Amy; Katz, Jonathan L.

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) has been a primary target for cocaine abuse/addiction medication discovery. However predicted addiction liability and limited clinical evaluation has provided a formidable challenge for development of these agents for human use. The unique and atypical pharmacological profile of the benztropine (BZT) class of dopamine uptake inhibitors, in preclinical models of cocaine effects and abuse, has encouraged further development of these agents. Moreover, in vivo studies have challenged the original DAT hypothesis and demonstrated that DAT occupancy and subsequent increases in dopamine produced by BZT analogues are significantly delayed and long lasting, as compared to cocaine. These important and distinctive elements are critical to the lack of abuse liability among BZT analogues, and improve their potential for development as treatments for cocaine abuse and possibly other neuropsychiatric disorders.

  13. Alterations in dopamine and serotonin uptake systems in the striatum of the weaver mutant mouse.

    PubMed

    Stotz, E H; Palacios, J M; Landwehrmeyer, B; Norton, J; Ghetti, B; Simon, J R; Triarhou, L C

    1994-01-01

    In the striatum of the homozygous weaver mutant mouse (wv/wv), dopamine content, uptake and tyrosine hydroxylase activity are decreased compared to wild-type (+/+) mice. In mice heterozygous for the weaver gene (wv/+), these dopaminergic parameters exhibit only minor reductions compared to +/+ mice. The wv/wv striatum has recently been shown to have an increase in serotonin content. In the present study, the serotonin uptake system of the weaver striatum was investigated. Synaptosomal uptake of [3H] serotonin was determined in the dorsal portion of wv/wv and +/+ striatum, and serotonin uptake sites were examined by the binding of [3H] citalopram in the striatum of wv/wv, wv/+ and +/+ mice. The dopamine uptake system was also investigated in all three genotypes via the binding of [3H] mazindol. Synaptosomal uptake of [3H] serotonin was increased by 79% in the dorsal portion of the wv/wv striatum compared to that seen in the +/+ striatum. The binding of [3H] citalopram was increased by 62% in the dorsolateral and by 111% in the dorsomedial portions of the wv/wv striatum compared to +/+. [3H] Citalopram binding in the wv/+ striatum was also higher than +/+, but this increase did not reach statistical significance. Within the wv/wv striatum, [3H] mazindol binding was almost completely absent (88-89% reduction) in the dorsal portion and severely reduced in the other striatal areas. These data support the notion that the dorsal portion of the wv/wv striatum, which has the severest reduction in dopamine uptake, is hyperinnervated by serotonin fibers.

  14. Role of Histidine 547 of Human Dopamine Transporter in Molecular Interaction with HIV-1 Tat and Dopamine Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yaxia; Quizon, Pamela M.; Sun, Wei-Lun; Yao, Jianzhuang; Zhu, Jun; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat plays an important role in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) by disrupting neurotransmission including dopamine uptake by human dopamine transporter (hDAT). Previous studies have demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat directly binds to hDAT and some amino-acid mutations that attenuate the hDAT-Tat binding also significantly decreased dopamine uptake activity of hDAT. This combined computational-experimental study demonstrates that histidine-547 (H547) of hDAT plays a crucial role in the hDAT-Tat binding and dopamine uptake by hDAT, and that the H547A mutation can not only considerably attenuate Tat-induced inhibition of dopamine uptake, but also significantly increase the Vmax of hDAT for dopamine uptake. The finding of such an unusual hDAT mutant capable of both increasing the Vmax of hDAT for dopamine uptake and disrupting the hDAT-Tat binding may provide an exciting knowledge basis for development of novel concepts for therapeutic treatment of the HAND. PMID:27250920

  15. Striatal dopamine neurotransmission: regulation of release and uptake

    PubMed Central

    Sulzer, David; Cragg, Stephanie J.; Rice, Margaret E.

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) transmission is governed by processes that regulate release from axonal boutons in the forebrain and the somatodendritic compartment in midbrain, and by clearance by the DA transporter, diffusion, and extracellular metabolism. We review how axonal DA release is regulated by neuronal activity and by autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, and address how quantal release events are regulated in size and frequency. In brain regions densely innervated by DA axons, DA clearance is due predominantly to uptake by the DA transporter, whereas in cortex, midbrain, and other regions with relatively sparse DA inputs, the norepinephrine transporter and diffusion are involved. We discuss the role of DA uptake in restricting the sphere of influence of DA and in temporal accumulation of extracellular DA levels upon successive action potentials. The tonic discharge activity of DA neurons may be translated into a tonic extracellular DA level, whereas their bursting activity can generate discrete extracellular DA transients. PMID:27141430

  16. Effects of cadmium on the uptake of dopamine and norepinephrine in rat brain synaptosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-01

    Cadmium (Cd) a known environmental contaminant is neurotoxic. Kinetics of cadmium inhibition indicate that the metal may compete with ATP and Na/sup +/ sites on Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ ATPase in rat brain synaptosomes. Uptake and release processes of catecholamines into the central nervous system are dependent on membrane bound Na/sup +/-K/sup +/ ATPase. It is suggested that the uptake and release processes of dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) in neurons are energy utilizing and hence are dependent on active ion transport. If the two aforementioned mechanisms are truly interdependent, then any alteration caused by a toxin to either of the above two mechanisms should also cause a parallel change in the other. The purpose of this study was to examine in vitro effects of cadmium chloride on the uptake of DA and NE and the activity of ATPase in the rat brain synaptosome.

  17. Measurement of binding potential of [C11]WIN 35,428 for dopamine re-uptake site in normal human brain: Comparison of graphical and non-linear least-squares analytic method

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoi, F.; Wong, D.F.; Marenco, S.

    1994-05-01

    (C11)WIN 35,428 was evaluated as a specific radioligand for the dopamine re-uptake site in brain by PET scanning. Twenty mCi of [C11]WIN 35,428 was administered IV to 8 normal volunteers (19-81 y.o.). Fifty dynamic PET scan images were acquired with blood sampling, for 90 min after [C11]WIN 35,428 injection. Four different kinetic modeling procedures were used to estimate the binding potential, k3/k4. The k3 and k4 parameters reflect the rate constants for binding to and dissociation from receptors, respectively. The first model is a three-compartment model which is a standard non-linear least-squares analysis with constraint of the k1/k2 ratio. This consists of a plasma, ligand free and a specifically bound compartment. The k1/k2 ratio was estimated with a two-compartment model using plasma and cerebellar data. The other three models are two-compartment models. This consists of a plasma and a brain (cerebellum or striatum) compartment. The second model is a two-compartment graphical method of Gjedde. The distribution volume of [C11]WIN in striatum and cerebellum was plotted as an intercept. The third model approach is the graphical method of Logan, which was a modification of the Gjedde approach. The distribution volume of [C11]WIN in striatum and cerebellum was plotted as a slope. The fourth model consisted of a direct fit a f cerebellum and striatum without plasma input. The mean value and standard deviation of k3/k4 in each model was 4.38 {plus_minus} 0.81, 3.93 {plus_minus} 0.98, 4.15 {plus_minus} 0.83, and 6.90 {plus_minus} 2.19, respectively. There is a significant difference between k3/k4 values of the constraint method and that of the last method. There is no significant difference between the k3/k4 values of the constraint method and the other two methods.

  18. HIV-1 transgenic rats display an increase in [3H]dopamine uptake in the prefrontal cortex and striatum

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun; Yuan, Yaxia; Midde, Narasimha M.; Gomez, Adrian M.; Sun, Wei-Lun; Quizon, Pamela M.; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2017-01-01

    HIV viral proteins within the central nervous system are associated with the development of neurocognitive impairments in HIV-infected individuals. Dopamine transporter (DAT)-mediated dopamine transport is critical for normal dopamine homeostasis. Abnormal dopaminergic transmission has been implicated as a risk determinant of HIV-induced neurocognitive impairments. Our published work has demonstrated that Tat-induced inhibition of DAT is mediated by allosteric binding site(s) on DAT, not the interaction with the dopamine uptake site. The present study investigated whether impaired DAT function induced by Tat exposure in vitro can be documented in HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg) rats. We assessed kinetic analyses of [3H]dopamine uptake into prefrontal and striatal synaptosomes of HIV-1Tg and Fisher 344 rats. Compared with Fisher 344 rats, the capacity of dopamine transport in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatum of HIV-1Tg rats was increased by 34% and 32%, respectively. Assessment of surface biotinylation indicated that DAT expression in the plasma membrane was reduced in PFC and enhanced in striatum, respectively, of HIV-1Tg rats. While the maximal binding sites (Bmax) of [3H]WIN 35,428 was decreased in striatum of HIV-1Tg rats, an increase in DAT turnover proportion was found, relative to Fisher 344 rats. Together, these findings suggest that neuroadaptive changes in DAT function are evidenced in the HIV-1Tg rats, perhaps compensating for viral protein-induced abnormal dopaminergic transmission. Thus, our study provides novel insights into understanding mechanism underlying neurocognitive impairment evident in neuroAIDS. PMID:26501780

  19. Fluoxetine at anorectic doses does not have properties of a dopamine uptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fuller, R W; Hemrick-Luecke, S K; Snoddy, H D

    1994-01-01

    Although fluoxetine is a highly selective inhibitor of serotonin uptake in vitro and in vivo, some investigators have suggested that dopamine uptake inhibition may contribute to anorectic actions of fluoxetine. The present experiments were done to determine fluoxetine's effects in some animal protocols in which dopamine uptake inhibitors have characteristic actions. Mazindol prevented the depletion of striatal dopamine and its metabolites by amphetamine in iprindole-pretreated rats, but fluoxetine had no effect. Mazindol prevented the depletion of striatal dopamine and its metabolites by 6-hydroxydopamine injected intracerebroventricularly into rats, but fluoxetine had no effect. Mazindol enhanced the elevation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid concentration in rat brain after spiperone injection, but fluoxetine did not cause that effect. Fluoxetine did not mimic amfonelic acid in antagonizing the retention of alpha-methyl-m-tyramine invant striatum after the injection of alpha-methyl-m-tyrosine. These results show that fluoxetine, at doses that are effective in blocking the serotonin uptake carrier and causing anorexia, does not block the dopamine uptake carrier.

  20. Impaired Brain Dopamine and Serotonin Release and Uptake in Wistar Rats Following Treatment with Carboplatin.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Sam V; Limbocker, Ryan A; Gehringer, Rachel C; Divis, Jenny L; Osterhaus, Gregory L; Newby, Maxwell D; Sofis, Michael J; Jarmolowicz, David P; Newman, Brooke D; Mathews, Tiffany A; Johnson, Michael A

    2016-06-15

    Chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment, known also as "chemobrain", is a medical complication of cancer treatment that is characterized by a general decline in cognition affecting visual and verbal memory, attention, complex problem solving skills, and motor function. It is estimated that one-third of patients who undergo chemotherapy treatment will experience cognitive impairment. Alterations in the release and uptake of dopamine and serotonin, central nervous system neurotransmitters that play important roles in cognition, could potentially contribute to impaired intellectual performance in those impacted by chemobrain. To investigate how chemotherapy treatment affects these systems, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at carbon-fiber microelectrodes was used to measure dopamine and serotonin release and uptake in coronal brain slices containing the striatum and dorsal raphe nucleus, respectively. Measurements were taken from rats treated weekly with selected doses of carboplatin and from control rats treated with saline. Modeling the stimulated dopamine release plots revealed an impairment of dopamine release per stimulus pulse (80% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 58% at 20 mg/kg) after 4 weeks of carboplatin treatment. Moreover, Vmax, the maximum uptake rate of dopamine, was also decreased (55% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 57% at 20 mg/kg). Nevertheless, overall dopamine content, measured in striatal brain lysates by high performance liquid chromatography, and reserve pool dopamine, measured by FSCV after pharmacological manipulation, did not significantly change, suggesting that chemotherapy treatment selectively impairs the dopamine release and uptake processes. Similarly, serotonin release upon electrical stimulation was impaired (45% of saline control at 20 mg/kg). Measurements of spatial learning discrimination were taken throughout the treatment period and carboplatin was found to alter cognition. These studies support the need for additional

  1. Impaired Brain Dopamine and Serotonin Release and Uptake in Wistar Rats Following Treatment with Carboplatin

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment, known also as “chemobrain”, is a medical complication of cancer treatment that is characterized by a general decline in cognition affecting visual and verbal memory, attention, complex problem solving skills, and motor function. It is estimated that one-third of patients who undergo chemotherapy treatment will experience cognitive impairment. Alterations in the release and uptake of dopamine and serotonin, central nervous system neurotransmitters that play important roles in cognition, could potentially contribute to impaired intellectual performance in those impacted by chemobrain. To investigate how chemotherapy treatment affects these systems, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at carbon-fiber microelectrodes was used to measure dopamine and serotonin release and uptake in coronal brain slices containing the striatum and dorsal raphe nucleus, respectively. Measurements were taken from rats treated weekly with selected doses of carboplatin and from control rats treated with saline. Modeling the stimulated dopamine release plots revealed an impairment of dopamine release per stimulus pulse (80% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 58% at 20 mg/kg) after 4 weeks of carboplatin treatment. Moreover, Vmax, the maximum uptake rate of dopamine, was also decreased (55% of saline control at 5 mg/kg and 57% at 20 mg/kg). Nevertheless, overall dopamine content, measured in striatal brain lysates by high performance liquid chromatography, and reserve pool dopamine, measured by FSCV after pharmacological manipulation, did not significantly change, suggesting that chemotherapy treatment selectively impairs the dopamine release and uptake processes. Similarly, serotonin release upon electrical stimulation was impaired (45% of saline control at 20 mg/kg). Measurements of spatial learning discrimination were taken throughout the treatment period and carboplatin was found to alter cognition. These studies support the need for additional

  2. Prolonged treatment with pramipexole promotes physical interaction of striatal dopamine D3 autoreceptors with dopamine transporters to reduce dopamine uptake.

    PubMed

    Castro-Hernández, Javier; Afonso-Oramas, Domingo; Cruz-Muros, Ignacio; Salas-Hernández, Josmar; Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Moratalla, Rosario; Millan, Mark J; González-Hernández, Tomás

    2015-02-01

    The dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT), a membrane glycoprotein expressed in dopaminergic neurons, clears DA from extracellular space and is regulated by diverse presynaptic proteins like protein kinases, α-synuclein, D2 and D3 autoreceptors. DAT dysfunction is implicated in Parkinson's disease and depression, which are therapeutically treated by dopaminergic D2/D3 receptor (D2/D3R) agonists. It is, then, important to improve our understanding of interactions between D3R and DAT. We show that prolonged administration of pramipexole (0.1mg/kg/day, 6 to 21 days), a preferential D3R agonist, leads to a decrease in DA uptake in mouse striatum that reflects a reduction in DAT affinity for DA in the absence of any change in DAT density or subcellular distribution. The effect of pramipexole was absent in mice with genetically-deleted D3R (D3R(-/-)), yet unaffected in mice genetically deprived of D2R (D2R(-/-)). Pramipexole treatment induced a physical interaction between D3R and DAT, as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation and in situ proximity ligation assay. Furthermore, it promoted the formation of DAT dimers and DAT association with both D2R and α-synuclein, effects that were abolished in D3R(-/-) mice, yet unaffected in D2R(-/-) mice, indicating dependence upon D3R. Collectively, these data suggest that prolonged treatment with dopaminergic D3 agonists provokes a reduction in DA reuptake by dopaminergic neurons related to a hitherto-unsuspected modification of the DAT interactome. These observations provide novel insights into the long-term antiparkinson, antidepressant and additional clinical actions of pramipexole and other D3R agonists.

  3. Studies, using in vivo microdialysis, on the effect of the dopamine uptake inhibitor GBR 12909 on 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine ('ecstasy')-induced dopamine release and free radical formation in the mouse striatum.

    PubMed

    Camarero, Jorge; Sanchez, Veronica; O'Shea, Esther; Green, A Richard; Colado, M Isabel

    2002-06-01

    The present study examined the mechanisms by which 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) produces long-term neurotoxicity of striatal dopamine neurones in mice and the protective action of the dopamine uptake inhibitor GBR 12909. MDMA (30 mg/kg, i.p.), given three times at 3-h intervals, produced a rapid increase in striatal dopamine release measured by in vivo microdialysis (maximum increase to 380 +/- 64% of baseline). This increase was enhanced to 576 +/- 109% of baseline by GBR 12909 (10 mg/kg, i.p.) administered 30 min before each dose of MDMA, supporting the contention that MDMA enters the terminal by diffusion and not via the dopamine uptake site. This, in addition to the fact that perfusion of the probe with a low Ca(2+) medium inhibited the MDMA-induced increase in extracellular dopamine, indicates that the neurotransmitter may be released by a Ca(2+) -dependent mechanism not related to the dopamine transporter. MDMA (30 mg/kg x 3) increased the formation of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA) from salicylic acid perfused through a probe implanted in the striatum, indicating that MDMA increased free radical formation. GBR 12909 pre-treatment attenuated the MDMA-induced increase in 2,3-DHBA formation by approximately 50%, but had no significant intrinsic radical trapping activity. MDMA administration increased lipid peroxidation in striatal synaptosomes, an effect reduced by approximately 60% by GBR 12909 pre-treatment. GBR 12909 did not modify the MDMA-induced changes in body temperature. These data suggest that MDMA-induced toxicity of dopamine neurones in mice results from free radical formation which in turn induces an oxidative stress process. The data also indicate that the free radical formation is probably not associated with the MDMA-induced dopamine release and that MDMA does not induce dopamine release via an action at the dopamine transporter.

  4. Interaction between diffusion and Michaelis-Menten uptake of dopamine after iontophoresis in striatum.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, C

    1995-01-01

    A quantitative description of the behavior of a neurotransmitter in the brain extracellular microenvironment requires an understanding of the relative importance of diffusion versus uptake processes. This paper models the behavior of dopamine released from a small iontophoresis electrode and its voltammetric detection by a carbon fiber sensor 100 microns away as a basis for developing a new paradigm for measuring dopamine kinetics in intact rat neostriatum. The diffusion equation incorporating uptake, characterized by a maximum velocity Vmax and a Michaelis-Menten constant Km, was transformed to an integral equation and solved numerically for the dopamine concentration, C. Analytical solutions were derived for limiting cases of a steady-state free-boundary problem when C >> Km and the linear time-dependent problem when C << Km. These solutions were compared with complete numerical solutions, both for normal uptake (Vmax = 0.2 or 0.8 microM s-1; Km = 0.15 microM), and in the presence of the uptake blocker nomifensine (Km = 6 microM). The results suggest that an experimental strategy for the quantitative analysis of dopamine, and other compounds, in living tissue is to fit a family of concentration versus time curves generated with different iontophoretic current strengths and recorded with a microsensor, to the numerical solution of the diffusion-uptake equation. PMID:7612814

  5. Uptake of taurine, GABA, 5-HT, and dopamine by blood platelets in progressive myoclonus epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Airaksinen, E M

    1979-10-01

    The uptakes of four neurotransmitters (taurine, GABA, 5-HT, and dopamine) by blood platelets from patients with degenerative-type progressive myoclonus epilepsy (PME) and from controls were studied using different incubation times and different concentrations. Only the uptakes of taurine differed significantly between patients and controls: patients' uptakes were 70% to 80% of control values at 10, 30, 60, and 120 min of incubation time. Km values were approximately the same, but Vmax values in PME patients were lower, showing quantitative but not qualitative differences in taurine uptake by platelets in PME. These results suggest that a defect or an inhibitory mechanism of some factor needed in the transport or binding of taurine (but not of GABA, 5-HT, and dopamine) is present in PME.

  6. Dopamine transport sites selectively labeled by a novel photoaffinity probe: 125I-DEEP

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriadis, D.E.; Wilson, A.A.; Lew, R.; Sharkey, J.S.; Kuhar, M.J. )

    1989-08-01

    The dopamine transporter was labeled using a photosensitive compound related to GBR-12909, {sup 125}I-1-(2-(diphenylmethoxy)ethyl)-4-(2- (4-azido-3-iodophenyl)ethyl)piperazine ({sup 125}I-DEEP). {sup 125}I-DEEP bound reversibly and with high affinity to the dopamine transport protein in the absence of light and could be covalently attached to the protein following exposure to UV light. In rat striatal homogenates, {sup 125}I-DEEP was found to incorporate covalently into a protein with apparent molecular weight of 58,000 Da. The properties of this binding protein were characteristic of the dopamine transporter since covalent attachment could be inhibited by dopamine-uptake blockers with the proper pharmacological rank order of potencies. Covalent binding was also inhibited in a stereospecific manner by (+) and (-) cocaine, as well as other cocaine analogs. The protein was not found in the cerebellum. The dopamine transporter appears to exist in a glycosylated form since photoaffinity-labeled transport sites could adsorb to wheat germ-agglutinin and could be specifically eluted from the column by beta-N-acetylglucosamine.

  7. Social Isolation Rearing Increases Dopamine Uptake and Psychostimulant Potency in the Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Yorgason, Jordan T.; Calipari, Erin S.; Ferris, Mark J.; Karkhanis, Annushree N.; Fordahl, Steven C.; Weiner, Jeffrey L.; Jones, Sara R.

    2015-01-01

    Social isolation rearing (SI) is a model of early life stress that results in neurobiological alterations leading to increased anxiety-like behaviors. These animals also exhibit an increased propensity to administer psychostimulants, such as cocaine; however, the mechanisms governing this increased addiction vulnerability remains to be elucidated. Long-term stressors have been shown to produce important alterations in nucleus accumbens core (NAc) function. The NAc regulates motivated and goal-directed behaviors, and individual differences in NAc function have been shown to be predictive of addiction vulnerability. Rats were reared in group (GH; 4/cage) or SI (1/cage) conditions from weaning (PD 28) into early adulthood (PD 77) and dopamine release was assessed using voltammetry in brain slices containing the NAc and dorsomedial striatum. SI rats exhibited enhanced dopamine release and uptake in both regions compared to GH rats. In regard to psychostimulant effects directly at the dopamine transporter (DAT), methylphenidate and amphetamine, but not cocaine, inhibited uptake more in SI than GH rats. The increased potencies were positively correlated with uptake rates, suggesting that increased potencies of amphetamine-like compounds are due to changes in DAT function. Cocaine’s effects on uptake were similar between rearing conditions, however, cocaine enhanced evoked dopamine release greater in SI than GH rats, suggesting that the enhanced cocaine reinforcement in SI animals involves a DAT independent mechanism. Together, the results provide the first evidence that greater psychostimulant effects in SI compared to GH rats are due to effects on dopamine terminals related to uptake dependent and independent mechanisms. PMID:26525189

  8. Social isolation rearing increases dopamine uptake and psychostimulant potency in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Yorgason, Jordan T; Calipari, Erin S; Ferris, Mark J; Karkhanis, Anushree N; Fordahl, Steven C; Weiner, Jeffrey L; Jones, Sara R

    2016-02-01

    Social isolation rearing (SI) is a model of early life stress that results in neurobiological alterations leading to increased anxiety-like behaviors. These animals also exhibit an increased propensity to administer psychostimulants, such as cocaine; however, the mechanisms governing this increased addiction vulnerability remain to be elucidated. Long-term stressors have been shown to produce important alterations in nucleus accumbens core (NAc) function. The NAc regulates motivated and goal-directed behaviors, and individual differences in NAc function have been shown to be predictive of addiction vulnerability. Rats were reared in group (GH; 4/cage) or SI (1/cage) conditions from weaning (PD 28) into early adulthood (PD 77) and dopamine release was assessed using voltammetry in brain slices containing the NAc and dorsomedial striatum. SI rats exhibited enhanced dopamine release and uptake in both regions compared to GH rats. In regard to psychostimulant effects directly at the dopamine transporter (DAT), methylphenidate and amphetamine, but not cocaine, inhibited uptake more in SI than GH rats. The increased potencies were positively correlated with uptake rates, suggesting that increased potencies of amphetamine-like compounds are due to changes in DAT function. Cocaine's effects on uptake were similar between rearing conditions, however, cocaine enhanced evoked dopamine release greater in SI than GH rats, suggesting that the enhanced cocaine reinforcement in SI animals involves a DAT independent mechanism. Together, the results provide the first evidence that greater psychostimulant effects in SI compared to GH rats are due to effects on dopamine terminals related to uptake dependent and independent mechanisms.

  9. Correlation between (/sup 3/H)dopamine specific uptake and (/sup 3/H)GBR 12783 specific binding during the maturation of rat striatum

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnet, J.J.; Costentin, J.

    1989-01-01

    The development of the specific uptake of dopamine in the rat striatum during the early postnatal period is compared with the ontogenetic changes of the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)GBR 12783 to the site of uptake inhibition. During maturation, the increase in the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)GBR 12783 parallels the increase in the specific uptake of dopamine. (/sup 3/H)GBR 12783 specific binding sites increase in number from day 1 postpartum until 40 days, when they reach the adult level. In 40 day-old rats, the weight of the striatum represents 80% of adult values. The affinity of (/sup 3/H)GBR 12783 for the inhibition site is similar in membrane preparations obtained from 6 day-old pups and adults; this results in a same ability of the inhibitor to block the specific uptake of dopamine into synaptosomes obtained from pups or adult rats. These data support the hypothesis of the existence of a single molecular entity including both the inhibition site and the carrier itself.

  10. Effect of the inhibition of dopamine uptake on the dopamine- and dimethyldopamine-induced-inhibition of the potassium-evoked release of [3H]acetylcholine from striatal slices.

    PubMed

    Farooqui, T; Wallace, R A; Miller, D D; Uretsky, N J

    1989-01-01

    1. Dimethyldopamine was eight times more potent than dopamine in activating the D2 receptor that inhibits the potassium-evoked release of [3H]acetylcholine from striatal slices. 2. Cocaine and mazindol produced an eight-fold shift in the concentration-response curve for dopamine, but not for dimethyldopamine. 3. The IC50 of dimethyldopamine for the inhibition of [3H]dopamine uptake was thirty times greater than that for dopamine. 4. Dopamine may be less potent than dimethyldopamine at the D2 receptor because dopamine has a higher affinity for the dopamine uptake system, resulting in its rapid removal from the vicinity of the receptor.

  11. Voltammetric characterization of the effect of monoamine uptake inhibitors and releasers on dopamine and serotonin uptake in mouse caudate-putamen and substantia nigra slices

    PubMed Central

    John, Carrie E.; Jones, Sara R.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Fast scan cyclic voltammetry is an electrochemical technique used to measure dynamics of transporter-mediated monoamine uptake in real time and provides a tool to evaluate the detailed effects of monoamine uptake inhibitors and releasers on dopamine and serotonin transporter function. We measured the effects of cocaine, methylphenidate, 2β-propanoyl–3β-(4tolyl) tropane (PTT), fluoxetine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), phentermine and fenfluramine on dopamine and serotonin uptake following electrically stimulated release in mouse caudate-putamen and substantia nigra pars reticulata slices. We determined rank orders of uptake inhibition effects based on two variables; increases in apparent Km for dopamine and serotonin uptake and inhibition constant (Ki) values. For example, the rank order of uptake inhibition based on apparent Km values at the dopamine transporter was amphetamine ≥ PTT ≥ methylphenidate ≫ methamphetamine = phentermine = MDMA > cocaine ≫ fluoxetine = fenfluramine, and at the serotonin transporter was fluoxetine = methamphetamine = fenfluramine = MDMA > amphetamine = cocaine = PTT ≥ methylphenidate > phentermine. Additionally, changes in electrically stimulated release were documented. This is the first study using voltammetry to measure the effects of a wide range of monoamine uptake inhibitors and releasers on dopamine and serotonin uptake in mouse brain slices. These studies also highlight methodological considerations for comparison of effects between heterogeneous brain regions. PMID:17459426

  12. Impact of disruption of secondary binding site S2 on dopamine transporter function.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Juan; Reith, Maarten E A

    2016-09-01

    The structures of the leucine transporter, drosophila dopamine transporter, and human serotonin transporter show a secondary binding site (designated S2 ) for drugs and substrate in the extracellular vestibule toward the membrane exterior in relation to the primary substrate recognition site (S1 ). The present experiments are aimed at disrupting S2 by mutating Asp476 and Ile159 to Ala. Both mutants displayed a profound decrease in [(3) H]DA uptake compared with wild-type associated with a reduced turnover rate kcat . This was not caused by a conformational bias as the mutants responded to Zn(2+) (10 μM) similarly as WT. The dopamine transporters with either the D476A or I159A mutation both displayed a higher Ki for dopamine for the inhibition of [3H](-)-2-β-carbomethoxy-3-β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane binding than did the WT transporter, in accordance with an allosteric interaction between the S1 and S2 sites. The results provide evidence in favor of a general applicability of the two-site allosteric model of the Javitch/Weinstein group from LeuT to dopamine transporter and possibly other monoamine transporters. X-ray structures of transporters closely related to the dopamine (DA) transporter show a secondary binding site S2 in the extracellular vestibule proximal to the primary binding site S1 which is closely linked to one of the Na(+) binding sites. This work examines the relationship between S2 and S1 sites. We found that S2 site impairment severely reduced DA transport and allosterically reduced S1 site affinity for the cocaine analog [(3) H]CFT. Our results are the first to lend direct support for the application of the two-site allosteric model, advanced for bacterial LeuT, to the human DA transporter. The model states that, after binding of the first DA molecule (DA1 ) to the primary S1 site (along with Na(+) ), binding of a second DA (DA2 ) to the S2 site triggers, through an allosteric interaction, the release of DA1 and Na(+) into the cytoplasm.

  13. The Design, Synthesis and Structure-Activity Relationship of Mixed Serotonin, Norepinephrine and Dopamine Uptake Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhengming; Yang, Ji; Skolnick, Phil

    The evolution of antidepressants over the past four decades has involved the replacement of drugs with a multiplicity of effects (e.g., TCAs) by those with selective actions (i.e., SSRIs). This strategy was employed to reduce the adverse effects of TCAs, largely by eliminating interactions with certain neurotransmitters or receptors. Although these more selective compounds may be better tolerated by patients, selective drugs, specifically SSRIs, are not superior to older drugs in treating depressed patients as measured by response and remission rates. It may be an advantage to increase synaptic levels of both serotonin and norepinephrine, as in the case of dual uptake inhibitors like duloxetine and venlafaxine. An important recent development has been the emergence of the triple-uptake inhibitors (TUIs/SNDRIs), which inhibit the uptake of the three neurotransmitters most closely linked to depression: serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine. Preclinical studies and clinical trials indicate that a drug inhibiting the reuptake of all three of these neurotransmitters could produce more rapid onset of action and greater efficacy than traditional antidepressants. This review will detail the medicinal chemistry involved in the design, synthesis and discovery of mixed serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine transporter uptake inhibitors.

  14. Uptake inhibitors but not substrates induce protease resistance in extracellular loop two of the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Gaffaney, Jon D; Vaughan, Roxanne A

    2004-03-01

    Changes in protease sensitivity of extracellular loop two (EL2) of the dopamine transporter (DAT) during inhibitor and substrate binding were examined using trypsin proteolysis and epitope-specific immunoblotting. In control rat striatal membranes, proteolysis of DAT in a restricted region of EL2 was produced by 0.001 to 10 microg/ml trypsin. However, in the presence of the dopamine uptake blockers [2-(diphenylmethoxyl) ethyl]-4-(3phenylpropyl) piperazine (GBR 12909), mazindol, 2beta-carbomethoxy-3beta-(4-flourophenyl)tropane (beta-CFT), nomifensine, benztropine, or (-)-cocaine, 100- to 1000-fold higher concentrations of trypsin were required to produce comparable levels of proteolysis. Protease resistance induced by ligands was correlated with their affinity for DAT binding, was not observed with Zn2+, (+)-cocaine, or inhibitors of norepinephrine or serotonin transporters, and was not caused by altered catalytic activity of trypsin. Together, these results support the hypothesis that the interaction of uptake inhibitors with DAT induces a protease-resistant conformation in EL2. In contrast, binding of substrates did not induce protease resistance in EL2, suggesting that substrates and inhibitors interact with DAT differently during binding. To assess the effects of EL2 proteolysis on DAT function, the binding and transport properties of trypsin-digested DAT were assayed with [3H]CFT and [3H]dopamine. Digestion decreased the Bmax for binding and the Vmax for uptake in amounts that were proportional to the extent of proteolysis, indicating that the structural integrity of EL2 is required for maintenance of both DAT binding and transport functions. Together this data provides novel information about inhibitor and substrate interactions at EL2, possibly relating the protease resistant DAT conformation to a mechanism of transport inhibition.

  15. Characterization of the dopamine transporter gene expression and binding sites in cultured human amniotic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Elwan, Mohamed A; Ishii, Takashi; Sakuragawa, Norio

    2003-05-15

    In this study we sought to investigate whether the dopamine transporter, DAT, and its binding sites are expressed in the human amniotic epithelial cells (HAEC) using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and radioligand binding studies, respectively. The RT-PCR findings showed that HAEC expressed DAT mRNA with 100% homology to the human brain DAT. Saturation binding studies using [3H]mazindol showed a high affinity DAT binding site with K(D) and B(max) values of 12.32+/-1.67 nM and 82.7+/-9.74 fmol/mg protein, respectively. Competition experiments showed that selective DAT blockers are potent displacers of [3H]mazindol binding. The rank order of potency of the competing drugs is consistent with the pharmacology of the DAT. The present results provide compelling evidence that HAEC natively express the DAT mRNA and binding sites. More importantly, these results may suggest that HAEC is an appropriate human cell model for studying dopamine release and uptake processes and potential ligands at these sites.

  16. ( sup 3 H)Dopamine uptake by platelet storage granules in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Rabey, J.M.; Graff, E.; Oberman, Z. ); Lerner, A.; Sigal, M. )

    1992-01-01

    ({sup 3}H)Dopamine (DA) uptake by platelet storage granules was determined in 26 schizophrenic male patients, paranoid type (14 acute stage; 12 in remission) and 20 age-matched, normal controls. maximum velocity (Vmax) of DA uptake was significantly higher in acute patients, than patients in remission or controls (p>0.05). The apparent Michaelis constant (kM) of DA uptake in acute patients was also significantly different from chronic patients a substantial diminution of DA uptake, while haloperidol produced a substantial diminution of DA uptake, while haloperidol (10{sup {minus}4}, 10{sup {minus}5} M) did not affect the assay. Considering that a DA disequilibrium in schizophrenia may be expressed not only in the brain, but also in the periphery and that an increased amount of DA accumulated in the vesicles, implies that an increased quantity of catecholamine is available for release, our findings suggest additional evidence for the role of DA overactivity in the pathophysiology of this disorder.

  17. Examining the complex regulation and drug-induced plasticity of dopamine release and uptake using voltammetry in brain slices.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Mark J; Calipari, Erin S; Yorgason, Jordan T; Jones, Sara R

    2013-05-15

    Fast scan cyclic voltammetry in brain slices (slice voltammetry) has been used over the last several decades to increase substantially our understanding of the complex local regulation of dopamine release and uptake in the striatum. This technique is routinely used for the study of changes that occur in the dopamine system associated with various disease states and pharmacological treatments, and to study mechanisms of local circuitry regulation of dopamine terminal function. In the context of this Review, we compare the relative advantages of voltammetry using striatal slice preparations versus in vivo preparations, and highlight recent advances in our understanding of dopamine release and uptake in the striatum specifically from studies that use slice voltammetry in drug-naïve animals and animals with a history of psychostimulant self-administration.

  18. Midbrain dopamine neurons sustain inhibitory transmission using plasma membrane uptake of GABA, not synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tritsch, Nicolas X; Oh, Won-Jong; Gu, Chenghua; Sabatini, Bernardo L

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic transmission between midbrain dopamine neurons and target neurons in the striatum is essential for the selection and reinforcement of movements. Recent evidence indicates that nigrostriatal dopamine neurons inhibit striatal projection neurons by releasing a neurotransmitter that activates GABAA receptors. Here, we demonstrate that this phenomenon extends to mesolimbic afferents, and confirm that the released neurotransmitter is GABA. However, the GABA synthetic enzymes GAD65 and GAD67 are not detected in midbrain dopamine neurons. Instead, these cells express the membrane GABA transporters mGAT1 (Slc6a1) and mGAT4 (Slc6a11) and inhibition of these transporters prevents GABA co-release. These findings therefore indicate that GABA co-release is a general feature of midbrain dopaminergic neurons that relies on GABA uptake from the extracellular milieu as opposed to de novo synthesis. This atypical mechanism may confer dopaminergic neurons the flexibility to differentially control GABAergic transmission in a target-dependent manner across their extensive axonal arbors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01936.001 PMID:24843012

  19. In vivo brain dopaminergic receptor site mapping using /sup 75/Se-labeled pergolide analogs: the effects of various dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, A.

    1986-01-01

    Perogolide mesylate is a new synthetic ergoline derivative which is reported to possess agonistic activity at central dopamine receptor sites in the brain. The authors have synthesized a (/sup 75/Se)-radiolabeled pergolide mesylate derivative, (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate, which, after i.v. administration to mature male rats, showed a time course differentiation in the uptake of this radiolabeled compound in isolated peripheral and central (brain) tissues that are known to be rich in dopamine receptor sites. Further studies were conducted in which the animals were preexposed to the dopamine receptor agonist SKF-38393, as well as the dopamine receptor antagonists (+)-butaclamol, (-)-butaclamol, (+/-)-butaclamol and (-)-chloroethylnorapomorphine, to substantiate the specific peripheral and central localization patterns of (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate. Further investigations were also conducted in which the animals received an i.v. administration of N-isopropyl-l-123-p-iodoamphetamine ((/sup 123/I)-iodoamphetamine). However, (/sup 123/I)-iodoamphetamine did not demonstrate a specific affinity for any type of receptor site in the brain. These investigations further substantiated the fact that (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate does cross the blood-brain barrier is quickly localized at specific dopamine receptor sites in the intact rat brain and that this localization pattern can be affected by preexposure to different dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists. Therefore, these investigations provided further evidence that (/sup 75/Se)-pergolide tartrate and other radiolabeled ergoline analogs might be useful as brain dopamine receptor localization radiopharmaceuticals.

  20. Histamine H3 receptor activation inhibits dopamine synthesis but not release or uptake in rat nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Aquino-Miranda, Guillermo; Escamilla-Sánchez, Juan; González-Pantoja, Raúl; Bueno-Nava, Antonio; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio

    2016-07-01

    We studied the effect of activating histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) on rat nucleus accumbens (rNAcc) dopaminergic transmission by analyzing [(3)H]-dopamine uptake by synaptosomes, and dopamine synthesis and depolarization-evoked [(3)H]-dopamine release in slices. The uptake of [(3)H]-dopamine by rNAcc synaptosomes was not affected by the H3R agonist RAMH (10(-10)-10(-6) M). In rNAcc slices perfusion with RAMH (1 μM) had no significant effect on [(3)H]-dopamine release evoked by depolarization with 30 mM K(+) (91.4 ± 4.5% of controls). The blockade of dopamine D2 autoreceptors with sulpiride (1 μM) enhanced K(+)-evoked [(3)H]-dopamine release (168.8 ± 15.5% of controls), but under this condition RAMH (1 μM) also failed to affect [(3)H]-dopamine release. Dopamine synthesis was evaluated in rNAcc slices incubated with the l-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) decarboxylase inhibitor NSD-1015 (1 mM). Forskolin-induced DOPA accumulation (220.1 ± 10.4% of controls) was significantly reduced by RAMH (41.1 ± 6.5% and 43.5 ± 9.1% inhibition at 100 nM and 1 μM, respectively), and this effect was prevented by the H3R antagonist ciproxifan (10 μM). DOPA accumulation induced by preventing cAMP degradation with IBMX (iso-butyl-methylxantine, 1 mM) or by activating receptors for the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)/pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) with PACAP-27 (1 μM) was reduced (IBMX) or prevented (PACAP-27) by RAMH (100 nM). In contrast, DOPA accumulation induced by 8-Bromo-cAMP (1 mM) was not affected by RAMH (100 nM). These results indicate that in rNAcc H3Rs do not modulate dopamine uptake or release, but regulate dopamine synthesis by inhibiting cAMP formation and thus PKA activation. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'.

  1. Measuring the serotonin uptake site using (/sup 3/H)paroxetine--a new serotonin uptake inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gleiter, C.H.; Nutt, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that may be involved in ethanol preference and dependence. It is possible to label the serotonin uptake site in brain using the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine, but this also binds to other sites. We have used the new high-affinity uptake blocker paroxetine to define binding to this site and report it to have advantages over imipramine as a ligand.

  2. Single exposure to cocaine impairs aspartate uptake in the pre-frontal cortex via dopamine D1-receptor dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sathler, Matheus Figueiredo; Stutz, Bernardo; Martins, Robertta Silva; Dos Santos Pereira, Maurício; Pecinalli, Ney Roner; Santos, Luis E; Taveira-da-Silva, Rosilane; Lowe, Jennifer; de Freitas, Isis Grigorio; de Melo Reis, Ricardo Augusto; Manhães, Alex C; Kubrusly, Regina C C

    2016-08-04

    Dopamine and glutamate play critical roles in the reinforcing effects of cocaine. We demonstrated that a single intraperitoneal administration of cocaine induces a significant decrease in [(3)H]-d-aspartate uptake in the pre-frontal cortex (PFC). This decrease is associated with elevated dopamine levels, and requires dopamine D1-receptor signaling (D1R) and adenylyl cyclase activation. The effect was observed within 10min of cocaine administration and lasted for up to 30min. This rapid response is related to D1R-mediated cAMP-mediated activation of PKA and phosphorylation of the excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT1, EAAT2 and EAAT3. We also demonstrated that cocaine exposure increases extracellular d-aspartate, l-glutamate and d-serine in the PFC. Our data suggest that cocaine activates dopamine D1 receptor signaling and PKA pathway to regulate EAATs function and extracellular EAA level in the PFC.

  3. Electrophysiological and amperometric evidence that modafinil blocks the dopamine uptake transporter to induce behavioral activation.

    PubMed

    Federici, M; Latagliata, E C; Rizzo, F R; Ledonne, A; Gu, H H; Romigi, A; Nisticò, R; Puglisi-Allegra, S; Mercuri, N B

    2013-11-12

    Although the wake-promoting drug modafinil has been shown to bind quite exclusively to the dopamine transporter (DAT), its action in the brain has been thought to be partially independent from the facilitation of the dopaminergic signals. Here we used electrophysiological and amperometric techniques to investigate the effects of modafinil on the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and on the synaptic overflow of dopamine in the dorsal striatum from the sliced tissue of wild-type and cocaine-insensitive genetically modified mice (DAT-CI). Moreover, we examined the consequences of modafinil administration on the locomotor behavior of wild-type and DAT-CI mice. In in vitro experiments, modafinil inhibited the spontaneous firing discharge of the dopaminergic neurons. More consistently, it potentiated firing inhibition and the membrane responses caused by exogenously applied dopamine on these cells. Furthermore, it augmented the stimulus-evoked outflow of DA in the striatum. Noteworthy, modafinil caused locomotor activation in wild-type mice. On the other hand, neither the electrophysiological nor the behavioral effects of modafinil were detected in DAT-CI animals. These results demonstrate that modafinil potentiates brain dopaminergic signals via DAT inhibition by acting at the same binding site of cocaine. Therefore, this mechanism of action explains most of the pharmacological properties of this compound in the clinical setting.

  4. 4-Iodotomoxetine: a novel ligand for serotonin uptake sites.

    PubMed

    Kung, M P; Chumpradit, S; Billings, J; Kung, H

    1992-01-01

    The tomoxetine analog, R-4-iodotomoxetine, binds in vitro to a single site of rat cortical membranes with high affinity (Kd = 0.03 +/- 0.01 nM, n = 4) and can be blocked by a selective serotonin reuptake site inhibitor, paroxetine. The [125I]R-4-iodotomoxetine binding at equilibrium is saturable and is temperature- and Na(+)-dependent. The number of specific [125I]R-4-iodotomoxetine binding sites (Bmax = 356 +/- 20 fmol/mg protein) is similar to that of [3H]citalopram (329 +/- 30 fmol/mg protein), a known serotonin uptake inhibitor. The binding of [125I]R-4-iodotomoxetine is selectively inhibited by several serotonin uptake blockers, and a good correlation is demonstrated between the potency of various drugs to inhibit in vitro binding of [125I]R-4-iodotomoxetine and [3H]citalopram. In addition, lesions performed with the neurotoxin p-chloroamphetamine, which destroys monoamine neurons, including serotonergic neuronal system, result in a 90% reduction of [125I]R-4-iodotomoxetine binding when compared to sham controls. These results indicate that the binding sites labeled by [125I]R-4-iodotomoxetine are associated with the neuronal serotonin uptake sites. However, the in vivo and ex vivo results do not show regional localization corresponding to the distribution of serotonin uptake sites. The nonspecific uptake may be related to this compound's high lipophilicity (octanol-buffer partition coefficient = 1100 - 1400 at pH 7). Although the in vivo properties of [125I]R-4-iodotomoxetine make it an unlikely candidate for mapping serotonin uptake sites with SPECT, the high affinity and selectivity should make it a useful tool for in vitro studies of the serotonin uptake sites.

  5. Autoradiographic localization of /sup 3/H-paroxetine-labeled serotonin uptake sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    De Souza, E.B.; Kuyatt, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Paroxetine is a potent and selective inhibitor of serotonin uptake into neurons. Serotonin uptake sites have been identified, localized, and quantified in rat brain by autoradiography with 3H-paroxetine; 3H-paroxetine binding in slide-mounted sections of rat forebrain was of high affinity (KD = 10 pM) and the inhibition affinity constant (Ki) values of various drugs in competing 3H-paroxetine binding significantly correlated with their reported potencies in inhibiting synaptosomal serotonin uptake. Serotonin uptake sites labeled by 3H-paroxetine were highly concentrated in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei, central gray, superficial layer of the superior colliculus, lateral septal nucleus, paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus, and the islands of Calleja. High concentrations of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were found in brainstem areas containing dopamine (substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area) and norepinephrine (locus coeruleus) cell bodies. Moderate concentrations of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were present in laminae I and IV of the frontal parietal cortex, primary olfactory cortex, olfactory tubercle, regions of the basal ganglia, septum, amygdala, thalamus, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and some brainstem areas including the interpeduncular, trigeminal, and parabrachial nuclei. Lower densities of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were found in other regions of the neocortex and very low to nonsignificant levels of binding were present in white matter tracts and in the cerebellum. Lesioning of serotonin neurons with 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine caused large decreases in 3H-paroxetine binding. The autoradiographic distribution of 3H-paroxetine binding sites in rat brain corresponds extremely well to the distribution of serotonin terminals and cell bodies as well as with the pharmacological sites of action of serotonin.

  6. Catecholamine uptake sites: characterization, localization, and a role in the production of N-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced Parkinsonism

    SciTech Connect

    Javitch, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Dopamine and norepinephrine are inactivated by specific high affinity transport systems which mediate the recapture of the amines into presynaptic nerve terminals. (/sup 3/H)Maxindol labels neuronal dopamine uptake sites in corpus striatum membranes and neuronal norepinephrine uptake sites in cerebral cortex and submaxillary/sublingual gland membranes. The potencies of various inhibitors of biogenic amine uptake in reducing (/sup 3/H)mazindol binding in striatal membranes correlate with their potencies for inhibition of neurona (/sup 3/H)dopamine accumulation, whereas their potencies in reducing (/sup 3/H)mazindol binding to cortical and salivary gland membranes correlate with their potencies for inhibition of neuronal (/sup 3/H)norepinephrine accumulation. The association of (/sup 3/H)mazindol binding sites with neuronal dopamine uptake sites in the corpus striatum is further supported by the reduction of (/sup 3/H)mazindol binding sites in striatal membranes following destruction of dopaminergic neurons by 6-hydroxydopamine. Similarly, destruction of noradrenergic neurons by N-(2-chloro-ethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine(DSP-4) decreases (/sup 3/H)mazindol binding to cortical membranes. Dopamine and norepinephrine uptake sites in rat brain have been differentially visualized using (/sup 3/H)mazindol autoradiography. N-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) produces neuropathologic and clinical abnormalities in humans and animals that closely resemble idiopathic Parkinson disease. (/sup 3/H)MPTP binds with high affinity to brain membranes. The chemical specificity of the binding sites corresponds to structure-activity requirements for neurotoxicity.

  7. Liposomal drug deposits in poly(dopamine) coatings: effect of their composition, cell type, uptake pathway considerations, and shear stress.

    PubMed

    Lynge, Martin E; Fernandez-Medina, Marina; Postma, Almar; Städler, Brigitte

    2014-12-01

    Implantable devices equipped with coatings which have the ability to carry and deliver active compounds are of great interest. We report the assembly of liposome-containing poly(dopamine) films, and their interaction with adhering cells. The liposome composition is varied by adding lipophilic dopamine-conjugates and charged lipids. The cell mean fluorescence (CMF) of adhering cells due to the internalization of fluorescent cargo is found to be similar for coatings with the lipophilic-dopamine conjugates, while the charge affects the amount and location of the internalized cargo. The uptake mechanism for cargo by myoblasts using chemical inhibitors is found to be dependent on the used type of liposome. The CMF is significantly reduced for endothelial cells adhering to coatings with applied shear stress.

  8. Effects of phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase inhibitors on uptake and release of norepinephrine and dopamine from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, N.Y.; Hower, J.A.; Borchardt, R.T.

    1985-09-01

    Inhibitors of phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) and amphetamine were evaluated for their effects on the uptake of (TH)-norepinephrine (TH-NE) and the release of endogenous NE and dopamine (DA) from chopped rat brain tissues. Unlike amphetamine, all of PNMT inhibitors tested produced only slight inhibition of (TH)-NE uptake into chopped cerebral cortex. 2,3-Dichloro-alpha-methylbenzylamine (DCMB) and 7,8-dichloro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (SKF64139), but not 2-cyclooctyl-2-hydroxyethylamine (CONH) and 1-aminomethylcycloundecanol (CUNH) produced slight release of endogenous NE and DA from chopped hypothalami, but their effects were less pronounced than those produced by amphetamine.

  9. /sup 3/H-imipramine uptake into rat striatal slices and imipramine-induced /sup 3/H-dopamine efflux

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, R.; Kawasaki, K.; Ono, N.; Kamiya, H.

    1983-04-01

    The effect of imipramine on spontaneous efflux of radiolabelled dopamine (DA) from slices of rat striatum was examined by a superfusion method. Imipramine at concentrations of 10 - 100 microM enhanced the efflux of DA accumulated in a high-affinity uptake system in a concentration-dependent manner. This efflux of /sup 3/H-DA was not affected by conditions (Ca/sup 2 +/-free medium, 100 microM bretylium and 30 microM tetrodotoxin) which inhibited the release of /sup 3/H-DA by electrical stimulation. Furthermore, this imipramine-induced /sup 3/H-DA efflux was temperature-dependent. The uptake of /sup 3/H-imipramine into striatal slices was determined. This uptake was concentration- and temperature-dependent and increased linearly. These results are discussed in relation to the hypothesis that /sup 3/H-DA efflux by imipramine is connected with uptake of imipramine.

  10. Cooperation of taurine uptake and dopamine D1 receptor activation facilitates the induction of protein synthesis-dependent late LTP.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Luz M; Bustamante, Julián; Orensanz, Luís M; Martín del Río, Rafael; Solís, José M

    2014-04-01

    Co-activation of NMDA and dopamine receptors is required for the induction of the late phase of LTP (L-LTP) that is dependent on new protein synthesis. Other neuromodulatory substances may also contribute to this process. Here, we examined whether taurine is one of the neuromodulators contributing to L-LTP induction, since it is known that taurine uptake induces a long-lasting synaptic potentiation dependent on protein synthesis, and taurine uptake inhibition blocks L-LTP induced by tetanization. Experiments were conducted using rat hippocampal slices where field synaptic potentials were evoked and recorded in CA3-CA1 synapses. Taurine (1 mM) applied 10 min before a high frequency stimulation (HFS) train converted a transitory early-LTP (E-LTP) into an L-LTP dependent on protein synthesis. This taurine effect was blocked by a taurine uptake inhibitor. A facilitation of L-LTP induction was also obtained by pre-application of SKF38393, a D1/D5 dopamine receptor (D1R) agonist. In this case, LTP facilitation was not affected by the taurine uptake inhibitor. Nevertheless, when taurine and SKF38393 were simultaneously pre-applied at a concentration that individually did not modify E-LTP, they produced a synergistic mechanism that facilitated the induction of L-LTP with a sole HFS train. This facilitation of L-LTP was blocked by inhibiting either taurine uptake or D1R activation. Taurine and SKF38393 activated different signaling pathways to transform E-LTP into L-LTP. Taurine-induced L-LTP facilitation required MAPK activation, while D1R-agonist-induced facilitation depended mainly on PKA activation and partially on MAPK activation. On the other hand, the synergistic mechanisms induced by the cooperative action of taurine and SKF38393 were impaired by inhibitors against MAPK, PKA and PI3-K. This pharmacological profile resembles that displayed by L-LTP induced by three HFS trains at 10-min intervals. These results indicate that taurine uptake is necessary and

  11. Inhibition of ( sup 3 H)dopamine uptake into rat striatal slices by quaternary N-methylated nicotine metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Dwoskin, L.P.; Leibee, L.L.; Jewell, A.L.; Fang, Zhaoxia; Crooks, P.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The effects of quaternary N-methylated nicotine derivatives were examined on in vitro uptake of ({sup 3}H)dopamine (({sup 3}H)DA) in rat striatal slices. Striatal slices were incubated with a 10 {mu}M concentration of the following compounds: N-methylnicotinium, N-methylnornicotinium, N-methylcotininium, N,N{prime}-dimethylnicotinium and N{prime}-methylnicotinium salts. The results clearly indicated that significant inhibition of ({sup 3}H)DA uptake occurred with those compounds possessing a N-methylpyridinium group; whereas, compounds that were methylated at the N{prime}-pyrrolidinium position were less effective or exhibited no inhibition of ({sup 3}H)DA uptake. The results suggest that high concentrations of quaternary N-methylated nicotine metabolites which are structurally related to the neurotoxin MPP{sup +}, and which may be formed in the CNS, may protect against Parkinson's Disease and explain the inverse relationship between smoking and Parkinsonism reported in epidemiologic studies.

  12. Azepines and Piperidines with Dual Norepinephrine Dopamine Uptake Inhibition and Antidepressant Activity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Herein, we describe the discovery of inhibitors of norepinephrine (NET) and dopamine (DAT) transporters with reduced activity relative to serotonin transporters (SERT). Two compounds, 8b and 21a, along with nomifensine were tested in a rodent receptor occupancy study and demonstrated dose-dependent displacement of radiolabeled NET and DAT ligands. These compounds were efficacious in a rat forced swim assay (model of depression) and also had activity in rat spontaneous locomotion assay. PMID:24900562

  13. Distinct Effects of Nalmefene on Dopamine Uptake Rates and Kappa Opioid Receptor Activity in the Nucleus Accumbens Following Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Exposure.

    PubMed

    Rose, Jamie H; Karkhanis, Anushree N; Steiniger-Brach, Björn; Jones, Sara R

    2016-07-27

    The development of pharmacotherapeutics that reduce relapse to alcohol drinking in patients with alcohol dependence is of considerable research interest. Preclinical data support a role for nucleus accumbens (NAc) κ opioid receptors (KOR) in chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure-induced increases in ethanol intake. Nalmefene, a high-affinity KOR partial agonist, reduces drinking in at-risk patients and relapse drinking in rodents, potentially due to its effects on NAc KORs. However, the effects of nalmefene on accumbal dopamine transmission and KOR function are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of nalmefene on dopamine transmission and KORs using fast scan cyclic voltammetry in NAc brain slices from male C57BL/6J mice following five weeks of CIE or air exposure. Nalmefene concentration-dependently reduced dopamine release similarly in air and CIE groups, suggesting that dynorphin tone may not be present in brain slices. Further, nalmefene attenuated dopamine uptake rates to a greater extent in brain slices from CIE-exposed mice, suggesting that dopamine transporter-KOR interactions may be fundamentally altered following CIE. Additionally, nalmefene reversed the dopamine-decreasing effects of a maximal concentration of a KOR agonist selectively in brain slices of CIE-exposed mice. It is possible that nalmefene may attenuate withdrawal-induced increases in ethanol consumption by modulation of dopamine transmission through KORs.

  14. Distinct Effects of Nalmefene on Dopamine Uptake Rates and Kappa Opioid Receptor Activity in the Nucleus Accumbens Following Chronic Intermittent Ethanol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jamie H.; Karkhanis, Anushree N.; Steiniger-Brach, Björn; Jones, Sara R.

    2016-01-01

    The development of pharmacotherapeutics that reduce relapse to alcohol drinking in patients with alcohol dependence is of considerable research interest. Preclinical data support a role for nucleus accumbens (NAc) κ opioid receptors (KOR) in chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure-induced increases in ethanol intake. Nalmefene, a high-affinity KOR partial agonist, reduces drinking in at-risk patients and relapse drinking in rodents, potentially due to its effects on NAc KORs. However, the effects of nalmefene on accumbal dopamine transmission and KOR function are poorly understood. We investigated the effects of nalmefene on dopamine transmission and KORs using fast scan cyclic voltammetry in NAc brain slices from male C57BL/6J mice following five weeks of CIE or air exposure. Nalmefene concentration-dependently reduced dopamine release similarly in air and CIE groups, suggesting that dynorphin tone may not be present in brain slices. Further, nalmefene attenuated dopamine uptake rates to a greater extent in brain slices from CIE-exposed mice, suggesting that dopamine transporter-KOR interactions may be fundamentally altered following CIE. Additionally, nalmefene reversed the dopamine-decreasing effects of a maximal concentration of a KOR agonist selectively in brain slices of CIE-exposed mice. It is possible that nalmefene may attenuate withdrawal-induced increases in ethanol consumption by modulation of dopamine transmission through KORs. PMID:27472317

  15. Agonist and antagonist protect sulfhydrals in the binding site of the D-1 dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, A.; Kebabian, J.W.; Fishman, P.H.

    1986-05-01

    An iodinated compound (/sup 125/I)-SCH 23982 (8-iodo-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-methyl-5-phenyl-1H-3-benzazepine-7-ol) has been characterized as a specific, high affinity (Kd = 0.7 nM) ligand for the D-1 dopamine receptor. The ligand binding site of the D-1 receptor in rat striatum was inactivated by N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) in a time and concentration dependent manner. The inactivation was rapid and irreversible with a 70% net loss of binding sites. Scatchard analysis of binding to NEM-treated tissue showed a decrease both in receptor number and in radioligand affinity. The remaining receptors retained their selectivity for stereoisomers of both agonist and antagonist. Receptor occupancy by either a D-1 specific agonist or antagonist protected in a dose dependent manner the binding sites from inactivation by NEM; the agonist was more effective than the antagonist. The agonist high affinity site, however, was abolished in the absence or presence of protective compound, presumably because of inactivation of the GTP-binding component of adenylate cyclase. In this regard, there was a total loss of agonist- and forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity after NEM treatment. The authors conclude that the D-1 dopamine receptor contains NEM-sensitive sulfhydral group(s) at or near the vicinity of the ligand binding site.

  16. Computational and Biochemical Docking of the Irreversible Cocaine Analog RTI 82 Directly Demonstrates Ligand Positioning in the Dopamine Transporter Central Substrate-binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Rejwi Acharya; Pramod, Akula Bala; Sharma, Babita; Krout, Danielle; Foster, James D.; Cha, Joo Hwan; Cao, Jianjing; Newman, Amy Hauck; Lever, John R.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.; Henry, L. Keith

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) functions as a key regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission via re-uptake of synaptic dopamine (DA). Cocaine binding to DAT blocks this activity and elevates extracellular DA, leading to psychomotor stimulation and addiction, but the mechanisms by which cocaine interacts with DAT and inhibits transport remain incompletely understood. Here, we addressed these questions using computational and biochemical methodologies to localize the binding and adduction sites of the photoactivatable irreversible cocaine analog 3β-(p-chlorophenyl)tropane-2β-carboxylic acid, 4′-azido-3′-iodophenylethyl ester ([125I]RTI 82). Comparative modeling and small molecule docking indicated that the tropane pharmacophore of RTI 82 was positioned in the central DA active site with an orientation that juxtaposed the aryliodoazide group for cross-linking to rat DAT Phe-319. This prediction was verified by focused methionine substitution of residues flanking this site followed by cyanogen bromide mapping of the [125I]RTI 82-labeled mutants and by the substituted cysteine accessibility method protection analyses. These findings provide positive functional evidence linking tropane pharmacophore interaction with the core substrate-binding site and support a competitive mechanism for transport inhibition. This synergistic application of computational and biochemical methodologies overcomes many uncertainties inherent in other approaches and furnishes a schematic framework for elucidating the ligand-protein interactions of other classes of DA transport inhibitors. PMID:25179220

  17. Computational and biochemical docking of the irreversible cocaine analog RTI 82 directly demonstrates ligand positioning in the dopamine transporter central substrate-binding site.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Rejwi Acharya; Pramod, Akula Bala; Sharma, Babita; Krout, Danielle; Foster, James D; Cha, Joo Hwan; Cao, Jianjing; Newman, Amy Hauck; Lever, John R; Vaughan, Roxanne A; Henry, L Keith

    2014-10-24

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) functions as a key regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission via re-uptake of synaptic dopamine (DA). Cocaine binding to DAT blocks this activity and elevates extracellular DA, leading to psychomotor stimulation and addiction, but the mechanisms by which cocaine interacts with DAT and inhibits transport remain incompletely understood. Here, we addressed these questions using computational and biochemical methodologies to localize the binding and adduction sites of the photoactivatable irreversible cocaine analog 3β-(p-chlorophenyl)tropane-2β-carboxylic acid, 4'-azido-3'-iodophenylethyl ester ([(125)I]RTI 82). Comparative modeling and small molecule docking indicated that the tropane pharmacophore of RTI 82 was positioned in the central DA active site with an orientation that juxtaposed the aryliodoazide group for cross-linking to rat DAT Phe-319. This prediction was verified by focused methionine substitution of residues flanking this site followed by cyanogen bromide mapping of the [(125)I]RTI 82-labeled mutants and by the substituted cysteine accessibility method protection analyses. These findings provide positive functional evidence linking tropane pharmacophore interaction with the core substrate-binding site and support a competitive mechanism for transport inhibition. This synergistic application of computational and biochemical methodologies overcomes many uncertainties inherent in other approaches and furnishes a schematic framework for elucidating the ligand-protein interactions of other classes of DA transport inhibitors.

  18. Characteristics of the ambulation-increasing effect of GBR-12909, a selective dopamine uptake inhibitor, in mice.

    PubMed

    Hirate, K; Kuribara, H

    1991-04-01

    Behavioral effects of a dopamine uptake inhibitor, GBR-12909 (GBR), were evaluated by ambulatory activity in mice. The single administration of over 10 mg/kg of GBR, i.p. and p.o., significantly increased the ambulatory activity. The repeated administration of GBR, at only 10 mg/kg, produced a reverse tolerance to its ambulation-increasing effect. However, a cross-reverse tolerance was induced between GBR (10 and 20 mg/kg) and methamphetamine (2 mg/kg) in both directions. Furthermore, 5 mg/kg of GBR significantly enhanced the effects of methamphetamine, cocaine, imipramine, morphine, scopolamine and caffeine. R-THBP, a coenzyme of tyrosine hydroxylase, also enhanced the effect of GBR. In contrast, the ambulation-increasing effect of 10 mg/kg of GBR was markedly reduced by haloperidol, chlorpromazine, tetrabenazine, oxypertine, reserpine and alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine. On the other hand, the effect of GBR was only slightly and/or scarcely modified by apomorphine, caerulein, physostigmine, pilocarpine, N6-(L-2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine and naloxone. The neurochemical experiment in rats, not in mice, revealed that GBR possessed more dominant action on dopaminergic systems than noradrenergic or serotonergic systems. However, the behavioral characteristics of GBR are similar to those of methamphetamine and cocaine, which possess less selective action than GBR on dopaminergic and noradrenergic systems.

  19. Mutational Analysis of the High-Affinity Zinc Binding Site Validates a Refined Human Dopamine Transporter Homology Model

    PubMed Central

    Stockner, Thomas; Montgomery, Therese R.; Kudlacek, Oliver; Weissensteiner, Rene; Ecker, Gerhard F.; Freissmuth, Michael; Sitte, Harald H.

    2013-01-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of the leucine transporter (LeuT) is frequently used as a template for homology models of the dopamine transporter (DAT). Although similar in structure, DAT differs considerably from LeuT in a number of ways: (i) when compared to LeuT, DAT has very long intracellular amino and carboxyl termini; (ii) LeuT and DAT share a rather low overall sequence identity (22%) and (iii) the extracellular loop 2 (EL2) of DAT is substantially longer than that of LeuT. Extracellular zinc binds to DAT and restricts the transporter‚s movement through the conformational cycle, thereby resulting in a decrease in substrate uptake. Residue H293 in EL2 praticipates in zinc binding and must be modelled correctly to allow for a full understanding of its effects. We exploited the high-affinity zinc binding site endogenously present in DAT to create a model of the complete transmemberane domain of DAT. The zinc binding site provided a DAT-specific molecular ruler for calibration of the model. Our DAT model places EL2 at the transporter lipid interface in the vicinity of the zinc binding site. Based on the model, D206 was predicted to represent a fourth co-ordinating residue, in addition to the three previously described zinc binding residues H193, H375 and E396. This prediction was confirmed by mutagenesis: substitution of D206 by lysine and cysteine affected the inhibitory potency of zinc and the maximum inhibition exerted by zinc, respectively. Conversely, the structural changes observed in the model allowed for rationalizing the zinc-dependent regulation of DAT: upon binding, zinc stabilizes the outward-facing state, because its first coordination shell can only be completed in this conformation. Thus, the model provides a validated solution to the long extracellular loop and may be useful to address other aspects of the transport cycle. PMID:23436987

  20. Mutational analysis of the high-affinity zinc binding site validates a refined human dopamine transporter homology model.

    PubMed

    Stockner, Thomas; Montgomery, Therese R; Kudlacek, Oliver; Weissensteiner, Rene; Ecker, Gerhard F; Freissmuth, Michael; Sitte, Harald H

    2013-01-01

    The high-resolution crystal structure of the leucine transporter (LeuT) is frequently used as a template for homology models of the dopamine transporter (DAT). Although similar in structure, DAT differs considerably from LeuT in a number of ways: (i) when compared to LeuT, DAT has very long intracellular amino and carboxyl termini; (ii) LeuT and DAT share a rather low overall sequence identity (22%) and (iii) the extracellular loop 2 (EL2) of DAT is substantially longer than that of LeuT. Extracellular zinc binds to DAT and restricts the transporter's movement through the conformational cycle, thereby resulting in a decrease in substrate uptake. Residue H293 in EL2 praticipates in zinc binding and must be modelled correctly to allow for a full understanding of its effects. We exploited the high-affinity zinc binding site endogenously present in DAT to create a model of the complete transmemberane domain of DAT. The zinc binding site provided a DAT-specific molecular ruler for calibration of the model. Our DAT model places EL2 at the transporter lipid interface in the vicinity of the zinc binding site. Based on the model, D206 was predicted to represent a fourth co-ordinating residue, in addition to the three previously described zinc binding residues H193, H375 and E396. This prediction was confirmed by mutagenesis: substitution of D206 by lysine and cysteine affected the inhibitory potency of zinc and the maximum inhibition exerted by zinc, respectively. Conversely, the structural changes observed in the model allowed for rationalizing the zinc-dependent regulation of DAT: upon binding, zinc stabilizes the outward-facing state, because its first coordination shell can only be completed in this conformation. Thus, the model provides a validated solution to the long extracellular loop and may be useful to address other aspects of the transport cycle.

  1. Carbonyl sulfide uptake and chloroform emissions from an Arctic site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkins, J. W.; Dutton, G. S.; Montzka, S. A.; Nance, J. D.; Hall, B. D.; Thoning, K. W.; Miller, J. B.; White, J.; Vaugh, B.; Manning, A.

    2008-12-01

    The Arctic Region is most sensitive to future climate change. Quantifying emissions and sinks of many important biogenic trace gases there may become important indicators of potential climate feedback. Once snowmelt at Pt. Barrow, Alaska (77o N) occurs, ground cover is exposed by sunlight and higher temperatures, then photosynthesis starts up. Peaks of chloroform (CHCl3) appear throughout the summer from southerly-based air masses based over northern Alaska and northwest Canada. Carbonyl sulfide (COS) undergoes uptake throughout the summer season through the same enzymes that uptake carbon dioxide (CO2). We will calculate the footprint of emissions of CHCl3 and uptake of COS using high frequency in situ observations, and the NAME and FLEXPART models. Previous studies show a large source of CHCl3 (8% of the total budget) may be coming from soils in high latitude pine forests. We will examine emissions of CHCl3 to see whether or not they are coming from the tundra just south of Pt. Barrow. We will identify the regions for uptake of COS and CO2 from the footprint generated from the models.

  2. Tesofensine, a novel triple monoamine re-uptake inhibitor with anti-obesity effects: dopamine transporter occupancy as measured by PET.

    PubMed

    Appel, Lieuwe; Bergström, Mats; Buus Lassen, Jørgen; Långström, Bengt

    2014-02-01

    Tesofensine (TE) is a novel triple monoamine re-uptake inhibitor inducing a potent inhibition of the re-uptake process in the synaptic cleft of the neurotransmitters dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin. In recent preclinical and clinical evaluations TE showed a robust anti-obesity effect, but the specific mechanism of this triple monoamine re-uptake inhibitor still needs to be further elucidated. This positron emission tomography (PET) study, using [¹¹C]βCIT-FE, aimed to assess the degree of the dopamine transporter (DAT) occupancy, at constant TE plasma levels, following different oral, multiple doses of TE during totally 8-12 days. In addition, the relationships between DAT occupancy and TE plasma concentrations, or doses, were investigated to enable assessment of DAT occupancies in subsequent clinical trials. The results demonstrated that TE induced a dose-dependent blockade of DAT following multiple doses of 0.125-1 mg TE at anticipated steady-state conditions. The mean striatal DAT occupancy varied dose-dependently between 18% and 77%. A sigmoid E(max) model well described the relationship between striatal DAT occupancy and TE plasma concentrations or doses. It was estimated that the maximum achievable DAT occupancy was about 80% and that half of this effect was accomplished by approximately 0.25 mg TE and a plasma drug concentration of 4 ng/ml. The results indicated an important mechanism of action of TE on DAT. Further, these results suggest that the previously reported dose-dependent weight loss, in TE treated subjects, was in part mediated by an up-regulation of dopaminergic pathways due to enhanced amounts of synaptic dopamine after blockade of DAT.

  3. Insights from molecular dynamics: the binding site of cocaine in the dopamine transporter and permeation pathways of substrates in the leucine and dopamine transporters

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Bonnie A.; Madura, Jeffry D.

    2012-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) facilitates the regulation of synaptic neurotransmitter levels. As a target for therapeutic and illicit psycho-stimulant drugs like antidepressants and cocaine, DAT has been studied intensively. Despite a wealth of mutational and physiological data regarding DAT, the structure remains unsolved and details of the transport mechanism, binding sites and conformational changes remain debated. A bacterial homologue of DAT, the leucine transporter (LeuTAa) has been used as a template and framework for modeling and understanding DAT. Free energy profiles obtained from Multi-Configuration Thermodynamic Integration allowed us to correctly identify the primary and secondary binding pockets of LeuTAa. A comparison of free energy profiles for dopamine and cocaine in DAT suggests that the binding site of cocaine is located in a secondary pocket, not the primary substrate site. Two recurring primary pathways for intracellular substrate release from the primary pocket are identified in both transporters using the Random Acceleration Molecular Dynamics method. One pathway appears to follow transmembranes (TMs) 1a and 6b while the other pathway follows along TMs 6b and 8. Interestingly, we observe that a single sodium ion is co-transported with leucine during both simulations types. PMID:23079638

  4. The predicted 3D structure of the human D2 dopamine receptor and the binding site and binding affinities for agonists and antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Hall, Spencer E.; Trabanino, Rene J.; Freddolino, Peter L.; Kalani, Maziyar A.; Floriano, Wely B.; Tak Kam, Victor Wai; Goddard, William A., III

    2004-03-01

    Dopamine neurotransmitter and its receptors play a critical role in the cell signaling process responsible for information transfer in neurons functioning in the nervous system. Development of improved therapeutics for such disorders as Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia would be significantly enhanced with the availability of the 3D structure for the dopamine receptors and of the binding site for dopamine and other agonists and antagonists. We report here the 3D structure of the long isoform of the human D2 dopamine receptor, predicted from primary sequence using first-principles theoretical and computational techniques (i.e., we did not use bioinformatic or experimental 3D structural information in predicting structures). The predicted 3D structure is validated by comparison of the predicted binding site and the relative binding affinities of dopamine, three known dopamine agonists (antiparkinsonian), and seven known antagonists (antipsychotic) in the D2 receptor to experimentally determined values. These structures correctly predict the critical residues for binding dopamine and several antagonists, identified by mutation studies, and give relative binding affinities that correlate well with experiments. The predicted binding site for dopamine and agonists is located between transmembrane (TM) helices 3, 4, 5, and 6, whereas the best antagonists bind to a site involving TM helices 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 with minimal contacts to TM helix 5. We identify characteristic differences between the binding sites of agonists and antagonists.

  5. The action of dopamine and vascular dopamine (DA1) receptor agonists on human isolated subcutaneous and omental small arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, A. D.; Sever, P. S.

    1989-01-01

    1. Human small arteries were obtained from surgical specimens and studied in vitro by use of a myograph technique. Following induction of tone with a potassium depolarizing solution, dopamine in the presence of beta-adrenoceptor and catecholamine uptake blockade relaxed isolated omental and subcutaneous arteries. Preincubation of tissues with phentolamine increased the maximum relaxation in response to dopamine. 2. The selective vascular dopamine receptor agonists, fenoldopam and SKF 38393 also relaxed isolated subcutaneous and omental arteries in a concentration-dependent manner. The order of potency for agonists was dopamine greater than fenoldopam greater than SKF 38393. 3. Dopamine-induced relaxation was competitively antagonized by SCH 23390, (R)- and (S)-sulpiride, and fenoldopam induced relaxation by SCH 23390 and (+)- but not (-)-butaclamol. 4. These results indicate the presence of vascular dopamine receptors (DA1 subtype) on human isolated resistance arteries from omental and subcutaneous sites. PMID:2474354

  6. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine destroy serotonin terminals in rat brain: quantification of neurodegeneration by measurement of (/sup 3/H)paroxetine-labeled serotonin uptake sites

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, G.; Yeh, S.Y.; O'Hearn, E.; Molliver, M.E.; Kuhar, M.J.; De Souza, E.B.

    1987-09-01

    This study examines the effects of repeated systemic administration (20 mg/kg s.c., twice daily for 4 days) of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) on levels of brain monoamines, their metabolites and on the density of monoamine uptake sites in various regions of rat brain. Marked reductions (30-60%) in the concentration of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were observed in cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum, hypothalamus and midbrain at 2 weeks after a 4-day treatment regimen of MDMA or MDA; less consistent reductions in serotonin (5-HT) content were observed in these brain regions. In addition, both MDMA and MDA caused comparable and substantial reductions (50-75%) in the density of (/sup 3/H)paroxetine-labeled 5-HT uptake sites in all brain regions examined. In contrast, neither MDMA nor MDA caused any widespread or long-term changes in the content of the catecholaminergic markers (i.e., norepinephrine, dopamine, 3,4 dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid) or in the number of (/sup 3/H)mazindol-labeled norepinephrine or dopamine uptake sites in the brain regions examined. These data demonstrate that MDMA and MDA cause long-lasting neurotoxic effects with respect to both the functional and structural integrity of serotonergic neurons in brain. Furthermore, our measurement of reductions in the density of 5-HT uptake sites provides a means for quantification of the neurodegenerative effects of MDMA and MDA on presynaptic 5-HT terminals.

  7. Dopamine transporter comparative molecular modeling and binding site prediction using the LeuT(Aa) leucine transporter as a template.

    PubMed

    Indarte, Martín; Madura, Jeffry D; Surratt, Christopher K

    2008-02-15

    Pharmacological and behavioral studies indicate that binding of cocaine and the amphetamines by the dopamine transporter (DAT) protein is principally responsible for initiating the euphoria and addiction associated with these drugs. The lack of an X-ray crystal structure for the DAT or any other member of the neurotransmitter:sodium symporter (NSS) family has hindered understanding of psychostimulant recognition at the atomic level; structural information has been obtained largely from mutagenesis and biophysical studies. The recent publication of a crystal structure for the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT(Aa), a distantly related NSS family homolog, provides for the first time a template for three-dimensional comparative modeling of NSS proteins. A novel computational modeling approach using the capabilities of the Molecular Operating Environment program MOE 2005.06 in conjunction with other comparative modeling servers generated the LeuT(Aa)-directed DAT model. Probable dopamine and amphetamine binding sites were identified within the DAT model using multiple docking approaches. Binding sites for the substrate ligands (dopamine and amphetamine) overlapped substantially with the analogous region of the LeuT(Aa) crystal structure for the substrate leucine. The docking predictions implicated DAT side chains known to be critical for high affinity ligand binding and suggest novel mutagenesis targets in elucidating discrete substrate and inhibitor binding sites. The DAT model may guide DAT ligand QSAR studies, and rational design of novel DAT-binding therapeutics.

  8. Prion uptake in the gut: identification of the first uptake and replication sites.

    PubMed

    Kujala, Pekka; Raymond, Claudine R; Romeijn, Martijn; Godsave, Susan F; van Kasteren, Sander I; Wille, Holger; Prusiner, Stanley B; Mabbott, Neil A; Peters, Peter J

    2011-12-01

    After oral exposure, prions are thought to enter Peyer's patches via M cells and accumulate first upon follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) before spreading to the nervous system. How prions are actually initially acquired from the gut lumen is not known. Using high-resolution immunofluorescence and cryo-immunogold electron microscopy, we report the trafficking of the prion protein (PrP) toward Peyer's patches of wild-type and PrP-deficient mice. PrP was transiently detectable at 1 day post feeding (dpf) within large multivesicular LAMP1-positive endosomes of enterocytes in the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) and at much lower levels within M cells. Subsequently, PrP was detected on vesicles in the late endosomal compartments of macrophages in the subepithelial dome. At 7-21 dpf, increased PrP labelling was observed on the plasma membranes of FDCs in germinal centres of Peyer's patches from wild-type mice only, identifying FDCs as the first sites of PrP conversion and replication. Detection of PrP on extracellular vesicles displaying FAE enterocyte-derived A33 protein implied transport towards FDCs in association with FAE-derived vesicles. By 21 dpf, PrP was observed on the plasma membranes of neurons within neighbouring myenteric plexi. Together, these data identify a novel potential M cell-independent mechanism for prion transport, mediated by FAE enterocytes, which acts to initiate conversion and replication upon FDCs and subsequent infection of enteric nerves.

  9. Gradients of dopamine D1- and D2/3-binding sites in the basal ganglia of pig and monkey measured by PET.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Doudet, Doris J; Cumming, Paul

    2004-07-01

    The distributions of dopamine D1 and D2/3 binding sites in living brain have not been compared directly using positron emission tomography (PET). To map these binding sites, we first optimized methods for the assay of dopamine receptors in brain of Göttingen miniature pigs. The binding potentials (pB) of [11C]NNC 112 for dopamine D1 receptors and [11C]raclopride for dopamine D2/3 receptors were calculated in pig striatum volumes of interest using metabolite corrected arterial inputs or using cerebellum as a non-binding reference region. Depending upon the method for quantitation, the pB for [11C]NNC 112 was 1.2-5.1 in pig striatum, whereas the pB for [11C]raclopride was 1.0-1.8. We used the reference tissue method of Logan to calculate pB maps for the two tracers. The maps were co-registered to the common stereotaxic space for the pig brain and normalized to a global mean for pB in striatum; t-maps showed that dopamine D1 binding was relatively more abundant in the ventral-anterior striatum of the pig, while dopamine D2/3 binding was greater in the dorsal striatum. Similar comparisons were made for the pBs of [11C]Sch 23390 for dopamine D1 receptors and for [11C]raclopride in the brain of six rhesus monkeys. The magnitudes of pB for both binding sites in monkey brain were close to those in the pig. Consistent with the pig results, there were distinct gradients in the distributions of the two binding sites in monkey brain: D1 binding predominated in the ventral striatum, whereas D2/3 binding was relatively greater in the dorsal-posterior striatum. Gradients of dopamine receptor concentration within the striatum may be a general phenomenon of mammalian brain.

  10. Plant uptake and dissipation of PBDEs in the soils of electronic waste recycling sites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Honglin; Zhang, Shuzhen; Christie, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Plant uptake and dissipation of weathered PBDEs in the soils of e-waste recycling sites were investigated in a greenhouse study. Eighteen PBDE congeners (tri- through deca-) were detected in the plant tissues. The proportion of lower brominated PBDEs (mono- through hexa-) in plant roots was higher than that in the soils. A concentration gradient was observed of PBDEs in plants with the highest concentrations in the roots followed by the stems and lowest in the leaves. Reduction rates of the total PBDEs in the soils ranged from 13.3 to 21.7% after plant harvest and lower brominated PBDEs were associated with a higher tendency to dissipate than the higher brominated PBDEs. This study provides the first evidence for plant uptake of weathered PBDEs in the soils of e-waste recycling sites and planting contributes to the removal of PBDEs in e-waste contaminated soils.

  11. Native Plant Uptake Model for Radioactive Waste Disposal Areas at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,THERESA J.; WIRTH,SHARON

    1999-09-01

    This report defines and defends the basic framework, methodology, and associated input parameters for modeling plant uptake of radionuclides for use in Performance Assessment (PA) activities of Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). PAs are used to help determine whether waste disposal configurations meet applicable regulatory standards for the protection of human health, the environment, or both. Plants adapted to the arid climate of the NTS are able to rapidly capture infiltrating moisture. In addition to capturing soil moisture, plant roots absorb nutrients, minerals, and heavy metals, transporting them within the plant to the above-ground biomass. In this fashion, plant uptake affects the movement of radionuclides. The plant uptake model presented reflects rooting characteristics important to plant uptake, biomass turnover rates, and the ability of plants to uptake radionuclides from the soil. Parameters are provided for modeling plant uptake and estimating surface contaminant flux due to plant uptake under both current and potential future climate conditions with increased effective soil moisture. The term ''effective moisture'' is used throughout this report to indicate the soil moisture that is available to plants and is intended to be inclusive of all the variables that control soil moisture at a site (e.g., precipitation, temperature, soil texture, and soil chemistry). Effective moisture is a concept used to simplify a number of complex, interrelated soil processes for which there are too little data to model actual plant available moisture. The PA simulates both the flux of radionuclides across the land surface and the potential dose to humans from that flux. Surface flux is modeled here as the amount of soil contamination that is transferred from the soil by roots and incorporated into aboveground biomass. Movement of contaminants to the surface is the only transport mechanism evaluated with the model presented here

  12. Distribution of 3H-GABA uptake sites in the nematode Ascaris

    SciTech Connect

    Guastella, J.; Stretton, A.O. )

    1991-05-22

    The distribution of uptake sites for the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the nematode Ascaris suum was examined by autoradiography of 3H-GABA uptake. Single neural processes in both the ventral and dorsal nerve cords were labeled with 3H-GABA. Serial section analysis identified the cells of origin of these processes as the RMEV-like and RMED-like neurons. These cells belong to a set of four neurons in the nerve ring, all of which are labeled by 3H-GABA. 3H-GABA labeling of at least two other sets of cephalic neurons was seen. One of these pairs consists of medium-sized lateral ganglia neurons, located at the level of the amphid commissure bundle. A second pair is located in the lateral ganglia at the level of the deirid commissure bundle. The position and size of these lateral ganglia cells suggest that they are the GABA-immunoreactive lateral ganglia cells frequently seen in whole-mount immunocytochemical preparations. Four neuronal cell bodies located in the retrovesicular ganglion were also labeled with 3H-GABA. These cells, which are probably cholinergic excitatory motor neurons, do not contain detectable GABA-like immunoreactivity. Heavy labeling of muscle cells was also observed. The ventral and dorsal nerve cord inhibitory motor neurons, which are known to contain GABA-like immunoreactivity, were not labeled above background with 3H-GABA. Together with the experiments reported previously, these results define three classes of GABA-associated neurons in Ascaris: (1) neurons that contain endogenous GABA and possess a GABA uptake system; (2) neurons that contain endogenous GABA, but that either lack a GABA uptake system or possess a GABA uptake system of low activity; (3) neurons that possess a GABA uptake system, but that lack endogenous GABA.

  13. Differences between high-affinity forskolin binding sites in dopamine-riche and other regions of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Poat, J.A.; Cripps, H.E.; Iversen, L.L.

    1988-05-01

    Forskolin labelled with (/sup 3/H) bound to high- and low-affinity sites in the rat brain. The high-affinity site was discretely located, with highest densities in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercule, substantia nigra, hippocampus, and the molecular layers of the cerebellum. This site did not correlate well with the distribution of adenylate cyclase. The high-affinity striatal binding site may be associated with a stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein. Thus, the number of sites was increased by the addition of Mg/sup 2 +/ and guanylyl imidodiphosphate. Cholera toxin stereotaxically injected into rat striatum increased the number of binding sites, and no further increase was noted following the subsequent addition of guanyl nucleotide. High-affinity forskolin binding sites in non-dopamine-rich brain areas (hippocampus and cerebullum) were modulated in a qualitatively different manner by guanyl nucleotides. In these areas the number of binding sites was significantly reduced by the addition of guanyl nucleotide. These results suggest that forskolin may have a potential role in identifying different functional/structural guanine nucleotide-binding proteins.

  14. The structure of the Helicobacter pylori ferric uptake regulator Fur reveals three functional metal binding sites.

    PubMed

    Dian, Cyril; Vitale, Sylvia; Leonard, Gordon A; Bahlawane, Christelle; Fauquant, Caroline; Leduc, Damien; Muller, Cécile; de Reuse, Hilde; Michaud-Soret, Isabelle; Terradot, Laurent

    2011-03-01

    Fur, the ferric uptake regulator, is a transcription factor that controls iron metabolism in bacteria. Binding of ferrous iron to Fur triggers a conformational change that activates the protein for binding to specific DNA sequences named Fur boxes. In Helicobacter pylori, HpFur is involved in acid response and is important for gastric colonization in model animals. Here we present the crystal structure of a functionally active HpFur mutant (HpFur2M; C78S-C150S) bound to zinc. Although its fold is similar to that of other Fur and Fur-like proteins, the crystal structure of HpFur reveals a unique structured N-terminal extension and an unusual C-terminal helix. The structure also shows three metal binding sites: S1 the structural ZnS₄ site previously characterized biochemically in HpFur and the two zinc sites identified in other Fur proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis and spectroscopy analyses of purified wild-type HpFur and various mutants show that the two metal binding sites common to other Fur proteins can be also metallated by cobalt. DNA protection and circular dichroism experiments demonstrate that, while these two sites influence the affinity of HpFur for DNA, only one is absolutely required for DNA binding and could be responsible for the conformational changes of Fur upon metal binding while the other is a secondary site.

  15. Binding site residues control inhibitor selectivity in the human norepinephrine transporter but not in the human dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jacob; Ringsted, Kristoffer B; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Strømgaard, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders S

    2015-10-27

    The transporters for norepinephrine and dopamine (NET and DAT, respectively) constitute the molecular targets for recreational drugs and therapeutics used in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Despite a strikingly similar amino acid sequence and predicted topology between these transporters, some inhibitors display a high degree of selectivity between NET and DAT. Here, a systematic mutational analysis of non-conserved residues within the extracellular entry pathway and the high affinity binding site in NET and DAT was performed to examine their role for selective inhibitor recognition. Changing the six diverging residues in the central binding site of NET to the complementary residues in DAT transferred a DAT-like pharmacology to NET, showing that non-conserved binding site residues in NET are critical determinants for inhibitor selectivity. In contrast, changing the equivalent residues in the central site of DAT to the corresponding residues in NET had modest effects on the same inhibitors, suggesting that non-conserved binding site residues in DAT play a minor role for selective inhibitor recognition. Our data points towards distinct structural determinants governing inhibitor selectivity in NET and DAT, and provide important new insight into the molecular basis for NET/DAT selectivity of therapeutic and recreational drugs.

  16. Binding site residues control inhibitor selectivity in the human norepinephrine transporter but not in the human dopamine transporter

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jacob; Ringsted, Kristoffer B.; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Strømgaard, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders S.

    2015-01-01

    The transporters for norepinephrine and dopamine (NET and DAT, respectively) constitute the molecular targets for recreational drugs and therapeutics used in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Despite a strikingly similar amino acid sequence and predicted topology between these transporters, some inhibitors display a high degree of selectivity between NET and DAT. Here, a systematic mutational analysis of non-conserved residues within the extracellular entry pathway and the high affinity binding site in NET and DAT was performed to examine their role for selective inhibitor recognition. Changing the six diverging residues in the central binding site of NET to the complementary residues in DAT transferred a DAT-like pharmacology to NET, showing that non-conserved binding site residues in NET are critical determinants for inhibitor selectivity. In contrast, changing the equivalent residues in the central site of DAT to the corresponding residues in NET had modest effects on the same inhibitors, suggesting that non-conserved binding site residues in DAT play a minor role for selective inhibitor recognition. Our data points towards distinct structural determinants governing inhibitor selectivity in NET and DAT, and provide important new insight into the molecular basis for NET/DAT selectivity of therapeutic and recreational drugs. PMID:26503701

  17. Extraskeletal uptake of technetium-99m-MDP in sites of heparin administration.

    PubMed

    Challa, S; Miller, J H

    1998-05-01

    A 19-yr-old woman with juvenile diabetes and protein C deficiency was referred for a bone scan to rule out osteomyelitis of the right tibia. The bone scan did not reveal evidence of osteomyelitis. There was, however, extraskeletal uptake of the 99mTc bone tracer in the anterior abdominal wall confined to the sites of subcutaneous heparin administration. This case is presented because of its interesting scintigraphic findings and to discuss the association of protein C deficiency and heparin administration as a cause of extraskeletal 99mTc bone tracer accumulation.

  18. Vanadium uptake and translocation in dominant plant species on an urban coastal brownfield site.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yu; Gallagher, Frank J; Feng, Huan; Wu, Meiyin; Zhu, Qingzhi

    2014-04-01

    This study, conducted at a brownfield site in New Jersey, USA, investigated factors controlling V uptake and translocation in naturally assembled plant species. Six dominant species were collected from 22 stations in the study area. We found that V concentration in the plants decreased in a sequence of root>leaf>stem. No significant differences were found among the six dominant plant species in terms of root V uptake efficiency (V BCF) and V root to shoot translocation (V TF). Although soil pH and TOC did not show significant impact on V accumulation in the roots, soil labile V content showed significant positive linear correlation (p<0.05) with plant root V. Non-linear regression analysis indicates that V translocation efficiency decreases with increasing concentration in the soil, implying that excessive V in the soil might inhibit its absorption by the plant roots. Leaf V concentration was constant in all the plant species regardless of the variation in soil V concentration. The study shows that the six dominant plant species on site had limited amount of V translocated to the aerial part of the plant.

  19. A ZnS(4) structural zinc site in the Helicobacter pylori ferric uptake regulator.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Sylvia; Fauquant, Caroline; Lascoux, David; Schauer, Kristine; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Michaud-Soret, Isabelle

    2009-06-23

    The ferric uptake regulator, Fur, is a global bacterial transcriptional regulator using iron as a cofactor to bind to specific DNA sequences. This paper describes the biochemical characterization of the native ferric uptake regulator from Helicobacter pylori (HpFur): oligomeric state, metal content, and characterization of a structural metal-binding site. HpFur contains six cysteines with two CxxC motifs, which makes it closer to Bacillus subtilis PerR (BsPerR) than to Escherichia coli Fur (EcFur). Chemical modifications of cysteine residues using iodoacetamide followed by mass spectrometry after enzymatic digestion strongly suggest that these two CxxC motifs containing cysteines 102-105 and 142-145 are involved in zinc binding in a ZnS(4) metal site. The other two cysteines (78 and 150) are not essential for DNA binding activity and do not perturb metal binding as demonstrated with the characterization of a FurC78SC150S double mutant. Chelating agent such as EDTA disrupts the dimeric structure into monomer which did not contain zinc anymore. Reconstitution of dimer from monomer requires reduction and Zn(2+) binding. Cadmium(II) substitution allows also dimer formation from monomer, and Cd(II)-substituted FurC78SC150S mutant presents a characteristic absorption of a Cd(II)Cys(4) metal-binding site. These results establish that coordination of the zinc ion in HpFur is ZnCys(4), therefore closer to the zinc site in BsPerR than in EcFur. Furthermore, the redox state of the cysteines and the zinc binding are essential to hold the H. pylori Fur in a dimeric state.

  20. Microseconds simulations reveal a new sodium-binding site and the mechanism of sodium-coupled substrate uptake by LeuT.

    PubMed

    Zomot, Elia; Gur, Mert; Bahar, Ivet

    2015-01-02

    The bacterial sodium-coupled leucine/alanine transporter LeuT is broadly used as a model system for studying the transport mechanism of neurotransmitters because of its structural and functional homology to mammalian transporters such as serotonin, dopamine, or norepinephrine transporters, and because of the resolution of its structure in different states. Although the binding sites (S1 for substrate, and Na1 and Na2 for two co-transported sodium ions) have been resolved, we still lack a mechanistic understanding of coupled Na(+)- and substrate-binding events. We present here results from extensive (>20 μs) unbiased molecular dynamics simulations generated using the latest computing technology. Simulations show that sodium binds initially the Na1 site, but not Na2, and, consistently, sodium unbinding/escape to the extracellular (EC) region first takes place at Na2, succeeded by Na1. Na2 diffusion back to the EC medium requires prior dissociation of substrate from S1. Significantly, Na(+) binding (and unbinding) consistently involves a transient binding to a newly discovered site, Na1″, near S1, as an intermediate state. A robust sequence of substrate uptake events coupled to sodium bindings and translocations between those sites assisted by hydration emerges from the simulations: (i) bindings of a first Na(+) to Na1″, translocation to Na1, a second Na(+) to vacated Na1″ and then to Na2, and substrate to S1; (ii) rotation of Phe(253) aromatic group to seclude the substrate from the EC region; and (iii) concerted tilting of TM1b and TM6a toward TM3 and TM8 to close the EC vestibule.

  1. Water uptake by two river red gum ( Eucalyptus camaldulensis) clones in a discharge site plantation in the Western Australian wheatbelt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, John K.; Morgan, Anne L.; Akilan, Kandia; Farrell, Richard C. C.; Bell, David T.

    1997-12-01

    The heat-pulse technique was used to estimate year-long water uptake in a discharge zone plantation of 9-year-old clonal Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. near Wubin, Western Australia. Water uptake matched rainfall closely during weter months but exceeded rainfall as the dry season progressed. Average annual water uptake (1148 mm) exceeded rainfall (432 mm) by about 2.7 fold and approached 56% of pan evaporation for the area. The data suggest that at least 37% (i.e. ( {1}/{2.7}) × 100 ) of the lower catchment discharge zone should be planted to prevent the rise of groundwater. Water uptake varied with soil environment, season and genotype. Upslope trees used more water than did downslope trees. Water uptake was higher in E. camaldulensis clone M80 than in clone M66 until late spring. The difference reversed as summer progressed. Both clones, however, have the potential to dry out the landscape when potential evapotranspiration exceeds rainfall. This variation in water uptake within the species indicates the potential for manipulating plantation uptake by matching tree characteristics to site characteristics. Controlled experiments on the heat-pulse technique indicated accuracy errors of approximately 10%. This, combined with the ability to obtain long-term, continuous data and the superior logistics of use of the heat-pulse technique, suggests that results obtained by it would be much more reliable than those achieved by the ventilated chamber technique.

  2. Electrical stimulation of reward sites in the ventral tegmental area increases dopamine transmission in the nucleus accumbens of the rat.

    PubMed

    Fiorino, D F; Coury, A; Fibiger, H C; Phillips, A G

    1993-06-30

    In vivo microdialysis with HPLC-ED was used to measure dopamine (DA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the nucleus accumbens of the rat, prior, during, and after 15-min periods of electrical brain stimulation at sites in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) that supported intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS). In the first experiment, both ICSS and yoked stimulation of the VTA evoked significant increases in extracellular concentrations of DA, its metabolites, and 5-HIAA. Comparable results from ICSS and yoked groups were interpreted as evidence that the rewarding properties of VTA stimulation were a causal factor in the elevated DA transmission in the nucleus accumbens, rather than intense operant behavior. Further evidence for this hypothesis came from a second set of data in which changes in extracellular DA levels during the measurement of rate/intensity functions for ICSS were positively correlated. 5-HIAA concentrations also increased during ICSS but these changes were not correlated with either ICSS rate or current intensity, suggesting that changes in serotonin metabolism were unlikely to subserve brain stimulation reward in the VTA. These results add to the growing body of evidence linking changes in extracellular DA in the mesolimbic DA system with both brain stimulation reward and the conditioned and unconditioned rewarding effects of biologically relevant stimuli.

  3. Occupancy of the Zinc-binding Site by Transition Metals Decreases the Substrate Affinity of the Human Dopamine Transporter by an Allosteric Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Mayer, Felix P.; Hasenhuetl, Peter S.; Burtscher, Verena; Schicker, Klaus; Sitte, Harald H.; Freissmuth, Michael; Sandtner, Walter

    2017-01-01

    The human dopamine transporter (DAT) has a tetrahedral Zn2+-binding site. Zn2+-binding sites are also recognized by other first-row transition metals. Excessive accumulation of manganese or of copper can lead to parkinsonism because of dopamine deficiency. Accordingly, we examined the effect of Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, and Cu2+ on transport-associated currents through DAT and DAT-H193K, a mutant with a disrupted Zn2+-binding site. All transition metals except Mn2+ modulated the transport cycle of wild-type DAT with affinities in the low micromolar range. In this concentration range, they were devoid of any action on DAT-H193K. The active transition metals reduced the affinity of DAT for dopamine. The affinity shift was most pronounced for Cu2+, followed by Ni2+ and Zn2+ (= Co2+). The extent of the affinity shift and the reciprocal effect of substrate on metal affinity accounted for the different modes of action: Ni2+ and Cu2+ uniformly stimulated and inhibited, respectively, the substrate-induced steady-state currents through DAT. In contrast, Zn2+ elicited biphasic effects on transport, i.e. stimulation at 1 μm and inhibition at 10 μm. A kinetic model that posited preferential binding of transition metal ions to the outward-facing apo state of DAT and a reciprocal interaction of dopamine and transition metals recapitulated all experimental findings. Allosteric activation of DAT via the Zn2+-binding site may be of interest to restore transport in loss-of-function mutants. PMID:28096460

  4. Mapping the Catechol Binding Site in Dopamine D1 Receptors: Synthesis and Evaluation of Two Parallel Series of Bicyclic Dopamine Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Lisa A.; Laban, Uros; Chemel, Benjamin R.; Juncosa, Jose I.; Lill, Markus A.; Watts, Val J.; Nichols, David E.

    2012-01-01

    A novel class of isochroman dopamine analogues, 1, originally reported by Abbott Laboratories, had greater than 100-fold selectivity for D1-like vs. D2-like receptors. We synthesized a parallel series of chroman compounds, 2, and showed that repositioning the oxygen in the heterocyclic ring reduced potency and conferred D2-like receptor selectivity to these compounds. In silico modeling supported the hypothesis that the altered pharmacology for 2 was due to potential intramolecular hydrogen bonding between the oxygen in the chroman ring and the meta-hydroxyl of the catechol moiety. This interaction realigns the catechol hydroxyl groups and disrupts key interactions between these ligands and critical serine residues in TM5 of the D1-like receptors. This hypothesis was tested by the synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of a parallel series of carbocyclic compounds, 3. Our results suggest that when the potential for intramolecular hydrogen bonding is removed, D1-like receptor potency and selectivity is restored. PMID:21538900

  5. Drug uptake pathways of multidrug transporter AcrB studied by molecular simulations and site-directed mutagenesis experiments.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xin-Qiu; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Murakami, Satoshi; Takada, Shoji

    2013-05-22

    Multidrug resistance has been a critical issue in current chemotherapy. In Escherichia coli , a major efflux pump responsible for the multidrug resistance contains a transporter AcrB. Crystallographic studies and mutational assays of AcrB provided much of structural and overall functional insights, which led to the functionally rotating mechanism. However, the drug uptake pathways are somewhat controversial because at least two possible pathways, the vestibule and the cleft paths, were suggested. Here, combining molecular simulations and site-directed mutagenesis experiments, we addressed the uptake mechanism finding that the drug uptake pathways can be significantly different depending on the properties of drugs. First, in the computational free energy analysis of drug movements along AcrB tunnels, we found a ligand-dependent drug uptake mechanism. With the same molecular sizes, drugs that are both strongly hydrophobic and lipophilic were preferentially taken in via the vestibule path, while other drugs favored the cleft path. Second, direct simulations realized totally about 3500 events of drug uptake by AcrB for a broad range of drug property. These simulations confirmed the ligand-dependent drug uptake and further suggested that a smaller drug favors the vestibule path, while a larger one is taken in via the cleft path. Moreover, the direct simulations identified an alternative uptake path which is not visible in the crystal structure. Third, site-directed mutagenesis of AcrB in E. coli verified that mutations of residues located along the newly identified path significantly reduced the efflux efficiency, supporting its relevance in in vivo function.

  6. Effects of high-dose fenfluramine treatment on monoamine uptake sites in rat brain: Assessment using quantitative autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, N.M.; Mitchell, W.M.; Contrera, J.F.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Fenfluramine is an amphetamine derivative that in humans is used primarily as an anorectic agent in the treatment of obesity. In rats, subchronic high-dose d,l-fenfluramine treatment (24 mg/kg subcutaneously, twice daily for 4 days) causes long-lasting decreases in brain serotonin (5HT), its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and high-affinity 5HT uptake sites. Moreover, this high-dose treatment regimen causes both selective long-lasting decreases in fine-caliber 5HT-immunoreactive axons and appearance of other 5HT-immunoreactive axons with morphology characteristic of degenerating axons. Determination of the potential neurotoxic effects of fenfluramine treatment using immunohistochemistry is limited from the perspectives that staining is difficult to quantify and that it relies on presence of the antigen (in this case 5HT), and the 5HT-depleting effects of fenfluramine are well known. In the present study, we used quantitative in vitro autoradiography to assess, in detail, the density and regional distribution of (3H)paroxetine-labeled 5HT and (3H)mazindol-labeled catecholamine uptake sites in response to the high-dose fenfluramine treatment described above. Because monoamine uptake sites are concentrated on monoamine-containing nerve terminals, decreases in uptake site density would provide a quantitative assessment of potential neurotoxicity resulting from this fenfluramine treatment regimen. Marked decreases in densities of (3H)paroxetine-labeled 5HT uptake sites occurred in brain regions in which fenfluramine treatment decreased the density of 5HT-like immunostaining when compared to saline-treated control rats. These included cerebral cortex, caudate putamen, hippocampus, thalamus, and medial hypothalamus.

  7. Similarity of nutrient uptake and root dimensions of Engelmann spruce and subalpine fir at two contrasting sites in Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Yanai, R; McFarlane, K; Lucash, M; Kulpa, S; Wood, D

    2009-10-09

    Nutrient uptake capacity is an important parameter in modeling nutrient uptake by plants. Researchers commonly assume that uptake capacity measured for a species can be used across sites. We tested this assumption by measuring the nutrient uptake capacity of intact roots of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmanni Parry) and subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.) at Loch Vale Watershed and Fraser Experimental Forest in the Rocky Mountains of central Colorado. Roots still attached to the tree were exposed to one of three concentrations of nutrient solutions for time periods ranging from 1 to 96 hours, and solutions were analyzed for ammonium, nitrate, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. Surprisingly, the two species were indistinguishable in nutrient uptake within site for all nutrients (P > 0.25), but uptake rates differed by site. In general, nutrient uptake was higher at Fraser (P = 0.01, 0.15, 0.03, 0.18 for NH{sub 4}{sup +}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, Ca{sup 2+}, and K{sup +}, respectively), which is west of the Continental Divide and has lower atmospheric deposition of N than Loch Vale. Mean uptake rates by site for ambient solution concentrations were 0.12 {micro}mol NH{sub 4}{sup +} g{sub fwt}{sup -1} h{sup -1}, 0.02 {micro}mol NO{sub 3}{sup -} g{sub fwt}{sup -1}, 0.21 {micro}mol Ca{sup 2+} g{sub fwt}{sup -1} h{sup -1}, and 0.01 {micro}mol Mg{sup 2+} g{sub fwt}{sup -1} h{sup -1} at Loch Vale, and 0.21 {micro}mol NH{sub 4}{sup +} f{sub fwt}{sup -1}h{sup -1}, 0.04 {micro}mol NO{sub 3}{sup -} g{sub fwt}{sup -1} h{sup -1}, 0.51 {micro}mol Ca{sup 2+}g{sub fwt}{sup -1}h{sup -1}, and 0.07 {micro}mol Mg{sup 2+} f{sub fwt}{sup -1}h{sup -1} at Fraser. The importance of site conditions in determining uptake capacity should not be overlooked when parameterizing nutrient uptake models. We also characterized the root morphology of these two species and compared them to other tree species we have measured at various sites in the northeastern USA. Engelman spruce and subalpine fir

  8. Urinary Dopamine as a Potential Index of the Transport Activity of Multidrug and Toxin Extrusion in the Kidney.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Moto; Ban, Tsuyoshi; Matsubara, Kazuo; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Masuda, Satohiro

    2016-07-30

    Dopamine is a cationic natriuretic catecholamine synthesized in proximal tubular cells (PTCs) of the kidney before secretion into the lumen, a key site of its action. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying dopamine secretion into the lumen remain unclear. Multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE) is a H⁺/organic cation antiporter that is highly expressed in the brush border membrane of PTCs and mediates the efflux of organic cations, including metformin and cisplatin, from the epithelial cells into the urine. Therefore, we hypothesized that MATE mediates dopamine secretion, a cationic catecholamine, into the tubule lumen, thereby regulating natriuresis. Here, we show that [³H]dopamine uptake in human (h) MATE1-, hMATE-2K- and mouse (m) MATE-expressing cells exhibited saturable kinetics. Fluid retention and decreased urinary excretion of dopamine and Na⁺ were observed in Mate1-knockout mice compared to that in wild-type mice. Imatinib, a MATE inhibitor, inhibited [³H]dopamine uptake by hMATE1-, hMATE2-K- and mMATE1-expressing cells in a concentration-dependent manner. At clinically-relevant concentrations, imatinib inhibited [³H]dopamine uptake by hMATE1- and hMATE2-K-expressing cells. The urinary excretion of dopamine and Na⁺ decreased and fluid retention occurred in imatinib-treated mice. In conclusion, MATE transporters secrete renally-synthesized dopamine, and therefore, urinary dopamine has the potential to be an index of the MATE transporter activity.

  9. Blockade of uptake for dopamine, but not norepinephrine or 5-HT, increases selection of high effort instrumental activity: Implications for treatment of effort-related motivational symptoms in psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Yohn, Samantha E; Errante, Emily E; Rosenbloom-Snow, Aaron; Somerville, Matthew; Rowland, Margaret; Tokarski, Kristin; Zafar, Nadia; Correa, Merce; Salamone, John D

    2016-10-01

    Deficits in behavioral activation, exertion of effort, and other psychomotor/motivational symptoms are frequently seen in people with depression and other disorders. Depressed people show a decision bias towards selection of low effort activities, and animal tests of effort-related decision making are being used as models of motivational dysfunctions seen in psychopathology. The present studies investigated the ability of drugs that block dopamine transport (DAT), norepinephrine transport (NET), and serotonin transport (SERT) to modulate work output in rats responding on a test of effort-related decision making (i.e., a progressive ratio (PROG)/chow feeding choice task). With this task, rats choose between working for a preferred food (high carbohydrate pellets) by lever pressing on a PROG schedule vs. obtaining a less preferred lab chow that is freely available in the chamber. The present studies focused on the effects of the selective DAT inhibitor GBR12909, the selective SERT inhibitor fluoxetine, and the selective NET inhibitors desipramine and atomoxetine. Acute and repeated administration of GBR12909 shifted choice behavior, increasing measures of PROG lever pressing but decreasing chow intake. In contrast, fluoxetine, desipramine and atomoxetine failed to increase lever pressing output, and actually decreased it at higher doses. In the behaviorally effective dose range, GBR12909 elevated extracellular dopamine levels in accumbens core as measured by microdialysis, but fluoxetine, desipramine and atomoxetine decreased extracellular dopamine. Thus, blockade of DAT increases selection of the high effort instrumental activity, while inhibition of SERT or NET does not. These results have implications for the use of monoamine uptake inhibitors for the treatment of effort-related psychiatric symptoms in humans.

  10. Missense dopamine transporter mutations associate with adult parkinsonism and ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Freja H.; Skjørringe, Tina; Yasmeen, Saiqa; Arends, Natascha V.; Sahai, Michelle A.; Erreger, Kevin; Andreassen, Thorvald F.; Holy, Marion; Hamilton, Peter J.; Neergheen, Viruna; Karlsborg, Merete; Newman, Amy H.; Pope, Simon; Heales, Simon J.R.; Friberg, Lars; Law, Ian; Pinborg, Lars H.; Sitte, Harald H.; Loland, Claus; Shi, Lei; Weinstein, Harel; Galli, Aurelio; Hjermind, Lena E.; Møller, Lisbeth B.; Gether, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    Parkinsonism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are widespread brain disorders that involve disturbances of dopaminergic signaling. The sodium-coupled dopamine transporter (DAT) controls dopamine homeostasis, but its contribution to disease remains poorly understood. Here, we analyzed a cohort of patients with atypical movement disorder and identified 2 DAT coding variants, DAT-Ile312Phe and a presumed de novo mutant DAT-Asp421Asn, in an adult male with early-onset parkinsonism and ADHD. According to DAT single-photon emission computed tomography (DAT-SPECT) scans and a fluoro-deoxy-glucose-PET/MRI (FDG-PET/MRI) scan, the patient suffered from progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration. In heterologous cells, both DAT variants exhibited markedly reduced dopamine uptake capacity but preserved membrane targeting, consistent with impaired catalytic activity. Computational simulations and uptake experiments suggested that the disrupted function of the DAT-Asp421Asn mutant is the result of compromised sodium binding, in agreement with Asp421 coordinating sodium at the second sodium site. For DAT-Asp421Asn, substrate efflux experiments revealed a constitutive, anomalous efflux of dopamine, and electrophysiological analyses identified a large cation leak that might further perturb dopaminergic neurotransmission. Our results link specific DAT missense mutations to neurodegenerative early-onset parkinsonism. Moreover, the neuropsychiatric comorbidity provides additional support for the idea that DAT missense mutations are an ADHD risk factor and suggests that complex DAT genotype and phenotype correlations contribute to different dopaminergic pathologies. PMID:24911152

  11. Dopamine transporter; solubilization and characterization of ( sup 3 H) GBR-12935 binding in canine caudate

    SciTech Connect

    Sallee, F.R.

    1988-01-01

    The dopamine (DA) transporter protein, as indexed by ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935 binding, was solubilized from canine striatal membranes with the detergent digitonin. This solubilized protein retained the same pharmacological characteristics as membrane attached uptake sites. The binding of ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935 to solubilized preparations was specific, saturable and reversible with an equilibrium dissociation constant of approximately 3 nM and a maximum ligand binding (B{sub max}) of 3.4 pmol/mg protein. ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935 also bound to solubilized sites in a sodium-independent manner with a K{sub D} of approximately 6 nM and a B{sub max} of 1.2 {plus minus} 0.2 pmol/mg protein. Dopamine uptake inhibitors and substrates of DA uptake inhibited ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935 binding in a stereoselective and concentration dependent manner. For these compounds rank order of potency for inhibition of ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935 binding correlated with their potency for inhibition of dopamine uptake. K{sub D} values for DA uptake inhibitors in solubilized preparations correlated with those obtained on ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935 binding in the native state. The dopamine transporter appears to be a transmembrane glycoprotein by virtue of its absorption and specific elution from wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-lectin column. Solubilization of the putative dopamine transporter with full retention of binding activity now allows for the purification and biochemical characterization of this important membrane protein.

  12. Different components of /sup 3/H-imipramine binding in rat brain membranes: relation to serotonin uptake sites

    SciTech Connect

    Gobbi, M.; Taddei, C.; Mennini, T.

    1988-01-01

    In the present paper, the authors confirm and extend previous studies showing heterogeneous /sup 3/H-imipramine (/sup 3/H-IMI) binding sites. Inhibition curves of various drugs (serotonin, imipramine, desmethyl-imipramine, d-fenfluramine, d-norfenfluramine and indalpine, a potent serotonin uptake inhibitor) obtained using 2 nM /sup 3/H-IMI and in presence of 120 mM NaCl, confirmed the presence of at least three /sup 3/H-IMI binding sites: two of these were serotonin-insensitive while the third one was selectively inhibited by serotonin and indalpine with nanomolar affinities. Moreover this last component was found to be selectively modulated by chronic imipramine treatment thus suggesting a close relation to serontonin uptake mechanism. These data indicate that the use of a more selective inhibitors of the serotonin-sensitive component (like indalpine or serotonin itself) to define non specific /sup 3/H-IMI, may be of help in understanding its relation with serotonin uptake system. 22 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Uptake and recycling of lead by boreal forest plants: Quantitative estimates from a site in northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaminder, Jonatan; Bindler, Richard; Emteryd, Ove; Renberg, Ingemar

    2005-05-01

    As a consequence of deposition of atmospheric pollution, the lead concentration in the mor layer (the organic horizon) of remote boreal forest soils in Sweden is raised far above natural levels. How the mor will respond to decreased atmospheric pollution is not well known and is dependent on future deposition rates, downward migration losses and upward fluxes in the soil profile. Plants may contribute to the upward flux of lead by 'pumping' lead back to the mor surface through root uptake and subsequent litter fall. We use lead concentration and stable isotope ( 206Pb, 207Pb and 208Pb) measurements of forest vegetation to quantify plant uptake rates from the soil and direct from the atmosphere at two sites in northern Sweden; an undisturbed mature forest and a disturbed site with Scots pine ( Pinus sylvestris) growing on a recently exposed mineral soil (C-horizon) containing a minimum of atmospherically derived pollution lead. Analyses of forest mosses from a herbarium collection (spanning the last ˜100 yr) and soil matrix samples suggest that the atmospheric lead deposited on plants and soil has an average 206Pb/ 207Pb ratio of 1.15, while lead derived from local soil minerals has an average ratio of ˜1.47. Since the biomass of trees and field layer shrubs has an average 206Pb/ 207Pb ratio of ˜1.25, this indicates that 70% ± 10% of the inventory of 1 ± 0.8 mg Pb m -2 stored in plants in the mature forest originates from pollution. Needles, bark and apical stemwood of the pine growing on the disturbed soil, show lower 206Pb/ 207Pb ratios (as low as 1.21) than the roots and basal stemwood (having ratios > 1.36), which indicate that plants are able to incorporate lead directly from the atmosphere (˜50% of the total tree uptake). By partitioning the total uptake of lead into uptake from the atmosphere and different soil layers using an isotopic mixing model, we estimate that ˜0.03 ± 0.01, 0.02 ± 0.01 and 0.05 ± 0.01 mg Pb m -2 yr -1 (mean ± SD), is taken up

  14. Photoaffinity labeling of the dopamine reuptake carrier protein with 3-azido sup 3 H GBR-12935

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, S.P.; Martenson, R.E.; Laing, P.; Thurkauf, A.; Decosta, B.; Rice, K.C.; Paul, S.M. )

    1991-04-01

    A high affinity tritiated azido-diphenylpiperazine derivative, 3-azido {sup 3}H GBR-12935, was synthesized as a potential photoaffinity probe of the dopamine transporter. Initially, the reversible binding of 3-azido {sup 3}H GBR-12935 to crude synaptosomal membranes from the rat striatum was characterized. Specific binding was sodium dependent and inhibited by a variety of drugs that are known to potently inhibit dopamine uptake. Other neurotransmitter uptake inhibitors, as well as cis-flupenthixol, a potent inhibitor of {sup 3}H GBR-12935 binding to piperazine binding sites, failed to inhibit specific binding at concentrations of less than or equal to 10 microM. A good correlation was observed between the relative potencies of these drugs in inhibiting dopamine uptake into synaptosomes and in inhibiting specific 3-azido {sup 3}H GBR-12935 binding to rat striatal membranes. These data suggest that 3-azido {sup 3}H GBR-12935, like other diphenylpiperazines such as {sup 3}H GBR-12935 and {sup 3}H GBR-12909, binds primarily to the dopamine transporter under defined assay conditions. After UV photolysis of crude synaptosomal membranes preincubated with 3-azido {sup 3}H GBR-12935 (1-2 nM), a single radiolabeled polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 80 kDa was observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. Photoincorporation of 3-azido {sup 3}H GBR-12935 into this polypeptide was inhibited selectively by compounds that inhibit the uptake of dopamine and was completely dependent on the presence of Na+. No photolabeled proteins were observed when cerebellar membranes were substituted for striatal membranes. Essentially complete adsorption of the radiolabeled 80-kDa polypeptide to wheat germ agglutinin and elution with N-acetyl-D-glucosamine strongly suggest that the dopamine transporter polypeptide photolabeled by 3-azido {sup 3}H GBR-12935 is glycosylated.

  15. Plant selective uptake of halogenated flame retardants at an e-waste recycling site in southern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaorui; Wang, Yan; Luo, Chunling; Li, Jun; Yin, Hua; Zhang, Gan

    2016-07-01

    The concentrations and homolog patterns of halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) in vegetables grown at an e-waste contaminated site were investigated. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were the dominant HFRs in vegetable tissues, with concentrations ranging from 10.3 to 164 ng g(-1) and 1.16-107 ng g(-1) in shoots and roots, respectively, followed by novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) and dechlorane plus (DPs). This is an indication that PBDE contamination in vegetables grown around e-waste recycling sites may pose a risk to the local terrestrial ecosystem and residents. In addition, this is the first report on the concentrations and compositions of NBFRs in vegetables around e-waste recycling sites. The HFRs concentrations in vegetables varied greatly with the vegetable species, with the highest concentrations observed in Brassica oleracea var. capitata. Root concentration factors (RCF) decreased with increasing log Kow of HFRs, which indicated that the uptake of HFRs was controlled mainly by log Kow. Dissimilar HFRs profiles in shoots and roots suggested that the uptake and translocation of HFRs by plants were selective, with lower halogenated congeners prone to accumulation in vegetable tissues. Positive relationships between PBDEs and their substitutes were observed in vegetable tissues, suggesting that the replacement of PBDEs by NBFRs has not resulted in an obvious transition in plants within the study area.

  16. Selective labeling of serotonin uptake sites in rat brain by (/sup 3/H)citalopram contrasted to labeling of multiple sites by (/sup 3/H)imipramine

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amato, R.J.; Largent, B.L.; Snowman, A.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-07-01

    Citalopram is a potent and selective inhibitor of neuronal serotonin uptake. In rat brain membranes (/sup 3/H)citalopram demonstrates saturable and reversible binding with a KD of 0.8 nM and a maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) of 570 fmol/mg of protein. The drug specificity for (/sup 3/H)citalopram binding and synaptosomal serotonin uptake are closely correlated. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)citalopram binding by both serotonin and imipramine is consistent with a competitive interaction in both equilibrium and kinetic analyses. The autoradiographic pattern of (/sup 3/H)citalopram binding sites closely resembles the distribution of serotonin. By contrast, detailed equilibrium-saturation analysis of (/sup 3/H)imipramine binding reveals two binding components, i.e., high affinity (KD = 9 nM, Bmax = 420 fmol/mg of protein) and low affinity (KD = 553 nM, Bmax = 8560 fmol/mg of protein) sites. Specific (/sup 3/H)imipramine binding, defined as the binding inhibited by 100 microM desipramine, is displaced only partially by serotonin. Various studies reveal that the serotonin-sensitive portion of binding corresponds to the high affinity sites of (/sup 3/H)imipramine binding whereas the serotonin-insensitive binding corresponds to the low affinity sites. Lesioning of serotonin neurons with p-chloroamphetamine causes a large decrease in (/sup 3/H)citalopram and serotonin-sensitive (/sup 3/H)imipramine binding with only a small effect on serotonin-insensitive (/sup 3/H)imipramine binding. The dissociation rate of (/sup 3/H)imipramine or (/sup 3/H)citalopram is not altered by citalopram, imipramine or serotonin up to concentrations of 10 microM. The regional distribution of serotonin sensitive (/sup 3/H)imipramine high affinity binding sites closely resembles that of (/sup 3/H)citalopram binding.

  17. Site-Specific Radioiodination of HER2-Targeting Affibody Molecules using 4-Iodophenethylmaleimide Decreases Renal Uptake of Radioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Joanna; Nordeman, Patrik; Honarvar, Hadis; Altai, Mohamed; Orlova, Anna; Larhed, Mats; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Affibody molecules are small scaffold-based affinity proteins with promising properties as probes for radionuclide-based molecular imaging. However, a high reabsorption of radiolabeled Affibody molecules in kidneys is an issue. We have shown that the use of 125I-3-iodo-((4-hydroxyphenyl)ethyl)maleimide (IHPEM) for site-specific labeling of cysteine-containing Affibody molecules provides high tumor uptake but low radioactivity retention in kidneys. We hypothesized that the use of 4-iodophenethylmaleimide (IPEM) would further reduce renal retention of radioactivity because of higher lipophilicity of radiometabolites. An anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) Affibody molecule (ZHER2:2395) was labeled using 125I-IPEM with an overall yield of 45±3 %. 125I-IPEM-ZHER2:2395 bound specifically to HER2-expressing human ovarian carcinoma cells (SKOV-3 cell line). In NMRI mice, the renal uptake of 125I-IPEM-ZHER2:2395 (24±2 and 5.7±0.3 % IA g−1at 1 and 4 h after injection, respectively) was significantly lower than uptake of 125I-IHPEM-ZHER2:2395 (50±8 and 12±2 % IA g−1at 1 and 4 h after injection, respectively). In conclusion, the use of a more lipophilic linker for the radioiodination of Affibody molecules reduces renal radioactivity. PMID:25969816

  18. Cellular sites of estrogen and antiestrogen uptake, retention and action: comparative autoradiographic studies in the immature rat uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Ennis, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    This purpose of this study is to clarify the mechanism of action of antiestrogens: agents used for treating breast cancer and as probes for studying the mechanisms of action of estrogen. Nuclear uptake and retention of estrogen and antiestrogen were determined in the different cell types of the immature rat uterus, by quantitative autoradiography, after an injection of tritiated hydroxytamoxifen ((/sup 3/H)TAM(OH)) or tritiated estradiol ((/sup 3/H)E/sub 2/). The effect of TAM(OH) and E/sub 2/ on progesterone receptor content was assessed in the different cell types by determining nuclear uptake of the synthetic progestin (/sup 3/H)Org 2058. The results indicate that antiestrogen and estrogen localize to nuclei of the same uterine cell types, but that this nuclear uptake differs among the uterine tissue compartments, that antiestrogen is taken up considerably slower and retained longer than estrogen and that antiestrogen and estrogen differentially affect progesterone receptor content in the different cell types. The results further suggest that antiestrogen-specific binding sites exist in the cytoplasm of uterine luminal epithelium.

  19. Investigation of Local Hydrogen Uptake in Rescaled Model Occluded Sites Using Crevice Scaling Laws

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Measured potential, TDS measured CH, and calculated CH versus depth. 1.2- -0-- PH17-7 (Burnell et al.) -- 0-- PH13 - 8 (Tyler et al.) 1.0 - V PH17-4...formation [7] as well as possibly triggering dynamic trap state creation when vacancies function as H traps. [ 8 ] The amount of H generation within the...a different local crack tip chemistry and level of H uptake.[21]. The Kth vs yield strength data for PH 13- 8 Mo suggest an extreme sensitivity to

  20. Comparison of dopamine receptor sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)-S-sulpiride and (/sup 3/H)-spiperone in striatum

    SciTech Connect

    Zahniser, N.R.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    1983-12-01

    Binding of the radiolabeled active isomer of the neuroleptic sulpiride, (/sup 3/H)-S-sulpiride, to rat and rabbit striatal membranes was characterized. Regardless of whether the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)-S-sulpiride was defined with spiperone or the active isomers of butaclamol or flupenthixol, a single homogeneous++ population of binding sites (rat: Kd . 5.6 nM, maximum binding . 590 fmol/mg of protein; rabbit: Kd . 8.3 nM, maximum binding . 540 fmol/mg of protein) was detected. The pharmacological profile of these sites was characteristic of that described for the dopaminergic D-2 receptor subtype. To determine whether (/sup 3/H)-S-sulpiride and (/sup 3/H)spiperone label common sites in the striatum, the binding of these two radioligands was compared under similar assay conditions. When specific binding of (/sup 3/H)spiperone was defined with S-sulpiride, (/sup 3/H)spiperone labeled the same number of binding sites as (/sup 3/H)-S-sulpiride despite the fact that the affinity of the sites for (/sup 3/H)spiperone was 80- to 90-fold higher than for (/sup 3/H)-S-sulpiride. When specific binding of (/sup 3/H)spiperone was defined with either (+)-butaclamol or (alpha)-flupenthixol, however, approximately 30% more sites were labeled. The predominant site labeled by (/sup 3/H)spiperone also possessed the characteristics of the D-2 receptor. It is concluded that (/sup 3/H)-S-sulpiride under the conditions used is a selective radioligand with which dopamine receptors of the D-2 subtype can be directly measured and localized. (/sup 3/H)Spiperone can be used to detect the same sites only if specific binding is defined with S-sulpiride.

  1. Development of potent dopamine-norepinephrine uptake inhibitors (DNRIs) based on a (2S,4R,5R)-2-benzhydryl-5-((4-methoxybenzyl)amino)tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-ol molecular template.

    PubMed

    Santra, Soumava; Sharma, Horrick; Vedachalam, Seenuvasan; Antonio, Tamara; Reith, Maarten; Dutta, Aloke

    2015-02-15

    Current therapy of depression is less than ideal with remission rates of only 25-35% and response rates of 45-60%. It has been hypothesized that a dysfunctional dopaminergic system in the mesocorticolimbic pathway in depressive disorder may lead to development of anhedonia associated with loss of pleasure and interest along with loss of motivation. The current antidepressants do not address dopamine dysfunction which might explain their low efficacy. In this report, we have described an SAR study on our pyran-based triple reuptake inhibitors (TRIs) which are being investigated as the next-generation antidepressants. In the present work we demonstrate that our lead TRIs can be modified with appropriate aromatic substitutions to display a highly potent SSRI profile for compounds 2a and 4a (Ki (SERT); 0.71 and 2.68nM, respectively) or a potent DNRI profile for compounds 6b and 6h (Ki (DAT/NET); 8.94/4.76 and 13/7.37nM, respectively). Compounds 4g-4i exhibited potencies at all three monoamine transporters. The results provide insights into the structural requirements for developing selective dual- and triple-uptake inhibitors from a unique pyran molecular template for an effective management of depression and related disorders.

  2. Arsenic and lead uptake by Brassicas grown on an old orchard site.

    PubMed

    Lim, Maya P; McBride, Murray B

    2015-12-15

    Arugula (Eruca sativa) and collards (Brassica oleracea var. acephala), were grown at a former orchard where soils had been variably contaminated by lead arsenate pesticides. To test for the effect of compost on As and Pb transfer into plants, compost was added (0, 5, and 10% DW) to five plots representing a wide range of soil Pb and As. Arugula accumulated about 5 times higher As concentrations in above-ground tissues than collards, with high variability in individual plant concentrations. Soil to arugula transfer (uptake) coefficients were higher for As than for Pb, and increased with soil As. Crop concentrations of Pb varied widely within replicate samples of both arugula and collards. Arugula contamination by Pb was significantly correlated to soil total Pb, but collard contamination was not. Evidence was found using Al as an indicator of soil particle contamination of plant tissues that Pb in arugula was primarily due to soil particle deposition on foliar surfaces. Compost amendments reduced 0.01 M CaCl2 -extractable Pb but increased extractable As in the orchard soils. However, compost had the beneficial effect of reducing both As and Pb concentrations in harvested arugula grown on most of the plots.

  3. The cell pole: the site of cross talk between the DNA uptake and genetic recombination machinery.

    PubMed

    Kidane, Dawit; Ayora, Silvia; Sweasy, Joann B; Graumann, Peter L; Alonso, Juan C

    2012-01-01

    Natural transformation is a programmed mechanism characterized by binding of free double-stranded (ds) DNA from the environment to the cell pole in rod-shaped bacteria. In Bacillus subtilis some competence proteins, which process the dsDNA and translocate single-stranded (ss) DNA into the cytosol, recruit a set of recombination proteins mainly to one of the cell poles. A subset of single-stranded binding proteins, working as "guardians", protects ssDNA from degradation and limit the RecA recombinase loading. Then, the "mediators" overcome the inhibitory role of guardians, and recruit RecA onto ssDNA. A RecA·ssDNA filament searches for homology on the chromosome and, in a process that is controlled by "modulators", catalyzes strand invasion with the generation of a displacement loop (D-loop). A D-loop resolvase or "resolver" cleaves this intermediate, limited DNA replication restores missing information and a DNA ligase seals the DNA ends. However, if any step fails, the "rescuers" will repair the broken end to rescue chromosomal transformation. If the ssDNA does not share homology with resident DNA, but it contains information for autonomous replication, guardian and mediator proteins catalyze plasmid establishment after inhibition of RecA. DNA replication and ligation reconstitute the molecule (plasmid transformation). In this review, the interacting network that leads to a cross talk between proteins of the uptake and genetic recombination machinery will be placed into prospective.

  4. Dopamine transporter: expression in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Uhl, G R; O'Hara, B; Shimada, S; Zaczek, R; DiGiorgianni, J; Nishimori, T

    1991-01-01

    Xenopus oocytes can express biologically relevant transport activity after injection of mRNAs encoding several carrier molecules. mRNA from PC12 cells, as well as transcripts from a rat ventral midbrain library, can be expressed in these oocytes and allow them to display pharmacologically specific dopamine uptake. mRNA-injected oocytes incubated with tritiated dopamine contain tritiated dopamine and metabolites; lower amounts of radiolabeled dopamine and more radiolabeled metabolites are found in oocytes co-incubated with cocaine or in water-injected oocytes. Tritiated dopamine uptake into mRNA-injected oocytes is time, sodium, and temperature dependent. It is blocked by cocaine and mazindol, but not by haloperidol. It is not found after injection of mRNA from other brain regions. A size-selected rat midbrain library constructed in the plasma vector pCDM8 yields mRNA transcripts whose injection into oocytes causes cocaine-blockable [3H]dopamine uptake. These findings provide an assay for purification of the dopamine transporter cDNA by sib selection techniques.

  5. Beta-test Results for an HPV Information Web site: GoHealthyGirls.org – Increasing HPV Vaccine Uptake in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Nodulman, Jessica A.; Kong, Alberta S.; Wheeler, Cosette M.; Buller, David B.; Woodall, W. Gill

    2014-01-01

    A web site, GoHealthyGirls, was developed to educate and inform parents and their adolescent daughters about human papillomavirus (HPV) and HPV vaccines. This article provides an overview of web site development and content followed by the results of a beta-test of the web site. 63 New Mexican parents of adolescent girls tested the site. Results indicated that GoHealthyGirls was a functioning and appealing web site. During this brief educational intervention, findings suggest that the web site has the potential to increase HPV vaccine uptake. This research supports the Internet as a valuable channel to disseminate health education and information to diverse populations. PMID:25221442

  6. Beta-test Results for an HPV Information Web site: GoHealthyGirls.org - Increasing HPV Vaccine Uptake in the United States.

    PubMed

    Starling, Randall; Nodulman, Jessica A; Kong, Alberta S; Wheeler, Cosette M; Buller, David B; Woodall, W Gill

    2014-01-01

    A web site, GoHealthyGirls, was developed to educate and inform parents and their adolescent daughters about human papillomavirus (HPV) and HPV vaccines. This article provides an overview of web site development and content followed by the results of a beta-test of the web site. 63 New Mexican parents of adolescent girls tested the site. Results indicated that GoHealthyGirls was a functioning and appealing web site. During this brief educational intervention, findings suggest that the web site has the potential to increase HPV vaccine uptake. This research supports the Internet as a valuable channel to disseminate health education and information to diverse populations.

  7. The cell pole: The site of cross talk between the DNA uptake and genetic recombination machinery

    PubMed Central

    Kidane, Dawit; Ayora, Silvia; Sweasy, Joann; Graumann, Peter L.; Alonso, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Natural transformation is a programmed mechanism characterized by binding of free double-stranded (ds) DNA from the environment to the cell pole in rod-shaped bacteria. In Bacillus subtilis some competence proteins, which process the dsDNA and translocate single-stranded (ss) DNA into the cytosol, recruit a set of recombination proteins mainly to one of the cell poles. A subset of single-stranded binding proteins, working as “guardians”, protect ssDNA from degradation and limit the RecA recombinase loading. Then, the “mediators” overcome the inhibitory role of guardians, and recruit RecA onto ssDNA. A RecA·ssDNA filament searches for homology on the chromosome and, in a process that is controlled by “modulators”, catalyzes strand invasion with the generation of a displacement loop (D-loop). A D-loop resolvase or “resolver” cleaves this intermediate, limited DNA replication restores missing information and a DNA ligase seals the DNA ends. However, if any step fails, the “rescuers” will repair the broken end to rescue chromosomal transformation. If the ssDNA does not share homology with resident DNA, but it contains information for autonomous replication, guardian and mediator proteins catalyze plasmid establishment after inhibition of RecA. DNA replication and ligation reconstitute the molecule (plasmid transformation). In this review, the interacting network that leads to a cross talk between proteins of the uptake and genetic recombination machinery will be placed into prospective. PMID:23046409

  8. Synthesis of Highly Porous Coordination Polymers with Open Metal Sites for Enhanced Gas Uptake and Separation.

    PubMed

    Song, Kyung Seob; Kim, Daeok; Polychronopoulou, Kyriaki; Coskun, Ali

    2016-10-12

    Metal-containing amorphous microporous polymers are an emerging class of functional porous materials in which the surface properties and functions of polymers are dictated by the nature of the metal ions incorporated into the framework. In an effort to introduce coordinatively unsaturated metal sites into the porous polymers, we demonstrate herein an aqueous-phase synthesis of porous coordination polymers (PCPs) incorporating bis(o-diiminobenzosemiquinonato)-Cu(II) or -Ni(II) bridges by simply reacting hexaminotriptycene with CuSO4·5H2O [Cu(II)-PCP] or NiCl2·6H2O [Ni(II)-PCP] in H2O. The resulting polymers showed surface areas of up to 489 m(2) g(-1) along with a narrow pore size distribution. The presence of open metal sites significantly improved the gas affinity of these frameworks, leading to an exceptional isosteric heat of adsorption of 10.3 kJ·mol(-1) for H2 at zero coverage. The high affinities of Cu(II)- and Ni(II)-PCPs toward CO2 prompted us to investigate the removal of CO2 from natural and landfill gas conditions. We found that the higher affinity of Cu(II)-PCP compared to that of Ni(II)-PCP not only allowed for the tuning of the affinity of CO2 molecules toward the sorbent, but also led to an exceptional CO2/CH4 selectivity of 35.1 for landfill gas and 20.7 for natural gas at 298 K. These high selectivities were further verified by breakthrough measurements under the simulated natural and landfill gas conditions, in which both Cu(II)- and Ni(II)-PCPs showed complete removal of CO2. These results clearly demonstrate the promising attributes of metal-containing porous polymers for gas storage and separation applications.

  9. Dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome: phenotypic spectrum from infancy to adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Joanne; Zhen, Juan; Meyer, Esther; Erreger, Kevin; Li, Yan; Kakar, Naseebullah; Ahmad, Jamil; Thiele, Holger; Kubisch, Christian; Rider, Nicholas L.; Holmes Morton, D.; Strauss, Kevin A.; Puffenberger, Erik G.; D’Agnano, Daniela; Anikster, Yair; Carducci, Claudia; Hyland, Keith; Rotstein, Michael; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Borck, Guntram; Reith, Maarten E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome due to SLC6A3 mutations is the first inherited dopamine ‘transportopathy’ to be described, with a classical presentation of early infantile-onset progressive parkinsonism dystonia. In this study we have identified a new cohort of patients with dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome, including, most significantly, atypical presentation later in childhood with a milder disease course. We report the detailed clinical features, molecular genetic findings and in vitro functional investigations undertaken for adult and paediatric cases. Patients presenting with parkinsonism dystonia or a neurotransmitter profile characteristic of dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome were recruited for study. SLC6A3 mutational analysis was undertaken in all patients. The functional consequences of missense variants on the dopamine transporter were evaluated by determining the effect of mutant dopamine transporter on dopamine uptake, protein expression and amphetamine-mediated dopamine efflux using an in vitro cellular heterologous expression system. We identified eight new patients from five unrelated families with dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome. The median age at diagnosis was 13 years (range 1.5–34 years). Most significantly, the case series included three adolescent males with atypical dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome of juvenile onset (outside infancy) and progressive parkinsonism dystonia. The other five patients in the cohort presented with classical infantile-onset parkinsonism dystonia, with one surviving into adulthood (currently aged 34 years) and labelled as having ‘juvenile parkinsonism’. All eight patients harboured homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in SLC6A3, of which the majority are previously unreported variants. In vitro studies of mutant dopamine transporter demonstrated multifaceted loss of dopamine transporter function. Impaired dopamine uptake was universally present, and more

  10. SKF-83566, a D1-dopamine receptor antagonist, inhibits the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, Melissa A; Ali, Solav; Reith, Maarten E A; Patel, Jyoti C; Sarti, Federica; Carr, Kenneth D; Rice, Margaret E

    2011-09-01

    Dopamine (DA) is an important transmitter in both motor and limbic pathways. We sought to investigate the role of D(1)-receptor activation in axonal DA release regulation in dorsal striatum using a D(1)-receptor antagonist, SKF-83566. Evoked DA release was monitored in rat striatal slices using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. SKF-83566 caused a concentration-dependent increase in peak single-pulse evoked extracellular DA concentration, with a maximum increase of ∼ 65% in 5 μM SKF-83566. This was accompanied by a concentration-dependent increase in extracellular DA concentration clearance time. Both effects were occluded by nomifensine (1 μM), a dopamine transporter (DAT) inhibitor, suggesting that SKF-83566 acted via the DAT. We tested this by examining [(3)H]DA uptake into LLc-PK cells expressing rat DAT, and confirmed that SKF-83566 is a competitive DAT inhibitor with an IC(50) of 5.7 μM. Binding studies with [(3)H]CFT, a cocaine analog, showed even more potent action of SKF-83566 at the DAT cocaine binding site (IC(50) = 0.51 μM). Thus, data obtained using SKF-83566 as a D(1) DA-receptor antagonist may be confounded by concurrent DAT inhibition. More positively, however, SKF-83566 might be a candidate to attenuate cocaine effects in vivo because of the greater potency of this drug at the cocaine versus DA binding site of the DAT.

  11. Amino Acid Neurotransmitters; Mechanisms of Their Uptake into Synaptic Vesicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    same neuron, at least from the cerebellar Golgi cell terminals. It should be kept in mind that the uptake of noradrenaline and dopamine in synaptic...vesicles prepared from rat brain is relatively non-specific. Noradrenaline containing vesicles can take up noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin. In...also shown that the vesicles isolated from corpus striatum exhibited the same ratio of uptake of dopamine /noradrenaline as did vesicles from cerebral

  12. Site-selective growth of patterned silver grid networks as flexible transparent conductive film by using poly(dopamine) at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yunxia; Cheng, Yuanrong; Deng, Dunying; Jiang, Chengjie; Qi, Tianke; Yang, Donglun; Xiao, Fei

    2014-02-12

    Metal transparent conductive films (TCFs) have received increasing attention in various flexible electronics. However, there are two crucial issues that need to be addressed: (1) strong adhesion between metal TCFs and the flexible substrates and (2) high conductivity with short treatment time and low process temperature, simultaneous with high transparency. In this paper, a site-selective electroless plating combination with poly(dopamine) modification is demonstrated to fabricate a new high performance transparent conductor composed of a periodic two-dimensional silver network on a heat sensitive flexible substrate at room temperature. The TCF reveals an extremely high ratio of DC to optical conductivity (σ(DC)/σ(Op)) value in the range of 350-1000 for various fabricated silver grid films. It also exhibits particularly strong adhesion, which can resist ultrasonic treatment in water or organic solvent for several hours. Its reliability (stable for at least 1440 h during 85 °C/85% RH aging) meets the essential requirements for microelectronic applications. Using this method, we obtain silver grid film on a flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrate with optical transmittance of 91% and sheet resistance of 8 Ohm sq(-1), which is comparable to or better than the commercially available indium tin oxide.

  13. Metabolism of dopamine by the nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Chemuturi, Nagendra V; Donovan, Maureen D

    2006-11-01

    The nasal route of administration offers several advantages over oral and intravenous administration, including the ability to avoid hepatic first pass metabolism. Dopamine deficiency has been associated with several neurological disorders; it has been shown to have good systemic bioavailability and significant uptake into the CNS following intranasal administration. The purpose of these studies was to investigate the limiting role of mucosal metabolism of dopamine during nasal absorption. In vitro transport and initial rate studies were carried out using nasal mucosal explants to study dopamine permeability and metabolism. Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) was the only metabolite detected. Monoamine oxidase (MAO), the enzyme responsible for DOPAC formation, was localized to the submucosal region of the nasal explants. The amount of DOPAC formed during the transport studies was less than 0.5% of the initial amount of dopamine placed into the system. Iproniazid, an MAO inhibitor, blocked DOPAC formation but had no effect on dopamine transport. The limited extent of dopamine metabolism compared to its mucosal transport demonstrates that nasal dopamine transport is not significantly reduced by mucosal metabolism and suggests that the nasal route may be promising for the efficient delivery of dopamine to the CNS.

  14. Increased expression of the dopamine transporter leads to loss of dopamine neurons, oxidative stress and l-DOPA reversible motor deficits.

    PubMed

    Masoud, S T; Vecchio, L M; Bergeron, Y; Hossain, M M; Nguyen, L T; Bermejo, M K; Kile, B; Sotnikova, T D; Siesser, W B; Gainetdinov, R R; Wightman, R M; Caron, M G; Richardson, J R; Miller, G W; Ramsey, A J; Cyr, M; Salahpour, A

    2015-02-01

    The dopamine transporter is a key protein responsible for regulating dopamine homeostasis. Its function is to transport dopamine from the extracellular space into the presynaptic neuron. Studies have suggested that accumulation of dopamine in the cytosol can trigger oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. Previously, ectopic expression of the dopamine transporter was shown to cause damage in non-dopaminergic neurons due to their inability to handle cytosolic dopamine. However, it is unknown whether increasing dopamine transporter activity will be detrimental to dopamine neurons that are inherently capable of storing and degrading dopamine. To address this issue, we characterized transgenic mice that over-express the dopamine transporter selectively in dopamine neurons. We report that dopamine transporter over-expressing (DAT-tg) mice display spontaneous loss of midbrain dopamine neurons that is accompanied by increases in oxidative stress markers, 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine and 5-S-cysteinyl-DOPAC. In addition, metabolite-to-dopamine ratios are increased and VMAT2 protein expression is decreased in the striatum of these animals. Furthermore, DAT-tg mice also show fine motor deficits on challenging beam traversal that are reversed with l-DOPA treatment. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that even in neurons that routinely handle dopamine, increased uptake of this neurotransmitter through the dopamine transporter results in oxidative damage, neuronal loss and l-DOPA reversible motor deficits. In addition, DAT over-expressing animals are highly sensitive to MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. The effects of increased dopamine uptake in these transgenic mice could shed light on the unique vulnerability of dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease.

  15. Increased expression of the dopamine transporter leads to loss of dopamine neurons, oxidative stress and L-DOPA reversible motor deficits

    PubMed Central

    Masoud, ST; Vecchio, LM; Bergeron, Y; Hossain, MM; Nguyen, LT; Bermejo, MK; Kile, B; Sotnikova, TD; Siesser, WB; Gainetdinov, RR; Wightman, RM; Caron, MG; Richardson, JR; Miller, GW; Ramsey, AJ; Cyr, M; Salahpour, A

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine transporter is a key protein responsible for regulating dopamine homeostasis. Its function is to transport dopamine from the extracellular space into the presynaptic neuron. Studies have suggested that accumulation of dopamine in the cytosol can trigger oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. Previously, ectopic expression of the dopamine transporter was shown to cause damage in non-dopaminergic neurons due to their inability to handle cytosolic dopamine. However, it is unknown whether increasing dopamine transporter activity will be detrimental to dopamine neurons that are inherently capable of storing and degrading dopamine. To address this issue, we characterized transgenic mice that over-express the dopamine transporter selectively in dopamine neurons. We report that dopamine transporter over-expressing (DAT-tg) mice display spontaneous loss of midbrain dopamine neurons that is accompanied by increases in oxidative stress markers, 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine and 5-S-cysteinyl-DOPAC. In addition, metabolite-to-dopamine ratios are increased and VMAT2 protein expression is decreased in the striatum of these animals. Furthermore, DAT-tg mice also show fine motor deficits on challenging beam traversal that are reversed with L-DOPA treatment. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that even in neurons that routinely handle dopamine, increased uptake of this neurotransmitter through the dopamine transporter results in oxidative damage, neuronal loss and LDOPA reversible motor deficits. In addition, DAT over-expressing animals are highly sensitive to MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. The effects of increased dopamine uptake in these transgenic mice could shed light on the unique vulnerability of dopamine neurons in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25447236

  16. Furosemide renal excretion rate and the effects of the diuretic on different tubular sites are modified by endogenous dopamine in normohydrated rats.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, S; Opezzo, J A; Levin, G; Gonzalez, D; Elias, M M

    1995-09-01

    The present study was designed to explore the involvement of endogenous dopamine in furosemide excretion and in the actions of the diuretic on tubular sodium reabsorption. The dose-response relationship for the diuretic effect of furosemide given as i.v. bolus injections (0.2-7.5 mg.kg-1) was studied by clearance technique in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats treated with vehicle, benserazide (BZ) (25 mg.kg-1 i.v.) or SCH 23390 (50 micrograms.kg-1 + 10 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 i.v.). Furosemide induced the maximal diuresis 15 to 30 min after i.v. administration. The diuretic response was dose-dependent and was reduced in the animals treated with BZ and SCH 23390. Fractional sodium excretion was also increased by furosemide from 1.8 to 7.5% during the same period. This effect was reduced by both BZ or SCH 23390 by 35 to 50%. The effects of furosemide on proximal and distal renal tubules were dissected by measuring the renal lithium clearance (CLi+). Furosemide effective on proximal tubular sites (measured by FENa+ prox = CLi+/Cln) were completely abolished by BZ and SCH 23390, whereas both drugs reduced furosemide effects on distal tubular sites (measured by FENa+ distal = CNa+/CLi+) by 20 to 40%. Furosemide excretion rate during the peak response to the diuretic was measured in the urine. BZ and SCH 23390 diminished furosemide excretion by 45 to 80% as compared with vehicle-treated animals. The furosemide tubular effects and the proximal and distal functions measured by CLi+ determined during the peak response were correlated to the maximal excretion rate of furosemide in the urine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Endogenous dopamine increases extracellular concentrations of glutamate and GABA in striatum of the freely moving rat: involvement of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Expósito, I; Del Arco, A; Segovia, G; Mora, F

    1999-07-01

    Interactions between endogenous dopamine, glutamate, GABA, and taurine were investigated in striatum of the freely moving rat by using microdialysis. Intrastriatal infusions of the selective dopamine uptake inhibitor nomifensine (NMF) were used to increase the endogenous extracellular dopamine. NMF produced a dose-related increase in extracellular dopamine and also increased extracellular concentrations of glutamate, GABA, and taurine. Extracellular increases of dopamine were significantly correlated with extracellular increases of glutamate and GABA, but not taurine. To investigate whether the increased extracellular dopamine produced by NMF was responsible for the concomitant increase of glutamate and GABA, D1, and D2 receptor antagonists were used. Dopamine receptor antagonists D1 (SCH23390) and D2 (sulpiride) significantly attenuated the increases of glutamate and GABA produced by NMF. These data suggest that endogenous dopamine, through both D1 and D2 dopamine receptors, plays a role in releasing glutamate and GABA in striatum of the freely moving rat.

  18. Metal uptake by homegrown vegetables – The relative importance in human health risk assessments at contaminated sites

    SciTech Connect

    Augustsson, Anna L.M.; Uddh-Söderberg, Terese E.; Hogmalm, K. Johan; Filipsson, Monika E.M.

    2015-04-15

    Risk assessments of contaminated land often involve the use of generic bioconcentration factors (BCFs), which express contaminant concentrations in edible plant parts as a function of the concentration in soil, in order to assess the risks associated with consumption of homegrown vegetables. This study aimed to quantify variability in BCFs and evaluate the implications of this variability for human exposure assessments, focusing on cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) in lettuce and potatoes sampled around 22 contaminated glassworks sites. In addition, risks associated with measured Cd and Pb concentrations in soil and vegetable samples were characterized and a probabilistic exposure assessment was conducted to estimate the likelihood of local residents exceeding tolerable daily intakes. The results show that concentrations in vegetables were only moderately elevated despite high concentrations in soil, and most samples complied with applicable foodstuff legislation. Still, the daily intake of Cd (but not Pb) was assessed to exceed toxicological thresholds for about a fifth of the study population. Bioconcentration factors were found to vary more than indicated by previous studies, but decreasing BCFs with increasing metal concentrations in the soil can explain why the calculated exposure is only moderately affected by the choice of BCF value when generic soil guideline values are exceeded and the risk may be unacceptable. - Highlights: • Uptake of Cd and Pb by lettuce and potatoes increased with soil contamination. • Consumption of homegrown vegetables may lead to a daily Cd intake above TDIs. • The variability in the calculated BCFs is high when compared to previous studies. • Exposure assessments are most sensitive to the choice of BCFs at low contamination.

  19. Comparison of modelled and measured ozone concentrations and meteorology for a site in south-west Sweden: implications for ozone uptake calculations.

    PubMed

    Klingberg, Jenny; Danielsson, Helena; Simpson, David; Pleijel, Håkan

    2008-09-01

    Measurements of ground-level ozone concentrations and meteorology (temperature, vapour pressure deficit (VPD), solar radiation) at the monitoring site Ostad (south-west Sweden) were compared to data from the corresponding grid in the EMEP photo-oxidant model for 1997, 1999 and 2000. The influence of synoptic weather on the agreement between model and measurements was studied. Implications of differences between modelled and observed inputs for ozone flux calculations for wheat and potato were investigated. The EMEP model output of ozone, temperature and VPD correlated well with measurements during daytime. Deviations were larger during the night, especially in calm conditions, attributed to local climatological conditions at the monitoring site deviating from average conditions of the grid. These differences did not lead to significant differences in calculated ozone uptake, which was reproduced remarkably well. The uptake calculations were sensitive to errors in the ozone and temperature input data, especially when including a flux threshold.

  20. Dopamine receptors in human gastrointestinal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, D.E.; Mason, G.A.; Walker, C.H.; Valenzuela, J.E.

    1987-12-21

    Dopamine is a putative enteric neurotransmitter that has been implicated in exocrine secretory and motility functions of the gastrointestinal tract of several mammalian species including man. This study was designed to determine the presence of dopamine binding sites in human gastric and duodenal mucosa and to describe certain biochemical characteristics of these enteric receptor sites. The binding assay was performed in triplicate with tissue homogenates obtained from healthy volunteers of both sexes using /sup 3/H-dopamine as a ligand. The extent of nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of a 100-fold excess of unlabeled dopamine. Scatchard analysis performed with increasing concentrations of /sup 3/H-dopamine (20-500 nM) revealed a single class of saturable dopamine binding sites in gastric and duodenal mucosa. The results of this report demonstrate the presence of specific dopamine receptors in human gastric and duodenal mucosa. These biochemical data suggest that molecular abnormalities of these receptor sites may be operative in the pathogenesis of important gastrointestinal disorders. 33 references, 2 figures.

  1. Dopamine synapse is a neuroligin-2-mediated contact between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures.

    PubMed

    Uchigashima, Motokazu; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-04-12

    Midbrain dopamine neurons project densely to the striatum and form so-called dopamine synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs), principal neurons in the striatum. Because dopamine receptors are widely expressed away from dopamine synapses, it remains unclear how dopamine synapses are involved in dopaminergic transmission. Here we demonstrate that dopamine synapses are contacts formed between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures. The presynaptic structure expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2, and plasmalemmal dopamine transporter, which are essential for dopamine synthesis, vesicular filling, and recycling, but was below the detection threshold for molecules involving GABA synthesis and vesicular filling or for GABA itself. In contrast, the postsynaptic structure of dopamine synapses expressed GABAergic molecules, including postsynaptic adhesion molecule neuroligin-2, postsynaptic scaffolding molecule gephyrin, and GABAA receptor α1, without any specific clustering of dopamine receptors. Of these, neuroligin-2 promoted presynaptic differentiation in axons of midbrain dopamine neurons and striatal GABAergic neurons in culture. After neuroligin-2 knockdown in the striatum, a significant decrease of dopamine synapses coupled with a reciprocal increase of GABAergic synapses was observed on MSN dendrites. This finding suggests that neuroligin-2 controls striatal synapse formation by giving competitive advantage to heterologous dopamine synapses over conventional GABAergic synapses. Considering that MSN dendrites are preferential targets of dopamine synapses and express high levels of dopamine receptors, dopamine synapse formation may serve to increase the specificity and potency of dopaminergic modulation of striatal outputs by anchoring dopamine release sites to dopamine-sensing targets.

  2. C2H2 adsorption in three isostructural metal-organic frameworks: boosting C2H2 uptake by rational arrangement of nitrogen sites.

    PubMed

    Song, Chengling; Jiao, Jingjing; Lin, Qiyi; Liu, Huimin; He, Yabing

    2016-03-21

    Replacing the benzene spacer in the organic linker 5,5'-(benzene-1,4-diyl)diisophthalate with the nitrogen containing heterocyclic rings, namely, pyrazine, pyridazine, and pyrimidine results in three organic linkers, which were reacted with copper ions under solvothermal conditions to form three isostructural metal-organic frameworks (ZJNU-46, ZJNU-47 and ZJNU-48) exhibiting exceptionally high sorption capacities with regard to acetylene due to the simultaneous immobilization of open metal sites and Lewis basic nitrogen sites in the frameworks. At 1 atm and 295 K, the gravimetric C2H2 adsorption uptakes reach 187, 213 and 193 cm(3) (STP) g(-1) for these three compounds. The gravimetric C2H2 adsorption amount of ZJNU-47a is the second highest reported for MOF materials. Notably, despite their same porosities, and densities of open metal sites and uncoordinated nitrogen sites, distinctly different C2H2 adsorption capacities were observed for these three compounds, which we think are mainly associated with the difference in the relative position of nitrogen atoms leading to different binding affinities of the frameworks towards C2H2 guest molecules, and thus different C2H2 adsorptions. This work demonstrates that the rational arrangement of open nitrogen sites will favorably improve the C2H2 uptake and thus provides useful information for future design of porous MOFs with high acetylene storage capacities.

  3. Dopamine receptor-interacting proteins: the Ca(2+) connection in dopamine signaling.

    PubMed

    Bergson, Clare; Levenson, Robert; Goldman-Rakic, Patricia S; Lidow, Michael S

    2003-09-01

    Abnormal activity of the dopamine system has been implicated in several psychiatric and neurological illnesses; however, lack of knowledge about the precise sites of dopamine dysfunction has compromised our ability to improve the efficacy and safety of dopamine-related drugs used in treatment modalities. Recent work suggests that dopamine transmission is regulated via the concerted efforts of a cohort of cytoskeletal, adaptor and signaling proteins called dopamine receptor-interacting proteins (DRIPs). The discovery that two DRIPs, calcyon and neuronal Ca(2+) sensor 1 (NCS-1), are upregulated in schizophrenia highlights the possibility that altered protein interactions and defects in Ca(2+) homeostasis might contribute to abnormalities in the brain dopamine system in neuropsychiatric diseases.

  4. Presence and Function of Dopamine Transporter (DAT) in Stallion Sperm: Dopamine Modulates Sperm Motility and Acrosomal Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Alejandra A.; Rodríguez-Gil, Joan Enric; Ramírez-Reveco, Alfredo; Concha, Ilona I.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine is a catecholamine with multiple physiological functions, playing a key role in nervous system; however its participation in reproductive processes and sperm physiology is controversial. High dopamine concentrations have been reported in different portions of the feminine and masculine reproductive tract, although the role fulfilled by this catecholamine in reproductive physiology is as yet unknown. We have previously shown that dopamine type 2 receptor is functional in boar sperm, suggesting that dopamine acts as a physiological modulator of sperm viability, capacitation and motility. In the present study, using immunodetection methods, we revealed the presence of several proteins important for the dopamine uptake and signalling in mammalian sperm, specifically monoamine transporters as dopamine (DAT), serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) transporters in equine sperm. We also demonstrated for the first time in equine sperm a functional dopamine transporter using 4-[4-(Dimethylamino)styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (ASP+), as substrate. In addition, we also showed that dopamine (1 mM) treatment in vitro, does not affect sperm viability but decreases total and progressive sperm motility. This effect is reversed by blocking the dopamine transporter with the selective inhibitor vanoxerine (GBR12909) and non-selective inhibitors of dopamine reuptake such as nomifensine and bupropion. The effect of dopamine in sperm physiology was evaluated and we demonstrated that acrosome integrity and thyrosine phosphorylation in equine sperm is significantly reduced at high concentrations of this catecholamine. In summary, our results revealed the presence of monoamine transporter DAT, NET and SERT in equine sperm, and that the dopamine uptake by DAT can regulate sperm function, specifically acrosomal integrity and sperm motility. PMID:25402186

  5. Fluorescent false neurotransmitter reveals functionally silent dopamine vesicle clusters in the striatum

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Daniela B.; Schmitz, Yvonne; Mészáros, József; Merchant, Paolomi; Hu, Gang; Li, Shu; Henke, Adam; Lizardi-Ortiz, José E.; Karpowicz, Richard J.; Morgenstern, Travis J.; Sonders, Mark S.; Kanter, Ellen; Rodriguez, Pamela C.; Mosharov, Eugene V.; Sames, Dalibor; Sulzer, David

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmission at dopaminergic synapses has been studied with techniques that provide high temporal resolution but cannot resolve individual synapses. To elucidate the spatial dynamics and heterogeneity of individual dopamine boutons, we developed fluorescent false neurotransmitter 200 (FFN200), a vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) substrate that is the first probe to selectively trace monoamine exocytosis in both neuronal cell culture and brain tissue. By monitoring electrically-evoked Ca2+ transients with GCaMP3 and FFN200 release simultaneously, we find that only a small fraction of dopamine boutons that exhibit Ca2+ influx engage in exocytosis, a result confirmed with activity-dependent loading of the endocytic probe FM 1-43. Thus, only a low fraction of striatal dopamine axonal sites with uptake-competent VMAT2 vesicles are capable of transmitter release. This is consistent with the presence of functionally “silent” dopamine vesicle clusters and represents a first report suggestive of presynaptically silent neuromodulatory synapses. PMID:26900925

  6. Contaminant Uptake and Demography of the Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Site 300

    SciTech Connect

    van Hattem, M G; Santolo, G

    2005-02-23

    Concentrations of eleven potential environmental contaminants (metals) in the blood and retrice feathers of fledged-Hatch Year and adult loggerhead shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus) were examined at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Site 300 and a control site, in San Joaquin and Contra Costa Counties, California. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine, through non-lethal means, if loggerhead shrikes are exposed to metals at Site 300 and whether specific demographic variables (i.e., clutch size, fledgling success, etc.) are affected. Loggerhead shrikes at Site 300 had higher blood concentrations of metals, especially birds on the west side of the site, when compared to control site birds. Metal concentrations in the feathers of control site birds tended to be higher than Site 300 shrikes. Blood concentrations of metals in loggerhead shrikes from both Site 300 and the control site were well below the Most Tolerant Dietary Level (MTDL) for domestic birds for all metals except selenium. Clutch size was similar to other populations but one deformed embryo was discovered in a failed egg. The results of this pilot study suggest further work is needed to understand possible synergistic effects related to other contaminants of concern found at Site 300 and overall population variability.

  7. Dopamine denervation of the prefrontal cortex increases expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1

    PubMed Central

    Vollbrecht, Peter J.; Simmler, Linda D.; Blakely, Randy D.; Deutch, Ariel Y.

    2014-01-01

    Both dopamine and glutamate are critically involved in cognitive processes such as working memory. Astrocytes, which express dopamine receptors, are essential elements in the termination of glutamatergic signaling: the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1 is responsible for >90% of cortical glutamate uptake. The effect of dopamine depletion on glutamate transporters in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is unknown. In an effort to determine if astrocytes are a locus of cortical dopamine-glutamate interactions, we examined the effects of chronic dopamine denervation on PFC protein and mRNA levels of glutamate transporters. PFC dopamine denervation elicited a marked increase in GLT-1 protein levels, but had no effect on levels of other glutamate transporters; high affinity glutamate transport was positively correlated with the extent of dopamine depletion. GLT-1 gene expression was not altered. Our data suggests that dopamine depletion may lead to post-translational modifications that result in increased expression and activity of GLT-1 in PFC astrocytes. PMID:24611756

  8. Testosterone modulation of striatal dopamine output in orchidectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Shemisa, Kamal; Kunnathur, Vidhya; Liu, Bin; Salvaterra, Ty J; Dluzen, Dean E

    2006-10-01

    Three experiments are presented in which dopamine (DA) responses from superfused striatal tissue of orchidectomized (ORCH) mice treated or not with testosterone (T) are compared. In experiment 1, potassium-stimulated DA output was significantly greater in ORCH vs. ORCH+T mice. This profile was reversed when reserpine was infused in experiment 2, with DA output being significantly greater in ORCH+T vs. ORCH mice. In experiment 3, the amount of DA recovered following infusion of DA indicated no statistically significant differences in DA recoveries between ORCH and ORCH+T mice as tested in this paradigm. The findings that both potassium- and reserpine-induced DA responses are altered significantly by T suggests that one potential site of T action might involve the storage/uptake of DA within the vesicles of these neurons. Such results have important implications with regard to understanding the sex differences that are present in nigrostriatal dopaminergic function within health and diseased states.

  9. Tianeptine: 5-HT uptake sites and 5-HT(1-7) receptors modulate memory formation in an autoshaping Pavlovian/instrumental task.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2002-05-01

    Recent studies using invertebrate and mammal species have revealed that, endogenous serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) modulates cognitive processes, particularly learning and memory, though, at present, it is unclear the manner, where, and how long 5-HT systems are involved. Hence in this work, an attempt was made to study the effects of 5-HT endogenous on memory formation, using a 5-HT uptake facilitator (tianeptine) and, selective 5-HT(1-7) receptor antagonists to determine whether 5-HT uptake sites and which 5-HT receptors are involved, respectively. Results showed that post-training tianeptine injection enhanced memory consolidation in an autoshaping Pavlovian/instrumental learning task, which has been useful to detect changes on memory formation elicited by drugs or aging. On interaction experiments, ketanserin (5-HT(1D/2A/2C) antagonist) slightly enhanced tianeptine effects, while WAY 100635 (5-HT(1A) antagonist), SB-224289 (5-HT(1B) inverse agonist), SB-200646 (5-HT(2B/2C) antagonist), ondansetron (5-HT(3) antagonist), GR 127487 (5-HT(4) antagonist), Ro 04-6790 (5-HT(6) antagonist), DR 4004 (5-HT(7) antagonist), or fluoxetine (an inhibitor of 5-HT reuptake) blocked the facilitatory tianeptine effect. Notably, together tianeptine and Ro 04-6790 impaired learning consolidation. Moreover, 5-HT depletion completely reversed the tianeptine effect. Tianeptine also normalized an impaired memory elicited by scopolamine (an antimuscarinic) or dizocilpine (non-competitive glutamatergic antagonist), while partially reversed that induced by TFMPP (5-HT(1B/1D/2A-2C/7) agonist/antagonist). Finally, tianeptine-fluoxetine coadministration had no effect on learning consolidation; nevertheless, administration of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, phenserine, potentiated subeffective tianeptine or fluoxetine doses. Collectively, these data confirmed that endogenously 5-HT modulates, via uptake sites and 5-HT(1-7) receptors, memory consolidation, and are consistent with the

  10. Molecular mechanism: the human dopamine transporter histidine 547 regulates basal and HIV-1 Tat protein-inhibited dopamine transport

    PubMed Central

    Quizon, Pamela M.; Sun, Wei-Lun; Yuan, Yaxia; Midde, Narasimha M.; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal dopaminergic transmission has been implicated as a risk determinant of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders. HIV-1 Tat protein increases synaptic dopamine (DA) levels by directly inhibiting DA transporter (DAT) activity, ultimately leading to dopaminergic neuron damage. Through integrated computational modeling prediction and experimental validation, we identified that histidine547 on human DAT (hDAT) is critical for regulation of basal DA uptake and Tat-induced inhibition of DA transport. Compared to wild type hDAT (WT hDAT), mutation of histidine547 (H547A) displayed a 196% increase in DA uptake. Other substitutions of histidine547 showed that DA uptake was not altered in H547R but decreased by 99% in H547P and 60% in H547D, respectively. These mutants did not alter DAT surface expression or surface DAT binding sites. H547 mutants attenuated Tat-induced inhibition of DA transport observed in WT hDAT. H547A displays a differential sensitivity to PMA- or BIM-induced activation or inhibition of DAT function relative to WT hDAT, indicating a change in basal PKC activity in H547A. These findings demonstrate that histidine547 on hDAT plays a crucial role in stabilizing basal DA transport and Tat-DAT interaction. This study provides mechanistic insights into identifying targets on DAT for Tat binding and improving DAT-mediated dysfunction of DA transmission. PMID:27966610

  11. Recovery of dopamine transporters with methamphetamine detoxification is not linked to changes in dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Volkow, Nora D; Wang, Gene-Jack; Smith, Lisa; Fowler, Joanna S; Telang, Frank; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-11-01

    Methamphetamine's widepread abuse and concerns that it might increase Parkinson's disease led us to assess if the reported loss of dopamine transporters (DAT) in methamphetamine abusers (MA) reflected damage to dopamine neurons. Using PET with [(11)C]cocaine to measure DAT, and with [(11)C]raclopride to measure dopamine release (assessed as changes in specific binding of [(11)C]raclopride between placebo and methylphenidate), which was used as a marker of dopamine neuronal function, we show that MA (n=16), tested during early detoxification, had lower DAT (20-30%) but overall normal DA release in striatum (except for a small decrease in left putamen), when compared to controls (n=15). In controls, DAT were positively correlated with DA release (higher DAT associated with larger DA increases), consistent with DAT serving as markers of DA terminals. In contrast, MA showed a trend for a negative correlation (p=0.07) (higher DAT associated with lower DA increases), consistent with reduced DA re-uptake following DAT downregulation. MA who remained abstinent nine-months later (n=9) showed significant increases in DAT (20%) but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases did not change. In contrast, in controls, DAT did not change when retested 9 months later but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases in ventral striatum were reduced (p=0.05). Baseline D2/D3 receptors in caudate were lower in MA than in controls and did not change with detoxification, nor did they change in the controls upon retest. The loss of DAT in the MA, which was not associated with a concomitant reduction in dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT loss reflected DA terminal degneration; as well as the recovery of DAT after protracted detoxification, which was not associated with increased dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT increases reflected terminal regeneration, indicate that the loss of DAT in these MA does not reflect degeneration of dopamine terminals.

  12. Grass species influence on plant N uptake - Determination of atmospheric N deposition to a semi-natural peat bog site using a 15N labelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurkuck, Miriam; Brümmer, Christian; Spott, Oliver; Flessa, Heinz; Kutsch, Werner L.

    2014-05-01

    Large areas of natural peat bogs in Northwestern Germany have been converted to arable land and were subjected to draining and peat cutting in the past. The few protected peatland areas remaining are affected by high nitrogen (N) deposition. Our study site - a moderately drained raised bog - is surrounded by highly fertilized agricultural land and livestock production. In this study, we used a 15N pool dilution technique called 'Integrated Total Nitrogen Input' (ITNI) to quantify annual deposition of atmospheric N into biomonitoring pots over a two-year period. Since it considers direct N uptake by plants, it was expected to result in higher N input than conventional methods for determination of N deposition (e.g. micrometeorological approaches, bulk N samplers). Using Lolium multiflorum and Eriophorum vaginatum as monitor plants and low, medium and high levels of fertilization, we aimed to simulate increasing N deposition to planted pots and to allocate airborne N after its uptake by the soil-plant system in aboveground biomass, roots and soil. Increasing N fertilization was positively correlated with biomass production of Eriophorum vaginatum, whereas atmospheric plant N uptake decreased and highest airborne N input of 899.8 ± 67.4 µg N d-1 pot-1 was found for low N fertilization. In contrast, Lolium multiflorum showed a clear dependency of N supply on plant N uptake and was highest (688.7 ± 41.4 µg N d-1 pot-1) for highly fertilized vegetation pots. Our results suggest that grass species respond differently to increasing N input. While crop grasses such as Lolium multiflorum take up N according to N availability, species adopted to nutrient-limited conditions like Eriophorum vaginatum show N saturation effects with increasing N supply. Total airborne N input ranged from about 24 to 66 kg N ha-1 yr-1 dependent on the used indicator plant and the amount of added fertilizer. Parallel determination of atmospheric N deposition using a micrometeorological approach

  13. Increasing Healthy Start food and vitamin voucher uptake for low income pregnant women (Early Years Collaborative Leith Pioneer Site).

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Graham; Dougall, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Poverty has a detrimental impact on health and wellbeing. Healthy Start food and vitamin vouchers provide support for low income families across the UK, but at least 25% of eligible women and children miss out. We set out to increase uptake, with an aim of 90% of eligible women and children (n~540 eligible, varying over time) receiving vouchers in the initial team's catchment area by December 2015. Starting with one midwife and one pregnant woman in March 2014 we used the model for improvement to identify ways to improve documentation, sign up, and referral. Weekly data on process measures and monthly data on voucher receipt were plotted on run charts. Comparing medians for January-June 2014 and March-August 2015 there was a 13.3% rise in voucher receipt in Lothian (increase from 313 to 355 women), versus an 8.4% decline for the rest of Scotland (fall from 1688 to 1546 women). Figures varied by team, influenced by staff, family, and area factors. The initial aim proved unrealistic, as signing up a woman for vouchers increases both the numerator and denominator. Accordingly, the percentage uptake has not increased at a regional level (remains at 75%), though the figure for the initiating team ("team 3" in graphs) has increased from 73.0% (January 2014) to 79.0% (November 2015). We have continued testing, achieving recent increases in the number of women referred for welfare rights advice on benefits, tax credits, employment rights, childcare, and debt, securing on average £4,500 per client during 2015/16 (£404k for 89 clients by mid September 2015). This improvement project, part of the Early Years Collaborative in Scotland, has had a measureable impact on pregnant women across Lothian. Success has relied on testing, an electronic maternity record, rapid dissemination of findings through direct engagement with clinical teams, and persistence. Our findings have relevance across the UK, particularly at a time of worsening finances for many families.

  14. A Physical Interaction between the Dopamine Transporter and DJ-1 Facilitates Increased Dopamine Reuptake.

    PubMed

    Luk, Beryl; Mohammed, Mohinuddin; Liu, Fang; Lee, Frank J S

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of the dopamine transporter (DAT) impacts extracellular dopamine levels after release from dopaminergic neurons. Furthermore, a variety of protein partners have been identified that can interact with and modulate DAT function. In this study we show that DJ-1 can potentially modulate DAT function. Co-expression of DAT and DJ-1 in HEK-293T cells leads to an increase in [3H] dopamine uptake that does not appear to be mediated by increased total DAT expression but rather through an increase in DAT cell surface localization. In addition, through a series of GST affinity purifications and co-immunoprecipitations, we provide evidence that the DAT can be found in a complex with DJ-1, which involve distinct regions within both DAT and DJ-1. Using in vitro binding experiments we also show that this complex can be formed in part by a direct interaction between DAT and DJ-1. Co-expression of a mini-gene that can disrupt the DAT/DJ-1 complex appears to block the increase in [3H] dopamine uptake by DJ-1. Mutations in DJ-1 have been linked to familial forms of Parkinson's disease, yet the normal physiological function of DJ-1 remains unclear. Our study suggests that DJ-1 may also play a role in regulating dopamine levels by modifying DAT activity.

  15. A Physical Interaction between the Dopamine Transporter and DJ-1 Facilitates Increased Dopamine Reuptake

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Beryl; Mohammed, Mohinuddin; Liu, Fang; Lee, Frank J. S.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of the dopamine transporter (DAT) impacts extracellular dopamine levels after release from dopaminergic neurons. Furthermore, a variety of protein partners have been identified that can interact with and modulate DAT function. In this study we show that DJ-1 can potentially modulate DAT function. Co-expression of DAT and DJ-1 in HEK-293T cells leads to an increase in [3H] dopamine uptake that does not appear to be mediated by increased total DAT expression but rather through an increase in DAT cell surface localization. In addition, through a series of GST affinity purifications and co-immunoprecipitations, we provide evidence that the DAT can be found in a complex with DJ-1, which involve distinct regions within both DAT and DJ-1. Using in vitro binding experiments we also show that this complex can be formed in part by a direct interaction between DAT and DJ-1. Co-expression of a mini-gene that can disrupt the DAT/DJ-1 complex appears to block the increase in [3H] dopamine uptake by DJ-1. Mutations in DJ-1 have been linked to familial forms of Parkinson’s disease, yet the normal physiological function of DJ-1 remains unclear. Our study suggests that DJ-1 may also play a role in regulating dopamine levels by modifying DAT activity. PMID:26305376

  16. Dopamine synapse is a neuroligin-2–mediated contact between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures

    PubMed Central

    Uchigashima, Motokazu; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons project densely to the striatum and form so-called dopamine synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs), principal neurons in the striatum. Because dopamine receptors are widely expressed away from dopamine synapses, it remains unclear how dopamine synapses are involved in dopaminergic transmission. Here we demonstrate that dopamine synapses are contacts formed between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures. The presynaptic structure expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2, and plasmalemmal dopamine transporter, which are essential for dopamine synthesis, vesicular filling, and recycling, but was below the detection threshold for molecules involving GABA synthesis and vesicular filling or for GABA itself. In contrast, the postsynaptic structure of dopamine synapses expressed GABAergic molecules, including postsynaptic adhesion molecule neuroligin-2, postsynaptic scaffolding molecule gephyrin, and GABAA receptor α1, without any specific clustering of dopamine receptors. Of these, neuroligin-2 promoted presynaptic differentiation in axons of midbrain dopamine neurons and striatal GABAergic neurons in culture. After neuroligin-2 knockdown in the striatum, a significant decrease of dopamine synapses coupled with a reciprocal increase of GABAergic synapses was observed on MSN dendrites. This finding suggests that neuroligin-2 controls striatal synapse formation by giving competitive advantage to heterologous dopamine synapses over conventional GABAergic synapses. Considering that MSN dendrites are preferential targets of dopamine synapses and express high levels of dopamine receptors, dopamine synapse formation may serve to increase the specificity and potency of dopaminergic modulation of striatal outputs by anchoring dopamine release sites to dopamine-sensing targets. PMID:27035941

  17. Dopamine alleviates salt-induced stress in Malus hupehensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Sun, Xiangkai; Chang, Cong; Jia, Dongfeng; Wei, Zhiwei; Li, Cuiying; Ma, Fengwang

    2015-04-01

    Dopamine mediates many physiological processes in plants. We investigated its role in regulating growth, ion homeostasis and the response to salinity in Malus hupehensis Rehd. Both hydroponics and field-pot experiments were conducted under saline conditions. Salt-stressed plants had reduced growth and a marked decline in their net photosynthetic rates, values for Fv /Fm and chlorophyll contents. However, pretreatment with 100 or 200 μM dopamine significantly alleviated this inhibition and enabled plants to maintain their photosynthetic capacity. In addition to changing stomatal behavior, supplementation with dopamine positively influenced the uptake of K, N, P, S, Cu and Mn ions but had an inhibitory effect on Na and Cl uptake, the balance of which is responsible for managing the response to salinity by Malus plants. Dopamine pretreatment also controlled the burst of hydrogen peroxide, possibly through direct scavenging and by enhancing the activities of antioxidative enzymes and the capacity of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle. We also investigated whether dopamine might regulate salt overly sensitive pathway genes under salinity. Here, MdHKT1, MdNHX1 and MdSOS1 were greatly upregulated in roots and leaves, which possibly contributed to the maintenance of ion homeostasis and, thus, improved salinity resistance in plants exposed earlier to exogenous dopamine. These results support our conclusion that dopamine alleviates salt-induced stress not only at the level of antioxidant defense but also by regulating other mechanisms of ion homeostasis.

  18. NOTE: The specific uptake size index for quantifying radiopharmaceutical uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, John S.; Bolt, Livia; Stratford, Jennifer S.; Kemp, Paul M.

    2004-07-01

    Quantitative indices of radionuclide uptake in an object of interest provide a useful adjunct to qualitative interpretation in the diagnostic application of radionuclide imaging. This note describes a new measure of total uptake of an organ, the specific uptake size index (SUSI). It can either be related in absolute terms to the total activity injected or to the specific activity in a reference region. As it depends on the total activity in the object, the value obtained will not depend on the resolution of the imaging process, as is the case with some other similar quantitative indices. This has been demonstrated in an experiment using simulated images. The application of the index to quantification of dopamine receptor SPECT imaging and parathyroid thyroid subtraction planar scintigraphy is described. The index is considered to be of potential value in reducing variation in quantitative assessment of uptake in objects with applications in all areas of radionuclide imaging.

  19. The ability of denbufylline to inhibit cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and its affinity for adenosine receptors and the adenosine re-uptake site.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, C. D.; Jackman, S. A.; Wilke, R.

    1989-01-01

    1. Denbufylline has been examined for its ability to inhibit cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase isoenzymes from rat cardiac ventricle and cerebrum, as well as for its affinity for adenosine A1 and A2 receptors and the re-uptake site. For comparison, SK&F 94120, theophylline and 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine (IBMX) were examined as phosphodiesterase inhibitors whilst N6-cyclohexyladenosine, R(-)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine, 5'-N-ethylcarboxamido-adenosine, 2-nitrobenzylthioinosine, theophylline and IBMX were examined for their affinity for adenosine binding sites. 2. This investigation confirmed the presence of four phosphodiesterase activities in rat cardiac ventricle; in rat cerebrum only three were present. 3. Denbufylline selective inhibited one form of Ca2+-independent, low Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase. The form inhibited was one of two present in cardiac ventricle and the sole one in cerebrum. This form was not inhibited by cyclic GMP. The inotropic agent SK&F 94120 selectively inhibited the form of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase which was inhibited by cyclic GMP present in cardiac ventricle. Theophylline and IBMX were relatively non-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitors. 4. Denbufylline was a less potent inhibitor of ligand binding to adenosine receptors than of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase. This contrasted with theophylline, which had a higher affinity for adenosine receptors, and IBMX which showed no marked selectivity. Denbufylline, theophylline and IBMX all had a low affinity for the adenosine re-uptake site. 5. Denbufylline is being developed as an agent for the therapy of multi-infarct dementia. The selective inhibition of a particular low Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase may account for the activity of this compound. PMID:2474352

  20. Increasing Healthy Start food and vitamin voucher uptake for low income pregnant women (Early Years Collaborative Leith Pioneer Site)

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Graham; Dougall, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Poverty has a detrimental impact on health and wellbeing. Healthy Start food and vitamin vouchers provide support for low income families across the UK, but at least 25% of eligible women and children miss out. We set out to increase uptake, with an aim of 90% of eligible women and children (n~540 eligible, varying over time) receiving vouchers in the initial team's catchment area by December 2015. Starting with one midwife and one pregnant woman in March 2014 we used the model for improvement to identify ways to improve documentation, sign up, and referral. Weekly data on process measures and monthly data on voucher receipt were plotted on run charts. Comparing medians for January-June 2014 and March-August 2015 there was a 13.3% rise in voucher receipt in Lothian (increase from 313 to 355 women), versus an 8.4% decline for the rest of Scotland (fall from 1688 to 1546 women). Figures varied by team, influenced by staff, family, and area factors. The initial aim proved unrealistic, as signing up a woman for vouchers increases both the numerator and denominator. Accordingly, the percentage uptake has not increased at a regional level (remains at 75%), though the figure for the initiating team (“team 3” in graphs) has increased from 73.0% (January 2014) to 79.0% (November 2015). We have continued testing, achieving recent increases in the number of women referred for welfare rights advice on benefits, tax credits, employment rights, childcare, and debt, securing on average £4,500 per client during 2015/16 (£404k for 89 clients by mid September 2015). This improvement project, part of the Early Years Collaborative in Scotland, has had a measureable impact on pregnant women across Lothian. Success has relied on testing, an electronic maternity record, rapid dissemination of findings through direct engagement with clinical teams, and persistence. Our findings have relevance across the UK, particularly at a time of worsening finances for many families. PMID

  1. Quantitative autoradiography of /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding sites in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Scatton, B.; Dubois, A.; Dubocovich, M.L.; Zahniser, N.R.; Fage, D.

    1985-03-04

    The distribution of /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding sites in the rat brain has been studied by quantitative autoradiography. The binding of /sup 3/H-nomifensine to caudate putamen sections was saturable, specific, of a highly affinity (Kd = 56 nM) and sodium-dependent. The dopamine uptake inhibitors benztropine, nomifensine, cocaine, bupropion and amfonelic acid were the most potent competitors of /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding to striatal sections. The highest levels of (benztropine-displaceable) /sup 3/H-nomifensine binding sites were found in the caudate-putamen, the olfactory tubercle and the nucleus accumbens. 6-Hydroxy-dopamine-induced lesion of the ascending dopaminergic bundle resulted in a marked decrease in the /sup 3/H-ligand binding in these areas. Moderately high concentrations of the /sup 3/H-ligand were observed in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the anteroventral thalamic nucleus, the cingulate cortex, the lateral septum, the hippocampus, the amygdala, the zona incerta and some hypothalamic nuclei. There were low levels of binding sites in the habenula, the dorsolateral geniculate body, the substantia nigra, the ventral tegmental area and the periaqueductal gray matter. These autoradiographic data are consistent with the hypothesis that /sup 3/H-nomifensine binds primarily to the presynaptic uptake site for dopamine but also labels the norepinephrine uptake site. 33 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  2. Site-specific conjugation of single domain antibodies to liposomes enhances photosensitizer uptake and photodynamic therapy efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broekgaarden, M.; van Vught, R.; Oliveira, S.; Roovers, R. C.; van Bergen En Henegouwen, P. M. P.; Pieters, R. J.; van Gulik, T. M.; Breukink, E.; Heger, M.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy for therapy-resistant cancers will greatly benefit from targeted delivery of tumor photosensitizing agents. In this study, a strategy for the site-specific conjugation of single domain antibodies onto liposomes containing the photosensitizer zinc phthalocyanine was developed and tested.Photodynamic therapy for therapy-resistant cancers will greatly benefit from targeted delivery of tumor photosensitizing agents. In this study, a strategy for the site-specific conjugation of single domain antibodies onto liposomes containing the photosensitizer zinc phthalocyanine was developed and tested. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials and methods. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00014b

  3. Dopamine-oxytocin interactions in penile erection.

    PubMed

    Baskerville, T A; Allard, J; Wayman, C; Douglas, A J

    2009-12-03

    Dopamine and oxytocin have established roles in the central regulation of penile erection in rats; however, the neural circuitries involved in a specific erectile context and the interaction between dopamine and oxytocin mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The medial preoptic area (MPOA), supraoptic nucleus (SON) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus may serve as candidate sites because they contain oxytocin cells, receive dopaminergic inputs and have been implicated in mediating masculine sexual behavior. Double immunofluorescence revealed that substantial numbers of oxytocin cells in the MPOA, SON and PVN possess dopamine D(2), D(3) and D(4) receptors. In anaesthetized rats, using intracavernous pressure as a physiological indicator of erection, blockade of lumbosacral oxytocin receptors (UK, 427843) reduced erectile responses to a nonselective dopamine agonist (apomorphine), suggesting that dopamine recruits a paraventriculospinal oxytocin pathway. In conscious males in the absence of a female, penile erection elicited by a D(2)/D(3) (Quinelorane) but not D(4) (PD168077) agonist was associated with activation of medial parvocellular PVN oxytocin cells. In another experiment where males were given full access to a receptive female, a D(4) (L-745870) but not D(2) or D(3) antagonist (L-741626; nafadotride) inhibited penile erection (intromission), and this was correlated with SON magnocellular oxytocin neuron activation. Together, the data suggest dopamine's effects on hypothalamic oxytocin cells during penile erection are context-specific. Dopamine may act via different parvocellular and magnocellular oxytocin subpopulations to elicit erectile responses, depending upon whether intromission is performed. This study demonstrates the potential existence of interaction between central dopamine and oxytocin pathways during penile erection, with the SON and PVN serving as integrative sites.

  4. Evidence for regional catecholamine uptake and storage sites in the transplanted human heart by positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schwaiger, M.; Hutchins, G.D.; Kalff, V.; Rosenspire, K.; Haka, M.S.; Mallette, S.; Deeb, G.M.; Abrams, G.D.; Wieland, D. )

    1991-05-01

    Positron emission tomography in combination with the newly introduced catecholamine analogue ({sup 11}C)hydroxyephedrine (({sup 11}C)HED) enables the noninvasive delineation of sympathetic nerve terminals of the heart. To address the ongoing controversy over possible reinnervation of the human transplant, 5 healthy control subjects and 11 patients were studied after cardiac transplant by this imaging approach. Regional ({sup 11}C)HED retention was compared to regional blood flow as assessed by rubidium-82. Transplant patients were divided into two groups. Group I had recent (less than 1 yr, 4.4 +/- 2.3 mo) surgery, while group II patients underwent cardiac transplantation more than 2 yr before imaging (3.5 +/- 1.3 yr). ({sup 11}C)HED retention paralleled blood flow in normals, but was homogeneously reduced in group I. In contrast, group II patients revealed heterogeneous ({sup 11}C)HED retention, with increased uptake in the proximal anterior and septal wall. Quantitative evaluation of ({sup 11}C)HED retention revealed a 70% reduction in group I and 59% reduction in group II patients (P less than 0.001). In group II patients, ({sup 11}C)HED retention reached 60% of normal in the proximal anterior wall. These data suggest the presence of neuronal tissue in the transplanted human heart, which may reflect regional sympathetic reinnervation.

  5. Site-specific conjugation of single domain antibodies to liposomes enhances photosensitizer uptake and photodynamic therapy efficacy.

    PubMed

    Broekgaarden, M; van Vught, R; Oliveira, S; Roovers, R C; van Bergen en Henegouwen, P M P; Pieters, R J; Van Gulik, T M; Breukink, E; Heger, M

    2016-03-28

    Photodynamic therapy for therapy-resistant cancers will greatly benefit from targeted delivery of tumor photosensitizing agents. In this study, a strategy for the site-specific conjugation of single domain antibodies onto liposomes containing the photosensitizer zinc phthalocyanine was developed and tested.

  6. SITE SITE DISTURBANCE EFFECTS ON A CLAY SOIL UNDER PINUS RADIATA - ROOT BIOMASS, MYCORRHIZAL COLONISATION, 15AMMONIUM UPTAKE, AND FOLIAR NUTRIENT LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Timber harvesting can result in adverse physical, chemical and biological alterations to soil. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of site disturbance to determine the extent and duration of possible harvesting impacts on soil chemical and biological propertie...

  7. Homeostatic mechanisms in dopamine synthesis and release: a mathematical model

    PubMed Central

    Best, Janet A; Nijhout, H Frederik; Reed, Michael C

    2009-01-01

    Background Dopamine is a catecholamine that is used as a neurotransmitter both in the periphery and in the central nervous system. Dysfunction in various dopaminergic systems is known to be associated with various disorders, including schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and Tourette's syndrome. Furthermore, microdialysis studies have shown that addictive drugs increase extracellular dopamine and brain imaging has shown a correlation between euphoria and psycho-stimulant-induced increases in extracellular dopamine [1]. These consequences of dopamine dysfunction indicate the importance of maintaining dopamine functionality through homeostatic mechanisms that have been attributed to the delicate balance between synthesis, storage, release, metabolism, and reuptake. Methods We construct a mathematical model of dopamine synthesis, release, and reuptake and use it to study homeostasis in single dopaminergic neuron terminals. We investigate the substrate inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase by tyrosine, the consequences of the rapid uptake of extracellular dopamine by the dopamine transporters, and the effects of the autoreceoptors on dopaminergic function. The main focus is to understand the regulation and control of synthesis and release and to explicate and interpret experimental findings. Results We show that the substrate inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase by tyrosine stabilizes cytosolic and vesicular dopamine against changes in tyrosine availability due to meals. We find that the autoreceptors dampen the fluctuations in extracellular dopamine caused by changes in tyrosine hydroxylase expression and changes in the rate of firing. We show that short bursts of action potentials create significant dopamine signals against the background of tonic firing. We explain the observed time courses of extracellular dopamine responses to stimulation in wild type mice and mice that have genetically altered dopamine transporter densities and the observed half-lives of extracellular

  8. PKCβ Inhibitors Attenuate Amphetamine-Stimulated Dopamine Efflux.

    PubMed

    Zestos, Alexander G; Mikelman, Sarah R; Kennedy, Robert T; Gnegy, Margaret E

    2016-06-15

    Amphetamine abuse afflicts over 13 million people, and there is currently no universally accepted treatment for amphetamine addiction. Amphetamine serves as a substrate for the dopamine transporter and reverses the transporter to cause an increase in extracellular dopamine. Activation of the beta subunit of protein kinase C (PKCβ) enhances extracellular dopamine in the presence of amphetamine by facilitating the reverse transport of dopamine and internalizing the D2 autoreceptor. We previously demonstrated that PKCβ inhibitors block amphetamine-stimulated dopamine efflux in synaptosomes from rat striatum in vitro. In this study, we utilized in vivo microdialysis in live, behaving rats to assess the effect of the PKCβ inhibitors, enzastaurin and ruboxistaurin, on amphetamine-stimulated locomotion and increases in monoamines and their metabolites. A 30 min perfusion of the nucleus accumbens core with 1 μM enzastaurin or 1 μM ruboxistaurin reduced efflux of dopamine and its metabolite 3-methoxytyramine induced by amphetamine by approximately 50%. The inhibitors also significantly reduced amphetamine-stimulated extracellular levels of norepinephrine. The stimulation of locomotor behavior by amphetamine, measured simultaneously with the analytes, was comparably reduced by the PKCβ inhibitors. Using a stable isotope label retrodialysis procedure, we determined that ruboxistaurin had no effect on basal levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, glutamate, or GABA. In addition, normal uptake function through the dopamine transporter was unaltered by the PKCβ inhibitors, as measured in rat synaptosomes. Our results support the utility of using PKCβ inhibitors to reduce the effects of amphetamine.

  9. What Mechanisms Are Responsible for the Reuptake of Levodopa-Derived Dopamine in Parkinsonian Striatum?

    PubMed Central

    Nishijima, Haruo; Tomiyama, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Levodopa is the most effective medication for motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease. However, various motor and non-motor complications are associated with levodopa treatment, resulting from altered levodopa-dopamine metabolism with disease progression and long-term use of the drug. The present review emphasizes the role of monoamine transporters other than the dopamine transporter in uptake of extracellular dopamine in the dopamine-denervated striatum. When dopaminergic neurons are lost and dopamine transporters decreased, serotonin and norepinephrine transporters compensate by increasing uptake of excessive extracellular dopamine in the striatum. Organic cation transporter-3 and plasma membrane monoamine transporter, low affinity, and high capacity transporters, also potentially uptake dopamine when high-affinity transporters do not work normally. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors are often administered to patients with Parkinson's disease presenting with depression, pain or other non-motor symptoms. Thus, it is important to address the potential of these drugs to modify dopamine metabolism and uptake through blockade of the compensatory function of these transporters, which could lead to changes in motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. PMID:28018168

  10. Ligand uptake in Mycobacterium tuberculosis truncated hemoglobins is controlled by both internal tunnels and active site water molecules

    PubMed Central

    Davidge, Kelly S; Singh, Sandip; Bowman, Lesley AH; Tinajero-Trejo, Mariana; Carballal, Sebastián; Radi, Rafael; Poole, Robert K; Dikshit, Kanak; Estrin, Dario A; Marti, Marcelo A; Boechi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis, has two proteins belonging to the truncated hemoglobin (trHb) family. Mt-trHbN presents well-defined internal hydrophobic tunnels that allow O 2 and •NO to migrate easily from the solvent to the active site, whereas Mt-trHbO possesses tunnels that are partially blocked by a few bulky residues, particularly a tryptophan at position G8. Differential ligand migration rates allow Mt-trHbN to detoxify •NO, a crucial step for pathogen survival once under attack by the immune system, much more efficiently than Mt-trHbO. In order to investigate the differences between these proteins, we performed experimental kinetic measurements, •NO decomposition, as well as molecular dynamics simulations of the wild type Mt-trHbN and two mutants, VG8F and VG8W. These mutations introduce modifications in both tunnel topologies and affect the incoming ligand capacity to displace retained water molecules at the active site. We found that a single mutation allows Mt-trHbN to acquire ligand migration rates comparable to those observed for Mt-trHbO, confirming that ligand migration is regulated by the internal tunnel architecture as well as by water molecules stabilized in the active site. PMID:26478812

  11. D-A and D-2 dopamine receptor function in the rabbit retina: a model for the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Hensler, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    Studies were done investigating the effect of the synaptic concentration of the transmitter DA, modified by changes in the frequency of electrical field stimulation and by the DA uptake inhibitor nomifensine, on the modulation of /sup 3/H-DA release by D-2 DA autoreceptors and by melatonin receptor sites. At lower synaptic concentrations of the transmitter dopamine, D-2 DA receptor agonists were more potent, while antagonists were more potent when the synaptic concentration of transmitter was higher. The potency of melatonin to inhibit DA release was not altered by the frequency of field stimulation of by frequency-dependent changes in the synaptic concentration of the transmitter.

  12. Dopamine denervation of the prefrontal cortex increases expression of the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1.

    PubMed

    Vollbrecht, Peter J; Simmler, Linda D; Blakely, Randy D; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2014-07-01

    Both dopamine and glutamate are critically involved in cognitive processes such as working memory. Astrocytes, which express dopamine receptors, are essential elements in the termination of glutamatergic signaling: the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1 is responsible for > 90% of cortical glutamate uptake. The effect of dopamine depletion on glutamate transporters in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) remains unknown. In an effort to determine if astrocytes are a locus of cortical dopamine-glutamate interactions, we examined the effects of chronic dopamine denervation on PFC protein and mRNA levels of glutamate transporters. PFC dopamine denervation elicited a marked increase in GLT-1 protein levels, but had no effect on levels of other glutamate transporters; high-affinity glutamate transport was positively correlated with the extent of dopamine depletion. GLT-1 gene expression was not altered. Our data suggest that dopamine depletion may lead to post-translational modifications that result in increased expression and activity of GLT-1 in PFC astrocytes. The glutamate transporter GLT-1 is expressed by astrocytes, which also express dopamine receptors. Regulation of prefrontal cortical (PFC) GLT-1 potentially offers a novel treatment approach to the cognitive deficits of schizophrenia. Partial PFC dopamine deafferentation increased membrane expression of GLT-1 protein and glutamate uptake, but did not alter levels of the other two neocortical glutamate transporters, GLAST and EAAC1.

  13. The interaction of methylphenidate and benztropine with the dopamine transporter is different than other substrates and ligands.

    PubMed

    Dar, Dalit E; Mayo, Cheryl; Uhl, George R

    2005-08-01

    A substantial body of evidence suggests that the dopamine transporter (DAT) is the principal site for cocaine-induced reward and euphoria. Interactions between the DAT and its substrates and ligands may therefore be of clinical relevance. The pharmacological characteristics of DAT compounds were compared in wild type (WT) and mutant DATs. The DAT mutants chosen for study were those with reduced binding and uptake activities (aspartic acid 79 mutated to alanine, termed D79A), reduced binding but normal uptake (tyrosine 251 mutated to alanine, termed Y251A; tyrosine 273 mutated to alanine, termed, Y273A), and normal binding but reduced uptake (a double mutation: serines 356 and 359 mutated to alanine, termed S356,359A). The WT and mutant DATs were transfected into COS-7 cells, and their pharmacological activities were examined 3 days later. Different patterns of pharmacological activity emerged. GBR 12909, cocaine, and mazindol each showed reduced affinity for the Y251A and the Y273A mutants, but their affinity for the S356,359A mutant was similar to that of the WT DAT. d-Amphetamine, MPP+, and dopamine each showed reduced affinity for the S356,359A mutant. Benztropine and methylphenidate had a different effect. Relative to the WT DAT, they both showed reduced affinity for the S356,359A mutant when displacing radioactive carboxyfluorotropane (CFT) binding, but similar affinity when inhibiting radioactive dopamine uptake. These results indicate that methylphenidate and benztropine may interact with the DAT in a different fashion then other substrates and ligands.

  14. An evaluation of the regional acid deposition model surface module for ozone uptake at three sites in the San Joaquin Valley of California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massman, W. J.; Pederson, J.; Delany, A.; Grantz, D.; Hertog, G. Den; Neumann, H. H.; Oncley, S. P.; Pearson, R., Jr.; Shaw, R. H.

    1994-01-01

    Plants and soils act as major sinks for the destruction of tropospheric ozone, especially during daylight hours when plant stomata open and are thought to provide the dominant pathway for the uptake of ozone. The present study, part of the California Ozone Deposition Experiment, compares predictions of the regional acid deposition model ozone surface conductance module with surface conductance data derived from eddy covariance measurements of ozone flux taken at a grape, a cotton, and a grassland site in the San Joaquin Valley of California during the summer of 1991. Results indicate that the model (which was developed to provide long-term large-area estimates for the eastern United States) significantly overpredicts the surface conductance at all times of the day for at least two important types of plant cover of the San Joaquin Valley and that it incorrectly partitions the ozone flux between transpiring and nontranspiring components of the surface at the third site. Consequently, the model either overpredicts or inaccurately represents the observed deposition velocities. Other results indicate that the presence of dew does not reduce the rate of ozone deposition, contradicting to model assumptions, and that model assumptions involving the dependency of stomata upon environmental temperature are unnecessary. The effects of measurement errors and biases, arising from the presence of the roughness sublayer and possible photochemical reactions, are also discussed. A simpler model for ozone surface deposition (at least for the San Joaquin Valley) is proposed and evaluated.

  15. Dopamine and T cells: dopamine receptors and potent effects on T cells, dopamine production in T cells, and abnormalities in the dopaminergic system in T cells in autoimmune, neurological and psychiatric diseases.

    PubMed

    Levite, M

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine, a principal neurotransmitter, deserves upgrading to 'NeuroImmunotransmitter' thanks to its multiple, direct and powerful effects on most/all immune cells. Dopamine by itself is a potent activator of resting effector T cells (Teffs), via two independent ways: direct Teffs activation, and indirect Teffs activation by suppression of regulatory T cells (Tregs). The review covers the following findings: (i) T cells express functional dopamine receptors (DRs) D1R-D5R, but their level and function are dynamic and context-sensitive, (ii) DR membranal protein levels do not necessarily correlate with DR mRNA levels, (iii) different T cell types/subtypes have different DR levels and composition and different responses to dopamine, (iv) autoimmune and pro-inflammatory T cells and T cell leukaemia/lymphoma also express functional DRs, (v) dopamine (~10(-8) M) activates resting/naive Teffs (CD8(+) >CD4(+) ), (vi) dopamine affects Th1/Th2/Th17 differentiation, (vii) dopamine inhibits already activated Teffs (i.e. T cells that have been already activated by either antigen, mitogen, anti-CD3 antibodies cytokines or other molecules), (viii) dopamine inhibits activated Tregs in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Thus, dopamine 'suppresses the suppressors' and releases the inhibition they exert on Teffs, (ix) dopamine affects intracellular signalling molecules and cascades in T cells (e.g. ERK, Lck, Fyn, NF-κB, KLF2), (x) T cells produce dopamine (Tregs>Teffs), can release dopamine, mainly after activation (by antigen, mitogen, anti-CD3 antibodies, PKC activators or other), uptake extracellular dopamine, and most probably need dopamine, (xi) dopamine is important for antigen-specific interactions between T cells and dendritic cells, (xii) in few autoimmune diseases (e.g. multiple sclerosis/SLE/rheumatoid arthritis), and neurological/psychiatric diseases (e.g. Parkinson disease, Alzheimer's disease, Schizophrenia and Tourette), patient's T cells seem to have abnormal DRs

  16. Random and site-specific mutagenesis of the Helicobacter pylori ferric uptake regulator provides insight into Fur structure-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Gilbreath, Jeremy J; Pich, Oscar Q; Benoit, Stéphane L; Besold, Angelique N; Cha, Jeong-Heon; Maier, Robert J; Michel, Sarah L J; Maynard, Ernest L; Merrell, D Scott

    2013-07-01

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) of Helicobacter pylori is a global regulator that is important for colonization and survival within the gastric mucosa. H. pylori Fur is unique in its ability to activate and repress gene expression in both the iron-bound (Fe-Fur) and apo forms (apo-Fur). In the current study we combined random and site-specific mutagenesis to identify amino acid residues important for both Fe-Fur and apo-Fur function. We identified 25 mutations that affected Fe-Fur repression and 23 mutations that affected apo-Fur repression, as determined by transcriptional analyses of the Fe-Fur target gene amiE, and the apo-Fur target gene, pfr. In addition, eight of these mutations also significantly affected levels of Fur in the cell. Based on regulatory phenotypes, we selected several representative mutations to characterize further. Of those selected, we purified the wild-type (HpFurWT) and three mutant Fur proteins (HpFurE5A, HpFurA92T and HpFurH134Y), which represent mutations in the N-terminal extension, the regulatory metal binding site (S2) and the structural metal binding site (S3) respectively. Purified proteins were evaluated for secondary structure by circular dichroism spectroscopy, iron-binding by atomic absorption spectrophotometry, oligomerization in manganese-substituted and apo conditions by in vitro cross-linking assays, and DNA binding to Fe-Fur and apo-Fur target sequences by fluorescence anisotropy. The results showed that the N-terminal, S2 and S3 regions play distinct roles in terms of Fur structure-function relationships. Overall, these studies provide novel information regarding the role of these residues in Fur function, and provide mechanistic insight into how H. pylori Fur regulates gene expression in both the iron-bound and apo forms of the protein.

  17. Computational modeling of extracellular dopamine kinetics suggests low probability of neurotransmitter release.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Katherine E; Wallace, Lane J

    2015-11-01

    Dopamine in the striatum signals the saliency of current environmental input and is involved in learned formation of appropriate responses. The regular baseline-firing rate of dopaminergic neurons suggests that baseline dopamine is essential for proper brain function. The first goal of the study was to estimate the likelihood of full exocytotic dopamine release associated with each firing event under baseline conditions. A computer model of extracellular space associated with a single varicosity was developed using the program MCell to estimate kinetics of extracellular dopamine. Because the literature provides multiple kinetic values for dopamine uptake depending on the system tested, simulations were run using different kinetic parameters. With all sets of kinetic parameters evaluated, at most, 25% of a single vesicle per varicosity would need to be released per firing event to maintain a 5-10 nM extracellular dopamine concentration, the level reported by multiple microdialysis experiments. The second goal was to estimate the fraction of total amount of stored dopamine released during a highly stimulated condition. This was done using the same model system to simulate published measurements of extracellular dopamine following electrical stimulation of striatal slices in vitro. The results suggest the amount of dopamine release induced by a single electrical stimulation may be as large as the contents of two vesicles per varicosity. We conclude that dopamine release probability at any particular varicosity is low. This suggests that factors capable of increasing release probability could have a powerful effect on sculpting dopamine signals.

  18. Dopamine Modulates Cell Cycle in the Lateral Ganglionic Eminence

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Nobuyo; Goto, Tomohide; Waeber, Christian; Bhide, Pradeep G.

    2005-01-01

    Dopamine is a neuromodulator the functions of which in the regulation of complex behaviors such as mood, motivation, and attention are well known. Dopamine appears in the brain early in the embryonic period when none of those behaviors is robust, raising the possibility that dopamine may influence brain development. The effects of dopamine on specific developmental processes such as neurogenesis are not fully characterized. The neostriatum is a dopamine-rich region of the developing and mature brain. If dopamine influenced neurogenesis, the effects would likely be pronounced in the neostriatum. Therefore, we examined whether dopamine influenced neostriatal neurogenesis by influencing the cell cycle of progenitor cells in the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE), the neuroepithelial precursor of the neostriatum. We show that dopamine arrives in the LGE via the nigrostriatal pathway early in the embryonic period and that neostriatal neurogenesis progresses in a dopamine-rich milieu. Dopamine D1-like receptor activation reduces entry of progenitor cells from the G1-to S-phase of the cell cycle, whereas D2-like receptor activation produces the opposite effects by promoting G1- to S-phase entry. D1-like effects are prominent in the ventricular zone, and D2-like effects are prominent in the subventricular zone. The overall effects of dopamine on the cell cycle are D1-like effects, most likely because of the preponderance of D1-like binding sites in the embryonic neostriatum. These data reveal a novel developmental role for dopamine and underscore the relevance of dopaminergic signaling in brain development. PMID:12684471

  19. Pyrethroid pesticide-induced alterations in dopamine transporter function

    SciTech Connect

    Elwan, Mohamed A.; Richardson, Jason R.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Caudle, W. Michael; Miller, Gary W. . E-mail: gary.miller@emory.edu

    2006-03-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between pesticide exposure and the incidence of PD. Studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that certain pesticides increase levels of the dopamine transporter (DAT), an integral component of dopaminergic neurotransmission and a gateway for dopaminergic neurotoxins. Here, we report that repeated exposure (3 injections over 2 weeks) of mice to two commonly used pyrethroid pesticides, deltamethrin (3 mg/kg) and permethrin (0.8 mg/kg), increases DAT-mediated dopamine uptake by 31 and 28%, respectively. Using cells stably expressing DAT, we determined that exposure (10 min) to deltamethrin and permethrin (1 nM-100 {mu}M) had no effect on DAT-mediated dopamine uptake. Extending exposures to both pesticides for 30 min (10 {mu}M) or 24 h (1, 5, and 10 {mu}M) resulted in significant decrease in dopamine uptake. This reduction was not the result of competitive inhibition, loss of DAT protein, or cytotoxicity. However, there was an increase in DNA fragmentation, an index of apoptosis, in cells exhibiting reduced uptake at 30 min and 24 h. These data suggest that up-regulation of DAT by in vivo pyrethroid exposure is an indirect effect and that longer-term exposure of cells results in apoptosis. Since DAT can greatly affect the vulnerability of dopamine neurons to neurotoxicants, up-regulation of DAT by deltamethrin and permethrin may increase the susceptibility of dopamine neurons to toxic insult, which may provide insight into the association between pesticide exposure and PD.

  20. Monitoring dopamine release from single living vesicles with nanoelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Zhan; Huang, Wei-Hua; Wang, Wei; Wang, Zong-Li; Cheng, Jie-Ke; Xu, Tao; Zhang, Rong-Ying; Chen, Yu; Liu, Jie

    2005-06-29

    Carbon fiber nanoelectrodes (tip diameter = ca. 100 nm) have been first used to monitor real-time dopamine release from single living vesicles of single rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. The experiments show that active and inactive release sites exist on the surface of cells, and the spatial distributions have been differentiated even in the same active release zone. It is first demonstrated that multiple vesicles can sequentially release dopamine at the same site of the cell surface, which possibly plays the main role in the dopamine release from PC12 cells.

  1. Myocardial accumulation of a dopamine D2 receptor-binding radioligand, 2'-iodospiperone.

    PubMed

    Saji, H; Yonekura, Y; Tanahashi, K; Iida, Y; Iwasaki, Y; Magata, Y; Konishi, J; Yokoyama, A

    1993-08-01

    125I-2'-iodospiperone (2'-ISP), which has a high and selective affinity for dopamine D2 receptors, produced a high myocardial accumulation of radioactivity in the early phase after intravenous injection into mice. A human scintigraphic study also showed that the myocardium was clearly visualized soon after intravenous injection of the tracer. Analysis of the myocardial homogenate obtained from mice showed that 125I-2'-ISP was metabolically stable and was taken up the myocardium in its intact form. Administration of spiperone significantly reduced the myocardial uptake of 125I-2'-ISP in mice. Treatment with haloperidol and (+) butaclamol, which have a high affinity for dopamine D2 receptors, also tended to reduce the myocardial uptake of radioactivity, while (-)-butaclamol, which has no affinity for dopamine D2 receptors, caused no change in uptake. These findings suggest that the myocardial accumulation of 2'-ISP occurred in association with dopamine D2 (DA2) receptors.

  2. Identification and characterization of two nuclear factor-kappaB sites in the regulatory region of the dopamine D2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Bontempi, Sandra; Fiorentini, Chiara; Busi, Chiara; Guerra, Nicoletta; Spano, PierFranco; Missale, Cristina

    2007-05-01

    Regulation of D2 receptor (D2R) expression is crucial in the function of dopaminergic systems. Because alterations of D2R expression may contribute to the development of different disorders, it is important to elucidate the mechanisms regulating D2R gene transcription. We report the characterization of two putative nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) motifs, referred to as D2-kappaB sites, in the human D2R promoter, and demonstrate that they bind NF-kappaB subunits and stimulate D2R promoter activity. D2-kappaB sites show different degrees of conservation and specificity, when compared with canonical kB sites. The D2-kappaB1 site (from -407 to -398) is highly conserved and binds p50/p65 and p50/c-Rel complexes, whereas D2-kappaB2 (from -513 to -504) is more degenerated and only binds p50/p65 heterodimers. Activation of D2-kappaB sites in COS-7 cells expressing a luciferase reporter vector containing the D2R promoter resulted in increased transcriptional activity. Site-directed mutagenesis of each D2-kappaB site differentially modified D2R promoter activity. In particular, mutation of the D2-kappaB1 motif did not affect D2R promoter response to p50/c-Rel complexes, whereas inactivation of the D2-kappaB2 site decreased it. Mutations of either D2-kappaB1 or D2-kappaB2 sites attenuated the D2R promoter transcriptional efficiency induced by p50/p65 complexes. Thus, D2R transcription mediated by p50/c-Rel is supported mainly by the D2-kappaB2 site, whereas both sites are necessary to support the full transcriptional activity mediated by p50/p65 complexes. A correlation was found between NF-kappaB activity and D2R expression in the pituitary and pituitary-derived cells but not in the striatum, suggesting that NF-kappaB regulation of D2R expression could be a pituitary-specific mechanism.

  3. Uptake of strontium by chamisa (Chrysothamnus nauseosus) shrub plants growing over a former liquid waste disposal site at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Foxx, T.S.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1996-06-01

    A major concern of managers at low-level waste burial site facilities is that plant roots may translocate contaminants up to the soil surface. This study investigates the uptake of strontium ({sup 90}Sr), a biologically mobile element, by chamisa (Chrysothamnus nauseosus), a deep-rooted shrub plant, growing in a former liquid waste disposal site (Solid Waste Management Unit [SWMU] 10-003[c]) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, New Mexico. Surface soil samples were also collected from below (understory) and between (interspace) shrub canopies. Both chamisa plants growing over SWMU 10-003(c) contained significantly higher concentrations of {sup 90}Sr than a control plant--one plant, in particular, contained 3.35 x 10{sup 6} Bq kg{sup {minus}1} ash (9.05 x 10{sup 4} pCi g{sup {minus}1} ash) in top-growth material. Similarly, soil surface samples collected underneath and between plants contained {sup 90}Sr concentrations above background and LANL screening action levels (> 218 Bq kg{sup {minus}1} dry [5.90 pCi g{sup {minus}1} dry]); this probably occurred as a result of chamisa plant leaf fall contaminating the soil understory area followed by water and/or winds moving {sup 90}Sr to the soil interspace areas. Although some soil surface migration of {sup 90}Sr from SWMU 10-003(c) has occurred, the level of {sup 90}Sr in sediments collected downstream of SWMU 10-003(c) at the LANL boundary was still within regional (background) concentrations.

  4. Site-specific conjugation of monodispersed DOTA-PEGn to a thiolated diabody reveals the effect of increasing peg size on kidney clearance and tumor uptake with improved 64-copper PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Crow, Desiree; Turatti, Fabio; Bading, James R; Anderson, Anne-Line; Poku, Erasmus; Yazaki, Paul J; Carmichael, Jenny; Leong, David; Wheatcroft, David; Wheatcroft, Michael P; Raubitschek, Andrew A; Hudson, Peter J; Colcher, David; Shively, John E

    2011-04-20

    Optimal PET imaging of tumors with radiolabeled engineered antibodies requires, among other parameters, matching blood clearance and tumor uptake with the half-life of the engineered antibody. Although diabodies have favorable molecular sizes (50 kDa) for rapid blood clearance (t(1/2) = 30-60 min) and are bivalent, thereby increasing tumor uptake, they exhibit substantial kidney uptake as their major route of clearance, which is especially evident when they are labeled with the PET isotope (64)Cu (t(1/2) = 12 h). To overcome this drawback, diabodies may be conjugated to PEG, a modification that increases the apparent molecular size of the diabody and reduces kidney uptake without adversely affecting tumor uptake or the tumor to blood ratio. We show here that site-specific attachment of monodispersed PEGn of increasing molecular size (n = 12, 24, and 48) can uniformly increase the apparent molecular size of the PEG-diabody conjugate, decrease kidney uptake, and increase tumor uptake, the latter due to the increased residence time of the conjugate in the blood. Since the monodispersed PEGs were preconjugated to the chelator DOTA, the conjugates were able to bind radiometals such as (111)In and (64)Cu that can be used for SPECT and PET imaging, respectively. To allow conjugation of the DOTA-PEG to the diabody, the DOTA-PEG incorporated a terminal cysteine conjugated to a vinyl sulfone moiety. In order to control the conjugation chemistry, we have engineered a surface thiolated diabody that incorporates two cysteines per monomer (four per diabody). The thiolated diabody was expressed and purified from bacterial fermentation and only needs to be reduced prior to conjugation to the DOTA-PEGn-Cys-VS. This novel imaging agent (a diabody with DOTA-PEG48-Cys-VS attached to introduced thiols) gave up to 80%ID/g of tumor uptake with a tumor to blood ratio (T/B) of 8 at 24 h when radiolabeled with (111)In and 37.9% ID/g of tumor uptake (T/B = 8) at 44 h when radiolabeled with

  5. Fungal-derived semiochemical 1-octen-3-ol disrupts dopamine packaging and causes neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Inamdar, Arati A.; Hossain, Muhammad M.; Bernstein, Alison I.; Miller, Gary W.; Richardson, Jason R.; Bennett, Joan Wennstrom

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the most common movement disorder and, although the exact causes are unknown, recent epidemiological and experimental studies indicate that several environmental agents may be significant risk factors. To date, these suspected environmental risk factors have been man-made chemicals. In this report, we demonstrate via genetic, biochemical, and immunological studies that the common volatile fungal semiochemical 1-octen-3-ol reduces dopamine levels and causes dopamine neuron degeneration in Drosophila melanogaster. Overexpression of the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT) rescued the dopamine toxicity and neurodegeneration, whereas mutations decreasing VMAT and tyrosine hydroxylase exacerbated toxicity. Furthermore, 1-octen-3-ol also inhibited uptake of dopamine in human cell lines expressing the human plasma membrane dopamine transporter (DAT) and human VMAT ortholog, VMAT2. These data demonstrate that 1-octen-3-ol exerts toxicity via disruption of dopamine homeostasis and may represent a naturally occurring environmental agent involved in parkinsonism. PMID:24218591

  6. Fungal-derived semiochemical 1-octen-3-ol disrupts dopamine packaging and causes neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, Arati A; Hossain, Muhammad M; Bernstein, Alison I; Miller, Gary W; Richardson, Jason R; Bennett, Joan Wennstrom

    2013-11-26

    Parkinson disease (PD) is the most common movement disorder and, although the exact causes are unknown, recent epidemiological and experimental studies indicate that several environmental agents may be significant risk factors. To date, these suspected environmental risk factors have been man-made chemicals. In this report, we demonstrate via genetic, biochemical, and immunological studies that the common volatile fungal semiochemical 1-octen-3-ol reduces dopamine levels and causes dopamine neuron degeneration in Drosophila melanogaster. Overexpression of the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT) rescued the dopamine toxicity and neurodegeneration, whereas mutations decreasing VMAT and tyrosine hydroxylase exacerbated toxicity. Furthermore, 1-octen-3-ol also inhibited uptake of dopamine in human cell lines expressing the human plasma membrane dopamine transporter (DAT) and human VMAT ortholog, VMAT2. These data demonstrate that 1-octen-3-ol exerts toxicity via disruption of dopamine homeostasis and may represent a naturally occurring environmental agent involved in parkinsonism.

  7. Amphetamine elevates nucleus accumbens dopamine via an action potential-dependent mechanism that is modulated by endocannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Covey, Dan P; Bunner, Kendra D; Schuweiler, Douglas R; Cheer, Joseph F; Garris, Paul A

    2016-06-01

    The reinforcing effects of abused drugs are mediated by their ability to elevate nucleus accumbens dopamine. Amphetamine (AMPH) was historically thought to increase dopamine by an action potential-independent, non-exocytotic type of release called efflux, involving reversal of dopamine transporter function and driven by vesicular dopamine depletion. Growing evidence suggests that AMPH also acts by an action potential-dependent mechanism. Indeed, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry demonstrates that AMPH activates dopamine transients, reward-related phasic signals generated by burst firing of dopamine neurons and dependent on intact vesicular dopamine. Not established for AMPH but indicating a shared mechanism, endocannabinoids facilitate this activation of dopamine transients by broad classes of abused drugs. Here, using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry coupled to pharmacological manipulations in awake rats, we investigated the action potential and endocannabinoid dependence of AMPH-induced elevations in nucleus accumbens dopamine. AMPH increased the frequency, amplitude and duration of transients, which were observed riding on top of slower dopamine increases. Surprisingly, silencing dopamine neuron firing abolished all AMPH-induced dopamine elevations, identifying an action potential-dependent origin. Blocking cannabinoid type 1 receptors prevented AMPH from increasing transient frequency, similar to reported effects on other abused drugs, but not from increasing transient duration and inhibiting dopamine uptake. Thus, AMPH elevates nucleus accumbens dopamine by eliciting transients via cannabinoid type 1 receptors and promoting the summation of temporally coincident transients, made more numerous, larger and wider by AMPH. Collectively, these findings are inconsistent with AMPH eliciting action potential-independent dopamine efflux and vesicular dopamine depletion, and support endocannabinoids facilitating phasic dopamine signalling as a common action in drug reinforcement.

  8. Methamphetamine Regulation of Firing Activity of Dopamine Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lin, Min; Sambo, Danielle; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2016-10-05

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a substrate for the dopamine transporter that increases extracellular dopamine levels by competing with dopamine uptake and increasing reverse transport of dopamine via the transporter. METH has also been shown to alter the excitability of dopamine neurons. The mechanism of METH regulation of the intrinsic firing behaviors of dopamine neurons is less understood. Here we identified an unexpected and unique property of METH on the regulation of firing activity of mouse dopamine neurons. METH produced a transient augmentation of spontaneous spike activity of midbrain dopamine neurons that was followed by a progressive reduction of spontaneous spike activity. Inspection of action potential morphology revealed that METH increased the half-width and produced larger coefficients of variation of the interspike interval, suggesting that METH exposure affected the activity of voltage-dependent potassium channels in these neurons. Since METH has been shown to affect Ca(2+) homeostasis, the unexpected findings that METH broadened the action potential and decreased the amplitude of afterhyperpolarization led us to ask whether METH alters the activity of Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channels. First, we identified BK channels in dopamine neurons by their voltage dependence and their response to a BK channel blocker or opener. While METH suppressed the amplitude of BK channel-mediated unitary currents, the BK channel opener NS1619 attenuated the effects of METH on action potential broadening, afterhyperpolarization repression, and spontaneous spike activity reduction. Live-cell total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, electrophysiology, and biochemical analysis suggest METH exposure decreased the activity of BK channels by decreasing BK-α subunit levels at the plasma membrane.

  9. Mechanism for cocaine blocking the transport of dopamine: insights from molecular modeling and dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoqin; Gu, Howard H; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2009-11-12

    Molecular modeling and dynamics simulations have been performed to study how cocaine inhibits dopamine transporter (DAT) for the transport of dopamine. The computationally determined DAT-ligand binding mode is totally different from the previously proposed overlap binding mode in which cocaine- and dopamine-binding sites are the same (Beuming, T.; et al. Nat. Neurosci. 2008, 11, 780-789). The new cocaine-binding site does not overlap with, but is close to, the dopamine-binding site. Analysis of all results reveals that when cocaine binds to DAT, the initial binding site is likely the one modeled in this study because this binding site can naturally accommodate cocaine. Then cocaine may move to the dopamine-binding site after DAT makes some necessary conformational change and expands the binding site cavity. It has been demonstrated that cocaine may inhibit the transport of dopamine through both blocking the initial DAT-dopamine binding and reducing the kinetic turnover of the transporter following the DAT-dopamine binding. The relative contributions to the phenomenological inhibition of the transport of dopamine from blocking the initial binding and reducing the kinetic turnover can be different in different types of assays. The obtained general structural and mechanistic insights are consistent with available experimental data and could be valuable for guiding future studies toward understanding cocaine's inhibiting of other transporters.

  10. In vivo measurement of somatodendritic release of dopamine in the ventral tegmental area

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Justin M.; Kile, Brian M.; Parker, Lauren E.; Wightman', R. Mark

    2009-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA), the locus of mesolimbic dopamine cell bodies, contains dopamine. Experiments in brain slices have demonstrated that VTA dopamine can be released by local electrical stimulation. Measurements with both push-pull cannula and microdialysis in intact animals have also obtained evidence for releasable dopamine. Here we demonstrate that dopamine release in the VTA can be evoked by remote stimulations of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) in the anesthetized rat. In initial experiments, the MFB was electrically stimulated while a carbon-fiber electrode was lowered to the VTA, with recording by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. While release was not observed with the carbon fiber 4 to 6 mm below dura, a voltammetric response was observed a t 6-8 mm below dura, but the voltammogram was poorly defined. At lower depths, in the VTA, dopamine release was evoked. Immunohistochemistry experiments with antibodies for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) confirmed that dopamine processes were primarily found below 8 mm. Similarly, tissue content determined by liquid chromatography revealed serotonin but not dopamine dorsal to 8 mm with both dopamine and serotonin at lower depths. Evaluation of the VTA signal by pharmacological means showed that it increased with inhibitors of dopamine uptake, but release was not altered by D2 agents. Dopamine release in the VTA was frequency dependent and could be exhausted by stimulations longer than 5 s. Thus, VTA dopamine release can be evoked in vivo by remote stimulations and it resembles release in terminal regions, possessing a similar uptake mechanism and a finite releasable storage pool. PMID:19593821

  11. UWA-121, a mixed dopamine and serotonin re-uptake inhibitor, enhances L-DOPA anti-parkinsonian action without worsening dyskinesia or psychosis-like behaviours in the MPTP-lesioned common marmoset.

    PubMed

    Huot, Philippe; Johnston, Tom H; Lewis, Katie D; Koprich, James B; Reyes, M Gabriela; Fox, Susan H; Piggott, Matthew J; Brotchie, Jonathan M

    2014-07-01

    L-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is the most effective treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), but its long-term administration is complicated by wearing-off and dyskinesia. UWA-101, a dual, equipotent inhibitor of dopamine (DAT) and serotonin (SERT) transporters, has previously been shown to successfully extend duration of anti-parkinsonian benefit of L-DOPA (ON-time), without exacerbating dyskinesia, in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-lesioned marmoset. However, UWA-101 is racemic and it is unclear whether one or both enantiomers contribute to its actions, and whether a better therapeutic effect might be attained by using a single antipode. In the current study, we synthesised the two enantiomers of UWA-101, R-101 (UWA-121) and S-101 (UWA-122), characterised their pharmacological profiles and administered them to MPTP-lesioned marmosets. Parkinsonism, dyskinesia, psychosis-like behaviours and duration of ON-time were evaluated. UWA-121 is a dual DAT > SERT inhibitor, with an approximate 10:1 DAT:SERT affinity ratio (inhibitory constants (Ki) of 307 and 3830 nM, respectively). In combination with L-DOPA, UWA-121 extended duration of ON-time when compared to L-DOPA/vehicle treatment (by 40%, P < 0.01). UWA-121 also extended duration of ON-time without dyskinesia (by 215%, P < 0.05) and ON-time without psychosis-like behaviours when compared to L-DOPA/vehicle treatment (by 345%, P < 0.01). UWA-121 did not worsen the severity of dyskinesia or psychosis-like behaviours (P > 0.05). UWA-122 is a selective SERT inhibitor (Ki 120 nM, Ki at DAT > 50 μM) and, in combination with L-DOPA, had no effect on ON-time, dyskinesia or psychosis-like behaviours (P > 0.05). These data indicate that dual DAT and SERT inhibitors effectively enhance L-DOPA anti-parkinsonian action without worsening dyskinesia and that compounds with such a pharmacological profile represent promising agents against wearing-off in PD.

  12. Recovery of dopamine transporters with methamphetamine detoxification is not linked to changes in dopamine release

    DOE PAGES

    Volkow, Nora D.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Smith, Lisa; ...

    2015-07-21

    Metamphetamine’s widepread abuse and concerns that it may increase Parkinson’s disease led us to assess if the reported loss of dopamine transporters (DAT) in methamphetamine abusers (MA) reflected damage to dopamine neurons. Using PET with [11C]cocaine to measure DAT, and with [11C]raclopride to measure dopamine release (assessed as changes in specific binding of [11C]raclopride between placebo and methylphenidate), which was used as marker of dopamine neuronal function, we show that MA (n=16), tested during early detoxification, had lower DAT (20-30%) but overall normal DA release in striatum (except for a small decrease in left putamen), when compared to controls (n=15).more » In controls, DAT were positively correlated with DA release (higher DAT associated with larger DA increases), consistent with DAT serving as markers of DA terminals. In contrast, MA showed a trend for a negative correlation (p=0.07) (higher DAT associated with lower DA increases), consistent with reduced DA re-uptake following DAT downregulation. MA who remained abstinent nine-months later (n=9) showed significant increases in DAT (20%) but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases did not change. In contrast, in controls, DAT did not change when retested 9 months later but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases in ventral striatum were reduced (p=0.05). Baseline D2/D3 receptors in caudate were lower in MA than in controls and did not change with detoxification, nor did they change in the controls upon retest. The loss of DAT in the MA, which was not associated with a concomitant reduction in dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT loss reflected DA terminal degneration; as well as the recovery of DAT after protracted detoxification, which was not associated with increased dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT increases reflected terminal regeneration, indicate that the loss of DAT in these MA does not reflect degeneration of dopamine terminals.« less

  13. Recovery of dopamine transporters with methamphetamine detoxification is not linked to changes in dopamine release

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, Nora D.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Smith, Lisa; Fowler, Joanna S.; Telang, Frank; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-07-21

    Metamphetamine’s widepread abuse and concerns that it may increase Parkinson’s disease led us to assess if the reported loss of dopamine transporters (DAT) in methamphetamine abusers (MA) reflected damage to dopamine neurons. Using PET with [11C]cocaine to measure DAT, and with [11C]raclopride to measure dopamine release (assessed as changes in specific binding of [11C]raclopride between placebo and methylphenidate), which was used as marker of dopamine neuronal function, we show that MA (n=16), tested during early detoxification, had lower DAT (20-30%) but overall normal DA release in striatum (except for a small decrease in left putamen), when compared to controls (n=15). In controls, DAT were positively correlated with DA release (higher DAT associated with larger DA increases), consistent with DAT serving as markers of DA terminals. In contrast, MA showed a trend for a negative correlation (p=0.07) (higher DAT associated with lower DA increases), consistent with reduced DA re-uptake following DAT downregulation. MA who remained abstinent nine-months later (n=9) showed significant increases in DAT (20%) but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases did not change. In contrast, in controls, DAT did not change when retested 9 months later but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases in ventral striatum were reduced (p=0.05). Baseline D2/D3 receptors in caudate were lower in MA than in controls and did not change with detoxification, nor did they change in the controls upon retest. The loss of DAT in the MA, which was not associated with a concomitant reduction in dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT loss reflected DA terminal degneration; as well as the recovery of DAT after protracted detoxification, which was not associated with increased dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT increases reflected terminal regeneration, indicate that the loss of DAT in these MA does not reflect degeneration of

  14. Assessment of the in vitro binding of JHW 007, a dopamine transport inhibitor that blocks the effects of cocaine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Benztropine (BZT) and its analogues, like cocaine, bind to the dopamine transporter and block dopamine uptake. However, while BZT analogues bind the DAT with high affinity, they generally do not have cocaine-like behavioral effects. JHW 007 is a BZT analogue that displaces [3H]WIN 35,428 from the D...

  15. Anterior cingulate dopamine turnover and behavior change in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Catherine L; Bell, Brian; Palotti, Matthew; Oh, Jen; Christian, Bradley T; Okonkwo, Ozioma; Sojkova, Jitka; Buyan-Dent, Laura; Nickles, Robert J; Harding, Sandra J; Stone, Charles K; Johnson, Sterling C; Holden, James E

    2015-12-01

    Subtle cognitive and behavioral changes are common in early Parkinson's disease. The cause of these symptoms is probably multifactorial but may in part be related to extra-striatal dopamine levels. 6-[(18) F]-Fluoro-L-dopa (FDOPA) positron emission tomography has been widely used to quantify dopamine metabolism in the brain; the most frequently measured kinetic parameter is the tissue uptake rate constant, Ki. However, estimates of dopamine turnover, which also account for the small rate of FDOPA loss from areas of specific trapping, may be more sensitive than Ki for early disease-related changes in dopamine biosynthesis. The purpose of the present study was to compare effective distribution volume ratio (eDVR), a metric for dopamine turnover, to cognitive and behavioral measures in Parkinson's patients. We chose to focus the investigation on anterior cingulate cortex, which shows highest FDOPA uptake within frontal regions and has known roles in executive function. Fifteen non-demented early-stage PD patients were pretreated with carbidopa and tolcapone, a central catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) inhibitor, and then underwent extended imaging with FDOPA PET. Anterior cingulate eDVR was compared with composite scores for language, memory, and executive function measured by neuropsychological testing, and behavior change measured using two informant-based questionnaires, the Cambridge Behavioral Inventory and the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Adult Version. Lower mean eDVR (thus higher dopamine turnover) in anterior cingulate cortex was related to lower (more impaired) behavior scores. We conclude that subtle changes in anterior cingulate dopamine metabolism may contribute to dysexecutive behaviors in Parkinson's disease.

  16. Association of {sup 11}C-Methionine PET Uptake With Site of Failure After Concurrent Temozolomide and Radiation for Primary Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Irwin H.; Piert, Morand; Gomez-Hassan, Diana; Junck, Larry; Rogers, Lisa; Hayman, James; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Cao Yue; Tsien, Christina

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether increased uptake on 11C-methionine-PET (MET-PET) imaging obtained before radiation therapy and temozolomide is associated with the site of subsequent failure in newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods: Patients with primary GBM were treated on a prospective trial with dose- escalated radiation and concurrent temozolomide. As part of the study, MET-PET was obtained before treatment but was not used for target volume definition. Using automated image registration, we assessed whether the area of increased MET-PET activity (PET gross target volume [GTV]) was fully encompassed within the high-dose region and compared the patterns of failure for those with and without adequate high-dose coverage of the PET-GTV. Results: Twenty-six patients were evaluated with a median follow-up of 15 months. Nineteen of 26 had appreciable (>1 cm{sup 3}) volumes of increased MET-PET activity before treatment. Five of 19 patients had PET-GTV that was not fully encompassed within the high-dose region, and all five patients had noncentral failures. Among the 14 patients with adequately covered PET-GTV, only two had noncentral treatment failures. Three of 14 patients had no evidence of recurrence more than 1 year after radiation therapy. Inadequate PET-GTV coverage was associated with increased risk of noncentral failures. (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Pretreatment MET-PET appears to identify areas at highest risk for recurrence for patients with GBM. It would be reasonable to test a strategy of incorporating MET-PET into radiation treatment planning, particularly for identifying areas for conformal boost.

  17. Roles of uptake, biotransformation, and target site sensitivity in determining the differential toxicity of chlorpyrifos to second to fourth instar Chironomous riparius (Meigen)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchwalter, D.B.; Sandahl, J.F.; Jenkins, J.J.; Curtis, L.R.

    2004-01-01

    Early life stages of aquatic organisms tend to be more sensitive to various chemical contaminants than later life stages. This research attempted to identify the key biological factors that determined sensitivity differences among life stages of the aquatic insect Chironomous riparius. Specifically, second to fourth instar larvae were exposed in vivo to both low and high waterborne concentrations of chlorpyrifos to examine differences in accumulation rates, chlorpyrifos biotransformation, and overall sensitivity among instars. In vitro acetylcholinesterase (AChE) assays were performed with chlorpyrifos and the metabolite, chlorpyrifos-oxon, to investigate potential target site sensitivity differences among instars. Earlier instars accumulated chlorpyrifos more rapidly than later instars. There were no major differences among instars in the biotransformation rates of chlorpyrifos to the more polar metabolites, chlorpyrifos-oxon, and chlorpyridinol (TCP). Homogenate AChE activities from second to fourth instar larvae were refractory to chlorpyrifos, even at high concentrations. In contrast, homogenate AChE activities were responsive in a dose-dependent manner to chlorpyrifos-oxon. In general, it appeared that chlorpyrifos sensitivity differences among second to fourth instar C. riparius were largely determined by differences in uptake rates. In terms of AChE depression, fourth instar homogenates were more sensitive to chlorpyrifos and chlorpyrifos-oxon than earlier instars. However, basal AChE activity in fourth instar larvae was significantly higher than basal AChE activity in second to third instar larvae, which could potentially offset the apparent increased sensitivity to the oxon. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of chronic cocaine abuse on postsynaptic dopamine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.; Schlyer, D.; Shiue, C.Y.; Alpert, R.; Dewey, S.L.; Logan, J.; Bendriem, B.; Christman, D. )

    1990-06-01

    To assess the effects of chronic cocaine intoxication on dopamine receptors in human subjects, the authors evaluated ({sup 18}F)N-methylspiroperidol binding using positron emission tomography in 10 cocaine abusers and 10 normal control subjects. Cocaine abusers who had been detoxified for 1 week or less showed significantly lower values for uptake of ({sup 18}F)N-methylspiroperidol in striatum than the normal subjects, whereas the cocaine abusers who had been detoxified for 1 month showed values comparable to those obtained from normal subjects. The authors conclude that postsynaptic dopamine receptor availability decreases with chronic cocaine abuse but may recover after a drug-free interval.

  19. Positron-labeled dopamine agonists for probing the high affinity states of dopamine subtype 2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Dah-Ren; Narendran, Raj; Laruelle, Marc

    2005-01-01

    It is well documented that guanidine nucleotide-coupled dopamine subtype 2 receptors (D2) are configured in high and low affinity states for the dopamine agonist in vitro. However, it is still unclear whether these functional states exist in vivo. We hypothesized that positron-labeled D2 agonist and Positron Emission Tomography can be used to probe these functional states noninvasively. Recently, we demonstrated in nonhuman primates that N-[11C]propyl-norapomorphine (NPA), a full D2 agonist, is a suitable tracer for imaging the high affinity states of D2 receptors in vivo. We also developed kinetic modeling method to derive receptor parameters, such as binding potential (BP) and specific uptake ratios (V3''). When coupled with a dopamine releasing drug, amphetamine, NPA was found to be more sensitive than antagonist tracers, such as [11C]raclopride (RAC), to endogenous dopamine concentration changes (by about 42%). This finding suggests that NPA is a superior tracer for reporting endogenous DA concentration. In addition, the difference of the BP or V3'' of NPA and RAC under control and amphetamine challenge conditions could be used to estimate the functional states of D2 receptors in vivo. On the basis of our findings and the assumptions that NPA binds only to the high affinity states and RAC binds equally to both affinity states, we proposed that about 70% of the D2 receptors are configured in the high affinity states in vivo.

  20. (125)I-spectramide: A novel benzamide displaying potent and selective effects at the D sub 2 dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Roa, P.M.; Grigoriadis, D.E.; Wilson, A.A.; Sharkey, J.; Dannals, R.F.; Villemagne, Victor, L.; Wong, D.F.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.; Kuhar, M.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The new substituted benzamide Spectramide, (N-(2-(4-iodobenzyl-N-methylamino)-2-methoxy-4-ethyl)-5-chloro-methylamine benzamide) labelled with {sup 125}I was used as a potent and highly selective dopamine-D{sub 2} receptor antagonist in rat striatal homogenates for in vitro receptor binding. Kinetic experiments demonstrated the reversibility of the binding and the estimated Kd from saturation analysis was 25 pM, with a Bmax of 20 pmol/g of tissue. Competition studies showed that spectramide did not interact potently with the D{sub 1} or dopamine-uptake site. Drugs known to interact with other receptor system were weak competitors of the binding, while binding was potently inhibited by other D{sub 2} antagonists, such as spiperone and eticlopride. These data indicate that Spectramide binds selectively and with high affinity to the dopamine D{sub 2} receptors, and may prove to be a useful tool for the study of these receptors in vivo using PET or SPECT.

  1. Effects of Chronic Caffeine on Adenosine, Dopamine and Acetylcholine Systems in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shi, D.; Nikodijević, O.; Jacobson, K. A.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic ingestion of caffeine by male NIH Swiss strain mice leads in about 3 days to a significant increase in A1-adenosine, nicotinic and muscarinic receptors, and a significant decrease of β1-adrenoceptors in cerebral cortical membranes. Plasma levels of caffeine in the chronically treated mice range from 0.70 to 5.7 μg/ml. The changes in receptors reverse after withdrawal of caffeine within 7 days. An increase in nitrendipine binding sites, associated with L-type calcium channels, also occurs within 4 days and has reversed in 7 days after withdrawal. There is no change in the levels of striatal nicotinic receptors or D2-dopamine receptors, nor of [3H]cocaine binding to dopamine uptake sites. Levels of opioid receptors are either increased (δ) or unaltered (μ, κ). σ-Receptors are unaltered. Stimulations of striatal adenylate cyclase by forskolin, dopamine and NECA are not significantly affected after chronic caffeine ingestion. The adenosine agonist, NECA, reverses the amphetamine-elicited increases in locomotor activity and partly reverses the cocaine-elicited increases. The NECA dose-response curve is multiphasic (depression, stimulation and then depression) versus amphetamine in control mice, but only depressant versus amphetamine in chronic caffeine mice, while being multiphasic versus cocaine in both control and chronic caffeine mice. NECA reverses the stimulation of locomotor activity elicited by the muscarinic antagonist, scopolamine, and is more effective in the chronic caffeine mice. The behavioral depressant effects of the muscarinic agonist, oxotremorine, are not markedly altered after chronic caffeine ingestion. The behavioral depressant effects of nicotine are abolished after chronic caffeine ingestion, while the behavioral depressant effects of the nicotinic antagonist, mecamylamine, are not markedly altered after chronic caffeine ingestion. In combination with caffeine, nicotine has depressant effects in control mice, while having biphasic

  2. Striatal dopamine innervation and receptor density: regional effects of the weaver mutation.

    PubMed

    Pullara, J M; Marshall, J F

    1989-02-20

    Mice homozygous for the autosomal recessive gene weaver (wv) exhibit a regionally specific depletion of forebrain dopamine (DA). DA is reduced approximately 70% in the dorsal striatum of homozygotes (wv/wv) relative to heterozygous (+/wv) controls while DA content in ventral striatum is relatively unchanged. The goal of the present study was to determine the regional effects of the weaver mutation on striatal DA receptors and DA uptake sites using quantitative autoradiography. Catecholamine histofluorescence was used to examine midbrain DA-containing cell bodies. Compared to behaviorally normal (+/-) littermates, the binding of [3H]spiroperidol to D2 sites was significantly increased in the dorsal but not ventral striatum of wv/wv mice. Binding of the D1 ligand, [3H]SCH23390, was significantly decreased throughout the striatum of wv/wv mice. The binding of [3H]mazindol to DA uptake sites was dramatically reduced in all wv/wv striatal regions except the ventrolateral portion. Compared to +/- littermates, wv/wv mice had far fewer fluorescent cell bodies in the substantia nigra and a less pronounced reduction of ventral tegmental area fluorescent somata. These findings support the hypothesis that heterogeneities exist in the genetic control of the mesotelencephalic DA system. The results underscore the usefulness of the weaver mouse in the study of mesostriatal sub-systems, receptor regulation, and potentially as a model of human neuropathologies that affect distinct populations of cells in the mesotelencephalic system.

  3. Diazepam Inhibits Electrically Evoked and Tonic Dopamine Release in the Nucleus Accumbens and Reverses the Effect of Amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Gomez-A, Alexander; Fiorenza, Amanda M; Boschen, Suelen L; Sugi, Adam H; Beckman, Danielle; Ferreira, Sergio T; Lee, Kendall; Blaha, Charles D; Da Cunha, Claudio

    2017-02-15

    Diazepam is a benzodiazepine receptor agonist with anxiolytic and addictive properties. Although most drugs of abuse increase the level of release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens, here we show that diazepam not only causes the opposite effect but also prevents amphetamine from enhancing dopamine release. We used 20 min sampling in vivo microdialysis and subsecond fast-scan cyclic voltammetry recordings at carbon-fiber microelectrodes to show that diazepam caused a dose-dependent decrease in the level of tonic and electrically evoked dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens of urethane-anesthetized adult male Swiss mice. In fast-scan cyclic voltammetry assays, dopamine release was evoked by electrical stimulation of the ventral tegmental area. We observed that 2 and 3 mg of diazepam/kg reduced the level of electrically evoked dopamine release, and this effect was reversed by administration of the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist flumazenil in doses of 2.5 and 5 mg/kg, respectively. No significant effects on measures of dopamine re-uptake were observed. Cyclic voltammetry experiments further showed that amphetamine (5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) caused a significant increase in the level of dopamine release and in the half-life for dopamine re-uptake. Diazepam (2 mg/kg) significantly weakened the effect of amphetamine on dopamine release without affecting dopamine re-uptake. These results suggest that the pharmacological effects of benzodiazepines have a dopaminergic component. In addition, our findings challenge the classic view that all drugs of abuse cause dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and suggest that benzodiazepines could be useful in the treatment of addiction to other drugs that increase the level of dopamine release, such as cocaine, amphetamines, and nicotine.

  4. Comparison of dopamine kinetics in the larval Drosophila ventral nerve cord and protocerebrum with improved optogenetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Privman, Eve; Venton, B Jill

    2015-11-01

    Dopamine release and uptake have been studied in the Drosophila larval ventral nerve cord (VNC) using optogenetics to stimulate endogenous release. However, other areas of the central nervous system remain uncharacterized. Here, we compare dopamine release in the VNC and protocerebrum of larval Drosophila. Stimulations were performed with CsChrimson, a new, improved, red light-activated channelrhodopsin. In both regions, dopamine release was observed after only a single, 4 ms duration light pulse. Michaelis-Menten modeling was used to understand release and uptake parameters for dopamine. The amount of dopamine released ([DA]p ) on the first stimulation pulse is higher than the average [DA]p released from subsequent pulses. The initial and average amount of dopamine released per stimulation pulse is smaller in the protocerebrum than in the VNC. The average Vmax of 0.08 μM/s in the protocerebrum was significantly higher than the Vmax of 0.05 μM/s in the VNC. The average Km of 0.11 μM in the protocerebrum was not significantly different from the Km of 0.10 μM in the VNC. When the competitive dopamine transporter (DAT) inhibitor nisoxetine was applied, the Km increased significantly in both regions while Vmax stayed the same. This work demonstrates regional differences in dopamine release and uptake kinetics, indicating important variation in the amount of dopamine available for neurotransmission and neuromodulation. We use a new optogenetic tool, red light activated CsChrimson, to stimulate the release of dopamine in the ventral nerve cord and medial protocerebrum of the larval Drosophila central nervous system. We monitored extracellular dopamine by fast scan cyclic voltammetry and used Michaelis-Menten modeling to probe the regulation of extracellular dopamine, discovering important similarities and differences in these two regions.

  5. Studies of the Biogenic Amine Transporters 15. Identification of Novel Allosteric Dopamine Transporter Ligands with Nanomolar Potency

    PubMed Central

    Ananthan, Subramaniam; Partilla, John S.; Saini, Surendra K.; Moukha-Chafiq, Omar; Pathak, Vibha; Baumann, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Novel allosteric modulators of the dopamine transporter (DAT) have been identified. We have shown previously that SRI-9804 [N-(diphenylmethyl)-2-phenyl-4-quinazolinamine], SRI-20040 [N-(2,2-diphenylethyl)-2-phenyl-4-quinazolinamine], and SRI-20041 [N-(3,3-diphenylpropyl)-2-phenyl-4-quinazolinamine] partially inhibit [125I]RTI-55 ([125I]3β-(4′-iodophenyl)tropan-2β-carboxylic acid methyl ester) binding and [3H]dopamine ([3H]DA) uptake, slow the dissociation rate of [125I]RTI-55 from the DAT, and allosterically modulate d-amphetamine–induced, DAT-mediated DA release. We synthesized and evaluated the activity of >500 analogs of these ligands and report here on 36 selected compounds. Using synaptosomes prepared from rat caudate, we conducted [3H]DA uptake inhibition assays, DAT binding assays with [3H]WIN35428 ([3H]2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane), and DAT-mediated release assays with either [3H]MPP+ ([3H]1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium) or [3H]DA. We observed three groups of [3H]DA uptake inhibitors: 1) full-efficacy agents with a one-site fit, 2) full-efficacy agents with a two-site fit, and 3) partial-efficacy agents with a one-site fit—the focus of further studies. These agents partially inhibited DA, serotonin, and norepinephrine uptake, yet were much less potent at inhibiting [3H]WIN35428 binding to the DAT. For example, SRI-29574 [N-(2,2-diphenylethyl)-2-(imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-6-yl)quinazolin-4-amine] partially inhibited DAT uptake, with an IC50 = 2.3 ± 0.4 nM, without affecting binding to the DAT. These agents did not alter DAT-mediated release of [3H]MPP+ in the absence or presence of 100 nM d-amphetamine. SRI-29574 had no significant effect on the d-amphetamine EC50 or Emax value for DAT-mediated release of [3H]MPP+. These studies demonstrate the existence of potent DAT ligands that partially block [3H]DA uptake, without affecting DAT binding or d-amphetamine–induced [3H]MPP+ release. These compounds may prove to be useful probes of

  6. Acute fasting increases somatodendritic dopamine release in the ventral tegmental area.

    PubMed

    Roseberry, Aaron G

    2015-08-01

    Fasting and food restriction alter the activity of the mesolimbic dopamine system to affect multiple reward-related behaviors. Food restriction decreases baseline dopamine levels in efferent target sites and enhances dopamine release in response to rewards such as food and drugs. In addition to releasing dopamine from axon terminals, dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) also release dopamine from their soma and dendrites, and this somatodendritic dopamine release acts as an autoinhibitory signal to inhibit neighboring VTA dopamine neurons. It is unknown whether acute fasting also affects dopamine release, including the local inhibitory somatodendritic dopamine release in the VTA. In these studies, I have tested whether fasting affects the inhibitory somatodendritic dopamine release within the VTA by examining whether an acute 24-h fast affects the inhibitory postsynaptic current mediated by evoked somatodendritic dopamine release (D2R IPSC). Fasting increased the contribution of the first action potential to the overall D2R IPSC and increased the ratio of repeated D2R IPSCs evoked at short intervals. Fasting also reduced the effect of forskolin on the D2R IPSC and led to a significantly bigger decrease in the D2R IPSC in low extracellular calcium. Finally, fasting resulted in an increase in the D2R IPSCs when a more physiologically relevant train of D2R IPSCs was used. Taken together, these results indicate that fasting caused a change in the properties of somatodendritic dopamine release, possibly by increasing dopamine release, and that this increased release can be sustained under conditions where dopamine neurons are highly active.

  7. Development of specificity and stereoselectivity of rat brain dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Miller, J C; Friedhoff, A J

    1986-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to the neuroleptic haloperidol has been reported to produce an enduring decrement in the number of dopamine D2 receptors in rat striatum and a persistent diminution of a dopamine dependent behavior, stereotypy. The ontogeny of rat brain dopamine binding sites has been studied in terms of the kinetic properties and phenotypic specificity in rat fetal brain through early postnatal development. Sites showing some properties of the D2 binding site can be found prior to gestational day (GD) 18, can be labeled with [3H]dopamine or [3H]spiroperidol and can be displaced with dopaminergic agonists and antagonists. Saturation kinetics for specific [3H]spiroperidol has previously been found to occur on or about GD 18. It is of interest that the critical period for the prenatal effect of haloperidol to reduce striatal D2 binding sites, GD's 15-18, coincides with the period during which dopamine binding sites lack true specificity, but can be labeled with dopaminergic ligands. In these experiments the development of stereoselectivity of brain dopamine binding sites has been examined. When rat mothers were given either the neuroleptic (+)-butaclamol or its therapeutically inactive isomer (-)-butaclamol during the critical period GD's 15-18, the number of [3H]spiroperidol binding sites in striata of offspring was significantly reduced by both stereoisomers. This is in marked contrast to the postnatal treatment effect by a neuroleptic in which upregulation of striatal D2 binding sites occurs only by treatment with the therapeutically active isomer (+)-butaclamol. In vitro studies of the direct effect of the stereoisomers of butaclamol indicate that the recognition sites detected during fetal brain development with [3H]spiroperidol do not distinguish between the isomers of butaclamol.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Platelet monoamine uptake in relatives of patients with Huntington's chorea.

    PubMed Central

    Ehsanullah, R. S.; Turner, P.

    1981-01-01

    Uptake of dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) by the platelets of 25 symptom-free relatives of patients with established Huntington's chorea (HC) was not significantly different from that of control subjects. Platelet uptake of 5-HT in 3 subjects with early signs of the disease showed increased Km and Vmax values. Increased platelet uptake of 5-HT in patients with established HC was confirmed in a further 3 patients. It seems that this phenomenon appears with the clinical evidence of the disease. Further investigation of the nature of the platelet uptake abnormality may cast light on pathogenic factors in HC. PMID:6458032

  9. Molecular model of the neural dopamine transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravna, Aina Westrheim; Sylte, Ingebrigt; Dahl, Svein G.

    2003-05-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) regulates the action of dopamine by reuptake of the neurotransmitter into presynaptic neurons, and is the main molecular target of amphetamines and cocaine. DAT and the Na+/H+ antiporter (NhaA) are secondary transporter proteins that carry small molecules across a cell membrane against a concentration gradient, using ion gradients as energy source. A 3-dimensional projection map of the E. coli NhaA has confirmed a topology of 12 membrane spanning domains, and was previously used to construct a 3-dimensional NhaA model with 12 trans-membrane α-helices (TMHs). The NhaA model, and site directed mutagenesis data on DAT, were used to construct a detailed 3-dimensional DAT model using interactive molecular graphics and empiric force field calculations. The model proposes a dopamine transport mechanism involving TMHs 1, 3, 4, 5, 7 and 11. Asp79, Tyr252 and Tyr274 were the primary cocaine binding residues. Binding of cocaine or its analogue, (-)-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane (CFT), seemed to lock the transporter in an inactive state, and thus inhibit dopamine transport. The present model may be used to design further experimental studies of the molecular structure and mechanisms of DAT and other secondary transporter proteins.

  10. Dopamine and anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Södersten, P; Bergh, C; Leon, M; Zandian, M

    2016-01-01

    We have suggested that reduced food intake increases the risk for anorexia nervosa by engaging mesolimbic dopamine neurons, thereby initially rewarding dieting. Recent fMRI studies have confirmed that dopamine neurons are activated in anorexia nervosa, but it is not clear whether this response is due to the disorder or to its resulting nutritional deficit. When the body senses the shortage of nutrients, it rapidly shifts behavior toward foraging for food as a normal physiological response and the mesolimbic dopamine neurons may be involved in that process. On the other hand, the altered dopamine status of anorexics has been suggested to result from a brain abnormality that underlies their complex emotional disorder. We suggest that the outcomes of the treatments that emerge from that perspective remain poor because they target the mental symptoms that are actually the consequences of the food deprivation that accompanies anorexia. On the other hand, a method that normalizes the disordered eating behavior of anorexics results in much better physiological, behavioral, and emotional outcomes.

  11. Measurements, in vivo, of parameters of the dopamine system

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.M.; DeJesus, O.T.; Dinerstein, R.; Revenaugh, J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper discusses methods of measuring important parameters of the dopamine system in the living animal by use of PET techniques. One primary concern is the density and binding affinity of post-synaptic neuroreceptors. A second concern is the activity of neurons. In vivo, this is generally related to the turnover of neurotransmitter and can also be related to the uptake of precursor compounds by the neurons. If the transmitter and neuroleptic compound compete for the same binding sites (on the receptor molecule) these two effects are interwoven and are not easily isolated. It appears that the movement of neuroleptic drugs from the brain is slow enough to allow equilibrium to be maintained between ligand and receptor, especially after some time for the initial washout and translocation in the brain. To test the consequences of equilibrium binding and the possible use of the model for measurement of receptor densities by emission tomography we have modified Clark's equilibrium model of ligand binding. In this note we will describe the solutions of the equations and some comparisons of the predictions of the model with data, as well as its application to tomographic measurements.

  12. Dopamine transporters participate in the physiological regulation of prolactin.

    PubMed

    Demaria, J E; Nagy, G M; Lerant, A A; Fekete, M I; Levenson, C W; Freeman, M E

    2000-01-01

    Three populations of hypothalamic neuroendocrine dopaminergic (NEDA) neurons, arising from the arcuate and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus release dopamine (DA) that acts at the pituitary gland to regulate the secretion of PRL. It is generally accepted that NEDA neurons lack functional DA transporters (DATs), which are responsible for uptake of DA from the synaptic cleft into the presynaptic axon terminal. This study localized DATs to the hypothalamo-pituitary axis and evaluated the effect of DAT blockade on the hypothalamo-pituitary regulation of PRL. After 7 days of treatment with cocaine (a nonspecific amine transporter blocker) or mazindol (a specific DAT blocker), the relative abundance of PRL messenger RNA (mRNA) in the anterior lobe (AL) of OVX rats was significantly decreased, whereas the relative abundance of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA in the hypothalamus was significantly increased. The effect of cocaine or mazindol administration on DA turnover and serum PRL concentration was examined in estradiol (E2)-treated OVX rats. E2 administration (i.v.) resulted in a significant increase in serum PRL within 4 h; however, cocaine or mazindol administration abolished the E2-induced increase of PRL. Cocaine or mazindol significantly increased the concentration of DA at the site of the axon terminals within the median eminence (ME), intermediate lobe (IL) and neural lobe (NL), indicating blockade of uptake. Because formation of DOPAC requires uptake of DA, concentrations of DOPAC in the ME, IL and NL decreased following treatment with either cocaine or mazindol. These data, together with the presence of immunopositive DAT in the ME, pituitary stalk, IL, and NL, suggest that a functional DAT system is present within all three populations of NEDA neurons. Moreover, similarity between the effects of cocaine and mazindol treatment indicate that blockade of the DAT, but not other amine transporters, is responsible for suppression of PRL gene expression and

  13. Orthostatic hypotension, non-dipping and striatal dopamine in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yoon-Sang; Kim, Joong-Seok; Chung, Yong-An; You, Ie Ryung; Yang, Dong-Won; Chung, Sung-Woo; Park, Jeong-Wook; Kim, Yeong-In; Lee, Kwang-Soo

    2013-04-01

    Orthostatic hypotension and non-dipping are relatively common autonomic dysfunctions in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). These abnormalities have been thought to occur independently of striatal dopaminergic depletion; however, only little preliminary information is available. In this study, we investigated the association of neurocirculatory changes with striatal dopamine transporter status in 69 patients with early PD. Seventeen patients had orthostatic hypotension and 55 patients were non-dippers. A comparison between cases with and without orthostatic hypotension was insignificant for striatal dopamine transporter uptake. These insignificances continued in a comparison of dippers and non-dippers. These results suggest that sympathetic noradrenergic dysfunctions in PD are independent of striatal dopamine transporter depletion.

  14. Dopamine receptors in pituitary adenomas: PET visualization with 11C-N-methylspiperone

    SciTech Connect

    Muhr, C.; Bergstroem, M.L.; Lundberg, P.O.; Bergstroem, K.H.; Hartvig, P.; Lundqvist, H.; Antoni, G.; Langstroem B2

    1986-03-01

    Two patients with pituitary tumors were examined with positron emission tomography (PET) after intravenous administration of 11C-N-methylspiperone. In repeat studies the patients were given 1 mg of intravenous haloperidol prior to the administration of the radioligand to block the dopamine receptors. High uptakes of the radiolabeled ligand were seen in one of the tumors. With haloperidol pretreatment the uptake was lower, probably mainly showing the remaining unspecific binding. The most marked uptake and the largest effect of haloperidol pretreatment was seen in a patient with a hormonally active prolactinoma. Dopamine receptor binding in pituitary tumors can be demonstrated in vivo with PET, and quantification of this binding is possible using a compartmental model. This technique may be useful in improving our understanding of the variable response to medical treatment of prolactinomas with dopamine agonists as well as in the prediction of the effect of such treatment.

  15. Enhanced Dopamine Release by Dopamine Transport Inhibitors Described by a Restricted Diffusion Model and Fast-Scan Cyclic Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Alexander F; Spivak, Charles E; Lupica, Carl R

    2016-06-15

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) using carbon fiber electrodes is widely used to rapidly monitor changes in dopamine (DA) levels in vitro and in vivo. Current analytical approaches utilize parameters such as peak oxidation current amplitude and decay times to estimate release and uptake processes, respectively. However, peak amplitude changes are often observed with uptake inhibitors, thereby confounding the interpretation of these parameters. To overcome this limitation, we demonstrate that a simple five-parameter, two-compartment model mathematically describes DA signals as a balance of release (r/ke) and uptake (ku), summed with adsorption (kads and kdes) of DA to the carbon electrode surface. Using nonlinear regression, we demonstrate that our model precisely describes measured DA signals obtained in brain slice recordings. The parameters extracted from these curves were then validated using pharmacological manipulations that selectively alter vesicular release or DA transporter (DAT)-mediated uptake. Manipulation of DA release through altering the Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) ratio or adding tetrodotoxin reduced the release parameter with no effect on the uptake parameter. DAT inhibitors methylenedioxypyrovalerone, cocaine, and nomifensine significantly reduced uptake and increased vesicular DA release. In contrast, a low concentration of amphetamine reduced uptake but had no effect on DA release. Finally, the kappa opioid receptor agonist U50,488 significantly reduced vesicular DA release but had no effect on uptake. Together, these data demonstrate a novel analytical approach to distinguish the effects of manipulations on DA release or uptake that can be used to interpret FSCV data.

  16. Dual Action of Zn2+ on the Transport Cycle of the Dopamine Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Hasenhuetl, Peter S.; Schicker, Klaus; Sitte, Harald H.; Freissmuth, Michael; Sandtner, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine transporter shapes dopaminergic neurotransmission by clearing extracellular dopamine and by replenishing vesicular stores. The dopamine transporter carries an endogenous binding site for Zn2+, but the nature of the Zn2+-dependent modulation has remained elusive: both, inhibition and stimulation of DAT have been reported. Here, we exploited the high time resolution of patch-clamp recordings to examine the effects of Zn2+ on the transport cycle of DAT: we recorded peak currents associated with substrate translocation and steady-state currents reflecting the forward transport mode of DAT. Zn2+ depressed the peak current but enhanced the steady-state current through DAT. The parsimonious explanation is preferential binding of Zn2+ to the outward facing conformation of DAT, which allows for an allosteric activation of DAT, in both, the forward transport mode and substrate exchange mode. We directly confirmed that Zn2+ dissociated more rapidly from the inward- than from the outward-facing state of DAT. Finally, we formulated a kinetic model for the action of Zn2+ on DAT that emulated all current experimental observations and accounted for all previous (in part contradictory) findings. Importantly, the model predicts that the intracellular Na+ concentration determines whether substrate uptake by DAT is stimulated or inhibited by Zn2+. This prediction was directly verified. The mechanistic framework provided by the current model is of relevance for the rational design of allosteric activators of DAT. These are of interest for treating de novo loss-of-function mutations of DAT associated with neuropsychiatric disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). PMID:26504078

  17. Optogenetic Control of Serotonin and Dopamine Release in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Optogenetic control of neurotransmitter release is an elegant method to investigate neurobiological mechanisms with millisecond precision and cell type-specific resolution. Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) can be expressed in specific neurons, and blue light used to activate those neurons. Previously, in Drosophila, neurotransmitter release and uptake have been studied after continuous optical illumination. In this study, we investigated the effects of pulsed optical stimulation trains on serotonin or dopamine release in larval ventral nerve cords. In larvae with ChR2 expressed in serotonergic neurons, low-frequency stimulations produced a distinct, steady-state response while high-frequency patterns were peak shaped. Evoked serotonin release increased with increasing stimulation frequency and then plateaued. The steady-state response and the frequency dependence disappeared after administering the uptake inhibitor fluoxetine, indicating that uptake plays a significant role in regulating the extracellular serotonin concentration. Pulsed stimulations were also used to evoke dopamine release in flies expressing ChR2 in dopaminergic neurons and similar frequency dependence was observed. Release due to pulsed optical stimulations was modeled to determine the uptake kinetics. For serotonin, Vmax was 0.54 ± 0.07 μM/s and Km was 0.61 ± 0.04 μM; and for dopamine, Vmax was 0.12 ± 0.03 μM/s and Km was 0.45 ± 0.13 μM. The amount of serotonin released per stimulation pulse was 4.4 ± 1.0 nM, and the amount of dopamine was 1.6 ± 0.3 nM. Thus, pulsed optical stimulations can be used to mimic neuronal firing patterns and will allow Drosophila to be used as a model system for studying mechanisms underlying neurotransmission. PMID:24849718

  18. Does human presynaptic striatal dopamine function predict social conformity?

    PubMed

    Stokes, Paul R A; Benecke, Aaf; Puraite, Julita; Bloomfield, Michael A P; Shotbolt, Paul; Reeves, Suzanne J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Howes, Oliver; Egerton, Alice

    2014-03-01

    Socially desirable responding (SDR) is a personality trait which reflects either a tendency to present oneself in an overly positive manner to others, consistent with social conformity (impression management (IM)), or the tendency to view one's own behaviour in an overly positive light (self-deceptive enhancement (SDE)). Neurochemical imaging studies report an inverse relationship between SDR and dorsal striatal dopamine D₂/₃ receptor availability. This may reflect an association between SDR and D₂/₃ receptor expression, synaptic dopamine levels or a combination of the two. In this study, we used a [¹⁸F]-DOPA positron emission tomography (PET) image database to investigate whether SDR is associated with presynaptic dopamine function. Striatal [¹⁸F]-DOPA uptake, (k(i)(cer), min⁻¹), was determined in two independent healthy participant cohorts (n=27 and 19), by Patlak analysis using a cerebellar reference region. SDR was assessed using the revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-R) Lie scale, and IM and SDE were measured using the Paulhus Deception Scales. No significant associations were detected between Lie, SDE or IM scores and striatal [¹⁸F]-DOPA k(i)(cer). These results indicate that presynaptic striatal dopamine function is not associated with social conformity and suggests that social conformity may be associated with striatal D₂/₃ receptor expression rather than with synaptic dopamine levels.

  19. Cocaine and amphetamine elicit differential effects in rats with a unilateral injection of dopamine transporter antisense oligodeoxynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Silvia, C P; Jaber, M; King, G R; Ellinwood, E H; Caron, M G

    1997-02-01

    We have developed an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to the dopamine transporter and used it to discriminate the behavioral properties of amphetamine and cocaine. In SK-N-MC cells permanently transfected with the dopamine transporter complementary DNA, treatment with 5 mM antisense oligodeoxynucleotide reduced dopamine uptake by 25% when compared to sense control. Unilateral intranigral administration of dopamine transporter antisense (50 microM) twice daily in freely moving rats for 2.5 days was sufficient to reduce dopamine transporter messenger RNA by 70% as measured by in situ hybridization, but not protein levels as measured by [3H]mazindol binding. However, intranigral treatment via implanted osmotic minipump over a period of seven days produced reductions in both dopamine transporter messenger RNA and protein levels (32%) at a dose of 500 pmol/day. These results indicate a longer half-life for the dopamine transporter than expected. Potassium chloride depolarization of ipsilateral striatal slices showed a greater than 200% increase in dopamine overflow on the antisense-treated side compared to the control side. Since imbalance of dopamine tone is known to induce rotational activity, we tested this behavioral paradigm in rats treated with various oligodeoxynucleotides at different doses and time-points. We have found that antisense-treated animals did not rotate spontaneously under any experimental conditions. Using various psychostimulants that target the dopamine transporter and increase dopamine levels, we found that the antisense-treated animals consistently rotated contralaterally in response to amphetamine (2 mg/kg), but not to cocaine (10 mg/kg) or nomifensine (10 mg/kg). These results bring in vivo evidence for a different mode of action of amphetamine and cocaine on the dopamine transporter and lend direct support to the view that amphetamine acts as a dopamine releaser, whereas cocaine acts by blocking dopamine transport.

  20. Growth of dopamine crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Vidya; Patki, Mugdha

    2016-05-01

    Many nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals have been identified as potential candidates in optical and electro-optical devices. Use of NLO organic crystals is expected in photonic applications. Hence organic nonlinear optical materials have been intensely investigated due to their potentially high nonlinearities, and rapid response in electro-optic effect compared to inorganic NLO materials. There are many methods to grow organic crystals such as vapor growth method, melt growth method and solution growth method. Out of these methods, solution growth method is useful in providing constraint free crystal. Single crystals of Dopamine have been grown by evaporating the solvents from aqueous solution. Crystals obtained were of the size of orders of mm. The crystal structure of dopamine was determined using XRD technique. Images of crystals were obtained using FEG SEM Quanta Series under high vacuum and low KV.

  1. Updating dopamine reward signals

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has advanced our knowledge of phasic dopamine reward prediction error signals. The error signal is bidirectional, reflects well the higher order prediction error described by temporal difference learning models, is compatible with model-free and model-based reinforcement learning, reports the subjective rather than physical reward value during temporal discounting and reflects subjective stimulus perception rather than physical stimulus aspects. Dopamine activations are primarily driven by reward, and to some extent risk, whereas punishment and salience have only limited activating effects when appropriate controls are respected. The signal is homogeneous in terms of time course but heterogeneous in many other aspects. It is essential for synaptic plasticity and a range of behavioural learning situations. PMID:23267662

  2. Dopamine blockade and clinical response: Evidence for two biological subgroups of schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Wolkin, A.; Barouche, F.; Wolf, A.P.; Rotrosen, J.; Fowler, J.S.; Shiue, C.Y.; Cooper, T.B.; Brodie, J.D. )

    1989-07-01

    Because CNS neuroleptic concentration cannot be directly measured in patients, the relation between clinical response and extent of dopamine receptor blockade is unknown. This relationship is critical in ascertaining whether nonresponse to neuroleptics is the result merely of inadequate CNS drug levels or of more basic biological differences in pathophysiology. Using ({sup 18}F)N-methylspiroperidol and positron emission tomography, the authors assessed dopamine receptor occupancy in 10 schizophrenic patients before and after treatment with haloperidol. Responders and nonresponders had virtually identical indices of ({sup 18}F)N-methylspiroperidol uptake after treatment, indicating that failure to respond clinically was not a function of neuroleptic uptake or binding in the CNS.

  3. An acute, epitope-specific modification in the dopamine transporter associated with methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Fricks-Gleason, Ashley N; German, Christopher L; Hoonakker, Amanda J; Friend, Danielle M; Ganesh, Kamala K; Carver, Aaron S; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E; Keefe, Kristen A

    2016-04-01

    Preclinical studies demonstrate that repeated, high-dose methamphetamine administrations rapidly decrease plasmalemmal dopamine uptake, which may contribute to aberrant dopamine accumulation, reactive species generation, and long-term dopaminergic deficits. The present study extends these findings by demonstrating a heretofore unreported, epitope-specific modification in the dopamine transporter caused by a methamphetamine regimen that induces these deficits. Specifically, repeated, high-dose methamphetamine injections (4 × 10 mg/kg/injection, 2-h intervals) rapidly decreased immunohistochemical detection of striatal dopamine transporter as assessed 1 h after the final methamphetamine exposure. In contrast, neither a single high dose (1 × 10 mg/kg) nor repeated injections of a lower dose (4 × 2 mg/kg/injection) induced this change. The high-dose regimen-induced alteration was only detected using antibodies directed against the N-terminus. Immunohistochemical staining using antibodies directed against the C-terminus did not reveal any changes. The high-dose regimen also did not alter dopamine transporter expression as assessed using [(125) I]RTI-55 autoradiography. These data suggest that the repeated, high-dose methamphetamine regimen alters the N-terminus of the dopamine transporter. Further, these data may be predictive of persistent dopamine deficits caused by the stimulant. Future studies of the signaling cascades involved should provide novel insight into potential mechanisms underlying the physiological and pathophysiological regulation of the dopamine transporter.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome is a rare movement disorder. ...

  5. Phosphorylation mechanisms in dopamine transporter regulation.

    PubMed

    Foster, James D; Vaughan, Roxanne A

    2016-11-09

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a plasma membrane phosphoprotein that actively translocates extracellular dopamine (DA) into presynaptic neurons. The transporter is the primary mechanism for control of DA levels and subsequent neurotransmission, and is the target for abused and therapeutic drugs that exert their effects by suppressing reuptake. The transport capacity of DAT is acutely regulated by signaling systems and drug exposure, providing neurons the ability to fine-tune DA clearance in response to specific conditions. Kinase pathways play major roles in these mechanisms, and this review summarizes the current status of DAT phosphorylation characteristics and the evidence linking transporter phosphorylation to control of reuptake and other functions. Greater understanding of these processes may aid in elucidation of their possible contributions to DA disease states and suggest specific phosphorylation sites as targets for therapeutic manipulation of reuptake.

  6. Binding of [(3)H]lysergic acid diethylamide to serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors and of [(3)H]paroxetine to serotonin uptake sites in platelets from healthy children, adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Sigurdh, J; Spigset, O; Allard, P; Mjörndal, T; Hägglöf, B

    1999-11-01

    Possible age effects on binding of [(3)H]lysergic acid diethylamide ([(3)H]LSD) to serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors and of [(3)H]paroxetine to serotonin uptake sites were studied in platelets from healthy children (11-12 years of age), adolescents (16-17 years of age) and adults. Significant overall age effects were found both for the number of binding sites (B(max)) for [(3)H]LSD binding (p < 0.001), the affinity constant (K(d)) for [(3)H]LSD binding (p < 0.001), B(max) for [(3)H]paroxetine binding (p < 0.001) and K(d) for [(3)H] paroxetine binding (p = 0.006). In general, there was a decrease in B(max) with increasing age, which predominantly occurred between the ages 11-12 years and 16-17 years for the 5-HT(2A) receptor, and after 16-17 years of age for the serotonin uptake site. These developmental changes might have an impact on the effect of treatment with serotonergic drugs in children and adolescents. When the platelet serotonin variables investigated are employed in studies in children or adolescents, age matching or, alternatively, introduction of age control in the statistical analysis should be performed.

  7. Preferentially impaired neurotransmitter release sites not their discreteness compromise the validity of microdialysis zero-net-flux method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kevin C

    2005-01-01

    Intracerebral microdialysis is a popular technique for studying neurochemistry and neural circuits in various brain regions. Recent studies called into question the validity of the microdialysis zero-net-flux (ZNF) method by suggesting that this method significantly underestimates the basal level of extracellular dopamine as a result of the discreteness of dopamine release sites as well as the preferential damage to dopamine release over uptake. To identify which factor is most important in undermining the microdialysis ZNF measurements and the extent of underestimation, two mathematical models were developed to explore the influences of the discrete nature and the probe-induced impairment in the neurotransmitter release. The two models differ in their characterizations of the transmitter release as spatially discrete and homogeneous, respectively. Simulations using physiologically reasonable parameters for striatal dopamine systems indicate that the preferential release site damage surrounding the implanted probe is the most important determinant to the underestimation of the microdialysis ZNF concentration. Under normal physiological conditions, the discreteness of neurotransmitter release sites is of minor importance, except when neuronal degeneration occurs. It is concluded that homogeneous models can adequately describe microdialysis operating processes as long as the corresponding tissue damage parameters in such models are appropriately incorporated.

  8. Neuronal uptake and metabolism of 2- and 6-fluorodopamine: false neurotransmitters for positron emission tomographic imaging of sympathetically innervated tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenhofer, G.; Hovevey-Sion, D.; Kopin, I.J.; Miletich, R.; Kirk, K.L.; Finn, R.; Goldstein, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    The neuronal uptake and metabolism of 2-fluorodopamine (2F-dopamine), 6-fluorodopamine (6F-dopamine) and tritium-labeled dopamine were compared in heart, submaxillary gland and spleen of rats to assess the utility of 18F-labeled 2F- or 6F-dopamine for positron emission tomographic imaging of sympathetically innervated tissues. Tritiated dopamine with and without 2F- or 6F-dopamine, or tritiated 2F-dopamine alone, were injected i.v. into rats that were or were not pretreated with desipramine to block catecholamine neuronal uptake or with reserpine to block vesicular translocation of catecholamines. Tissue and plasma samples were obtained at intervals up to 1 hr after injections. At 1 hr after injection of tritiated dopamine, tritium-labeled norepinephrine, dopamine, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and dihydroxyphenylglucol accounted for less than 2% of the tritium in plasma but up to 92% of that in tissues; tritiated norepinephrine accounted for 70% or more of the tritium in tissues. In contrast, at 1 hr after injection of tritiated 2F-dopamine, tritiated 2F-norepinephrine accounted for 30 to 46% of the tritium in tissues. Desipramine and reserpine pretreatment blocked the tissue accumulation of tritiated and fluorinated dopamine as well as their dihydroxy-metabolites, indicating that accumulation of exogenous norepinephrine and dopamine analogs was within sympathetic storage vesicles. Relative to the doses of dopamine precursors, less 2F- and 6F-norepinephrine accumulated in tissues than tritiated norepinephrine, due largely to inefficient beta-hydroxylation of fluorinated dopamine.

  9. meso-Transdiene analogs inhibit vesicular monoamine transporter-2 function and methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Horton, David B; Siripurapu, Kiran B; Norrholm, Seth D; Culver, John P; Hojahmat, Marhaba; Beckmann, Joshua S; Harrod, Steven B; Deaciuc, Agripina G; Bardo, Michael T; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2011-03-01

    Lobeline, a nicotinic receptor antagonist and neurotransmitter transporter inhibitor, is a candidate pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine abuse. meso-Transdiene (MTD), a lobeline analog, lacks nicotinic receptor affinity, retains affinity for vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2), and, surprisingly, has enhanced affinity for dopamine (DA) and serotonin transporters [DA transporter (DAT) and serotonin transporter (SERT), respectively]. In the current study, MTD was evaluated for its ability to decrease methamphetamine self-administration in rats relative to food-maintained responding. MTD specifically decreased methamphetamine self-administration, extending our previous work. Classical structure-activity relationships revealed that more conformationally restricted MTD analogs enhanced VMAT2 selectivity and drug likeness, whereas affinity at the dihydrotetrabenazine binding and DA uptake sites on VMAT2 was not altered. Generally, MTD analogs exhibited 50- to 1000-fold lower affinity for DAT and were equipotent or had 10-fold higher affinity for SERT, compared with MTD. Representative analogs from the series potently and competitively inhibited [(3)H]DA uptake at VMAT2. (3Z,5Z)-3,5-bis(2,4-dichlorobenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidine (UKMH-106), the 3Z,5Z-2,4-dichlorophenyl MTD analog, had improved selectivity for VMAT2 over DAT and importantly inhibited methamphetamine-evoked DA release from striatal slices. In contrast, (3Z,5E)-3,5-bis(2,4-dichlorobenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidine (UKMH-105), the 3Z,5E-geometrical isomer, inhibited DA uptake at VMAT2, but did not inhibit methamphetamine-evoked DA release. Taken together, these results suggest that these geometrical isomers interact at alternate sites on VMAT2, which are associated with distinct pharmacophores. Thus, structural modification of the MTD molecule resulted in analogs exhibiting improved drug likeness and improved selectivity for VMAT2, as well as the ability to decrease methamphetamine-evoked DA release

  10. Glycine Transporter-1 Inhibition Promotes Striatal Axon Sprouting via NMDA Receptors in Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Castagna, Candace; Mrejeru, Ana; Lizardi-Ortiz, José E.; Klein, Zoe; Lindsley, Craig W.

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptor activity is involved in shaping synaptic connections throughout development and adulthood. We recently reported that brief activation of NMDA receptors on cultured ventral midbrain dopamine neurons enhanced their axon growth rate and induced axonal branching. To test whether this mechanism was relevant to axon regrowth in adult animals, we examined the reinnervation of dorsal striatum following nigral dopamine neuron loss induced by unilateral intrastriatal injections of the toxin 6-hydroxydopamine. We used a pharmacological approach to enhance NMDA receptor-dependent signaling by treatment with an inhibitor of glycine transporter-1 that elevates levels of extracellular glycine, a coagonist required for NMDA receptor activation. All mice displayed sprouting of dopaminergic axons from spared fibers in the ventral striatum to the denervated dorsal striatum at 7 weeks post-lesion, but the reinnervation in mice treated for 4 weeks with glycine uptake inhibitor was approximately twice as dense as in untreated mice. The treated mice also displayed higher levels of striatal dopamine and a complete recovery from lateralization in a test of sensorimotor behavior. We confirmed that the actions of glycine uptake inhibition on reinnervation and behavioral recovery required NMDA receptors in dopamine neurons using targeted deletion of the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit in dopamine neurons. Glycine transport inhibitors promote functionally relevant sprouting of surviving dopamine axons and could provide clinical treatment for disorders such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:24133278

  11. Dopamine gates action potential backpropagation in midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Gentet, Luc J; Williams, Stephen R

    2007-02-21

    Dopamine is released from both axonal and somatodendritic sites of midbrain dopaminergic neurons in an action potential-dependent manner. In contrast to the majority of central neurons, the axon of dopaminergic neurons typically originates from a dendritic site, suggesting a specialized computational function. Here, we examine the initiation and spread of action potentials in dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars reticulata and reveal that the displacement of the axon to a dendritic site allows highly compartmentalized electrical signaling. In response to a train of synaptic input, action potentials initiated at axon-bearing dendritic sites formed a variable trigger for invasion to the soma and contralateral dendritic tree, with action potentials often confined to the axon-bearing dendrite. The application of dopamine increased this form of electrical compartmentalization, an effect mediated by a tonic membrane potential hyperpolarization leading to an increased availability of a class of voltage-dependent potassium channel. These data suggest that the release of dopamine from axonal and somatodendritic sites are dissociable, and that dopamine levels within the midbrain are dynamically controlled by the somatodendritic spread of action potentials.

  12. Dopamine mediates striatal malonate toxicity via dopamine transporter-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species and D2 but not D1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Xia, X G; Schmidt, N; Teismann, P; Ferger, B; Schulz, J B

    2001-10-01

    Intrastriatal injection of the reversible succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor malonate results in both chemically induced hypoxia and striatal lesions that are similar to those seen in Huntington's disease and cerebral ischaemia. The mechanisms leading to neuronal death involve secondary excitotoxicity, the release of dopamine from nigrostriatal fibres and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) including nitric oxide (NO) and hydroxyl radicals. Here, we further investigated the contribution and mechanism of dopamine on malonate-induced striatal lesions. Prior lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway with 6-OHDA or the depletion of striatal dopamine stores by pretreatment with reserpine, an inhibitor or the vesicular monoamine transporter type-2 (VMAT2), in combination with alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine resulted in a significant reduction of malonate-induced striatal lesion volumes. This was paralleled by block or reduction of the malonate-induced generation of ROS, as measured by the conversions of salicylate to 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA) using microdialysis. Systemic or intrastriatal application of L-DOPA or dopamine, respectively, reconstituted malonate toxicity and the generation of ROS in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Block of the dopamine transporter by GBR12909 did not result in a reduction of malonate-induced dopamine release, but significantly reduced the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The D2 receptor agonist lisuride and the mixed D1 and D2 receptor agonist apomorphine, but not the D1 receptor agonist SKF38393, partially restored malonate toxicity in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats without increasing the generation of ROS. In line with these results sulpiride, an inhibitor of D2 receptors, reduced the malonate-induced lesion volume, whereas SCH23390, an inhbitor of D1 receptors, was ineffective. Our data suggest that malonate-induced dopamine toxicity to energetically impaired neurons is mediated by two independent pathways: (i) dopamine transporter uptake

  13. Voltammetric study of the control of striatal dopamine release by glutamate.

    PubMed

    Borland, Laura M; Michael, Adrian C

    2004-10-01

    The central dopamine systems are involved in several aspects of normal brain function and are implicated in a number of human disorders. Hence, it is important to understand the mechanisms that control dopamine release in the brain. The striatum of the rat receives both dopaminergic and glutamatergic projections that synaptically target striatal neurons but not each other. Nevertheless, these afferents do form frequent appositional contacts, which has engendered interest in the question of whether they communicate with each other despite the absence of a direct synaptic connection. In this study, we used voltammetry in conjunction with carbon fiber microelectrodes in anesthetized rats to further examine the effect of the ionotropic glutamate antagonist, kynurenate, on extracellular dopamine levels in the striatum. Intrastriatal infusions of kynurenate decreased extracellular dopamine levels, suggesting that glutamate acts locally within the striatum via ionotropic receptors to regulate the basal extracellular dopamine concentration. Infusion of tetrodotoxin into the medial forebrain bundle or the striatum did not alter the voltammetric response to the intrastriatal kynurenate infusions, suggesting that glutamate receptors control a non-vesicular release process that contributes to the basal extracellular dopamine level. However, systemic administration of the dopamine uptake inhibitor, nomifensine (20 mg/kg i.p.), markedly decreased the amplitude of the response to kynurenate infusions, suggesting that the dopamine transporter mediates non-vesicular dopamine release. Collectively, these findings are consistent with the idea that endogenous glutamate acts locally within the striatum via ionotropic receptors to control a tonic, impulse-independent, transporter-mediated mode of dopamine release. Although numerous prior in vitro studies had suggested that such a process might exist, it has not previously been clearly demonstrated in an in vivo experiment.

  14. Complexity of dopamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) coincides with a dramatic loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra. A key player in the loss of dopaminergic neurons is oxidative stress. Dopamine (DA) metabolism itself is strongly linked to oxidative stress as its degradation generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DA oxidation can lead to endogenous neurotoxins whereas some DA derivatives show antioxidative effects. Therefore, DA metabolism is of special importance for neuronal redox-homeostasis and viability. In this review we highlight different aspects of dopamine metabolism in the context of PD and neurodegeneration. Since most reviews focus only on single aspects of the DA system, we will give a broader overview by looking at DA biosynthesis, sequestration, degradation and oxidation chemistry at the metabolic level, as well as at the transcriptional, translational and posttranslational regulation of all enzymes involved. This is followed by a short overview of cellular models currently used in PD research. Finally, we will address the topic from a medical point of view which directly aims to encounter PD. PMID:23683503

  15. Dopamine D(3) receptors contribute to methamphetamine-induced alterations in dopaminergic neuronal function: role of hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Baladi, Michelle G; Newman, Amy H; Nielsen, Shannon M; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2014-06-05

    Methamphetamine administration causes long-term deficits to dopaminergic systems that, in humans, are thought to be associated with motor slowing and memory impairment. Methamphetamine interacts with the dopamine transporter (DAT) and increases extracellular concentrations of dopamine that, in turn, binds to a number of dopamine receptor subtypes. Although the relative contribution of each receptor subtype to the effects of methamphetamine is not fully known, non-selective dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonists can attenuate methamphetamine-induced changes to dopamine systems. The present study extended these findings by testing the role of the dopamine D3 receptor subtype in mediating the long-term dopaminergic, and for comparison serotonergic, deficits caused by methamphetamine. Results indicate that the dopamine D3 receptor selective antagonist, PG01037, attenuated methamphetamine-induced decreases in striatal DAT, but not hippocampal serotonin (5HT) transporter (SERT), function, as assessed 7 days after treatment. However, PG01037 also attenuated methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia. When methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia was maintained by treating rats in a warm ambient environment, PG01037 failed to attenuate the effects of methamphetamine on DAT uptake. Furthermore, PG01037 did not attenuate methamphetamine-induced decreases in dopamine and 5HT content. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that dopamine D3 receptors mediate, in part, the long-term deficits in DAT function caused by methamphetamine, and that this effect likely involves an attenuation of methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia.

  16. Cannabidiol is a partial agonist at dopamine D2High receptors, predicting its antipsychotic clinical dose

    PubMed Central

    Seeman, P

    2016-01-01

    Although all current antipsychotics act by interfering with the action of dopamine at dopamine D2 receptors, two recent reports showed that 800 to 1000 mg of cannabidiol per day alleviated the signs and symptoms of schizophrenia, although cannabidiol is not known to act on dopamine receptors. Because these recent clinical findings may indicate an important exception to the general rule that all antipsychotics interfere with dopamine at dopamine D2 receptors, the present study examined whether cannabidiol acted directly on D2 receptors, using tritiated domperidone to label rat brain striatal D2 receptors. It was found that cannabidiol inhibited the binding of radio-domperidone with dissociation constants of 11 nm at dopamine D2High receptors and 2800 nm at dopamine D2Low receptors, in the same biphasic manner as a dopamine partial agonist antipsychotic drug such as aripiprazole. The clinical doses of cannabidiol are sufficient to occupy the functional D2High sites. it is concluded that the dopamine partial agonist action of cannabidiol may account for its clinical antipsychotic effects. PMID:27754480

  17. Phase I Report: Technetium Radiotracers for the Dopamine Transporter. [September 1998 - March 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, R.N.

    1999-03-17

    This project (a) demonstrated specific dopamine transporter (DAT) uptake in vivo and metabolic stability of a radiolabelled cycloplentadieny rhenium compound in rats and baboons, (b) showed that cyclopentadieny tricarbonyl rhenium and technetium compounds conjugated tropanel could be made by metal transfer with ferrocenes; and (c) explored new methods of synthesizing these compounds under mild conditions.

  18. Brominated and radioiodinated derivatives of methylphenidate (MP): Potential imaging agents for the dopamine (DA) transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, D.; Gatley, S.J.; Dewey, S.L.

    1994-05-01

    MP (Ritalin) is a psychomotor stimulant used in the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. The therapeutic properties of MP are thought to be mediated by its binding to a site on the DA transporter, resulting in inhibition of DA reuptake and enhanced levels of synaptic dopamine. MP also inhibits reuptake of norepinephrine (NE) in vitro. MP has two chiral centers, but its pharmacological activity is believed due solely to the d-threo isomer. We have found that d,l-threo-C-11 MP has favorable properties for PET studies, and therefore examined the effects of incorporating halogen atoms into the phenyl ring of MP, with a view to preparing C-11 and I-123 MP analogs as potential PET/SPECT tracers. We synthesized the 2-, 3- and 4-bromo MP analogs from the corresponding bromophenylacetonitriles by modification of the original synthesis of MP. In in vitro binding assays all three d,l-threo bromo compounds had higher affinities than MP for DA transporter sites labeled with tritiated WIN 35,428 (3->4-, 2->MP). They also showed high activity with NE reuptake sites labeled with tritiated nisoxetine. They were active in vivo as demonstrated by inhibition of heart uptake of tritiated NE in the mouse, and elevation of striatal extracellular DA (microdialysis) and stimulation of locomotor activity in the rat.

  19. Selective Enhancement of Dopamine Release in the Ventral Pallidum of Methamphetamine-Sensitized Mice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Drugs of abuse induce sensitization, which is defined as enhanced response to additional drug following a period of withdrawal. Sensitization occurs in both humans and animal models of drug reinforcement and contributes substantially to the addictive nature of drugs of abuse, because it is thought to represent enhanced motivational wanting for drug. The ventral pallidum, a key member of the reward pathway, contributes to behaviors associated with reward, such as sensitization. Dopamine inputs to the ventral pallidum have not been directly characterized. Here we provide anatomical, neurochemical, and behavioral evidence demonstrating that dopamine terminals in the ventral pallidum contribute to reward in mice. We report subregional differences in dopamine release, measured by ex vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry: rostral ventral pallidum exhibits increased dopamine release and uptake compared with caudal ventral pallidum, which is correlated with tissue expression of dopaminergic proteins. We then subjected mice to a methamphetamine-sensitization protocol to investigate the contribution of dopaminergic projections to the region in reward related behavior. Methamphetamine-sensitized animals displayed a 508% and 307% increase in baseline dopamine release in the rostral and caudal ventral pallidum, respectively. Augmented dopamine release in the rostral ventral pallidum was significantly correlated with sensitized locomotor activity. Moreover, this presynaptic dopaminergic plasticity occurred only in the ventral pallidum and not in the ventral or dorsal striatum, suggesting that dopamine release in the ventral pallidum may be integrally important to drug-induced sensitization. PMID:27501345

  20. Cloning, pharmacological characterization, and chromosome assignment of the human dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Giros, B; el Mestikawy, S; Godinot, N; Zheng, K; Han, H; Yang-Feng, T; Caron, M G

    1992-09-01

    We have screened a human substantia nigra cDNA library with probes derived from the rat dopamine transporter. A 3.5-kilobase cDNA clone was isolated and its corresponding gene was located on the distal end of chromosome 5 (5p15.3). This human clone codes for a 620-amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 68,517. Hydropathicity analysis suggests the presence of 12 putative transmembrane domains, a characteristic feature of sodium-dependent neurotransmitter carriers. The rat and the human dopamine transporters are 92% homologous. When permanently expressed in mouse fibroblast Ltk- cells, the human clone is able to induce a saturable, time- and sodium-dependent, dopamine uptake. This transport is blocked by psychostimulant drugs (cocaine, l- and d-amphetamine, and phenyclidine), neurotoxins (6-hydroxydopamine and N-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP))+), neurotransmitters (epinephrine, norepinephrine, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and serotonin), antidepressants (amitriptyline, bupropion, desipramine, mazindol, nomifensine, and nortriptyline), and various uptake inhibitors (mazindol, GBR 12783, GBR 12909, and amfonelic acid). The rank orders of the Ki values of these substances at the human and the rat dopamine transporters are highly correlated (r = 0.998). The cloning of DNA human dopamine transporter gene has allowed establishment of a cell line stably expressing the human dopamine transporter and, for the first time, an extensive characterization of its pharmacology. Furthermore, these newly developed tools will help in the study of the regulation of dopamine transport in humans and in the clarification of the potential role of the dopamine transporter in a variety of disease states.

  1. Diet-induced obesity: dopamine transporter function, impulsivity and motivation

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswami, V; Thompson, AC; Cassis, LA; Bardo, MT; Dwoskin, LP

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A rat model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) was used to determine dopamine transporter (DAT) function, impulsivity and motivation as neurobehavioral outcomes and predictors of obesity. DESIGN To evaluate neurobehavioral alterations following the development of DIO induced by an 8-week high-fat diet (HF) exposure, striatal D2-receptor density, DAT function and expression, extracellular dopamine concentrations, impulsivity, and motivation for high- and low-fat reinforcers were determined. To determine predictors of DIO, neurobehavioral antecedents including impulsivity, motivation for high-fat reinforcers, DAT function and extracellular dopamine were evaluated before the 8-week HF exposure. METHODS Striatal D2-receptor density was determined by in vitro kinetic analysis of [3H]raclopride binding. DAT function was determined using in vitro kinetic analysis of [3H]dopamine uptake, methamphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine overflow and no-net flux in vivo microdialysis. DAT cell-surface expression was determined using biotinylation and western blotting. Impulsivity and food-motivated behavior were determined using a delay discounting task and progressive ratio schedule, respectively. RESULTS Relative to obesity-resistant (OR) rats, obesity-prone (OP) rats exhibited 18% greater body weight following an 8-week HF-diet exposure, 42% lower striatal D2-receptor density, 30% lower total DAT expression, 40% lower in vitro and in vivo DAT function, 45% greater extracellular dopamine and twofold greater methamphetamine-evoked [3H]dopamine overflow. OP rats exhibited higher motivation for food, and surprisingly, were less impulsive relative to OR rats. Impulsivity, in vivo DAT function and extracellular dopamine concentration did not predict DIO. Importantly, motivation for high-fat reinforcers predicted the development of DIO. CONCLUSION Human studies are limited by their ability to determine if impulsivity, motivation and DAT function are causes or consequences of DIO. The

  2. Carbon nanotube nanoweb-bioelectrode for highly selective dopamine sensing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Zhang, Weimin; Sherrell, Peter; Razal, Joselito M; Huang, Xu-Feng; Minett, Andrew I; Chen, Jun

    2012-01-01

    A highly sensitive and selective dopamine sensor was fabricated with the unique 3D carbon nanotube nanoweb (CNT-N) electrode. The as-synthesised CNT-N was modified by oxygen plasma to graft functional groups in order to increase selective electroactive sites at the CNT sidewalls. This electrode was characterized physically and electrochemically using HRSEM, Raman, FT-IR, and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Our investigations indicated that the O(2)-plasma treated CNT-N electrode could serve as a highly sensitive biosensor for the selective sensing of dopamine (DA, 1 μM to 20 μM) in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA, 1000 μM).

  3. Dopamine reward prediction error coding.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2016-03-01

    Reward prediction errors consist of the differences between received and predicted rewards. They are crucial for basic forms of learning about rewards and make us strive for more rewards-an evolutionary beneficial trait. Most dopamine neurons in the midbrain of humans, monkeys, and rodents signal a reward prediction error; they are activated by more reward than predicted (positive prediction error), remain at baseline activity for fully predicted rewards, and show depressed activity with less reward than predicted (negative prediction error). The dopamine signal increases nonlinearly with reward value and codes formal economic utility. Drugs of addiction generate, hijack, and amplify the dopamine reward signal and induce exaggerated, uncontrolled dopamine effects on neuronal plasticity. The striatum, amygdala, and frontal cortex also show reward prediction error coding, but only in subpopulations of neurons. Thus, the important concept of reward prediction errors is implemented in neuronal hardware.

  4. Dopamine reward prediction error coding

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Reward prediction errors consist of the differences between received and predicted rewards. They are crucial for basic forms of learning about rewards and make us strive for more rewards—an evolutionary beneficial trait. Most dopamine neurons in the midbrain of humans, monkeys, and rodents signal a reward prediction error; they are activated by more reward than predicted (positive prediction error), remain at baseline activity for fully predicted rewards, and show depressed activity with less reward than predicted (negative prediction error). The dopamine signal increases nonlinearly with reward value and codes formal economic utility. Drugs of addiction generate, hijack, and amplify the dopamine reward signal and induce exaggerated, uncontrolled dopamine effects on neuronal plasticity. The striatum, amygdala, and frontal cortex also show reward prediction error coding, but only in subpopulations of neurons. Thus, the important concept of reward prediction errors is implemented in neuronal hardware. PMID:27069377

  5. Acute psychological effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "Ecstasy") are attenuated by the serotonin uptake inhibitor citalopram.

    PubMed

    Liechti, M E; Baumann, C; Gamma, A; Vollenweider, F X

    2000-05-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "Ecstasy") is a recreational drug that has been shown to release serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) in animals. The effect of MDMA on 5-HT release can be blocked by 5-HT uptake inhibitors such as citalopram, suggesting that MDMA interacts with the 5-HT uptake site. It is unknown whether this mechanism is also responsible for the psychological effects of MDMA in humans. We investigated the effect of citalopram pretreatment (40 mg iv) on the psychological effects of MDMA (1.5 mg/kg po) in a double-blind placebo-controlled psychometric study in 16 healthy human volunteers. MDMA produced an emotional state with heightened mood, increased self-confidence and extroversion, moderate derealization, and an intensification of sensory perception. Most of these effects were markedly reduced by citalopram. This finding suggests that the psychological effects of MDMA are mediated via action at the 5-HT uptake site to increase 5-HT release through the carrier, as expected from animal studies.

  6. An uptake of cationized ferritin by alveolar type I cells in airway-instilled goat lung: distribution of anionic sites on the epithelial surface.

    PubMed

    Atwal, O S; Viel, L; Minhas, K J

    1990-07-01

    The present study has investigated ultrastructural localization of anionic sites on the luminal surface of the alveolar epithelium of goat lung by direct airway instillation of cationized ferritin (CF) in the cranial lobe of the right lung through a bronchoscope. The cationic probe decorated preferentially the luminal plasmalemmal vesicles and plasmalemma proper of alveolar type I cell. This indicated the presence of highly charged anionic microdomains at these binding sites. The ligand was internalized in the free plasmalemmal vesicles of alveolar type I cell within 2 min. Heavy decoration of vesicles at 5 min of perfusion indicated that the amount of CF internalization increased with its concentration in the alveoli. It is suggested that exposure of alveolar surface to several gases of ruminal-origin induces changes in the surface charge of luminal plasmalemma of alveolar type I cells. The significance of these anionic plasmalemmal sites is discussed in relation to the adjustment of osmotic pressure gradient across the alveolar-capillary membrane of the ruminant lung.

  7. Root Fungal Endophytes Enhance Heavy-Metal Stress Tolerance of Clethra barbinervis Growing Naturally at Mining Sites via Growth Enhancement, Promotion of Nutrient Uptake and Decrease of Heavy-Metal Concentration.

    PubMed

    Yamaji, Keiko; Watanabe, Yumiko; Masuya, Hayato; Shigeto, Arisa; Yui, Hiroshi; Haruma, Toshikatsu

    2016-01-01

    Clethra barbinervis Sieb. et Zucc. is a tree species that grows naturally at several mine sites and seems to be tolerant of high concentrations of heavy metals, such as Cu, Zn, and Pb. The purpose of this study is to clarify the mechanism(s) underlying this species' ability to tolerate the sites' severe heavy-metal pollution by considering C. barbinervis interaction with root fungal endophytes. We measured the heavy metal concentrations of root-zone soil, leaves, branches, and fine roots collected from mature C. barbinervis at Hitachi mine. We isolated fungal endophytes from surface-sterilized root segments, and we examined the growth, and heavy metal and nutrient absorption of C. barbinervis seedlings growing in sterilized mine soil with or without root fungal endophytes. Field analyses showed that C. barbinervis contained considerably high amounts of Cu, Zn, and Pb in fine roots and Zn in leaves. The fungi, Phialocephala fortinii, Rhizodermea veluwensis, and Rhizoscyphus sp. were frequently isolated as dominant fungal endophyte species. Inoculation of these root fungal endophytes to C. barbinervis seedlings growing in sterilized mine soil indicated that these fungi significantly enhanced the growth of C. barbinervis seedlings, increased K uptake in shoots and reduced the concentrations of Cu, Ni, Zn, Cd, and Pb in roots. Without root fungal endophytes, C. barbinervis could hardly grow under the heavy-metal contaminated condition, showing chlorosis, a symptom of heavy-metal toxicity. Our results indicate that the tree C. barbinervis can tolerate high heavy-metal concentrations due to the support of root fungal endophytes including P. fortinii, R. veluwensis, and Rhizoscyphus sp. via growth enhancement, K uptake promotion and decrease of heavy metal concentrations.

  8. Dopamine Release Dynamics Change during Adolescence and after Voluntary Alcohol Intake

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Sara; Nylander, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Adolescence is associated with high impulsivity and risk taking, making adolescent individuals more inclined to use drugs. Early drug use is correlated to increased risk for substance use disorders later in life but the neurobiological basis is unclear. The brain undergoes extensive development during adolescence and disturbances at this time are hypothesized to contribute to increased vulnerability. The transition from controlled to compulsive drug use and addiction involve long-lasting changes in neural networks including a shift from the nucleus accumbens, mediating acute reinforcing effects, to recruitment of the dorsal striatum and habit formation. This study aimed to test the hypothesis of increased dopamine release after a pharmacological challenge in adolescent rats. Potassium-evoked dopamine release and uptake was investigated using chronoamperometric dopamine recordings in combination with a challenge by amphetamine in early and late adolescent rats and in adult rats. In addition, the consequences of voluntary alcohol intake during adolescence on these effects were investigated. The data show a gradual increase of evoked dopamine release with age, supporting previous studies suggesting that the pool of releasable dopamine increases with age. In contrast, a gradual decrease in evoked release with age was seen in response to amphetamine, supporting a proportionally larger storage pool of dopamine in younger animals. Dopamine measures after voluntary alcohol intake resulted in lower release amplitudes in response to potassium-chloride, indicating that alcohol affects the releasable pool of dopamine and this may have implications for vulnerability to addiction and other psychiatric diagnoses involving dopamine in the dorsal striatum. PMID:24788731

  9. Dopamine Stimulation of Active Na and Cl Absorption in Rabbit Ileum

    PubMed Central

    Donowitz, Mark; Cusolito, Sheila; Battisti, Laurie; Fogel, Ronald; Sharp, Geoffrey W. G.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of dopamine on active intestinal ion transport have been evaluated. An epithelial sheet preparation of rabbit ileum was used in vitro with the Ussing chamber-voltage clamp technique. Dopamine, in the presence of 1 mM ascorbic acid, added to the serosal bathing solution caused a dose-dependent decrease in short-circuit current, with a half-maximal effect at 1.2 μM and maximal effect of −50 μA/cm2 at 50 μM; dopamine decreased the potential difference, and increased the conductance and net Na and net Cl absorption. There was no effect on the residual ion flux. Dopamine did not alter the change in short-circuit current caused by mucosal glucose (10 mM) or serosal theophylline (10 mM). Mucosal dopamine had no effect. The effect of dopamine on short-circuit current was inhibited by the dopamine antagonists haloperidol and domperidone and the α2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine; there was no effect of the α1-antagonist prazosin and the β-antagonist propranolol. In addition, the α2-adrenergic agonist clonidine, but not the α1-agonist methoxamine caused a dose-dependent decrease in short-circuit current. The ileal effects of dopamine did not occur via conversion into norepinephrine or release of norepinephrine from the peripheral nerves since “peripheral sympathectomy” with 6-hydroxydopamine did not alter the dopamine-induced change in ileal short-circuit current. The dopamine effects were not associated with a change in basal ileal cyclic AMP content but were associated with a decrease in total ileal calcium content as measured by atomic absorption spectrometry and as estimated by 45Ca++ uptake. The decrease in calcium content could be attributed to a dopamine-induced decrease in 45Ca++ influx from the serosal surface. Because of the presence of dopamine in ileal mucosa and these effects on ileal electrolyte transport, it is possible that dopamine may be involved in the physiologic regulation of active intestinal electrolyte absorption. PMID

  10. Dopamine, Affordance and Active Inference

    PubMed Central

    Friston, Karl J.; Shiner, Tamara; FitzGerald, Thomas; Galea, Joseph M.; Adams, Rick; Brown, Harriet; Dolan, Raymond J.; Moran, Rosalyn; Stephan, Klaas Enno; Bestmann, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The role of dopamine in behaviour and decision-making is often cast in terms of reinforcement learning and optimal decision theory. Here, we present an alternative view that frames the physiology of dopamine in terms of Bayes-optimal behaviour. In this account, dopamine controls the precision or salience of (external or internal) cues that engender action. In other words, dopamine balances bottom-up sensory information and top-down prior beliefs when making hierarchical inferences (predictions) about cues that have affordance. In this paper, we focus on the consequences of changing tonic levels of dopamine firing using simulations of cued sequential movements. Crucially, the predictions driving movements are based upon a hierarchical generative model that infers the context in which movements are made. This means that we can confuse agents by changing the context (order) in which cues are presented. These simulations provide a (Bayes-optimal) model of contextual uncertainty and set switching that can be quantified in terms of behavioural and electrophysiological responses. Furthermore, one can simulate dopaminergic lesions (by changing the precision of prediction errors) to produce pathological behaviours that are reminiscent of those seen in neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. We use these simulations to demonstrate how a single functional role for dopamine at the synaptic level can manifest in different ways at the behavioural level. PMID:22241972

  11. Dopamine depletion alters phosphorylation of striatal proteins in a model of Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Brown, Abigail M; Deutch, Ariel Y; Colbran, Roger J

    2005-07-01

    Nigrostriatal dopamine depletion disrupts striatal medium spiny neuron morphology in Parkinson's disease and modulates striatal synaptic plasticity in animal models of parkinsonism. We demonstrate that long-term nigrostriatal dopamine depletion in the rat induces evolving changes in the phosphorylation of striatal proteins critical for synaptic plasticity. Dopamine depletion increased the phosphorylation of the alpha isoform of calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKIIalpha) at Thr286, a site associated with enhanced autonomous kinase activity, but did not alter total levels of CaMKIIalpha or other synaptic proteins. Dopamine depletion decreased CaMKIIalpha levels in postsynaptic density-enriched fractions without significant changes in other proteins. The activity of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a postsynaptic phosphatase that dephosphorylates CaMKII, is regulated by DARPP-32 (dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa). Dopamine depletion had no effect on DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr34, but increased DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr75. Levodopa administration reversed the increased phosphorylation of both CaMKIIalpha and DARPP-32. Normal ageing increased the levels of PP1(gamma1 isoform) but decreased levels of the PP1gamma1-targeting proteins spinophilin and neurabin. Elevated phosphorylations of CaMKIIalpha and DARPP-32 were maintained for up to 20 months after dopamine depletion. However, phosphorylation of the CaMKII-PP1 substrate, Ser831 in the glutamate receptor GluR1 subunit, was increased only after sustained (9-20 months) dopamine depletion. Interaction of ageing-related changes in PP1 with the dopamine depletion-induced changes in CaMKIIalpha may account for enhanced GluR1 phosphorylation only after long-term dopamine depletion. These evolving changes may impact striatal synaptic plasticity, Parkinson's disease progression and the changing efficacy and side-effects associated with dopamine replacement therapy.

  12. Dopamine- and Tyrosine Hydroxylase-Immunoreactive Neurons in the Brain of the American Cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Minoura, Run; Nishino, Hiroshi; Miura, Toru; Mizunami, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    The catecholamine dopamine plays several vital roles in the central nervous system of many species, but its neural mechanisms remain elusive. Detailed neuroanatomical characterization of dopamine neurons is a prerequisite for elucidating dopamine's actions in the brain. In the present study, we investigated the distribution of dopaminergic neurons in the brain of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, using two antisera: 1) an antiserum against dopamine, and 2) an antiserum against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, an enzyme required for dopamine synthesis), and identified about 250 putatively dopaminergic neurons. The patterns of dopamine- and TH-immunoreactive neurons were strikingly similar, suggesting that both antisera recognize the same sets of "dopaminergic" neurons. The dopamine and TH antibodies intensively or moderately immunolabeled prominent brain neuropils, e.g. the mushroom body (memory center), antennal lobe (first-order olfactory center) and central complex (motor coordination center). All subdivisions of the mushroom body exhibit both dopamine and TH immunoreactivity. Comparison of immunolabeled neurons with those filled by dye injection revealed that a group of immunolabeled neurons with cell bodies near the calyx projects into a distal region of the vertical lobe, which is a plausible site for olfactory memory formation in insects. In the antennal lobe, ordinary glomeruli as well as macroglomeruli exhibit both dopamine and TH immunoreactivity. It is noteworthy that the dopamine antiserum labeled tiny granular structures inside the glomeruli whereas the TH antiserum labeled processes in the marginal regions of the glomeruli, suggesting a different origin. In the central complex, all subdivisions excluding part of the noduli and protocerebral bridge exhibit both dopamine and TH immunoreactivity. These anatomical findings will accelerate our understanding of dopaminergic systems, specifically in neural circuits underlying aversive memory formation

  13. Mapping cocaine binding sites in human and baboon brain in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J S; Volkow, N D; Wolf, A P; Dewey, S L; Schlyer, D J; Macgregor, R R; Hitzemann, R; Logan, J; Bendriem, B; Gatley, S J

    1989-01-01

    The first direct measurements of cocaine binding in the brain of normal human volunteers and baboons have been made by using positron emission tomography (PET) and tracer doses of [N-11C-methyl]-(-)-cocaine ([11C]cocaine). Cocaine's binding and release from brain are rapid with the highest regional uptake of carbon-11 occurring in the corpus striatum at 4-10 minutes after intravenous injection of labeled cocaine. This was followed by a clearance to half the peak value at about 25 minutes with the overall time course paralleling the previously documented time course of the euphoria experienced after intravenous cocaine administration. Blockade of the dopamine reuptake sites with nomifensine reduced the striatal but not the cerebellar uptake of [11C]cocaine in baboons indicating that cocaine binding is associated with the dopamine reuptake site in the corpus striatum. A comparison of labeled metabolites of cocaine in human and baboon plasma showed that while cocaine is rapidly metabolized in both species, the profile of labeled metabolites is different, with baboon plasma containing significant amounts of labeled carbon dioxide, and human plasma containing no significant labeled carbon dioxide. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using [11C]cocaine and PET to map binding sites for cocaine in human brain, to monitor its kinetics, and to characterize its binding mechanism by using appropriate pharmacological challenges.

  14. In vivo vulnerability of dopamine neurons to inhibition of energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zeevalk, G D; Manzino, L; Hoppe, J; Sonsalla, P

    1997-02-12

    In vitro studies indicate that mesencephalic dopamine neurons are more vulnerable than other neurons to impairment of energy metabolism. Such findings may have bearing on the loss of dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease, in which mitochondrial deficiencies have been identified, but would only be relevant if the selective vulnerability were maintained in vivo. To examine this, rats were stereotaxically administered various concentrations of the succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor, malonate (0.25-4 mumol), either into the left substantia nigra or striatum. One week following injection, dopamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels in the mesencephalon and striatum were measured. Intranigral injection of malonate caused nigral dopamine and GABA to be comparably reduced at all doses tested. The 50% dose level for malonate vs. dopamine and GABA loss was 0.39 and 0.42 mumol, respectively. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunocytochemistry of the midbrains of rats which received an intranigral injection of malonate showed normal staining with 0.25 mumol malonate, but almost complete loss of tyrosine hydroxylase positive nigral pars compacta cells with 1 mumol malonate. Intrastriatal injection of malonate produced a loss of both tyrosine hydroxylase activity and dopamine. In contrast to what was seen in substantia nigra, there was a greater loss of dopamine than GABA in striatal regions nearest the injection site. In striatal regions most distal to the injection site, and which received the lowest concentration of malonate due to diffusion, dopamine levels were significantly reduced with all doses of malonate (0.5-4 mumol), whereas GABA levels were unaffected. Intrastriatal coinfusion of succinate along with malonate completely prevented the loss of dopamine and GABA indicating that succinate dehydrogenase inhibition was the cause of toxicity. These findings indicate that dopamine terminals in the striatum of adult rats are selectively more vulnerable than are the GABA neurons

  15. Simultaneous measurement of extracellular dopamine and dopamine transporter occupancy by cocaine analogs in squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Heather L; Nye, Jonathon A; Voll, Ronald; Mun, Jiyoung; Stehouwer, Jeffrey; Goodman, Mark M; Votaw, John R; Carroll, F I; Howell, Leonard L

    2012-06-01

    Several classes of drugs bind to the dopamine transporter (DAT) with high affinity, but some are weaker positive reinforcers than cocaine, suggesting that affinity for and occupancy of the DAT is not the only determinant of a drug's reinforcing effectiveness. Other factors such as the rate of onset have been positively and strongly correlated with the reinforcing effects of DAT inhibitors in nonhuman primates. In the current studies, we examined the effects of acute systemic administration of cocaine and three cocaine analogs (RTI-150, RTI-177, and RTI-366) on binding to DAT in squirrel monkey brain using positron emission tomography (PET) neuroimaging. During the PET scan, we also measured drug effects on dopamine (DA) levels in the caudate using in vivo microdialysis. In general, our results suggest a lack of concordance between drug occupancy at DAT and changes in DA levels. These studies also indicate that acute cocaine administration decreases the availability of plasma membrane DAT for binding, even after cocaine is no longer blocking DA uptake as evidence by a return to basal DA levels.

  16. Sensitized nucleus accumbens dopamine terminal responses to methylphenidate and dopamine transporter releasers after intermittent-access self-administration.

    PubMed

    Calipari, Erin S; Jones, Sara R

    2014-07-01

    Long-access methylphenidate (MPH) self-administration has been shown to produce enhanced amphetamine potency at the dopamine transporter and concomitant changes in reinforcing efficacy, suggesting that MPH abuse may change the dopamine system in a way that promotes future drug abuse. While long-access self-administration paradigms have translational validity for cocaine, it may not be as relevant a model of MPH abuse, as it has been suggested that people often take MPH intermittently. Although previous work outlined the neurochemical and behavioral consequences of long-access MPH self-administration, it was not clear whether intermittent access (6 h session; 5 min access/30 min) would result in similar changes. For cocaine, long-access self-administration resulted in tolerance to cocaine's effects on dopamine and behavior while intermittent-access resulted in sensitization. Here we assessed the neurochemical consequences of intermittent-access MPH self-administration on dopamine terminal function. We found increased maximal rates of uptake, increased stimulated release, and subsensitive D2-like autoreceptors. Consistent with previous work using extended-access MPH paradigms, the potencies of amphetamine and MPH, but not cocaine, were increased, demonstrating that unlike cocaine, MPH effects were not altered by the pattern of intake. Although the potency results suggest that MPH may share properties with releasers, dopamine release was increased following acute application of MPH, similar to cocaine, and in contrast to the release decreasing effects of amphetamine. Taken together, these data demonstrate that MPH exhibits properties of both blockers and releasers, and that the compensatory changes produced by MPH self-administration may increase the abuse liability of amphetamines, independent of the pattern of administration.

  17. Effects of dopamine on adenylyl cyclase activity and amylase secretion in rat parotid tissue.

    PubMed

    Hatta, S; Amemiya, N; Takemura, H; Ohshika, H

    1995-06-01

    Several previous studies have shown that dopamine causes amylase secretion from rat parotid tissue. However, the mechanism of this dopamine action is still unclear. The present study was designed to characterize dopamine action in rat parotid gland tissue by examining the effects of dopamine on cyclic AMP accumulation, adenylyl cyclase activity, and amylase release. Dopamine significantly enhanced accumulation of cyclic AMP in parotid slices and stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in parotid membrane preparations. It also significantly stimulated amylase release from parotid slices. The stimulatory effects of dopamine on cyclic AMP accumulation, adenylyl cyclase activity, and amylase release were effectively blocked with propranolol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, but not by either SCH 23390, a preferential D1 antagonist, or butaclamol, a preferential D2 antagonist. No substantial specific binding sites for D1 receptors were detectable by [3H]SCH 23390 binding in parotid membranes. These results suggest that the stimulatory effect of dopamine on amylase secretion in rat parotid tissue is not mediated through specific D1 dopamine receptors but rather through beta-adrenergic receptors.

  18. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Dopamine Tubular Transport by Organic Cation Transporters: A Novel Mechanism to Enhance Renal Sodium Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Kouyoumdzian, Nicolás M.; Rukavina Mikusic, Natalia L.; Kravetz, María C.; Lee, Brenda M.; Carranza, Andrea; Del Mauro, Julieta S.; Pandolfo, Marcela; Gironacci, Mariela M.; Gorzalczany, Susana; Toblli, Jorge E.; Fernández, Belisario E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on organic cation transporters (OCTs) expression and activity, and its consequences on dopamine urinary levels, Na+, K+-ATPase activity and renal function. Male Sprague Dawley rats were infused with isotonic saline solution during 120 minutes and randomized in nine different groups: control, pargyline plus tolcapone (P+T), ANP, dopamine (DA), D-22, DA+D-22, ANP+D-22, ANP+DA and ANP+DA+D-22. Renal functional parameters were determined and urinary dopamine concentration was quantified by HPLC. Expression of OCTs and D1-receptor in membrane preparations from renal cortex tissues were determined by western blot and Na+, K+-ATPase activity was determined using in vitro enzyme assay. 3H-DA renal uptake was determined in vitro. Compared to P+T group, ANP and dopamine infusion increased diuresis, urinary sodium and dopamine excretion significantly. These effects were more pronounced in ANP+DA group and reversed by OCTs blockade by D-22, demonstrating that OCTs are implied in ANP stimulated-DA uptake and transport in renal tissues. The activity of Na+, K+-ATPase exhibited a similar fashion when it was measured in the same experimental groups. Although OCTs and D1-receptor protein expression were not modified by ANP, OCTs-dependent-dopamine tubular uptake was increased by ANP through activation of NPR-A receptor and protein kinase G as signaling pathway. This effect was reflected by an increase in urinary dopamine excretion, natriuresis, diuresis and decreased Na+, K+-ATPase activity. OCTs represent a novel target that links the activity of ANP and dopamine together in a common mechanism to enhance their natriuretic and diuretic effects. PMID:27392042

  19. Application of ground bone and sheep manure on soils from two contaminated sites and influence on oat growth, uranium and radium uptake and translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, M. M.; Pacheco, A.; Santos, E.; Magalhães, M. C. F.

    2012-04-01

    Past radium and uranium exploitation and processing in Urgeiriça mine and radium processing in Barracão (centre-north of Portugal) led to soils and waters contamination. Most of the soils, located in rural areas, are cultivated for vegetables, fruit trees, and/or pasturage, and the waters used for soils irrigation. The objective of this work was to evaluate the capacity of organic amendments and hydroxiapatite to reduce the soil available fraction of Utotal and 226Ra in soils of two areas after four months of incubation. Influence on oat growth, uranium and radium uptake and translocation was also studied. Pot experiments, under controlled conditions, were undertaken during four months of incubation at 70% of the soil water-holding capacity. Urgeiriça (Urg) and Barracão (Brc) soils containing large concentrations of Utotal (635 and 189 mg/kg, respectively), and 226Ra (2310 and 1770 Bq/kg, respectively) were used. The available fraction of these elements, extracted with ammonium acetate, corresponds to: 90 and 20% of total concentration of uranium and radium, respectively, for Urgeiriça soil, and 19 and 43% of total concentration of uranium and radium, respectively, for Barracão soil. Fine ground bone (FB), sheep manure (OM), and vermicompost (V) single or mixtures were used as amendments. Control (soil) and treatments were made in triplicate: (T1) soil+96 g FB/kg of soil; (T2) soil+168 g OM/kg of soil; (T3) soil+168 g OM/kg of soil+96 g FB/kg of soil; (T4) soil+168 g V/kg of soil. After incubation, soil subsamples were analysed for pH, electric conductivity (EC), and available fractions of Utotal and 226Ra. The remaining soils were used for oat (Avena sativa L.) cultivation. Soils had pH 5.15 (Urg) and 6.04 (Brc), and EC 57.3 µS/cm (Urg) and 36.3 µS/cm (Brc). After incubation soil pH increased to a maximum of 6.82 (Urg) and 7.10 (Brc) in amended samples, and EC showed a large increase (15-19 times) when compared to the control. A decrease of the available

  20. Anterior cingulate dopamine turnover and behavior change in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Catherine L; Bell, Brian; Palotti, Matthew; Oh, Jen; Christian, Bradley T.; Okonkwo, Ozioma; Sojkova, Jitka; Buyan-Dent, Laura; Nickles, Robert J.; Harding, Sandra J.; Stone, Charles K.; Johnson, Sterling C.; Holden, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Subtle cognitive and behavioral changes are common in early Parkinson’s disease. The cause of these symptoms is probably multifactorial but may in part be related to extra-striatal dopamine levels. 6-[18F]-Fluoro-L-dopa (FDOPA) positron emission tomography has been widely used to quantify dopamine metabolism in the brain; the most frequently measured kinetic parameter is the tissue uptake rate constant, Ki. However, estimates of dopamine turnover, which also account for the small rate of FDOPA loss from areas of specific trapping, may be more sensitive than Ki for early disease-related changes in dopamine biosynthesis. The purpose of the present study was to compare effective distribution volume ratio (eDVR), a metric for dopamine turnover, to cognitive and behavioral measures in Parkinson’s patients. We chose to focus the investigation on anterior cingulate cortex, which shows highest FDOPA uptake within frontal regions and has known roles in executive function. 15 Non-demented early-stage PD patients were pretreated with carbidopa and tolcapone, a central catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) inhibitor and then underwent extended imaging with FDOPA PET. Anterior cingulate eDVR was compared with composite scores for language, memory, and executive function measured by neuropsychological testing, and behavior change measured using two informant-based questionnaires, the Cambridge Behavioral Inventory and the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function- Adult Version. Lower mean eDVR (thus higher dopamine turnover) in anterior cingulate cortex was related to lower (more impaired) behavior scores. We conclude that subtle changes in anterior cingulate dopamine metabolism may contribute to dysexecutive behaviors in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25511521

  1. Spiperone: evidence for uptake into secretory granules.

    PubMed Central

    Dannies, P S; Rudnick, M S; Fishkes, H; Rudnick, G

    1984-01-01

    Spiperone, a dopamine antagonist widely used as a specific ligand for dopamine and serotonin receptors, is actively accumulated into the F4C1 strain of rat pituitary tumor cells. The accumulation of 10 nM [3H]spiperone was linear for 3 min and reached a steady state after 10 min. Spiperone accumulation was reduced 50% by preincubation with 5 microM reserpine, an inhibitor of biogenic amine transport into secretory granules, and was also blocked by monensin and ammonium chloride, both of which increase the pH of intracellular storage organelles. Uptake was not affected by replacing sodium in the buffer with lithium at equimolar concentrations. Spiperone at 1 microM inhibited by over 50% serotonin transport into membrane vesicles isolated from platelet dense granules; this concentration inhibited the Na+-dependent plasma membrane transport system less than 10%. The data indicate spiperone specifically interacts with the secretory granule amine transport system and suggest that this transport system is found in the F4C1 pituitary cell strain as well as in platelets and neurons. The data also suggest that experiments utilizing spiperone to measure dopamine and serotonin receptors be interpreted with caution. PMID:6584920

  2. Dopamine Receptors and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Coronel, Israel; Florán, Benjamín

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is one of the major neurotransmitters and participates in a number of functions such as motor coordination, emotions, memory, reward mechanism, neuroendocrine regulation etc. DA exerts its effects through five DA receptors that are subdivided in 2 families: D1-like DA receptors (D1 and D5) and the D2-like (D2, D3 and D4). All DA receptors are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and play an important role in not only in physiological conditions but also pathological scenarios. Abnormalities in the DAergic system and its receptors in the basal ganglia structures are the basis Parkinson’s disease (PD), however DA also participates in other neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington disease (HD) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Under pathological conditions reorganization of DAergic system has been observed and most of the times, those changes occur as a mechanism of compensation, but in some cases contributes to worsening the alterations. Here we review the changes that occur on DA transmission and DA receptors (DARs) at both levels expression and signals transduction pathways as a result of neurotoxicity, inflammation and in neurodegenerative processes. The better understanding of the role of DA receptors in neuropathological conditions is crucial for development of novel therapeutic approaches to treat alterations related to neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26425390

  3. A Role for Accumbal Glycine Receptors in Modulation of Dopamine Release by the Glycine Transporter-1 Inhibitor Org25935

    PubMed Central

    Lidö, Helga Höifödt; Ericson, Mia; Marston, Hugh; Söderpalm, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Accumbal glycine modulates basal and ethanol-induced dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens (nAc) as well as voluntary ethanol consumption. Also, systemic administration of the glycine transporter-1 inhibitor Org25935 elevates dopamine levels in nAc, prevents a further ethanol-induced dopamine elevation and robustly and dose-dependently decreases ethanol consumption in rats. Here we investigated whether Org25935 applied locally in nAc modulates dopamine release, and whether accumbal glycine receptors or NMDA receptors are involved in this tentative effect. We also addressed whether Org25935 and ethanol applied locally in nAc interact with dopamine levels, as seen after systemic administration. We used in vivo microdialysis coupled to HPLC-ED in freely moving male Wistar rats to monitor dopamine output in nAc after local perfusion of Org25935 alone, with ethanol, or Org25935-perfusion after pre-treatment with the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine or the NMDA receptor glycine site antagonist L-701.324. Local Org25935 increased extracellular dopamine levels in a subpopulation of rats. Local strychnine, but not systemic L-701.324, antagonized the dopamine-activating effect of Org25935. Ethanol failed to induce a dopamine overflow in the subpopulation responding to Org25935 with a dopamine elevation. The study supports a role for accumbal glycine receptors rather than NMDA receptor signaling in the dopamine-activating effect of Org25935. The results further indicate that the previously reported systemic Org25935–ethanol interaction with regard to accumbal dopamine is localized to the nAc. This adds to the growing evidence for the glycine receptor as an important player in the dopamine reward circuitry and in ethanol's effects within this system. PMID:21556278

  4. Binding of [3H]paroxetine to serotonin uptake sites and of [3H]lysergic acid diethylamide to 5-HT2A receptors in platelets from women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder during gonadotropin releasing hormone treatment.

    PubMed

    Bixo, M; Allard, P; Bäckström, T; Mjörndal, T; Nyberg, S; Spigset, O; Sundström-Poromaa, I

    2001-08-01

    Changes in serotonergic parameters have been reported in psychiatric conditions such as depression but also in the premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). In addition, hormonal effects on serotonergic activity have been established. In the present study, binding of [3H]paroxetine to platelet serotonin uptake sites and binding of [3H]lysergic acid diethylamide ([3H]LSD) to platelet serotonin (5-HT)2A receptors were studied in patients with PMDD treated with a low dose of a gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist (buserelin) or placebo and compared to controls. The PMDD patients were relieved of premenstrual symptoms like depression and irritability during buserelin treatment. The number of [3H]paroxetine binding sites (Bmax) were significantly higher in the follicular phase in untreated PMDD patients compared to controls. When treated with buserelin the difference disappeared. No differences in [3H]LSD binding between the three groups were shown. The present study demonstrated altered platelet [3H]paroxetine binding characteristics in women with PMDD compared to controls. Furthermore, [3H]paroxetine binding was affected by PMDD treatment with a low dose of buserelin. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that changes in serotonergic transmission could be a trait in the premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

  5. Potential Moderating Effects of Selenium on Mercury Uptake and Selenium:Mercury Molar Ratios in Fish From Oak Ridge and Savannah River Site - 12086

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Donio, Mark; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn

    2012-07-01

    Mercury contamination is an important remediation issue at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation and to a lesser extent at other DOE sites because of the hazard it presents, potential consequences to humans and eco-receptors, and completed pathways, to offsite receptors. Recent work has emphasized that selenium might ameliorate the toxicity of mercury, and we examine the selenium:mercury (Se:Hg) molar ratios in fish from Oak Ridge, and compare them to Se:Hg molar ratios in fish from the Savannah River. Selenium/mercury molar ratios varied considerably among and within fish species. There was considerable variation in the molar ratios for individual fish (as opposed to mean ratios by species) for freshwater fish from both sites. The inter-individual variation in molar ratios indicates that such that the molar ratios of mean Se and Hg concentrations may not be representative. Even for fish species with relatively low mercury levels, some individual fish have molar ratios less than unity, the value sometime thought to be protective. Selenium levels varied narrowly regardless of fish size, consistent with homeostatic regulation of this essential trace element. The data indicate that considerable attention will need to be directed toward variations and variances, as well as the mechanisms of the interaction of selenium and mercury, before risk assessment and risk management policies can use this information to manage mercury pollution and risk. Even so, if there are high levels of selenium in the fish from Poplar Creek on Oak Ridge, then the potential exists for some amelioration of adverse health effects, on the fish themselves, predators that eat them, and people who consume them. This work will aid DOE because it will allow managers and scientists to understand another aspect that affects fate and transport of mercury, as well as the potential effects of methylmercury in fish for human and ecological receptors. The variability within fish

  6. Efficient and Selective Uptake of TcO4(-) by a Cationic Metal-Organic Framework Material with Open Ag(+) Sites.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Daopeng; Zhu, Lin; Xu, Chao; Xiao, Chengliang; Wang, Yanlong; Wang, Yaxing; Chen, Lanhua; Diwu, Juan; Chen, Jing; Chai, Zhifang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E; Wang, Shuao

    2017-03-21

    (99)Tc is one of the most problematic radioisotopes in used nuclear fuel owing to its combined features of high fission yield, long half-life, and high environmental mobility. There are only a handful of functional materials that can remove TcO4(-) anion from aqueous solution and identifying for new, stable materials with high anion-exchange capacities, fast kinetics, and good selectivity remains a challenge. We report here an 8-fold interpenetrated three-dimensional cationic metal-organic framework material, SCU-100, which is assembled from a tetradentate neutral nitrogen-donor ligand and two-coordinate Ag(+) cations as potential open metal sites. The structure also contains a series of 1D channels filled with unbound nitrate anions. SCU-100 maintains its crystallinity in aqueous solution over a wide pH range from 1 to 13 and exhibits excellent β and γ radiation-resistance. Initial anion exchange studies show that SCU-100 is able to both quantitatively and rapidly remove TcO4(-) from water within 30 min. The exchange capacity for the surrogate ReO4(-) reaches up to 541 mg/g and the distribution coefficient Kd is up to 1.9 × 10(5) mL/g, which are significantly higher than all previously tested inorganic anion sorbent materials. More importantly, SCU-100 can selectively capture TcO4(-) in the presence of large excess of competitive anions (NO3(-), SO4(2-), CO3(2-), and PO4(3-)) and remove as much as 87% of TcO4(-) from the Hanford low-level waste melter off-gas scrubber simulant stream within 2 h. The sorption mechanism is well elucidated by single crystal X-ray diffraction, showing that the sorbed ReO4(-) anion is able to selectively coordinate to the open Ag(+) sites forming Ag-O-Re bonds and a series of hydrogen bonds. This further leads to a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation from an 8-fold interpenetrated framework with disordered nitrate anions to a 4-fold interpenetrated framework with fully ordered ReO4(-) anions. This work represents a

  7. Root Fungal Endophytes Enhance Heavy-Metal Stress Tolerance of Clethra barbinervis Growing Naturally at Mining Sites via Growth Enhancement, Promotion of Nutrient Uptake and Decrease of Heavy-Metal Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Shigeto, Arisa; Yui, Hiroshi; Haruma, Toshikatsu

    2016-01-01

    Clethra barbinervis Sieb. et Zucc. is a tree species that grows naturally at several mine sites and seems to be tolerant of high concentrations of heavy metals, such as Cu, Zn, and Pb. The purpose of this study is to clarify the mechanism(s) underlying this species’ ability to tolerate the sites’ severe heavy-metal pollution by considering C. barbinervis interaction with root fungal endophytes. We measured the heavy metal concentrations of root-zone soil, leaves, branches, and fine roots collected from mature C. barbinervis at Hitachi mine. We isolated fungal endophytes from surface-sterilized root segments, and we examined the growth, and heavy metal and nutrient absorption of C. barbinervis seedlings growing in sterilized mine soil with or without root fungal endophytes. Field analyses showed that C. barbinervis contained considerably high amounts of Cu, Zn, and Pb in fine roots and Zn in leaves. The fungi, Phialocephala fortinii, Rhizodermea veluwensis, and Rhizoscyphus sp. were frequently isolated as dominant fungal endophyte species. Inoculation of these root fungal endophytes to C. barbinervis seedlings growing in sterilized mine soil indicated that these fungi significantly enhanced the growth of C. barbinervis seedlings, increased K uptake in shoots and reduced the concentrations of Cu, Ni, Zn, Cd, and Pb in roots. Without root fungal endophytes, C. barbinervis could hardly grow under the heavy-metal contaminated condition, showing chlorosis, a symptom of heavy-metal toxicity. Our results indicate that the tree C. barbinervis can tolerate high heavy-metal concentrations due to the support of root fungal endophytes including P. fortinii, R. veluwensis, and Rhizoscyphus sp. via growth enhancement, K uptake promotion and decrease of heavy metal concentrations. PMID:28030648

  8. Dopamine regulates body size in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Takashi; Oami, Eitaro; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Ishiura, Shoichi; Suo, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    The nervous system plays a critical role in the regulation of animal body sizes. In Caenorhabditis elegans, an amine neurotransmitter, dopamine, is required for the tactile perception of food and food-dependent behavioral changes, while its role in development is unknown. In this study, we show that dopamine negatively regulates body size through a D2-like dopamine receptor, DOP-3, in C. elegans. Dopamine alters body size without affecting food intake or developmental rate. We also found that dopamine promotes egg-laying, although the regulation of body size by dopamine was not solely caused by this effect. Furthermore, dopamine negatively regulates body size through the suppression of signaling by octopamine and Gq-coupled octopamine receptors, SER-3 and SER-6. Our results demonstrate that dopamine and octopamine regulate the body size of C. elegans and suggest a potential role for perception in addition to ingestion of food for growth.

  9. Dopamine, reward learning, and active inference

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, Thomas H. B.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Friston, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Temporal difference learning models propose phasic dopamine signaling encodes reward prediction errors that drive learning. This is supported by studies where optogenetic stimulation of dopamine neurons can stand in lieu of actual reward. Nevertheless, a large body of data also shows that dopamine is not necessary for learning, and that dopamine depletion primarily affects task performance. We offer a resolution to this paradox based on an hypothesis that dopamine encodes the precision of beliefs about alternative actions, and thus controls the outcome-sensitivity of behavior. We extend an active inference scheme for solving Markov decision processes to include learning, and show that simulated dopamine dynamics strongly resemble those actually observed during instrumental conditioning. Furthermore, simulated dopamine depletion impairs performance but spares learning, while simulated excitation of dopamine neurons drives reward learning, through aberrant inference about outcome states. Our formal approach provides a novel and parsimonious reconciliation of apparently divergent experimental findings. PMID:26581305

  10. Dopamine controls neurogenesis in the adult salamander midbrain in homeostasis and during regeneration of dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Berg, Daniel A; Kirkham, Matthew; Wang, Heng; Frisén, Jonas; Simon, András

    2011-04-08

    Appropriate termination of regenerative processes is critical for producing the correct number of cells in tissues. Here we provide evidence for an end-product inhibition of dopamine neuron regeneration that is mediated by dopamine. Ablation of midbrain dopamine neurons leads to complete regeneration in salamanders. Regeneration involves extensive neurogenesis and requires activation of quiescent ependymoglia cells, which express dopamine receptors. Pharmacological compensation for dopamine loss by L-dopa inhibits ependymoglia proliferation and regeneration in a dopamine receptor-signaling-dependent manner, specifically after ablation of dopamine neurons. Systemic administration of the dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol alone causes ependymoglia proliferation and the appearance of excessive number of neurons. Our data show that stem cell quiescence is under dopamine control and provide a model for termination once normal homeostasis is restored. The findings establish a role for dopamine in the reversible suppression of neurogenesis in the midbrain and have implications for regenerative strategies in Parkinson's disease.

  11. Dopamine denervation does not alter in vivo /sup 3/H-spiperone binding in rat striatum: implications for external imaging of dopamine receptors in Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.P. Jr.; Wooten, G.F.

    1986-04-01

    Striatal particulate preparations, both from rats with lesion-induced striatal dopamine (DA) loss and from some striatal dopamine (DA) loss and from some patients with Parkinson's disease, exhibit increased /sup 3/H-neuroleptic binding, which is interpreted to be the mechanism of denervation-induced behavioral supersensitivity to dopaminergic compounds. After intravenous /sup 3/H-spiperone (/sup 3/H-SP) administration to rats with unilateral nigral lesions, we found no differences in accumulation of total or particulate-bound /sup 3/H-SP in dopamine-denervated compared with intact striata. /sup 3/H-SP in vivo binds to less than 10% of striatal sites labeled by /sup 3/H-SP incubated with striatal particulate preparations in vitro. Quantitative autoradiography of /sup 3/H-SP binding to striatal sections in vitro also failed to reveal any effects of dopamine denervation. /sup 3/H-SP bound to striatal sites in vivo dissociates more slowly than that bound to striatal particulate preparations labeled in vitro. Striatal binding properties of /sup 3/H-SP administered in vivo are quite different from the same kinetic binding parameters estimated in vitro using crude membrane preparations of striatum. In addition, striatal binding of in vivo-administered 3H-SP is not affected by prior lesion of the substantia nigra, which results in profound ipsilateral striatal dopamine depletion. Thus, behavioral supersensitivity to dopaminergic compounds may not be associated with altered striatal binding properties for dopamine receptor ligands in vivo.

  12. New selenium-75 labeled radiopharmaceuticals: selenonium analogues of dopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Sadek, S.A.; Basmadjian, G.P.; Hsu, P.M.; Rieger, J.A.

    1983-07-01

    Selenium-75 labeled selenonium analogues of dopamine, (2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethyl)dimethylselenonium iodide and its dihydroxy analogue, were prepared by reducing (/sup 75/Se)selenious acid with sodium borohydride at pH 6.0 and reacting the NaSeH produced with 1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(p-toluenesulfonyloxy)ethane. Tissue distribution studies in rats given the /sup 75/Se-labeled selenonium agents intravenously demonstrated high initial heart uptake. Prolonged adrenal retention and high adrenal to blood ratio of compound 4 were observed. The high uptake and adrenal to blood ratio suggest the potential use of compound 4 as a radiopharmaceutical for the adrenal gland.

  13. Dopamine- and Tyrosine Hydroxylase-Immunoreactive Neurons in the Brain of the American Cockroach, Periplaneta americana

    PubMed Central

    Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Minoura, Run; Nishino, Hiroshi; Miura, Toru; Mizunami, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    The catecholamine dopamine plays several vital roles in the central nervous system of many species, but its neural mechanisms remain elusive. Detailed neuroanatomical characterization of dopamine neurons is a prerequisite for elucidating dopamine’s actions in the brain. In the present study, we investigated the distribution of dopaminergic neurons in the brain of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, using two antisera: 1) an antiserum against dopamine, and 2) an antiserum against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, an enzyme required for dopamine synthesis), and identified about 250 putatively dopaminergic neurons. The patterns of dopamine- and TH-immunoreactive neurons were strikingly similar, suggesting that both antisera recognize the same sets of “dopaminergic” neurons. The dopamine and TH antibodies intensively or moderately immunolabeled prominent brain neuropils, e.g. the mushroom body (memory center), antennal lobe (first-order olfactory center) and central complex (motor coordination center). All subdivisions of the mushroom body exhibit both dopamine and TH immunoreactivity. Comparison of immunolabeled neurons with those filled by dye injection revealed that a group of immunolabeled neurons with cell bodies near the calyx projects into a distal region of the vertical lobe, which is a plausible site for olfactory memory formation in insects. In the antennal lobe, ordinary glomeruli as well as macroglomeruli exhibit both dopamine and TH immunoreactivity. It is noteworthy that the dopamine antiserum labeled tiny granular structures inside the glomeruli whereas the TH antiserum labeled processes in the marginal regions of the glomeruli, suggesting a different origin. In the central complex, all subdivisions excluding part of the noduli and protocerebral bridge exhibit both dopamine and TH immunoreactivity. These anatomical findings will accelerate our understanding of dopaminergic systems, specifically in neural circuits underlying aversive memory

  14. Pharmacological and biochemical characterization of the D-1 dopamine receptor mediating acetylcholine release in rabbit retina

    SciTech Connect

    Hensler, J.G.; Cotterell, D.J.; Dubocovich, M.L.

    1987-12-01

    Superfusion with dopamine (0.1 microM-10 mM) evokes calcium-dependent (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release from rabbit retina labeled in vitro with (/sup 3/H)choline. This effect is antagonized by the D-1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH 23390. Activation or blockade of D-2 dopamine, alpha-2 or beta receptors did not stimulate or attenuate the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine from rabbit retina. Dopamine receptor agonists evoke the release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine with the following order of potency: apomorphine less than or equal to SKF(R)82526 < SKF 85174 < SKF(R)38393 less than or equal to pergolide less than or equal to dopamine (EC50 = 4.5 microM) < SKF(S)82526 less than or equal to SKF(S)38393. Dopamine receptor antagonists inhibited the dopamine-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine: SCH 23390 (IC50 = 1 nM) < (+)-butaclamol less than or equal to cis-flupenthixol < fluphenazine < perphenazine < trans-flupenthixol < R-sulpiride. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the dopamine receptor mediating (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release is characteristic of the D-1 dopamine receptor. These potencies were correlated with the potencies of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists at the D-1 dopamine receptor in rabbit retina as labeled by (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390, or as determined by adenylate cyclase activity. (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding in rabbit retinal membranes was stable, saturable and reversible. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 saturation data revealed a single high affinity binding site (Kd = 0.175 +/- 0.002 nM) with a maximum binding of 482 +/- 12 fmol/mg of protein. The potencies of dopamine receptor agonists to stimulate (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine release were correlated with their potencies to stimulate adenylate cyclase (r = 0.784, P less than .05, n = 7) and with their affinities at (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 binding sites (r = 0.755, P < .05, n = 8).

  15. Ascorbic acid and striatal transport of (/sup 3/H)1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP/sup +/) and (/sup 3/H)dopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Debler, E.A.; Hashim, A.; Lajtha, A.; Sershen, H.

    1988-01-01

    The inhibition of uptake of (/sup 3/H)dopamine and (/sup 3/H)1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP/sup +/) was examined in mouse striatal synaptosomal preparations. Kinetic analysis indicated that ascorbic acid is a noncompetitive inhibitor of (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ uptake. No inhibition of (/sup 3/H)dopamine uptake is observed. The dopamine uptake blockers, GBR-12909, cocaine, and mazindol strongly inhibit (IC/sub 50/ < 1 ..mu..M) both (/sup 3/H)dopamine and (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ transport. Nicotine, its metabolites, and other tobacco alkaloids are weak inhibitors except 4-phenylpyridine and lobeline, which are moderate inhibitors of both (/sup 3/H)dopamine and (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ uptake. These similarities in potencies are in agreement with the suggestion that (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ and (/sup 3/H) are transported by the same carrier. The differences observed in the alteration of dopaminergic transport and mazindol binding by ascorbic acid suggest that ascorbic acid's effects on (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ transport are related to translocation and/or dissociation processes occurring subsequent to the initial binding event.

  16. Chaotic behavior in dopamine neurodynamics.

    PubMed Central

    King, R; Barchas, J D; Huberman, B A

    1984-01-01

    We report the results of the dynamics of a model of the central dopaminergic neuronal system. In particular, for certain values of a parameter k, which monitors the efficacy of dopamine at the postsynaptic receptor, chaotic solutions of the dynamical equations appear--a prediction that correlates with the observed increased variability in behavior among schizophrenics, the rapid fluctuations in motor activity among Parkinsonian patients treated chronically with L-dopa, and the lability of mood in some patients with an affective disorder. Moreover our hypothesis offers specific results concerning the appearance or disappearance of erratic solutions as a function of k and the external input to the dopamine neuronal system. PMID:6583705

  17. Chaotic behavior in dopamine neurodynamics.

    PubMed

    King, R; Barchas, J D; Huberman, B A

    1984-02-01

    We report the results of the dynamics of a model of the central dopaminergic neuronal system. In particular, for certain values of a parameter k, which monitors the efficacy of dopamine at the postsynaptic receptor, chaotic solutions of the dynamical equations appear--a prediction that correlates with the observed increased variability in behavior among schizophrenics, the rapid fluctuations in motor activity among Parkinsonian patients treated chronically with L-dopa, and the lability of mood in some patients with an affective disorder. Moreover our hypothesis offers specific results concerning the appearance or disappearance of erratic solutions as a function of k and the external input to the dopamine neuronal system.

  18. Copper uptake by the water hyacinth. [Eichornia crassipes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.A.; Hardy, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    Factors affecting Cu/sup +2/ uptake by the water hyacinth (Eichornia crassipes) were examined. Two phases of copper uptake were observed throughout the uptake range (1-1000 mg/1). An initial rapid uptake phase of 4 hours followed by a slower, near linear uptake phase extending past 48 hours was observed. Stirring the solution enhanced uptake, suggesting copper removal is partially diffusion limited. Variations in pH over the range of 3 to 10 did not significantly affect uptake. Increasing the root mass of the plant increased the amount of copper taken up. As solution volume was increased more copper was removed. The presence of complexing agents during the uptake phase reduced copper uptake. The inability of complexing agents to recover all copper initially removed by a plant suggests a migration to sites within the plant.

  19. Classic Studies on the Interaction of Cocaine and the Dopamine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine transporter is responsible for recycling dopamine after release. Inhibitors of the dopamine transporter, such as cocaine, will stop the reuptake of dopamine and allow it to stay extracellularly, causing prominent changes at the molecular, cellular, and behavioral levels. There is much left to be known about the mechanism and site(s) of binding, as well as the effect that cocaine administration does to dopamine transporter-cocaine binding sites and gene expression which also plays a strong role in cocaine abusers and their behavioral characteristics. Thus, if more light is shed on the dopamine transporter-cocaine interaction, treatments for addiction and even other diseases of the dopaminergic system may not be too far ahead. As today’s ongoing research expands on the shoulders of classic research done in the 1990s and 2000s, the foundation of core research done in that time period will be reviewed, which forms the basis of today’s work and tomorrow’s therapies. PMID:26598579

  20. Dopamine Modulates the Activity of Sensory Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Cecilia; Trapani, Josef G.; Pacentine, Itallia; Maeda, Reo; Sheets, Lavinia; Mo, Weike

    2015-01-01

    The senses of hearing and balance are subject to modulation by efferent signaling, including the release of dopamine (DA). How DA influences the activity of the auditory and vestibular systems and its site of action are not well understood. Here we show that dopaminergic efferent fibers innervate the acousticolateralis epithelium of the zebrafish during development but do not directly form synapses with hair cells. However, a member of the D1-like receptor family, D1b, tightly localizes to ribbon synapses in inner ear and lateral-line hair cells. To assess modulation of hair-cell activity, we reversibly activated or inhibited D1-like receptors (D1Rs) in lateral-line hair cells. In extracellular recordings from hair cells, we observed that D1R agonist SKF-38393 increased microphonic potentials, whereas D1R antagonist SCH-23390 decreased microphonic potentials. Using ratiometric calcium imaging, we found that increased D1R activity resulted in larger calcium transients in hair cells. The increase of intracellular calcium requires Cav1.3a channels, as a Cav1 calcium channel antagonist, isradipine, blocked the increase in calcium transients elicited by the agonist SKF-38393. Collectively, our results suggest that DA is released in a paracrine fashion and acts at ribbon synapses, likely enhancing the activity of presynaptic Cav1.3a channels and thereby increasing neurotransmission. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The neurotransmitter dopamine acts in a paracrine fashion (diffusion over a short distance) in several tissues and bodily organs, influencing and regulating their activity. The cellular target and mechanism of the action of dopamine in mechanosensory organs, such as the inner ear and lateral-line organ, is not clearly understood. Here we demonstrate that dopamine receptors are present in sensory hair cells at synaptic sites that are required for signaling to the brain. When nearby neurons release dopamine, activation of the dopamine receptors increases the activity of

  1. Dopamine-dependent hyperactivity in the rat following manipulation of GABA mechanisms in the region of the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Pycock, C J; Horton, R W

    1979-01-01

    The effect of manipulation of GABA mechanisms in the region of the nucleus accumbens on dopamine-dependent locomotor hyperactivity in the rat has been studied. Two models of hyperactivity were used: (1) the injection of dopamine into the region of the nucleus accumbens in nialamide-pretreated animals and (2) the systemic administration of d-amphetamine. Both GABA and the GABA agonist 3-aminopropane sulphonic acid (3-APS) depressed hyperactivity in a dose-related manner. High concentrations of GABA (greater than 100 micrograms) were required to produce a significant effect and the response was short-lived possibly reflecting the efficient GABA inactivating mechanisms. 3-APS proved to be approximately 10 times more potent as compared to GABA in the dopamine-accumbens hyperactivity model. Conversely GABA receptor antagonism with low doses of either picrotoxin or bicuculline enhanced the mild locomotor response induced by a low dose of dopamine injected into the nucleus accumbens. However such results were difficult to evaluate fairly as higher doses of the GABA antagonists resulted in varying degrees of generalized seizures. Blockade of GABA uptake systems with cis-1, 3-aminocyclohexane carboxylic acid (ACHC), nipecotic acid or beta-alanine within the region of the nucleus accumbens produced dose-related depression of dopamine-dependent hyperactivity in both models. GABA uptake blockade (nipecotic acid) significantly enhanced the GABA-mediated depression of hyperactivity induced by bilateral injection of dopamine into the nucleus accumbens. The results demonstrate an inhibitory action of GABA and drugs facilitating GABA-ergic transmission on dopamine-dependent hyperactivity in the rat. Although open to criticisms of not being able to distinguish between true GABA effects and the results of non-specific neuronal depression the hyperactivity model underlines the potency of the GABA uptake blocking compounds and their possible potential for future clinical use.

  2. Photoaffinity labelling of high affinity dopamine binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, G.M.; McCarry, B.E.; Mishra, R.K.

    1986-03-01

    A photoactive analogue of the dopamine agonist 2-amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronapthalene (ADTN) has been synthesized and used to photoaffinity label dopamine binding proteins prepared from bovine caudate nucleus. N-(3-)N'-4-azidobenzamidol)-aminopropyl)-aminopropyl)-ADTN (AzB-AP-ADTN) was incubated with caudate membranes and irradiated with UV light. Membranes were then repeatedly washed by centrifugation to remove excess photolabel. A binding assay, using (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 (a D/sub 1/ specific antagonist), was then performed to evaluate the loss of receptor density in the photolyzed preparation. AzB-AP-ADTN irreversibly blocked (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 binding in a dose-dependent manner. Scatchard analysis revealed a decrease in the B/sub max/, with no significant change in the K/sub d/, of (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 binding. Compounds which compete for D/sub 1/ receptor binding (such as dopamine, SKF 38393 or apomorphine), proteted the SCH 23390 binding site from inactivation. This data would suggest that the novel photoaffinity ligand, AzB-AP-ADTN, can covalently label the D/sub 1/ (adenylate cyclase linked) dopamine receptor.

  3. Familial Parkinson mutant alpha-synuclein causes dopamine neuron dysfunction in transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Tomoki; Koyama, Akihiko; Gengyo-Ando, Keiko; Masuda, Mayumi; Kowa, Hisatomo; Tsunoda, Makoto; Mitani, Shohei; Iwatsubo, Takeshi

    2006-01-06

    Mutations in alpha-synuclein gene cause familial form of Parkinson disease, and deposition of wild-type alpha-synuclein as Lewy bodies occurs as a hallmark lesion of sporadic Parkinson disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, implicating alpha-synuclein in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease and related neurodegenerative diseases. Dopamine neurons in substantia nigra are the major site of neurodegeneration associated with alpha-synuclein deposition in Parkinson disease. Here we establish transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans (TG worms) that overexpresses wild-type or familial Parkinson mutant human alpha-synuclein in dopamine neurons. The TG worms exhibit accumulation of alpha-synuclein in the cell bodies and neurites of dopamine neurons, and EGFP labeling of dendrites is often diminished in TG worms expressing familial Parkinson disease-linked A30P or A53T mutant alpha-synuclein, without overt loss of neuronal cell bodies. Notably, TG worms expressing A30P or A53T mutant alpha-synuclein show failure in modulation of locomotory rate in response to food, which has been attributed to the function of dopamine neurons. This behavioral abnormality was accompanied by a reduction in neuronal dopamine content and was treatable by administration of dopamine. These phenotypes were not seen upon expression of beta-synuclein. The present TG worms exhibit dopamine neuron-specific dysfunction caused by accumulation of alpha-synuclein, which would be relevant to the genetic and compound screenings aiming at the elucidation of pathological cascade and therapeutic strategies for Parkinson disease.

  4. Receptor crosstalk protein, calcyon, regulates affinity state of dopamine D1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lidow, M S; Roberts, A; Zhang, L; Koh, P O; Lezcano, N; Bergson, C

    2001-09-21

    The recently cloned protein, calcyon, potentiates crosstalk between G(s)-coupled dopamine D1 receptors and heterologous G(q/11)-coupled receptors allowing dopamine D1 receptors to stimulate intracellular Ca(2+) release, in addition to cAMP production. This crosstalk also requires the participating G(q/11)-coupled receptors to be primed by their agonists. We examined the ability of calcyon and priming to regulate the affinity of dopamine D1 receptors for its ligands. Receptor binding assays were performed on HEK293 cell membrane preparations expressing dopamine D1 receptors either alone or in combination with calcyon. Co-expression of dopamine D1 receptor and calcyon affected neither the affinity of this receptor for antagonists nor the affinity of agonist binding to this receptor high and low-affinity states. However, the presence of calcyon dramatically decreased the proportion of the high-affinity dopamine D1 receptor agonist binding sites. This decrease was reversed by carbachol, which primes the receptor crosstalk by stimulating endogenous G(q/11)-coupled muscarinic receptors. Our findings suggest that calcyon regulates the ability of dopamine D1 receptors to achieve the high-affinity state for agonists, in a manner that depends on priming of receptor crosstalk.

  5. Dual role of medial A10 dopamine neurons in affective encoding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-Hua; Shin, Rick; Ikemoto, Satoshi

    2008-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the activation of medial A10 neurons mediates positive affective encoding. However, little is known about the functions of the inhibition of midbrain dopamine neurons. Here we show evidence suggesting that the inhibition of medial A10 neurons mediates a negative affective state, leading to negative affective encoding, whereas blunting the activation of medial A10 neurons disrupts positive affective encoding involving food reward. We used a microinjection procedure, in which the D(2) dopamine receptor agonist quinpirole was administered into the cell body region of the dopamine neurons, a procedure that reduces dopamine cell firing. Microinjections of quinpirole into the posteromedial ventral tegmental area, but not its more lateral counterparts, led to conditioned place aversion. Quinpirole administration to this site also decreased food intake and basal dopamine concentration in the ventromedial striatum, a major projection area of medial A10 neurons. In addition, moderate quinpirole doses that did not lead to conditioned place aversion or disrupt food intake abolished food-conditioned place preference, suggesting that blunting dopamine impulse activity in response to food reward disrupts positive affective encoding in associated external stimuli. Our data support the hypothesis that activation of medial A10 dopamine neurons mediates a positive affective state, leading to positive affective encoding, while their inhibition mediates a negative affective state, leading to negative affective encoding. Together with previous findings, we propose that medial A10 neurons are an important component of the mechanism via which animals learn to avoid negative incentive stimuli.

  6. Interaction of dopamine and haloperidol with O2 and CO2 chemoreception in carotid body.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, S; Nishino, T; Mokashi, A; Mulligan, E

    1980-07-01

    Effects of dopamine and of a dopaminergic blocker, haloperidol, on the responses of carotid body chemoreceptors to hypoxia and hypercapnia were investigated in 16 anesthetized cats. Intravenous infusion of dopamine (10-20 micrograms.min-1) decreased carotid body chemoreceptor responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia. The effect was greater at higher levels of arterial oxygen and carbon dioxide tension (PaO2 and PaCO2) stimulus. Thus, the magnitude of the dopamine effect depended on the degree of both PO2- and PCO2-mediated excitation of the receptors. Haloperidol potentiated responses to both hypoxia and hypercapnia but apparently did not stimulate the receptors in the absence of these stimuli. Potentiation by haloperidol and inhibition by dopamine of excitatory effects due to PaO2 decrease and PaCO2 increase are complementary. The data suggest that chemoreception of dopamine, O2, and CO2 converge at some site in the carotid body. Persistence of hypoxic and hypercapnic responses, following dopamine-blocking doses of haloperidol, does not support the theory that regulation of dopamine release is responsible for O2 and CO2 chemoreception in carotid body of the cat.

  7. Dual Role of Medial A10 Dopamine Neurons in Affective Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhong-Hua; Shin, Rick; Ikemoto, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the activation of medial A10 neurons mediates positive affective encoding. However, little is known about the functions of the inhibition of midbrain dopamine neurons. Here we show evidence suggesting that the inhibition of medial A10 neurons mediates a negative affective state, leading to negative affective encoding, whereas blunting the activation of medial A10 neurons disrupts positive affective encoding involving food reward. We used a microinjection procedure, in which the D2 dopamine receptor agonist quinpirole was administered into the cell body region of the dopamine neurons, a procedure that reduces dopamine cell firing. Microinjections of quinpirole into the posteromedial ventral tegmental area, but not its more lateral counterparts, led to conditioned place aversion. Quinpirole administration to this site also decreased food intake and basal dopamine concentration in the ventromedial striatum, a major projection area of medial A10 neurons. In addition, moderate quinpirole doses that did not lead to conditioned place aversion or disrupt food intake abolished food-conditioned place preference, suggesting that blunting dopamine impulse activity in response to food reward disrupts positive affective encoding in associated external stimuli. Our data support the hypothesis that activation of medial A10 dopamine neurons mediates a positive affective state, leading to positive affective encoding, while their inhibition mediates a negative affective state, leading to negative affective encoding. Together with previous findings, we propose that medial A10 neurons are an important component of the mechanism via which animals learn to avoid negative incentive stimuli. PMID:18256592

  8. Psychostimulants affect dopamine transmission through both dopamine transporter-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    dela Peña, Ike; Gevorkiana, Ruzanna; Shi, Wei-Xing

    2015-10-05

    The precise mechanisms by which cocaine and amphetamine-like psychostimulants exert their reinforcing effects are not yet fully defined. It is widely believed, however, that these drugs produce their effects by enhancing dopamine neurotransmission in the brain, especially in limbic areas such as the nucleus accumbens, by inducing dopamine transporter-mediated reverse transport and/or blocking dopamine reuptake though the dopamine transporter. Here, we present the evidence that aside from dopamine transporter, non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanisms also participate in psychostimulant-induced dopamine release and contribute to the behavioral effects of these drugs, such as locomotor activation and reward. Accordingly, psychostimulants could increase norepinephrine release in the prefrontal cortex, the latter then alters the firing pattern of dopamine neurons resulting in changes in action potential-dependent dopamine release. These alterations would further affect the temporal pattern of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, thereby modifying information processing in that area. Hence, a synaptic input to a nucleus accumbens neuron may be enhanced or inhibited by dopamine depending on its temporal relationship to dopamine release. Specific temporal patterns of dopamine release may also be required for certain forms of synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens. Together, these effects induced by psychostimulants, mediated through a non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanism involving norepinephrine and the prefrontal cortex, may also contribute importantly to the reinforcing properties of these drugs.

  9. Regulation of dopamine synthesis and release in striatal and prefrontal cortical brain slices

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    Brain slices were used to investigate the role of nerve terminal autoreceptors in modulating dopamine (DA) synthesis and release in striatum and prefrontal cortex. Accumulation of dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) was used as an index of tyrosine hydroxylation in vitro. Nomifensine, a DA uptake blocker, inhibited DOPA synthesis in striatal but not prefrontal slices. This effect was reversed by the DA antagonist sulpiride, suggesting it involved activation of DA receptors by elevated synaptic levels of DA. The autoreceptor-selective agonist EMD-23-448 also inhibited striatal but not prefrontal DOPA synthesis. DOPA synthesis was stimulated in both brain regions by elevated K/sup +/, however only striatal synthesis could be further enhanced by sulpiride. DA release was measured by following the efflux of radioactivity from brain slices prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)-DA. EMD-23-448 and apomorphine inhibited, while sulpiride enhanced, the K/sup +/-evoked overflow of radioactivity from both striatal and prefrontal cortical slices. These findings suggest that striatal DA nerve terminals possess autoreceptors which modulate tyrosine hydroxylation as well as autoreceptors which modulate release. Alternatively, one site may be coupled to both functions through distinct transduction mechanisms. In contrast, autoreceptors on prefrontal cortical terminals appear to regulate DA release but not DA synthesis.

  10. In vitro characterisation of dopamine receptors in the superior colliculus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Weller, M E; Rose, S; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D

    1987-04-01

    In membrane preparations of superior colliculus of the rat, the binding of [3H]spiperone (0.15 nM) was displaced by the incorporation of (+)-butaclamol, haloperidol, apomorphine and (+/-)-sulpiride, but not by (-)-butaclamol, prazosin, propranolol, ketanserin or cinanserin. The Ki values for the displacement of [3H]spiperone by (+/-)-sulpiride, (+)-butaclamol and haloperidol were similar in tissue preparations from superior colliculus and striatum. Equilibrium analysis of the specific binding of [3H]spiperone (0.03-1.0 nM), defined by 10(-5) M (+/-)-sulpiride, to membrane preparations of the superior colliculus, showed the interaction to be saturable and of high affinity. However, the Bmax was only approximately 10% of that found in preparations of striatum; the apparent dissociation constant (KD) was the same in both preparations of the superior colliculus and striatum. Uptake of [3H]dopamine into synaptosomal preparations of the superior colliculus was approximately 20% of that found in synaptosomes from the striatum. In preparations of striatum nomifensine, but not desipramine or fluoxetine, inhibited the uptake of [3H]dopamine. However, in preparations from the superior colliculus, nomifensine, desipramine and fluoxetine were without effect on the uptake of [3H]dopamine. Dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT) were present in small concentrations in the superior colliculus. Homovanillic acid (HVA) was present in larger concentrations and the HVA plus DOPAC/dopamine ratios were greater in the superior colliculus than in the striatum. The superior colliculus contained only small amounts of noradrenaline but 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were present in larger amounts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Mesocortical Dopamine Phenotypes in Mice Lacking the Sonic Hedgehog Receptor Cdon.

    PubMed

    Verwey, Michael; Grant, Alanna; Meti, Nicholas; Adye-White, Lauren; Torres-Berrío, Angelica; Rioux, Veronique; Lévesque, Martin; Charron, Frederic; Flores, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Motivated behaviors and many psychopathologies typically involve changes in dopamine release from the projections of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and/or the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). The morphogen Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) specifies fates of midbrain dopamine neurons, but VTA-specific effects of Shh signaling are also being uncovered. In this study, we assessed the role of the Shh receptor Cdon in the development of VTA and SNc dopamine neurons. We find that Cdon is expressed in the proliferating progenitor zone of the embryonic ventral midbrain and that the number of proliferating cells in this region is increased in mouse Cdon(-/-) embryos. Consistent with a role of Shh in the regulation of neuronal proliferation in this region, we find that the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons is increased in the VTA of Cdon(-/-) mice at birth and that this effect endures into adulthood. In contrast, the number of TH-positive neurons in the SNc is not altered in Cdon(-/-) mice at either age. Moreover, adult Cdon(-/-) mice have a greater number of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) dopamine presynaptic sites, and increased baseline concentrations of dopamine and dopamine metabolites selectively in this region. Finally, consistent with increased dopamine function in the mPFC, we find that adult Cdon(-/-) mice fail to exhibit behavioral plasticity upon repeated amphetamine treatment. Based on these data, we suggest that Cdon plays an important role encoding the diversity of dopamine neurons in the midbrain, influencing both the development of the mesocortical dopamine pathway and behavioral outputs that involve this neural circuitry.

  12. Mesocortical Dopamine Phenotypes in Mice Lacking the Sonic Hedgehog Receptor Cdon

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Alanna; Meti, Nicholas; Adye-White, Lauren; Rioux, Veronique

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Motivated behaviors and many psychopathologies typically involve changes in dopamine release from the projections of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and/or the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). The morphogen Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) specifies fates of midbrain dopamine neurons, but VTA-specific effects of Shh signaling are also being uncovered. In this study, we assessed the role of the Shh receptor Cdon in the development of VTA and SNc dopamine neurons. We find that Cdon is expressed in the proliferating progenitor zone of the embryonic ventral midbrain and that the number of proliferating cells in this region is increased in mouse Cdon−/− embryos. Consistent with a role of Shh in the regulation of neuronal proliferation in this region, we find that the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons is increased in the VTA of Cdon−/− mice at birth and that this effect endures into adulthood. In contrast, the number of TH-positive neurons in the SNc is not altered in Cdon−/− mice at either age. Moreover, adult Cdon−/− mice have a greater number of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) dopamine presynaptic sites, and increased baseline concentrations of dopamine and dopamine metabolites selectively in this region. Finally, consistent with increased dopamine function in the mPFC, we find that adult Cdon−/− mice fail to exhibit behavioral plasticity upon repeated amphetamine treatment. Based on these data, we suggest that Cdon plays an important role encoding the diversity of dopamine neurons in the midbrain, influencing both the development of the mesocortical dopamine pathway and behavioral outputs that involve this neural circuitry. PMID:27419218

  13. Chronic intrastriatal dopamine infusions in rats with unilateral lesions of the substantia nigra

    SciTech Connect

    Hargraves, R.; Freed, W.J.

    1987-03-09

    This study examined the effects of continuously supplied dopamine delivered directly into the dopamine-deficient striatum. Rats received unilateral lesions of the substantia nigra by stereotaxic administration of 6-hydroxydopamine and were tested for apomorphine-induced rotational behavior and general activity. Osmotic mini-pumps were filled with dopamine in various concentrations, implanted subcutaneously and connected to a cannula implanted directly into the striatum. The system delivered solution at a rate of .5 ..mu..l/hr for two weeks. Dopamine in a dosage of 0.5 ..mu..g/per hour reduced apomorphine-induced rotational behavior by a mean of 52 +/- 5.8% (mean +/- SEM n=20) with a maximal individual decrease of 99%. There was no change in general activity or increase in stereotype behavior. Infusions of vehicle solutions did not decrease rotational behavior. Spread of the infused dopamine and its metabolites was estimated by adding /sup 3/H-dopamine to the pumps in tracer quantities. Radioactivity was highly concentrated at the infusion site and decreased rapidly within a few mm from the infusion site. Continuous infusion methods may eventually prove to be effective in the treatment of nigro-striatal degenerative disease. 12 references, 4 figures.

  14. Antiferroptotic activity of non-oxidative dopamine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ding; Peng, Yingpeng; Xie, Yangchun; Zhou, Borong; Sun, Xiaofang; Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin

    2016-11-25

    Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that has many functions in the nervous and immune systems. Ferroptosis is a non-apoptotic form of regulated cell death that is involved in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the role of dopamine in ferroptosis remains unidentified. Here, we show that the non-oxidative form of dopamine is a strong inhibitor of ferroptotic cell death. Dopamine dose-dependently blocked ferroptosis in cancer (PANC1 and HEY) and non-cancer (MEF and HEK293) cells following treatment with erastin, a small molecule ferroptosis inducer. Notably, dopamine reduced erastin-induced ferrous iron accumulation, glutathione depletion, and malondialdehyde production. Mechanically, dopamine increased the protein stability of glutathione peroxidase 4, a phospholipid hydroperoxidase that protects cells against membrane lipid peroxidation. Moreover, dopamine suppressed dopamine receptor D4 protein degradation and promoted dopamine receptor D5 gene expression. Thus, our findings uncover a novel function of dopamine in cell death and provide new insight into the regulation of iron metabolism and lipid peroxidation by neurotransmitters.

  15. Direct inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel by dopamine and (+)-SKF38393.

    PubMed

    Castro, N G; de Mello, M C; de Mello, F G; Aracava, Y

    1999-04-01

    1. Dopamine is known to modulate glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the retina and in several brain regions by activating specific G-protein-coupled receptors. We have examined the possibility of a different type of mechanism for this modulation, one involving direct interaction of dopamine with ionotropic glutamate receptors. 2. Ionic currents induced by fast application of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) were recorded under whole-cell patch-clamp in cultured striatal, thalamic and hippocampal neurons of the rat and in retinal neurons of the chick. Dopamine at concentrations above 100 microM inhibited the NMDA response in all four neuron types, exhibiting an IC50 of 1.2 mM in hippocampal neurons. The time course of this inhibition was fast, developing in less than 100 ms. 3. The D1 receptor agonist (+)-SKF38393 mimicked the effect of dopamine, with an IC50 of 58.9 microM on the NMDA response, while the enantiomer (-)-SKF38393 was ineffective at 50 microM. However, the D1 antagonist R(+)-SCH23390 did not prevent the inhibitory effect of (+)-SKF38393. 4. The degree of inhibition by dopamine and (+)-SKF38393 depended on transmembrane voltage, increasing 2.7 times with a hyperpolarization of about 80 mV. The voltage-dependent block by dopamine was also observed in the presence of MgCl2 1 mM. 5. Single-channel recordings showed that the open times of NMDA-gated channels were shortened by (+)-SKF38393. 6. These data suggested that the site to which the drugs bound to produce the inhibitory effect was distinct from the classical D1-type dopamine receptor sites, possibly being located inside the NMDA channel pore. It is concluded that dopamine and (+)-SKF38393 are NMDA channel ligands.

  16. Direct inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel by dopamine and (+)-SKF38393

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Newton G; de Mello, Maria Christina F; de Mello, Fernando G; Aracava, Yasco

    1999-01-01

    Dopamine is known to modulate glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the retina and in several brain regions by activating specific G-protein-coupled receptors. We have examined the possibility of a different type of mechanism for this modulation, one involving direct interaction of dopamine with ionotropic glutamate receptors.Ionic currents induced by fast application of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) were recorded under whole-cell patch-clamp in cultured striatal, thalamic and hippocampal neurons of the rat and in retinal neurons of the chick. Dopamine at concentrations above 100 μM inhibited the NMDA response in all four neuron types, exhibiting an IC50 of 1.2 mM in hippocampal neurons. The time course of this inhibition was fast, developing in less than 100 ms.The D1 receptor agonist (+)-SKF38393 mimicked the effect of dopamine, with an IC50 of 58.9 μM on the NMDA response, while the enantiomer (−)-SKF38393 was ineffective at 50 μM. However, the D1 antagonist R(+)-SCH23390 did not prevent the inhibitory effect of (+)-SKF38393.The degree of inhibition by dopamine and (+)-SKF38393 depended on transmembrane voltage, increasing 2.7 times with a hyperpolarization of about 80 mV. The voltage-dependent block by dopamine was also observed in the presence of MgCl2 1 mM.Single-channel recordings showed that the open times of NMDA-gated channels were shortened by (+)-SKF38393.These data suggested that the site to which the drugs bound to produce the inhibitory effect was distinct from the classical D1-type dopamine receptor sites, possibly being located inside the NMDA channel pore. It is concluded that dopamine and (+)-SKF38393 are NMDA channel ligands. PMID:10372829

  17. In vivo comparison of norepinephrine and dopamine release in rat brain by simultaneous measurements with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinwoo; Takmakov, Pavel; Wightman, R Mark

    2011-12-01

    Brain norepinephrine and dopamine regulate a variety of critical behaviors such as stress, learning, memory, and drug addiction. In this study, we demonstrate differences in the regulation of in vivo neurotransmission for dopamine in the anterior nucleus accumbens (NAc) and norepinephrine in the ventral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (vBNST) of the anesthetized rat. Release of the two catecholamines was measured simultaneously using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry at two different carbon-fiber microelectrodes, each implanted in the brain region of interest. Simultaneous dopamine and norepinephrine release was evoked by electrical stimulation of a region where the ventral noradrenergic bundle, the pathway of noradrenergic neurons, courses through the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra, the origin of dopaminergic cell bodies. The release and uptake of norepinephrine in the vBNST were both significantly slower than for dopamine in the NAc. Pharmacological manipulations in the same animal demonstrated that the two catecholamines are differently regulated. The combination of a dopamine autoreceptor antagonist and amphetamine significantly increased basal extracellular dopamine whereas a norepinephrine autoreceptor antagonist and amphetamine did not change basal norepinephrine concentration. α-Methyl-p-tyrosine, a tyrosine hydroxylase inhibitor, decreased electrically evoked dopamine release faster than norepinephrine. The dual-microelectrode fast-scan cyclic voltammetry technique along with anatomical and pharmacological evidence confirms that dopamine in the NAc and norepinephrine in the vBNST can be monitored selectively and simultaneously in the same animal. The high temporal and spatial resolution of the technique enabled us to examine differences in the dynamics of extracellular norepinephrine and dopamine concurrently in two different limbic structures.

  18. Comparison of three high affinity SPECT radiotracers for the dopamine D2 receptor.

    PubMed

    al-Tikriti, M S; Baldwin, R M; Zea-Ponce, Y; Sybirska, E; Zoghbi, S S; Laruelle, M; Malison, R T; Kung, H F; Kessler, R M; Charney, D S

    1994-02-01

    The regional brain distribution and pharmacological specificity of three high affinity tracers for the dopamine (DA) D2 receptor: [123I]IBF, [123I]epidepride, and [123I]2'-ISP were assessed by SPECT imaging of non-human primates. The ratios of striatal-to-occipital activities at the time of peak striatal uptake were 2.2, 6.3 and 1.7, respectively. From the peak striatal activities, washout rates were 33, 4 and 16%/h for [123I]IBF, [123I]epidepride and [123I]2'-ISP, respectively. The reversibility of the striatal uptake of all three agents was demonstrated by the rapid displacement induced by the dopamine D2 selective antipsychotic agent raclopride, which increased washout rates to 96, 58 and 43%/h. The administration of d-amphetamine, which induces release of dopamine, had no noticeable effect on [123I]epidepride but increased the washout rate of [123I]IBF. These results suggest that, among these three agents, [123I]epidepride is the superior tracer for in vivo displacement studies because of its slow washout and high target-to-background ratios. However, for tracer kinetic modeling, [123I]IBF may be the superior agent because of its early time of peak uptake and its higher target-to-background ratios than [123I]2'-ISP.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Dopamine beta (β)-hydroxylase deficiency is a condition that ...

  20. Greater Ethanol-Induced Locomotor Activation in DBA/2J versus C57BL/6J Mice Is Not Predicted by Presynaptic Striatal Dopamine Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jamie H.; Calipari, Erin S.; Mathews, Tiffany A.; Jones, Sara R.

    2013-01-01

    A large body of research has aimed to determine the neurochemical factors driving differential sensitivity to ethanol between individuals in an attempt to find predictors of ethanol abuse vulnerability. Here we find that the locomotor activating effects of ethanol are markedly greater in DBA/2J compared to C57BL/6J mice, although it is unclear as to what neurochemical differences between strains mediate this behavior. Dopamine elevations in the nucleus accumbens and caudate-putamen regulate locomotor behavior for most drugs, including ethanol; thus, we aimed to determine if differences in these regions predict strain differences in ethanol-induced locomotor activity. Previous studies suggest that ethanol interacts with the dopamine transporter, potentially mediating its locomotor activating effects; however, we found that ethanol had no effects on dopamine uptake in either strain. Ex vivo voltammetry allows for the determination of ethanol effects on presynaptic dopamine terminals, independent of drug-induced changes in firing rates of afferent inputs from either dopamine neurons or other neurotransmitter systems. However, differences in striatal dopamine dynamics did not predict the locomotor-activating effects of ethanol, since the inhibitory effects of ethanol on dopamine release were similar between strains. There were differences in presynaptic dopamine function between strains, with faster dopamine clearance in the caudate-putamen of DBA/2J mice; however, it is unclear how this difference relates to locomotor behavior. Because of the role of the dopamine system in reinforcement and reward learning, differences in dopamine signaling between the strains could have implications for addiction-related behaviors that extend beyond ethanol effects in the striatum. PMID:24349553

  1. Methylphenidate elevates resting dopamine which lowers the impulse-triggered release of dopamine: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Philip; Madras, Bertha

    2002-03-10

    How do 'stimulants' reduce hyperactivity in children and adults? How can drugs which raise extracellular dopamine result in psychomotor slowing of hyperactive children when dopamine is known to enhance motor activity, such as in Parkinson's disease? In summary, the hypothesis for the anti-hyperactivity effects of the stimulants is as follows: during normal nerve activity, extracellular dopamine levels transiently rise 60-fold. At low therapeutic doses (0.2-0.5 mg/kg) to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, stimulant drugs such as methylphenidate and dextroamphetamine reduce locomotion in both humans and animals. The drugs raise resting extracellular levels of dopamine several-fold, but reduce the extent to which dopamine is released with nerve impulses, compared to the impulse-associated release in the absence of the drug. This relatively reduced amplitude of impulse-associated dopamine would result in less activation of post-synaptic dopamine receptors which drive psychomotor activity. At higher doses, stimulants produce generalized stimulation of the nervous system, as a result of the very high concentrations of extracellular dopamine at rest, and the markedly increased release of dopamine with nerve impulses. These high levels of resting and pulsatile dopamine cause widespread stimulation of post-synaptic dopamine receptors, overcoming any concomitant presynaptic inhibition of dopamine release.

  2. Dopamine receptors – IUPHAR Review 13

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Jean-Martin; Espinoza, Stefano; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-01-01

    The variety of physiological functions controlled by dopamine in the brain and periphery is mediated by the D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5 dopamine GPCRs. Drugs acting on dopamine receptors are significant tools for the management of several neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and Parkinson's disease. Recent investigations of dopamine receptor signalling have shown that dopamine receptors, apart from their canonical action on cAMP-mediated signalling, can regulate a myriad of cellular responses to fine-tune the expression of dopamine-associated behaviours and functions. Such signalling mechanisms may involve alternate G protein coupling or non-G protein mechanisms involving ion channels, receptor tyrosine kinases or proteins such as β-arrestins that are classically involved in GPCR desensitization. Another level of complexity is the growing appreciation of the physiological roles played by dopamine receptor heteromers. Applications of new in vivo techniques have significantly furthered the understanding of the physiological functions played by dopamine receptors. Here we provide an update of the current knowledge regarding the complex biology, signalling, physiology and pharmacology of dopamine receptors. PMID:25671228

  3. Grafted dopamine neurons: Morphology, neurochemistry, and electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Strömberg, Ingrid; Bickford, Paula; Gerhardt, Greg A

    2010-02-09

    Grafting of dopamine-rich tissue to counteract the symptoms in Parkinson's disease became a promising tool for future treatment. This article discusses how to improve the functional outcome with respect to graft outgrowth and functions of dopamine release and electrophysiological responses to graft implantation in the host brain striatal target. It has been documented that a subpopulation of the dopamine neurons innervates the host brain in a target-specific manner, while some of the grafted dopamine neurons never project to the host striatum. Neurochemical studies have demonstrated that the graft-induced outgrowth synthesize, store, metabolize and release dopamine and possibly other neurotransmitters such as 5-HT. Furthermore, the released dopamine affects the dopamine-depleted brain in areas that are larger than the graft-derived nerve fibers reach. While stem cells will most likely be the future source of cells to be used in grafting, it is important to find the guiding cues for how to reinnervate the dopamine-depleted striatum in a proper way with respect to the dopamine subpopulations of A9 and A10 to efficiently treat the motor abnormalities seen in Parkinson's disease.

  4. Mesolimbic Dopamine Signals the Value of Work

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Arif A.; Pettibone, Jeffrey R.; Mabrouk, Omar S.; Hetrick, Vaughn L.; Schmidt, Robert; Vander Weele, Caitlin M.; Kennedy, Robert T.; Aragona, Brandon J.; Berke, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine cell firing can encode errors in reward prediction, providing a learning signal to guide future behavior. Yet dopamine is also a key modulator of motivation, invigorating current behavior. Existing theories propose that fast (“phasic”) dopamine fluctuations support learning, while much slower (“tonic”) dopamine changes are involved in motivation. We examined dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens across multiple time scales, using complementary microdialysis and voltammetric methods during adaptive decision-making. We first show that minute-by-minute dopamine levels covary with reward rate and motivational vigor. We then show that second-by-second dopamine release encodes an estimate of temporally-discounted future reward (a value function). We demonstrate that changing dopamine immediately alters willingness to work, and reinforces preceding action choices by encoding temporal-difference reward prediction errors. Our results indicate that dopamine conveys a single, rapidly-evolving decision variable, the available reward for investment of effort, that is employed for both learning and motivational functions. PMID:26595651

  5. Characterization of alternate reductant binding and electron transfer in the dopamine. beta. -monooxygenase reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, L.C.; Klinman, J.P.

    1987-08-25

    The steady-state limiting kinetic parameters V/sub max/, V/K/sub DA/, and V/K/sub O/sub 2//, together with deuterium isotope effects on these parameters, have been determined for the dopamine ..beta..-monooxygenase (D..beta..M) reaction in the presence of structurally distinct reductants. The results show the one-electron reductant ferrocyanide to be nearly as kinetically competent as the presumed in vivo reductant ascrobate. Further, a reductant system of ferricyanide plus substrate dopamine yields steady-state kinetic parameters and isotope effects very similar to those measured solely in the presence of ferrocyanide, indicating a role for catecholamine in the rapid recycling of oxidized ferrocyanide. Use of substrate dopamine as the sole reductant is found to lead to a highly unusual kinetic independence of oxygen concentration, as well as significantly reduced values of V/sub max/ and V/K/sub DA/, and the authors conclude that dopamine reduces enzymic copper in a rate-limiting step that is 40-fold slower than with ascorbate. The near-identical kinetic parameters measured in the presence of either ascorbate or ferrocyanide, together with markedly reduced rates with dopamine, are interpreted in terms of a binding site for reductant that is physically distinct from the substrate binding site. This view is supported by molecular modeling, which reveals ascorbate and ferrocyanide to possess an unexpected similarity in potential sites for interaction with enzymic residues. With regard to electron flux, identical values of V/K/sub O/sub 2// have been measured with (2,2-/sup 2/H/sub 2/)dopamine as substrate both in the presence and in the absence of added ascorbate. This key result unambiguously rules out an entry of electrons to enzyme forms leading from the enzyme-dopamine complex to enzyme-bound product and, hence, reaction mechanisms involving a reductive activation of the putative Cu(II)-OOH prior to substrate hydroxylation.

  6. Differential Influence of Dopamine Transport Rate on the Potencies of Cocaine, Amphetamine, and Methylphenidate

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine transporter (DAT) levels vary across brain regions and individuals, and are altered by drug history and disease states; however, the impact of altered DAT expression on psychostimulant effects in brain has not been systematically explored. Using fast scan cyclic voltammetry, we measured the effects of elevated DAT levels on presynaptic dopamine parameters as well as the uptake inhibition potency of the blockers cocaine and methylphenidate (MPH) and the releaser amphetamine (AMPH) in the nucleus accumbens core. Here we found that increases in DAT levels, resulting from either genetic overexpression or MPH self-administration, caused markedly increased maximal rates of uptake (Vmax) that were positively correlated with the uptake inhibition potency of AMPH and MPH, but not cocaine. AMPH and MPH were particularly sensitive to DAT changes, with a 100% increase in Vmax resulting in a 200% increase in potency. The relationship between Vmax and MPH potency was the same as that for AMPH, but was different from that for cocaine, indicating that MPH more closely resembles a releaser with regard to uptake inhibition. Conversely, the effects of MPH on stimulated dopamine release were similar to those of cocaine, with inverted U-shaped increases in release over a concentration–response curve. This was strikingly different from the release profile of AMPH, which showed only reductions at high concentrations, indicating that MPH is not a pure releaser. These data indicate that although MPH is a DAT blocker, its uptake-inhibitory actions are affected by DAT changes in a similar manner to releasers. Together, these data show that fluctuations in DAT levels alter the potency of releasers and MPH but not blockers and suggest an integral role of the DAT in the addictive potential of AMPH and related compounds. PMID:25474655

  7. Identification of D/sub 1/-like dopamine receptors on human blood platelets

    SciTech Connect

    De Keyser, J.; De Waele, M.; Convents, A.; Ebinger, G.; Vauquelin, G.

    1988-01-01

    Dopamine is able to inhibit the epinephrine-induced aggregation of human blood platelets, but the mechanism of action has not been elucidated. In this study the authors report that membranes from human blood platelets possess high affinity, saturable and stereoselective binding sites for the D/sub 1/ dopamine receptor antagonist (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390. (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 appeared to label a single class of binding sites with a B/sub max/ of 18.6 +- 1.6 fmolmg protein and a K/sub D/ of 0.8 nM. The potencies of different dopaminergic antagonists and agonists in displacing (/sup 3/H)SCH 23390 from blood platelet membranes were similar to those obtained for striatal membranes. Unlike the classically defined D/sub 1/ receptors, e.g. those in striatum, the D/sub 1/ receptor sites on platelets appeared no to be coupled to the adenylate cyclase system, hence the term D/sub 1/-like. The D/sub 1/ agonist SKF 38393 was more potent than dopamine in inhibiting platelet aggregation induced by epinephrine, and the effects of dopamine and SKF 38393 were prevented by SCH 23390. These results suggest that the inhibitory action of dopamine on the epinephrine-induced platelet aggregation is mediated through these D/sub 1/-like receptors

  8. Effects of the monoamine uptake inhibitors RTI-112 and RTI-113 on cocaine- and food-maintained responding in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Negus, S S; Mello, N K; Kimmel, H L; Howell, L L; Carroll, F I

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine blocks uptake of the monoamines dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine, and monoamine uptake inhibitors constitute one class of drugs under consideration as candidate "agonist" medications for the treatment of cocaine abuse and dependence. The pharmacological selectivity of monoamine uptake inhibitors to block uptake of dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine is one factor that may influence the efficacy and/or safety of these compounds as drug abuse treatment medications. To address this issue, the present study compared the effects of 7-day treatment with a non-selective monoamine uptake inhibitor (RTI-112) and a dopamine-selective uptake inhibitor (RTI-113) on cocaine- and food-maintained responding in rhesus monkeys. Monkeys (N=3) were trained to respond for cocaine injections (0.01 mg/kg/inj) and food pellets under a second-order schedule [FR2(VR16:S)] during alternating daily components of cocaine and food availability. Both RTI-112 (0.0032-0.01 mg/kg/hr) and RTI-113 (0.01-0.056 mg/kg/h) produced dose-dependent, sustained and nearly complete elimination of cocaine self-administration. However, for both drugs, the potency to reduce cocaine self-administration was similar to the potency to reduce food-maintained responding. These findings do not support the hypothesis that pharmacological selectivity to block dopamine uptake is associated with behavioral selectivity to decrease cocaine- vs. food-maintained responding in rhesus monkeys.

  9. Dopamine D2High receptors measured ex vivo are elevated in amphetamine-sensitized animals.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Philip

    2009-03-01

    Although dopamine supersensitivity is a fundamental aspect of diseases such as schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease, the molecular basis of dopamine supersensitivity is not known. Because behavioral dopamine supersensitivity is associated with a marked elevation of striatal dopamine D2(High) receptors in vitro, it is important to develop methods to measure D2(High) receptors in vivo. The present ex vivo study found that the dopamine agonist NPA ([-]-N-propyl-norapomorphine) inhibited the binding of the agonist [(3)H](+)PHNO to rat striatal D2 receptors significantly more than the D2 antagonist [(3)H]raclopride, when NPA was coinjected i.v. with each radioligand. These results suggest that the greater sensitivity of [(3)H](+)PHNO to inhibition by the coinjected NPA reflects in vivo competition at D2(High) receptors. Using rats that had been sensitized to amphetamine, this ex vivo method found that the specific binding of [(3)H](+)PHNO that was displaced by 10 microg/kg of NPA was 2.4-fold higher than that for control rats. These data agree with in vitro data showing a marked increase in D2(High) sites after amphetamine sensitization. Therefore, it is recommended that this method of co-injecting the D2 radioligand and the dopamine agonist displacer be used in human positron tomography to detect D2(High) receptors in health and disease.

  10. False labelling of dopaminergic terminals in the rabbit caudate nucleus: uptake and release of [3H]-5-hydroxytryptamine.

    PubMed Central

    Feuerstein, T. J.; Hertting, G.; Lupp, A.; Neufang, B.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of the catecholamine uptake inhibitor nomifensine and of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) uptake blocker 6-nitroquipazine on the accumulation of [3H]-5-HT (0.1 microM, 60 min incubation) and [3H]-dopamine (0.1 microM, 30 min incubation) into slices of hippocampus and caudate nucleus of the rabbit was investigated. In addition, the influence of nomifensine on the electrically evoked [3H]-5-HT release from caudate nucleus slices and of nomifensine and 6-nitroquipazine on [3H]-5-HT released from caudate nucleus slices was analysed. In hippocampal slices, which contain practically no dopaminergic but densely distributed 5-hydroxytryptaminergic and noradrenergic nerve terminals (ratio of dopamine:5-HT:noradrenaline about 1:30:25), nomifensine (1, 10 microM) did not affect the accumulation of [3H]-5-HT; 6-nitroquipazine (1 microM) reduced [3H]-5-HT uptake to about 35% of controls. In the caudate nucleus, however, where dopamine is the predominant monoamine (ratio of dopamine:5-HT:noradrenaline about 400:25:15) nomifensine (1, 10 microM) reduced the tritium accumulation to 65% whereas 6-nitroquipazine (1 microM) was ineffective. The combination of both drugs (1 microM each) led to a further decrease to about 15%. The uptake of [3H]-dopamine into hippocampal slices was blocked by both nomifensine (1 microM) and 6-nitroquipazine (1 microM) whereas in caudate nucleus slices only nomifensine (1, 10 microM) reduced the accumulation of [3H]-dopamine. The combination of both drugs was not more effective than nomifensine alone. The different effects of both uptake inhibitors in the hippocampus and caudate nucleus suggest a neurone specific rather than a substrate specific mode of action.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3742155

  11. Taurine infused intrastriatally elevates, but intranigrally decreases striatal extracellular dopamine concentration in anaesthetised rats.

    PubMed

    Ruotsalainen, M; Heikkilä, M; Lillsunde, P; Seppälä, T; Ahtee, L

    1996-01-01

    In the present study we infused taurine (50, 150 or 450 mM, 2 microliters/min for 4h) into the dorsal striatum or into the substantia nigra via microdialysis probe and estimated the extracellular concentrations of dopamine and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), in the dorsal striatum of anaesthetised rats. Intrastriatal infusion of taurine elevated striatal dopamine at all concentrations studied. At the 450 mM concentration taurine elevated the extracellular dopamine 10-fold, but only in the first 30 min sample after starting the taurine infusion. At 50 and 150 mM taurine elevated dopamine throughout the 4h infusion maximally up to 3-4-fold the control level. Extracellular DOPAC was increased by 150 and 450 mM taurine (up to about 150-160% of the control level), whereas at all three concentrations taurine decreased HVA to about 85% of the control; however, the decrease caused by 450 mM taurine was short-lasting. At all three concentrations taurine infused into the substantia nigra decreased the extracellular dopamine in the ipsilateral striatum to about 40-50% of the control, and increased extracellular DOPAC and HVA maximally to about 150% and 170% of the control, respectively. These results show that the effects of taurine on the concentrations of extracellular dopamine and its metabolites depend on its administration site on nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. It elevates the extracellular dopamine when given into the striatum, but when given into the cell body region of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway it decreases the extracellular dopamine in the ipsilateral striatum.

  12. Measurement in vivo of dopamine receptor density I: Effect of endogenous dopamine on spiroperidol binding

    SciTech Connect

    De Jesus, O.T.; Van Moffaert, G.J.C.; Friedman, A.M.; Dinerstein, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    Non-invasive localization of brain dopamine (DA) receptors has been achieved by us and others using gamma emitting derivatives of the DA antagonist spiroperidol (SP). To accurately characterize this localization, the authors have previously described an equilibrium binding model involving SP and DA for a single DA receptor. It is the purpose of this study to establish experimentally the significance of endogenous DA on the ability of SP to bind a group of DA receptors. Several mice were administered different doses of SP. To one group of mice L-dopa was given with peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor, RO-4-4602, in order to elevate brain DA levels while a separate group served as control. /sup 3/H-SP binding and DA levels were measured in each brain sample. The results reflect a significant competition between DA and SP for caudate DA binding sites.

  13. Synapsins Differentially Control Dopamine and Serotonin Release

    PubMed Central

    Kile, Brian M.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Venton, B. Jill; Wetsel, William C.; Augustine, George J.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2010-01-01

    Synapsins are a family of synaptic vesicle proteins that are important for neurotransmitter release. Here we have used triple knockout (TKO) mice lacking all three synapsin genes to determine the roles of synapsins in the release of two monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin. Serotonin release evoked by electrical stimulation was identical in substantia nigra pars reticulata slices prepared from TKO and wild-type mice. In contrast, release of dopamine in response to electrical stimulation was approximately doubled in striatum of TKO mice, both in vivo and in striatal slices, in comparison to wild-type controls. This was due to loss of synapsin III, because deletion of synapsin III alone was sufficient to increase dopamine release. Deletion of synapsins also increased the sensitivity of dopamine release to extracellular calcium ions. Although cocaine did not affect the release of serotonin from nigral tissue, this drug did enhance dopamine release. Cocaine-induced facilitation of dopamine release was a function of external calcium, an effect that was reduced in TKO mice. We conclude that synapsins play different roles in the control of release of dopamine and serotonin, with release of dopamine being negatively regulated by synapsins, specifically synapsin III, while serotonin release appears to be relatively independent of synapsins. These results provide further support for the concept that synapsin function in presynaptic terminals varies according to the neurotransmitter being released. PMID:20660258

  14. Going for broke: dopamine influences risky choice.

    PubMed

    Moschak, Travis M; Carelli, Regina M

    2014-10-01

    Dopamine neurons track reward by increasing or decreasing their firing rate when a reward is present or absent. In this issue of Neuron, Stopper et al. (2014) demonstrate that artificially eliminating these dopamine bursts or dips can alter risky decision-making.

  15. Glutamate-evoked release of endogenous brain dopamine: inhibition by an excitatory amino acid antagonist and an enkephalin analogue.

    PubMed Central

    Jhamandas, K.; Marien, M.

    1987-01-01

    The present study examined the effect of a selective delta-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala2-D-Leu5] enkephalin (DADL) on the spontaneous and the L-glutamic acid (L-Glu)-evoked release of endogenous dopamine from superfused slices of rat caudate-putamen. The amount of dopamine in slice superfusates was measured by a sensitive method employing high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (h.p.l.c.-e.d.) after a two-step separation procedure. The spontaneous release of endogenous dopamine was partially dependent on Ca2+, enhanced in Mg2+-free superfusion medium, partially reduced by tetrodotoxin (TTX, 0.3 microM), partially reduced by the putative excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid (DL-APH, 1 mM), and increased 10 fold by the dopamine uptake blocker, nomifensine (10 microM). DADL (5 and 50 nM) did not significantly affect spontaneous dopamine release. L-Glu (0.1-10 mM) produced a concentration-dependent release of endogenous dopamine from slices of caudate-putamen. This effect was Ca2+-dependent, strongly inhibited by 1.2 mM Mg2+, attenuated by DL-APH (1 mM), attenuated by TTX (0.3 microM), and enhanced by nomifensine (10 microM). In the presence of nomifensine DADL (50 nM) reduced significantly the L-Glu-evoked release of endogenous dopamine by 20%. The inhibitory effect of DADL was blocked by 10 microM naloxone. These results indicate that L-Glu stimulates the Ca2+-dependent release of endogenous dopamine in the caudate-putamen by activation of N-methy-D-aspartate-type of excitatory amino acid receptors. This release can be selectively modified by the delta-opioid agonist DADL in a naloxone-sensitive manner. PMID:2884003

  16. Acute and sustained effects of methylphenidate on cognition and presynaptic dopamine metabolism: an [18F]FDOPA PET study.

    PubMed

    Schabram, Ina; Henkel, Karsten; Mohammadkhani Shali, Siamak; Dietrich, Claudia; Schmaljohann, Jörn; Winz, Oliver; Prinz, Susanne; Rademacher, Lena; Neumaier, Bernd; Felzen, Marc; Kumakura, Yoshitaka; Cumming, Paul; Mottaghy, Felix M; Gründer, Gerhard; Vernaleken, Ingo

    2014-10-29

    Methylphenidate (MPH) inhibits the reuptake of dopamine and noradrenaline. PET studies with MPH challenge show increased competition at postsynaptic D2/3-receptors, thus indirectly revealing presynaptic dopamine release. We used [(18)F]fluorodopamine ([(18)F]FDOPA)-PET in conjunction with the inlet-outlet model (IOM) of Kumakura et al. (2007) to investigate acute and long-term changes in dopamine synthesis capacity and turnover in nigrostriatal fibers of healthy subjects with MPH challenge. Twenty healthy human females underwent two dynamic [(18)F]FDOPA PET scans (124 min; slow bolus-injection; arterial blood sampling), with one scan in untreated baseline condition and the other after MPH administration (0.5 mg/kg, p.o.), in randomized order. Subjects underwent cognitive testing at each PET session. Time activity curves were obtained for ventral putamen and caudate and were analyzed according to the IOM to obtain the regional net-uptake of [(18)F]FDOPA (K; dopamine synthesis capacity) as well as the [(18)F]fluorodopamine washout rate (kloss, index of dopamine turnover). MPH substantially decreased kloss in putamen (-22%; p = 0.003). In the reversed treatment order group (MPH/no drug), K was increased by 18% at no drug follow-up. The magnitude of K at the no drug baseline correlated with cognitive parameters. Furthermore, individual kloss changes correlated with altered cognitive performance under MPH. [(18)F]FDOPA PET in combination with the IOM detects an MPH-evoked decrease in striatal dopamine turnover, in accordance with the known acute pharmacodynamics of MPH. Furthermore, the scan-ordering effect on K suggested that a single MPH challenge persistently increased striatal dopamine synthesis capacity. Attenuation of dopamine turnover by MPH is linked to enhanced cognitive performance in healthy females.

  17. The crystal structure of human dopamine β-hydroxylase at 2.9 Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Vendelboe, Trine V; Harris, Pernille; Zhao, Yuguang; Walter, Thomas S; Harlos, Karl; El Omari, Kamel; Christensen, Hans E M

    2016-04-01

    The norepinephrine pathway is believed to modulate behavioral and physiological processes, such as mood, overall arousal, and attention. Furthermore, abnormalities in the pathway have been linked to numerous diseases, for example hypertension, depression, anxiety, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and cocaine dependence. We report the crystal structure of human dopamine β-hydroxylase, which is the enzyme converting dopamine to norepinephrine. The structure of the DOMON (dopamine β-monooxygenase N-terminal) domain, also found in >1600 other proteins, reveals a possible metal-binding site and a ligand-binding pocket. The catalytic core structure shows two different conformations: an open active site, as also seen in another member of this enzyme family [the peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating (and α-amidating) monooxygenase], and a closed active site structure, in which the two copper-binding sites are only 4 to 5 Å apart, in what might be a coupled binuclear copper site. The dimerization domain adopts a conformation that bears no resemblance to any other known protein structure. The structure provides new molecular insights into the numerous devastating disorders of both physiological and neurological origins associated with the dopamine system.

  18. The crystal structure of human dopamine β-hydroxylase at 2.9 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Vendelboe, Trine V.; Harris, Pernille; Zhao, Yuguang; Walter, Thomas S.; Harlos, Karl; El Omari, Kamel; Christensen, Hans E. M.

    2016-01-01

    The norepinephrine pathway is believed to modulate behavioral and physiological processes, such as mood, overall arousal, and attention. Furthermore, abnormalities in the pathway have been linked to numerous diseases, for example hypertension, depression, anxiety, Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and cocaine dependence. We report the crystal structure of human dopamine β-hydroxylase, which is the enzyme converting dopamine to norepinephrine. The structure of the DOMON (dopamine β-monooxygenase N-terminal) domain, also found in >1600 other proteins, reveals a possible metal-binding site and a ligand-binding pocket. The catalytic core structure shows two different conformations: an open active site, as also seen in another member of this enzyme family [the peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating (and α-amidating) monooxygenase], and a closed active site structure, in which the two copper-binding sites are only 4 to 5 Å apart, in what might be a coupled binuclear copper site. The dimerization domain adopts a conformation that bears no resemblance to any other known protein structure. The structure provides new molecular insights into the numerous devastating disorders of both physiological and neurological origins associated with the dopamine system. PMID:27152332

  19. Dopamine D5 receptor expression is unchanged in peripheral blood lymphocytes in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ricci, A; Chiandussi, L; Schena, M; Schiavone, D; Veglio, F; Amenta, F

    1995-11-01

    The present study was designed to investigate possible changes in the expression of lymphocyte dopamine receptor in essential hypertension. The expression of dopamine D5 receptor was evaluated by radioligand binding techniques using [3H]-SCH 23390 as ligand. Plasma catecholamines, aldosterone levels and plasma renin activity were also measured. Eleven borderline hypertensive patients, 15 patient with the mild essential hypertension, 7 patients with moderate essential hypertension and 5 patients with severe essential hypertension were examined. Plasma catecholamine levels were assayed by high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Dopamine D5 receptor was measured by radioligand binding techniques. Plasma aldosterone levels and renin activity were determined by radio immunoassay. [3H]-SCH 23390 was specifically bound to human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The binding was time-, temperature- and concentration-dependent with a dissociation constant (Kd) value of 0.59 nM and a maximum density of binding sites (Bmax) of 223 pmol/10(6) cells. Dopamine competed with [3H]-SCH 23390 binding in the submicromolar range suggesting the labelling of a dopamine D5 receptor. No changes in the density of [3H]-SCH 23390 binding sites were observed in human peripheral blood lymphocytes between essential hypertensive patients and normotensive subjects. Also catecholamines, plasma renin activity and aldosterone levels were unchanged. In spite of the availability of a sensitive technique for measuring dopamine receptors in human peripheral lymphocytes, no change in their expression was noticeable in essential hypertension. This suggests that dopamine receptor analysis in essential hypertension is not a useful marker for investigating hypertension-dependent changes of the peripheral dopaminergic system.

  20. Metabolic hormones, dopamine circuits, and feeding

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Nandakumar S.; Guarnieri, Douglas J.; DiLeone, Ralph J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence has emerged demonstrating that metabolic hormones such as ghrelin and leptin can act on ventral tegmental area (VTA) midbrain dopamine neurons to influence feeding. The VTA is the origin of mesolimbic dopamine neurons that project to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) to influence behavior. While blockade of dopamine via systemic antagonists or targeted gene delete can impair food intake, local NAc dopamine manipulations have little effect on food intake. Notably, non-dopaminergic manipulations in the VTA and NAc produce more consistent effects on feeding and food choice. More recent genetic evidence supports a role for the substantia nigra-striatal dopamine pathways in food intake, while the VTA-NAc circuit is more likely involved in higher-order aspects of food acquisition, such as motivation and cue associations. This rich and complex literature should be considered in models of how peripheral hormones influence feeding behavior via action on the midbrain circuits. PMID:19836414

  1. Dopamine transporter mutant animals: a translational perspective

    PubMed Central

    Efimova, Evgenia V.; Gainetdinov, Raul R.; Budygin, Evgeny A.; Sotnikova, Tatiana D.

    2016-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) plays an important homeostatic role in the control of both the extracellular and intraneuronal concentrations of dopamine, thereby providing effective control over activity of dopaminergic transmission. Since brain dopamine is known to be involved in numerous neuropsychiatric disorders, investigations using mice with genetically altered DAT function and thus intensity of dopamine-mediated signaling have provided numerous insights into the pathology of these disorders and highlight novel pathological mechanisms that could be targeted to provide new therapeutic approaches for these disorders. In this brief overview we discuss recent investigations involving animals with genetically altered DAT function, particularly focusing on translational studies providing new insights into pathology and pharmacology of dopamine-related disorders. Perspective applications of these and newly developed models of DAT dysfunction are also discussed. PMID:27276191

  2. Iron, melanin and dopamine interaction: relevance to Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shachar, D; Youdim, M B

    1993-01-01

    1. Interaction between iron and melanin may provide a reasonable explanation for the vulnerability of the melanin containing dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) to neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). 2. Scatchard analysis of the binding of iron to synthetic dopamine melanin revealed a high-affinity (KD = 13 nM) and a lower affinity (KD = 200 nM) binding sites. 3. The binding of iron to melanin is dependent on the concentration of melanin and on pH. 4. Iron chelators, U74500A, desferrioxamine and to a lesser extent 1,10-phenanthroline and chlorpromazine could displace iron from melanin. In contrast, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and its metabolite 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium (MPP+), which cause Parkinsonism, were unable to displace iron. 5. Melanin alone reduced lipid peroxidation in rat cortical membrane preparations. However, iron induced lipid peroxidation, which could be inhibited by desferrioxamine, was potentiated by melanin. 6. Iron bound to neuromelanin in melanized dopamine neurons was detected only in parkinsonian brains and not in controls. The interaction of iron with neuromelanin as identified by x-ray defraction technique was identical to iron interaction with synthetic dopamine melanin. 7. In the absence of an identified exogenous or endogenous neurotoxin in idiopathic Parkinson's disease, iron-melanin interaction in the SN may serve as a candidate for the oxygen-radical induced neurodegeneration of the melanin containing dopaminergic neurons.

  3. Dopamine agonist therapy in hyperprolactinemia.

    PubMed

    Webster, J

    1999-12-01

    Introduction of the dopamine agonist bromocriptine heralded a major advance in the management of hyperprolactinemic disorders. Although its side effects of nausea, dizziness and headache and its short elimination half-life are limiting factors, its efficacy established it as a reference compound against the activity of which several dopamine agonists, like pergolide, lysuride, metergoline, terguride and dihydroergocristine, fell by the wayside. More recently, two new agents, cabergoline and quinagolide, have been introduced and appear to offer considerable advantages over bromocriptine. Cabergoline, an ergoline D2 agonist, has a long plasma half-life that enables once- or twice-weekly administration. Quinagolide, in contrast, is a nonergot D2 agonist with an elimination half-life intermediate between those of bromocriptine and cabergoline, allowing the drug to be administered once daily. Comparative studies indicate that cabergoline is clearly superior to bromocriptine in efficacy (prolactin suppression, restoration of gonadal function) and in tolerability. In similar studies, quinagolide appeared to have similar efficacy and superior tolerability to that of bromocriptine. Results of a small crossover study indicate that cabergoline is better tolerated, with a trend toward activity superior to that of quinagolide. In hyperprolactinemic men and in women not seeking to become pregnant, cabergoline may be regarded as the treatment of choice.

  4. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    MedlinePlus

    ... procedures within the last two months that used iodine-based contrast material. Your doctor will instruct you ... a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is also known as a ...

  5. Thyroid Scan and Uptake

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... A thyroid scan is a type of nuclear medicine imaging. The radioactive iodine uptake test (RAIU) is ... thyroid function, but does not involve imaging. Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses ...

  6. Mechanisms of amphetamine action illuminated through optical monitoring of dopamine synaptic vesicles in Drosophila brain

    PubMed Central

    Freyberg, Zachary; Sonders, Mark S.; Aguilar, Jenny I.; Hiranita, Takato; Karam, Caline S.; Flores, Jorge; Pizzo, Andrea B.; Zhang, Yuchao; Farino, Zachary J.; Chen, Audrey; Martin, Ciara A.; Kopajtic, Theresa A.; Fei, Hao; Hu, Gang; Lin, Yi-Ying; Mosharov, Eugene V.; McCabe, Brian D.; Freyberg, Robin; Wimalasena, Kandatege; Hsin, Ling-Wei; Sames, Dalibor; Krantz, David E.; Katz, Jonathan L.; Sulzer, David; Javitch, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Amphetamines elevate extracellular dopamine, but the underlying mechanisms remain uncertain. Here we show in rodents that acute pharmacological inhibition of the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT) blocks amphetamine-induced locomotion and self-administration without impacting cocaine-induced behaviours. To study VMAT's role in mediating amphetamine action in dopamine neurons, we have used novel genetic, pharmacological and optical approaches in Drosophila melanogaster. In an ex vivo whole-brain preparation, fluorescent reporters of vesicular cargo and of vesicular pH reveal that amphetamine redistributes vesicle contents and diminishes the vesicle pH-gradient responsible for dopamine uptake and retention. This amphetamine-induced deacidification requires VMAT function and results from net H+ antiport by VMAT out of the vesicle lumen coupled to inward amphetamine transport. Amphetamine-induced vesicle deacidification also requires functional dopamine transporter (DAT) at the plasma membrane. Thus, we find that at pharmacologically relevant concentrations, amphetamines must be actively transported by DAT and VMAT in tandem to produce psychostimulant effects. PMID:26879809

  7. Fast uptake and long-lasting binding of methamphetamine in the human brain: comparison with cocaine.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Joanna S; Volkow, Nora D; Logan, Jean; Alexoff, David; Telang, Frank; Wang, Gene-Jack; Wong, Christopher; Ma, Yeming; Kriplani, Aarti; Pradhan, Kith; Schlyer, David; Jayne, Millard; Hubbard, Barbara; Carter, Pauline; Warner, Donald; King, Payton; Shea, Colleen; Xu, Youwen; Muench, Lisa; Apelskog, Karen

    2008-12-01

    Methamphetamine is one of the most addictive and neurotoxic drugs of abuse. It produces large elevations in extracellular dopamine in the striatum through vesicular release and inhibition of the dopamine transporter. In the U.S. abuse prevalence varies by ethnicity with very low abuse among African Americans relative to Caucasians, differentiating it from cocaine where abuse rates are similar for the two groups. Here we report the first comparison of methamphetamine and cocaine pharmacokinetics in brain between Caucasians and African Americans along with the measurement of dopamine transporter availability in striatum. Methamphetamine's uptake in brain was fast (peak uptake at 9 min) with accumulation in cortical and subcortical brain regions and in white matter. Its clearance from brain was slow (except for white matter which did not clear over the 90 min) and there was no difference in pharmacokinetics between Caucasians and African Americans. In contrast cocaine's brain uptake and clearance were both fast, distribution was predominantly in striatum and uptake was higher in African Americans. Among individuals, those with the highest striatal (but not cerebellar) methamphetamine accumulation also had the highest dopamine transporter availability suggesting a relationship between METH exposure and DAT availability. Methamphetamine's fast brain uptake is consistent with its highly reinforcing effects, its slow clearance with its long-lasting behavioral effects and its widespread distribution with its neurotoxic effects that affect not only striatal but also cortical and white matter regions. The absence of significant differences between Caucasians and African Americans suggests that variables other than methamphetamine pharmacokinetics and bioavailability account for the lower abuse prevalence in African Americans.

  8. The role of dopamine in risk taking: a specific look at Parkinson’s disease and gambling

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Crystal A.; Dagher, Alain

    2014-01-01

    An influential model suggests that dopamine signals the difference between predicted and experienced reward. In this way, dopamine can act as a learning signal that can shape behaviors to maximize rewards and avoid punishments. Dopamine is also thought to invigorate reward seeking behavior. Loss of dopamine signaling is the major abnormality in Parkinson’s disease. Dopamine agonists have been implicated in the occurrence of impulse control disorders in Parkinson’s disease patients, the most common being pathological gambling, compulsive sexual behavior, and compulsive buying. Recently, a number of functional imaging studies investigating impulse control disorders in Parkinson’s disease have been published. Here we review this literature, and attempt to place it within a decision-making framework in which potential gains and losses are evaluated to arrive at optimum choices. We also provide a hypothetical but still incomplete model on the effect of dopamine agonist treatment on these value and risk assessments. Two of the main brain structures thought to be involved in computing aspects of reward and loss are the ventral striatum (VStr) and the insula, both dopamine projection sites. Both structures are consistently implicated in functional brain imaging studies of pathological gambling in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:24910600

  9. Acute dopamine depletion with branched chain amino acids decreases auditory top-down event-related potentials in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Andres H; Goldberg, Terry E; Hassoun, Youssef; Bates, John A; Nassauer, Katharine W; Sevy, Serge; Opgen-Rhein, Carolin; Malhotra, Anil K

    2009-06-01

    Cerebral dopamine homeostasis has been implicated in a wide range of cognitive processes and is of great pathophysiological importance in schizophrenia. A novel approach to study cognitive effects of dopamine is to deplete its cerebral levels with branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) that acutely lower dopamine precursor amino acid availability. Here, we studied the effects of acute dopamine depletion on early and late attentive cortical processing. Auditory event-related potential (ERP) components N2 and P3 were investigated using high-density electroencephalography in 22 healthy male subjects after receiving BCAAs or placebo in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design. Total free serum prolactin was also determined as a surrogate marker of cerebral dopamine depletion. Acute dopamine depletion increased free plasma prolactin and significantly reduced prefrontal ERP components N2 and P3. Subcomponent analysis of N2 revealed a significant attenuation of early attentive N2b over prefrontal scalp sites. As a proof of concept, these results strongly suggest that BCAAs are acting on basic information processing. Dopaminergic neurotransmission seems to be involved in auditory top-down processing as indexed by prefrontal N2 and P3 reductions during dopamine depletion. In healthy subjects, intact early cortical top-down processing can be acutely dysregulated by ingestion of BCAAs. We discuss the potential impact of these findings on schizophrenia research.

  10. Acute dopamine depletion with branched chain amino acids decreases auditory top-down event-related potentials in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Neuhaus, Andres H.; Goldberg, Terry E.; Hassoun, Youssef; Bates, John A.; Nassauer, Katharine W.; Sevy, Serge; Opgen-Rhein, Carolin; Malhotra, Anil K.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral dopamine homeostasis has been implicated in a wide range of cognitive processes and is of great pathophysiological importance in schizophrenia. A novel approach to study cognitive effects of dopamine is to deplete its cerebral levels with branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) that acutely lower dopamine precursor amino acid availability. Here, we studied the effects of acute dopamine depletion on early and late attentive cortical processing. Auditory event-related potential (ERP) components N2 and P3 were investigated using high-density electroencephalography in 22 healthy male subjects after receiving BCAAs or placebo in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design. Total free serum prolactin was also determined as a surrogate marker of cerebral dopamine depletion. Acute dopamine depletion increased free plasma prolactin and significantly reduced prefrontal ERP components N2 and P3. Subcomponent analysis of N2 revealed a significant attenuation of early attentive N2b over prefrontal scalp sites. As a proof of concept, these results strongly suggest that BCAAs are acting on basic information processing. Dopaminergic neurotransmission seems to be involved in auditory top-down processing as indexed by prefrontal N2 and P3 reductions during dopamine depletion. In healthy subjects, intact early cortical top-down processing can be acutely dysregulated by ingestion of BCAAs. We discuss the potential impact of these findings on schizophrenia research. PMID:19356906

  11. Supramolecular micelle-based nucleoapzymes for the catalytic oxidation of dopamine to aminochrome.

    PubMed

    Albada, H Bauke; de Vries, Jan Willem; Liu, Qing; Golub, Eyal; Klement, Niels; Herrmann, Andreas; Willner, Itamar

    2016-04-25

    Lipidated DNAzymes or a lipidated Cu(II)-complex and lipidated aptamer sequences form supramolecular assemblies of micellar nucleoapzymes for the enhanced oxidation of dopamine to aminochrome. The catalytic functions of the micellar nucleoapzymes are attributed to the concentration of the substrate, using the aptamer units, in close proximity to the active sites.

  12. Dopamine-Secreting Paraganglioma in the Retroperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Kimura, Noriko; Yoshimoto, Takanobu; Sekiguchi, Yoshihiro; Tomoishi, Junzo; Kasahara, Ichiro; Hara, Yoshihito; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2017-03-01

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas, which exclusively produce dopamine, are very rare. Herein, we report for the first time a Japanese case of an exclusively dopamine-producing paraganglioma accompanied by detailed immunohistochemical analyses. A 70-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our hospital for functional examination of her left retroperitoneal mass. Her adrenal functions were normal, except for excessive dopamine secretion. After the tumorectomy, her dopamine level normalized. The histopathological diagnosis of the tumor was paraganglioma; this was confirmed by positive immunostaining of chromogranin A (CgA), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH), and succinate dehydrogenase gene subunit B (SDHB). However, the immunostaining of CgA in the tumor cells showed peculiar dot-like staining located corresponding to Golgi complex in the perinuclear area, rather than the diffuse cytoplasmic staining usually observed in epinephrine- or norepinephrine-producing functional pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas. The immunohistochemical results suggested that the tumor cells had sparse neuroendocrine granules in the cytoplasm, resulting in inhibition of catecholamine synthesis from dopamine to norepinephrine in neurosecretory granules. This may be the mechanism responsible for exclusive dopamine secretion in the present case.

  13. Stereoselectivity of presynaptic autoreceptors modulating dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Arbilla, S; Langer, S Z

    1981-12-17

    The effects of the (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of sulpiride and butaclamol were studied on the spontaneous and field stimulation-evoked release of total radioactivity from slices of rabbit caudate nucleus prelabelled with [3H]dopamine. (S)-Sulpiride in concentrations ranging from 0.01--1 microM enhanced the electrically evoked release of [3H]dopamine while (R)-sulpiride was 10 times less potent than (S)-sulpiride. Exposure to (S)-butaclamol (0.01--1 microM) but not to (R)-butaclamol (0.1--10 microM) enhanced the field-stimulated release of [3H]dopamine. The facilitatory effects of (S)- and (R)-sulpiride and (S)-butaclamol on the stimulated release of the labelled neurotransmitter were observed under conditions in which these drugs did not modify the spontaneous outflow of radioactivity. Only the active enantiomers of sulpiride and butaclamol antagonized the inhibition by apomorphine (1 microM) of the stimulated release of [3H]dopamine. Our results indicate that the presynaptic inhibitory dopamine autoreceptors modulating the stimulation-evoked release of [3H]dopamine in the caudate nucleus are, like the classical postsynaptic dopamine receptors, chemically stereoselective.

  14. Stereoselective effects of MDMA on inhibition of monoamine uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, T.D.; Nichols, D.E.; Yim, G.K.W.

    1986-03-05

    The R(-)-isomers of hallucinogenic phenylisopropylamines are most active, whereas the S(+)-enantiomers of amphetamine (AMPH) and methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) are more potent centrally. To determine if MDMA exhibits stereoselective effects at the biochemical level that resemble either those of amphetamine or the potent hallucinogen 2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine (DOM), the ability of the isomers of MDMA, AMPH and DOM to inhibit uptake of radiolabelled monoamines into synaptosomes was measured. AMPH was more potent than MDMA in inhibiting uptake of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine (NE) into hypothalamic synaptosomes and /sup 3/H-dopamine (DA) into striatal synaptosomes. The S(+)-isomer was more active in each case. MDMA was more potent than AMPH in inhibiting uptake of /sup 3/H-serotonin (5-HT) into hippocampal synaptosomes and exhibited a high degree of stereoselectivity, in favor of the S(+)-isomer. DOM showed only minimal activity in inhibiting uptake of any monoamine (IC/sub 50/ > 10/sup -5/M). These results suggest that MDMA exhibits stereoselective effects similar to those of amphetamine on monoamine uptake inhibition, a parameter that is unrelated to the mechanism of action of the hallucinogen DOM.

  15. A continuous-wave electron-nuclear double resonance (X-band) study of the Cu2+ sites of particulate methane mono-oxygenase of Methylococcus capsulatus (strain M) in membrane and pure dopamine beta-mono-oxygenase of the adrenal medulla.

    PubMed Central

    Katterle, Bettina; Gvozdev, Rudolf I; Abudu, Ntei; Ljones, Torbjørn; Andersson, K Kristoffer

    2002-01-01

    All methanotrophic bacteria express a membrane-bound (particulate) methane mono-oxygenase (pMMO). In the present study, we have investigated pMMO in membrane fragments from Methylococcus capsulatus (strain M). pMMO contains a typical type-2 Cu(2+) centre with the following EPR parameters: g(z) 2.24, g(x,y) 2.06, A(Cu)(z) 19.0 mT and A(Cu)(x,y) 1.0 mT. Simulation of the Cu(2+) spectrum yielded a best match by using four equivalent nitrogens (A(N)=1.5 mT, 42 MHz). Incubation with ferricyanide neither changed nor increased the amount of EPR-active Cu(2+), in contrast with other reports. The EPR visible copper seems not to be part of any cluster, as judged from the microwave power saturation behaviour. Continuous-wave electron-nuclear double resonance (CW ENDOR; 9.4 GHz, 5-20 K) experiments at g( perpendicular) of the Cu(II) spectrum show a weak coupling to protons with an A(H) of 2.9 MHz that corresponds to a distance of 3.8 A (1 A identical with 0.1 nm), assuming that it is a purely dipolar coupling. Incubation in (2)H(2)O leads to a significant decrease in these (1)H-ENDOR intensities, showing that these protons are exchangeable. This result strongly suggests that the EPR visible copper site of pMMO is accessible to solvent, which was confirmed by the chelation of the Cu(2+) by diethyldithiocarbamic acid. The (1)H and (14)N hyperfine coupling constants confirm a histidine ligation of the EPR visible copper site in pMMO. The hyperfine structure in the ENDOR or EPR spectra of pMMO is not influenced by the inhibitors azide, cyanide or ammonia, indicating that they do not bind to the EPR visible copper. We compared pMMO with the type-2 Cu(2+) enzyme, dopamine beta-mono-oxygenase (DbetaM). For DbetaM, it is assumed that the copper site is solvent-accessible. CW ENDOR shows similar weakly coupled and (2)H(2)O-exchangeable protons (2.9 MHz), as observed in pMMO, as well as the strongly coupled nitrogens (40 MHz) from the co-ordinating N of the histidines in DbetaM. In

  16. Human dopamine receptor and its uses

    DOEpatents

    Civelli, Olivier; Van Tol, Hubert Henri-Marie

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward the isolation, characterization and pharmacological use of the human D4 dopamine receptor. The nucleotide sequence of the gene corresponding to this receptor and alleleic variant thereof are provided by the invention. The invention also includes recombinant eukaryotic expression constructs capable of expressing the human D4 dopamine receptor in cultures of transformed eukaryotic cells. The invention provides cultures of transformed eukaryotic cells which synthesize the human D4 dopamine receptor, and methods for characterizing novel psychotropic compounds using such cultures.

  17. Uptake of Metal Ions by Rhizopus arrhizus Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, J. M.; Cooper, D. G.; Neufeld, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Rhizopus arrhizus biomass was found to absorb a variety of different metal cations and anions but did not absorb alkali metal ions. The amount of uptake of the cations was directly related to ionic radii of La3+, Mn2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Ba2+, Hg2+, Pb2+, UO22+, and Ag+. The uptake of all the cations is consistent with absorption of the metals by sites in the biomass containing phosphate, carboxylate, and other functional groups. The uptake of the molybdate and vanadate anions was strongly pH dependent, and it is proposed that the uptake mechanism involves electrostatic attraction to positively charged functional groups. PMID:16346521

  18. Pharmacological characterization and autoradiographic localization of dopamine receptors in the rat adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Barili, P; Zaccheo, D; Amenta, F

    1996-08-29

    The pharmacological profile and the anatomical localization of dopamine D1-like and D2-like receptors were studied in sections of rat adrenal medulla, with radioligand binding and autoradiographic techniques, respectively. [3H]([R]-(+)-chloro-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-5-phenyl-1 H-3benzazepin-al hemimaleate) (SCH 23390) was used as a ligand for dopamine D1-like receptors and [3H]spiperone was used as a ligand for dopamine D2-like receptors. Radioligand binding and light microscope autoradiography did not show specific [3H]SCH 23390 binding in sections of rat adrenal medulla. This suggests that rat adrenal medulla does not express dopamine D1-like receptors. [3H]Spiperone was specifically bound to sections of rat adrenal medulla. The binding was time-, temperature- and concentration-dependent, with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.05 nM and a maximum density of binding sites (Bmax) of 100.2 +/- 3.8 fmol/mg tissue. The pharmacological profile of [3H]spiperone binding to rat adrenal medulla was similar to that displayed by neostriatum, which is known to express dopamine D2 receptors. Light microscope autoradiography showed the accumulation of specifically bound [3H]spiperone as silver grains within sections of adrenal medulla. Silver grains were found primarily over the cellular membrane of chromaffin cells. The above data indicate that chromaffin cells of the rat adrenal medulla express dopamine receptors belonging to the dopamine D2 receptor subtype. These receptors are probably involved in the modulation of catecholamine release from chromaffin cells, as documented by functional studies.

  19. Phasic dopamine release in appetitive behaviors and drug abuse

    PubMed Central

    Wanat, Matthew J.; Willuhn, Ingo; Clark, Jeremy J.; Phillips, Paul E. M.

    2010-01-01

    Short phasic bursts of neuronal activity in dopamine neurons produce rapid and transient increases in extracellular dopamine concentrations throughout the mesocorticolimbic system, which are associated with the initiation of goal-directed behaviors. It is well established that acute exposure to many addictive drugs produce increases in tonic dopamine levels that occur on the order of minutes. However, recent studies suggest that abused drugs similarly enhance phasic dopamine release events that occur on a subsecond time scale. Furthermore, drug experience modulates the synaptic and intrinsic properties of dopamine neurons, which could affect dopamine burst firing and phasic dopamine release. This review will provide a general introduction to the mesolimbic dopamine system, as well as the primary methods used to detect dopamine neurons and dopamine release. We present the role of phasic dopamine release in appetitive behaviors in the context of contemporary theories regarding the function of dopamine. Next we discuss the known drug-induced changes to dopamine neurons and phasic release in both in vitro and in vivo preparations. Finally, we offer a simple model that chronic drug experience attenuates tonic/basal dopamine levels but promotes phasic dopamine release, which may result in aberrant goal-directed behaviors contributing to the development of addiction. PMID:19630749

  20. Regulation of dopamine D2 receptors in a novel cell line (SUP1)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivins, K.J.; Luedtke, R.R.; Artymyshyn, R.P.; Molinoff, P.B. )

    1991-04-01

    A prolactin-secreting cell line, SUP1, has been established from rat pituitary tumor 7315a. In radioligand binding experiments, the D2 receptor antagonist (S)-(-)-3-{sup 125}I iodo-2-hydroxy-6-methoxy-N-((1-ethyl-2- pyrrolidinyl)methyl)benzamide ({sup 125}I IBZM) labeled a single class of sites in homogenates of SUP1 cells (Kd = 0.6 nM; Bmax = 45 fmol/mg of protein). The sites displayed a pharmacological profile consistent with that of D2 receptors. Inhibition of the binding of {sup 125}I IBZM by dopamine was sensitive to GTP, suggesting that D2 receptors in SUP1 cells are coupled to guanine nucleotide-binding protein(s). In the presence of isobutylmethylxanthine, dopamine decreased the level of cAMP accumulation in SUP1 cells. Dopamine also inhibited prolactin secretion from SUP1 cells. Both the inhibition of cAMP accumulation and the inhibition of prolactin secretion were blocked by D2 receptor antagonists, suggesting that these effects of dopamine were mediated by an interaction with D2 receptors. The regulation of D2 receptors in SUP1 cells by D2 receptor agonists was investigated. Exposure of SUP1 cells to dopamine or to the D2 receptor agonist N-propylnorapomorphine led to increased expression of D2 receptors, with no change in the affinity of the receptors for {sup 125}I IBZM. An increase in the density of D2 receptors in SUP1 cells was evident within 7 hr of exposure to dopamine. Spiroperidol, a D2 receptor antagonist, blocked the effect of dopamine on receptor density. These results suggest that exposure of D2 receptors in SUP1 cells to agonists leads to an up-regulation of D2 receptors. Dopamine retained the ability to inhibit cAMP accumulation in SUP1 cells exposed to dopamine for 24 hr, suggesting that D2 receptors in SUP1 cells are not desensitized by prolonged exposure to agonist.

  1. Binding Interactions of Dopamine and Apomorphine in D2High and D2Low States of Human Dopamine D2 Receptor Using Computational and Experimental Techniques.

    PubMed

    Durdagi, Serdar; Salmas, Ramin Ekhteiari; Stein, Matthias; Yurtsever, Mine; Seeman, Philip

    2016-02-17

    We have recently reported G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) model structures for the active and inactive states of the human dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) using adrenergic crystal structures as templates. Since the therapeutic concentrations of dopamine agonists that suppress the release of prolactin are the same as those that act at the high-affinity state of the D2 receptor (D2High), D2High in the anterior pituitary gland is considered to be the functional state of the receptor. In addition, the therapeutic concentrations of anti-Parkinson drugs are also related to the dissociation constants in the D2High form of the receptor. The discrimination between the high- and low-affinity (D2Low) components of the D2R is not obvious and requires advanced computer-assisted structural biology investigations. Therefore, in this work, the derived D2High and D2Low receptor models (GPCR monomer and dimer three-dimensional structures) are used as drug-binding targets to investigate binding interactions of dopamine and apomorphine. The study reveals a match between the experimental dissociation constants of dopamine and apomorphine at their high- and low-affinity sites of the D2 receptor in monomer and dimer and their calculated dissociation constants. The allosteric receptor-receptor interaction for dopamine D2R dimer is associated with the accessibility of adjacent residues of transmembrane region 4. The measured negative cooperativity between agonist ligand at dopamine D2 receptor is also correctly predicted using the D2R homodimerization model.

  2. Amphetamine in adolescence disrupts the development of medial prefrontal cortex dopamine connectivity in a DCC-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Lauren M; Makowski, Carolina S; Yogendran, Sandra V; Kiessling, Silke; Cermakian, Nicolas; Flores, Cecilia

    2015-03-13

    Initiation of drug use during adolescence is a strong predictor of both the incidence and severity of addiction throughout the lifetime. Intriguingly, adolescence is a period of dynamic refinement in the organization of neuronal connectivity, in particular medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) dopamine circuitry. The guidance cue receptor, DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer), is highly expressed by dopamine neurons and orchestrates their innervation to the mPFC during adolescence. Furthermore, we have shown that amphetamine in adolescence regulates DCC expression in dopamine neurons. Drugs in adolescence may therefore induce their enduring behavioral effects via DCC-mediated disruption in mPFC dopamine development. In this study, we investigated the impact of repeated exposure to amphetamine during adolescence on both the development of mPFC dopamine connectivity and on salience attribution to drug context in adulthood. We compare these effects to those induced by adult exposure to an identical amphetamine regimen. Finally, we determine whether DCC signaling within dopamine neurons is necessary for these events. Exposure to amphetamine in adolescence, but not in adulthood, leads to an increase in the span of dopamine innervation to the mPFC, but a reduction of presynaptic sites present on these axons. Amphetamine treatment in adolescence, but not in adulthood, also produces an increase in salience attribution to a previously drug-paired context in adulthood. Remarkably, DCC signaling within dopamine neurons is required for both of these effects. Drugs of abuse in adolescence may therefore induce their detrimental behavioral consequences by disrupting mesocortical dopamine development through alterations in the DCC signaling cascade.

  3. Specific 3H-haloperidol binding to dopamine receptors in the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Y; Takayanagi, I

    1982-12-01

    The anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis has specific dopamine receptors. We carried out a radioligand binding assay for dopamine receptors in ABRM using (3H)-haloperidol as the radioligand. High affinity binding of (3H)-haloperidol has been shown. Scatchard analysis showed a single component of binding with an apparent equilibrium constant (KD) of 1.6 nM and a maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) of 219 fmoles/mg protein. Some dopamine antagonists displaced 3 nM (3H)-haloperidol binding, and the IC50 and Ki-value of these drugs were calculated. Considering these results, this muscle is thought to be suitable for a study of the dopamine receptors.

  4. Carrier-dependent and Ca2+-dependent 5-HT and dopamine release induced by (+)-amphetamine, 3,4-methylendioxy-methamphetamine, p-chloroamphetamine and (+)-fenfluramine

    PubMed Central

    Crespi, Daniela; Mennini, Tiziana; Gobbi, Marco

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism underlying 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and/or dopamine release induced by (+)-amphetamine ((+)-Amph), 3,4-methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), p-chloroamphetamine (pCA) and (+)-fenfluramine ((+)-Fen) was investigated in rat brain superfused synaptosomes preloaded with the 3H neurotransmitters. Their rank order of potency for [3H]-5-HT-releasing activity was the same as for inhibition of 5-HT uptake (pCA⩾MDMA⩾(+)-Fen>>(+)-Amph). Similarly, their rank order as [3H]-dopamine releasers and dopamine uptake inhibitors was the same ((+)-Amph>>pCA=MDMA>>(+)-Fen). We also confirmed that the release induced by these compounds was prevented by selective transporter inhibitors (indalpine or nomifensine). [3H]-5-HT and/or [3H]-dopamine release induced by all these compounds was partially (31–80%), but significantly Ca2+-dependent. Lack of extracellular Ca2+ did not alter uptake mechanisms nor did it modify the carrier-dependent dopamine-induced [3H]-dopamine release. (+)-Amph-induced [3H]-dopamine release and pCA- and MDMA-induced [3H]-5-HT release were significantly inhibited by ω-agatoxin-IVA, a specific blocker of P-type voltage-operated Ca2+-channels, similar to the previous results on (+)-Fen-induced [3H]-5-HT release. Methiothepin inhibited the Ca2+-dependent component of (+)-Amph-induced [3H]-dopamine release with high potency (70 nM), as previously found with (+)-Fen-induced [3H]-5-HT release. The inhibitory effect of methiothepin was not due to its effects as a transporter inhibitor or Ca2+-channel blocker and is unlikely to be due to its antagonist properties on 5-HT1/2, dopamine or any other extracellular receptor. These results indicate that the release induced by these compounds is both ‘carrier-mediated' and Ca2+-dependent (possibly exocytotic-like), with the specific carrier allowing the amphetamines to enter the synaptosome. The Ca2+-dependent release is mediated by Ca2+-influx (mainly through P-type Ca2+-channels), possibly triggered by

  5. Quantitative Analysis of D2 Dopamine Receptor Binding in the Living Human Brain by PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farde, Lars; Hall, Hakan; Ehrin, Erling; Sedvall, Goran

    1986-01-01

    D2 dopamine receptors in the putamen of living human subjects were characterized by using the selective, high-affinity D2 dopamine receptor antagonist carbon-11-labeled raclopride and positron emission tomography. Experiments in four healthy men demonstrated saturability of [11C]raclopride binding to an apparently homogeneous population of sites with Hill coefficients close to unity. In the normal putamen, maximum binding ranged from 12 to 17 picomoles per cubic centimeter and dissociation constants from 3.4 to 4.7 nanomolar. Maximum binding for human putamen at autopsy was 15 picomoles per cubic centimeter. Studies of [11C]raclopride binding indicate that clinically effective doses of chemically distinct neuroleptic drugs result in 85 to 90 percent occupancy of D2 dopamine receptors in the putamen of schizophrenic patients.

  6. Delusions, superstitious conditioning and chaotic dopamine neurodynamics.

    PubMed

    Shaner, A

    1999-02-01

    Excessive mesolimbic dopaminergic neurotransmission is closely related to the psychotic symptoms of schizophrenia. A mathematical model of dopamine neuron firing rates, developed by King and others, suggests a mechanism by which excessive dopaminergic transmission could produce psychotic symptoms, especially delusions. In this model, firing rates varied chaotically when the efficacy of dopaminergic transmission was enhanced. Such non-contingent changes in firing rates in mesolimbic reward pathways could produce delusions by distorting thinking in the same way that non-contingent reinforcement produces superstitious conditioning. Though difficult to test in humans, the hypothesis is testable as an explanation for a common animal model of psychosis--amphetamine stereotypy in rats. The hypothesis predicts that: (1) amphetamine will cause chaotic firing rates in mesolimbic dopamine neurons; (2) non-contingent brain stimulation reward will produce stereotypy; (3) non-contingent microdialysis of dopamine into reward areas will produce stereotypy; and (4) dopamine antagonists will block all three effects.

  7. Detection of Dopamine Dynamics in the Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wightman, R. Mark; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Explores neurochemical events in the extra cellular space of the brain by use of in vivo voltammetric microelectrodes. Reports dopamine concentrations and pathways, and discusses techniques used for analysis. Recognizes current problems and future directions for research. (ML)

  8. Development of dopamine and N-methyl-D-aspartate systems in rat brain: the effect of prenatal phencyclidine exposure.

    PubMed

    Ali, S F; Holson, R R; Newport, G D; Slikker, W; Bowyer, J F

    1993-05-21

    Phencyclidine (PCP) inhibits the uptake of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA), and blocks N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-regulated ion channels. PCP also binds to sigma receptors in vivo and in vitro in rat brain. Prolonged exposure to PCP in adults has been observed to reduce the number of PCP binding sites in brain. We designed these experiments to evaluate whether prolonged prenatal exposure to PCP produces alterations in the development of DA and NMDA systems in brain. To do so, we characterized the normal course of development of basal and stimulated DA release in striatal slices, the ontogeny of striatal DA concentrations, and the development of NMDA receptor channels and associated glutamate binding sites in frontal cortex. We compared these developmental profiles to those in rats exposed to prenatal PCP, in an attempt to characterize the effect of prenatal PCP exposure on the pattern of brain development. Pregnant CD rats were injected s.c. with either 0, 10 or 20 mg/kg PCP daily on gestational days 8 through 20. On postnatal days (PND) 8, 21, 45, or 100, rats were sacrificed and brain tissues isolated for in vitro assessment. In vitro [3H]DA release from striatal slices evoked by either 40 microM glutamate or 15 mM K+ increased over 250% from PND 8 to PND 45, and glutamate-stimulated release was still significantly below adult levels at PND 45. In contrast, D-methamphetamine (D-METH)-evoked [3H]DA release, frontal cortical glutamate binding sites and NMDA channels developed early, reaching adult levels on or before PND 21.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Effect of cocaine on striatal dopamine clearance in a rat model of developmental stress and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Womersley, Jacqueline S; Kellaway, Lauriston A; Stein, Dan J; Gerhardt, Greg A; Russell, Vivienne A

    2016-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and developmental stress are considered risk factors for the development of drug abuse. Though the physiological mechanisms underlying this risk are not yet clear, ADHD, developmental stress and drug abuse are known to share underlying disturbances in dopaminergic neurotransmission. Thus, we hypothesized that clearance of cocaine-induced elevations in striatal dopamine would be prolonged in a rat model of ADHD and that this would be further increased by exposure to developmental stress. In the current study, male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), a well-validated model of ADHD, and control Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were exposed to either standard rearing (nMS) or a maternal separation (MS) paradigm involving removal of the pups from the dam for 180 min/day over 13 days. This produced a 2 × 2 factorial design (SHR/WKY × nMS/MS) with 5-6 rats/group. Striatal clearance of exogenously applied dopamine was measured via in vivo chronoamperometry, and the difference in dopamine uptake parameters before and after cocaine administration was compared between experimental groups. Cocaine, a potent dopamine transporter inhibitor, reliably increased the clearance time of dopamine though no difference in this parameter was found between SHR and WKY strains. However, developmental stress elevated the cocaine-induced increase in time to clear 50% of exogenously applied dopamine (T50) in SHR but had no effect in WKY rats. These findings suggest that a strain × environment interaction prolongs elevated levels of dopamine thereby potentially increasing the rewarding properties of this drug in SHR.

  10. Allelic association of the D2 dopamine receptor gene with receptor-binding characteristics in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, E.P.; Blum, K.; Ritchie, T.; Montgomery, A.; Sheridan, P.J. )

    1991-07-01

    The allelic association of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene with the binding characteristics of the D2 dopamine receptor was determined in 66 brains of alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects. In a blinded experiment, DNA from the cerebral cortex was treated with the restriction endonuclease Taql and probed with a 1.5-kilobase (kb) digest of a clone (lambda hD2G1) of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene. The binding characteristics (Kd (binding affinity) and Bmax (number of binding sites)) of the D2 dopamine receptor were determined in the caudate nuclei of these brains using tritiated spiperone as the ligand. The adjusted Kd was significantly lower in alcoholic than in nonalcoholic subjects. In subjects with the A1 allele, in whom a high association with alcoholism was found, the Bmax was significantly reduced compared with the Bmax of subjects with the A2 allele. Moreover, a progressively reduced Bmax was found in subjects with A2/A2, A1/A2, and A1/A1 alleles, with subjects with A2/A2 having the highest mean values, and subjects with A1/A1, the lowest. The polymorphic pattern of the D2 dopamine receptor gene and its differential expression of receptors suggests the involvement of the dopaminergic system in conferring susceptibility to at least one subtype of severe alcoholism.

  11. /sup 125/I-spiperone: a novel ligand for D/sub 2/ dopamine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Gundlach, A.L.; Largent, B.L.; Synder, S.H.

    1984-11-05

    /sup 125/I-Spiperone binds with high affinity K/sub D/ 0.3 nM) to a single specific site (B/sub max/ 34 pmole/g wet weight) in homogenates of rat corpus striatum. Specific binding is about 40-60 percent of total binding and is displaced stereo-specifically by butaclamol and clopenthixol. Neuroleptic drugs of various classes are potent inhibitors of /sup 125/I-spiperone binding (/sub i/'s 1-10 nM). Selective dopamine antagonists such as sulpiride (K/sub i/ 50 nM) and dopamine agonists such as apomorphine (K/sub i/ 200 nM) are also potent inhibitors. The drugs specificity of /sup 125/I-spiperone binding correlates well with that of /sup 3/H-spiperone binding, providing good evidence that /sup 125/I-spiperone labels D/sub 2/ dopamine receptors in striatal membranes. /sup 125/I-Spiperone, with its high specific activity (2200 Ci/mmol) may prove to be a useful ligand in studies examining D/sub 2/ dopamine receptors in soluble preparations and by autoradiography. Furthermore iodinated spiperone may be useful in radioreceptor assays of neuroleptic drug levels and, in a /sup 123/I-labeled form for imaging of dopamine receptors, in vivo, using single photon tomography. 18 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  12. A model of dopamine modulated glutamatergic synapse.

    PubMed

    Di Maio, Vito; Ventriglia, Francesco; Santillo, Silvia

    2015-10-01

    The dopamine neurotransmitter regulates important neural pathways and its action in the brain is very complex. When dopaminergic neurons make synapses on spiny neurons of the striatum nucleus, they tune the responsiveness of glutamatergic synapses by means of the dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. We studied the effect of dopamine D1 receptors on glutamatergic synapse of GABAergic spiny neurons in striatum nucleus where they are located on the neck of the same spine. The action of dopamine consists essentially in promoting the phosphorylation of AMPA and NMDA receptors thus increasing the Excitatory Post Synaptic Current peak amplitude. The consequence is a cooperative effect of glutamatergic and dopaminergic synapses for the regulation of the GABAergic neuronal code. The mechanisms by which the phosphorylation induces the increase of the EPSC amplitude still remain unclear although the lack of this regulation can be involved in several pathologies as, for example, the Parkinson's disease. We tested, by computational experiments based on our model of glutamatergic synapse, three parameters of the synaptic function that could be involved in dopamine action: (a) time binding of glutamate to receptors; (b) open probability of the receptors; and (c) single receptor conductance. For different reasons, any of the three parameters could be responsible of the increased EPSC-dopamine-dependent. Our computational results were compared and discussed with experimental results found in literature. Although for our model both the open probability and the single receptor conductance can reproduce the phosphorylation effect of dopamine, we argue that the dopamine effect consists essentially in an increase of the single receptor conductance due to a 3D rearrangement of the phosphorylated receptors.

  13. Long-term studies of dopamine agonists.

    PubMed

    Hubble, Jean P

    2002-02-26

    Dopamine agonists have long been used as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). In more recent years these drugs have also been proved safe and effective as initial therapy in lieu of levodopa in the treatment of PD. Long-term levodopa therapy is associated with motor complications, including fluctuating response patterns and dyskinesia. By initially introducing a dopamine agonist as symptomatic drug therapy, it may be possible to postpone the use of levodopa and delay or prevent the development of motor complications. Recently, four clinical trials have explored this hypothesis by comparing the long-term response and side effects of levodopa with dopamine agonist therapy. The drugs studied have included ropinirole, pramipexole, cabergoline, and pergolide. In each of these projects, the occurrence of motor complications, such as wearing off and dyskinesia, was significantly less in the subjects assigned to initiation of therapy with a dopamine agonist. The addition of levodopa could be postponed by many months or even several years. Therefore, these long-term studies of dopamine agonists support the initiation of a dopamine agonist instead of levodopa in an effort to postpone levodopa-related motor complications. This therapeutic approach may be particularly appropriate in PD patients with a long treatment horizon on the basis of age and general good health. The extension phase of the long-term study comparing pramipexole with levodopa is ongoing, and follow-up information may help to establish the value of this treatment strategy.

  14. Pharmacological characterization of renal vascular dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M; Imbs, J L

    1980-01-01

    We present an in vitro method for studying the renal effects of dopamine in the isolated rat kidney. The organ is perfused in an open circuit and can be maintained satisfactorily for up to 180 min. The responses to dopamine were studied in the presence of phenoxybenzamine (10(-5) M) and sotalol (10(-5) M) while stable renal vasoconstriction was maintained by perfusion with prostaglandine F2 alpha. Dopamine induced dose-dependent renal vasodilation with an ED50 of 2.53 X 10(-6) moles/liter, which was not modified by reserpine pretreatment. (+) Butaclamol but not (-) butaclamol shifted the dopamine dose-response curve to the right in a parallel fashion, indicating competitive antagonism. Haloperidol and sulpiride at concentrations without intrinsic effect on vascular resistance also acted as competitive inhibitors for dopamine. Calculation of empirical pA2 values yielded the following relative potencies for these antagonists: (+) butaclamol greater than haloperidol greater than sulpiride. The renal vascular dopamine receptors are tentatively classified as being of the D1 type.

  15. Effects of diet and insulin on dopamine transporter activity and expression in rat caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, and midbrain.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kymry T; Woods, Catherine; Zhen, Juan; Antonio, Tamara; Carr, Kenneth D; Reith, Maarten E A

    2017-03-01

    Food restriction (FR) and obesogenic (OB) diets are known to alter brain dopamine transmission and exert opposite modulatory effects on behavioral responsiveness to psychostimulant drugs of abuse. Mechanisms underlying these diet effects are not fully understood. In this study, we examined diet effects on expression and function of the dopamine transporter (DAT) in caudate-putamen (CPu), nucleus accumbens (NAc), and midbrain regions. Dopamine (DA) uptake by CPu, NAc or midbrain synapto(neuro)somes was measured in vitro with rotating disk electrode voltammetry or with [(3) H]DA uptake and was found to correlate with DAT surface expression, assessed by maximal [(3) H](-)-2-β-carbomethoxy-3-β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane binding and surface biotinylation assays. FR and OB diets were both found to decrease DAT activity in CPu with a corresponding decrease in surface expression but had no effects in the NAc and midbrain. Diet treatments also affected sensitivity to insulin-induced enhancement of DA uptake, with FR producing an increase in CPu and NAc, likely mediated by an observed increase in insulin receptor expression, and OB producing a decrease in NAc. The increased expression of insulin receptor in NAc of FR rats was accompanied by increased DA D2 receptor expression, and the decreased DAT expression and function in CPu of OB rats was accompanied by decreased DA D2 receptor expression. These results are discussed as partial mechanistic underpinnings of diet-induced adaptations that contribute to altered behavioral sensitivity to psychostimulants that target the DAT.

  16. Structural Modification of the Designer Stimulant α-Pyrrolidinovalerophenone (α-PVP) Influences Potency at Dopamine Transporters.

    PubMed

    Kolanos, R; Sakloth, F; Jain, A D; Partilla, J S; Baumann, M H; Glennon, R A

    2015-10-21

    α-Pyrrolidinovalerophenone (α-PVP, 7) is an illegal synthetic stimulant that is being sold on the clandestine market as "flakka" and "gravel". The potent pharmacological effects of α-PVP are presumably mediated by inhibition of dopamine uptake at the dopamine transporter (DAT). However, little is known about how structural modification of α-PVP influences activity at DAT. Eleven analogs of α-PVP were synthesized and examined for their ability to inhibit uptake of [(3)H]dopamine and [(3)H]serotonin in rat brain synaptosomes. None of the analogs significantly inhibited [(3)H]serotonin uptake when tested at 10 μM at the serotonin transporter (SERT). All of the analogs behaved as DAT reuptake inhibitors, but potencies varied over a >1500-fold range. Potency was primarily associated with the nature of the α-substituent, with the more bulky substituents imparting the highest potency. Expansion of the pyrrolidine ring to a piperidine reduced potency up to 10-fold, whereas conformational constraint in the form of an aminotetralone resulted in the least potent compound. Our study provides the first systematic and comparative structure-activity investigation on the ability of α-PVP analogs to act as inhibitors of DAT.

  17. Studies of the biogenic amine transporters. IV. Demonstration of a multiplicity of binding sites in rat caudate membranes for the cocaine analog [125I]RTI-55.

    PubMed

    Rothman, R B; Cadet, J L; Akunne, H C; Silverthorn, M L; Baumann, M H; Carroll, F I; Rice, K C; de Costa, B R; Partilla, J S; Wang, J B

    1994-07-01

    The drug 3 beta-[4'-iodophenyl]tropan-2 beta-carboxylic acid methyl ester (RTI-55) is a cocaine congener with high affinity for the dopamine transporter (Kd < 1 nM). The present study characterized [125I]RTI-55 binding to membranes prepared from rat, monkey and human caudates and COS cells transiently expressing the cloned rat dopamine (DA) transporter. Using the method of binding surface analysis, two binding sites were resolved in rat caudate: a high-capacity binding site (site 1, Bmax = 11,900 fmol/mg of protein) and a low-capacity site (site 2, Bmax = 846 fmol/mg of protein). The Kd (or Ki) values of selected drugs at the two sites were as follows: (Ki for high-capacity site and Ki for low-capacity site, respectively): RTI-55 (0.76 and 0.21 nM), 1-[2-diphenyl-methoxy)ethyl]-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine (0.79 and 358 nM), mazindol (37.6 and 631 nM), 2 beta-carbomethoxy-3 beta-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane (45.0 and 540 nM) and cocaine (341 and 129 nM). Nisoxetine, a selective noradrenergic uptake blocker, had low affinity for both sites. Serotonergic uptake blockers had a high degree of selectivity and high affinity for the low-capacity binding site (Ki of citalopram = 0.38 nM; Ki of paroxetine = 0.033 nM). The i.c.v. administration of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine to rats pretreated with nomifensine (to protect dopaminergic and noradrenergic nerve terminals) selectively decreased the Bmax of site 2, strongly supporting the idea that site 2 is a binding site on the serotonin (5-HT) transporter. This serotonergic lesion also increased the affinity of [125I]RTI-55 for the DA transporter by 10-fold. The ligand selectivity of the caudate 5-HT transporter was different from the [I125]RTI-55 binding site on the 5-HT transporter present in membranes prepared from whole rat brain minus caudate. The [125I]RTI-55 binding to the DA transporter was further resolved into two components, termed sites 1a and 1b, by using human and monkey (Macaca mulatta) caudate membranes but not the

  18. Nonclassical pharmacology of the dopamine transporter: atypical inhibitors, allosteric modulators, and partial substrates.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Kyle C; Rothman, Richard B; Reith, Maarten E A

    2013-07-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a sodium-coupled symporter protein responsible for modulating the concentration of extraneuronal dopamine in the brain. The DAT is a principle target of various psychostimulant, nootropic, and antidepressant drugs, as well as certain drugs used recreationally, including the notoriously addictive stimulant cocaine. DAT ligands have traditionally been divided into two categories: cocaine-like inhibitors and amphetamine-like substrates. Whereas inhibitors block monoamine uptake by the DAT but are not translocated across the membrane, substrates are actively translocated and trigger DAT-mediated release of dopamine by reversal of the translocation cycle. Because both inhibitors and substrates increase extraneuronal dopamine levels, it is often assumed that all DAT ligands possess an addictive liability equivalent to that of cocaine. However, certain recently developed ligands, such as atypical benztropine-like DAT inhibitors with reduced or even a complete lack of cocaine-like rewarding effects, suggest that addictiveness is not a constant property of DAT-affecting compounds. These atypical ligands do not conform to the classic preconception that all DAT inhibitors (or substrates) are functionally and mechanistically alike. Instead, they suggest the possibility that the DAT exhibits some of the ligand-specific pleiotropic functional qualities inherent to G-protein-coupled receptors. That is, ligands with different chemical structures induce specific conformational changes in the transporter protein that can be differentially transduced by the cell, ultimately eliciting unique behavioral and psychological effects. The present overview discusses compounds with conformation-specific activity, useful not only as tools for studying the mechanics of dopamine transport, but also as leads for medication development in addictive disorders.

  19. Locally formed dopamine inhibits Na sup + -K sup + -ATPase activity in rat renal cortical tubule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Seri, I.; Kone, B.C.; Gullans, S.R.; Aperia, A.; Brenner, B.M.; Ballermann, B.J. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm )

    1988-10-01

    Dopamine, generated locally from L-dopa, inhibits Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase in permeabilized rat proximal tubules under maximum transport rate conditions for sodium. To determine whether locally formed dopamine inhibits Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase activity in intact cortical tubule cells we studied the effect of L-dopa on ouabain-sensitive oxygen consumption rate ({dot Q}o{sub 2}) and {sup 86}Rb uptake in renal cortical tubule cell suspensions. L-Dopa did not affect ouabain-insensitive {dot Q}o{sub 2} or mitochondrial respiration. However, L-dopa inhibited ouabain-sensitive {dot Q}o{sub 2} in a concentration-dependent manner, with half-maximal inhibition (K{sub 0.5}) of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} M and a maximal inhibition of 14.1 {plus minus} 1.5% at 10{sup {minus}4}M. L-Dopa also blunted the nystatin-stimulated {dot Q}o{sub 2} in a concentration-dependent manner, indicating the L-dopa directly inhibits Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase activity and not sodium entry. Ouabain-sensitive {sup 86}Rb uptake was also inhibited by L-dopa. Carbidopa, an inhibitor of the conversion of L-dopa to dopamine, eliminated the effect of L-dopa on ouabain-sensitive {dot Q}o{sub 2} and {sup 86}Rb uptake, indicating that dopamine rather than L-dopa was the active agent. The finding that the L-dopa concentration-response curve was shifted to the left by one order of magnitude in the presence of nystatin suggests that the inhibitory effect is enhanced when the intracellular sodium concentration is increased. By studying the effect of L-dopa on ouabain-sensitive {dot Q}o{sub 2} at increasing extracellular sodium concentrations in the presence of nystatin, the authors demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of locally formed dopamine on the Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase is indeed dependent on the sodium available for the enzyme and occurs in an uncompetitive manner.

  20. Imaging dopamine release with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and (11)C-raclopride in freely moving animals.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vinal D; Lee, Dianne E; Alexoff, David L; Dewey, Stephen L; Schiffer, Wynne K

    2008-07-01

    We investigated an imaging strategy that provides simultaneous measurements of radiotracer binding and behavior in awake, freely moving animals. In this strategy, animals are injected intravenously (i.v.) through a catheterized line and permitted to move freely for 30 min during uptake of the imaging agent, in this case 11C-raclopride. After this Awake Uptake period, animals are anesthetized and scanned for 25 min. We tested the utility of this strategy for measuring changes in striatal 11C-raclopride binding under control conditions (awake and freely moving in the home cage) and with several drug challenges: a loading dose of unlabeled raclopride, pretreatment with methamphetamine (METH) or pretreatment with gamma-vinyl-GABA [S+-GVG] followed by METH. An additional group of animals underwent a stress paradigm that we have previously shown increases brain dopamine. For drug challenge experiments, the change in 11C-raclopride binding was compared to data from animals that were anesthetized for the uptake period ("Anesthetized Uptake") and full time activity curves were used to calculate 11C-raclopride binding. Regardless of the drug treatment protocol, there was no difference in 11C-raclopride striatum to cerebellum ratio between the Awake versus the Anesthetized Uptake conditions. Awake and Anesthetized groups demonstrated over 90% occupancy of dopamine receptors with a loading dose of cold raclopride, both groups demonstrated approximately 30% reduction in 11C-raclopride binding from METH pretreatment and this effect was modulated to the same degree by GVG under both uptake conditions. Restraint during Awake Uptake decreased 11C-raclopride binding by 29%. These studies support a unique molecular imaging strategy in which radiotracer uptake occurs in freely moving animals, after which they are anesthetized and scanned. This imaging strategy extends the applicability of small animal PET to include functional neurotransmitter imaging and the neurochemical correlates

  1. Methylphenidate Increases Glutamate Uptake in Bergmann Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Guillem, Alain M; Martínez-Lozada, Zila; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; López-Bayghen, Esther; López-Bayghen, Bruno; Calleros, Oscar A; Campuzano, Marco R; Ortega, Arturo

    2015-11-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory transmitter in the vertebrate brain, exerts its actions through the activation of specific membrane receptors present in neurons and glial cells. Over-stimulation of glutamate receptors results in neuronal death, phenomena known as excitotoxicity. A family of glutamate uptake systems, mainly expressed in glial cells, removes the amino acid from the synaptic cleft preventing an excessive glutamatergic stimulation and thus neuronal damage. Autism spectrum disorders comprise a group of syndromes characterized by impaired social interactions and anxiety. One or the most common drugs prescribed to treat these disorders is Methylphenidate, known to increase dopamine extracellular levels, although it is not clear if its sedative effects are related to a plausible regulation of the glutamatergic tone via the regulation of the glial glutamate uptake systems. To gain insight into this possibility, we used the well-established model system of cultured chick cerebellum Bergmann glia cells. A time and dose-dependent increase in the activity and protein levels of glutamate transporters was detected upon Methylphenidate exposure. Interestingly, this increase is the result of an augmentation of both the synthesis as well as the insertion of these protein complexes in the plasma membrane. These results favour the notion that glial cells are Methylphenidate targets, and that by these means could regulate dopamine turnover.

  2. Changes in dopamine transporter binding in nucleus accumbens following chronic self-administration cocaine: heroin combinations.

    PubMed

    Pattison, Lindsey P; McIntosh, Scot; Sexton, Tammy; Childers, Steven R; Hemby, Scott E

    2014-10-01

    Concurrent use of cocaine and heroin (speedball) has been shown to exert synergistic effects on dopamine neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), as observed by significant increases in extracellular dopamine levels and compensatory elevations in the maximal reuptake rate of dopamine. The present studies were undertaken to determine whether chronic self-administration of cocaine, heroin or a combination of cocaine:heroin led to compensatory changes in the abundance and/or affinity of high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Saturation binding of the cocaine analog [(125) I] 3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2β-carboxylic acid methyl ester ([(125) I]RTI-55) in rat NAc membranes resulted in binding curves that were best fit to two-site binding models, allowing calculation of dissociation constant (Kd ) and binding density (Bmax ) values corresponding to high- and low-affinity DAT binding sites. Scatchard analysis of the saturation binding curves clearly demonstrate the presence of high- and low- affinity binding sites in the NAc, with low-affinity sites comprising 85 to 94% of the binding sites. DAT binding analyses revealed that self-administration of cocaine and a cocaine:heroin combination increased the affinity of the low-affinity site for the cocaine congener RTI-55 compared to saline. These results indicate that the alterations observed following chronic speedball self-administration are likely due to the cocaine component alone; thus further studies are necessary to elaborate upon the synergistic effect of cocaine:heroin combinations on the dopamine system in the NAc.

  3. (S)-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl]-5-[125I]iodo- 2-methoxybenzamide hydrochloride, a new selective radioligand for dopamine D-2 receptors.

    PubMed

    de Paulis, T; Janowsky, A; Kessler, R M; Clanton, J A; Smith, H E

    1988-10-01

    From salicyclic acid, the two enantiomers of N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl]-5-iodo-2-methoxybenzamide (6b) were prepared in a five-step synthesis. With use of Heindel's triazene method for introduction of the radionuclide, the iodine-125-labeled substituted benzamide was obtained with a calculated specific activity of 136 Ci/mmol and 14% radiochemical yield. For the preparation of the iodine-125-labeled benzamide with higher specific activity, this method was unsuccessful and utilization of the corresponding tri-n-butyltin derivative was required. Treatment of the latter in dilute hydrochloric acid with sodium iodide-125 and chloramine-T gave [125I](S)-6b in 56% radiochemical yield and at least 97% radiochemical purity. The displacement of [125I](S)-6b and [3H](S)-sulpiride from their respective binding sites in striatal rat brain homogenates using various neuroleptic agents showed that (S)-6b has the same binding profile but more potent binding for dopamine D-2 receptors than has sulpiride. These experiments also indicate that the S enantiomer of 6b is a specific ligand (KD = 1.2 nM) for the D-2 receptor. Further, the octanol-water partition coefficient of (S)-6b as determined by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography was found to be 40 times greater than that for sulpiride. Thus (S)-6b has a lipophilicity that will allow a relatively higher uptake into the brain compared to sulpiride. In vivo experiments with rats show that [125I](S)-6b penetrates readily into the brain and is preferentially localized in the striatum as compared to the cerebellum, the ratio of uptake being 7.2 to 1, 60 min after injection. These observations of good brain penetration and high affinity and selectivity for D-2 receptors indicate that the corresponding iodine-123-labeled benzamide may be a useful ligand for the noninvasive visualization study of dopamine D-2 receptor sites in vivo by single photon emission computed tomography.

  4. Glutamate Counteracts Dopamine/PKA Signaling via Dephosphorylation of DARPP-32 Ser-97 and Alteration of Its Cytonuclear Distribution.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Akinori; Matamales, Miriam; Musante, Veronica; Valjent, Emmanuel; Kuroiwa, Mahomi; Kitahara, Yosuke; Rebholz, Heike; Greengard, Paul; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Nairn, Angus C

    2017-01-27

    The interaction of glutamate and dopamine in the striatum is heavily dependent on signaling pathways that converge on the regulatory protein DARPP-32. The efficacy of dopamine/D1 receptor/PKA signaling is regulated by DARPP-32 phosphorylated at Thr-34 (the PKA site), a process that inhibits protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and potentiates PKA action. Activation of dopamine/D1 receptor/PKA signaling also leads to dephosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Ser-97 (the CK2 site), leading to localization of phospho-Thr-34 DARPP-32 in the nucleus where it also inhibits PP1. In this study the role of glutamate in the regulation of DARPP-32 phosphorylation at four major sites was further investigated. Experiments using striatal slices revealed that glutamate decreased the phosphorylation states of DARPP-32 at Ser-97 as well as Thr-34, Thr-75, and Ser-130 by activating NMDA or AMPA receptors in both direct and indirect pathway striatal neurons. The effect of glutamate in decreasing Ser-97 phosphorylation was mediated by activation of PP2A. In vitro phosphatase assays indicated that the PP2A/PR72 heterotrimer complex was likely responsible for glutamate/Ca(2+)-regulated dephosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Ser-97. As a consequence of Ser-97 dephosphorylation, glutamate induced the nuclear localization in cultured striatal neurons of dephospho-Thr-34/dephospho-Ser-97 DARPP-32. It also reduced PKA-dependent DARPP-32 signaling in slices and in vivo Taken together, the results suggest that by inducing dephosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Ser-97 and altering its cytonuclear distribution, glutamate may counteract dopamine/D1 receptor/PKA signaling at multiple cellular levels.

  5. Immunomodulatory Effects Mediated by Dopamine.

    PubMed

    Arreola, Rodrigo; Alvarez-Herrera, Samantha; Pérez-Sánchez, Gilberto; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Cruz-Fuentes, Carlos; Flores-Gutierrez, Enrique Octavio; Garcés-Alvarez, María Eugenia; de la Cruz-Aguilera, Dora Luz; Medina-Rivero, Emilio; Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Quintero-Fabián, Saray; Pavón, Lenin

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine (DA), a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS), has modulatory functions at the systemic level. The peripheral and central nervous systems have independent dopaminergic system (DAS) that share mechanisms and molecular machinery. In the past century, experimental evidence has accumulated on the proteins knowledge that is involved in the synthesis, reuptake, and transportation of DA in leukocytes and the differential expression of the D1-like (D1R and D5R) and D2-like receptors (D2R, D3R, and D4R). The expression of these components depends on the state of cellular activation and the concentration and time of exposure to DA. Receptors that are expressed in leukocytes are linked to signaling pathways that are mediated by changes in cAMP concentration, which in turn triggers changes in phenotype and cellular function. According to the leukocyte lineage, the effects of DA are associated with such processes as respiratory burst, cytokine and antibody secretion, chemotaxis, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity. In clinical conditions such as schizophrenia, Parkinson disease, Tourette syndrome, and multiple sclerosis (MS), there are evident alterations during immune responses in leukocytes, in which changes in DA receptor density have been observed. Several groups have proposed that these findings are useful in establishing clinical status and clinical markers.

  6. Addiction: Beyond dopamine reward circuitry

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.-J.; Fowler, J.S.; Tomasi, D.; Telang, F.

    2011-09-13

    Dopamine (DA) is considered crucial for the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, but its role in addiction is much less clear. This review focuses on studies that used PET to characterize the brain DA system in addicted subjects. These studies have corroborated in humans the relevance of drug-induced fast DA increases in striatum [including nucleus accumbens (NAc)] in their rewarding effects but have unexpectedly shown that in addicted subjects, drug-induced DA increases (as well as their subjective reinforcing effects) are markedly blunted compared with controls. In contrast, addicted subjects show significant DA increases in striatum in response to drug-conditioned cues that are associated with self-reports of drug craving and appear to be of a greater magnitude than the DA responses to the drug. We postulate that the discrepancy between the expectation for the drug effects (conditioned responses) and the blunted pharmacological effects maintains drug taking in an attempt to achieve the expected reward. Also, whether tested during early or protracted withdrawal, addicted subjects show lower levels of D2 receptors in striatum (including NAc), which are associated with decreases in baseline activity in frontal brain regions implicated in salience attribution (orbitofrontal cortex) and inhibitory control (anterior cingulate gyrus), whose disruption results in compulsivity and impulsivity. These results point to an imbalance between dopaminergic circuits that underlie reward and conditioning and those that underlie executive function (emotional control and decision making), which we postulate contributes to the compulsive drug use and loss of control in addiction.

  7. Dopamine, behavioral economics, and effort.

    PubMed

    Salamone, John D; Correa, Merce; Farrar, Andrew M; Nunes, Eric J; Pardo, Marta

    2009-01-01

    There are numerous problems with the hypothesis that brain dopamine (DA) systems, particularly in the nucleus accumbens, directly mediate the rewarding or primary motivational characteristics of natural stimuli such as food. Research and theory related to the functions of mesolimbic DA are undergoing a substantial conceptual restructuring, with the traditional emphasis on hedonia and primary reward yielding to other concepts and lines of inquiry. The present review is focused upon the involvement of nucleus accumbens DA in behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Viewed from the framework of behavioral economics, the effects of accumbens DA depletions and antagonism on food-reinforced behavior are highly dependent upon the work requirements of the instrumental task, and DA depleted rats are more sensitive to increases in response costs (i.e., ratio requirements). Moreover, interference with accumbens DA transmission exerts a powerful influence over effort-related choice behavior. Rats with accumbens DA depletions or antagonism reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks that have high response requirements, and instead these rats select a less-effortful type of food-seeking behavior. Nucleus accumbens DA and adenosine interact in the regulation of effort-related functions, and other brain structures (anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, ventral pallidum) also are involved. Studies of the brain systems regulating effort-based processes may have implications for understanding drug abuse, as well as energy-related disorders such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia in depression and other neurological disorders.

  8. Immunomodulatory Effects Mediated by Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Herrera, Samantha; Pérez-Sánchez, Gilberto; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Cruz-Fuentes, Carlos; Flores-Gutierrez, Enrique Octavio; Quintero-Fabián, Saray

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine (DA), a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS), has modulatory functions at the systemic level. The peripheral and central nervous systems have independent dopaminergic system (DAS) that share mechanisms and molecular machinery. In the past century, experimental evidence has accumulated on the proteins knowledge that is involved in the synthesis, reuptake, and transportation of DA in leukocytes and the differential expression of the D1-like (D1R and D5R) and D2-like receptors (D2R, D3R, and D4R). The expression of these components depends on the state of cellular activation and the concentration and time of exposure to DA. Receptors that are expressed in leukocytes are linked to signaling pathways that are mediated by changes in cAMP concentration, which in turn triggers changes in phenotype and cellular function. According to the leukocyte lineage, the effects of DA are associated with such processes as respiratory burst, cytokine and antibody secretion, chemotaxis, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity. In clinical conditions such as schizophrenia, Parkinson disease, Tourette syndrome, and multiple sclerosis (MS), there are evident alterations during immune responses in leukocytes, in which changes in DA receptor density have been observed. Several groups have proposed that these findings are useful in establishing clinical status and clinical markers. PMID:27795960

  9. Dopamine, Behavioral Economics, and Effort

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, John D.; Correa, Merce; Farrar, Andrew M.; Nunes, Eric J.; Pardo, Marta

    2009-01-01

    There are numerous problems with the hypothesis that brain dopamine (DA) systems, particularly in the nucleus accumbens, directly mediate the rewarding or primary motivational characteristics of natural stimuli such as food. Research and theory related to the functions of mesolimbic DA are undergoing a substantial conceptual restructuring, with the traditional emphasis on hedonia and primary reward yielding to other concepts and lines of inquiry. The present review is focused upon the involvement of nucleus accumbens DA in behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Viewed from the framework of behavioral economics, the effects of accumbens DA depletions and antagonism on food-reinforced behavior are highly dependent upon the work requirements of the instrumental task, and DA depleted rats are more sensitive to increases in response costs (i.e., ratio requirements). Moreover, interference with accumbens DA transmission exerts a powerful influence over effort-related choice behavior. Rats with accumbens DA depletions or antagonism reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks that have high response requirements, and instead these rats select a less-effortful type of food-seeking behavior. Nucleus accumbens DA and adenosine interact in the regulation of effort-related functions, and other brain structures (anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, ventral pallidum) also are involved. Studies of the brain systems regulating effort-based processes may have implications for understanding drug abuse, as well as energy-related disorders such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia in depression and other neurological disorders. PMID:19826615

  10. Dopamine release in the basal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Margaret E.; Patel, Jyoti C.; Cragg, Stephanie J.

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a key transmitter in the basal ganglia, yet DA transmission does not conform to several aspects of the classic synaptic doctrine. Axonal DA release occurs through vesicular exocytosis and is action-potential and Ca2+ dependent. However, in addition to axonal release, DA neurons in midbrain exhibit somatodendritic release, by an incompletely understood, but apparently exocytotic mechanism. Even in striatum, axonal release sites are controversial, with evidence for DA varicosities that lack postsynaptic specialization, and largely extrasynaptic DA receptors and transporters. Moreover, DA release is often assumed to reflect a global response to a population of activities in midbrain DA neurons, whether tonic or phasic, with precise timing and specificity of action governed by other basal ganglia circuits. This view has been reinforced by anatomical evidence showing dense axonal DA arbors throughout striatum, and a lattice network formed by DA axons and glutamatergic input from cortex and thalamus. Nonetheless, localized DA transients are seen in vivo using voltammetric methods with high spatial and temporal resolution. Mechanistic studies using similar methods in vitro have revealed local regulation of DA release by other transmitters and modulators, as well as by proteins known to be disrupted in Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders. Notably, the actions of most other striatal transmitters on DA release also do not conform to the synaptic doctrine, with the absence of direct synaptic contacts for glutamate, GABA and aceylcholie (ACh) on striatal DA axons. Overall, the findings reviewed here indicate that DA signaling in the basal ganglia is sculpted by cooperation between the timing and pattern of DA input and those of local regulatory factors. PMID:21939738

  11. Determinants of buildup of the toxic dopamine metabolite DOPAL in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S; Sullivan, Patti; Holmes, Courtney; Miller, Gary W; Alter, Shawn; Strong, Randy; Mash, Deborah C; Kopin, Irwin J; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2013-09-01

    Intra-neuronal metabolism of dopamine (DA) begins with production of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL),which is toxic. According to the 'catecholaldehyde hypothesis', DOPAL destroys nigrostriatal DA terminals and contributes to the profound putamen DA deficiency that characterizes Parkinson’s disease (PD). We tested the feasibility of using post-mortem patterns of putamen tissue catechols to examine contributions of altered activities of the type 2 vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) and aldehyde dehydrogenase(ALDH) to the increased DOPAL levels found in PD. Theoretically, the DA : DOPA concentration ratio indicates vesicular uptake, and the 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid: DOPAL ratio indicates ALDH activity. We validated these indices in transgenic mice with very low vesicular uptake VMAT2-Lo) or with knockouts of the genes encoding ALDH1A1 and ALDH2 (ALDH1A1,2 KO), applied these indices in PD putamen, and estimated the percent decreases in vesicular uptake and ALDH activity in PD. VMAT2-Lo mice had markedly decreased DA:DOPA (50 vs. 1377, p < 0.0001),and ALDH1A1,2 KO mice had decreased 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid:DOPAL (1.0 vs. 11.2, p < 0.0001). In PD putamen, vesicular uptake was estimated to be decreased by 89% and ALDH activity by 70%. Elevated DOPAL levels in PD putamen reflect a combination of decreased vesicular uptake of cytosolic DA and decreased DOPAL detoxification by ALDH.

  12. Genetic disruption of dopamine production results in pituitary adenomas and severe prolactinemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dopamine release from tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons into the median eminence activates dopamine-D2 receptors in the pituitary gland where it inhibits lactotroph function. We have previously described genetic dopamine-deficient mouse models which lack the ability to synthesize dopamine. Because...

  13. Role of dopamine in distal retina.

    PubMed

    Popova, E

    2014-05-01

    Dopamine is the most abundant catecholamine in the vertebrate retina. Despite the description of retinal dopaminergic cells three decades ago, many aspects of their function in the retina remain unclear. There is no consensus among the authors about the stimulus conditions for dopamine release (darkness, steady or flickering light) as well as about its action upon the various types of retinal cells. Many contradictory results exist concerning the dopamine effect on the gross electrical activity of the retina [reflected in electroretinogram (ERG)] and the receptors involved in its action. This review summarized current knowledge about the types of the dopaminergic neurons and receptors in the retina as well as the effects of dopamine receptor agonists and antagonists on the light responses of photoreceptors, horizontal and bipolar cells in both nonmammalian and mammalian retina. Special focus of interest concerns their effects upon the diffuse ERG as a useful tool for assessment of the overall function of the distal retina. An attempt is made to reveal some differences between the dopamine actions upon the activity of the ON versus OFF channel in the distal retina. The author has included her own results demonstrating such differences.

  14. Androgen-induced sexual dimorphism in high affinity dopamine binding in the brain transcends the hypothalamic-limbic region.

    PubMed Central

    Jalilian-Tehrani, M. H.; Karakiulakis, G.; Le Blond, C. B.; Powell, R.; Thomas, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    1 High affinity binding of [3H]-dopamine and [3H]-5-hydroxytryptamine ([3H]-5-HT) was measured in membrane fractions prepared from cerebral cortex, amygdala, hypothalamus, thalamus and brain stem of rats of either sex and of rats which had been either neonatally castrated or androgenized. 2 Binding was measured in rats of 8, 20 and 30 days old as well as in adults. 3 [3H]-dopamine bound with approximately 30 nM affinity ahd [3H]-5-HT with approximately 10 nM affinity to all areas of the brain tested. The relative inhibitory effects of haloperidol, apomorphine, cis-flupenthixol, unlabelled dopamine, noradrenaline, spiroperone, (+)-butaclamol, fluphenazine, pimozide and 5-HT on [3H]-dopamine binding in the cerebral cortex was consistent with receptor status for the binding components there as were the relative inhibitory effects of methysergide, dopamine, fluoxetine and ouabain on [3H]-5-HT binding in the fore brain. 4 Neither [3H]-dopamine nor [3H]-5-HT binding varied with the state of the sexual cycle in females. 5 There were no sexual differences in [3H]-5-HT binding in any of the brain areas tested nor was it affected by neonatal androgenization or neonatal castration. 6 [3H]-dopamine binding was greater in the cerebral cortex and amygdala of male than of female rats. These differences could be mimicked artificially by neonatal castration of males (female type development) or neonatal androgenization of females (male type development). Sexual dimorphism did not become overt until 20 days of age and did not extend to hypothalamus, thalamus or brain stem. 7 It is concluded that neonatal sex differences in exposure to steroid hormones has permanent effects on the number of dopamine binding sites in the cerebral cortex and is suggested that this sexual dimorphism extends to the amygdala. PMID:7074286

  15. Dopamine system dysregulation by the ventral subiculum as the common pathophysiological basis for schizophrenia psychosis, psychostimulant abuse, and stress.

    PubMed

    Grace, Anthony A

    2010-11-01

    The dopamine system is under multiple forms of regulation, and in turn provides effective modulation of system responses. Dopamine neurons are known to exist in several states of activity. The population activity, or the proportion of dopamine neurons firing spontaneously, is controlled by the ventral subiculum of the hippocampus. In contrast, burst firing, which is proposed to be the behaviorally salient output of the dopamine system, is driven by the brainstem pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPTg). When an animal is exposed to a behaviorally salient stimulus, the PPTg elicits a burst of action potentials in the dopamine neurons. However, this bursting only occurs in the portion of the dopamine neuron population that is firing spontaneously. This proportion is regulated by the ventral subiculum. Therefore, the ventral subiculum provides the gain, or the amplification factor, for the behaviorally salient stimulus. The ventral subiculum itself is proposed to carry information related to the environmental context. Thus, the ventral subiculum will adjust the responsivity of the dopamine system based on the needs of the organism and the characteristics of the environment. However, this finely tuned system can be disrupted in disease states. In schizophrenia, a disruption of interneuronal regulation of the ventral subiculum is proposed to lead to an overdrive of the dopamine system, rendering the system in a constant hypervigilant state. Moreover, amphetamine sensitization and stressors also appear to cause an abnormal dopaminergic drive. Such an interaction could underlie the risk factors of drug abuse and stress in the precipitation of a psychotic event. On the other hand, this could point to the ventral subiculum as an effective site of therapeutic intervention in the treatment or even the prevention of schizophrenia.

  16. Neuronal Source of Plasma Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, David S.; Holmes, Courtney

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Determinants of plasma norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine concentrations are well known; those of the third endogenous catecholamine, dopamine (DA), remain poorly understood. We tested in humans whether DA enters the plasma after corelease with NE during exocytosis from sympathetic noradrenergic nerves. METHODS We reviewed plasma catecholamine data from patients referred for autonomic testing and control subjects under the following experimental conditions: during supine rest and in response to orthostasis; intravenous yohimbine (YOH), isoproterenol (ISO), or glucagon (GLU), which augment exocytotic release of NE from sympathetic nerves; intravenous tri-methaphan (TRI) or pentolinium (PEN), which decrease exocytotic NE release; or intravenous tyramine (TYR), which releases NE by nonexocytotic means. We included groups of patients with pure autonomic failure (PAF), bilateral thoracic sympathectomies (SNS-x), or multiple system atrophy (MSA), since PAF and SNS-x are associated with noradrenergic denervation and MSA is not. RESULTS Orthostasis, YOH, ISO, and TYR increased and TRI/PEN decreased plasma DA concentrations. Individual values for changes in plasma DA concentrations correlated positively with changes in NE in response to orthostasis (r =0.72, P <0.0001), YOH (r = 0.75, P < 0.0001), ISO (r = 0.71, P < 0.0001), GLU (r = 0.47, P = 0.01), and TYR (r = 0.67, P < 0.0001). PAF and SNS-x patients had low plasma DA concentrations. We estimated that DA constitutes 2%– 4% of the catecholamine released by exocytosis from sympathetic nerves and that 50%–90% of plasma DA has a sympathoneural source. CONCLUSIONS Plasma DA is derived substantially from sympathetic noradrenergic nerves. PMID:18801936

  17. Imaging of Brain Dopamine Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.; Thanos, Panayotis K.; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is typically associated with abnormal eating behaviors. Brain imaging studies in humans implicate the involvement of dopamine (DA)-modulated circuits in pathologic eating behavior(s). Food cues increase striatal extracellular DA, providing evidence for the involvement of DA in the nonhedonic motivational properties of food. Food cues also increase metabolism in the orbitofrontal cortex indicating the association of this region with the motivation for food consumption. Similar to drug-addicted subjects, striatal DA D2 receptor availability is reduced in obese subjects, which may predispose obese subjects to seek food as a means to temporarily compensate for understimulated reward circuits. Decreased DA D2 receptors in the obese subjects are also associated with decreased metabolism in prefrontal regions involved in inhibitory control, which may underlie their inability to control food intake. Gastric stimulation in obese subjects activates cortical and limbic regions involved with self-control, motivation, and memory. These brain regions are also activated during drug craving in drug-addicted subjects. Obese subjects have increased metabolism in the somatosensory cortex, which suggests an enhanced sensitivity to the sensory properties of food. The reduction in DA D2 receptors in obese subjects coupled with the enhanced sensitivity to food palatability could make food their most salient reinforcer putting them at risk for compulsive eating and obesity. The results from these studies suggest that multiple but similar brain circuits are disrupted in obesity and drug addiction and suggest that strategies aimed at improving DA function might be beneficial in the treatment and prevention of obesity. PMID:21603099

  18. Detection of cell surface dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiping; Bergson, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine receptors are a class of metabotropic G protein-coupled receptors. Plasma membrane expression is a key determinant of receptor signaling, and one that is regulated both by extra and intracellular cues. Abnormal dopamine receptor signaling is implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, as well as drug abuse. Here, we describe in detail the application of two complementary applications of protein biotinylation and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting and quantifying levels of dopamine receptors expressed on the cell surface. In the biotinylation method, cell surface receptors are labeled with Sulfo-NHS-biotin. The charge on the sulfonyl facilitates water solubility of the reactive biotin compound and prevents its diffusion across the plasma membrane. In the ELISA method, surface labeling is achieved with antibodies specific to extracellular epitopes on the receptors, and by fixing the cells without detergent such that the plasma membrane remains intact.

  19. Detection of Cell Surface Dopamine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jiping; Bergson, Clare

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine receptors are a class of metabotropic G protein-coupled receptors. Plasma membrane expression is a key determinant of receptor signaling, and one that is regulated both by extra and intracellular cues. Abnormal dopamine receptor signaling is implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, as well as drug abuse. Here, we describe in detail the application of two complementary applications of protein biotinylation and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbant assay (ELISA) for detecting and quantifying levels of dopamine receptors expressed on the cell surface. In the biotinylation method, cell surface receptors are labeled with Sulfo-NHS-biotin. The charge on the sulfonyl facilitates water solubility of the reactive biotin compound and prevents its diffusion across the plasma membrane. In the ELISA method, cells surface labeling is achieved with antibodies specific to extracellular epitopes on the receptors, and by fixing the cells without detergent such that the plasma membrane remains intact. PMID:23296774

  20. Dopamine, T cells and multiple sclerosis (MS).

    PubMed

    Levite, Mia; Marino, Franca; Cosentino, Marco

    2017-03-10

    Dopamine is a key neurotransmitter that induces critical effects in the nervous system and in many peripheral organs, via 5 dopamine receptors (DRs): D1R-D5R. Dopamine also induces many direct and very potent effects on many DR-expressing immune cells, primarily T cells and dendritic cells. In this review, we focus only on dopamine receptors, effects and production in T cells. Dopamine by itself (at an optimal concentration of~0.1 nM) induces multiple function of resting normal human T cells, among them: T cell adhesion, chemotactic migration, homing, cytokine secretion and others. Interestingly, dopamine activates resting effector T cells (Teffs), but suppresses regulatory T cells (Tregs), and both effects lead eventually to Teff activation. Dopamine-induced effects on T cells are dynamic, context-sensitive and determined by the: T cell activation state, T cell type, DR type, and dopamine concentration. Dopamine itself, and also few dopaminergic molecules/ drugs that are in clinical use for cardiac, neurological and other non-immune indications, have direct effects on human T cells (summarized in this review). These dopaminergic drugs include: dopamine = intropin, L-DOPA, bromocriptine, pramipexole, pergolide, haloperidol, pimozide, and amantadine. Other dopaminergic drugs were not yet tested for their direct effects on T cells. Extensive evidence in multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) show dopaminergic dysregulations in T cells in these diseases: D1-like DRs are decreased in Teffs of MS patients, and dopamine does not affect these cells. In contrast, D1-like DRs are increased in Tregs of MS patients, possibly causing functional Treg impairment in MS. Treatment of MS patients with interferon β (IFN-β) increases D1-like DRs and decreases D2-like DRs in Teffs, decreases D1-like DRs in Tregs, and most important: restores responsiveness of patient's Teffs to dopamine. DR agonists and antagonists confer some benefits in

  1. How Addictive Drugs Disrupt Presynaptic Dopamine Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Sulzer, David

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental principle that unites addictive drugs appears to be that each enhances synaptic dopamine by means that dissociate it from normal behavioral control, so that they act to reinforce their own acquisition. This occurs via the modulation of synaptic mechanisms involved in learning, including enhanced excitation or disinhibition of dopamine neuron activity, blockade of dopamine reuptake, and altering the state of the presynaptic terminal to enhance evoked over basal transmission. Amphetamines offer an exception to such modulation in that they combine multiple effects to produce non-exocytic stimulation-independent release of neurotransmitter via reverse transport independent from normal presynaptic function. Questions on the molecular actions of addictive drugs, prominently including the actions of alcohol and solvents, remain unresolved, but their ability to co-opt normal presynaptic functions helps to explain why treatment for addiction has been challenging. PMID:21338876

  2. Vascular dopamine receptors: Demonstration and characterization by in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Brodde, O E

    1982-07-26

    Substantial evidence has accumulated that in certain vascular beds dopamine produces its relaxant effect through stimulation of specific dopamine receptors. The goal of this review is to describe several in vitro models (perfused mesenteric vessels of the dog; renal, mesenteric, splenic, coronary and cerebral arterial strips of rabbits, dogs and cats; perfused kidney of the rat) recently developed to demonstrate such specific relaxations induced by dopamine and dopaminomimetics. On these models studies on structure-activity relationship for activation of the dopamine receptor resulted in the following order of potency for agonists: SK&F 38393 (partial agonist) greater than epinine greater than A-6, 7-DTN greater than or equal to dopamine greater than N, N-di-n-propyl-dopamine (partial agonist) greater than apomorphine (partial agonist). The dopamine receptor antagonists (+)-butaclamol, cis-alpha-flupenthixol, metoclopramide, droperidol and bulbocapnine were found to competitively antagonize dopamine induced relaxation. In addition, in two isolated organ systems (rabbit mesenteric artery, rat perfused kidney) stereospecificity of the vascular dopamine receptor was demonstrated with the isomers of butaclamol. With the development of several in vitro models demonstrating a specific antagonism against dopamine induced relaxation an important requirement for definition of a specific dopamine receptor if fulfilled according to classical pharmacological criteria. Thus, there can be do doubt on the existence of post-synaptic dopamine receptors mediating vasodilation in certain vascular tissues.

  3. Supersensitive Kappa Opioid Receptors Promotes Ethanol Withdrawal-Related Behaviors and Reduce Dopamine Signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jamie H.; Karkhanis, Anushree N.; Chen, Rong; Gioia, Dominic; Lopez, Marcelo F.; Becker, Howard C.; McCool, Brian A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic ethanol exposure reduces dopamine transmission in the nucleus accumbens, which may contribute to the negative affective symptoms associated with ethanol withdrawal. Kappa opioid receptors have been implicated in withdrawal-induced excessive drinking and anxiety-like behaviors and are known to inhibit dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. The effects of chronic ethanol exposure on kappa opioid receptor-mediated changes in dopamine transmission at the level of the dopamine terminal and withdrawal-related behaviors were examined. Methods: Five weeks of chronic intermittent ethanol exposure in male C57BL/6 mice were used to examine the role of kappa opioid receptors in chronic ethanol-induced increases in ethanol intake and marble burying, a measure of anxiety/compulsive-like behavior. Drinking and marble burying were evaluated before and after chronic intermittent ethanol exposure, with and without kappa opioid receptor blockade by nor-binaltorphimine (10mg/kg i.p.). Functional alterations in kappa opioid receptors were assessed using fast scan cyclic voltammetry in brain slices containing the nucleus accumbens. Results: Chronic intermittent ethanol-exposed mice showed increased ethanol drinking and marble burying compared with controls, which was attenuated with kappa opioid receptor blockade. Chronic intermittent ethanol-induced increases in behavior were replicated with kappa opioid receptor activation in naïve mice. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry revealed that chronic intermittent ethanol reduced accumbal dopamine release and increased uptake rates, promoting a hypodopaminergic state of this region. Kappa opioid receptor activation with U50,488H concentration-dependently decreased dopamine release in both groups; however, this effect was greater in chronic intermittent ethanol-treated mice, indicating kappa opioid receptor supersensitivity in this group. Conclusions: These data suggest that the chronic intermittent ethanol-induced increase

  4. Gray-matter volume, midbrain dopamine D2/D3 receptors and drug craving in methamphetamine users.

    PubMed

    Morales, A M; Kohno, M; Robertson, C L; Dean, A C; Mandelkern, M A; London, E D

    2015-06-01

    Dysfunction of the mesocorticolimbic system has a critical role in clinical features of addiction. Despite evidence suggesting that midbrain dopamine receptors influence amphetamine-induced dopamine release and that dopamine is involved in methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity, associations between dopamine receptors and gray-matter volume have been unexplored in methamphetamine users. Here we used magnetic resonance imaging and [(18)F]fallypride positron emission tomography, respectively, to measure gray-matter volume (in 58 methamphetamine users) and dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability (binding potential relative to nondisplaceable uptake of the radiotracer, BPnd) (in 31 methamphetamine users and 37 control participants). Relationships between these measures and self-reported drug craving were examined. Although no difference in midbrain D2/D3 BPnd was detected between methamphetamine and control groups, midbrain D2/D3 BPnd was positively correlated with gray-matter volume in the striatum, prefrontal cortex, insula, hippocampus and temporal cortex in methamphetamine users, but not in control participants (group-by-midbrain D2/D3 BPnd interaction, P<0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons). Craving for methamphetamine was negatively associated with gray-matter volume in the insula, prefrontal cortex, amygdala, temporal cortex, occipital cortex, cerebellum and thalamus (P<0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons). A relationship between midbrain D2/D3 BPnd and methamphetamine craving was not detected. Lower midbrain D2/D3 BPnd may increase vulnerability to deficits in gray-matter volume in mesocorticolimbic circuitry in methamphetamine users, possibly reflecting greater dopamine-induced toxicity. Identifying factors that influence prefrontal and limbic volume, such as midbrain BPnd, may be important for understanding the basis of drug craving, a key factor in the maintenance of substance-use disorders.

  5. Salvinorin A Regulates Dopamine Transporter Function Via A Kappa Opioid Receptor and ERK1/2-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kivell, Bronwyn; Uzelac, Zeljko; Sundaramurthy, Santhanalakshmi; Rajamanickam, Jeyaganesh; Ewald, Amy; Chefer, Vladimir; Jaligam, Vanaja; Bolan, Elizabeth; Simonson, Bridget; Annamalai, Balasubramaniam; Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; Prisinzano, Thomas; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A.; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D.; Sitte, Harald H.; Ramamoorthy, Sammanda; Shippenberg, Toni S.

    2014-01-01

    Salvinorin A (SalA), a selective κ-opioid receptor (KOR) agonist, produces dysphoria and pro-depressant like effects. These actions have been attributed to inhibition of striatal dopamine release. The dopamine transporter (DAT) regulates dopamine transmission via uptake of released neurotransmitter. KORs are apposed to DAT in dopamine nerve terminals suggesting an additional target by which SalA modulates dopamine transmission. SalA produced a concentration-dependent, nor-binaltorphimine (BNI)- and pertussis toxin-sensitive increase of ASP+ accumulation in EM4 cells coexpressing myc-KOR and YFP-DAT, using live cell imaging and the fluorescent monoamine transporter substrate, trans 4-(4-(dimethylamino)-styryl)-N-methylpyridinium) (ASP+). Other KOR agonists also increased DAT activity that was abolished by BNI pretreatment. While SalA increased DAT activity, SalA treatment decreased serotonin transporter (SERT) activity and had no effect on norepinephrine transporter (NET) activity. In striatum, SalA increased the Vmax for DAT mediated DA transport and DAT surface expression. SalA up-regulation of DAT function is mediated by KOR activation and the KOR-linked extracellular signal regulated kinase-½ (ERK1/2) pathway. Co-immunoprecipitation and BRET studies revealed that DAT and KOR exist in a complex. In live cells, DAT and KOR exhibited robust FRET signals under basal conditions. SalA exposure caused a rapid and significant increase of the FRET signal. This suggests that the formation of KOR and DAT complexes is promoted in response to KOR activation. Together, these data suggest that enhanced DA transport and decreased DA release resulting in decreased dopamine signaling may contribute to the dysphoric and pro-depressant like effects of SalA and other KOR agonists. PMID:25107591

  6. Salvinorin A regulates dopamine transporter function via a kappa opioid receptor and ERK1/2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kivell, Bronwyn; Uzelac, Zeljko; Sundaramurthy, Santhanalakshmi; Rajamanickam, Jeyaganesh; Ewald, Amy; Chefer, Vladimir; Jaligam, Vanaja; Bolan, Elizabeth; Simonson, Bridget; Annamalai, Balasubramaniam; Mannangatti, Padmanabhan; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A; Jayanthi, Lankupalle D; Sitte, Harald H; Ramamoorthy, Sammanda; Shippenberg, Toni S

    2014-11-01

    Salvinorin A (SalA), a selective κ-opioid receptor (KOR) agonist, produces dysphoria and pro-depressant like effects. These actions have been attributed to inhibition of striatal dopamine release. The dopamine transporter (DAT) regulates dopamine transmission via uptake of released neurotransmitter. KORs are apposed to DAT in dopamine nerve terminals suggesting an additional target by which SalA modulates dopamine transmission. SalA produced a concentration-dependent, nor-binaltorphimine (BNI)- and pertussis toxin-sensitive increase of ASP(+) accumulation in EM4 cells coexpressing myc-KOR and YFP-DAT, using live cell imaging and the fluorescent monoamine transporter substrate, trans 4-(4-(dimethylamino)-styryl)-N-methylpyridinium) (ASP(+)). Other KOR agonists also increased DAT activity that was abolished by BNI pretreatment. While SalA increased DAT activity, SalA treatment decreased serotonin transporter (SERT) activity and had no effect on norepinephrine transporter (NET) activity. In striatum, SalA increased the Vmax for DAT mediated DA transport and DAT surface expression. SalA up-regulation of DAT function is mediated by KOR activation and the KOR-linked extracellular signal regulated kinase-½ (ERK1/2) pathway. Co-immunoprecipitation and BRET studies revealed that DAT and KOR exist in a complex. In live cells, DAT and KOR exhibited robust FRET signals under basal conditions. SalA exposure caused a rapid and significant increase of the FRET signal. This suggests that the formation of KOR and DAT complexes is promoted in response to KOR activation. Together, these data suggest that enhanced DA transport and decreased DA release resulting in decreased dopamine signalling may contribute to the dysphoric and pro-depressant like effects of SalA and other KOR agonists.

  7. Gray-Matter Volume, Midbrain Dopamine D2/D3 Receptors and Drug Craving in Methamphetamine Users

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Angelica A.; Kohno, Milky; Robertson, Chelsea L.; Dean, Andy C.; Mandelkern, Mark A.; London, Edythe D.

    2015-01-01

    Dysfunction of the mesocorticolimbic system plays a critical role in clinical features of addiction. Despite evidence suggesting that midbrain dopamine receptors influence amphetamine-induced dopamine release and that dopamine is involved in methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity, associations between dopamine receptors and gray-matter volume have been unexplored in methamphetamine users. Here we used magnetic resonance imaging and [18F]fallypride positron emission tomography, respectively, to measure gray-matter volume (in 58 methamphetamine users) and dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability (binding potential relative to nondisplaceable uptake of the radiotracer, BPnd) (in 31 methamphetamine users and 37 control participants). Relationships between these measures and self-reported drug craving were examined. Although no difference in midbrain D2/D3 BPnd was detected between methamphetamine and control groups, midbrain D2/D3 BPnd was positively correlated with gray-matter volume in the striatum, prefrontal cortex, insula, hippocampus and temporal cortex in methamphetamine users, but not in control participants (group-by-midbrain D2/D3 BPnd interaction, p<0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons). Craving for methamphetamine was negatively associated with gray-matter volume in the insula, prefrontal cortex, amygdala, temporal cortex, occipital cortex, cerebellum, and thalamus (p<0.05 corrected for multiple comparisons). A relationship between midbrain D2/D3 BPnd and methamphetamine craving was not detected. Lower midbrain D2/D3 BPnd may increase vulnerability to deficits in gray-matter volume in mesocorticolimbic circuitry in methamphetamine users, possibly reflecting greater dopamine-induced toxicity. Identifying factors that influence prefrontal and limbic volume, such as midbrain BPnd, may be important for understanding the basis of drug craving, a key factor in the maintenance of substance use disorders. PMID:25896164

  8. Investigation of the enzymology and pharmacology of novel substrates and inhibitors of dopamine beta-monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, S.F.

    1987-01-01

    Dopamine beta-monooxygenase (DBM) was shown to catalyze the selenoxidation of 2-(phenylseleno)ethylamines, selenium-containing analogues of dopamine, by the normal monooxygenase pathway. The compounds 2-(phenylseleno)-ethylamine (PAESe), 2-(4'-hydroxyphenylseleno)ethylamine (pOH PAESe), and 1-(phenylseleno)-2-propylamine (Me PAESe) were synthesized and fully characterized as DBM substrates. Two other classes of compounds were investigated as potential alternate substrates for DBM. The possibility of stereoselective sulfonylation of 2-(phenylsulfenyl)- ethylamine (PAESO) was considered. A unique class of compounds, 2-(phenylthio)ethanols were designed and synthesized as DBM substrates but were found to be a novel class of potent competitive inhibitors of DBM with respect to tyramine. Preliminary experiments were also performed in an effort to demonstrate that the potent antihypertensive and indirect-acting sympathomimetic activity of 2-(phenylthio)ethylamine (PAES) was a result of DBM-oxygenation of this compound in vivo. The specific reserpine-sensitive uptake of (/sup 3/H)-norepinephrine into rat brain synaptosomes was demonstrated as was the synaptosomal conversion of (/sup 3/H)-dopamine to (/sup 3/H)-norepinephrine.

  9. Dopamine receptors in a songbird brain

    PubMed Central

    Kubikova, Lubica; Wada, Kazuhiro; Jarvis, Erich D

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine is a key neuromodulatory transmitter in the brain. It acts through dopamine receptors to affect changes in neural activity, gene expression, and behavior. In songbirds, dopamine is released into the striatal song nucleus Area X, and the levels depend on social contexts of undirected and directed singing. This differential release is associated with differential expression of activity-dependent genes, such as egr1 (avian zenk), which in mammalian brain are modulated by dopamine receptors. Here we cloned from zebra finch brain cDNAs of all avian dopamine receptors: the D1 (D1A, D1B, D1D) and D2 (D2, D3, D4) families. Comparative sequence analyses of predicted proteins revealed expected phylogenetic relationships, in which the D1 family exists as single exon and the D2 family exists as spliced exon genes. In both zebra finch and chicken, the D1A, D1B, and D2 receptors were highly expressed in the striatum, the D1D and D3 throughout the pallium and within the mesopallium, respectively, and the D4 mainly in the cerebellum. Furthermore, within the zebra finch, all receptors, except for D4, showed differential expression in song nuclei relative to the surrounding regions and developmentally regulated expression that decreased for most receptors during the sensory acquisition and sensorimotor phases of song learning. Within Area X, half of the cells expressed both D1A and D2 receptors, and a higher proportion of the D1A-only-containing neurons expressed egr1 during undirected but not during directed singing. Our findings are consistent with hypotheses that dopamine receptors may be involved in song development and social context-dependent behaviors. J. Comp. Neurol. 518:741–769, 2010. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20058221

  10. Activation of transcription factor genes in striatum by cocaine: role of both serotonin and dopamine systems.

    PubMed

    Bhat, R V; Baraban, J M

    1993-10-01

    Acute administration of cocaine increases expression of the transcription factor genes c-fos and zif268 in the striatum. This response is thought to be mediated via D1 dopamine (DA) receptors, as it is blocked by the selective D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390. However, the directly acting D1 receptor agonists, apomorphine and SKF 38393, do not mimic cocaine's activation of these genes raising the possibility that D1 receptor activation is necessary, but not sufficient, to trigger transcription factor expression. Because cocaine blocks uptake of norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT), as well as DA, we examined whether cocaine's ability to inhibit NE and 5-HT uptake may contribute to its induction of c-fos and zif268 expression in striatum. In examining the effects of selective monoamine uptake inhibitors, we observed that fluoxetine or citalopram, selective inhibitors of 5-HT uptake, potentiated the ability of mazindol, a DA and NE uptake inhibitor, to induce zif268 and c-fos expression, even though these 5-HT uptake inhibitors had no effect when administered alone. In contrast, the selective NE uptake inhibitor, desipramine, administered alone, or in combination with fluoxetine, did not increase expression of zif268 or c-fos. Furthermore, selective denervation of 5-HT projections by p-chloroamphetamine treatment attenuated the increase in zif268 and c-fos expression induced by cocaine in the striatum. In contrast, selective lesions of NE projections with N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride failed to block cocaine's activation of these genes in the striatum. Taken together, these findings indicate that cocaine's ability to induce striatal expression of c-fos and zif268 is mediated by its effects on both the 5-HT and DA systems.

  11. Intra-neuronal vesicular uptake of catecholamines is decreased in patients with Lewy body diseases.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S; Holmes, Courtney; Kopin, Irwin J; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2011-08-01

    Several neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson disease (PD), are characterized by the presence of Lewy bodies - cytoplasmic inclusions containing α-synuclein protein aggregates - in the affected neurons. A poorly understood feature of Lewy body diseases is loss of sympathetic nerves in the heart and other organs, manifesting as orthostatic hypotension (OH; also known as postural hypotension). We asked whether sympathetic denervation is associated with decreased uptake of catecholamines, such as dopamine and norepinephrine, into storage vesicles within sympathetic neurons. We used 6-[18F]-dopamine (18F-DA) to track myocardial uptake and retention of catecholamines. Concurrently, the fate of intra-neuronal 18F-DA was followed by assessment of arterial plasma levels of the 18F-DA metabolite 18F-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (18F-DOPAC). The ratio of myocardial 18F-DA to arterial 18F-DOPAC provided an index of vesicular uptake. Tracer concentrations were measured in patients with PD with or without orthostatic hypotension (PD+OH, PD-No-OH); in patients with pure autonomic failure (PAF, a Lewy body disease without parkinsonism); in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA, a non-Lewy body synucleinopathy); and in normal controls. Patients with PD+OH or PAF had decreased vesicular 18F-DA uptake and accelerated 18F-DA loss, compared with MSA and control subjects. PD-No-OH patients could be subtyped into one of these categories based on their initial 18F-DA uptake. We conclude that sympathetic denervation in Lewy body diseases is associated with decreased vesicular uptake of neuronal catecholamines, suggesting that vesicular monoamine transport is impaired. Vesicular uptake may constitute a novel target for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

  12. 2,5-Disubstituted tetrahydrofurans as selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Voelker, Troy; Xia, Haiji; Fandrick, Keith; Johnson, Robert; Janowsky, Aaron; Cashman, John R

    2009-03-01

    Enhancement of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) neurotransmission is a viable means of treating depression. On the basis of this observation, agents that inhibit re-uptake of 5-HT were prepared based on (-)-cocaine and aryltropanes as lead compounds because they are reasonably potent 5-HT re-uptake inhibitors. Molecular dissection of an aryltropane provided a series of 5- and 6-membered ring compounds. From among this library of compounds a series of disubstituted tetrahydrofurans bearing 2-alkyl aryl and 5-alkyl amino groups were identified as having highly potent and selective 5-HT re-uptake inhibition. The compounds were evaluated for their ability to compete with radiolabeled RTI-55 binding and to inhibit re-uptake of neurotransmitters at the human dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine transporters. Based on potency (e.g., K(i)=800 pM) and significant functional selectivity (e.g., IC(50) ratios for human dopamine:serotonin or norepinephrine:serotonin, >or=1397) highly potent and selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors were identified. Optimal features playing a dominant role in binding affinity and re-uptake inhibition included lipophilic substitution on the aromatic moiety, trans relative stereochemistry of the 2,5-disubstituted tetrahydrofuran ring, and a total of four or five methylene groups between the alkyl amine and the alkyl aryl moiety and the tetrahydrofuran group. A number of the most potent serotonin re-uptake inhibitors were tested in Balb/c mice in the forced-swim test (FST), a behavioral test used to measure the effects of antidepressant agents. Acute administration of 32c (10mg/kg), or 32d (10mg/kg) ip tended to decrease the duration of mouse immobility in the FST although the effect was not statistically significant.

  13. Endocytotic uptake of nutrients in carnivorous plants.

    PubMed

    Adlassnig, Wolfram; Koller-Peroutka, Marianne; Bauer, Sonja; Koshkin, Edith; Lendl, Thomas; Lichtscheidl, Irene K

    2012-07-01

    Carnivorous plants trap, digest and absorb animals in order to supplement their mineral nutrition. Nutrients absorbed by the plant include different nitrogen species, phosphate, potassium, trace elements and small organic compounds. Uptake is usually thought to be performed via specific channels, but this study provides evidence that endocytosis is involved as well. Traps of the carnivorous plants Nepenthes coccinea, Nepenthes ventrata, Cephalotus follicularis, Drosophyllum lusitanicum, Drosera capensis, Dionaea muscipula, Aldrovanda vesiculosa, Genlisea violacea × lobata, Sarracenia psittacina and Sarracenia purpurea were stained with methylene blue in order to identify possible sites of uptake. The permeable parts of the traps were incubated with fluorescein isothiocyanate labelled bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) and other fluorescent endocytosis markers, combined with the soluble protein BSA or respiratory inhibitors. Uptake was studied by confocal microscopy. In Nepenthes, small fluorescent vesicles became visible 1 h after incubation with FITC-BSA. These vesicles fused to larger compartments within 30 h. A similar behaviour was found in the related genera Drosera, Dionaea, Aldrovanda and Drosophyllum but also in Cephalotus with glands of different evolutionary origin. In Genlisea and Sarracenia, no evidence for endocytosis was found. We propose that in many carnivorous plants, nutrient uptake by carriers is supplemented by endocytosis, which enables absorption and intracellular digestion of whole proteins. The advantage for the plant of reducing secretion of enzymes for extracellular digestion is evident.

  14. Understanding uptake of continuous quality improvement in Indigenous primary health care: lessons from a multi-site case study of the Audit and Best Practice for Chronic Disease project

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Experimentation with continuous quality improvement (CQI) processes is well underway in Indigenous Australian primary health care. To date, little research into how health organizations take up, support, and embed these complex innovations is available on which services can draw to inform implementation. In this paper, we examine the practices and processes in the policy and organisational contexts, and aim to explore the ways in which they interact to support and/or hinder services' participation in a large scale Indigenous primary health care CQI program. Methods We took a theory-driven approach, drawing on literature on the theory and effectiveness of CQI systems and the Greenhalgh diffusion of innovation framework. Data included routinely collected regional and service profile data; uptake of tools and progress through the first CQI cycle, and data collected quarterly from hub coordinators on their perceptions of barriers and enablers. A total of 48 interviews were also conducted with key people involved in the development, dissemination, and implementation of the Audit and Best Practice for Chronic Disease (ABCD) project. We compiled the various data, conducted thematic analyses, and developed an in-depth narrative account of the processes of uptake and diffusion into services. Results Uptake of CQI was a complex and messy process that happened in fits and starts, was often characterised by conflicts and tensions, and was iterative, reactive, and transformational. Despite initial enthusiasm, the mixed successes during the first cycle were associated with the interaction of features of the environment, the service, the quality improvement process, and the stakeholders, which operated to produce a set of circumstances that either inhibited or enabled the process of change. Organisations had different levels of capacity to mobilize resources that could shift the balance toward supporting implementation. Different forms of leadership and organisational

  15. PET evaluation of the dopamine system of the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Gatley, S. |

    1996-07-01

    Dopamine plays a pivotal role in the regulation and control of movement, motivation and cognition. It also is closely linked to reward, reinforcement and addiction. Abnormalities in brain dopamine are associated with many neurological and psychiatric disorders including Parkinson`s disease, schizophrenia and substance abuse. This close association between dopamine and neurological and psychiatric diseases and with substance abuse make it an important topic in research in the neurosciences and an important molecular target in drug development. PET enables the direct measurement of components of the dopamine system in the living human brain. It relies on radiotracers which label dopamine receptors, dopamine transporters, precursors of dopamine or compounds which have specificity for the enzymes which degrade dopamine. Additionally, by using tracers that provide information on regional brain metabolism or blood flow as well as neurochemically specific pharmacological interventions, PET can be used to assess the functional consequences of change in brain dopamine activity. PET dopamine measurements have been used to investigate the normal human brain and its involvement in psychiatric and neurological diseases. It has also been used in psychopharmacological research to investigate dopamine drugs used in the treatment of Parkinson`s disease and of schizophrenia as well as to investigate the effects of drugs of abuse on the dopamine system. Since various functional and neurochemical parameters can be studied in the same subject, PET enables investigation of the functional integrity of the dopamine system in the human brain and investigation of the interactions of dopamine with other neurotransmitters. This paper summarizes the different tracers and experimental strategies developed to evaluate the various elements of the dopamine system in the human brain with PET and their applications to clinical research. 254 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Enhanced Dopamine Transporter Activity in Middle-Aged Gdnf Heterozygous Mice

    PubMed Central

    Littrell, Ofelia M.; Pomerleau, Francois; Huettl, Peter; Surgener, Stewart; McGinty, Jacqueline F.; Middaugh, Lawrence D.; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte; Gerhardt, Greg A.; Boger, Heather A.

    2010-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) supports the viability of midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons that degenerate in Parkinson’s disease. Middle aged, 12-month-old, Gdnf heterozygous (Gdnf+/−) mice have diminished spontaneous locomotor activity and enhanced synaptosomal DA uptake compared to wildtype mice. In this study, dopamine transporter (DAT) function in middle-aged, 12-month-old Gdnf+/− mice was more thoroughly investigated using in vivo electrochemistry. Gdnf+/− mice injected with the DAT inhibitor, nomifensine, exhibited significantly more locomotor activity than wildtype mice. In vivo electrochemistry with carbon fiber microelectrodes demonstrated enhanced clearance of DA in the striatum of Gdnf+/− mice, suggesting greater surface expression of DAT than in wildtype littermates. Additionally, 12 month old Gdnf+/− mice expressed greater D2 receptor mRNA and protein in the striatum than wildtype mice. Neurochemical analyses of striatal tissue samples indicated significant reductions in DA and a faster DA metabolic rate in Gdnf+/− mice than in wildtype mice. Altogether, these data support an important role for GDNF in the regulation of uptake, synthesis, and metabolism of DA during aging. PMID:21144620

  17. Modulating dopamine release by optogenetics in transgenic mice reveals terminal dopaminergic dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yao; Driscoll, Nicolette; Ozden, Ilker; Yu, Zeyang; Nurmikko, Arto V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Dopamine (DA) release and uptake dynamics in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) have important implications for neurological diseases and mammalian animal behaviors. We demonstrate here the use of cell-type-specific optogenetic targeting in conjunction with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry applied to brain slices prepared from specifically tailored transgenic mice, which conditionally express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) through dopamine transporter (DAT)-Cre. Terminal dopaminergic dynamics and the direct manipulation of induced DA release level by controlling light intensity, pulse width, and the shape of stimulation waveforms were studied. Effective cell terminal-targeting optogenetic induction of DA release at physiological levels in NAc is demonstrated and discussed. It was found that delivering more light energy by increasing stimulation intensity and length is not the only way to control DA release; the temporal shape of the stimulus waveform at light onset is also critically related to induced DA concentrations. In addition, DA uptake dynamics as well as the recovery of the presynaptic releasable DA pool are studied and modeled. More broadly, our experimental findings provide important further evidence for effectively applying optogenetics to induce neurotransmitter release in the behaviorally relevant region of the brain in a highly cell-type selective context. PMID:26171413

  18. Age-related decline in motor behavior and striatal dopamine transporter in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Yue, Feng; Zeng, Sien; Wu, Di; Yi, Deqiao; Alex Zhang, Y; Chan, Piu

    2012-08-01

    Advanced human aging is associated with progressive declines of motor function and a risk factor for Parkinson's disease, which mainly involves central nigrostriatal dopaminergic system. The present study investigated age-related changes in motor behaviors and alterations of the number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic terminals in non-human primates. A total of 30 cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) of age 3.5-15.5 years were studied. Motor behaviors including upper limb movement time and the amount of overall home cage activity were quantitatively assessed using a modified movement assessment panel and a newly developed webcam-based monitoring system. The function of the dopaminergic system was semi-quantitatively measured by (99m)Tc-TRODAT-1 uptake rates, a dopamine transporter (DAT) specific radiopharmaceutical with SPECT imaging. The results showed a significant decline in motor behaviors associated with aging which were significantly correlated with age-related decreases of (99m)Tc-TRODAT-1 uptake. A further partial correlation analysis independent of age indicated that age contributed to the relationship between striatal DAT levels and motor behaviors. Our results indicate that normal aging-related dopamine physiology influences certain aspects of motor behaviors and suggest that aging-associated dysfunction in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system may be an important factor contributing to the decline of motor behaviors in aging cynomolgus monkeys.

  19. Quadruplex Integrated DNA (QuID) Nanosensors for Monitoring Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Jennifer M.; Skipwith, Christopher G.; Clark, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine is widely innervated throughout the brain and critical for many cognitive and motor functions. Imbalances or loss in dopamine transmission underlie various psychiatric disorders and degenerative diseases. Research involving cellular studies and disease states would benefit from a tool for measuring dopamine transmission. Here we show a Quadruplex Integrated DNA (QuID) nanosensor platform for selective and dynamic detection of dopamine. This nanosensor exploits DNA technology and enzyme recognition systems to optically image dopamine levels. The DNA quadruplex architecture is designed to be compatible in physically constrained environments (110 nm) with high flexibility, homogeneity, and a lower detection limit of 110 µM. PMID:26287196

  20. Local acamprosate modulates dopamine release in the rat nucleus accumbens through NMDA receptors: an in vivo microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Cano-Cebrián, M J; Zornoza-Sabina, T; Guerri, C; Polache, A; Granero, L

    2003-02-01

    The effects of acamprosate on the in vivo dopamine extracellular levels in the nucleus accumbens and the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in these effects were investigated. Microdialysis in freely moving rats was used to assess dopamine levels before and during simultaneous perfusion of acamprosate and/or different agonists or antagonists of NMDA receptors. Perfusion with acamprosate at concentrations of 0.5 and 5 mM provoked a concentration-dependent increase in extracellular dopamine in nucleus accumbens. The lowest concentration of acamprosate assayed (0.05 mM) had no effect on dopamine levels. Infusion of NMDA (25 and 500 microM) and the glutamate uptake blocker, L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxilic acid (PDC) (0.5 mM) into the NAc caused a significant increase in DA, whereas acamprosate (0.05 mM) co-infusion with these compounds blocked or attenuated the NMDA and PDC-induced increases in DA levels. Co-infusion of the selective antagonist of NMDA receptors, DL-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5) (400 microM) with acamprosate (0.5 mM), did not reduce the increase of DA levels induced by acamprosate. These results demonstrate that acamprosate is able to modulate DA extracellular levels in NAc via NMDA receptors and suggest that acamprosate acts as an antagonist of NMDA receptors.

  1. Inositol uptake in rat aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Rapoport, R.M.; Van Gorp, C.; Chang, Ki-Churl )

    1990-01-01

    {sup 3}H-inositol uptake into deendothelialized aorta was linear for at least 2 h and was composed of both a saturable, Na{sup +}-dependent, and a nonsaturable, Na{sup +}-independent component. The Na{sup +}-dependent component of inositol uptake had a K{sub m} of 50 {mu}M and a V{sub max} of 289 pmol/mg prot/h. Exposure to LiCl, ouabain, or Ca{sup 2+} - free Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate solution inhibited uptake. Metabolic poisoning with dinitrophenol, as well as incubation with phloretin, an inhibitor of carrier-mediated hexose transport, also inhibited uptake. Exposure to norepinephrine decreased inositol uptake, while phorbol myristate acetate was without effect. Isobutylmethylxanthine significantly increased inositol uptake, while the increased uptake due to dibutyryl cyclic AMP and forskolin were not statistically significant. Sodium nitroprusside, and activator of guanylate cyclase, and 8-bromo cyclic GMP, were without effect on uptake, as was methylene blue, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase. Inositol uptake into the aorta was increased when the endothelium was allowed to remain intact, although this effect was likely due to uptake in both the endothelial and smooth muscle cells.

  2. Interactions of dopamine and the release of [3H]-taurine and [3H]-glycine from the isolated retina of the rat.

    PubMed

    Pycock, C J; Smith, L F

    1983-02-01

    1 The dose-related, calcium-dependent, potassium-stimulated release of preloaded [(3)H]-dopamine from the superfused rat retina has been demonstrated.2 A high-affinity uptake system for dopamine exists in rat retina in vitro; K(m) value was calculated as 1.89 muM, V(max) value as 1.4 nmol g(-1) tissue h(-1).3 Dopamine (0.8 and 4 mM) inhibited the spontaneous release of [(3)H]-glycine from retina, and in the case of 0.8 mM dopamine this inhibitory effect was antagonized by 10 muM (+)-butaclamol but not by 10 muM (-)-butaclamol.4 The potassium-evoked (25 mM) release of [(3)H]-glycine from rat retina was similarly inhibited by dopamine (0.4-4 mM) in a dose-related manner when added to the superfusate with the potassium. The effect of 0.8 mM dopamine was antagonized by 10 muM (+)-butaclamol but not by 10 muM (-)-butaclamol.5 Dopamine (4 mM) significantly reduced the spontaneous release of [(3)H]-taurine from rat retina.6 The potassium-stimulated (25 mM) release of [(3)H]-taurine occurred after the cessation of the depolarizing stimulus. This delayed release of [(3)H]-taurine was unaffected if dopamine was applied to the superfusate at the same time as the potassium, but it was significantly reduced if dopamine (0.8 and 4 mM) was applied after the depolarizing stimulus had been removed and during the actual amino acid release phase.7 The inhibition of K(+)-stimulated (25 mM) delayed release of [(3)H]-taurine by applying dopamine (0.8 mM) after the depolarizing stimulus was blocked by 10 muM (+)-butaclamol but not by 10 muM (-)-butaclamol.8 The results are discussed with respect to the possible neurotransmitter role for dopamine within the rat retina, and its possible interaction with glycine and taurine.

  3. Methamphetamine Self-Administration in Mice Decreases GIRK Channel-Mediated Currents in Midbrain Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Amanda L.; Varela, Erika; Bettinger, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Background: Methamphetamine is a psychomotor stimulant with abuse liability and a substrate for catecholamine uptake transporters. Acute methamphetamine elevates extracellular dopamine, which in the midbrain can activate D2 autoreceptors to increase a G-protein gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) conductance that inhibits dopamine neuron firing. These studies examined the neurophysiological consequences of methamphetamine self-administration on GIRK channel-mediated currents in dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area. Methods: Male DBA/2J mice were trained to self-administer intravenous methamphetamine. A dose response was conducted as well as extinction and cue-induced reinstatement. In a second study, after at least 2 weeks of stable self-administration of methamphetamine, electrophysiological brain slice recordings were conducted on dopamine neurons from self-administering and control mice. Results: In the first experiment, ad libitum-fed, nonfood-trained mice exhibited a significant increase in intake and locomotion following self-administration as the concentration of methamphetamine per infusion was increased (0.0015–0.15mg/kg/infusion). Mice exhibited extinction in responding and cue-induced reinstatement. In the second experiment, dopamine cells in both the substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area from adult mice with a history of methamphetamine self-administration exhibited significantly smaller D2 and GABAB receptor-mediated currents compared with control mice, regardless of whether their daily self-administration sessions had been 1 or 4 hours. Interestingly, the effects of methamphetamine self-administration were not present when intracellular calcium was chelated by including BAPTA in the recording pipette. Conclusions: Our results suggest that methamphetamine self-administration decreases GIRK channel-mediated currents in dopaminergic neurons and that this effect may be calcium dependent. PMID:25522412

  4. Characterization of dopamine D2 receptors in the pituitary of the African catfish, Clarias gariepinus

    SciTech Connect

    Van Asselt, L.A.; Goos, H.J.; De Leeuw, R.; Peter, R.E.; Hol, E.M.; Wassenberg, F.P.; Van Oordt, P.G. )

    1990-10-01

    Dopamine receptors in the pituitary of the African catfish, Clarias gariepinus, were characterized using ({sup 3}H)spiperone as radioligand. Specific binding of ({sup 3}H)spiperone to pituitary membranes reached equilibrium within 60 min of incubation. The binding of the radioligand was tissue specific since the amount of binding was linear with pituitary membrane content in the incubations. In addition, pituitary membranes were observed to bind considerably more ({sup 3}H)spiperone, compared to membrane preparation of various other tissues. Saturation experiments revealed the presence of a single class of high affinity/low capacity binding sites. The binding characteristics, estimated by Scatchard analysis, were: Kd = 3.2 +/- 0.5 x 10(-9) M and Bmax = 105 +/- 5 fmol/mg protein. Specific binding was displaceable with dopamine and with various specific D2 agonists and antagonists. The nature of displacement curves resembles those observed in studies on mammalian dopamine receptors. Binding experiments with cell fractions, obtained after centrifugation of dispersed pituitary cells over a Percoll density gradient, showed that most ({sup 3}H)spiperone binding was obtained in an enriched gonadotropic cell fraction. This observation indicates that the receptor characteristics, estimated with the ({sup 3}H)spiperone assay, are representative for dopamine receptors on the gonadotropic cells.

  5. Viral-mediated temporally controlled dopamine production in a rat model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Gang; Okada, Takashi; Kodera, Mika; Nara, Yuko; Takino, Naomi; Muramatsu, Chieko; Ikeguchi, Kunihiko; Urano, Fumi; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Metzger, Daniel; Chambon, Pierre; Nakano, Imaharu; Ozawa, Keiya; Muramatsu, Shin-Ichi

    2006-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is necessary to avoid possible adverse effects of gene therapy due to excess synthesis of transgene products. To reduce transgene expression, we developed a viral vector-mediated somatic regulation system using inducible Cre recombinase. A recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing Cre recombinase fused to a mutated ligand-binding domain of the estrogen receptor alpha (CreER(T2)) was delivered along with AAV vectors expressing dopamine-synthesizing enzymes to rats of a Parkinson disease model. Treatment with 4-hydroxytamoxifen, a synthetic estrogen receptor modulator, activated Cre recombinase within the transduced neurons and induced selective excision of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) coding sequence flanked by loxP sites, leading to a reduction in transgene-mediated dopamine synthesis. Using this strategy, aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) activity was retained so that l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa), a substrate for AADC, could be converted to dopamine in the striatum and the therapeutic effects of L-dopa preserved, even after reduction of TH expression in the case of dopamine overproduction. Our data demonstrate that viral vector-mediated inducible Cre recombinase can serve as an in vivo molecular switch, allowing spatial and temporal control of transgene expression, thereby potentially increasing the safety of gene therapy.

  6. Dopamine neurons from transgenic mice with a knockout of the p53 gene resist MPTP neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Trimmer, P A; Smith, T S; Jung, A B; Bennett, J P

    1996-09-01

    We have examined MPTP toxicity to dopamine neurons of mice homozygous for a transgenic knockout of the p53 growth control gene (p53-/-). MPTP at a total dose of 96 mg/kg administered in four doses over two days produced a non-homogeneous loss of striatal dopamine transport sites and quantitatively reduced 3H-mazindol binding to similar degrees in p53-/- and wild type controls 2 and 3 weeks after starting MPTP. Nigral DA neurons stained immunohistochemically for tyrosine hydroxylase were counted using both manual and automated methods and found to be reduced 29-34% in wild type controls but were not reduced in p53-/-. Mean DA neuronal surface areas were reduced 63-68% by MPTP in controls and 35-50% in p53-/-. We conclude that p53 protein appears necessary for complete expression of MPTP neurotoxicity to dopamine neurons. Our findings suggest that the p53 gene and other growth control genes may regulate dopamine neuronal death in PD.

  7. Dopamine-first’ mechanism enables the rational engineering of the norcoclaurine synthase aldehyde activity profile

    PubMed Central

    Lichman, Benjamin R; Gershater, Markus C; Lamming, Eleanor D; Pesnot, Thomas; Sula, Altin; Keep, Nicholas H; Hailes, Helen C; Ward, John M

    2015-01-01

    Norcoclaurine synthase (NCS) (EC 4.2.1.78) catalyzes the Pictet–Spengler condensation of dopamine and an aldehyde, forming a substituted (S)-tetrahydroisoquinoline, a pharmaceutically important moiety. This unique activity has led to NCS being used for both in vitro biocatalysis and in vivo recombinant metabolism. Future engineering of NCS activity to enable the synthesis of diverse tetrahydroisoquinolines is dependent on an understanding of the NCS mechanism and kinetics. We assess two proposed mechanisms for NCS activity: (a) one based on the holo X-ray crystal structure and (b) the ‘dopamine-first’ mechanism based on computational docking. Thalictrum flavum NCS variant activities support the dopamine-first mechanism. Suppression of the non-enzymatic background reaction reveals novel kinetic parameters for NCS, showing it to act with low catalytic efficiency. This kinetic behaviour can account for the ineffectiveness of recombinant NCS in in vivo systems, and also suggests NCS may have an in planta role as a metabolic gatekeeper. The amino acid substitution L76A, situated in the proposed aldehyde binding site, results in the alteration of the enzyme's aldehyde activity profile. This both verifies the dopamine-first mechanism and demonstrates the potential for the rational engineering of NCS activity. PMID:25620686

  8. Dopamine-melanin nanofilms for biomimetic structural coloration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tong-Fei; Hong, Jong-Dal

    2015-02-09

    This article describes the formation of dopamine-melanin thin films (50-200 nm thick) at an air/dopamine solution interface under static conditions. Beneath these films, spherical melanin granules formed in bulk liquid phase. The thickness of dopamine-melanin films at the interface relied mainly on the concentration of dopamine solution and the reaction time. A plausible mechanism underlining dopamine-melanin thin film formation was proposed based on the hydrophobicity of dopamine-melanin aggregates and the mass transport of the aggregates to the air/solution interface as a result of convective flow. The thickness of the interfacial films increased linearly with the dopamine concentration and the reaction time. The dopamine-melanin thin film and granules (formed in bulk liquid phase) with a double-layered structure were transferred onto a solid substrate to mimic the (keratin layer)/(melanin granules) structure present in bird plumage, thereby preparing full dopamine-melanin thin-film reflectors. The reflected color of the thin-film reflectors depended on the film thickness, which could be adjusted according to the dopamine concentration. The reflectance of the resulted reflectors exhibited a maximal reflectance value of 8-11%, comparable to that of bird plumage (∼11%). This study provides a useful, simple, and low-cost approach to the fabrication of biomimetic thin-film reflectors using full dopamine-melanin materials.

  9. Extracellular dopamine and alterations on dopamine transporter are related to reserpine toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Reckziegel, Patrícia; Chen, Pan; Caito, Sam; Gubert, Priscila; Soares, Félix Alexandre Antunes; Fachinetto, Roselei; Aschner, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Reserpine is used as an animal model of parkinsonism. We hypothesized that the involuntary movements induced by reserpine in rodents are induced by dopaminergic toxicity caused by extracellular dopamine accumulation. The present study tested the effects of reserpine on the dopaminergic system in Caenorhabditis elegans. Reserpine was toxic to worms (decreased the survival, food intake, development and changed egg laying and defecation cycles). In addition, reserpine increased the worms' locomotor rate on food and decreased dopamine levels. Morphological evaluations of dopaminergic CEP neurons confirmed neurodegeneration characterized by decreased fluorescence intensity and the number of worms with intact CEP neurons, and increased number of shrunken somas per worm. These effects were unrelated to reserpine's effect on decreased expression of the dopamine transporter, dat-1. Interestingly, the locomotor rate on food and the neurodegenerative parameters fully recovered to basal conditions upon reserpine withdrawal. Furthermore, reserpine decreased survival in vesicular monoamine transporter and dat-1 loss-of-function mutant worms. In addition, worms pre-exposed to dopamine followed by exposure to reserpine had decreased survival. Reserpine activated gst-4, which controls a phase II detoxification enzymes downstream of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived-2)-like 2. Our findings establish that the dopamine transporter, dat-1, plays an important role in reserpine toxicity, likely by increasing extracellular dopamine concentrations.

  10. Impulse control disorders and dopamine dysregulation syndrome associated with dopamine agonist therapy in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fenu, Sandro; Wardas, Jadwiga; Morelli, Micaela

    2009-09-01

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged linking disorders in the impulsive-compulsive spectrum in Parkinson's disease to dopamine receptor agonist treatment. These disorders include hypersexuality, gambling and, to a minor extent, compulsive shopping and eating, as well as dopamine dysregulation syndrome, characterized by an addictive pattern toward dopamine replacement therapy and stereotyped behaviors, such as punding. These syndromes, which have only recently been recognized and are still underdiagnosed, have deleterious social consequences that warrant interventions at the clinical level and promotion of research at the preclinical level. In this review, we first provide a summary of features of Parkinson's disease and current pharmacological therapies associated with the development of dopamine dysregulation syndrome and impulsive-compulsive disorders. We also examine the dopamine receptors and brain areas important in reward and compulsive behaviors. We then critically examine the neuroadaptations in dopaminergic circuitries and the literature concerning gambling, hypersexuality, and other addictive behaviors in parkinsonian patients. Finally, we focus on suggestions pointing to a role for dopamine D(3) receptors and sensitization phenomena as the main factors which may be the origin of these disorders.

  11. Dopamine receptor in anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, I; Murakami, H; Iwayama, Y; Yoshida, Y; Miki, S

    1981-04-01

    Effects of dopamine, N-methyl-, ethyl- and propyl-derivatives of dopamine, and alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor stimulants on catch contraction of anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis were tested. The test drugs except the beta-adrenoceptor stimulants relaxed catch contraction. Dopamine was most active and substitution of amino group in dopamine with ethyl and propyl decreased activity considerably. The concentration-curves of dopamine, its derivatives and norepinephrine shifted in parallel with application of haloperidol but were not influenced by the alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor antagonists. These results suggest that relaxation of catch contraction by catecholamines is mediated through a dopamine receptor. This muscle is considered to be suitable for a study of the dopamine receptor.

  12. Phencyclidine: behavioral and biochemical evidence supporting a role for dopamine.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K M

    1983-06-01

    Pharmacological studies of phencyclidine (PCP)-induced behaviors such as stereotypy and turning suggest that PCP is an indirectly acting dopamine (DA) agonist with some anticholinergic potential. In vitro studies show that PCP is a potent, competitive inhibitor of monoamine uptake. PCP has also been shown to stimulate synaptosomal striatal tyrosine hydroxylase activity via a release of DA (which normally inhibits this enzyme). The mechanism by which PCP releases DA is unknown, but is similar to that of methylphenidate and distinct from that of amphetamine. In vivo studies also show similarities between PCP and the nonamphetamine class of stimulants. For example, PCP and amfonelic acid, but not amphetamine, potentiate haloperidol-induced DA metabolism. This effect can be blocked by baclofen, which suggests a dependence on nigrostriatal impulse flow. Other studies suggest that PCP releases a pool of DA that is in rapid equilibrium with the vesicular compartment, thereby activating a feedback mechanism (probably transsynaptic) that inhibits the synthesis of DA. Despite the similarities between PCP and nonamphetamine stimulants, there are both behavioral and biochemical anomalies that caution against the strict classification of PCP as a nonamphetamine stimulant.

  13. Effects of baclofen on dopamine-dependent behaviors in mice.

    PubMed

    Balsara, J J; Muley, M P; Vaidya, A S; Chandorkar, A G

    1981-01-01

    Baclofen, the parachlorophenyl analog of GABA, was found to induce catalepsy and to inhibit the traction response in mice. However, baclofen pretreatment, instead of antagonizing methamphetamine stereotypy and apomorphine-induced cage climbing behavior, was found to potentiate these behaviors, thereby ruling out the possibility of its possessing postsynaptic dopamine (DA) receptor blocking activity. The possible mechanism involved in the induction of catalepsy and in the inhibition of the traction response by baclofen is discussed on the basis that baclofen, by inhibiting the firing of the nigrostriatal and mesolimbic DA neurons, reduces the release of DA and thereby produces a functional lack of DA at postsynaptic DA receptor sites with resultant induction of catalepsy and inhibition of the traction response. Further, the hyper-responsiveness to methamphetamine and apomorphine is explained on the basis that, as the postsynaptic DA receptors are acutely deprived of their transmitter, following baclofen pretreatment, they become supersensitive to the DA agonists.

  14. Spermidine Uptake by Mitochondria of Helianthus tuberosus.

    PubMed

    Pistocchi, R; Antognoni, F; Bagni, N; Zannoni, D

    1990-03-01

    In the present work evidence is provided that spermidine, a polyamine largely present in plant tissues, may be transported, at physiological concentrations, into the matrix space of mitochondria isolated from tubers of Helianthus tuberosus L. cv OB1 (Jerusalem artichoke). It is concluded that the movement of spermidine strictly depends on membrane potential, since it is drastically blocked by valinomycin and only slightly sensitive to nigericin. Mg(2+) and K(+) inhibit the transport of spermidine in line with the general concept that these cations compete for the same binding sites on the mitochondrial membrane. In contrast to previous data on mammalian mitochondria, spermidine uptake by plant mitochondria does not depend on the presence of inorganic phosphate. This latter result, along with evidence that Ca(2+) does not affect accumulation of spermidine, indicates that the control of the polyamine uptake mechanism in plant mitochondria is distinct from that of mammalian systems.

  15. Pharmacological characterization of the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase in cockroach brain: evidence for a distinct dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, G.L.; Gole, J.W.D.; Notman, H.J.; Downer, R.G.H.

    1987-12-21

    Dopamine increases cyclic AMP production in crude membrane preparations of cockroach brain with plateaus in cyclic AMP production occurring between 1-10 ..mu..M and 10 mM. Maximal production of cyclic AMP is 2.25 fold greater than that of control values. Octopamine also increases cyclic AMP production with a Ka of 1.4 ..mu..M and maximal production 3.5 fold greater than that of control. 5-Hydroxytryptamine does not increase cyclic AMP production. The effects of octopamine and dopamine are fully additive. The vertebrate dopamine agonists ADTN and epinine stimulate the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase (AC) with Ka values of 4.5 and 0.6 ..mu..M respectively and with maximal effectiveness 1.7 fold greater than that of control. The selective D/sub 2/-dopamine agonist LY-171555 stimulates cyclic AMP production to a similar extent with a Ka of 50 ..mu..M. Other dopamine agonists have no stimulatory effects. With the exception of mianserin, /sup 3/H-piflutixol is displaced from brain membranes by dopamine antagonists with an order of potency similar to that observed for the inhibition of dopamine-sensitive AC. The results indicate that the octopamine- and dopamine-sensitive AC in cockroach brain can be distinguished pharmacologically and the dopamine receptors coupled to AC have pharmacological characteristics distinct from vertebrate D/sup 1/- and D/sup 2/-dopamine receptors. 33 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Characterization of [3H]LS-3-134, a Novel Arylamide Phenylpiperazine D3 Dopamine Receptor Selective Radioligand

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Malik, Maninder; Taylor, Michelle; Neve, Kim A.; Mach, Robert H.; Luedtke, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    LS-3-134 is a substituted N-phenylpiperazine derivative that has been reported to exhibit a) high-affinity binding (Ki value 0.2 nM) at human D3 dopamine receptors, b) >100-fold D3 vs. D2 dopamine receptor subtype binding selectivity and c) low-affinity binding (Ki values >5,000 nM) at sigma 1 and sigma 2 receptors. Based upon a forskolin-dependent activation of the adenylyl cyclase inhibition assay, LS-3-134 is a weak partial agonist at both D2 and D3 dopamine receptor subtypes (29% and 35% of full agonist activity, respectively). In this study, [3H]-labeled LS-3-134 was prepared and evaluated to further characterize its use as a D3 dopamine receptor selective radioligand. Kinetic and equilibrium radioligand binding studies were performed. This radioligand rapidly reaches equilibrium (10-15 min at 37°C) and binds with high affinity to both human (Kd = 0.06 ± 0.01 nM) and rat (Kd = 0.2 ± 0.02 nM) D3 receptors expressed in HEK-293 cells. Direct and competitive radioligand binding studies using rat caudate and nucleus accumbens tissue indicate that [3H]LS-3-134 selectively binds a homogeneous population of binding sites with a dopamine D3 receptor pharmacological profile. Based upon these studies we propose that [3H]LS-3-134 represents a novel D3 dopamine receptor selective radioligand that can be used for studying the expression and regulation of the D3 dopamine receptor subtype. PMID:25041389

  17. Recombinant glucose uptake system

    DOEpatents

    Ingrahm, Lonnie O.; Snoep, Jacob L.; Arfman, Nico

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant organisms are disclosed that contain a pathway for glucose uptake other than the pathway normally utilized by the host cell. In particular, the host cell is one in which glucose transport into the cell normally is coupled to PEP production. This host cell is transformed so that it uses an alternative pathway for glucose transport that is not coupled to PEP production. In a preferred embodiment, the host cell is a bacterium other than Z. mobilis that has been transformed to contain the glf and glk genes of Z. mobilis. By uncoupling glucose transport into the cell from PEP utilization, more PEP is produced for synthesis of products of commercial importance from a given quantity of biomass supplied to the host cells.

  18. Studies of the biogenic amine transporters. VI. Characterization of a novel cocaine binding site, identified with [125I]RTI-55, in membranes prepared from whole rat brain minus caudate.

    PubMed

    Rothman, R B; Silverthorn, M L; Baumann, M H; Goodman, C B; Cadet, J L; Matecka, D; Rice, K C; Carroll, F I; Wang, J B; Uhl, G R

    1995-07-01

    Previous studies showed that the cocaine analog [125I]RTI-55 labels dopamine and serotonergic (5-HT) biogenic amine transporters (BATs) with high affinity. Here we characterized [125I]RTI-55 binding to membranes prepared from whole rat brain minus the caudate nuclei. Paroxetine (50 nM) was used to block [125I]RTI-55 binding to 5-HT transporter sites. Initial experiments identified drugs that displaced [125I]RTI-55 binding with moderately low slope factors. Binding surface analysis of the interaction of 3 beta-(4-chlorophenyl)tropan-2 beta-carboxylic acid phenyl ester hydrochloride (RTI-113) and 3 beta-(4-iodophenyl)tropan-2 beta-carboxylic acid phenyl ester hydrochloride (RTI-122) with [125I]RTI-55 binding sites readily resolved two binding sites for [125I]RTI-55 with Kd values of 0.44 nM and 17 nM and Bmax values of 31 and 245 fmol/mg protein. Potent 5-HT and noradrenergic uptake inhibitors had low affinity for both sites. Whereas cocaine, CFT and WIN35,065-2 were 6.0-, 25- and 14-fold selective for the first site, benztropine, PCP and the novel pyrrole, (+-)-(2RS,3aSR,8bRS)-1,2,3,3a,4,8b-hexahydro- 2-benzyl-1-methylindeno-[1,2-b]pyrrole resorcylate [(+-)-HBMP, formerly called (+-)-RTI-4793-14], were moderately selective for the second site. A single binding site with the characteristics of site 1 was resolved using COS cells transiently expressing the cloned rat dopamine transporter. Lesion studies with 6-hydroxydopamine and 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine were conducted to test the hypothesis that site 1 and site 2 are physically distinct. The data showed that these neurotoxins differentially decreased [125I]RTI-55 binding to sites 1 and 2. The differential distribution of sites 1 and 2 in rat brain provides further support for this hypothesis. Viewed collectively, these data show that [125I]RTI-55 labels a novel binding site in rat brain membranes, termed DATsite2, which is not associated with the classic dopamine, serotonin or norepinephrine transporters.

  19. μ-Opioid receptors in the stimulation of mesolimbic dopamine activity by ethanol and morphine in Long-Evans rats: a delayed effect of ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Valenta, John P.; Job, Martin O.; Mangieri, Regina A.; Schier, Christina J.; Howard, Elaina C.; Gonzales, Rueben A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Naltrexone, a non-selective opioid antagonist, decreases the euphoria and positive subjective responses to alcohol in heavy drinkers. It has been proposed that the μ-opioid receptor plays a role in ethanol reinforcement through modulation of ethanol-stimulated mesolimbic dopamine release. Objective To investigate the ability of naltrexone and β-funaltrexamine, an irreversible μ-opioid specific antagonist, to inhibit ethanol-stimulated and morphine-stimulated mesolimbic dopamine release and to determine whether opioid receptors on mesolimbic neurons contribute to these mechanisms. Methods Ethanol-naïve male Long Evans rats were given opioid receptor antagonists either intravenously, subcutaneously, or intracranially into the ventral tegmental area (VTA), followed by intravenous administration of ethanol or morphine. We measured extracellular dopamine in vivo using microdialysis probes inserted into the nucleus accumbens shell (n=114). Results Administration of naltrexone (intravenously) and β-funaltrexamine (subcutaneously), as well as intracranial injection of naltrexone into the VTA did not prevent the initiation of dopamine release by intravenous ethanol administration, but prevented it from being as prolonged. In contrast, morphine-stimulated mesolimbic dopamine release was effectively suppressed. Conclusions Our results provide novel evidence that there are two distinct mechanisms that mediate ethanol-stimulated mesolimbic dopamine release (an initial phase and a delayed phase), and that opioid receptor activation is required to maintain the delayed-phase dopamine release. Moreover, μ-opioid receptors account for this delayed-phase dopamine response, and the VTA is potentially the site of action of this mechanism. We conclude that μ-opioid receptors play different roles in the mechanisms of stimulation of mesolimbic dopamine activity by ethanol and morphine. PMID:23503684

  20. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  1. The action of a dopamine (DA1) receptor agonist, fenoldopam in human vasculature in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, A; Thom, S; Martin, G; Redman, D; Hasan, S; Sever, P

    1986-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate dopaminergic mechanisms in human vasculature using the selective vascular dopamine receptor agonist fenoldopam in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, forearm blood flow was measured plethysmographically and in vitro isolated rings of human blood vessels from a variety of sites were used for tissue bath studies. Intra-arterial fenoldopam markedly increased forearm blood flow, this effect was antagonised by (R) sulpiride, a vascular dopamine (DA1) antagonist, but not by metoclopramide, a neuronal (DA2) antagonist, or by guanethidine, an adrenergic neurone blocking agent. In vitro, fenoldopam relaxed preconstricted human renal, mesenteric and lumbar arteries, but not saphenous vein in a concentration dependent manner. (RS) sulpiride and SCH 23390 competitively antagonised this effect. These studies demonstrate the presence of a vasodilatory vascular dopamine receptor in man both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:2878679

  2. Structure of the Human Dopamine D3 Receptor in Complex with a D2/D3 Selective Antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Ellen Y.T.; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Qiang; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Hanson, Michael A.; Shi, Lei; Newman, Amy Hauck; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2010-11-30

    Dopamine modulates movement, cognition, and emotion through activation of dopamine G protein-coupled receptors in the brain. The crystal structure of the human dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) in complex with the small molecule D2R/D3R-specific antagonist eticlopride reveals important features of the ligand binding pocket and extracellular loops. On the intracellular side of the receptor, a locked conformation of the ionic lock and two distinctly different conformations of intracellular loop 2 are observed. Docking of R-22, a D3R-selective antagonist, reveals an extracellular extension of the eticlopride binding site that comprises a second binding pocket for the aryl amide of R-22, which differs between the highly homologous D2R and D3R. This difference provides direction to the design of D3R-selective agents for treating drug abuse and other neuropsychiatric indications.

  3. Pharmacological profile of the abeorphine 201-678, a potent orally active and long lasting dopamine agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Jaton, A.L.; Giger, R.K.A.; Vigouret, J.M.; Enz, A.; Frick, W.; Closse, A.; Markstein, R.

    1986-01-13

    The central dopaminergic effects of an abeorphine derivative 201-678 were compared to those of apomorphine and bromocriptine in different model systems. After oral administration, this compound induced contralateral turning in rats with 6-hydroxydopamine induced nigral lesions and exhibited strong anti-akinetic properties in rats with 6-hydroxydopamine induced hypothalamic lesions. It decreased dopamine metabolism in striatum and cortex, but did not modify noradrenaline and serotonin metabolism in the rat brain. 201-678 counteracted the in vivo increase of tyrosine hydroxylase activity induced by ..gamma..-butyrolactone. In vitro it stimulated DA-sensitive adenylate cyclase and inhibited acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices. This compound had high affinity for /sup 3/H-dopamine and /sup 3/H-clonidine binding sites. These results indicate that 201-678 is a potent, orally active dopamine agonist with a long duration of action. Furthermore it appears more selective than other dopaminergic drugs. 29 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  4. An evaluation of the interactions of antiestrogens with pituitary and striatal dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Toney, T W; Katzenellenbogen, B S

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the ability of various antiestrogens (AE's) to compete with 3H-spiroperidol for binding to membrane preparations from striatal tissue and anterior pituitary glands of immature female rats in order to determine the affinity of binding of AE's to D-2 dopamine receptors. Scatchard analyses revealed the presence of a single class of high affinity receptor sites in both the striatum and pituitary with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.33 nM and 0.40 nM, respectively, for the dopamine antagonist spiroperidol. The AE's tamoxifen, 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen (TAM-OH), CI-628, LY 117018, and a structurally related compound t-butyl-phenoxyethyl diethylamine (BPEA) were all able to compete with spiroperidol for binding to D-2 receptors and demonstrated relative binding affinities of 0.4-0.06%, with spiroperidol set at 100%. Dopamine displayed a lower affinity, 0.01%. Estradiol failed to compete with spiroperidol for D-2 receptor binding while the non-steroidal estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) showed very weak competition. For the lipophilic AE's, alteration of the level of their non-specific binding greatly affected their relative affinities in these competitive binding assays. The amine side chain on an aromatic ring appears to be a critical structural requirement in allowing the AE's to bind to the dopamine receptor. The relatively low affinity of AE's for the dopamine receptor and the high degree of interaction of AE's with other proteins suggest that only limited occupancy of D-2 receptors by AE's is likely in vivo.

  5. Comparison of Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors in Decreasing Production of the Autotoxic Dopamine Metabolite 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde in PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jinsmaa, Yunden; Sullivan, Patti; Holmes, Courtney; Kopin, Irwin J.; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2016-01-01

    According to the catecholaldehyde hypothesis, the toxic dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL) contributes to the loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson’s disease. Monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) catalyzes the conversion of intraneuronal dopamine to DOPAL and may serve as a therapeutic target. The “cheese effect”—paroxysmal hypertension evoked by tyramine-containing foodstuffs—limits clinical use of irreversible MAO-A inhibitors. Combined MAO-A/B inhibition decreases DOPAL production in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, but whether reversible MAO-A inhibitors or MAO-B inhibitors decrease endogenous DOPAL production is unknown. We compared the potencies of MAO inhibitors in attenuating DOPAL production and examined possible secondary effects on dopamine storage, constitutive release, synthesis, and auto-oxidation. Catechol concentrations were measured in cells and medium after incubation with the irreversible MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline, three reversible MAO-A inhibitors, or the MAO-B inhibitors selegiline or rasagiline for 180 minutes. Reversible MAO-A inhibitors were generally ineffective, whereas clorgyline (1 nM), rasagiline (500 nM), and selegiline (500 nM) decreased DOPAL levels in the cells and medium. All three drugs also increased dopamine and norepinephrine, decreased 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, and increased cysteinyl-dopamine concentrations in the medium, suggesting increased vesicular uptake and constitutive release, decreased dopamine synthesis, and increased dopamine spontaneous oxidation. In conclusion, clorgyline, rasagiline, and selegiline decrease production of endogenous DOPAL. At relatively high concentrations, the latter drugs probably lose their selectivity for MAO-B. Possibly offsetting increased formation of potentially toxic oxidation products and decreased formation of DOPAL might account for the failure of large clinical trials of MAO-B inhibitors to demonstrate slowing of neurodegeneration in

  6. Comparison of Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors in Decreasing Production of the Autotoxic Dopamine Metabolite 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde in PC12 Cells.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Sullivan, Patti; Holmes, Courtney; Kopin, Irwin J; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2016-02-01

    According to the catecholaldehyde hypothesis, the toxic dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL) contributes to the loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. Monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) catalyzes the conversion of intraneuronal dopamine to DOPAL and may serve as a therapeutic target. The "cheese effect"-paroxysmal hypertension evoked by tyramine-containing foodstuffs-limits clinical use of irreversible MAO-A inhibitors. Combined MAO-A/B inhibition decreases DOPAL production in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, but whether reversible MAO-A inhibitors or MAO-B inhibitors decrease endogenous DOPAL production is unknown. We compared the potencies of MAO inhibitors in attenuating DOPAL production and examined possible secondary effects on dopamine storage, constitutive release, synthesis, and auto-oxidation. Catechol concentrations were measured in cells and medium after incubation with the irreversible MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline, three reversible MAO-A inhibitors, or the MAO-B inhibitors selegiline or rasagiline for 180 minutes. Reversible MAO-A inhibitors were generally ineffective, whereas clorgyline (1 nM), rasagiline (500 nM), and selegiline (500 nM) decreased DOPAL levels in the cells and medium. All three drugs also increased dopamine and norepinephrine, decreased 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, and increased cysteinyl-dopamine concentrations in the medium, suggesting increased vesicular uptake and constitutive release, decreased dopamine synthesis, and increased dopamine spontaneous oxidation. In conclusion, clorgyline, rasagiline, and selegiline decrease production of endogenous DOPAL. At relatively high concentrations, the latter drugs probably lose their selectivity for MAO-B. Possibly offsetting increased formation of potentially toxic oxidation products and decreased formation of DOPAL might account for the failure of large clinical trials of MAO-B inhibitors to demonstrate slowing of neurodegeneration in Parkinson

  7. Numerical model for the uptake of groundwater contaminants by phreatophytes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Widdowson, M.A.; El-Sayed, A.; Landmeyer, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional solute transport models do not adequately account for the effects of phreatophytic plant systems on contaminant concentrations in shallow groundwater systems. A numerical model was developed and tested to simulate threedimensional reactive solute transport in a heterogeneous porous medium. Advective-dispersive transport is coupled to biodegradation, sorption, and plantbased attenuation processes including plant uptake and sorption by plant roots. The latter effects are a function of the physical-chemical properties of the individual solutes and plant species. Models for plant uptake were tested and evaluated using the experimental data collected at a field site comprised of hybrid poplar trees. A non-linear equilibrium isotherm model best represented site conditions.

  8. Novel poly-dopamine adhesive for a halloysite nanotube-Ru(bpy)(3)2+ electrochemiluminescent sensor.

    PubMed

    Xing, Bo; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2009-07-30

    Herein, for the first time, the electrochemiluminescent sensor based on Ru(bpy)(3) (2+)-modified electrode using dopamine as an adhesive was successfully developed. After halloysite nanotube slurry was cast on a glassy carbon electrode and dried, an alkaline dopamine solution was added on the electrode surface. Initially, polydopamine belts with dimensions of tens to hundreds of nanometers formed via oxidization of the dopamine by ambient oxygen. As the incubation time increased, the nanobelts became broader and then united with each other to form a polydopamine film. The halloysite nanotubes were embedded within the polydopamine film. The above electrode was soaked in Ru(bpy)(3) (2+) aqueous solution to adsorb Ru(bpy)(3) (2+) into the active sites of the halloysite nanotubes via cation-exchange procedure. Through this simple procedure, a Ru(bpy)(3) (2+)-modified electrode was obtained using only 6.25 microg Ru(bpy)(3) (2+), 15.0 microg dopamine, and 9.0 microg halloysite nanotubes. The electrochemistry and electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of the modified electrode was investigated using tripropylamine (TPA) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as co-reactants. The different ECL behaviors of the modified electrode using NTA and TPA as well as the contact angle measurements reflected the hydrophilic character of the electrode. The results indicate that halloysite nanotubes have a high loading capacity for Ru(bpy)(3) (2+) and that dopamine is suitable for the preparation of modified electrodes.

  9. delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol excites rat VTA dopamine neurons through activation of cannabinoid CB1 but not opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    French, E D

    1997-05-02

    Behavioral, biochemical and recent electrophysiological data have increasingly implicated the involvement of dopamine in the central actions of cannabinoid compounds. However, the site and mechanism by which cannabinoids stimulate dopamine systems has been somewhat controversial. Central opioid systems have also been suggested to play a role in some cannabinoid-induced behaviors as evidenced by their attenuation in the presence of the opioid antagonist naloxone. However, recent studies using the cannabinoid receptor-selective antagonist SR141716A suggest that the central actions of psychoactive cannabinoids are mediated principally through activation of CB1 receptors. Using single cell electrophysiological recordings in the rat we assessed the effects of both SR141716A and naloxone on delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)-induced activation of ventral tegmental dopamine neurons. While dopamine cell firing was dose-dependently increased following cumulative dosing with delta9-THC it was partially or completely inhibited following pretreatment with 0.5 and 2 mg/kg SR141716A, respectively. However, 1 and 10 mg/kg naloxone failed to alter the response to delta9-THC. These data provide the first evidence that delta9-THC-induced changes in mesolimbic dopamine neuronal activity are mediated by the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, but a causal link for the involvement of opioid systems could not be established.

  10. Uptake of radium-226 from uranium mill tailing by C-3 and C-4 plants and implications for transport of radium-226 and radon-222 into the disposal-site environment

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonell, M.M.

    1986-01-01

    Radium-226 entry into plants grown on uranium mill tailings at pH 6.5 appears to be governed primarily by movement of tailings solution into the plant. The lower transpiration ratios of C-4 photosynthetic plants as compared to C-3 plants result in lower tissue concentrations of radium-225. In each case, the distribution of radium-226 within the plants studied: corn (C-4), dwarf sunflower (C-3), tall fescue grass (C-3), and four species of Panicum (two C-3 and two C-4) exhibited an acropetal gradient, decreasing from the roots where the concentrations are relatively high to the apex of the plant. Tissue concentrations of Ra-226 decreased over time, attributable to increases in biomass while total Ra-226 levels remain constant. Release of radon from vegetated tailings was found to be directly related to the total leaf area of the plant following introduction into the plant of tailings solution. Thus, the plant pathway is shown to be an important mechanism for the transport of radium-226 and radon-222 from mill tailings into the environment. Current tailings disposal site reclamation efforts should consider the effects of the photosynthetic nature of the vegetation species and its total leaf area to reduce the potential for introduction of these elements into the site environment.

  11. Dopamine in the Brain: Hypothesizing Surfeit or Deficit Links to Reward and Addiction.

    PubMed

    Blum, Kenneth; Thanos, Peter K; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Febo, Marcelo; Baron, David; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D; Gardner, Eliot; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Fahlke, Claudia; Haberstick, Brett C; Dushaj, Kristina; Gold, Mark S

    Recently there has been debate concerning the role of brain dopamine in reward and addiction. David Nutt and associates eloquently proposed that dopamine (DA) may be central to psycho stimulant dependence and some what important for alcohol, but not important for opiates, nicotine or even cannabis. Others have also argued that surfeit theories can explain for example cocaine seeking behavior as well as non-substance-related addictive behaviors. It seems prudent to distinguish between what constitutes "surfeit" compared to" deficit" in terms of short-term (acute) and long-term (chronic) brain reward circuitry responsivity. In an attempt to resolve controversy regarding the contributions of mesolimbic DA systems to reward, we review the three main competing explanatory categories: "liking", "learning", and "wanting". They are (a) the hedonic impact -liking reward, (b) the ability to predict rewarding effects-learning and (c) the incentive salience of reward-related stimuli -wanting. In terms of acute effects, most of the evidence seems to favor the "surfeit theory". Due to preferential dopamine release at mesolimbic-VTA-caudate-accumbens loci most drugs of abuse and Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) behaviors have been linked to heightened feelings of well-being and hyperdopaminergic states.The "dopamine hypotheses" originally thought to be simple, is now believed to be quite complex and involves encoding the set point of hedonic tone, encoding attention, reward expectancy, and incentive motivation. Importantly, Willuhn et al. shows that in a self-administration paradigm, (chronic) excessive use of cocaine is caused by decreased phasic dopamine signaling in the striatum. In terms of chronic addictions, others have shown a blunted responsivity at brain reward sites with food, nicotine, and even gambling behavior. Finally, we are cognizant of the differences in dopaminergic function as addiction progresses and argue that relapse may be tied to dopamine deficiency

  12. Dopamine in the Brain: Hypothesizing Surfeit or Deficit Links to Reward and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Kenneth; Thanos, Peter K.; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Febo, Marcelo; Baron, David; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D.; Gardner, Eliot; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Fahlke, Claudia; Haberstick, Brett C.; Dushaj, Kristina; Gold, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Recently there has been debate concerning the role of brain dopamine in reward and addiction. David Nutt and associates eloquently proposed that dopamine (DA) may be central to psycho stimulant dependence and some what important for alcohol, but not important for opiates, nicotine or even cannabis. Others have also argued that surfeit theories can explain for example cocaine seeking behavior as well as non-substance-related addictive behaviors. It seems prudent to distinguish between what constitutes “surfeit” compared to” deficit” in terms of short-term (acute) and long-term (chronic) brain reward circuitry responsivity. In an attempt to resolve controversy regarding the contributions of mesolimbic DA systems to reward, we review the three main competing explanatory categories: “liking”, “learning”, and “wanting”. They are (a) the hedonic impact -liking reward, (b) the ability to predict rewarding effects-learning and (c) the incentive salience of reward-related stimuli -wanting. In terms of acute effects, most of the evidence seems to favor the “surfeit theory”. Due to preferential dopamine release at mesolimbic-VTA-caudate-accumbens loci most drugs of abuse and Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) behaviors have been linked to heightened feelings of well-being and hyperdopaminergic states.The “dopamine hypotheses” originally thought to be simple, is now believed to be quite complex and involves encoding the set point of hedonic tone, encoding attention, reward expectancy, and incentive motivation. Importantly, Willuhn et al. shows that in a self-administration paradigm, (chronic) excessive use of cocaine is caused by decreased phasic dopamine signaling in the striatum. In terms of chronic addictions, others have shown a blunted responsivity at brain reward sites with food, nicotine, and even gambling behavior. Finally, we are cognizant of the differences in dopaminergic function as addiction progresses and argue that relapse may be tied

  13. Sequence determinants of the Caenhorhabditis elegans dopamine transporter dictating in vivo axonal export and synaptic localization.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sarah B; Hardaway, J Andrew; Hardie, Shannon L; Wright, Jane; Glynn, Ryan M; Bermingham, Daniel P; Han, Qiao; Sturgeon, Sarah M; Freeman, Phyllis; Blakely, Randy D

    2017-01-01

    The monoamine neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) acts across phylogeny to modulate both simple and complex behaviors. The presynaptic DA transporter (DAT) is a major determinant of DA signaling capacity in ensuring efficient extracellular DA clearance. In humans, DAT is also a major target for prescribed and abused psychostimulants. Multiple structural determinants of DAT function and regulation have been defined, though largely these findings have arisen from heterologous expression or ex vivo cell culture studies. Loss of function mutations in the gene encoding the Caenhorhabditis elegans DAT (dat-1) produces rapid immobility when animals are placed in water, a phenotype termed swimming-induced paralysis (Swip). The ability of a DA neuron-expressed, GFP-tagged DAT-1 fusion protein (GFP::DAT-1) to localize to synapses and rescue Swip in these animals provides a facile approach to define sequences supporting DAT somatic export and function in vivo. In prior studies, we found that truncation of the last 25 amino acids of the DAT-1 C-terminus (Δ25) precludes Swip rescue, supported by a deficit in GFP::DAT-1 synaptic localization. Here, we further defined the elements within Δ25 required for DAT-1 export and function in vivo. We identified two conserved motifs ((584)KW(585) and (591)PYRKR(595)) where mutation results in a failure of GFP::DAT-1 to be efficiently exported to synapses and restore DAT-1 function. The (584)KW(585) motif conforms to a sequence proposed to support SEC24 binding, ER export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and surface expression of mammalian DAT proteins, whereas the (591)PYRKR(595) sequence conforms to a 3R motif identified as a SEC24 binding site in vertebrate G-protein coupled receptors. Consistent with a potential role of SEC24 orthologs in DAT-1 export, we demonstrated DA neuron-specific expression of a sec-24.2 transcriptional reporter. Mutations of the orthologous C-terminal sequences in human DAT (hDAT) significantly reduced

  14. Amphetamine activates calcium channels through dopamine transporter-mediated depolarization.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Krasnodara N; Solis, Ernesto; Ruchala, Iwona; De Felice, Louis J; Eltit, Jose M

    2015-11-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) and its more potent enantiomer S(+)AMPH are psychostimulants used therapeutically to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and have significant abuse liability. AMPH is a dopamine transporter (DAT) substrate that inhibits dopamine (DA) uptake and is implicated in DA release. Furthermore, AMPH activates ionic currents through DAT that modify cell excitability presumably by modulating voltage-gated channel activity. Indeed, several studies suggest that monoamine transporter-induced depolarization opens voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (CaV), which would constitute an additional AMPH mechanism of action. In this study we co-express human DAT (hDAT) with Ca(2+) channels that have decreasing sensitivity to membrane depolarization (CaV1.3, CaV1.2 or CaV2.2). Although S(+)AMPH is more potent than DA in transport-competition assays and inward-current generation, at saturating concentrations both substrates indirectly activate voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channels (CaV1.3 and CaV1.2) but not the N-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV2.2). Furthermore, the potency to achieve hDAT-CaV electrical coupling is dominated by the substrate affinity on hDAT, with negligible influence of L-type channel voltage sensitivity. In contrast, the maximal coupling-strength (defined as Ca(2+) signal change per unit hDAT current) is influenced by CaV voltage sensitivity, which is greater in CaV1.3- than in CaV1.2-expressing cells. Moreover, relative to DA, S(+)AMPH showed greater coupling-strength at concentrations that induced relatively small hDAT-mediated currents. Therefore S(+)AMPH is not only more potent than DA at inducing hDAT-mediated L-type Ca(2+) channel currents but is a better depolarizing agent since it produces tighter electrical coupling between hDAT-mediated depolarization and L-type Ca(2+) channel activation.

  15. Validation of an ELISA for urinary dopamine: applications in monitoring treatment of dopamine-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Nichkova, Mikaela; Wynveen, Paul M; Marc, David T; Huisman, Han; Kellermann, Gottfried H

    2013-06-01

    Dopamine is a catecholamine that serves as a neurotransmitter in the central and peripheral nervous system. Non-invasive, reliable, and high-throughput techniques for its quantification are needed to assess dysfunctions of the dopaminergic system and monitor therapies. We developed and validated a competitive ELISA for direct determination of dopamine in urine samples. The method provides high specificity, good accuracy, and precision (average inter-assay variation < 12%). The analysis is not affected by general urinary components and structurally related drugs and metabolites. The correlation between ELISA and LC-MS/MS analyses was very good (r = 0.986, n = 28). The reference range was 64-261 μg/g Cr (n = 64). Week-to-week biological variations of second morning urinary dopamine under free-living conditions were 23.9% for within- and 35.5% for between-subject variation (n = 10). The assay is applied in monitoring Parkinson's disease patients under different treatments. Urinary dopamine levels significantly increase in a dose-dependent manner for Parkinson's disease patients under l-DOPA treatment. The present ELISA provides a cost-effective alternative to chromatographic methods to monitor patients receiving dopamine restoring treatment to ensure appropriate dosing and clinical efficacy. The method can be used in pathological research for the assessment of possible peripheral biological markers for disorders related to the dopaminergic system.

  16. Inhibitory effects of dopamine on spinal synaptic transmission via dopamine D1-like receptors in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Kawamoto, K; Otsuguro, K; Ishizuka, M; Ito, S

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Dopamine released from the endings of descending dopaminergic nerve fibres in the spinal cord may be involved in modulating functions such as locomotion and nociception. Here, we examined the effects of dopamine on spinal synaptic transmissions in rats. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Spinal reflex potentials, monosynaptic reflex potential (MSR) and slow ventral root potential (sVRP), were measured in the isolated spinal cord of the neonatal rat. Dopamine release was measured by HPLC. KEY RESULTS Dopamine at lower concentrations (<1 µM) depressed sVRP, which is a C fibre-evoked polysynaptic response and believed to reflect nociceptive transmission. At higher concentrations (>1 µM), in addition to a potent sVRP depression, dopamine depolarized baseline potential and slightly depressed MSR. Depression of sVRP by dopamine was partially reversed by dopamine D1-like but not by D2-like receptor antagonists. SKF83959 and SKF81297, D1-like receptor agonists, and methamphetamine, an endogenous dopamine releaser, also caused the inhibition of sVRP. Methamphetamine also depressed MSR, which was inhibited by ketanserin, a 5-HT2A/2C receptor antagonist. Methamphetamine induced the release of dopamine and 5-HT from spinal cords, indicating that the release of endogenous dopamine and 5-HT depresses sVRP and MSR respectively. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS These results suggested that dopamine at lower concentrations preferentially inhibited sVRP, which is mediated via dopamine D1-like and other unidentified receptors. The dopamine-evoked depression is involved in modulating the spinal functions by the descending dopaminergic pathways. PMID:22168428

  17. Altered basal and stimulated accumbens dopamine release in obese OLETF rats as a function of age and diabetic status

    PubMed Central

    Anderzhanova, Elmira; Covasa, Mihai; Hajnal, Andras

    2011-01-01

    The Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat lacking the CCK-1 receptor is hyperphagic, prefers palatable and high caloric meals, and gradually develops obesity and type-2 diabetes. To determine dopamine levels in this strain, we used in-vivo quantitative (no-net flux) microdialyis at three different ages representing non-diabetic (8 weeks), pre-diabetic (18 weeks), and diabetic (56 weeks) stages in OLETF and age-matched lean LETO controls. Results showed significantly elevated basal dopamine levels in the caudomedial nucleus accumbens of OLETF rats compared to LETO at younger ages (8 weeks: 20.10 ± 5.61 nM vs. 15.85 ± 5.63 nM; 18 weeks: 7.37 ± 3.71 nM vs. 4.75 ± 1.25 nM, Mean ± SD). In contrast, at 56 weeks of age, a profound decline in extracellular dopamine concentrations was seen in both strains with a tendency for a greater effect in OLETF rats (1.78 ± 0.40 nM vs. 2.39 ± 0.42 nM). Further, extracellular fraction, an index for reuptake, was higher in 56-week old OLETF compared to LETO (0.648 ± 0.049 vs. 0.526 ± 0.057). Potassium-stimulated dopamine efflux revealed an increased capacity of vesicular pool in OLETF rats compared to LETO across all age groups with an accentuated strain difference at 56 weeks. These findings demonstrate altered striatal dopamine functions (i.e. increased stimulated release and uptake) in obese OLETF rat. This could be due to the lack of functional CCK-1 receptors, or metabolic and hormonal factors associated with the development of obesity and insulin resistance, or both. PMID:17553848

  18. In vivo gene transfer to dopamine neurons of rat substantia nigra via the high-affinity neurotensin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Maya, I.; Navarro-Quiroga, I.; Meraz-Ríos, M. A.; Aceves, J.; Martinez-Fong, D.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, we synthesized a nonviral gene vector capable of transfecting cell lines taking advantage of neurotensin (NT) internalization. The vector is NT cross-linked with poly-L-lysine, to which a plasmid DNA was bound to form a complex (NT-polyplex). Nigral dopamine neurons are able to internalize NT, thus representing a target for gene transfer via NT-polyplex. This hypothesis was tested here using reporter genes encoding green fluorescent protein or chloramphenicol acetyl transferase. MATERIALS AND METHODS: NT-polyplex was injected into the substantia nigra. Double immunofluorescence labeling was used to reveal the cell type involved in the propidium iodide-labeled polyplex internalization and reporter gene expression. RESULTS: Polyplex internalization was observed within dopamine neurons but not within glial cells, and was prevented by both hypertonic sucrose solution and SR-48692, a selective nonpeptide antagonist of NT receptors. Reporter gene expression was observed in dopamine neurons from 48 hr up to 15 days after NT-polyplex injection, and was prevented by SR-48692. However, no expression was seen when the NT-polyplex was injected into the ansiform lobule of the cerebellum, which contains low- but not high-affinity NT receptors. Neither internalization nor expression was observed in cultured glial cells, despite the NT-polyplex binding to those cells that was prevented by levocabastine, a low-affinity NT receptor antagonist. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that high-affinity NT receptors mediate the uptake of NT-polyplex with the subsequent reporter gene expression in vivo. NT polyfection may be used to transfer genes of physiologic interest to nigrostriatal dopamine neurons, and to produce transgenic animal models of dopamine-related diseases. PMID:11471555

  19. Ropinirole, a non-ergoline dopamine agonist.

    PubMed

    Jost, Wolfgang H; Angersbach, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    Dopamine agonists have become indispensable in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. In every-day practice, however, the decision to select the best compound for an individual patient is rendered difficult because of the large number of substances available on the market. This review article provides a closer look at the experimental and clinical studies with ropinirole published so far. Ropinirole is a non-ergoline dopamine agonist which has been proven to be effective in both, monotherapy and combination therapy of idiopathic Parkinson's disease. In addition to ameliorating bradykinesia, rigor, and tremor, ropinirole facilitates the daily life and improves depressive moods of patients with Parkinson's disease. The long-term complications of levodopa are avoided, and problems commonly associated with levodopa treatment are reduced. Ropinirole appears to have a neuroprotective effect. In addition to Parkinson's disease, ropinirole has also been used successfully in the treatment of restless legs syndrome.

  20. Altered Neurocircuitry in the Dopamine Transporter Knockout Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Bearer, Elaine L.; Boulat, Benoit; Hall, F. Scott; Uhl, George R.; Jacobs, Russell E.

    2010-01-01

    The plasma membrane transporters for the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine modulate the dynamics of these monoamine neurotransmitters. Thus, activity of these transporters has significant consequences for monoamine activity throughout the brain and for a number of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Gene knockout (KO) mice that reduce or eliminate expression of each of these monoamine transporters have provided a wealth of new information about the function of these proteins at molecular, physiological and behavioral levels. In the present work we use the unique properties of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to probe the effects of altered dopaminergic dynamics on meso-scale neuronal circuitry and overall brain morphology, since changes at these levels of organization might help to account for some of the extensive pharmacological and behavioral differences observed in dopamine transporter (DAT) KO mice. Despite the smaller size of these animals, voxel-wise statistical comparison of high resolution structural MR images indicated little morphological change as a consequence of DAT KO. Likewise, proton magnetic resonance spectra recorded in the striatum indicated no significant changes in detectable metabolite concentrations between DAT KO and wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, alterations in the circuitry from the prefrontal cortex to the mesocortical limbic system, an important brain component intimately tied to function of mesolimbic/mesocortical dopamine reward pathways, were revealed by manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI). Analysis of co-registered MEMRI images taken over the 26 hours after introduction of Mn2+ into the prefrontal cortex indicated that DAT KO mice have a truncated Mn2+ distribution within this circuitry with little accumulation beyond the thalamus or contralateral to the injection site. By contrast, WT littermates exhibit Mn2+ transport into more posterior midbrain nuclei and contralateral mesolimbic structures at

  1. Spectroscopic Signatures and Structural Motifs of Dopamine: a Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Vipin Bahadur

    2016-06-01

    dopamine is significantly red shifted upon protonation at amino site. E. Dragicevic, J. Schiemann and B. Liss, Neuroscience, 2015, 284, 798. Y. T. Chien et al. Science, 2010, 330, 1091. Cabezas etal., J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2013, 4, 486.

  2. Effects of isomers of apomorphines on dopamine receptors in striatal and limbic tissue of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kula, N.S.; Baldessarini, R.J.; Bromley, S.; Neumeyer, J.L.

    1985-09-16

    The optical isomers of apomorphine (APO) and N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) were interacted with three biochemical indices of dopamine (Da) receptors in extrapyramidal and limbic preparations of rat brain tissues. There were consistent isomeric preferences for the R(-) configuration of both DA analogs in stimulation adenylate cyclase (D-1 sites) and in competing for high affinity binding of /sup 3/H-spiroperidol (D-2 sites) and of /sup 3/H-ADTN (DA agonist binding sites) in striatal tissue, with lesser isomeric differences in the limbic tissue. The S(+) apomorphines did not inhibit stimulation of adenylate cyclase by DA. The tendency for greater activity of higher apparent affinity of R(-) apomorphines in striatum may reflect the evidently greater abundance of receptor sites in that region. There were only small regional differences in interactions of the apomorphine isomers with all three receptor sites, except for a strong preference of (-)NPA for striatal D-2 sites. These results do not parallel our recent observations indicating potent and selective antidopaminergic actions of S(+) apomorphines in the rat limbic system. They suggest caution in assuming close parallels between current biochemical functional, especially behavioral, methods of evaluating dopamine receptors of mammalian brain.

  3. Alcohol-induced alterations in dopamine modulation of prefrontal activity.

    PubMed

    Trantham-Davidson, Heather; Chandler, L Judson

    2015-12-01

    Long-term alcohol use leads to persistent cognitive deficits that may be associated with maladaptive changes in the neurocircuitry that mediates executive functions. Impairments caused by these changes can persist well into abstinence and have a negative impact on quality of life and job performance, and can increase the probability of relapse. Many of the changes that affect cognitive function appear to involve dysregulation of the mesocortical dopamine system. This includes changes in dopamine release and alterations in dopamine receptor expression and function in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC). This review summarizes the cellular effects of acute and chronic ethanol exposure on dopamine release and dopamine receptor function in the PFC with the goal of providing greater understanding of the effects of alcohol-use disorders on the dopamine system and how this relates to deficits in the executive function of the PFC.

  4. Alcohol-induced alterations in dopamine modulation of prefrontal activity

    PubMed Central

    Trantham-Davidson, Heather; Chandler, L. Judson

    2015-01-01

    Long-term alcohol use leads to persistent cognitive deficits that may be associated with maladaptive changes in the neurocircuitry that mediates executive functions. Impairments caused by these changes can persist well into abstinence and have a negative impact on quality of life and job performance, and can increase the probability of relapse. Many of the changes that affect cognitive function appear to involve dysregulation of the mesocortical dopamine system. This includes changes in dopamine release and alterations in dopamine receptor expression and function in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC). This review summarizes the cellular effects of acute and chronic ethanol exposure on dopamine release and dopamine receptor function in the PFC with the goal of providing greater understanding of the effects of alcohol-use disorders on the dopamine system and how this relates to deficits in the executive function of the PFC. PMID:26558348

  5. Dopamine neurons share common response function for reward prediction error

    PubMed Central

    Eshel, Neir; Tian, Ju; Bukwich, Michael; Uchida, Naoshige

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine neurons are thought to signal reward prediction error, or the difference between actual and predicted reward. How dopamine neurons jointly encode this information, however, remains unclear. One possibility is that different neurons specialize in different aspects of prediction error; another is that each neuron calculates prediction error in the same way. We recorded from optogenetically-identified dopamine neurons in the lateral ventral tegmental area (VTA) while mice performed classical conditioning tasks. Our tasks allowed us to determine the full prediction error functions of dopamine neurons and compare them to each other. We found striking homogeneity among individual dopamine neurons: their responses to both unexpected and expected rewards followed the same function, just scaled up or down. As a result, we could describe both individual and population responses using just two parameters. Such uniformity ensures robust information coding, allowing each dopamine neuron to contribute fully to the prediction error signal. PMID:26854803

  6. SCH 23390 may alter dopamine-mediated motor behaviour via striatal D-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Boyce, S; Kelly, E; Davis, A; Fleminger, S; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D

    1985-05-15

    SCH 23390 potently displaced the specific binding of 3H-piflutixol to D-1 sites in striatal membranes but haloperidol was only weakly effective. SCH 23390 weakly displaced specific 3H-spiperone binding to D-2 sites, but haloperidol was potent. SCH 23390 was more effective than haloperidol in inhibiting dopamine stimulated striatal adenylate cyclase activity. These results confirm the D-1 selectivity of SCH 23390. However, SCH 23390 inhibited apomorphine-induced stereotypy and climbing behaviour in rats with equal potency to haloperidol. Haloperidol dose-dependently increased striatal HVA and DOPAC concentrations without altering dopamine content. Low doses of SCH 23390 elevated striatal DOPAC concentrations but higher doses were without effect; striatal dopamine and HVA overall was unaffected by administration of SCH 23390. Haloperidol did not affect basal 3H-acetylcholine release from striatal slices but reversed the apomorphine-induced inhibition of 3H-acetylcholine release. SCH 23390 did not affect basal 3H-acetylcholine release nor did it reverse the apomorphine-induced inhibition of 3H-acetylcholine release. The ability of SCH 23390 to inhibit motor behaviour in the rat may be due to its action on D-1 receptors since the drug does not cause typical changes in parameters of striatal D-2 receptor function.

  7. New copper(II) complexes with dopamine hydrochloride and vanillymandelic acid: Spectroscopic and thermal characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Gehad G.; Nour El-Dien, F. A.; El-Nahas, R. G.

    2011-10-01

    The dopamine derivatives participate in the regulation of wide variety of physiological functions in the human body and in medication life. Increase and/or decrease in the concentration of dopamine in human body reflect an indication for diseases such as Schizophrenia and/or Parkinson diseases. The Cu(II) chelates with coupled products of dopamine hydrochloride (DO.HCl) and vanillymandelic acid (VMA) with 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AAP) are prepared and characterized. Different physico-chemical techniques namely IR, magnetic and UV-vis spectra are used to investigate the structure of these chelates. Cu(II) forms 1:1 (Cu:DO) and 1:2 (Cu:VMA) chelates. DO behave as a uninegative tridentate ligand in binding to the Cu(II) ion while VMA behaves as a uninegative bidentate ligand. IR spectra show that the DO is coordinated to the Cu(II) ion in a tridentate manner with ONO donor sites of the phenolic- OH, -NH and carbonyl- O, while VMA is coordinated with OO donor sites of the phenolic- OH and -NH. Magnetic moment measurements reveal the presence of Cu(II) chelates in octahedral and square planar geometries with DO and VMA, respectively. The thermal decomposition of Cu(II) complexes is studied using thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) techniques. The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as, energy of activation, enthalpy, entropy and free energy change of the complexes are evaluated and the relative thermal stability of the complexes are discussed.

  8. Dopamine Modulates Reward-Related Vigor

    PubMed Central

    Beierholm, Ulrik; Guitart-Masip, Marc; Economides, Marcos; Chowdhury, Rumana; Düzel, Emrah; Dolan, Ray; Dayan, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Subjects routinely control the vigor with which they emit motoric responses. However, the bulk of formal treatments of decision-making ignores this dimension of choice. A recent theoretical study suggested that action vigor should be influenced by experienced average reward rate and that this rate is encoded by tonic dopamine in the brain. We previously examined how average reward rate modulates vigor as exemplified by response times and found a measure of agreement with the first suggestion. In the current study, we examined the second suggestion, namely the potential influence of dopamine signaling on vigor. Ninety healthy subjects participated in a double-blind experiment in which they received one of the following: placebo, L-DOPA (which increases dopamine levels in the brain), or citalopram (which has a selective, if complex, effect on serotonin levels). Subjects performed multiple trials of a rewarded odd-ball discrimination task in which we varied the potential reward over time in order to exercise the putative link between vigor and average reward rate. Replicating our previous findings, we found that a significant fraction of the variance in subjects' responses could be explained by our experimentally manipulated changes in average reward rate. Crucially, this relationship was significantly stronger under L-Dopa than under Placebo, suggesting that the impact of average reward levels on action vigor is indeed subject to a dopaminergic influence. PMID:23419875

  9. Linking unfounded beliefs to genetic dopamine availability

    PubMed Central

    Schmack, Katharina; Rössler, Hannes; Sekutowicz, Maria; Brandl, Eva J.; Müller, Daniel J.; Petrovic, Predrag; Sterzer, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Unfounded convictions involving beliefs in the paranormal, grandiosity ideas or suspicious thoughts are endorsed at varying degrees among the general population. Here, we investigated the neurobiopsychological basis of the observed inter-individual variability in the propensity toward unfounded beliefs. One hundred two healthy individuals were genotyped for four polymorphisms in the COMT gene (rs6269, rs4633, rs4818, and rs4680, also known as val158met) that define common functional haplotypes with substantial impact on synaptic dopamine degradation, completed a questionnaire measuring unfounded beliefs, and took part in a behavioral experiment assessing perceptual inference. We found that greater dopamine availability was associated with a stronger propensity toward unfounded beliefs, and that this effect was statistically mediated by an enhanced influence of expectations on perceptual inference. Our results indicate that genetic differences in dopaminergic neurotransmission account for inter-individual differences in perceptual inference linked to the formation and maintenance of unfounded beliefs. Thus, dopamine might be critically involved in the processes underlying one's interpretation of the relationship between the self and the world. PMID:26483654

  10. Linking unfounded beliefs to genetic dopamine availability.

    PubMed

    Schmack, Katharina; Rössler, Hannes; Sekutowicz, Maria; Brandl, Eva J; Müller, Daniel J; Petrovic, Predrag; Sterzer, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Unfounded convictions involving beliefs in the paranormal, grandiosity ideas or suspicious thoughts are endorsed at varying degrees among the general population. Here, we investigated the neurobiopsychological basis of the observed inter-individual variability in the propensity toward unfounded beliefs. One hundred two healthy individuals were genotyped for four polymorphisms in the COMT gene (rs6269, rs4633, rs4818, and rs4680, also known as val (158) met) that define common functional haplotypes with substantial impact on synaptic dopamine degradation, completed a questionnaire measuring unfounded beliefs, and took part in a behavioral experiment assessing perceptual inference. We found that greater dopamine availability was associated with a stronger propensity toward unfounded beliefs, and that this effect was statistically mediated by an enhanced influence of expectations on perceptual inference. Our results indicate that genetic differences in dopaminergic neurotransmission account for inter-individual differences in perceptual inference linked to the formation and maintenance of unfounded beliefs. Thus, dopamine might be critically involved in the processes underlying one's interpretation of the relationship between the self and the world.

  11. DOPAMINE AND FOOD ADDICTION: LEXICON BADLY NEEDED

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, John D.; Correa, Mercè

    2012-01-01

    Over the last few years, the concept of food addiction has become a common feature in the scientific literature, as well as the popular press. Nevertheless, the use of the term “addiction” to describe pathological aspects of food intake in humans remains controversial, and even among those who affirm the validity of the concept, there is considerable disagreement about its utility for explaining the increasing prevalence of obesity throughout much of the world. An examination of the literature on food addiction indicates that mesolimbic and nigrostriatal dopamine systems often are cited as mechanisms that contribute to the establishment of food addiction. However, in reviewing this literature, it is important to have a detailed consideration of the complex nature of dopaminergic involvement in motivational processes. For example, although it is often stated that mesolimbic dopamine mediates “reward”, there is no standard or consistent technical meaning of this term. Moreover, there is a persistent tendency to link dopamine transmission with pleasure or hedonia, as opposed to other aspects of motivation or learning. The present paper provides a critical discussion of some aspects of the food addiction literature, viewed through the lens of recent findings and current theoretical views of dopaminergic involvement in food motivation. Furthermore, compulsive food intake and binge eating will be considered from an evolutionary perspective, in terms of the motivational subsystems that are involved in adaptive patterns of food consumption and seeking behaviors, and a consideration of how these could be altered in pathological conditions. PMID:23177385

  12. Safety out of control: dopamine and defence.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Kevin; Dayan, Peter

    2016-05-23

    We enjoy a sophisticated understanding of how animals learn to predict appetitive outcomes and direct their behaviour accordingly. This encompasses well-defined learning algorithms and details of how these might be implemented in the brain. Dopamine has played an important part in this unfolding story, appearing to embody a learning signal for predicting rewards and stamping in useful actions, while also being a modulator of behavioural vigour. By contrast, although choosing correct actions and executing them vigorously in the face of adversity is at least as important, our understanding of learning and behaviour in aversive settings is less well developed. We examine aversive processing through the medium of the role of dopamine and targets such as D2 receptors in the striatum. We consider critical factors such as the degree of control that an animal believes it exerts over key aspects of its environment, the distinction between 'better' and 'good' actual or predicted future states, and the potential requirement for a particular form of opponent to dopamine to ensure proper calibration of state values.