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Sample records for doping control purposes

  1. Detection of peginesatide in equine serum using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for doping control purposes.

    PubMed

    Möller, Ines; Thomas, Andreas; Wingender, Anke; Machnik, Marc; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and its recombinant analogues are suspected to be illicitly administered to horses for performance enhancing purposes and, consequently, prohibited in equine sports. Recently, a new erythropoiesis-stimulating agent, peginesatide (Omontys, formerly referred to as Hematide), belonging to the upcoming class of EPO-mimetic peptides, received approval for the treatment of anaemia in humans with chronic kidney disease on dialysis. As the pegylated dimeric peptide of approximately 45 kDa without sequence homology to EPO is not detectable by conventional EPO detection assays, specific methods are bound to be established for horse sports drug testing. Thus, by fortifying equine serum with peginesatide, an approach consisting of a proteolytic digestion with subtilisin after protein precipitation was developed, eventually targeting a proteotypic and xenobiotic pentapeptide which is easily accessible to liquid chromatography- tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The method was validated for qualitative purposes and demonstrated to be specific, precise (relative standard deviations below 14%), sensitive (limit of detection 10 ng mL(-1)) and linear. Being simple, cost-effective and readily transferable to other doping control laboratories, a mass spectrometric assay for the detection of therapeutic concentrations of peginesatide in equine serum is, in terms of preventive doping research, applicable to routine analysis shortly after approval of the drug.

  2. Identification of selected in vitro generated phase-I metabolites of the steroidal selective androgen receptor modulator MK-0773 for doping control purposes.

    PubMed

    Lagojda, Andreas; Kuehne, Dirk; Krug, Oliver; Thomas, Andreas; Wigger, Tina; Karst, Uwe; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Research into developing anabolic agents for various therapeutic purposes has been pursued for decades. As the clinical utility of anabolic-androgenic steroids has been found to be limited because of their lack of tissue selectivity and associated off-target effects, alternative drug entities have been designed and are commonly referred to as selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). While most of these SARMs are of nonsteroidal structure, the drug candidate MK-0773 comprises a 4-aza-steroidal nucleus. Besides the intended therapeutic use, SARMs have been found to be illicitly distributed and misused as doping agents in sport, necessitating frequently updated doping control analytical assays. As steroidal compounds reportedly undergo considerable metabolic transformations, the phase-I metabolism of MK-0773 was simulated using human liver microsomal (HLM) preparations and electrochemical conversion. Subsequently, major metabolic products were identified and characterized employing liquid chromatography-high-resolution/high- accuracy tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. MK-0773 produced numerous phase-I metabolites under the chosen in vitro incubation reactions, mostly resulting from mono- and bisoxygenation of the steroid. HLM yielded at least 10 monooxygenated species, while electrochemistry-based experiments resulted predominantly in three monohydroxylated metabolites. Elemental composition data and product ion mass spectra were generated for these analytes, ESI/APCI measurements corroborated the formation of at least two N-oxygenated metabolites, and NMR data obtained from electrochemistry-derived products supported structures suggested for three monohydroxylated compounds. Hereby, the hydroxylation of the A-ring located N- bound methyl group was found to be of particular intensity. In the absence of controlled elimination studies, the

  3. Screening and confirmation of myo-inositol trispyrophosphate (ITPP) in human urine by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography high resolution / high accuracy mass spectrometry for doping control purposes.

    PubMed

    Görgens, Christian; Guddat, Sven; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Myo-inositol trispyrophosphate (ITPP) is a novel allosteric effector of haemoglobin with high permeation selectivity across the red blood cell plasma membrane. Due to its potential to reduce the oxygen affinity of haemoglobin, ITPP application results in an enhanced oxygen release in hypoxic tissues. Therefore, ITPP is being examined for the treatment of numerous illnesses that involve hypoxia, such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer or Alzheimer's disease. Similar to the prohibited substance Efaproxiral®, ITPP increases maximal exercise capacity in mice, providing high potential to be misused in sports. To keep up with cheating athletes, a fast and reliable liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for screening and confirmation of ITPP in human urine for doping control purposes was developed. According to the molecule's distinct hydrophilic properties, extraction from complex biological matrices is challenging and conventional reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) separations are not suitable for its detection. Therefore an approach based on hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) Orbitrap mass spectrometry was established. The methodology was fully validated for qualitative purposes. Screening and confirmation assay are characterized by satisfactory specificity and robustness, adequate intra-day (screening: 4.9-8.1%; confirmation: 2.0-6.7%) and inter-day precision (screening: 4.6-9.1%; confirmation: 1.8-6.6%), excellent linear correlations (>0.99) with sufficient LLOD in the sub ng/mL range (screening: 15 ng/mL; confirmation: 1 ng/mL). In addition it could be shown that ITPP is stable in human urine under the mandatory storage period and conditions for doping control laboratories. To our knowledge, this is the first validated 'dilute-and-inject' LC-MS/MS method for the reliable detection of ITPP in human urine.

  4. Mass spectrometric studies on the in vivo metabolism and excretion of SIRT1 activating drugs in rat urine, dried blood spots, and plasma samples for doping control purposes.

    PubMed

    Höppner, Sebastian; Delahaut, Philippe; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The NAD(+) depending enzyme SIRT1 regulates the mitochondrial biogenesis, fat and glucose metabolism through catalyzing the deacetylation of several metabolism-related protein-substrates. Recently, synthetic activators of SIRT1 referred to as STACs (Sirtuin activating compounds, e.g. SRT2104) were identified and tested in clinical studies for the treatment of aging-related diseases such as type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's and obesity. Although the mechanism of SIRT1 activation by small molecules has caused considerable controversy, STACs demonstrated a significant performance enhancement in mice experiments including an improvement of endurance, muscle strength, and locomotor behavior. Due to their potential to increase exercise tolerance in healthy individuals, SIRT1 activators are currently being monitored by anti-doping authorities. In the present study, the in vivo metabolic clearance of three SIRT1 activators was investigated in rats by the collection of urine, DBS (dried blood spots) and plasma samples following a single oral administration. The resulting metabolic products were studied by positive electrospray ionization - (tandem) mass spectrometry and confirmed by the comparison with in vitro generated metabolites using human and rat liver microsomal preparations. Subsequently, a screening procedure for five SIRT1 activators and the metabolite M1-SRT1720 in DBS specimens was developed. Liquid-liquid-extraction and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was employed based on diagnostic ion transitions recorded in multiple reaction monitoring mode and two deuterated internal standards namely d8-SRT1720 and d8-M1-SRT1720 were utilized. The doping control assay was characterized with regard to specificity, limit of detection (10-50ng/ml), recovery (65-83%) and imprecision (7-20%) and ion suppression/enhancement effects (<10%), demonstrating its fitness-for-purpose for sports drug testing applications.

  5. Characterization of equine urinary metabolites of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) S1, S4 and S22 for doping control purposes.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Annelie; Knych, Heather; Stanley, Scott; Thevis, Mario; Bondesson, Ulf; Hedeland, Mikael

    2015-08-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators, SARMs, constitute a class of compounds with anabolic properties but with few androgenic side-effects. This makes them possible substances of abuse and the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has banned the entire class of substances. There have been several cases of illicit use of aryl propionamide SARMs in human sports and in 2013, 13 cases were reported. These substances have been found to be extensively metabolized in humans, making detection of metabolites necessary for doping control. SARMs are also of great interest to equine doping control, but the in vivo metabolite pattern and thus possible analytical targets have not been previously studied in this species. In this study, the urinary metabolites of the SARMs S1, S4, and S22 in horses were studied after intravenous injection, using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QToF-MS). Eight different metabolites were found for SARM S1, nine for SARM S4, and seven for SARM S22. The equine urinary metabolite profiles differed significantly from those of humans. The parent compounds were only detected for SARMs S4 and S22 and only at the first sampling time point at 3 h post administration, making them unsuitable as target compounds. For all three SARMs tested, the metabolite yielding the highest response had undergone amide hydrolysis, hydroxylation and sulfonation. The resulting phase II metabolites (4-nitro-3-trifluoro-methyl-phenylamine sulfate for SARMs S1 and S4 and 4-cyano-3-trifluoro-methyl-phenylamine sulfate for SARM S22) are proposed as analytical targets for use in equine doping control.

  6. Determination of Vasopressin and Desmopressin in urine by means of liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry for doping control purposes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, A; Solymos, E; Schänzer, W; Baume, N; Saugy, M; Dellanna, F; Thevis, M

    2011-11-30

    The anti-diuretic neurohypophysial hormone Vasopressin (Vp) and its synthetic analogue Desmopressin (Dp, 1-desamino-vasopressin) have received considerable attention from doping control authorities due to their impact on physiological blood parameters. Accordingly, the illicit use of Desmopressin in elite sport is sanctioned by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and the drug is classified as masking agent. Vp and Dp are small (8-9 amino acids) peptides administered orally as well as intranasally. Within the present study a method to determine Dp and Vp in urinary doping control samples by means of liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry was developed. After addition of Lys-Vasopressin as internal standard and efficient sample clean up with a mixed mode solid phase extraction (weak cation exchange), the samples were directly injected into the LC-MS system. The method was validated considering the parameters specificity, linearity, recovery (80-100%), accuracy, robustness, limit of detection/quantification (20/50 pg mL(-1)), precision (inter/intra-day<10%), ion suppression and stability. The analysis of administration study urine samples collected after a single intranasal or oral application of Dp yielded in detection windows for the unchanged target analyte for up to 20 h at concentrations between 50 and 600 pg mL(-1). Endogenous Vp was detected in concentrations of approximately 20-200 pg mL(-1) in spontaneous urine samples obtained from healthy volunteers. The general requirements of the developed method provide the characteristics for an easy transfer to other anti-doping laboratories and support closing another potential gap for cheating athletes.

  7. A modified LC-MS/MS method to simultaneously quantify glycerol and mannitol concentrations in human urine for doping control purposes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Yan, Kuan; Ma, Yanhua; Yang, Zhiyong; Zhao, Jun; Ding, Jinglin

    2016-06-01

    Glycerol and mannitol have the potential to act as plasma volume expanders and have been prohibited as masking agents by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) accordingly. In this study, an improved strategy was developed and validated for the determination of urinary glycerol and mannitol levels simultaneously using a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry technique within 7min in an initial testing procedure. For confirmation, mannitol and all possible hexitols (allitol, altritol, galactitol, iditol and sorbitol) that can occur in human urine were baseline separated. This method made use of the derivatization of glycerol and mannitol by benzoyl chloride followed by analysis via LC-ESI-MS/MS with limited sample preparation. The limit of detection (LOD) for glycerol and mannitol was lower than 50ng/mL. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) for both substances was below 150ng/mL. The assay was linear from 0.15 to 1000μg/mL for glycerol and mannitol in human urine. The coefficients of variation of all inter- and intra-assay determinations at three concentration levels (0.5, 500, 900μg/mL) were better than 13% for glycerol and under 15% for mannitol. The method also afforded satisfactory results in terms of accuracy, derivatization yield, extraction recovery, matrix effect and specificity for both substances.

  8. Purpose plus: supporting youth purpose, control, and academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Pizzolato, Jane Elizabeth; Brown, Elizabeth Levine; Kanny, Mary Allison

    2011-01-01

    Research in the past decade suggests that a persistent achievement gap between students from low-income minority backgrounds and higher-income white backgrounds may be rooted in theories of student motivation and youth purpose. Yet limited research exists regarding the role of purpose on positive youth development as it pertains to academic achievement. Using a sample of 209 high school students, this study examines the effectiveness of an intervention designed to promote purpose development and internal control over academic success in high school students from a low-socioeconomic-status community. Findings reveal that a short-term intervention was effective in significantly increasing internal control over academic success and purpose in life for students participating in the intervention group. In addition, analysis of academic achievement for students who experienced positive gains in internal control and purpose demonstrates significant gains in academic achievement as measured by grade point average. Implications are made for further study of internal control and life purpose as a means of academic intervention in the effort to address the achievement gap.

  9. Biomarker monitoring in sports doping control.

    PubMed

    Pottgiesser, Torben; Schumacher, Yorck Olaf

    2012-06-01

    Biomarker monitoring can be considered a new era in the effort against doping. Opposed to the old concept in doping control of direct detection of a prohibited substance in a biological sample such as urine or blood, the new paradigm allows a personalized longitudinal monitoring of biomarkers that indicate non-physiological responses independently of the used doping technique or substance, and may cause sanctioning of illicit practices. This review presents the development of biomarker monitoring in sports doping control and focuses on the implementation of the Athlete Biological Passport as the current concept of the World Anti Doping Agency for the detection of blood doping (hematological module). The scope of the article extends to the description of novel biomarkers and future concepts of application.

  10. 15 CFR 730.6 - Control purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Control purposes. 730.6 Section 730.6... Control purposes. The export control provisions of the EAR are intended to serve the national security..., which in many cases are reflected in international obligations or arrangements. Some controls...

  11. 15 CFR 730.6 - Control purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Control purposes. 730.6 Section 730.6... Control purposes. The export control provisions of the EAR are intended to serve the national security... carry out its international obligations. Some controls are designed to restrict access to dual use...

  12. Human genetic variation: new challenges and opportunities for doping control.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Angela J; Fedoruk, Matthew N; Rupert, Jim L

    2012-01-01

    Sport celebrates differences in competitors that lead to the often razor-thin margins between victory and defeat. The source of this variation is the interaction between the environment in which the athletes develop and compete and their genetic make-up. However, a darker side of sports may also be genetically influenced: some anti-doping tests are affected by the athlete's genotype. Genetic variation is an issue that anti-doping authorities must address as more is learned about the interaction between genotype and the responses to prohibited practices. To differentiate between naturally occurring deviations in indirect blood and urine markers from those potentially caused by doping, the "biological-passport" program uses intra-individual variability rather than population values to establish an athlete's expected physiological range. The next step in "personalized" doping control may be the inclusion of genetic data, both for the purposes of documenting an athlete's responses to doping agents and doping-control assays as well facilitating athlete and sample identification. Such applications could benefit "clean" athletes but will come at the expense of risks to privacy. This article reviews the instances where genetics has intersected with doping control, and briefly discusses the potential role, and ethical implications, of genotyping in the struggle to eliminate illicit ergogenic practices.

  13. Doping control from a global and national perspective.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Albert D

    2004-04-01

    The practice of enhancing athletic performance through foreign substances was known from the earliest Olympic games. In 1967, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) established a Medical Commission responsible for developing a list of prohibited substances and methods. Drug tests were first introduced at the Olympic winter games in Grenoble and at the summer games in Mexico City in 1968. In February 1999, the IOC convened the World Conference on Doping in Sport in Lausanne, Switzerland. The Lausanne Declaration on Doping in Sport recommended creation of an International Anti-Doping Agency. The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) was formed in Lausanne, Switzerland on the basis of equal representation from the Olympic movement and public authorities. One of the mandates of WADA was to harmonize the Olympic antidoping code and develop a single code applicable and acceptable for all stakeholders. The world antidoping code developed by WADA included creation of several international standards (IS). The purpose of each IS was harmonization among antidoping organizations. The ISs were developed for laboratories, testing, the prohibited list, and for therapeutic use exemptions (TUE). The objective of this manuscript is to present a brief history of doping in sport and describe creation of WADA in 1999. The components of the World Anti-Doping code (in particular, the Therapeutic Use Exclusion program or TUE) is described. The WADA code defines a TUE as "permission to use, for therapeutic purposes, a drug or drugs which are otherwise prohibited in sporting competition." Experiences of the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport Doping Control Review Board are presented because this national TUE committee has been operational for over 12 years. The challenge of developing a rigorous global antidoping program requires acceptance of doping as a problem by sport organizations, athletes, and public authorities. Individual stakeholders must be prepared to preserve the values of sport

  14. Detection of SARMs in doping control analysis.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2017-01-27

    The class of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) has been the subject of intense and dedicated clinical research over the past two decades. Potential therapeutic applications of SARMs are manifold and focus particularly on the treatment of conditions manifesting in muscle loss such as general sarcopenia, cancer-associated cachexia, muscular dystrophy, etc. Consequently, based on the substantial muscle- and bone-anabolic properties of SARMs, these agents constitute substances with significant potential for misuse in sport and have therefore been added to the Word Anti-Doping Agency's (WADA's) Prohibited List in 2008. Since then, numerous adverse analytical findings have been reported for various different SARMs, which has underlined the importance of proactive and preventive anti-doping measures concerning emerging drugs such as these anabolic agents, which have evidently been misused in sport despite the fact that none of these SARMs has yet received full clinical approval. In this review, analytical data on SARMs generated in the context of research conducted for sports drug testing purposes are summarized and state-of-the-art test methods aiming at intact drugs as well as diagnostic urinary metabolites are discussed. Doping control analytical approaches predominantly rely on chromatography hyphenated to mass spectrometry, which have allowed for appropriately covering the considerable variety of pharmacophores present in SARMs such as the non-steroidal representatives ACP-105, BMS-564929, GLPG0492 (DT-200), LG-121071, LGD-2226, LGD-4033/VK 5211, ostarine/enobosarm, RAD-140, S-40503, etc. as well as steroidal compounds such as MK-0773 and YK-11.

  15. Purpose Plus: Supporting Youth Purpose, Control, and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pizzolato, Jane Elizabeth; Brown, Elizabeth Levine; Kanny, Mary Allison

    2011-01-01

    Research in the past decade suggests that a persistent achievement gap between students from low-income minority backgrounds and higher-income white backgrounds may be rooted in theories of student motivation and youth purpose. Yet limited research exists regarding the role of purpose on positive youth development as it pertains to academic…

  16. Beta2-Agonist Doping Control and Optical Isomer Challenges.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Glenn A; Fawcett, J Paul

    2016-12-01

    The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) currently allows therapeutic use of the beta2-agonists salbutamol, formoterol and salmeterol when delivered via inhalation despite some evidence suggesting these anti-asthma drugs may be performance enhancing. Beta2-agonists are usually administered as 50:50 racemic mixtures of two enantiomers (non-superimposable mirror images), one of which demonstrates significant beta2-adrenoceptor-mediated bronchodilation while the other appears to have little or no pharmacological activity. For salbutamol and formoterol, urine thresholds have been adopted to limit supratherapeutic dosing and to discriminate between inhaled (permitted) and oral (prohibited) use. However, chiral switches have led to the availability of enantiopure (active enantiomer only) preparations of salbutamol and formoterol, which effectively doubles their urine thresholds and provides a means for athletes to take supratherapeutic doses for doping purposes. Given the availability of these enantiopure beta2-agonists, the analysis of these drugs using enantioselective assays should now become routine. For salmeterol, there is currently only a therapeutic dose threshold and adoption of a urinary threshold should be a high priority for doping control.

  17. 15 CFR 730.6 - Control purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... controls designed to stem the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and controls designed to limit.... Multilateral export control cooperation is sought through arrangements such as the Nuclear Suppliers Group,...

  18. 15 CFR 730.6 - Control purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... controls designed to stem the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and controls designed to limit.... Multilateral export control cooperation is sought through arrangements such as the Nuclear Suppliers Group,...

  19. 15 CFR 730.6 - Control purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... controls designed to stem the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and controls designed to limit.... Multilateral export control cooperation is sought through arrangements such as the Nuclear Suppliers Group,...

  20. Properties of doped boiler steel after controlled rolling

    SciTech Connect

    Bobylev, M.V.; Kireev, V.B.; Koreshkova, A.M.

    1992-03-01

    The article shows that the structural strength of carbon boiler steel type 20K can be enhanced by doping with vanadium or niobium and by controlled rolling and controlled cooling. 8 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. 12 CFR 18.1 - Purpose and OMB control number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... statement with narrative information management deems important. The availability of this information is... AND OTHER INFORMATION BY NATIONAL BANKS § 18.1 Purpose and OMB control number. (a) Purpose. The... public confidence in the national banking system. (b) OMB control number. The collection of...

  2. 12 CFR 18.1 - Purpose and OMB control number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... statement with narrative information management deems important. The availability of this information is... AND OTHER INFORMATION BY NATIONAL BANKS § 18.1 Purpose and OMB control number. (a) Purpose. The... public confidence in the national banking system. (b) OMB control number. The collection of...

  3. 12 CFR 18.1 - Purpose and OMB control number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... statement with narrative information management deems important. The availability of this information is... AND OTHER INFORMATION BY NATIONAL BANKS § 18.1 Purpose and OMB control number. (a) Purpose. The... public confidence in the national banking system. (b) OMB control number. The collection of...

  4. 12 CFR 18.1 - Purpose and OMB control number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... statement with narrative information management deems important. The availability of this information is... AND OTHER INFORMATION BY NATIONAL BANKS § 18.1 Purpose and OMB control number. (a) Purpose. The... public confidence in the national banking system. (b) OMB control number. The collection of...

  5. 12 CFR 18.1 - Purpose and OMB control number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... statement with narrative information management deems important. The availability of this information is... AND OTHER INFORMATION BY NATIONAL BANKS § 18.1 Purpose and OMB control number. (a) Purpose. The... public confidence in the national banking system. (b) OMB control number. The collection of...

  6. Controlled Chemical Doping of Semiconductor Nanocrystals Using Redox Buffers

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, Jesse H.; Surendranath, Yogesh; Alivisatos, Paul

    2013-07-20

    Semiconductor nanocrystal solids are attractive materials for active layers in next-generation optoelectronic devices; however, their efficient implementation has been impeded by the lack of precise control over dopant concentrations. Herein we demonstrate a chemical strategy for the controlled doping of nanocrystal solids under equilibrium conditions. Exposing lead selenide nanocrystal thin films to solutions containing varying proportions of decamethylferrocene and decamethylferrocenium incrementally and reversibly increased the carrier concentration in the solid by 2 orders of magnitude from their native values. This application of redox buffers for controlled doping provides a new method for the precise control of the majority carrier concentration in porous semiconductor thin films.

  7. Doping control analyses in horseracing: a clinician's guide.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jenny K Y; Wan, Terence S M

    2014-04-01

    Doping(1) in sports is highly detrimental, not only to the athletes involved but to the sport itself as well as to the confidence of the spectators and other participants. To protect the integrity of any sport, there must be in place an effective doping control program. In human sports, a 'top-down' and generally unified approach is taken where the rules and regulations against doping for the majority of elite sport events held in any country are governed by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). However, in horseracing, there is no single organisation regulating this form of equestrian sport; instead, the rules and regulations are provided by individual racing authorities and so huge variations exist in the doping control programs currently in force around the world. This review summarises the current status of doping control analyses in horseracing, from sample collection, to the analyses of the samples, and to the need for harmonisation as well as exploring some of the difficulties currently faced by racing authorities, racing chemists and regulatory veterinarians worldwide.

  8. Analytical challenges in the detection of peptide hormones for anti-doping purposes.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Osquel; Handelsman, David J; Strasburger, Christian; Thevis, Mario

    2012-07-01

    Although significant progress has been achieved during the past few years with the introduction of new assays and analytical methodologies, the detection and quantification of protein analytes, in particular of peptide hormones, continues to pose analytical challenges for the World Anti-Doping Agency-accredited anti-doping laboratories. In this article, the latest achievements in the application of MS-based methodologies and specific biochemical and immunological assays to detect some of the prohibited substances listed in section S2 of the World Anti-Doping Agency List of Prohibited Substances and Methods are reviewed. In addition, we look towards the future by focusing on some of the most promising analytical approaches under development for the detection of so-called 'biomarkers of doping'.

  9. RoboCon: A general purpose telerobotic control center

    SciTech Connect

    Draper, J.V.; Noakes, M.W.; Schempf, H.; Blair, L.M.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes human factors issues involved in the design of RoboCon, a multi-purpose control center for use in US Department of Energy remote handling applications. RoboCon is intended to be a flexible, modular control center capable of supporting a wide variety of robotic devices.

  10. Controlled cobalt doping in biogenic magnetite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, J. M.; Coker, V. S.; Moise, S.; Wincott, P. L.; Vaughan, D. J.; Tuna, F.; Arenholz, E.; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Lloyd, J. R.; Telling, N. D.

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt-doped magnetite (CoxFe3 −xO4) nanoparticles have been produced through the microbial reduction of cobalt–iron oxyhydroxide by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. The materials produced, as measured by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, Mössbauer spectroscopy, etc., show dramatic increases in coercivity with increasing cobalt content without a major decrease in overall saturation magnetization. Structural and magnetization analyses reveal a reduction in particle size to less than 4 nm at the highest Co content, combined with an increase in the effective anisotropy of the magnetic nanoparticles. The potential use of these biogenic nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions for magnetic hyperthermia applications is demonstrated. Further analysis of the distribution of cations within the ferrite spinel indicates that the cobalt is predominantly incorporated in octahedral coordination, achieved by the substitution of Fe2+ site with Co2+, with up to 17 per cent Co substituted into tetrahedral sites. PMID:23594814

  11. Optimal doping control of magnetic semiconductors via subsurfactant epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Changgan; Zhang, Zhenyu; van Benthem, Klaus; Chisholm, Matthew F; Weitering, Harm H

    2008-02-01

    Dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMS) with high ferromagnetic ordering temperatures (T{sub c}) have vast potential for advancing spin-based electronics or 'spintronics'. To date, achieving high-T{sub c} DMS typically required doping levels of order 5%. Such high doping levels inevitably compromise the structural homogeneity and carrier mobility of the DMS. Here, we establish 'subsurfactant epitaxy' as a novel kinetic pathway for synthesizing Mn-doped germanium with T{sub c} much higher than room temperature, at dramatically reduced doping levels. This is accomplished by optimal control of the diffusion kinetics of the dopant atoms near the growth front in two separate deposition steps. The first involves a submonolayer dose of Mn on Ge(100) at low temperature, which populates subsurface interstitial sites with Mn while suppressing lateral Mn diffusion and clustering. The second step involves epitaxial growth of Ge at elevated temperature, taking advantage of the strong floating ability of the interstitial Mn dopants towards the newly defined subsurface sites at the growth front. Most remarkably, the Mn dopants trapped inside the film are uniformly distributed at substitutional sites, and the resulting film exhibits ferromagnetism above 400 K at the nominal doping level of only 0.2%.

  12. The purposes, achievements, and priorities of arms control

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.S.

    1987-09-01

    Arms control purposes include strengthening the framework of deterrence and reducing the threat of the use of nuclear weapons, reducing the dangers of attack and accidental nuclear war, and allowing more resources for the civilian economy. The paper briefly describes achievements in arms control since World War II. These include the Limited Test Ban Treaty (LTBT), Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT), Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty (ABMT)-SALT I, SALT II, Threshold Test Ban Treaty (TTBT), Peaceful Nuclear Explosions Treaty (PNET), and Nuclear-Free Zones treaties. The author also discusses his views on what the priorities of arms control activities should be. (ACR)

  13. Doping Level of Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes Controls the Grafting Density of Functional Groups for DNA Assays.

    PubMed

    Švorc, Ĺubomír; Jambrec, Daliborka; Vojs, Marian; Barwe, Stefan; Clausmeyer, Jan; Michniak, Pavol; Marton, Marián; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2015-09-02

    The impact of different doping levels of boron-doped diamond on the surface functionalization was investigated by means of electrochemical reduction of aryldiazonium salts. The grafting efficiency of 4-nitrophenyl groups increased with the boron levels (B/C ratio from 0 to 20,000 ppm). Controlled grafting of nitrophenyldiazonium was used to adjust the amount of immobilized single-stranded DNA strands at the surface and further on the hybridization yield in dependence on the boron doping level. The grafted nitro functions were electrochemically reduced to the amine moieties. Subsequent functionalization with a succinic acid introduced carboxyl groups for subsequent binding of an amino-terminated DNA probe. DNA hybridization significantly depends on the probe density which is in turn dependent on the boron doping level. The proposed approach opens new insights for the design and control of doped diamond surface functionalization for the construction of DNA hybridization assays.

  14. Polarization controllable Fresnel lens using dye-doped liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Huang, Yuhua; Fuh, Andy Y G; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2006-03-20

    A scattering-free, polarization controllable Fresnel zone plate lens is demonstrated using a photo-induced alignment of the dye-doped liquid crystal film. This photo-aligned liquid crystal zone plate provides orthogonal polarization states for odd and even zones. The different focus orders can be separated because of their different polarization states. The fabrication process is relatively simple and the operation voltage is less than 5 V(rms).

  15. [Doping in disabled sports. Doping control activities at the Paralympic Games 1984-2008 and in Germany 1992-2008].

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Hemmersbach, Peter; Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2009-12-15

    Activities concerning the fight against doping with regard to the Paralympic Games have been initiated in 1984, when first doping controls were conducted. The foundation of the International Paralympic Committee exactly 20 years ago (1989) considerably supported systematic sports drug-testing programs specifically designed to meet the particular challenges related to disabled sports, which yielded a variety of adverse analytical findings (e.g., with anabolic steroids, diuretics, corticosteroids, and stimulants) especially at Paralympic Summer Games. In Germany, doping controls for handicapped athletes were established in 1992 and have been conducted since by the National Paralympic Committee Germany and the National Anti-Doping Agency. Also here, various analogies in terms of antidoping rule violations were found in comparison to doping controls of nondisabled athletes. In the present article, available numbers of samples analyzed at Paralympic Summer and Winter Games as well as within the doping control program for disabled sports in Germany are summarized, and particularities concerning sample collection and the doping method termed boosting are presented.

  16. Silica sol-gel matrix doped with Photolon molecules for sensing and medical therapy purposes.

    PubMed

    Podbielska, Halina; Ulatowska-Jarza, Agnieszka; Müller, Gerhard; Holowacz, Iwona; Bauer, Joanna; Bindig, Uwe

    2007-11-01

    Photolon is one of the new photosensitisers that has found application in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Its chemical structure has a partially reduced porphyrin moiety and its molecular structure is comparable to chlorin e(6), which can be isolated after hydrolysis of the 5-membered exocyclic beta-ketoester moiety of pheophorbide a. For this study, a Photolon doped sol-gel matrix was produced in the form of coatings deposited on silica fibers cores. The material was produced from sols prepared from the silicate precursor TEOS mixed with ethyl alcohol. The sol-gel films were prepared with factor R=20, where R denotes the solvent-to-precursor molar ratio. Hydrochloric acid was added as a catalyst in the correct proportion to ensure acid hydrolysis (pH approximately 2). The mixture was stirred at room temperature for 4h using a magnetic stirrer (speed 400 rpm). The coated fibers were examined in different environments, liquid and gaseous, at different pH values and with various zinc cation concentrations. The chemical reactions were studied by means of spectroscopic methods, whereby the fluorescence response was studied. It was demonstrated that Photolon immobilized in a sol-gel matrix is accessible for the environment and shows visible response to the external changes. Furthermore, it was observed that these reactions are reversible. These biomaterials are also examined as carriers for PDT. It was also proved that a toxic effect is observed an environment with microorganisms, meaning that doped coatings have photodynamic activity.

  17. Procedures for monitoring recombinant erythropoietin and analogues in doping control.

    PubMed

    Segura, Jordi; Pascual, José A; Gutiérrez-Gallego, Ricardo

    2007-08-01

    The present report summarizes the main analytical strategies developed to identify the presence of recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) administered as a doping agent. Indirect evidence is based on the analysis of blood parameters (haemoglobin, haematocrit, reticulocytes, macrocytes, etc.) and serum markers (concentration of EPO and serum transferrin receptors, etc.). The problem of intertechnique comparison for reliable results evaluation is emphasized, especially for serum markers. Charge differences between isoforms of recombinant EPO and native urinary EPO are the grounds for the isoelectric focusing-double blotting-chemiluminescence detection method presently approved for doping control. Works addressing its advantages and limitations are presented and commented on. The chemical bases of the differential detection are highlighted and some future approaches for detection are also presented. The appearance and detectability of EPO analogues and mimetics susceptible for abuse are also addressed.

  18. Controlled doping of semiconducting titania nanosheets for tailored spinelectronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Minoru; Yoguchi, Satoshi; Itose, Masayuki; Li, Bao-Wen; Ebina, Yasuo; Fukuda, Katsutoshi; Kotani, Yoshinori; Ono, Kanta; Ueda, Shigenori; Sasaki, Takayoshi

    2014-11-01

    Ti1-x-yFexCoyO2 nanosheets are synthesized in which the (Fe/Co) content is systematically controlled in the range of 0 <= x <= 0.4 and 0 <= y <= 0.2. A key feature of this new preparation is the use of (Li/Fe)-, (Fe/Co)- and (Li/Co)-co-substituted layered titanates as starting materials. In exfoliated nanosheets, the composition can be intentionally modified by controlled Fe/Co substitution into Ti sites during the solid-state synthesis of the starting layered compounds. The composition of the host layers is maintained in the subsequent exfoliation process, which is very helpful in the rational design of nanosheets through the use of controlled doping. Through this controlled doping, we achieve exquisite control of the electronic properties of Ti1-δO2 nanosheets, including the position of impurity bands, the Fermi energy and ferromagnetic properties. From photoelectron spectroscopy and first-principles studies, we have observed that the use of Fe/Co co-doping with higher Fe and Co oxidation states is necessary to bring the highest occupied Fe/Co impurity states to the Fermi level. This band engineering transforms the Ti1-x-yFexCoyO2 nanosheet into a room-temperature half-metallic ferromagnet, thus accomplishing the main requirements of future spinelectronics.Ti1-x-yFexCoyO2 nanosheets are synthesized in which the (Fe/Co) content is systematically controlled in the range of 0 <= x <= 0.4 and 0 <= y <= 0.2. A key feature of this new preparation is the use of (Li/Fe)-, (Fe/Co)- and (Li/Co)-co-substituted layered titanates as starting materials. In exfoliated nanosheets, the composition can be intentionally modified by controlled Fe/Co substitution into Ti sites during the solid-state synthesis of the starting layered compounds. The composition of the host layers is maintained in the subsequent exfoliation process, which is very helpful in the rational design of nanosheets through the use of controlled doping. Through this controlled doping, we achieve exquisite

  19. Ag-doped manganite nanoparticles: new materials for temperature-controlled medical hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Melnikov, O V; Gorbenko, O Yu; Markelova, M N; Kaul, A R; Atsarkin, V A; Demidov, V V; Soto, C; Roy, E J; Odintsov, B M

    2009-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to introduce newly synthesized nanomaterials as an alternative to superparamagnetic ironoxide based particles (SPIO) and thus to launch a new platform for highly controllable hyperthermia cancer therapy and imaging. The new material that forms the basis for this article is lanthanum manganite particles with silver ions inserted into the perovskite lattice: La(1-x)Ag(x)MnO(3+delta). Adjusting the silver doping level, it is possible to control the Curie temperature (T(c)) in the hyperthermia range of interest (41-44 degrees C). A new class of nanoparticles based on silver-doped manganites La(1-x)Ag(x)MnO(3+delta) is suggested. New nanoparticles are stable, and their properties were not affected by the typical ambient conditions in the living tissue. It is possible to monitor the particle uptake and retention by MRI. When these particles are placed into an alternating magnetic field, their temperature increases to the definite value near T(c) and then remains constant if the magnetic field is maintained. During the hyperthermia procedure, the temperature can be restricted, thereby preventing the necrosis of normal tissue. A new class of nanoparticles based on silver-doped manganites La(1-x)Ag(x)MnO(3+delta) was suggested. Ag-doped perovskite manganites particles clearly demonstrated the effect of adjustable Curie temperature necessary for highly controllable cellular hyperthermia. The magnetic relaxation properties of the particles are comparable with that of SPIO, and so we were able to monitor the particle movement and retention by MRI. Thus, the new material combines the MRI contrast enhancement capability with targeted hyperthermia treatment.

  20. P-type nitrogen-doped ZnO nanostructures with controlled shape and doping level by facile microwave synthesis.

    PubMed

    Herring, Natalie P; Panchakarla, Leela S; El-Shall, M Samy

    2014-03-04

    We report herein the development of a facile microwave irradiation (MWI) method for the synthesis of high-quality N-doped ZnO nanostructures with controlled morphology and doping level. We present two different approaches for the MWI-assisted synthesis of N-doped ZnO nanostructures. In the first approach, N-doping of Zn-poor ZnO prepared using zinc peroxide (ZnO2) as a precursor is carried out under MWI in the presence of urea as a nitrogen source and oleylamine (OAm) as a capping agent for the shape control of the resulting N-doped ZnO nanostructures. Our approach utilizes the MWI process for the decomposition of ZnO2, where the rapid transfer of energy directly to ZnO2 can cause an instantaneous internal temperature rise and, thus, the activation energy for the ZnO2 decomposition is essentially decreased as compared to the decomposition under conductive heating. In the second synthesis method, a one-step synthesis of N-doped ZnO nanostructures is achieved by the rapid decomposition of zinc acetate in a mixture of urea and OAm under MWI. We demonstrate, for the first time, that MWI decomposition of zinc acetate in a mixture of OAm and urea results in the formation of N-doped nanostructures with controlled shape and N-doping level. We report a direct correlation between the intensity of the Raman scattering bands in N-doped ZnO and the concentration of urea used in the synthesis. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate the successful synthesis of stable p-type N-doped ZnO nanostructures using the one-step MWI synthesis and, therefore, allow us to investigate, for the first time, the relationship between the doping level and morphology of the ZnO nanostructures. The results provide strong evidence for the control of the electrical behavior and the nanostructured shapes of ZnO nanoparticles using the facile MWI synthesis method developed in this work.

  1. Humane killing of animals for disease control purposes.

    PubMed

    Thornber, P M; Rubira, R J; Styles, D K

    2014-04-01

    Killing for disease control purposes is an emotional issue for everyone concerned. Large-scale euthanasia or depopulation of animals may be necessary for the emergency control or eradication of animal diseases, to remove animals from a compromised situation (e.g. following flood, storm, fire, drought or a feed contamination event), to effect welfare depopulation when there is an oversupply due to a dysfunctional or closed marketing channel, or to depopulate and dispose of animals with minimal handling to decrease the risk of a zoonotic disease infecting humans. The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) developed international standards to provide advice on humane killing for various species and situations. Some fundamental issues are defined, such as competency of animal handling and implementation of humane killing techniques. Some of these methods have been used for many years, but novel approaches for the mass killing of particular species are being explored. Novel vaccines and new diagnostic techniques that differentiate between vaccinated and infected animals will save many animals from being killed as part of biosecurity response measures. Unfortunately, the destruction of affected livestock will still be required to control diseases whilst vaccination programmes are activated or where effective vaccines are not available. This paper reviews the principles of humane destruction and depopulation and explores available techniques with their associated advantages and disadvantages. It also identifies some current issues that merit consideration, such as legislative conflicts (emergency disease legislation versus animal welfare legislation, occupational health and safety), media issues, opinions on the future approaches to killing for disease control, and animal welfare.

  2. Programming methodology for a general purpose automation controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturzenbecker, M. C.; Korein, J. U.; Taylor, R. H.

    1987-01-01

    The General Purpose Automation Controller is a multi-processor architecture for automation programming. A methodology has been developed whose aim is to simplify the task of programming distributed real-time systems for users in research or manufacturing. Programs are built by configuring function blocks (low-level computations) into processes using data flow principles. These processes are activated through the verb mechanism. Verbs are divided into two classes: those which support devices, such as robot joint servos, and those which perform actions on devices, such as motion control. This programming methodology was developed in order to achieve the following goals: (1) specifications for real-time programs which are to a high degree independent of hardware considerations such as processor, bus, and interconnect technology; (2) a component approach to software, so that software required to support new devices and technologies can be integrated by reconfiguring existing building blocks; (3) resistance to error and ease of debugging; and (4) a powerful command language interface.

  3. Shape control of colloidal Mn doped ZnO nanocrystals and their visible light photocatalytic properties.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yefeng; Li, Yaguang; Zhu, Liping; He, Haiping; Hu, Liang; Huang, Jingyun; Hu, Fengchun; He, Bo; Ye, Zhizhen

    2013-11-07

    For colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs), shape control and doping as two widely applied strategies are crucial for enhancing and manipulating their functional properties. Here we report a facile and green synthetic approach for high-quality colloidal Mn doped ZnO NCs with simultaneous control over composition, shape and optical properties. Specifically, the shape of doped ZnO NCs can be finely modulated from three dimensional (3D) tetrapods to 0D spherical nanoparticles in a single reaction scheme. The growth mechanism of doped ZnO NCs with interesting shape transition is explored. Furthermore, we demonstrate the tunable optical absorption features of Mn doped ZnO NCs by varying the Mn doping levels, and the enhanced photocatalytic performance of Mn doped ZnO NCs under visible light, which can be further optimized by delicately controlling their shapes and Mn doping concentrations. Our results provide an improved understanding of the growth mechanism of doped NCs during the growth process and can be potentially extended to ZnO NCs doped with other metal ions for various applications.

  4. BLASTbus electronics: general-purpose readout and control for balloon-borne experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benton, S. J.; Ade, P. A.; Amiri, M.; Angilè, F. E.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Bryan, S. A.; Chiang, H. C.; Contaldi, C. R.; Crill, B. P.; Devlin, M. J.; Dober, B.; Doré, O. P.; Farhang, M.; Filippini, J. P.; Fissel, L. M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Fukui, Y.; Galitzki, N.; Gambrel, A. E.; Gandilo, N. N.; Golwala, S. R.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hilton, G. C.; Holmes, W. A.; Hristov, V. V.; Irwin, K. D.; Jones, W. C.; Kermish, Z. D.; Klein, J.; Korotkov, A. L.; Kuo, C. L.; MacTavish, C. J.; Mason, P. V.; Matthews, T. G.; Megerian, K. G.; Moncelsi, L.; Morford, T. A.; Mroczkowski, T. K.; Nagy, J. M.; Netterfield, C. B.; Novak, G.; Nutter, D.; O'Brient, R.; Ogburn, R. W.; Pascale, E.; Poidevin, F.; Rahlin, A. S.; Reintsema, C. D.; Ruhl, J. E.; Runyan, M. C.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Shariff, J. A.; Soler, J. D.; Thomas, N. E.; Trangsrud, A.; Truch, M. D.; Tucker, C. E.; Tucker, G. S.; Tucker, R. S.; Turner, A. D.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Weber, A. C.; Wiebe, D. V.; Young, E. Y.

    2014-07-01

    We present the second generation BLASTbus electronics. The primary purposes of this system are detector readout, attitude control, and cryogenic housekeeping, for balloon-borne telescopes. Readout of neutron transmutation doped germanium (NTD-Ge) bolometers requires low noise and parallel acquisition of hundreds of analog signals. Controlling a telescope's attitude requires the capability to interface to a wide variety of sensors and motors, and to use them together in a fast, closed loop. To achieve these different goals, the BLASTbus system employs a flexible motherboard-daughterboard architecture. The programmable motherboard features a digital signal processor (DSP) and field-programmable gate array (FPGA), as well as slots for three daughterboards. The daughterboards provide the interface to the outside world, with versions for analog to digital conversion, and optoisolated digital input/output. With the versatility afforded by this design, the BLASTbus also finds uses in cryogenic, thermometry, and power systems. For accurate timing control to tie everything together, the system operates in a fully synchronous manner. BLASTbus electronics have been successfully deployed to the South Pole, and own on stratospheric balloons.

  5. Mini All-purpose Satellite Control Center (MASCC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaouche, Gerard

    1994-01-01

    A new generation of Mini All-purpose Satellite Control Centers (MASCC) has been developed by CNES (F). They turn out to be easily adaptable to different kinds of satellites, both Low Earth Orbital or Geostationary. The features of MASCC allow both standard satellite control activities, and checking of passengers experiments hosted on a space platform. In the different environments in which it may be used, MASCC provides standard broadcasting of telemetry parameters on animated synoptics (curves, bar graphs, alphanumeric displays, ...), which turns out to be a very useful and ergonomic medium for operational teams or satellite specialists. Special care has been taken during the MASCC development about two points: - automation of all routine tasks, allowing automated operation, and limiting human commitment to system supervision and decision making, - software adaptability. To reach these two main objectives, the MASCC design provides:(1) a simple, robust and flexible hardware architecture, based on powerful distributed workstations; and (2) a table-driven software architecture, easily adapted to various operational needs. Satellite characteristics are described in a central Data Base. Hence, the processing of telemetry and commands is largely independent from the satellite itself. In order to validate these capabilities, the MASCC has been customized to several types of satellites and orbital platforms: (1) SPOT4, the French new generation of remote sensing satellites; (2) TELECOM2, the French geostationary TV and telecommunication satellite; and (3) MIR, the Russian orbital platform. MASCC development has been completed by the third quarter of 1993. This paper will provide first a description of the MASCC basic functions, of its hardware and software design. It will then detail the increased automation capability, along with the easy adaptation of the MASCC to new satellites with minimal software modifications.

  6. Self-control, self-regulation, and doping in sport: a test of the strength-energy model.

    PubMed

    Chan, Derwin K; Lentillon-Kaestner, Vanessa; Dimmock, James A; Donovan, Robert J; Keatley, David A; Hardcastle, Sarah J; Hagger, Martin S

    2015-04-01

    We applied the strength-energy model of self-control to understand the relationship between self-control and young athletes' behavioral responses to taking illegal performance-enhancing substances, or "doping." Measures of trait self-control, attitude and intention toward doping, intention toward, and adherence to, doping-avoidant behaviors, and the prevention of unintended doping behaviors were administered to 410 young Australian athletes. Participants also completed a "lollipop" decision-making protocol that simulated avoidance of unintended doping. Hierarchical linear multiple regression analyses revealed that self-control was negatively associated with doping attitude and intention, and positively associated with the intention and adherence to doping-avoidant behaviors, and refusal to take or eat the unfamiliar candy offered in the "lollipop" protocol. Consistent with the strength-energy model, athletes with low self-control were more likely to have heightened attitude and intention toward doping, and reduced intention, behavioral adherence, and awareness of doping avoidance.

  7. Rogue athletes and recombinant DNA technology: challenges for doping control.

    PubMed

    Azzazy, Hassan M E; Mansour, Mai M H

    2007-10-01

    The quest for athletic excellence holds no limit for some athletes, and the advances in recombinant DNA technology have handed these athletes the ultimate doping weapons: recombinant proteins and gene doping. Some detection methods are now available for several recombinant proteins that are commercially available as pharmaceuticals and being abused by dopers. However, researchers are struggling to come up with efficient detection methods in preparation for the imminent threat of gene doping, expected in the 2008 Olympics. This Forum article presents the main detection strategies for recombinant proteins and the forthcoming detection strategies for gene doping as well as the prime analytical challenges facing them.

  8. Control of work function of graphene by plasma assisted nitrogen doping

    SciTech Connect

    Akada, Keishi; Terasawa, Tomo-o; Imamura, Gaku; Obata, Seiji; Saiki, Koichiro

    2014-03-31

    Nitrogen doping is expected to provide several intriguing properties to graphene. Nitrogen plasma treatment to defect-free and defective highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) samples causes doping of nitrogen atom into the graphene layer. Nitrogen atoms are initially doped at a graphitic site (inside the graphene) for the defect-free HOPG, while doping to a pyridinic or a pyrrolic site (edge of the graphene) is dominant for the defective HOPG. The work function of graphene correlates strongly with the site and amount of doped nitrogen. Nitrogen atoms doped at a graphitic site lower the work function, while nitrogen atoms at a pyridinic or a pyrrolic site increase the work function. Control of plasma treatment time and the amount of initial defect could change the work function of graphite from 4.3 eV to 5.4 eV, which would open a way to tailor the nature of graphene for various industrial applications.

  9. Screening for the synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 and its major metabolites in human doping controls.

    PubMed

    Möller, Ines; Wintermeyer, Annette; Bender, Katja; Jübner, Martin; Thomas, Andreas; Krug, Oliver; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2011-09-01

    Referred to as 'spice', several new drugs, advertised as herbal blends, have appeared on the market in the last few years, in which the synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and a C(8) homologue of CP 47,497 were identified as major active ingredients. Due to their reported cannabis-like effects, many European countries have banned these substances. The World Anti-Doping Agency has also explicitly prohibited synthetic cannabinoids in elite sport in-competition. Since urine specimens have been the preferred doping control samples, the elucidation of the metabolic pathways of these substances is of particular importance to implement them in sports drug testing programmes. In a recent report, an in vitro phase-I metabolism study of JWH-018 was presented yielding mainly hydroxylated and N-dealkylated metabolites. Due to these findings, a urine sample of a healthy man declaring to have smoked a 'spice' product was screened for potential phase-I and -II metabolites by high-resolution/high-accuracy mass spectrometry in the present report. The majority of the phase-I metabolites observed in earlier in vitro studies of JWH-018 were detected in this urine specimen and furthermore most of their respective monoglucuronides. As no intact JWH-018 was detectable, the monohydroxylated metabolite being the most abundant one was chosen as a target analyte for sports drug testing purposes; a detection method was subsequently developed and validated in accordance to conventional screening protocols based on enzymatic hydrolysis, liquid-liquid extraction, and liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The method was applied to approximately 7500 urine doping control samples yielding two JWH-018 findings and demonstrated its capability for a sensitive and selective identification of JWH-018 and its metabolites in human urine.

  10. Impurity doping: a novel strategy for controllable synthesis of functional lanthanide nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daqin; Wang, Yuansheng

    2013-06-07

    Many technological nanomaterials are intentionally 'doped' by introducing appropriate amounts of foreign elements into hosts to impart electronic, magnetic and optical properties. In fact, impurity doping was recently found to have significant influence on nucleation and growth of many functional nanocrystals (NCs), and provide a fundamental approach to modify the crystallographic phase, size, morphology, and electronic configuration of nanomaterials. In this feature article, we provide an overview of the most recent progresses in doping-induced control of phase structures, sizes, shapes, as well as performances of functional nanomaterials for the first time. Two kinds of impurity doping strategies, including the homo-valence ion doping and hetero-valence ion doping, are discussed in detail. We lay emphases on impurity doping induced modifications of microstructures and optical properties of upconversion (UC) lanthanide (Ln(3+)) NCs, but do not limit to them. In addition, we also illustrate the control of Ln(3+) activator distribution in the core@shell architecture, which has recently provided scientists with new opportunities for designing and tuning the multi-color emissions of Ln(3+)-doped UC NCs. Finally, the challenges and future perspectives of this novel impurity doping strategy are pointed out.

  11. A call for policy guidance on psychometric testing in doping control in sport.

    PubMed

    Petróczi, Andrea; Backhouse, Susan H; Barkoukis, Vassilis; Brand, Ralf; Elbe, Anne-Marie; Lazuras, Lambros; Lucidi, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    One of the fundamental challenges in anti-doping is identifying athletes who use, or are at risk of using, prohibited performance enhancing substances. The growing trend to employ a forensic approach to doping control aims to integrate information from social sciences (e.g., psychology of doping) into organised intelligence to protect clean sport. Beyond the foreseeable consequences of a positive identification as a doping user, this task is further complicated by the discrepancy between what constitutes a doping offence in the World Anti-Doping Code and operationalized in doping research. Whilst psychology plays an important role in developing our understanding of doping behaviour in order to inform intervention and prevention, its contribution to the array of doping diagnostic tools is still in its infancy. In both research and forensic settings, we must acknowledge that (1) socially desirable responding confounds self-reported psychometric test results and (2) that the cognitive complexity surrounding test performance means that the response-time based measures and the lie detector tests for revealing concealed life-events (e.g., doping use) are prone to produce false or non-interpretable outcomes in field settings. Differences in social-cognitive characteristics of doping behaviour that are tested at group level (doping users vs. non-users) cannot be extrapolated to individuals; nor these psychometric measures used for individual diagnostics. In this paper, we present a position statement calling for policy guidance on appropriate use of psychometric assessments in the pursuit of clean sport. We argue that, to date, both self-reported and response-time based psychometric tests for doping have been designed, tested and validated to explore how athletes feel and think about doping in order to develop a better understanding of doping behaviour, not to establish evidence for doping. A false 'positive' psychological profile for doping affects not only the individual

  12. Controllable Growth of Ultrathin P-doped ZnO Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuankun; Yang, Hengyan; Sun, Feng; Wang, Xianying

    2016-12-01

    Ultrathin phosphor (P)-doped ZnO nanosheets with branched nanowires were controllably synthesized, and the effects of oxygen and phosphor doping on the structural and optical properties were systematically studied. The grown ZnO nanosheet exhibits an ultrathin nanoribbon backbone with one-side-aligned nanoteeth. For the growth of ultrathin ZnO nanosheets, both oxygen flow rate and P doping are essential, by which the morphologies and microstructures can be finely tuned. P doping induces strain relaxation to change the growth direction of ZnO nanoribbons, and oxygen flow rate promotes the high supersaturation degree to facilitate the growth of nanoteeth and widens the nanoribbons. The growth of P-doped ZnO in this work provides a new progress towards the rational control of the morphologies for ZnO nanostructures.

  13. Controllable Growth of Ultrathin P-doped ZnO Nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuankun; Yang, Hengyan; Sun, Feng; Wang, Xianying

    2016-04-01

    Ultrathin phosphor (P)-doped ZnO nanosheets with branched nanowires were controllably synthesized, and the effects of oxygen and phosphor doping on the structural and optical properties were systematically studied. The grown ZnO nanosheet exhibits an ultrathin nanoribbon backbone with one-side-aligned nanoteeth. For the growth of ultrathin ZnO nanosheets, both oxygen flow rate and P doping are essential, by which the morphologies and microstructures can be finely tuned. P doping induces strain relaxation to change the growth direction of ZnO nanoribbons, and oxygen flow rate promotes the high supersaturation degree to facilitate the growth of nanoteeth and widens the nanoribbons. The growth of P-doped ZnO in this work provides a new progress towards the rational control of the morphologies for ZnO nanostructures.

  14. Urine stability and steroid profile: towards a screening index of urine sample degradation for anti-doping purpose.

    PubMed

    Mazzarino, Monica; Abate, Maria Gabriella; Alocci, Roberto; Rossi, Francesca; Stinchelli, Raffaella; Molaioni, Francesco; de la Torre, Xavier; Botrè, Francesco

    2011-01-10

    The presence of microorganisms in urine samples, under favourable conditions of storage and transportation, may alter the concentration of steroid hormones, thus altering the correct evaluation of the urinary steroid profile in doping control analysis. According to the rules of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA technical document TD2004 EAAS), a testosterone deconjugation higher than 5% and the presence of 5α-androstane-3,17-dione and 5β-androstane-3,17-dione in the deconjugated fraction, are reliable indicators of urine degradation. The determination of these markers would require an additional quantitative analysis since the steroids screening analysis, in anti-doping laboratories, is performed in the total (free+conjugated) fraction. The aim of this work is therefore to establish reliable threshold values for some representative compounds (namely 5α-androstane-3,17-dione and 5β-androstane-3,17-dione) in the total fraction in order to predict directly at the screening stage the potential microbial degradation of the urine samples. Preliminary evidence on the most suitable degradation indexes has been obtained by measuring the urinary concentration of testosterone, epitestosterone, 5α-androstane-3,17-dione and 5β-androstane-3,17-dione by gas chromatography-mass spectrometric every day for 15 days in the deconjugated, glucuronide and total fraction of 10 pools of urines from 60 healthy subjects, stored under different pH and temperature conditions, and isolating the samples with one or more markers of degradation according to the WADA technical document TD2004EAAS. The threshold values for 5α-androstane-3,17-dione and 5β-androstane-3,17-dione were therefore obtained correlating the testosterone deconjugation rate with the urinary concentrations of 5α-androstane-3,17-dione and 5β-androstane-3,17-dione in the total fraction. The threshold values suggested as indexes of urine degradation in the total fraction were: 10 ng mL(-1) for 5α-androstane-3,17-dione

  15. Controlled release of alendronate from nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Dipendu; Spurri, Amanda; Chen, Jihua; Hensley, Dale K.

    2016-04-13

    With this study, we have synthesized a nitrogen doped mesoporous carbon with the BET surface area of 1066 m2/g, total pore volume 0.6 cm3/g and nitrogen content of 0.5%. Total alendronate adsorption in this carbon was ~5%. The release experiments were designed in four different media with sequential pH values of 1.2, 4.5, 6.8 and 7.4 for 3, 1, 3 and 5 h, respectively and at 37 °C to imitate the physiological conditions of stomach, duodenum, small intestine and colon, respectively. Release of the drug demonstrated a controlled fashion; only 20% of the drug was released in the media with pH = 1.2, whereas 64% of the drug was released in pH = 7.4. This is in contrary to pure alendronate that was completely dissolved within 30 min in the first release media (pH = 1.2) only. The relatively larger uptake of alendronate in this carbon and its sustained fashion of release can be attributed to the hydrogen bonding between the drug and the nitrogen functionalities on carbon surface. Based on this result, it can be inferred that this formulation may lower the side effects of oral delivery of alendronate.

  16. Controlled release of alendronate from nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon

    DOE PAGES

    Saha, Dipendu; Spurri, Amanda; Chen, Jihua; ...

    2016-04-13

    With this study, we have synthesized a nitrogen doped mesoporous carbon with the BET surface area of 1066 m2/g, total pore volume 0.6 cm3/g and nitrogen content of 0.5%. Total alendronate adsorption in this carbon was ~5%. The release experiments were designed in four different media with sequential pH values of 1.2, 4.5, 6.8 and 7.4 for 3, 1, 3 and 5 h, respectively and at 37 °C to imitate the physiological conditions of stomach, duodenum, small intestine and colon, respectively. Release of the drug demonstrated a controlled fashion; only 20% of the drug was released in the media withmore » pH = 1.2, whereas 64% of the drug was released in pH = 7.4. This is in contrary to pure alendronate that was completely dissolved within 30 min in the first release media (pH = 1.2) only. The relatively larger uptake of alendronate in this carbon and its sustained fashion of release can be attributed to the hydrogen bonding between the drug and the nitrogen functionalities on carbon surface. Based on this result, it can be inferred that this formulation may lower the side effects of oral delivery of alendronate.« less

  17. Controlling ferromagnetism of (In,Fe)As semiconductors by electron doping

    SciTech Connect

    Dang Vu, Nguyen; Fukushima, Tetsuya; Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi; Sato, Kazunori

    2014-02-21

    Based on experimental results, using the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker coherent potential approximation (KKR-CPA) method and Monte Carlo simulation, we study the mechanism of ferromagnetic behavior of (In,Fe)As. We show that with doped Be atoms occupying in interstitial sites, chemical pair interactions between atoms and magnetic exchange interactions between Fe atoms change due to electron concentration. Therefore, by controlling the doping process, magnetic behavior of (In,Fe)As is controlled and ferromagnetism is observed in this semiconductor.

  18. Tailoring the optical bandgap and magnetization of cobalt ferrite thin films through controlled zinc doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Deepanshu; Khare, Neeraj

    2016-08-01

    In this report, the tuning of the optical bandgap and saturation magnetization of cobalt ferrite (CFO) thin films through low doping of zinc (Zn) has been demonstrated. The Zn doped CFO thin films with doping concentrations (0 to 10%) have been synthesized by ultrasonic assisted chemical vapour deposition technique. The optical bandgap varies from 1.48 to 1.88 eV and saturation magnetization varies from 142 to 221 emu/cc with the increase in the doping concentration and this change in the optical and magnetic properties is attributed to the change in the relative population of the Co2+ at the tetrahedral and octahedral sites. Raman study confirms the decrease in the population of Co2+ at tetrahedral sites with controlled Zn doping in CFO thin films. A quantitative analysis has been presented to explain the observed variation in the optical bandgap and saturation magnetization.

  19. Using a cognitive architecture for general purpose service robot control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puigbo, Jordi-Ysard; Pumarola, Albert; Angulo, Cecilio; Tellez, Ricardo

    2015-04-01

    A humanoid service robot equipped with a set of simple action skills including navigating, grasping, recognising objects or people, among others, is considered in this paper. By using those skills the robot should complete a voice command expressed in natural language encoding a complex task (defined as the concatenation of a number of those basic skills). As a main feature, no traditional planner has been used to decide skills to be activated, as well as in which sequence. Instead, the SOAR cognitive architecture acts as the reasoner by selecting which action the robot should complete, addressing it towards the goal. Our proposal allows to include new goals for the robot just by adding new skills (without the need to encode new plans). The proposed architecture has been tested on a human-sized humanoid robot, REEM, acting as a general purpose service robot.

  20. Some aspects of doping and medication control in equine sports.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Ed; Maynard, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This chapter reviews drug and medication control in equestrian sports and addresses the rules of racing, the technological advances that have been made in drug detection and the importance of metabolism studies in the development of effective drug surveillance programmes. Typical approaches to screening and confirmatory analysis are discussed, as are the quality processes that underpin these procedures. The chapter also addresses four specific topics relevant to equestrian sports: substances controlled by threshold values, the approach adopted recently by European racing authorities to control some therapeutic substances, anabolic steroids in the horse and LC-MS analysis in drug testing in animal sports and metabolism studies. The purpose of discussing these specific topics is to emphasise the importance of research and development and collaboration to further global harmonisation and the development and support of international rules.

  1. Mass spectrometric characterization of a prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor GSK1278863, its bishydroxylated metabolite, and its implementation into routine doping controls.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Milosovich, Susan; Licea-Perez, Hermes; Knecht, Dana; Cavalier, Tom; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2016-08-01

    Drug candidates, which have the potential of enhancing athletic performance represent a risk of being misused in elite sport. Therefore, there is a need for early consideration by anti-doping authorities and implementation into sports drug testing programmes. The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) or prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor (PHI) GSK1278863 represents an advanced candidate of an emerging class of therapeutics that possess substantial potential for abuse in sport due to their capability to stimulate the biogenesis of erythrocytes and, consequently, the individual's oxygen transport capacity. A thorough characterization of such analytes by technologies predominantly used for doping control purposes and the subsequent implementation of the active drug and/or its main urinary metabolite(s) are vital for comprehensive, preventive, and efficient anti-doping work. In the present study, the HIF PHI drug candidate GSK1278863 (comprising a 6-hydroxypyrimidine-2,4-dione nucleus) and its bishydroxylated metabolite M2 (GSK2391220A) were studied regarding their mass spectrometric behaviour under electrospray ionization (ESI-MS/MS) conditions. Synthesized reference materials were used to elucidate dissociation pathways by means of quadrupole/time-of-flight high resolution/high accuracy tandem mass spectrometry, and their detection from spiked urine and elimination study urine samples under routine doping control conditions was established using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry with direct injection. Dissociation pathways to diagnostic product ions of GSK1278863 (e.g. m/z 291, 223, and 122) were proposed as substantiated by determined elemental compositions and MS(n) experiments as well as comparison to spectra of the bishydroxylated analogue M2. An analytical assay based on direct urine injection using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed for the simultaneous determination of GSK1278863 in

  2. Neural network evaluation of reflectometry density profiles for control purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, J.; Nunes, F.; Manso, M.; Nunes, I.

    1999-01-01

    Broadband reflectometry is a diagnostic that is able to measure the density profile with high spatial and temporal resolutions, therefore it can be used to improve the performance of advanced tokamak operation modes and to supplement or correct the magnetics for plasma position control. To perform these tasks real-time processing is needed. Here we present a method that uses a neural network to make a fast evaluation of radial positions for selected density layers. Typical ASDEX Upgrade density profiles were used to generate the simulated network training and test sets. It is shown that the method has the potential to meet the tight timing requirements of control applications with the required accuracy. The network is also able to provide an accurate estimation of the position of density layers below the first density layer which is probed by an O-mode reflectometer, provided that it is trained with a realistic density profile model.

  3. Doping-assisted defect control in compound semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Specht, Petra; Weber, Eicke R.; Weatherford, Todd Russell

    2006-07-11

    The present invention relates to the production of thin film epilayers of III–V and other compounds with acceptor doping wherein the acceptor thermally stabilizes the epilayer, stabilize the naturally incorporated native defect population and therewith maintain the epilayer's beneficial properties upon annealing among other advantageous effects. In particular, balanced doping in which the acceptor concentration is similar to (but does not exceed) the antisite defects in the as-grown material is shown to be particularly advantageous in providing thermal stability, high resistivity and ultrashort trapping times. In particular, MBE growth of LT-GaAs epilayers with balanced Be doping is described in detail. The growth conditions greatly enhance the materials reproducibility (that is, the yield in processed devices). Such growth techniques can be transferred to other III–V materials if the growth conditions are accurately reproduced. Materials produced herein also demonstrate advantages in reproducibility, reliability and radiation hardening.

  4. Ge doped GaN with controllable high carrier concentration for plasmonic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kirste, Ronny; Hoffmann, Marc P.; Sachet, Edward; Bobea, Milena; Bryan, Zachary; Bryan, Isaac; Maria, Jon-Paul; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko; Nenstiel, Christian; Hoffmann, Axel

    2013-12-09

    Controllable Ge doping in GaN is demonstrated for carrier concentrations of up to 2.4 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3}. Low temperature luminescence spectra from the highly doped samples reveal band gap renormalization and band filling (Burstein-Moss shift) in addition to a sharp transition. Infrared ellipsometry spectra demonstrate the existence of electron plasma with an energy around 3500 cm{sup −1} and a surface plasma with an energy around 2000 cm{sup −1}. These findings open possibilities for the application of highly doped GaN for plasmonic devices.

  5. Detection of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in human anti-doping control: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Leuenberger, Nicolas; Reichel, Christian; Lasne, Françoise

    2012-07-01

    Stimulation of erythropoiesis is one of the most efficient ways of doping. This type of doping is advantageous for aerobic physical exercise and of particular interest to endurance athletes. Erythropoiesis, which takes place in bone marrow, is under the control of EPO, a hormone secreted primarily by the kidneys when the arterial oxygen tension decreases. In certain pathological disorders, such as chronic renal failure, the production of EPO is insufficient and results in anemia. The pharmaceutical industry has, thus, been very interested in developing drugs that stimulate erythropoiesis. With this aim, various strategies have been, and continue to be, envisaged, giving rise to an expanding range of drugs that are good candidates for doping. Anti-doping control has had to deal with this situation by developing appropriate methods for their detection. This article presents an overview of both the drugs and the corresponding methods of detection, and thus follows a roughly chronological order.

  6. Increased Photoconductivity Lifetime in GaAs Nanowires by Controlled n-Type and p-Type Doping.

    PubMed

    Boland, Jessica L; Casadei, Alberto; Tütüncüoglu, Gözde; Matteini, Federico; Davies, Christopher L; Jabeen, Fauzia; Joyce, Hannah J; Herz, Laura M; Fontcuberta I Morral, Anna; Johnston, Michael B

    2016-04-26

    Controlled doping of GaAs nanowires is crucial for the development of nanowire-based electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we present a noncontact method based on time-resolved terahertz photoconductivity for assessing n- and p-type doping efficiency in nanowires. Using this technique, we measure extrinsic electron and hole concentrations in excess of 10(18) cm(-3) for GaAs nanowires with n-type and p-type doped shells. Furthermore, we show that controlled doping can significantly increase the photoconductivity lifetime of GaAs nanowires by over an order of magnitude: from 0.13 ns in undoped nanowires to 3.8 and 2.5 ns in n-doped and p-doped nanowires, respectively. Thus, controlled doping can be used to reduce the effects of parasitic surface recombination in optoelectronic nanowire devices, which is promising for nanowire devices, such as solar cells and nanowire lasers.

  7. A General Purpose Experiment Controller for low cost Space Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman-Garcia, D.; Rowland, D. E.; Uribe, P.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.

    2012-12-01

    Space activities are very expensive and include a high degree of risk. Nowadays, CubeSat missions represent a fast and inexpensive way to conduct scientific space research. These platforms are less expensive to develop and build than conventional satellites. There are ample demonstration that these platforms are well suited for a wide range of science missions in different fields, such as astrobiology, astronomy, atmospheric science, space weather and biology. This paper presents a hybrid "processor in an Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)" experiment/spacecraft controller for Cubesat missions. The system has two objectives, first is to obtain a multipurpose and easily customizable system aimed at processing the data from the widest kind of instruments and second, to provide the system with the highest processing capabilities in order to be able to perform complex onboard algorithms. Due to the versatility of the system and its reduced dimensions, it can be employed in different space platforms. The system is envisioned to be employed for the first time as the smart radio receiver for the upcoming NASA FireStation instrument. It is one of four experiments manifested to fly on an experiment pallet the U.S Department of Defense plans to deploy on the International Space Station in 2013. FireStation will continue analyzing the link between the Lightning and the Terrestrial Gamma Rays initiated by the FireFly Cubesat. The system is responsible for the management of a set of small Heliophysics instrumentats, including a photometer, magnetometer, and electric and magnetic field antennas. A description of the system architecture and its main features are presented. The main functional and performance tests during the integration and calibration phase of the instruments are also discussed.

  8. Taking purpose into account in experimental psychology: testing for controlled variables.

    PubMed

    Marken, Richard S

    2013-02-01

    Experimental research in psychology is based on a causal model--the General Linear Model (GLM)--that assumes behavior has causes but not purposes. Powers (1978) used a control theory analysis to show that the results of psychological experiments based on such a model can be misleading if the organisms being studied are purposeful (control) systems. In the same paper, Powers presented evidence that organisms are such systems. Nevertheless, psychologists continue to use methods that ignore purpose because the behavior in most experiments appears to be non-purposeful (a caused result of variations in the independent variable). The experiments described in this paper show how purposeful behavior can appear to be caused by the independent variable when an organism's purposes are ignored. The results show how taking purpose into account using the control theory-based "Test for the Controlled Variable" can provide a productive new methodological direction for experimental research in psychology.

  9. Controlling the dopant dose in silicon by mixed-monolayer doping.

    PubMed

    Ye, Liang; Pujari, Sidharam P; Zuilhof, Han; Kudernac, Tibor; de Jong, Michel P; van der Wiel, Wilfred G; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2015-02-11

    Molecular monolayer doping (MLD) presents an alternative to achieve doping of silicon in a nondestructive way and holds potential for realizing ultrashallow junctions and doping of nonplanar surfaces. Here, we report the mixing of dopant-containing alkenes with alkenes that lack this functionality at various ratios to control the dopant concentration in the resulting monolayer and concomitantly the dopant dose in the silicon substrate. The mixed monolayers were grafted onto hydrogen-terminated silicon using well-established hydrosilylation chemistry. Contact angle measurements, X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) on the boron-containing monolayers, and Auger electron spectroscopy on the phosphorus-containing monolayers show clear trends as a function of the dopant-containing alkene concentration. Dynamic secondary-ion mass spectroscopy (D-SIMS) and Van der Pauw resistance measurements on the in-diffused samples show an effective tuning of the doping concentration in silicon.

  10. Environmental control of electron-phonon coupling in barium doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbitskiy, N. I.; Fedorov, A. V.; Tresca, C.; Profeta, G.; Petaccia, L.; Senkovskiy, B. V.; Usachov, D. Yu; Vyalikh, D. V.; Yashina, L. V.; Eliseev, A. A.; Pichler, T.; Grüneis, A.

    2016-12-01

    Two-dimensional superconductivity in alkali- and alkaline-Earth-metal doped monolayer graphene has been explained in the framework of electron-phonon coupling (EPC) and experiments yielded superconducting transition temperatures (T C ) up to 6 K. In contrast to bulk graphite intercalation compounds, the interface of doped graphene with its environment affects its physical properties. Here we present a novel and well-defined BaC8 interface structure in Ba-doped single-layer graphene on Au and Ge substrates. We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy in combination with ab initio modelling to extract the Eliashberg function and EPC for both substrates. This allows us to quantitatively assess the environmental effects for both Au and Ge substrates on superconductivity in graphene. We show that for semiconducting Ge substrates, the doping level and EPC are higher. Our study highlights that both dopant order and the metallicity of the substrate can be used to control EPC and hence superconductivity.

  11. Detection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) by mass spectrometry procedures in doping controls.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andreas; Walpurgis, Katja; Delahaut, Philippe; Kohler, Maxie; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Uncovering manipulation of athletic performance via small interfering (si)RNA is an emerging field in sports drug testing. Due to the potential to principally knock down every target gene in the organism by means of the RNA interference pathway, this facet of gene doping has become a realistic scenario. In the present study, two distinct model siRNAs comprising 21 nucleotides were designed as double strands which were perfect counterparts to a sequence of the respective messenger RNA coding the muscle regulator myostatin of Rattus norvegicus. Several modified nucleotides were introduced in both the sense and the antisense strand comprising phosphothioates, 2'-O-methylation, 2'-fluoro-nucleotides, locked nucleic acids and a cholesterol tag at the 3'-end. The model siRNAs were applied to rats at 1 mg/kg (i.v.) and blood as well as urine samples were collected. After isolation of the RNA by means of a RNA purification kit, the target analytes were detected by liquid chromatography - high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). Analytes were detected as modified nucleotides after alkaline hydrolysis, as intact oligonucleotide strands (top-down) and by means of denaturing SDS-PAGE analysis. The gel-separated siRNA was further subjected to in-gel hydrolysis with different RNases and subsequent identification of the fragments by untargeted LC-HRMS analysis (bottom-up, 'experimental RNomics'). Combining the results of all approaches, the identification of several 3'-truncated urinary metabolites was accomplished and target analytes were detected up to 24 h after a single administration. Simultaneously collected blood samples yielded no promising results. The methods were validated and found fit-for-purpose for doping controls.

  12. Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle Active Thermal Control and Environmental Control and Life Support Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, John F.; Barido, Richard A.; Boehm, Paul; Cross, Cynthia D.; Rains, George Edward

    2014-01-01

    The Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is the first crew transport vehicle to be developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the last thirty years. Orion is currently being developed to transport the crew safely beyond Earth orbit. This year, the vehicle focused on building the Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1) vehicle to be launched in September of 2014. The development of the Orion Active Thermal Control (ATCS) and Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System, focused on the integrating the components into the EFT1 vehicle and preparing them for launch. Work also has started on preliminary design reviews for the manned vehicle. Additional development work is underway to keep the remaining component progressing towards implementation on the flight tests of EM1 in 2017 and of EM2 in 2020. This paper covers the Orion ECLS development from April 2013 to April 2014

  13. Controlled doping by self-assembled dendrimer-like macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haigang; Guan, Bin; Sun, Yingri; Zhu, Yiping; Dan, Yaping

    2017-01-01

    Doping via self-assembled macromolecules might offer a solution for developing single atom electronics by precisely placing individual dopants at arbitrary location to meet the requirement for circuit design. Here we synthesize dendrimer-like polyglycerol macromolecules with each carrying one phosphorus atom in the core. The macromolecules are immobilized by the coupling reagent onto silicon surfaces that are pre-modified with a monolayer of undecylenic acid. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are employed to characterize the synthesized macromolecules and the modified silicon surfaces, respectively. After rapid thermal annealing, the phosphorus atoms carried by the macromolecules diffuse into the silicon substrate, forming dopants at a concentration of 1017 cm−3. Low-temperature Hall effect measurements reveal that the ionization process is rather complicated. Unlike the widely reported simple ionization of phosphorus dopants, nitrogen and carbon are also involved in the electronic activities in the monolayer doped silicon. PMID:28145485

  14. Controlled doping by self-assembled dendrimer-like macromolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Haigang; Guan, Bin; Sun, Yingri; Zhu, Yiping; Dan, Yaping

    2017-02-01

    Doping via self-assembled macromolecules might offer a solution for developing single atom electronics by precisely placing individual dopants at arbitrary location to meet the requirement for circuit design. Here we synthesize dendrimer-like polyglycerol macromolecules with each carrying one phosphorus atom in the core. The macromolecules are immobilized by the coupling reagent onto silicon surfaces that are pre-modified with a monolayer of undecylenic acid. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are employed to characterize the synthesized macromolecules and the modified silicon surfaces, respectively. After rapid thermal annealing, the phosphorus atoms carried by the macromolecules diffuse into the silicon substrate, forming dopants at a concentration of 1017 cm‑3. Low-temperature Hall effect measurements reveal that the ionization process is rather complicated. Unlike the widely reported simple ionization of phosphorus dopants, nitrogen and carbon are also involved in the electronic activities in the monolayer doped silicon.

  15. Controlled doping by self-assembled dendrimer-like macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haigang; Guan, Bin; Sun, Yingri; Zhu, Yiping; Dan, Yaping

    2017-02-01

    Doping via self-assembled macromolecules might offer a solution for developing single atom electronics by precisely placing individual dopants at arbitrary location to meet the requirement for circuit design. Here we synthesize dendrimer-like polyglycerol macromolecules with each carrying one phosphorus atom in the core. The macromolecules are immobilized by the coupling reagent onto silicon surfaces that are pre-modified with a monolayer of undecylenic acid. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are employed to characterize the synthesized macromolecules and the modified silicon surfaces, respectively. After rapid thermal annealing, the phosphorus atoms carried by the macromolecules diffuse into the silicon substrate, forming dopants at a concentration of 10(17) cm(-3). Low-temperature Hall effect measurements reveal that the ionization process is rather complicated. Unlike the widely reported simple ionization of phosphorus dopants, nitrogen and carbon are also involved in the electronic activities in the monolayer doped silicon.

  16. 27 CFR 27.75 - Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes. 27.75 Section 27.75 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... DISTILLED SPIRITS, WINES, AND BEER General Requirements Exemptions § 27.75 Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes. Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer in...

  17. 27 CFR 27.75 - Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes. 27.75 Section 27.75 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... DISTILLED SPIRITS, WINES, AND BEER General Requirements Exemptions § 27.75 Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes. Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer in...

  18. 27 CFR 27.75 - Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes. 27.75 Section 27.75 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... DISTILLED SPIRITS, WINES, AND BEER General Requirements Exemptions § 27.75 Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes. Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer in...

  19. 27 CFR 27.75 - Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes. 27.75 Section 27.75 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... DISTILLED SPIRITS, WINES, AND BEER General Requirements Exemptions § 27.75 Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes. Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer in...

  20. 27 CFR 27.75 - Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes. 27.75 Section 27.75 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... DISTILLED SPIRITS, WINES, AND BEER General Requirements Exemptions § 27.75 Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer for quality control purposes. Samples of distilled spirits, wine, and beer in...

  1. Method for continuous control of composition and doping of pulsed laser deposited films by pressure control

    DOEpatents

    Lowndes, Douglas H.; McCamy, James W.

    1996-01-01

    A method for growing a deposit upon a substrate of semiconductor material involves the utilization of pulsed laser deposition techniques within a low-pressure gas environment. The substrate and a target of a first material are positioned within a deposition chamber and a low-pressure gas atmosphere is developed within the chamber. The substrate is then heated, and the target is irradiated, so that atoms of the target material are ablated from the remainder of the target, while atoms of the gas simultaneously are adsorbed on the substrate/film surface. The ablated atoms build up upon the substrate, together with the adsorbed gas atoms to form the thin-film deposit on the substrate. By controlling the pressure of the gas of the chamber atmosphere, the composition of the formed deposit can be controlled, and films of continuously variable composition or doping can be grown from a single target of fixed composition.

  2. Nanoscale Control of Rewriteable Doping Patterns in Pristine Graphene/Boron Nitride Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Jairo; Ju, Long; Wong, Dillon; Kahn, Salman; Lee, Juwon; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Germany, Chad; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Lu, Jiong; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Zettl, Alex; Wang, Feng; Crommie, Michael F

    2016-03-09

    Nanoscale control of charge doping in two-dimensional (2D) materials permits the realization of electronic analogs of optical phenomena, relativistic physics at low energies, and technologically promising nanoelectronics. Electrostatic gating and chemical doping are the two most common methods to achieve local control of such doping. However, these approaches suffer from complicated fabrication processes that introduce contamination, change material properties irreversibly, and lack flexible pattern control. Here we demonstrate a clean, simple, and reversible technique that permits writing, reading, and erasing of doping patterns for 2D materials at the nanometer scale. We accomplish this by employing a graphene/boron nitride heterostructure that is equipped with a bottom gate electrode. By using electron transport and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we demonstrate that spatial control of charge doping can be realized with the application of either light or STM tip voltage excitations in conjunction with a gate electric field. Our straightforward and novel technique provides a new path toward on-demand graphene p-n junctions and ultrathin memory devices.

  3. Stable and controlled amphoteric doping by encapsulation of organic molecules inside carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Takenobu, Taishi; Takano, Takumi; Shiraishi, Masashi; Murakami, Yousuke; Ata, Masafumi; Kataura, Hiromichi; Achiba, Yohji; Iwasa, Yoshihiro

    2003-10-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have strong potential for molecular electronics, owing to their unique structural and electronic properties. However, various outstanding issues still need to be resolved before SWNT-based devices can be made. In particular, large-scale, air-stable and controlled doping is highly desirable. Here we present a method for integrating organic molecules into SWNTs that promises to push the performance limit of these materials for molecular electronics. Reaction of SWNTs with molecules having large electron affinity and small ionization energy achieved p- and n-type doping, respectively. Optical characterization revealed that charge transfer between SWNTs and molecules starts at certain critical energies. X-ray diffraction experiments revealed that molecules are predominantly encapsulated inside SWNTs, resulting in an improved stability in air. The simplicity of the synthetic process offers a viable route for the large-scale production of SWNTs with controlled doping states.

  4. N-type control of single-crystal diamond films by ultra-lightly phosphorus doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hiromitsu; Ogura, Masahiko; Makino, Toshiharu; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Yamasaki, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    A wide impurity doping range of p- and n-type diamond semiconductors will facilitate the development of various electronics. This study focused on producing n-type diamond with ultra-lightly impurity doping concentrations. N-type single-crystal diamond films were grown on (111)-oriented diamond substrates by phosphorus doping using the optimized doping conditions based on microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition with a high magnetron output power of 3600 W. The surface morphology was investigated by an optical microscopy using the Nomarski prism and confocal laser microscopy, and the phosphorus concentration was estimated by a secondary ion mass spectrometry. The phosphorus concentration was reproducibly controlled to between 2 × 1015 and 3 × 1017 cm-3 using a standard mass flow controller, and the average incorporation efficiency was around 0.1%. The electrical properties of the films were characterized by the Hall effect measurements as a function of temperature over a wide range from 220 to 900 K. N-type conductivity with thermal activation from a phosphorus donor level at around 0.57 eV was clearly observed for all the phosphorus-doped diamond films. The electron mobility of the film with a phosphorus concentration of 2 × 1015 cm-3 was recorded at 1060 cm2/V s at 300 K and 1500 cm2/V s at 225 K.

  5. New avenues to an old material: controlled nanoscale doping of germanium.

    PubMed

    Scappucci, Giordano; Capellini, Giovanni; Klesse, Wolfgang M; Simmons, Michelle Y

    2013-04-07

    We review our recent research into n-type doping of Ge for nanoelectronics and integrated photonics. We demonstrate a doping method in ultra-high vacuum to achieve high electron concentrations in Ge while maintaining atomic-level control of the doping process. We integrated this doping technique with ultra-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscope lithography and femtosecond laser ablation micron-scale lithography, and demonstrated basic components of donor-based nanoelectronic circuitry such as wires and tunnel gaps. By repetition of controlled doping cycles we have shown that stacking of multiple Ge:P two-dimensional electron gases results in high electron densities in Ge (>10(20) cm(-3)). Because of the strong vertical electron confinement, closely stacked 2D layers - although interacting - maintain their individuality in terms of electron transport. These results bode well towards the realization of nanoscale 3D epitaxial circuits in Ge comprising stacked 2DEGs and/or atomic-scale Ge:P devices with confinement in more dimensions.

  6. Sulfate metabolites as alternative markers for the detection of 4-chlorometandienone misuse in doping control.

    PubMed

    Balcells, Georgina; Gómez, Cristina; Garrostas, Lorena; Pozo, Óscar J; Ventura, Rosa

    2016-09-30

    Sulfate metabolites have been described as long-term metabolites for some anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS). 4-chlorometandienone (4Cl-MTD) is one of the most frequently detected AAS in sports drug testing and it is commonly detected by monitoring metabolites excreted free or conjugated with glucuronic acid. Sulfation reactions of 4Cl-MTD have not been studied. The aim of this work was to evaluate the sulfate fraction of 4Cl-MTD metabolism by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to establish potential long-term metabolites valuable for doping control purposes. 4Cl-MTD was administered to two healthy male volunteers and urine samples were collected up to 8 days after administration. A theoretical selected reaction monitoring (SRM) method working in negative mode was developed. Ion transitions were based on ionization and fragmentation behaviour of sulfate metabolites as well as specific neutral losses (NL of 15 Da and NL of 36 Da) of compounds with related chemical structure. Six sulfate metabolites were detected after the analysis of excretion study samples. Three of the identified metabolites were characterized by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). Results showed that five out of the six identified sulfate metabolites were detected in urine up to the last collected samples from both excretion studies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Light-controllable reflection wavelength of blue phase liquid crystals doped with azobenzene-dimers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xingwu; Wang, Ling; Li, Chenyue; Xiao, Jiumei; Ding, Hangjun; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoguang; He, Wanli; Yang, Huai

    2013-10-03

    A new series of azobenzene-dimers were synthesized and doped into the blue phase liquid crystals to broaden the temperature range of BPs. It is found that not only can the reflection wavelength of BPI be reversibly controlled but BPI can also be transformed into the cholesteric phase owing to isomerization of azobenzene induced by light.

  8. Preparation of Ni-doped carbon nanospheres with different surface chemistry and controlled pore structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubizarreta, L.; Arenillas, A.; Pis, J. J.

    2008-04-01

    In classic carbon supports is very difficult to control pore size, pore size distribution, and surface chemical properties at the same time. In this work microporous carbons derived from furfuryl alcohol are used as support to prepare Ni-doped carbon materials. The N 2 flow rate used during the carbonisation process of the precursor influences on the size of the nanospheres obtained but not in their textural properties. Microporous carbon nanospheres have been synthesised with a narrow pore size distribution centred in 5.5 Å. The surface chemistry of these materials can be easily modified by different treatments without detriment of the pore structure of the doped carbon nanospheres.

  9. Tunable electronic properties of graphene through controlling bonding configurations of doped nitrogen atoms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia; Zhao, Chao; Liu, Na; Zhang, Huanxi; Liu, Jingjing; Fu, Yong Qing; Guo, Bin; Wang, Zhenlong; Lei, Shengbin; Hu, PingAn

    2016-01-01

    Single–layer and mono–component doped graphene is a crucial platform for a better understanding of the relationship between its intrinsic electronic properties and atomic bonding configurations. Large–scale doped graphene films dominated with graphitic nitrogen (GG) or pyrrolic nitrogen (PG) were synthesized on Cu foils via a free radical reaction at growth temperatures of 230–300 °C and 400–600 °C, respectively. The bonding configurations of N atoms in the graphene lattices were controlled through reaction temperature, and characterized using Raman spectroscopy, X–ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscope. The GG exhibited a strong n–type doping behavior, whereas the PG showed a weak n–type doping behavior. Electron mobilities of the GG and PG were in the range of 80.1–340 cm2 V−1·s−1 and 59.3–160.6 cm2 V−1·s−1, respectively. The enhanced doping effect caused by graphitic nitrogen in the GG produced an asymmetry electron–hole transport characteristic, indicating that the long–range scattering (ionized impurities) plays an important role in determining the carrier transport behavior. Analysis of temperature dependent conductance showed that the carrier transport mechanism in the GG was thermal excitation, whereas that in the PG, was a combination of thermal excitation and variable range hopping. PMID:27325386

  10. Controllable formation of nano-crystalline in Sb4Te films by Zn doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guoxiang; Chen, Yimin; Shen, Xiang; Lu, Yegang; Dai, Shixun; Nie, Qiuhua; Xu, Tiefeng

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the optical, electrical, and thermal properties of Zn-doped Sb4Te films for application in phase change memory. Together with well-documented results of Zn-doped Sb2Te3, Sb2Te, Sb7Te3, and Sb3Te systems, we plotted the ternary amorphous-phase forming-region of Zn-Sb-Te. Zn-doping increased the crystallization temperature and data retention ability of Sb4Te films. We identified the optimal composition as Zn28.6(Sb4Te)71.4, which presents reversible optical performance between the amorphous and crystalline states. The minimum time for onset crystallization was 15 ns and the required pulse width for complete crystallization was 165 ns at 70 mW. Furthermore, in all of the Zn-doped Sb-Te films, it was confirmed that Zn-doping can effectively control the growth of nano-crystalline grains and allows only a single phase to form during crystallization.

  11. Tunable electronic properties of graphene through controlling bonding configurations of doped nitrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia; Zhao, Chao; Liu, Na; Zhang, Huanxi; Liu, Jingjing; Fu, Yong Qing; Guo, Bin; Wang, Zhenlong; Lei, Shengbin; Hu, Pingan

    2016-06-01

    Single–layer and mono–component doped graphene is a crucial platform for a better understanding of the relationship between its intrinsic electronic properties and atomic bonding configurations. Large–scale doped graphene films dominated with graphitic nitrogen (GG) or pyrrolic nitrogen (PG) were synthesized on Cu foils via a free radical reaction at growth temperatures of 230–300 °C and 400–600 °C, respectively. The bonding configurations of N atoms in the graphene lattices were controlled through reaction temperature, and characterized using Raman spectroscopy, X–ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscope. The GG exhibited a strong n–type doping behavior, whereas the PG showed a weak n–type doping behavior. Electron mobilities of the GG and PG were in the range of 80.1–340 cm2 V‑1·s‑1 and 59.3–160.6 cm2 V‑1·s‑1, respectively. The enhanced doping effect caused by graphitic nitrogen in the GG produced an asymmetry electron–hole transport characteristic, indicating that the long–range scattering (ionized impurities) plays an important role in determining the carrier transport behavior. Analysis of temperature dependent conductance showed that the carrier transport mechanism in the GG was thermal excitation, whereas that in the PG, was a combination of thermal excitation and variable range hopping.

  12. Basic analytical methods for identification of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in doping control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnikov, P. V.; Krotov, G. I.; Efimova, Yu A.; Rodchenkov, G. M.

    2016-02-01

    The design of new erythropoiesis-stimulating agents for clinical use necessitates constant development of methods for detecting the abuse of these substances, which are prohibited under the World Anti-Doping Code and are included in the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) prohibited list. This review integrates and describes systematically the published data on the key methods currently used by WADA-accredited anti-doping laboratories around the world to detect the abuse of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, including direct methods (various polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis techniques, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, membrane enzyme immunoassay and mass spectrometry) and indirect methods (athlete biological passport). Particular attention is given to promising approaches and investigations that can be used to control prohibited erythropoietins in the near future. The bibliography includes 122 references.

  13. Encapsulation of biomolecules for bioanalytical purposes: preparation of diclofenac antibody-doped nanometer-sized silica particles by reverse micelle and sol-gel processing.

    PubMed

    Tsagkogeorgas, Fotios; Ochsenkühn-Petropoulou, Maria; Niessner, Reinhard; Knopp, Dietmar

    2006-07-28

    In recent years, the sol-gel technique has attracted increasing interest as a unique approach to immobilize biomolecules for bioanalytical applications as well as biochemical and biophysical studies. For this purpose, crushed biomolecule-doped sol-gel glass monoliths have been widely used. In the present work, for the first time, the encapsulation of anti-diclofenac antibodies in silica nanoparticles was carried out by a combination of reverse micelle and sol-gel technique. Cyclohexane was used for the preparation of the microemulsion as organic solvent, while surfactant Igepal CO-520 was found to be the optimal stabilizer. The antibody source was a purified IgG fraction originating from a polyclonal rabbit antiserum. Tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) was used as precursor. Rather uniform, monodispersed and spherical silica particles of about 70nm diameter size were fabricated, as was demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis (SEM/EDX). The biological activity of the encapsulated antibodies was evaluated by incubation of the nanoparticles with a diclofenac standard solution and analysis of the filtrate and followed washing solutions by a highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), using non-doped particles as blanks. While only about 6% of the added diclofenac was nonspecifically retained by the blank, the corresponding amount of about 66% was much higher with the antibody-doped particles. An obvious advantage of this approach is the general applicability of the developed technique for a mild immobilization of different antibody species.

  14. Improved understanding and control of magnesium-doped gallium nitride by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnham, Shawn D.

    By an improved understanding of Mg-doped GaN through an exhaustive review of current limitations, increased control over the material was achieved by addressing several of these issues. To address the issues of the memory effect, low sticking coefficient and high vapor pressure of Mg, a new Mg dopant source was implemented, characterized and modeled for p-type doping of GaN. The device enhanced the sticking coefficient of Mg by energizing the outgoing Mg flux, and also allowed the first reported demonstration of an abrupt junction between two non-zero Mg concentrations and a graded Mg-doped GaN film. The significant compensation of Mg acceptors at high dopant concentrations was used advantageously to develop a new ex situ resistivity analysis technique using the energy distributions of SIMS to characterize doping of buried layers. The new technique was used to identify the barrier between conductive and resistive Mg doping for increased Mg concentration, which was then used to optimize Mg-doped GaN. Because Mg doping exhibits a dependence upon the growth regime, a new growth and regime characterization technique was developed using specific RHEED intensity responses to repeat growth conditions. During the development of this technique, a new surface kinetics growth model for III-nitrides was discovered based on DMS observations, which suggests preferential buildup of the metal bilayer before growth begins with an unfamiliar cation-anion exchange process initially upon metal shutter opening. Using the new RHEED growth and regime characterization technique, a new growth technique called metal modulated epitaxy (MME) was developed to increase repeatability, uniformity and smoothness. The MME technique was enhanced with a closed-loop control using real-time feedback from RHEED transients to control shutter transitions. This enhancement, called "smart shuttering," led to improved growth rate and further improvement of surface roughness and grain size, which were

  15. Possibility of analytical finding of glycerol caused by self-catheterization in doping control.

    PubMed

    Okano, Masato; Nishitani, Yasunori; Kageyama, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    Glycerol is listed on the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) prohibited list as a masking agent principally because the administration of glycerol increases plasma volume and decreases the concentration of haemoglobin and the value of haematocrit in blood. Glycerol is a naturally occurring substance; therefore, the threshold is set as 1.0 mg/mL in the WADA technical document (WADA TD2013DL). In a WADA-accredited doping control laboratory, three doping control urine specimens collected from impaired athletes were determined to contain a high concentration of glycerol (>1.0 mg/mL); two of these specimens were considered adverse analytical findings (AAFs). Self-catheterization is necessary for athletes with neurological disorders such as neurogenic bladder dysfunction. We conducted a simple simulation of self-catheterization as an experimental test using urethral catheters with an antiseptic agent containing glycerol to confirm the influence of this antiseptic agent on the quantitative value of glycerol in doping control analysis. Some users employ a catheter with glycerol solution (ca. 1 mL) to avoid pain during use. The urine sample passed through such a catheter exhibited a glycerol concentration (4.94 mg/mL) greater than the threshold level. In September 2014, the threshold for glycerol will change from 1.0 to 4.3 mg/mL (WADA TD2014DL); however, a possibility exists for the quantitative value of glycerol in doping control analysis to exceed the threshold because of the use of an antiseptic agent containing glycerol for self-catheterization. The AAF for glycerol for impaired athletes, particularly those who participate in Paralympic sports, should account for the use of a catheter with glycerol.

  16. Atomically controlled substitutional boron-doping of graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Shigeki; Saito, Shohei; Osumi, Shinichiro; Yamaguchi, Shigehiro; Foster, Adam S.; Spijker, Peter; Meyer, Ernst

    2015-08-01

    Boron is a unique element in terms of electron deficiency and Lewis acidity. Incorporation of boron atoms into an aromatic carbon framework offers a wide variety of functionality. However, the intrinsic instability of organoboron compounds against moisture and oxygen has delayed the development. Here, we present boron-doped graphene nanoribbons (B-GNRs) of widths of N=7, 14 and 21 by on-surface chemical reactions with an employed organoboron precursor. The location of the boron dopant is well defined in the centre of the B-GNR, corresponding to 4.8 atom%, as programmed. The chemical reactivity of B-GNRs is probed by the adsorption of nitric oxide (NO), which is most effectively trapped by the boron sites, demonstrating the Lewis acid character. Structural properties and the chemical nature of the NO-reacted B-GNR are determined by a combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy, high-resolution atomic force microscopy with a CO tip, and density functional and classical computations.

  17. [Medication, athletes and doping regulations].

    PubMed

    Hartgens, F

    2008-08-16

    Doping is defined as an offence of the antidopingcode of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). To uphold the code WADA has composed a list of prohibited substances and methods. The composition of the list is based on three mainstays: fair play, health risks and spirit of the sport. Among the prohibited substances are anabolic agents, erythropoietin, beta2-sympathicomimetics, growth hormone and masking agents. For some medications athletes may receive a therapeutic use exemption. Enforcement of the antidoping-code is performed by doping controls. For this purpose, blood and urine samples of athletes are collected and analysed. In 2006 approximately 200,000 samples were analysed worldwide, with 1.96% being tested positive. All physicians should be aware of the possibility that athletes use medication subjected to the doping regulations. There are guidelines for physicians on doping-related issues in medical practice.

  18. Control of intermediate-band configuration in GaAs:N δ-doped superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osada, Kazuki; Suzuki, Tomoya; Yagi, Shuhei; Naitoh, Shunya; Shoji, Yasushi; Hijikata, Yasuto; Okada, Yoshitaka; Yaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    GaAs:N δ-doped superlattices (SLs) consisting of alternating layers of undoped and N δ-doped GaAs were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) as possible candidates for the light-absorbing material of intermediate-band solar cells (IBSCs). Since the energy gaps in IBSCs need to be adjusted to optimum values to achieve sufficiently high conversion efficiency, it is important to control precisely the band configuration of intermediate-band (IB) materials. In this study, we demonstrated the control of the IB energy configuration in GaAs:N δ-doped SLs by changing their structural parameters. Optical transitions due to the SL minibands related to the N-induced conduction subbands E+ and E- were clearly observed and the transition energies depended systematically on the N area density and period length of the SLs. Conversion efficiency calculations based on the detailed balance model indicated that IBSCs with an efficiency of nearly 60% are achievable by using the fabricated GaAs:N δ-doped SLs.

  19. Compound semi-conductors and controlled doping thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, David J. (Inventor); Neudeck, Philip G. (Inventor); Powell, J. Anthony (Inventor); Matus, Lawrence G. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A method of controlling the amount of impurity incorporation in a crystal grown by a chemical vapor deposition process. Conducted in a growth chamber, the method includes the controlling of the concentration of the crystal growing components in the growth chamber to affect the demand of particular growth sites within the growing crystal thereby controlling impurity incorporation into the growth sites.

  20. Veterinary medicines and competition animals: the question of medication versus doping control.

    PubMed

    Toutain, Pierre-Louis

    2010-01-01

    In racing and other equine sports, it is possible to increase artificially both the physical capability and the presence of a competitive instinct, using drugs, such as anabolic steroids and agents stimulating the central nervous system. The word doping describes this illegitimate use of drugs and the primary motivation of an equine anti-doping policy is to prevent the use of these substances. However, an anti-doping policy must not impede the use of legitimate veterinary medications and most regulatory bodies in the world now distinguish the control of illicit substances (doping control) from the control of therapeutic substances (medication control). For doping drugs, the objective is to detect any trace of drug exposure (parent drug or metabolites) using the most powerful analytical methods (generally chromatographic/mass spectrometric techniques). This so-called "zero tolerance rule" is not suitable for medication control, because the high level of sensitivity of current screening methods allows the detection of totally irrelevant plasma or urine concentrations of legitimate drugs for long periods after their administration. Therefore, a new approach for these legitimate compounds, based upon pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) principles, has been developed. It involves estimating the order of magnitude of the irrelevant plasma concentration (IPC) and of the irrelevant urine concentration (IUC) in order to limit the impact of the high sensitivity of analytical techniques used for medication control. The European Horserace Scientific Liaison Committee (EHSLC), which is the European scientific committee in charge of harmonising sample testing and policies for racehorses in Europe, is responsible for estimating the IPCs and IUCs in the framework of a Risk Analysis. A Risk Analysis approach for doping/medication control involves three sequential steps, namely risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication. For medication control, the main task of

  1. Urinary human chorionic gonadotropin isoform concentrations in doping control samples.

    PubMed

    Butch, Anthony W; Woldemariam, Getachew A

    2016-11-01

    Anti-doping laboratories routinely use immunoassays to measure urinary concentrations of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). To minimize immunoassay differences and false positive screen results from inactive isoforms (free β-subunit (hCGβ), β-subunit core fragment (hCGβcf)) laboratories now use intact hCG instead of total hCG immunoassays to measure hCG. To determine the distribution of hCG isoforms in urine, we determined the concentrations of intact hCG, hCGβ, and hCGβcf in male urine samples based on immunoassay total hCG concentrations using a sequential immunoextraction and a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. hCG was isolated using antibody-conjugated magnetic beads and unique tryptic peptides were quantified by LC-MS/MS. Negative samples with detectable but low total hCG concentrations (1.2-3.5 pmol/L) had intact and hCGβ concentrations <1.2 pmol/L, and hCGβcf concentrations <2.3 pmol/L by LC-MS/MS. Urine samples from an athlete receiving hCG had intact hCG concentrations ranging from 18.8 to 57.6 pmol/L, hCGβ concentrations <0.7 pmol/L, and hCGβcf concentrations ranging from 94 to 243% of the intact hCG concentration. In 27 atypical samples with total hCG concentrations ranging from 16.7 to 412.7 pmol/L with intact hCG <2.7 pmol/L by immunoassay, all samples had intact hCG concentrations <3.8 pmol/L and hCGβ concentrations <6.2 pmol/L by LC-MS/MS. hCGβcf concentrations by LC-MS/MS varied widely and ranged from 1.03 to 21.9 pmol/L. In summary, total hCG immunoassays significantly overestimate hCG concentrations and can produce false positive results. Although the intact hCG immunoassay slightly overestimates hCG concentrations compared to LC-MS/MS, it can distinguish between cases of hCG use and atypical cases with elevated total hCG concentrations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Simultaneous detection of xenon and krypton in equine plasma by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for doping control.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Wai Him; Choi, Timmy L S; So, Pui-Kin; Yao, Zhong-Ping; Wan, Terence S M

    2017-02-01

    Xenon can activate the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). As such, it has been allegedly used in human sports for increasing erythropoiesis. Krypton, another noble gas with reported narcosis effect, can also be expected to be a potential and less expensive erythropoiesis stimulating agent. This has raised concern about the misuse of noble gases as doping agents in equine sports. The aim of the present study is to establish a method for the simultaneous detection of xenon and krypton in equine plasma for the purpose of doping control. Xenon- or krypton-fortified equine plasma samples were prepared according to reported protocols. The target noble gases were simultaneously detected by gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry using headspace injection. Three xenon isotopes at m/z 129, 131, and 132, and four krypton isotopes at m/z 82, 83, 84, and 86 were targeted in selected reaction monitoring mode (with the precursor ions and product ions at identical mass settings), allowing unambiguous identification of the target analytes. Limits of detection for xenon and krypton were about 19 pmol/mL and 98 pmol/mL, respectively. Precision for both analytes was less than 15%. The method has good specificity as background analyte signals were not observed in negative equine plasma samples (n = 73). Loss of analytes under different storage temperatures has also been evaluated. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Molecular doping for control of gate bias stress in organic thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hein, Moritz P.; Zakhidov, Alexander A.; Lüssem, Björn; Jankowski, Jens; Tietze, Max L.; Riede, Moritz K.; Leo, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The key active devices of future organic electronic circuits are organic thin film transistors (OTFTs). Reliability of OTFTs remains one of the most challenging obstacles to be overcome for broad commercial applications. In particular, bias stress was identified as the key instability under operation for numerous OTFT devices and interfaces. Despite a multitude of experimental observations, a comprehensive mechanism describing this behavior is still missing. Furthermore, controlled methods to overcome these instabilities are so far lacking. Here, we present the approach to control and significantly alleviate the bias stress effect by using molecular doping at low concentrations. For pentacene and silicon oxide as gate oxide, we are able to reduce the time constant of degradation by three orders of magnitude. The effect of molecular doping on the bias stress behavior is explained in terms of the shift of Fermi Level and, thus, exponentially reduced proton generation at the pentacene/oxide interface.

  4. Doping control analysis of anabolic steroids in equine urine by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wong, April S Y; Leung, Gary N W; Leung, David K K; Wan, Terence S M

    2016-09-08

    Anabolic steroids are banned substances in equine sports. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) has been the traditional technique for doping control analysis of anabolic steroids in biological samples. Although liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) has become an important technique in doping control, the detection of saturated hydroxysteroids by LC-MS remains a problem due to their low ionization efficiency under electrospray. The recent development in fast-scanning gas-chromatography-triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) has provided a better alternative with a significant reduction in chemical noise by means of selective reaction monitoring. Herein, we present a sensitive and selective method for the screening of over 50 anabolic steroids in equine urine using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Interfacial control of oxygen vacancy doping and electrical conduction in thin film oxide heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Veal, Boyd W; Kim, Seong Keun; Zapol, Peter; Iddir, Hakim; Baldo, Peter M; Eastman, Jeffrey A

    2016-06-10

    Oxygen vacancies in proximity to surfaces and heterointerfaces in oxide thin film heterostructures have major effects on properties, resulting, for example, in emergent conduction behaviour, large changes in metal-insulator transition temperatures or enhanced catalytic activity. Here we report the discovery of a means of reversibly controlling the oxygen vacancy concentration and distribution in oxide heterostructures consisting of electronically conducting In2O3 films grown on ionically conducting Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 substrates. Oxygen ion redistribution across the heterointerface is induced using an applied electric field oriented in the plane of the interface, resulting in controlled oxygen vacancy (and hence electron) doping of the film and possible orders-of-magnitude enhancement of the film's electrical conduction. The reversible modified behaviour is dependent on interface properties and is attained without cation doping or changes in the gas environment.

  6. Interfacial control of oxygen vacancy doping and electrical conduction in thin film oxide heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Veal, Boyd W.; Kim, Seong Keun; Zapol, Peter; Iddir, Hakim; Baldo, Peter M.; Eastman, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen vacancies in proximity to surfaces and heterointerfaces in oxide thin film heterostructures have major effects on properties, resulting, for example, in emergent conduction behaviour, large changes in metal-insulator transition temperatures or enhanced catalytic activity. Here we report the discovery of a means of reversibly controlling the oxygen vacancy concentration and distribution in oxide heterostructures consisting of electronically conducting In2O3 films grown on ionically conducting Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 substrates. Oxygen ion redistribution across the heterointerface is induced using an applied electric field oriented in the plane of the interface, resulting in controlled oxygen vacancy (and hence electron) doping of the film and possible orders-of-magnitude enhancement of the film's electrical conduction. The reversible modified behaviour is dependent on interface properties and is attained without cation doping or changes in the gas environment. PMID:27283250

  7. Cation coordination reactions on nanocrystals: surface/interface, doping control and advanced photocatalysis applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiatao

    2016-10-01

    Abstract: Including the shape and size effect, the controllable doping, hetero-composite and surface/interface are the prerequisite of colloidal nanocrystals for exploring their optoelectronic properties, such as fluorescence, plasmon-exciton coupling, efficient electron/hole separation, and enhanced photocatalysis applications. By controlling soft acid-base coordination reactions between cation molecular complexes and colloidal nanocrystals, we showed that chemical thermodynamics could drive nanoscale monocrystalline growth of the semiconductor shell on metal nano-substrates and the substitutional heterovalent doping in semiconductor nanocrystals. We have demonstrated evolution of relative position of Au and II-VI semiconductor in Au-Semi from symmetric to asymmetric configuration, different phosphines initiated morphology engineering, oriented attachment of quantum dots into micrometer nanosheets with synergistic control of surface/interface and doing, which can further lead to fine tuning of plasmon-exciton coupling. Therefore, different hydrogen photocatalytic performance, Plasmon enhanced photocatalysis properties have been achieved further which lead to the fine tuning of plasmon-exciton coupling. Substitutional heterovalent doping here enables the tailoring of optical, electronic properties and photocatalysis applications of semiconductor nanocrystals because of electronic impurities (p-, n-type doping) control. References: (1) J. Gui, J. Zhang*, et al. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2015, 54, 3683. (2) Q. Zhao, J. Zhang*, etc., Adv. Mater. 2014, 26, 1387. (3) J. Liu, Q. Zhao, S. G. Wang*, J. Zhang*, etc., Adv. Mater. 2015, 27-2753-2761. (4) H. Qian, J. Zhang*, etc., NPG Asia Mater. (2015) 7, e152. (5) M. Ji, M. Xu, etc., J. Zhang*, Adv. Mater. 2016, in proof. (6) S. Yu, J. T. Zhang, Y. Tang, M. Ouyang*, Nano Lett. 2015, 15, 6282-6288. (7) J. Zhang, Y. Tang, K. Lee and M. Ouyang*, Science 2010, 327, 1634. (8) J. Zhang, Y. Tang, K. Lee, M. Ouyang*, Nature 2010, 466

  8. Clean Photothermal Heating and Controlled Release from Near-Infrared Dye Doped Nanoparticles without Oxygen Photosensitization.

    PubMed

    Guha, Samit; Shaw, Scott K; Spence, Graeme T; Roland, Felicia M; Smith, Bradley D

    2015-07-21

    The photothermal heating and release properties of biocompatible organic nanoparticles, doped with a near-infrared croconaine (Croc) dye, were compared with analogous nanoparticles doped with the common near-infrared dyes ICG and IR780. Separate formulations of lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles and liposomes, each containing Croc dye, absorbed strongly at 808 nm and generated clean laser-induced heating (no production of (1)O2 and no photobleaching of the dye). In contrast, laser-induced heating of nanoparticles containing ICG or IR780 produced reactive (1)O2, leading to bleaching of the dye and also decomposition of coencapsulated payload such as the drug doxorubicin. Croc dye was especially useful as a photothermal agent for laser-controlled release of chemically sensitive payload from nanoparticles. Solution state experiments demonstrated repetitive fractional release of water-soluble fluorescent dye from the interior of thermosensitive liposomes. Additional experiments used a focused laser beam to control leakage from immobilized liposomes with very high spatial and temporal precision. The results indicate that fractional photothermal leakage from nanoparticles doped with Croc dye is a promising method for a range of controlled release applications.

  9. 12 CFR 24.1 - Authority, purpose, and OMB control number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ENTITIES, COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS, AND OTHER PUBLIC WELFARE INVESTMENTS § 24.1 Authority, purpose, and OMB control number. (a) Authority. The Office of the Comptroller of... national bank to make investments described in § 24.3, consistent with safety and soundness. This...

  10. 12 CFR 24.1 - Authority, purpose, and OMB control number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ENTITIES, COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS, AND OTHER PUBLIC WELFARE INVESTMENTS § 24.1 Authority, purpose, and OMB control number. (a) Authority. The Office of the Comptroller of... national bank to make investments described in § 24.3, consistent with safety and soundness. This...

  11. Doping control analysis of trimetazidine and characterization of major metabolites using mass spectrometric approaches.

    PubMed

    Sigmund, Gerd; Koch, Anja; Orlovius, Anne-Katrin; Guddat, Sven; Thomas, Andreas; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Since January 2014, the anti-anginal drug trimetazidine [1-(2,3,4-trimethoxybenzyl)-piperazine] has been classified as prohibited substance by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), necessitating specific and robust detection methods in sports drug testing laboratories. In the present study, the implementation of the intact therapeutic agent into two different initial testing procedures based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is reported, along with the characterization of urinary metabolites by electrospray ionization-high resolution/high accuracy (tandem) mass spectrometry. For GC-MS analyses, urine samples were subjected to liquid-liquid extraction sample preparation, while LC-MS/MS analyses were conducted by established 'dilute-and-inject' approaches. Both screening methods were validated for trimetazidine concerning specificity, limits of detection (0.5-50 ng/mL), intra-day and inter-day imprecision (<20%), and recovery (41%) in case of the GC-MS-based method. In addition, major metabolites such as the desmethylated trimetazidine and the corresponding sulfoconjugate, oxo-trimetazidine, and trimetazidine-N-oxide as identified in doping control samples were used to complement the LC-MS/MS-based assay, although intact trimetazidine was found at highest abundance of the relevant trimetazidine-related analytes in all tested sports drug testing samples. Retrospective data mining regarding doping control analyses conducted between 1999 and 2013 at the Cologne Doping Control Laboratory concerning trimetazidine revealed a considerable prevalence of the drug particularly in endurance and strength sports accounting for up to 39 findings per year.

  12. Controlling Octahedral Rotations in a Perovskite via Strain Doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herklotz, A.; Wong, A. T.; Meyer, T.; Biegalski, M. D.; Lee, H. N.; Ward, T. Z.

    2016-05-01

    The perovskite unit cell is the fundamental building block of many functional materials. The manipulation of this crystal structure is known to be of central importance to controlling many technologically promising phenomena related to superconductivity, multiferroicity, mangetoresistivity, and photovoltaics. The broad range of properties that this structure can exhibit is in part due to the centrally coordinated octahedra bond flexibility, which allows for a multitude of distortions from the ideal highly symmetric structure. However, continuous and fine manipulation of these distortions has never been possible. Here, we show that controlled insertion of He atoms into an epitaxial perovskite film can be used to finely tune the lattice symmetry by modifying the local distortions, i.e., octahedral bonding angle and length. Orthorhombic SrRuO3 films coherently grown on SrTiO3 substrates are used as a model system. Implanted He atoms are confirmed to induce out-of-plane strain, which provides the ability to controllably shift the bulk-like orthorhombically distorted phase to a tetragonal structure by shifting the oxygen octahedra rotation pattern. These results demonstrate that He implantation offers an entirely new pathway to strain engineering of perovskite-based complex oxide thin films, useful for creating new functionalities or properties in perovskite materials.

  13. Controlling octahedral rotations in a perovskite via strain doping

    SciTech Connect

    Herklotz, Andreas; Biegalski, Michael D.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Ward, Thomas Zac; Wong, A. T.; Meyer, T.

    2016-05-24

    The perovskite unit cell is the fundamental building block of many functional materials. The manipulation of this crystal structure is known to be of central importance to controlling many technologically promising phenomena related to superconductivity, multiferroicity, mangetoresistivity, and photovoltaics. The broad range of properties that this structure can exhibit is in part due to the centrally coordinated octahedra bond flexibility, which allows for a multitude of distortions from the ideal highly symmetric structure. However, continuous and fine manipulation of these distortions has never been possible. Here, we show that controlled insertion of He atoms into an epitaxial perovskite film can be used to finely tune the lattice symmetry by modifying the local distortions, i.e., octahedral bonding angle and length. Orthorhombic SrRuO3 films coherently grown on SrTiO3 substrates are used as a model system. Implanted He atoms are confirmed to induce out-of-plane strain, which provides the ability to controllably shift the bulk-like orthorhombically distorted phase to a tetragonal structure by shifting the oxygen octahedra rotation pattern. Lastly, these results demonstrate that He implantation offers an entirely new pathway to strain engineering of perovskite-based complex oxide thin films, useful for creating new functionalities or properties in perovskite materials.

  14. Controlling octahedral rotations in a perovskite via strain doping

    DOE PAGES

    Herklotz, Andreas; Biegalski, Michael D.; Lee, Ho Nyung; ...

    2016-05-24

    The perovskite unit cell is the fundamental building block of many functional materials. The manipulation of this crystal structure is known to be of central importance to controlling many technologically promising phenomena related to superconductivity, multiferroicity, mangetoresistivity, and photovoltaics. The broad range of properties that this structure can exhibit is in part due to the centrally coordinated octahedra bond flexibility, which allows for a multitude of distortions from the ideal highly symmetric structure. However, continuous and fine manipulation of these distortions has never been possible. Here, we show that controlled insertion of He atoms into an epitaxial perovskite film canmore » be used to finely tune the lattice symmetry by modifying the local distortions, i.e., octahedral bonding angle and length. Orthorhombic SrRuO3 films coherently grown on SrTiO3 substrates are used as a model system. Implanted He atoms are confirmed to induce out-of-plane strain, which provides the ability to controllably shift the bulk-like orthorhombically distorted phase to a tetragonal structure by shifting the oxygen octahedra rotation pattern. Lastly, these results demonstrate that He implantation offers an entirely new pathway to strain engineering of perovskite-based complex oxide thin films, useful for creating new functionalities or properties in perovskite materials.« less

  15. Controlling Octahedral Rotations in a Perovskite via Strain Doping

    PubMed Central

    Herklotz, A.; Wong, A. T.; Meyer, T.; Biegalski, M. D.; Lee, H. N.; Ward, T. Z.

    2016-01-01

    The perovskite unit cell is the fundamental building block of many functional materials. The manipulation of this crystal structure is known to be of central importance to controlling many technologically promising phenomena related to superconductivity, multiferroicity, mangetoresistivity, and photovoltaics. The broad range of properties that this structure can exhibit is in part due to the centrally coordinated octahedra bond flexibility, which allows for a multitude of distortions from the ideal highly symmetric structure. However, continuous and fine manipulation of these distortions has never been possible. Here, we show that controlled insertion of He atoms into an epitaxial perovskite film can be used to finely tune the lattice symmetry by modifying the local distortions, i.e., octahedral bonding angle and length. Orthorhombic SrRuO3 films coherently grown on SrTiO3 substrates are used as a model system. Implanted He atoms are confirmed to induce out-of-plane strain, which provides the ability to controllably shift the bulk-like orthorhombically distorted phase to a tetragonal structure by shifting the oxygen octahedra rotation pattern. These results demonstrate that He implantation offers an entirely new pathway to strain engineering of perovskite-based complex oxide thin films, useful for creating new functionalities or properties in perovskite materials. PMID:27215804

  16. Electric-field control of spin-orbit torque in magnetically doped topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yabin; Shao, Qiming; Kou, Xufeng; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Wang, Kang

    Recent advances of spin-orbit torques (SOTs) generated by topological insulators (TIs) have drawn increasing interest to the spin-momentum locking feature of TIs' surface states, which can potentially provide a very efficient means to generate SOTs for spintronic applications. In this presentation, we will show the magnetization switching through current-induced giant SOT in both TI/Cr-doped TI bilayer and uniformly Cr-doped TI films In particular, we show that the current-induced SOT has significant contribution from the spin-momentum locked surface states of TIs. We find that the spin torque efficiency is in general three orders of magnitude larger than those reported in heavy metal/ferromagnetic heterostructures. In the second part, we will present the electric-field control of the giant SOT in magnetically doped TIs, which suggests promising gate-controlled spin-torque device applications. The giant SOT and efficient current-induced magnetization switching exhibited by the magnetic TIs may lead to innovative spintronic applications such as ultralow power dissipation memory and logic devices. We acknowledge the supports from DARPA, FAME, SHINES and ARO programs.

  17. Targeting prohibited substances in doping control blood samples by means of chromatographic-mass spectrometric methods.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Thomas, Andreas; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2013-12-01

    Urine samples have been the predominant matrix for doping controls for several decades. However, owing to the complementary information provided by blood (as well as serum or plasma and dried blood spots (DBS)), the benefits of its analysis have resulted in continuously increasing appreciation by anti-doping authorities. On the one hand, blood samples allow for the detection of various different methods of blood doping and the abuse of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) via the Athlete Biological Passport; on the other hand, targeted and non-targeted drug detection by means of chromatographic-mass spectrometric methods represents an important tool to increase doping control frequencies out-of-competition and to determine drug concentrations particularly in in-competition scenarios. Moreover, blood analysis seldom requires in-depth knowledge of drug metabolism, and the intact substance rather than potentially unknown or assumed metabolic products can be targeted. In this review, the recent developments in human sports drug testing concerning mass spectrometry-based techniques for qualitative and quantitative analyses of therapeutics and emerging drug candidates are summarized and reviewed. The analytical methods include both low and high molecular mass compounds (e.g., anabolic agents, stimulants, metabolic modulators, peptide hormones, and small interfering RNA (siRNA)) determined from serum, plasma, and DBS using state-of-the-art instrumentation such as liquid chromatography (LC)-high resolution/high accuracy (tandem) mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS), LC-low resolution tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

  18. Ultrafast optical control of magnetization dynamics in polycrystalline bismuth doped iron garnet thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Marwan; Vomir, Mircea; Rehspringer, Jean-Luc; Bigot, Jean-Yves

    2015-12-01

    Controlling the magnetization dynamics on the femtosecond timescale is of fundamental importance for integrated opto-spintronic devices. For industrial perspectives, it requires to develop simple growth techniques for obtaining large area magneto-optical materials having a high amplitude ultrafast Faraday or Kerr response. Here we report on optical pump probe studies of light induced spin dynamics in high quality bismuth doped iron garnet polycrystalline film prepared by the spin coating method. We demonstrate an ultrafast non-thermal optical control of the spin dynamics using both circularly and linearly polarized pulses.

  19. Ultrafast optical control of magnetization dynamics in polycrystalline bismuth doped iron garnet thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Deb, Marwan Vomir, Mircea; Rehspringer, Jean-Luc; Bigot, Jean-Yves

    2015-12-21

    Controlling the magnetization dynamics on the femtosecond timescale is of fundamental importance for integrated opto-spintronic devices. For industrial perspectives, it requires to develop simple growth techniques for obtaining large area magneto-optical materials having a high amplitude ultrafast Faraday or Kerr response. Here we report on optical pump probe studies of light induced spin dynamics in high quality bismuth doped iron garnet polycrystalline film prepared by the spin coating method. We demonstrate an ultrafast non-thermal optical control of the spin dynamics using both circularly and linearly polarized pulses.

  20. Growth of optical-quality anthracene crystals doped with dibenzoterrylene for controlled single photon production

    SciTech Connect

    Major, Kyle D. Lien, Yu-Hung; Polisseni, Claudio; Grandi, Samuele; Kho, Kiang Wei; Clark, Alex S.; Hwang, J.; Hinds, E. A.

    2015-08-15

    Dibenzoterrylene (DBT) molecules within a crystalline anthracene matrix show promise as quantum emitters for controlled, single photon production. We present the design and construction of a chamber in which we reproducibly grow doped anthracene crystals of optical quality that are several mm across and a few μm thick. We demonstrate control of the DBT concentration over the range 6–300 parts per trillion and show that these DBT molecules are stable single-photon emitters. We interpret our data with a simple model that provides some information on the vapour pressure of DBT.

  1. Electric-field control of spin-orbit torque in a magnetically doped topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yabin; Kou, Xufeng; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Shao, Qiming; Pan, Lei; Lang, Murong; Che, Xiaoyu; Tang, Jianshi; Montazeri, Mohammad; Murata, Koichi; Chang, Li-Te; Akyol, Mustafa; Yu, Guoqiang; Nie, Tianxiao; Wong, Kin L.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-04-01

    Electric-field manipulation of magnetic order has proved of both fundamental and technological importance in spintronic devices. So far, electric-field control of ferromagnetism, magnetization and magnetic anisotropy has been explored in various magnetic materials, but the efficient electric-field control of spin-orbit torque (SOT) still remains elusive. Here, we report the effective electric-field control of a giant SOT in a Cr-doped topological insulator (TI) thin film using a top-gate field-effect transistor structure. The SOT strength can be modulated by a factor of four within the accessible gate voltage range, and it shows strong correlation with the spin-polarized surface current in the film. Furthermore, we demonstrate the magnetization switching by scanning gate voltage with constant current and in-plane magnetic field applied in the film. The effective electric-field control of SOT and the giant spin-torque efficiency in Cr-doped TI may lead to the development of energy-efficient gate-controlled spin-torque devices compatible with modern field-effect semiconductor technologies.

  2. Controlled bipolar doping in Cu{sub 3}N (100) thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, Kosuke Okazaki, Tetsushi; Lee, Yih-Shu; Susaki, Tomofumi; Hosono, Hideo

    2014-12-01

    We have fabricated insulating, p- and n-type Cu{sub 3}N(100) films on SrTiO{sub 3}(100) by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy. By controlling the Cu/N flux rate, p-type doping with 10{sup 18}–10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3} in Cu-poor condition and n-type doping with 10{sup 19}–10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3} in N-poor condition were obtained without introducing foreign species. Together with formation of insulating Cu{sub 3}N films with an optical absorption coefficient of ∼10{sup 5 }cm{sup −1} in the photon energy above ∼2.2 eV and an estimated indirect bandgap of ∼1.3 eV, the bipolar doping in Cu{sub 3}N films would be promising for solar energy conversion applications.

  3. Nitrogen-concentration control in GaNAs/AlGaAs quantum wells using nitrogen δ-doping technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mano, Takaaki; Jo, Masafumi; Kuroda, Takashi; Noda, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa; Sakuma, Yoshiki; Elborg, Martin; Sakoda, Kazuaki

    2014-05-15

    GaNAs/Al{sub 0.35}Ga{sub 0.65}As multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with nitrogen δ-doping were fabricated on GaAs (100) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. High controllability of nitrogen-concentrations in the MQWs was achieved by tuning nitrogen δ-doping time. The maximum nitrogen concentration in the MQWs was 2.8%. The MQWs exhibit intense, narrow photoluminescence emission.

  4. Distribution of caffeine levels in urine in different sports in relation to doping control before and after the removal of caffeine from the WADA doping list.

    PubMed

    Van Thuyne, W; Delbeke, F T

    2006-09-01

    Caffeine concentrations were measured in the urine of 4633 athletes tested for doping control in the Ghent Doping Control Laboratory in 2004. Determination of these concentrations was done using an alkaline extraction with a mixture of dichloromethane and methanol (9 : 1; v/v) followed by high performance liquid chromatography and ultraviolet detection (HPLC-UV). The method was validated according to ISO 17 025 standards (International Organisation for Standardisation). Quantification was done by using a linear calibration curve in the range from 0 to 20 microg/ml. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.10 microg/ml. Because the results were not normally distributed, transformation of the data was done to evaluate the difference in detected concentrations in several sports. This resulted in an overall average concentration of 1.12 +/- 2.68 microg/ml. Comparison of the most frequently tested sports in 2004 demonstrated that caffeine concentrations in samples originating from power lifters are significantly higher in comparison to urines taken in other sports. Also, a significant difference between caffeine concentrations found in cycling and concentrations found in other sports, including athletics and some ball sports, was observed. A comparison was made between results obtained in 2004 and results obtained before the removal of caffeine from the WADA (World Anti-Doping Agency) doping list indicating that average caffeine concentrations decreased after the withdrawal of caffeine from the list of prohibited substances. The overall percentage of positive samples between the two periods remained the same although the percentage of positive samples noticed in cycling increased after the removal of caffeine from the doping list.

  5. Evaluation of AMGEN clone 9G8A anti-Epo antibody for application in doping control.

    PubMed

    Reichel, Christian; Benetka, Wolfgang; Lorenc, Barbara; Thevis, Mario

    2016-11-01

    The two mouse monoclonal anti-erythropoietin (EPO) antibodies clone AE7A5 (generated by using a 26 amino acid N-terminal EPO-peptide) and 9G8A (developed by immunizing mice with full length human EPO) are both directed against linear epitopes at the N-terminus of EPO. While AE7A5 has been commercially available for many years, 9G8A was made for Amgen's internal research purposes. In the past, the commercial antibody was shown to cross-react with several proteins unrelated to EPO (e.g. E. coli thioredoxin reductase, zinc-α2-glycoprotein, S. cerevisiae enolase, human neuron-specific enolase, and human non-neuronal enolase). However, it displayed high sensitivity for detecting recombinant EPO (rEPO) misuse by athletes on Western blots. We evaluated the potential use of clone 9G8A for doping control purposes. While 9G8A showed lower sensitivity than AE7A5 (ca 45% on isoelectric focusing (IEF)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), ca 40% on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)- and sarcosyl (SAR)-PAGE), non-specific binding of the five proteins was not observed. The cross-reactivity of AE7A5 can be overcome by immunoaffinity purification of EPO before electrophoresis and Western blotting. Similar to AE7A5, clone 9G8A is also suited for Western double-blotting. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Fine-Tuning the Properties of Doped Multifunctional Materials by Controlled Reduction of Dopants.

    PubMed

    Barroux, Hugo; Jiang, Tengfei; Paul, Camille; Massuyeau, Florian; Génois, Romain; Gordon, Elijah E; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan; Jobic, Stéphane; Gautier, Romain

    2017-03-02

    The physical properties of doped multifunctional compounds are commonly tuned by controlling the amount of dopants, but this control is limited because all the properties are influenced simultaneously by this single parameter. Here, we present a strategy that enables the fine-tuning of a specific combination of properties by controlling the reduction of dopants. The feasibility of this approach was demonstrated by optimizing the near-IR photoluminescence of strontium titanate SrTiO3 :Ni for potential applications in biomedicine for a range of absorbance in the visible/near-IR region. We discussed how material properties, such as luminescence, conductivity, or photocatalytic properties can be designed by carefully controlling the ratio of dopants in different oxidation states.

  7. Light controlled drug delivery containers based on spiropyran doped liquid crystal micro spheres

    PubMed Central

    Petriashvili, Gia; Devadze, Lali; Zurabishvili, Tsisana; Sepashvili, Nino; Chubinidze, Ketevan

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a novel, light activated drug delivery containers, based on spiropyran doped liquid crystal micro spheres. Upon exposure to UV/violet light, the spiropyran molecules entrapped inside the nematic liquid crystal micro spheres, interconvert from the hydrophobic, oil soluble form, to the hydrophilic, water soluble merocyanine one, which stimulates the translocation of the merocyanine molecules across the nematic liquid crystal-water barrier and results their homogeneous distribution throughout in an aqueous environment. Light controllable switching property and extremely high solubility of spiropyran in the nematic liquid crystal, promise to elaborate a novel and reliable vehicles for the drug delivery systems. PMID:26977353

  8. Control of formaldehyde emission from wood-based panels by doping adsorbents: optimization and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhongkai; Zhang, Yinping

    2013-06-01

    This paper puts forward an approach to determine the optimal mode of doping adsorbents into the wood-based panels for control of their formaldehyde emission. Based on the optimization conclusion, a novel design method for low-emitting wood-based panels by daubing adsorbent layer on the panel's surface is proposed. The formaldehyde emission results from the prepared laboratory specimens indicate the feasibility of the proposed method. This study provides a meaningful guidance on designing low-emitting wood-based panels.

  9. Controllable synthesis of Cu-doped CoO hierarchical structure for high performance lithium-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chengcheng; Huang, Yanan; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Yijing; Jiao, Lifang; Yuan, Huatang

    2016-05-01

    We report on the strategy of Cu doping inducing the nanosize effect of CoO and their application as anode for lithium ion batteries. With an increase of Cu-doped amount, the structures and morphologies of CoO have special changes. The 0.05 mol Cu-doped CoO shows straw-like bundle structure assembled by nanorods, and the nanorods consist of ultra small nanoparticles (about 6-8 nm). Meanwhile, it shows an excellent rates performance and cycle life. The capacity of 800 mA h g-1 is obtained at 0.5 C after 80 cycles. The highest discharge capacity is 580 mA h g-1 at 10 C and the discharge capacities are relatively stable for 1000 cycles as an anode for Li-ion battery. Therefore, the controllable Cu-doped CoO composite could be deemed to be a potential candidate as an anode material.

  10. Controlling the strontium-doping in calcium phosphate microcapsules through yeast-regulated biomimetic mineralization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Miaojun; Li, Tianjie; Pan, Ting; Zhao, Naru; Yao, Yongchang; Zhai, Zhichen; Zhou, Jiaan; Du, Chang; Wang, Yingjun

    2016-10-01

    Yeast cells have controllable biosorption on metallic ions during metabolism. However, few studies were dedicated to using yeast-regulated biomimetic mineralization process to control the strontium-doped positions in calcium phosphate microcapsules. In this study, the yeast cells were allowed to pre-adsorb strontium ions metabolically and then served as sacrificing template for the precipitation and calcination of mineral shell. The pre-adsorption enabled the microorganism to enrich of strontium ions into the inner part of the microcapsules, which ensured a slow-release profile of the trace element from the microcapsule. The co-culture with human marrow stromal cells showed that gene expressions of alkaline phosphatase and Collagen-I were promoted. The promotion of osteogenic differentiation was further confirmed in the 3D culture of cell-material complexes. The strategy using living microorganism as 'smart doping apparatus' to control incorporation of trace element into calcium phosphate paved a pathway to new functional materials for hard tissue regeneration.

  11. Controlling the strontium-doping in calcium phosphate microcapsules through yeast-regulated biomimetic mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Miaojun; Li, Tianjie; Pan, Ting; Zhao, Naru; Yao, Yongchang; Zhai, Zhichen; Zhou, Jiaan; Du, Chang; Wang, Yingjun

    2016-01-01

    Yeast cells have controllable biosorption on metallic ions during metabolism. However, few studies were dedicated to using yeast-regulated biomimetic mineralization process to control the strontium-doped positions in calcium phosphate microcapsules. In this study, the yeast cells were allowed to pre-adsorb strontium ions metabolically and then served as sacrificing template for the precipitation and calcination of mineral shell. The pre-adsorption enabled the microorganism to enrich of strontium ions into the inner part of the microcapsules, which ensured a slow-release profile of the trace element from the microcapsule. The co-culture with human marrow stromal cells showed that gene expressions of alkaline phosphatase and Collagen-I were promoted. The promotion of osteogenic differentiation was further confirmed in the 3D culture of cell-material complexes. The strategy using living microorganism as ‘smart doping apparatus’ to control incorporation of trace element into calcium phosphate paved a pathway to new functional materials for hard tissue regeneration. PMID:27699057

  12. Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle Environmental Control and Life Support Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, John F.; Barido, Richard A.; Cross, Cynthia D.; Carrasquillo, Robyn; Rains, George Edward

    2011-01-01

    The Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is the first crew transport vehicle to be developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the last thirty years. Orion is currently being developed to transport the crew safely from the Earth beyond Earth orbit. This year, the vehicle focused on building the Orion Flight Test 1 (OFT1) vehicle to be launched in 2013. The development of the Orion Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System, focused on the components which are on OFT1 which includes pressure control and active thermal control systems, is progressing through the design stage into manufacturing. Additional development work was done to keep the remaining component progressing towards implementation for a flight test in 2017. This paper covers the Orion ECLS development from April 2011 to April 2012.

  13. Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle Environmental Control and Life Support Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, John F.; Barido, Richard A.; Cross, Cynthia D.; Carrasquillo, Robyn; Rains, George Edward

    2012-01-01

    The Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is the first crew transport vehicle to be developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the last thirty years. Orion is currently being developed to transport the crew safely from the Earth beyond Earth orbit. This year, the vehicle focused on building the Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1) vehicle to be launched in 2014. The development of the Orion Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System, focused on the components which are on EFT1 which includes pressure control and active thermal control systems, is progressing through the design stage into manufacturing. Additional development work was done to keep the remaining component progressing towards implementation for a flight tests in 2017 and in 2020. This paper covers the Orion ECLS development from April 2011 to April 2012.

  14. In vitro metabolism studies on the selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) LG121071 and its implementation into human doping controls using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Knoop, Andre; Krug, Oliver; Vincenti, Marco; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2015-01-01

    LG121071 is a member of the tetrahydroquinolinone-based class of selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) drug candidates. These nonsteroidal compounds are supposed to act as full anabolic agents with reduced androgenic properties. As SARMs provide an alternative to anabolic androgenic steroids, they represent an emerging class of potential doping substances abused by athletes for illicit performance enhancement. According to the World Anti-Doping Agency's regulations, SARMs are banned substances and part of the Prohibited List since 2008. In consideration of the increasing number of adverse analytical findings in doping controls caused by SARMs abuse, potential drug candidates such as LG121071 have been proactively investigated to enable a timely integration into routine testing procedures even though clinical trials are not yet complete. In the present approach, the collision-induced dissociation (CID) of LG121071 was characterized by means of electrospray ionization-high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry, MS(n), and isotope labeling experiments. Interestingly, the even-electron precursor ion [M + H](+) at m/z 297 was found to produce a radical cation at m/z 268 under CID conditions, violating the even-electron rule that commonly applies. For doping control purposes, metabolites were generated in vitro and a detection method for urine samples based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was established. The overall metabolic conversion of LG121071 was modest, yielding primarily mono-, bis- and trishydroxylated species. Notable, however, was the identification of a glucuronic acid conjugate of the intact drug, attributed to an N-glucuronide structure. The sample preparation procedure included the enzymatic hydrolysis of glucuronides prior to liquid-liquid extraction, allowing intact LG121071 to be measured, as well as the corresponding phase-I metabolites. The method was characterized concerning inter alia lower limit of detection (0

  15. Monitoring 2-phenylethanamine and 2-(3-hydroxyphenyl)acetamide sulfate in doping controls.

    PubMed

    Sigmund, Gerd; Dib, Josef; Tretzel, Laura; Piper, Thomas; Bosse, Christina; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2015-01-01

    2-Phenylethanamine (phenethylamine, PEA) represents the core structure of numerous drugs with stimulant-like properties and is explicitly featured as so-called specified substance on the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Prohibited List. Due to its natural occurrence in humans as well as its presence in dietary products, studies concerning the ability of test methods to differentiate between an illicit intake and the renal elimination of endogenously produced PEA were indicated. Following the addition of PEA to the Prohibited List in January 2015, retrospective evaluation of routine doping control data of 10 190 urine samples generated by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nitrogen phosphorus-specific detection (GC-MS/NPD) was performed. Signals for PEA at approximate concentrations > 500 ng/mL were observed in 31 cases (0.3%), which were subjected to a validated isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (ID-LC-MS/MS) test method for accurate quantification of the target analyte. Further, using elimination study urine samples collected after a single oral administration of 250 mg of PEA hydrochloride to two healthy male volunteers, two tentatively identified metabolites of PEA were observed and evaluated concerning their utility as discriminative markers for PEA intake. The ID-LC-MS/MS approach was extended to allow for the simultaneous detection of PEA and 2-(3-hydroxyphenyl)acetamide sulfate (M1), and concentration ratios of M1 and PEA were calculated for elimination study urine samples and a total of 205 doping control urine samples that returned findings for PEA at estimated concentrations of 50-2500 ng/mL. Urine samples of the elimination study with PEA yielded concentration ratios of M1/PEA up to values of 9.4. Notably, the urinary concentration of PEA did increase with the intake of PEA only to a modest extent, suggesting a comprehensive metabolism of the orally administered substance. Conversely, doping control

  16. Controlled in situ boron doping of short silicon nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Kanungo, Pratyush; Zakharov, Nikolai; Bauer, Jan; Breitenstein, Otwin; Werner, Peter; Goesele, Ulrich

    2008-06-01

    Epitaxial silicon nanowires (NWs) of short heights (˜280nm) on Si ⟨111⟩ substrate were grown and doped in situ with boron on a concentration range of 1015-1019cm-3 by coevaporation of atomic Si and B by molecular beam epitaxy. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a single-crystalline structure of the NWs. Electrical measurements of the individual NWs confirmed the doping. However, the low doped (1015cm-3) and medium doped (3×1016 and 1×1017cm-3) NWs were heavily depleted by the surface states while the high doped (1018 and 1019cm-3) ones showed volume conductivities expected for the corresponding intended doping levels.

  17. Experimental Approach to Controllably Vary Protein Oxidation While Minimizing Electrode Adsorption for Boron-Doped Diamond Electrochemical Surface Mapping Applications

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, Carlee; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative protein surface mapping has become a powerful approach for measuring the solvent accessibility of folded protein structures. A variety of techniques exist for generating the key reagent hydroxyl radicals for these measurements; however, many of these approaches require use of radioactive sources or caustic oxidizing chemicals. The purpose of this research was to evaluate and optimize the use of boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrochemistry as a highly accessible tool for producing hydroxyl radicals as a means to induce a controllable level of oxidation on a range of intact proteins. These experiments utilize a relatively high flow rates to reduce protein residence time inside the electrochemical flow chamber, along with a unique cell activation approach to improve control over the intact protein oxidation yield. Studies were conducted to evaluate the level of protein adsorption onto the electrode surface. This report demonstrates a robust protocol for the use of BDD electrochemistry and high performance LC-MS/MS as a high-throughput experimental pipeline for probing higher order protein structure, and illustrates how it is complementary to predictive computational modeling efforts.

  18. Controllable Synthesis and Tunable Photocatalytic Properties of Ti(3+)-doped TiO2.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ren; Wen, Zhenhai; Cui, Shumao; Hou, Yang; Guo, Xiaoru; Chen, Junhong

    2015-06-05

    Photocatalysts show great potential in environmental remediation and water splitting using either artificial or natural light. Titanium dioxide (TiO2)-based photocatalysts are studied most frequently because they are stable, non-toxic, readily available, and highly efficient. However, the relatively wide band gap of TiO2 significantly limits its use under visible light or solar light. We herein report a facile route for controllable synthesis of Ti(3+)-doped TiO2 with tunable photocatalytic properties using a hydrothermal method with varying amounts of reductant, i.e., sodium borohydride (NaBH4). The resulting TiO2 showed color changes from light yellow, light grey, to dark grey with the increasing amount of NaBH4. The present method can controllably and effectively reduce Ti(4+) on the surface of TiO2 and induce partial transformation of anatase TiO2 to rutile TiO2, with the evolution of nanoparticles into hierarchical structures attributable to a high pressure and strong alkali environment in the synthesis atmosphere; in this way, the photocatalytic activity of Ti(3+)-doped TiO2 under visible-light can be tuned. The as-developed strategy may open up a new avenue for designing and functionalizing TiO2 materials for enhancing visible light absorption, narrowing band gap, and improving photocatalytic activity.

  19. Controllable Synthesis and Tunable Photocatalytic Properties of Ti3+-doped TiO2

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Ren; Wen, Zhenhai; Cui, Shumao; Hou, Yang; Guo, Xiaoru; Chen, Junhong

    2015-01-01

    Photocatalysts show great potential in environmental remediation and water splitting using either artificial or natural light. Titanium dioxide (TiO2)-based photocatalysts are studied most frequently because they are stable, non-toxic, readily available, and highly efficient. However, the relatively wide band gap of TiO2 significantly limits its use under visible light or solar light. We herein report a facile route for controllable synthesis of Ti3+-doped TiO2 with tunable photocatalytic properties using a hydrothermal method with varying amounts of reductant, i.e., sodium borohydride (NaBH4). The resulting TiO2 showed color changes from light yellow, light grey, to dark grey with the increasing amount of NaBH4. The present method can controllably and effectively reduce Ti4+ on the surface of TiO2 and induce partial transformation of anatase TiO2 to rutile TiO2, with the evolution of nanoparticles into hierarchical structures attributable to a high pressure and strong alkali environment in the synthesis atmosphere; in this way, the photocatalytic activity of Ti3+-doped TiO2 under visible-light can be tuned. The as-developed strategy may open up a new avenue for designing and functionalizing TiO2 materials for enhancing visible light absorption, narrowing band gap, and improving photocatalytic activity. PMID:26044406

  20. Use of dried blood spots in doping control analysis of anabolic steroid esters.

    PubMed

    Tretzel, Laura; Thomas, Andreas; Geyer, Hans; Gmeiner, Günter; Forsdahl, Guro; Pop, Valentin; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2014-08-05

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling, a technique for whole blood sampling on a piece of filter paper, has more than 50-years tradition, particularly in the diagnostic analysis of metabolic disorders in neonatal screening. Due to the minimal invasiveness, straightforwardness, robustness against manipulation and fastness DBS sampling recommends itself as an advantageous technique in doping control analysis. The present approach highlights the development of a screening assay for the analysis of eight anabolic steroid esters (nandrolone phenylpropionate, trenbolone enanthate, testosterone acetate, testosterone cypionate, testosterone isocaproate, testosterone phenylpropionate, testosterone decanoate and testosterone undecanoate) and nandrolone in DBS. The detection of the intact esters allows an unequivocal proof of the administration of conjugates of exogenous testosterone and its derivatives. Precise, specific and linear conditions were obtained by means of liquid chromatography high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry. Sensitivity in the low ppb range was accomplished by the preparation of the methyloxime derivatives of the target compounds. Labeled internal standards (d3-nandrolone, d3-nandrolone caproate and d3-nandrolone undecanoate) were applied to compensate for the broad range in chain length of the esters. The assay presented here outlines the application of DBS for the analysis of anabolic steroid esters in doping controls for the first time providing great potential to simplify the proof of exogenous administration of testosterone.

  1. Highly doped silicon nanowires by monolayer doping.

    PubMed

    Veerbeek, Janneke; Ye, Liang; Vijselaar, Wouter; Kudernac, Tibor; van der Wiel, Wilfred G; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2017-02-23

    Controlling the doping concentration of silicon nanostructures is challenging. Here, we investigated three different monolayer doping techniques to obtain silicon nanowires with a high doping dose. These routes were based on conventional monolayer doping, starting from covalently bound dopant-containing molecules, or on monolayer contact doping, in which a source substrate coated with a monolayer of a carborane silane was the dopant source. As a third route, both techniques were combined to retain the benefits of conformal monolayer formation and the use of an external capping layer. These routes were used for doping fragile porous nanowires fabricated by metal-assisted chemical etching. Differences in porosity were used to tune the total doping dose inside the nanowires, as measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements. The higher the porosity, the higher was the surface available for dopant-containing molecules, which in turn led to a higher doping dose. Slightly porous nanowires could be doped via all three routes, which resulted in highly doped nanowires with (projected areal) doping doses of 10(14)-10(15) boron atoms per cm(2) compared to 10(12) atoms per cm(2) for a non-porous planar sample. Highly porous nanowires were not compatible with the conventional monolayer doping technique, but monolayer contact doping and the combined route resulted for these highly porous nanowires in tremendously high doping doses up to 10(17) boron atoms per cm(2).

  2. Analysis of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG): application of routine immunological methods for initial testing and confirmation analysis in doping control.

    PubMed

    Kuuranne, Tiia; Ahola, Liisa; Pussinen, Christel; Leinonen, Antti

    2013-08-01

    Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is dimeric glycoprotein produced by placenta in pregnancy and also in low levels by pituitary gland. The main clinical use for exogenous hCG-administration is typically linked to infertility. The desired effect of hCG misuse in sport is due to the enhancement of testicular production of testosterone. Therefore, hCG is listed by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) as a prohibited substance in male athletes and according to the recently published WADA guideline urinary concentrations of hCG > 5 IU/L may be an indicator of doping. In this study two independent immunoassays were used to implement the new WADA guideline. The assay for initial testing (Siemens Immulite 2000 XPi hCG assay) recognizes various hCG variants (e.g. hCG and β-core fragment of hCG) whereas the confirmatory assay (PerkinElmer DELFIA Xpress hCG) is sensitive to intact and nicked hCG only. Both assays showed adequate sensitivity and were proven fit-for-purpose in routine doping control. Population-based distribution of the assays was in good agreement with results of earlier studies and supported well the current threshold of 5 IU/L.

  3. Current status and bioanalytical challenges in the detection of unknown anabolic androgenic steroids in doping control analysis.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Oscar J; De Brabanter, Nik; Fabregat, Andreu; Segura, Jordi; Ventura, Rosa; Van Eenoo, Peter; Deventer, Koen

    2013-11-01

    Androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) are prohibited in sports due to their anabolic effects. Doping control laboratories usually face the screening of AAS misuse by target methods based on MS detection. Although these methods allow for the sensitive and specific detection of targeted compounds and metabolites, the rest remain undetectable. This fact opens a door for cheaters, since different AAS can be synthesized in order to evade doping control tests. This situation was evidenced in 2003 with the discovery of the designer steroid tetrahydrogestrinone. One decade after this discovery, the detection of unknown AAS still remains one of the main analytical challenges in the doping control field. In this manuscript, the current situation in the detection of unknown AAS is reviewed. Although important steps have been made in order to minimize this analytical problem and different analytical strategies have been proposed, there are still some drawbacks related to each approach.

  4. Understanding and Control of Bipolar Self-Doping in Copper Nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Fioretti, Angela N.; Schwartz, Craig P.; Vinson, John; Nordlund, Dennis; Prendergast, David; Tamboli, Adele C.; Caskey, Christopher M.; Tuomisto, Filip; Linez, Florence; Christensen, Steven T.; Toberer, Eric S.; Lany, Stephan; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2016-05-14

    Semiconductor materials that can be doped both n-type and p-type are desirable for diode-based applications and transistor technology. Copper nitride (Cu3N) is a metastable semiconductor with a solar-relevant bandgap that has been reported to exhibit bipolar doping behavior. However, deeper understanding and better control of the mechanism behind this behavior in Cu3N is currently lacking in the literature. In this work, we use combinatorial growth with a temperature gradient to demonstrate both conduction types of phase-pure, sputter-deposited Cu3N thin films. Room temperature Hall effect and Seebeck effect measurements show n-type Cu3N with 1017 electrons/cm3 for low growth temperature (approximately 35 degrees C) and p-type with 1015 holes/cm3-1016 holes/cm3 for elevated growth temperatures (50 degrees C-120 degrees C). Mobility for both types of Cu3N was approximately 0.1 cm2/Vs-1 cm2/Vs. Additionally, temperature-dependent Hall effect measurements indicate that ionized defects are an important scattering mechanism in p-type films. By combining X-ray absorption spectroscopy and first-principles defect theory, we determined that VCu defects form preferentially in p-type Cu3N, while Cui defects form preferentially in n-type Cu3N, suggesting that Cu3N is a compensated semiconductor with conductivity type resulting from a balance between donor and acceptor defects. Based on these theoretical and experimental results, we propose a kinetic defectformation mechanism for bipolar doping in Cu3N that is also supported by positron annihilation experiments. Overall, the results of this work highlight the importance of kinetic processes in the defect physics of metastable materials and provide a framework that can be applied when considering the properties of such materials in general.

  5. Understanding and control of bipolar self-doping in copper nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fioretti, Angela N.; Schwartz, Craig P.; Vinson, John; Nordlund, Dennis; Prendergast, David; Tamboli, Adele C.; Caskey, Christopher M.; Tuomisto, Filip; Linez, Florence; Christensen, Steven T.; Toberer, Eric S.; Lany, Stephan; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2016-05-01

    Semiconductor materials that can be doped both n-type and p-type are desirable for diode-based applications and transistor technology. Copper nitride (Cu3N) is a metastable semiconductor with a solar-relevant bandgap that has been reported to exhibit bipolar doping behavior. However, deeper understanding and better control of the mechanism behind this behavior in Cu3N is currently lacking in the literature. In this work, we use combinatorial growth with a temperature gradient to demonstrate both conduction types of phase-pure, sputter-deposited Cu3N thin films. Room temperature Hall effect and Seebeck effect measurements show n-type Cu3N with 1017 electrons/cm3 for low growth temperature (≈35 °C) and p-type with 1015 holes/cm3-1016 holes/cm3 for elevated growth temperatures (50 °C-120 °C). Mobility for both types of Cu3N was ≈0.1 cm2/Vs-1 cm2/Vs. Additionally, temperature-dependent Hall effect measurements indicate that ionized defects are an important scattering mechanism in p-type films. By combining X-ray absorption spectroscopy and first-principles defect theory, we determined that VCu defects form preferentially in p-type Cu3N, while Cui defects form preferentially in n-type Cu3N, suggesting that Cu3N is a compensated semiconductor with conductivity type resulting from a balance between donor and acceptor defects. Based on these theoretical and experimental results, we propose a kinetic defect formation mechanism for bipolar doping in Cu3N that is also supported by positron annihilation experiments. Overall, the results of this work highlight the importance of kinetic processes in the defect physics of metastable materials and provide a framework that can be applied when considering the properties of such materials in general.

  6. Understanding and Control of Bipolar Self-Doping in Copper Nitride.

    PubMed

    Fioretti, Angela N; Schwartz, Craig P; Vinson, John; Nordlund, Dennis; Prendergast, David; Tamboli, Adele C; Caskey, Christopher M; Tuomisto, Filip; Linez, Florence; Christensen, Steven T; Toberer, Eric S; Lany, Stephan; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2016-05-14

    Semiconductor materials that can be doped both n-type and p-type are desirable for diode-based applications and transistor technology. Copper nitride (Cu3N) is a metastable semiconductor with a solar-relevant bandgap that has been reported to exhibit bipolar doping behavior. However, deeper understanding and better control of the mechanism behind this behavior in Cu3N is currently lacking in the literature. In this work, we use combinatorial growth with a temperature gradient to demonstrate both conduction types of phase-pure, sputter-deposited Cu3N thin films. Room temperature Hall effect and Seebeck effect measurements show n-type Cu3N with an electron density of 10(17) cm(-3) for low growth temperature (≈ 35 °C) and p-type with a hole density between 10(15) cm(-3) and 10(16) cm(-3) for elevated growth temperatures (50 °C to 120 °C). Mobility for both types of Cu3N was ≈ 0.1 cm(2)/Vs to 1 cm(2)/V. Additionally, temperature-dependent Hall effect measurements indicate that ionized defects are an important scattering mechanism in p-type films. By combining X-ray absorption spectroscopy and first-principles defect theory, we determined that VCu defects form preferentially in p-type Cu3N while Cui defects form preferentially in n-type Cu3N; suggesting that Cu3N is a compensated semiconductor with conductivity type resulting from a balance between donor and acceptor defects. Based on these theoretical and experimental results, we propose a kinetic defect formation mechanism for bipolar doping in Cu3N, that is also supported by positron annihilation experiments. Overall, the results of this work highlight the importance of kinetic processes in the defect physics of metastable materials, and provide a framework that can be applied when considering the properties of such materials in general.

  7. Understanding and Control of Bipolar Self-Doping in Copper Nitride

    PubMed Central

    Fioretti, Angela N.; Schwartz, Craig P.; Vinson, John; Nordlund, Dennis; Prendergast, David; Tamboli, Adele C.; Caskey, Christopher M.; Tuomisto, Filip; Linez, Florence; Christensen, Steven T.; Toberer, Eric S.; Lany, Stephan; Zakutayev, Andriy

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor materials that can be doped both n-type and p-type are desirable for diode-based applications and transistor technology. Copper nitride (Cu3N) is a metastable semiconductor with a solar-relevant bandgap that has been reported to exhibit bipolar doping behavior. However, deeper understanding and better control of the mechanism behind this behavior in Cu3N is currently lacking in the literature. In this work, we use combinatorial growth with a temperature gradient to demonstrate both conduction types of phase-pure, sputter-deposited Cu3N thin films. Room temperature Hall effect and Seebeck effect measurements show n-type Cu3N with an electron density of 1017 cm−3 for low growth temperature (≈ 35 °C) and p-type with a hole density between 1015 cm−3 and 1016 cm−3 for elevated growth temperatures (50 °C to 120 °C). Mobility for both types of Cu3N was ≈ 0.1 cm2/Vs to 1 cm2/V. Additionally, temperature-dependent Hall effect measurements indicate that ionized defects are an important scattering mechanism in p-type films. By combining X-ray absorption spectroscopy and first-principles defect theory, we determined that VCu defects form preferentially in p-type Cu3N while Cui defects form preferentially in n-type Cu3N; suggesting that Cu3N is a compensated semiconductor with conductivity type resulting from a balance between donor and acceptor defects. Based on these theoretical and experimental results, we propose a kinetic defect formation mechanism for bipolar doping in Cu3N, that is also supported by positron annihilation experiments. Overall, the results of this work highlight the importance of kinetic processes in the defect physics of metastable materials, and provide a framework that can be applied when considering the properties of such materials in general. PMID:27746508

  8. Surface doping for photocatalytic purposes: relations between particle size, surface modifications, and photoactivity of SnO2:Zn2+ nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liping; Liu, Junjie; Su, Yiguo; Li, Guangshe; Chen, Xiaobo; Qiu, Xiaoqing; Yan, Tingjiang

    2009-04-01

    Highly crystalline SnO2 nanocrystals with and without Zn2+ doping were directly prepared by a solvothermal method. By systematic characterizations using x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectra, and UV-vis spectra, it is demonstrated that all samples crystallized in a single phase of rutile structure, and that upon Zn2+ doping particle sizes closer to the exciton Bohr radius (2.7 nm) of SnO2 were achieved, while the particle size of SnO2 nanoparticles was as large as about 12 nm without Zn2+ doping. The smaller particle sizes for Zn2+ doped nanoparticles had led to a lattice expansion, a blue-shift of the surface phonon mode for the anti-symmetric Sn-O stretching vibration, and a significantly narrowed band-gap energy, opposite to what is theoretically predicted by the quantum size effect. The photocatalytic activity of the doped samples is measured by monitoring the degradation of methylene blue dye in an aqueous solution under UV-radiation exposure. It is found that Zn2+ doped SnO2 showed excellent activity toward photodegradation of methylene blue solution under UV light irradiation. These observations were interpreted in terms of the Zn2+ doping at the surface sites of SnO2 nanoparticles and the relevant defects that have increased the surface active sites and moreover improved the ratio of surface charge carrier transfer rate to the electron-hole recombination rate. These results illustrate the potential of rationally modifying the particle size and surface defect characteristics for novel semiconductor oxide photocatalysts.

  9. Method for continuous control of composition and doping of pulsed laser deposited films

    DOEpatents

    Lowndes, Douglas H.; McCamy, James W.

    1995-01-01

    A method for growing a deposit upon a substrate of semiconductor material involves the utilization of pulsed laser deposition techniques within a low-pressure gas environment. The substrate and a target of a first material are positioned within a deposition chamber and a low-pressure gas atmosphere is developed within the chamber. The substrate is then heated, and the target is irradiated, so that atoms of the target material are ablated from the remainder of the target, while atoms of the gas simultaneously are adsorbed on the substrate/film surface. The ablated atoms build up upon the substrate, together with the adsorbed gas atoms to form the thin-film deposit on the substrate. By controlling the pressure of the gas of the chamber atmosphere, the composition of the formed deposit can be controlled, and films of continuously variable composition or doping can be grown from a single target of fixed composition.

  10. Laser control of the optical properties of a doped photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, A.; Radeonychev, Y. V.

    2010-08-01

    A method of dynamic control of absorption and dispersion of a two-level quantum system (atoms, ions or quantum dots) doping a photonic band gap (PBG) material via variation of the intensity and frequency of an external laser field is proposed. The frequency of an optical transition should be inside a PBG and located near or at a photonic band edge. In this case the laser field 'dresses' the quantum system (Mollow splitting) while the decay rates of the dressed states become very different due to a photonic band edge and depend on the form of spectral density of electromagnetic modes as well as intensity and frequency of the laser field. This enables us to control absorption and dispersion of a signal laser field, which is near resonant to the quantum transition of a dopant.

  11. A human rights view on access to controlled substances for medical purposes under the international drug control framework.

    PubMed

    Gispen, Marie Elske C

    2013-11-05

    The world is confronted with a major public health deficit caused by poor access to controlled essential medicines under the international drug control framework. This is affecting millions of patients on a daily basis and resulting in numerous human rights violations. The present review contextualises this deficit from a human rights perspective. Drug control efforts are informed by a twofold objective stemming from the double nature of scheduled substances: free access for medical purposes should be ensured, though non-medical use of substances such as opium should be restricted. The international drug control framework is, in theory, based on this twofold notion, however at the level of interpretation, monitoring, and implementation, a one-sided emphasis is demonstrated. By tracing a parallel between the obligations of states under the international drug control framework and those that derive from human rights law, the review shows that the two systems seem incoherent and conflicting in nature and flags the importance of cross-disciplinary research into drug control and human rights.

  12. Self- and dopant diffusion in extrinsic boron doped isotopically controlled silicon multilayer structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, Ian D.; Bracht, Hartmut A.; Silvestri, Hughes H.; Nicols, Samuel P.; Beeman, Jeffrey W.; Hansen, John L.; Nylandsted Larsen, Arne; Haller, Eugene E.

    2002-04-01

    Isotopically controlled silicon multilayer structures were used to measure the enhancement of self- and dopant diffusion in extrinsic boron doped silicon. {sup 30}Si was used as a tracer through a multilayer structure of alternating natural Si and enriched {sup 28}Si layers. Low energy, high resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) allowed for simultaneous measurement of self- and dopant diffusion profiles of samples annealed at temperatures between 850 C and 1100 C. A specially designed ion- implanted amorphous Si surface layer was used as a dopant source to suppress excess defects in the multilayer structure, thereby eliminating transient enhanced diffusion (TED) behavior. Self- and dopant diffusion coefficients, diffusion mechanisms, and native defect charge states were determined from computer-aided modeling, based on differential equations describing the diffusion processes. We present a quantitative description of B diffusion enhanced self-diffusion in silicon and conclude that the diffusion of both B and Si is mainly mediated by neutral and singly positively charged self-interstitials under p-type doping. No significant contribution of vacancies to either B or Si diffusion is observed.

  13. Stabilization of human urine doping control samples: II. microbial degradation of steroids.

    PubMed

    Tsivou, M; Livadara, D; Georgakopoulos, D G; Koupparis, M A; Atta-Politou, J; Georgakopoulos, C G

    2009-05-01

    The transportation of urine samples, collected for doping control analysis, does not always meet ideal conditions of storage and prompt delivery to the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) accredited laboratories. Because sample collection is not conducted under sterile conditions, microbial activity may cause changes to the endogenous steroid profiles of samples. In the current work, funded by WADA, a chemical mixture consisting of antibiotics, antimycotic substances and protease inhibitors was applied in urine aliquots fortified with conjugated and deuterated steroids and inoculated with nine representative microorganisms. Aliquots with and without the chemical mixture were incubated at 37 degrees C for 7 days to simulate the transportation period, whereas another series of aliquots was stored at -20 degrees C as reference. Microbial growth was assessed immediately after inoculation and at the end of the incubation period. Variations in pH and specific gravity values were recorded. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis was performed for the detection of steroids in the free, glucuronide, and sulfate fractions. The addition of the chemical stabilization mixture to urine samples inhibited microorganism growth and prevented steroid degradation at 37 degrees C. On the other hand, four of the nine microorganisms induced alterations in the steroid profile of the unstabilized samples incubated at 37 degrees C.

  14. Temperature sensitivity analysis of polarity controlled electrostatically doped tunnel field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, Kaushal; Pandey, Sunil; Kondekar, P. N.; Sharma, Dheeraj

    2016-09-01

    The conventional tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) have shown potential to scale down in sub-22 nm regime due to its lower sub-threshold slope and robustness against short-channel effects (SCEs), however, sensitivity towards temperature variation is a major concern. Therefore, for the first time, we investigate temperature sensitivity analysis of a polarity controlled electrostatically doped tunnel field-effect transistor (ED-TFET). Different performance metrics and analog/RF figure-of-merits were considered and compared for both devices, and simulations were performed using Silvaco ATLAS device tool. We found that the variation in ON-state current in ED-TFET is almost temperature independent due to electrostatically doped mechanism, while, it increases in conventional TFET at higher temperature. Above room temperature, the variation in ION, IOFF, and SS sensitivity in ED-TFET are only 0.11%/K, 2.21%/K, and 0.63%/K, while, in conventional TFET the variations are 0.43%/K, 2.99%/K, and 0.71%/K, respectively. However, below room temperature, the variation in ED-TFET ION is 0.195%/K compared to 0.27%/K of conventional TFET. Moreover, it is analysed that the incomplete ionization effect in conventional TFET severely affects the drive current and the threshold voltage, while, ED-TFET remains unaffected. Hence, the proposed ED-TFET is less sensitive towards temperature variation and can be used for cryogenics as well as for high temperature applications.

  15. Controlled fabrication of oriented co-doped ZnO clustered nanoassemblies.

    PubMed

    Barick, K C; Aslam, M; Dravid, Vinayak P; Bahadur, D

    2010-09-01

    Clustered nanoassemblies of Mn doped ZnO and co-doped ZnO (Mn, Sn co-doped ZnO; Mn, Sb co-doped ZnO; and Mn, Bi co-doped ZnO) were prepared by refluxing their respective precursors in diethylene glycol medium. The co-doping elements, Sn, Sb and Bi exist in multi oxidation states by forming Zn-O-M (M=Sb, Bi and Sn) bonds in hexagonal wurtzite nanostructure. The analyses of detailed structural characterization performed by XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), show that co-doping ions are successfully incorporated into the ZnO nanostructure and do not appear as precipitates or secondary phases. HRTEM analysis also confirmed the oriented attachment of nanocrystals as well as their defect structures. The formation/activation of higher amount of intrinsic host defects, for instance, oxygen vacancies in co-doped ZnO as compared to Mn doped ZnO sample is evident from Raman spectra. The doped and co-doped samples exhibit ferromagnetic like behavior at room temperature presumably due to the presence of defects. Specifically, it has been observed that the incorporation of dopant and co-dopants into ZnO structure can modulate the local electronic structure due to the formation/activation of defects and hence, cause significant changes in their structural, vibrational, optical and magnetic properties.

  16. A generic screening methodology for horse doping control by LC-TOF-MS, GC-HRMS and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Kioussi, Maroula K; Lyris, Emmanouil M; Angelis, Yiannis S; Tsivou, Maria; Koupparis, Michael A; Georgakopoulos, Costas G

    2013-12-15

    In the present study a general screening protocol was developed to detect prohibited substances and metabolites for doping control purposes in equine sports. It was based on the establishment of a unified sample preparation and on the combined implementation of liquid and gas chromatographic MS analysis. The sample pretreatment began with two parallel procedures: enzymatic hydrolysis of sulfate and glucuronide conjugates, and methanolysis of the 17β-sulfate steroid conjugates. The extracts were treated for LC-TOF-MS, GC-HRMS and GC-MS assays. The majority of the prohibited substances were identified through a high mass accuracy technique, such as LC-TOF-MS, without prior derivatization. The sample preparation procedure included the formation of methylated and trimethylsilylated derivatives common in toxicological GC-MS libraries. The screening method was enhanced by post-run library searching using automated mass spectral deconvolution and identification system (AMDIS) combined with deconvolution reporting software (DRS). The current methodology is able to detect the presence of more than 350 target analytes in horse urine and may easily incorporate a lot of new substances without changes in chromatography. The full scan acquisition allows retrospective identification of prohibited substances in stored urine samples after reprocessing of the acquired data. Validation was performed for sixty representative compounds and included limit of detection, matrix interference - specificity, extraction recovery, precision, mass accuracy, matrix effect and carry over contamination. The suitability of the method was demonstrated with previously declared positive horse urine samples.

  17. Current use of high-resolution mass spectrometry in drug screening relevant to clinical and forensic toxicology and doping control.

    PubMed

    Ojanperä, Ilkka; Kolmonen, Marjo; Pelander, Anna

    2012-05-01

    Clinical and forensic toxicology and doping control deal with hundreds or thousands of drugs that may cause poisoning or are abused, are illicit, or are prohibited in sports. Rapid and reliable screening for all these compounds of different chemical and pharmaceutical nature, preferably in a single analytical method, is a substantial effort for analytical toxicologists. Combined chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques with standardised reference libraries have been most commonly used for the purpose. In the last ten years, the focus has shifted from gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, because of progress in instrument technology and partly because of the polarity and low volatility of many new relevant substances. High-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), which enables accurate mass measurement at high resolving power, has recently evolved to the stage that is rapidly causing a shift from unit-resolution, quadrupole-dominated instrumentation. The main HRMS techniques today are time-of-flight mass spectrometry and Orbitrap Fourier-transform mass spectrometry. Both techniques enable a range of different drug-screening strategies that essentially rely on measuring a compound's or a fragment's mass with sufficiently high accuracy that its elemental composition can be determined directly. Accurate mass and isotopic pattern acts as a filter for confirming the identity of a compound or even identification of an unknown. High mass resolution is essential for improving confidence in accurate mass results in the analysis of complex biological samples. This review discusses recent applications of HRMS in analytical toxicology.

  18. Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Active Thermal Control and Environmental Control and Life Support Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, John F.; Barido, Richard A.; Boehm, Paul; Cross, Cynthia D.; Rains, George Edward

    2014-01-01

    The Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is the first crew transport vehicle to be developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the last thirty years. Orion is currently being developed to transport the crew safely beyond Earth orbit. This year, the vehicle focused on building the Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1) vehicle to be launched in September of 2014. The development of the Orion Active Thermal Control (ATCS) and Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System, focused on the integrating the components into the EFT1 vehicle and preparing them for launch. Work also has started on preliminary design reviews for the manned vehicle. Additional development work is underway to keep the remaining component progressing towards implementation on the flight tests of EM1 in 2017 and of EM2 in 2020. This paper covers the Orion ECLS development from April 2013 to April 2014.

  19. The Anti-Doping Movement.

    PubMed

    Willick, Stuart E; Miller, Geoffrey D; Eichner, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Historical reports of doping in sports date as far back as the ancient Greek Olympic Games. The anti-doping community considers doping in sports to be cheating and a violation of the spirit of sport. During the past century, there has been an increasing awareness of the extent of doping in sports and the health risks of doping. In response, the anti-doping movement has endeavored to educate athletes and others about the health risks of doping and promote a level playing field. Doping control is now undertaken in most countries around the world and at most elite sports competitions. As athletes have found new ways to dope, however, the anti-doping community has endeavored to strengthen its educational and deterrence efforts. It is incumbent upon sports medicine professionals to understand the health risks of doping and all doping control processes.

  20. Authority of compact commission to control import/export for disposal and other purposes

    SciTech Connect

    Poling, R.D.

    1995-12-31

    As operational capabilities for radioactive waste disposal expand and as approaching dates for waste exclusion near, the legal question of the authority of compact commissions to control the import and export of low-level radioactive nuclear waste is a legal issue of significance to many regions. This presentation will review the provisions of various compacts and the federal compact approval legislation, consider the interpretation of the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution, and discuss possible interpretive perspectives relating to the authority of compact commissions. The discussion will focus on whether waste exclusion authority is confined in application to imported waste for permanent disposal or extends to transported and imported waste for processing, treatment, or other purposes.

  1. Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle Environmental Control and Life Support Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, John F.; Barido, Richard A.; Cross, Cynthia D.; Rains, George Edward

    2012-01-01

    The Orion Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is the first crew transport vehicle to be developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the last thirty years. Orion is currently being developed to transport the crew safely beyond Earth orbit. This year, the vehicle focused on building the Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1) vehicle to be launched in 2014. The development of the Orion Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System, focused on the completing the components which are on EFT1. Additional development work has been done to keep the remaining component progressing towards implementation for a flight tests in of EM1 in 2017 and in and EM2 in 2020. This paper covers the Orion ECLS development from April 2012 to April 2013.

  2. Measurements, modeling, control and simulation - as applied to the human left ventricle for purposeful physiological monitoring.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghista, D. N.; Rasmussen, D. N.; Linebarger, R. N.; Sandler, H.

    1971-01-01

    Interdisciplinary engineering research effort in studying the intact human left ventricle has been employed to physiologically monitor the heart and to obtain its 'state-of-health' characteristics. The left ventricle was selected for this purpose because it plays a key role in supplying energy to the body cells. The techniques for measurement of the left ventricular geometry are described; the geometry is effectively displayed to bring out the abnormalities in cardiac function. Methods of mathematical modeling, which make it possible to determine the performance of the intact left ventricular muscle, are also described. Finally, features of a control system for the left ventricle for predicting the effect of certain physiological stress situations on the ventricle performance are discussed.

  3. Neutron irradiation control in the neutron transmutation doping process in HANARO using SPND

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Gi-Doo; Kim, Myong-Seop

    2015-07-01

    The neutron irradiation control method by using self-powered neutron detector (SPND) is developed for the neutron transmutation doping (NTD) application in HANARO. An SPND is installed at a fixed position of the upper part of the sleeve in HANARO NTD hole for real-time monitoring of the neutron irradiation. It is confirmed that the SPND is significantly affected by the in-core condition and surroundings of the facility. Furthermore, the SPND signal changes about 15% throughout a whole cycle according to the change of the control rod position. But, it is also confirmed that the variation of the neutron flux on the silicon ingots inside the irradiation can is not so big while moving of the control rod. Accordingly, the relationship between the ratio of the neutron flux to the SPND signal output and the control rod position is established. In this procedure, the neutron flux measurement by using zirconium foil is utilized. The real NTD irradiation experiments are performed using the established relationship. The irradiated neutron fluence can be controlled within ±1.3% of the target one. The mean value of the irradiation/target ratio of the fluence is 0.9992, and the standard deviation is 0.0071. Thus, it is confirmed that the extremely accurate irradiation would be accomplished. This procedure can be useful for the SPND application installed at the fixed position to the field requiring the extremely high accuracy. (authors)

  4. Doping in controlling the type of conductivity in bulk and nanostructured thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuks, D.; Komisarchik, G.; Kaller, M.; Gelbstein, Y.

    2016-08-01

    Doping of materials for thermoelectric applications is widely used nowadays to control the type of conductivity. We report the results of ab-initio calculations aimed at developing the consistent scheme for determining the role of impurities that may change the type of conductivity in two attractive thermoelectric classes of materials. It is demonstrated that alloying of TiNiSn with Cu makes the material of n-type, and alloying with Fe leads to p-type conductivity. Similar calculations for PbTe with small amount of Na substituting for Pb leads to p-type conductivity, while Cl substituting for Te makes PbTe an n-type material. It is shown also that for nano-grained materials the n-type conductivity should be observed. The effect of impurities segregating to the grain boundaries in nano-structured PbTe is also discussed.

  5. The dynamics of a doped hole in a cuprate is not controlled by spin fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimnejad, Hadi; Sawatzky, George A.; Berciu, Mona

    2014-12-01

    Understanding what controls the dynamics of the quasiparticle that results when a hole is doped into an antiferromagnetically ordered CuO2 layer is the first necessary step in the quest for a theory of the high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates. Here we show that the long-held belief that the quantum spin fluctuations of the antiferromagnetic background play a key role in determining this dynamics is wrong. Indeed, we demonstrate that the correct, experimentally observed quasiparticle dispersion is generically obtained for a three-band model describing the hole moving on the oxygen sublattice and coupled to a Néel lattice of spins without spin fluctuations. We argue that results from one-band model studies actually support this conclusion, and that this significant conceptual change in our understanding of this phenomenology opens the way to studying few-hole dynamics, to accurately gauge the strength of the `magnetic glue’ and its contribution to superconductivity.

  6. Shape-controlled synthesis and influence of W doping and oxygen nonstoichiometry on the phase transition of VO2

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ru; Miao, Lei; Liu, Chengyan; Zhou, Jianhua; Cheng, Haoliang; Asaka, Toru; Iwamoto, Yuji; Tanemura, Sakae

    2015-01-01

    Monoclinic VO2(M) in nanostructure is a prototype material for interpreting correlation effects in solids with fully reversible phase transition and for the advanced applications to smart devices. Here, we report a facile one-step hydrothermal method for the controlled growth of single crystalline VO2(M/R) nanorods. Through tuning the hydrothermal temperature, duration of the hydrothermal time and W-doped level, single crystalline VO2(M/R) nanorods with controlled aspect ratio can be synthesized in large quantities, and the crucial parameter for the shape-controlled synthesis is the W-doped content. The dopant greatly promotes the preferential growth of (110) to form pure phase VO2(R) nanorods with high aspect ratio for the W-doped level = 2.0 at% sample. The shape-controlled process of VO2(M/R) nanorods upon W-doping are systematically studied. Moreover, the phase transition temperature (Tc) of VO2 depending on oxygen nonstoichiometry is investigated in detail. PMID:26373612

  7. Confiscated black market products and nutritional supplements with non-approved ingredients analyzed in the Cologne Doping Control Laboratory 2009.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Maxie; Thomas, Andreas; Geyer, Hans; Petrou, Michael; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Doping control laboratories are frequently confronted with new substances that may be misused by athletes. Besides new pharmaceuticals, where method development for their detection is dependent on the availability of the substance and corresponding administration studies, some professional and amateur athletes are using illicit 'black market' products, which either differ from known pharmaceuticals but cause similar effects or still are undergoing clinical trials and are therefore rarely available to doping control laboratories. In the Cologne Doping Control Laboratory, different confiscated products and legally obtained nutritional supplements were analyzed in 2009, and various findings were reported including GH-labelled injection vials without any pharmacologically active content; combinations of products indicating the attempt to mask growth hormone abuse; unpurified long-R(3) -IGF-1; nutritional supplements containing the growth hormone releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2); and ampoules containing the selective androgen receptor modulator Andarine (S-4). This review provides an overview on the substances that were analyzed in 2009. Ingredients relevant for doping control were identified by means of liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry methods. The awareness of new products on the black market and in nutritional supplements is of utmost importance for laboratories to develop detection methods accordingly and screen for new substances as early as possible.

  8. Performance optimization of p-n homojunction nanowire-based piezoelectric nanogenerators through control of doping concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Guocheng Ban, Dayan; Abdel-Rahman, Eihab

    2015-09-07

    This paper demonstrates a series of flexible transparent ZnO p-n homojunction nanowire-based piezoelectric nanogenerators (NGs) with different p-doping concentrations. The lithium-doped segments are grown directly and consecutively on top of intrinsic nanowires (n-type). When characterized under cyclic compressive strains, the overall NG performance is enhanced by up to eleven-fold if the doping concentration is properly controlled. This improvement is attributable to reduction in the mobile charge screening effect and optimization of the NGs' internal electrical characteristics. Experimental results also show that an interfacial MoO{sub 3} barrier layer, at an optimized thickness of 5–10 nm, reduces leakage current and substantially improves piezoelectric NG performance.

  9. Controlled low Si doping and high breakdown voltages in GaN on sapphire grown by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Anchal; Gupta, Chirag; Enatsu, Yuuki; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh

    2016-12-01

    Controlled n-type doping down to 2 × 1015 cm-3 was achieved in GaN grown on sapphire by MOCVD by balancing the n-type Si doping with respect to the background carbon and oxygen levels. A dopant level of ˜1 × 1016 cm-3 displayed a very high mobility of 899 cm2 V-1 s-1. High electron mobility in the drift layer leads to a low on resistance and high current densities without compromising on any other properties of the device. Schottky diodes processed on these low n-type layers showed low R on values, while the p-n diodes display high reverse breakdown voltages in excess of 1000 V for 8 μm thick drift layers with a doping of 2 × 1015 cm-3.

  10. Planar Gallium arsenide nanowire arrays for nanoelectronics: Controlled growth, doping, characterization, and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdy, Ryan Stewart

    The Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) mechanism is a bottom-up approach to produce onedimensional semiconductor structures, or nanowires. VLS nanowires are formed via a chemical or physical deposition process, where a metallic nanoparticle (seed) facilitates the growth. Nanowire growth diameter is strongly correlated to seed size, therefore top-down patterning can control site location and diameter of nanowire growth. Nanowires are sought after for their potential use as a manageable way produce small dimensioned semiconductor features without the need of expensive lithographic techniques. VLS nanowires commonly grow out-of-plane with respect to their growth substrate, resulting in difficulty with integrating VLS nanowires into existing device processing which is intended for planar geometries. Nanowires are typically removed from the substrate, which requires painstaking and uneconomical methods to pattern and align the nanowires. Planar nanowires are a potential solution to this issue; they grow in-plane on the substrate surface, epitaxially attached along its entire axis. Planar nanowires, as is, can be integrated into any preexisting planar semiconductor process, combining the advantages of nanowires with increased manufacturability. In this dissertation, planar GaAs nanowires are grown using metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with Au nanoparticles as the liquid metal seed. Growth occurs across multiple substrates to elucidate the mechanism behind planar nanowire growth direction. Knowledge gained by observing planar nanowire growth is used to precisely control nanowire growth direction. Subsequently the doping of planar nanowires is explored and unique phenomena related to the p-type doping of planar nanowires are investigated and discussed. The advantages of using planar nanowires are demonstrated through the controlled growth and doping of planar nanowires, and ultimately fabrication of electronic devices using conventional planar process techniques

  11. Controlled in situ boron doping of short silicon nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Das Kanungo, Pratyush; Zakharov, Nikolai; Bauer, Jan; Breitenstein, Otwin; Werner, Peter; Goesele, Ulrich

    2008-06-30

    Epitaxial silicon nanowires (NWs) of short heights ({approx}280 nm) on Si <111> substrate were grown and doped in situ with boron on a concentration range of 10{sup 15}-10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} by coevaporation of atomic Si and B by molecular beam epitaxy. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a single-crystalline structure of the NWs. Electrical measurements of the individual NWs confirmed the doping. However, the low doped (10{sup 15} cm{sup -3}) and medium doped (3x10{sup 16} and 1x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) NWs were heavily depleted by the surface states while the high doped (10{sup 18} and 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}) ones showed volume conductivities expected for the corresponding intended doping levels.

  12. Process for fabricating device structures for real-time process control of silicon doping

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.

    2001-01-01

    Silicon device structures designed to allow measurement of important doping process parameters immediately after the doping step has occurred. The test structures are processed through contact formation using standard semiconductor fabrication techniques. After the contacts have been formed, the structures are covered by an oxide layer and an aluminum layer. The aluminum layer is then patterned to expose the contact pads and selected regions of the silicon to be doped. Doping is then performed, and the whole structure is annealed with a pulsed excimer laser. But laser annealing, unlike standard annealing techniques, does not effect the aluminum contacts because the laser light is reflected by the aluminum. Once the annealing process is complete, the structures can be probed, using standard techniques, to ascertain data about the doping step. Analysis of the data can be used to determine probable yield reductions due to improper execution of the doping step and thus provide real-time feedback during integrated circuit fabrication.

  13. Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Active Thermal Control and Environmental Control and Life Support Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, John F.; Barido, Richard A.; Cross, Cynthia D.; Rains, George Edward

    2013-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is the first crew transport vehicle to be developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the last thirty years. Orion is currently being developed to transport the crew safely beyond Earth orbit. This year, the vehicle focused on building the Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1) vehicle to be launched in 2014. The development of the Orion Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System, focused on the completing the components which are on EFT1. Additional development work has been done to keep the remaining component progressing towards implementation for a flight tests in of EM1 in 2017 and in and EM2 in 2020. This paper covers the Orion ECLS development from April 2012 to April 2013.

  14. [Anti-doping control and public health: limits to the exposure of human health to risk in the name of sporting glory].

    PubMed

    Aith, Fernando Mussa Abujamra

    2013-10-01

    Given the current regulatory environment surrounding doping in the world, and in view of the recurring scandals linking leading athletes in a variety of sports with doping, this paper aims to provide some thoughts on the relationship between doping and public health, taking as base reference the risks doping poses to health and considering the regulatory options that have been adopted by the international community and the sports federations to control and supervise this unsporting and risky practice. The text seeks to reflect on the necessary balance between sport and health, as well as on the role of the state in preserving this balance.

  15. Untargeted metabolomics in doping control: detection of new markers of testosterone misuse by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Raro, Montse; Ibáñez, María; Gil, Rubén; Fabregat, Andreu; Tudela, Eva; Deventer, Koen; Ventura, Rosa; Segura, Jordi; Marcos, Josep; Kotronoulas, Aristotelis; Joglar, Jesús; Farré, Magi; Yang, Sheng; Xing, Yanyi; Van Eenoo, Peter; Pitarch, Elena; Hernández, Félix; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Pozo, Óscar J

    2015-08-18

    The use of untargeted metabolomics for the discovery of markers is a promising and virtually unexplored tool in the doping control field. Hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) and hybrid quadrupole Orbitrap (Q Exactive) mass spectrometers, coupled to ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography, are excellent tools for this purpose. In the present work, QTOF and Q Exactive have been used to look for markers for testosterone cypionate misuse by means of untargeted metabolomics. Two different groups of urine samples were analyzed, collected before and after the intramuscular administration of testosterone cypionate. In order to avoid analyte losses in the sample treatment, samples were just 2-fold diluted with water and directly injected into the chromatographic system. Samples were analyzed in both positive and negative ionization modes. Data from both systems were treated under untargeted metabolomic strategies using XCMS application and multivariate analysis. Results from the two mass spectrometers differed in the number of detected features, but both led to the same potential marker for the particular testosterone ester misuse. The in-depth study of the MS and MS/MS behavior of this marker allowed for the establishment of 1-cyclopentenoylglycine as a feasible structure. The putative structure was confirmed by comparison with synthesized material. This potential marker seems to come from the metabolism of the cypionic acid release after hydrolysis of the administered ester. Its suitability for doping control has been evaluated.

  16. Traditional Chinese medicine and sports drug testing: identification of natural steroid administration in doping control urine samples resulting from musk (pod) extracts.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Geyer, Hans; Thieme, Detlef; Grosse, Joachim; Rautenberg, Claudia; Flenker, Ulrich; Beuck, Simon; Thomas, Andreas; Holland, Ruben; Dvorak, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    The administration of musk extract, that is, ingredients obtained by extraction of the liquid secreted from the preputial gland or resulting grains of the male musk deer (eg, Moschus moschiferus), has been recommended in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) applications and was listed in the Japanese pharmacopoeia for various indications requiring cardiovascular stimulation, anti-inflammatory medication or androgenic hormone therapy. Numerous steroidal components including cholesterol, 5α-androstane-3,17-dione, 5β-androstane-3,17-dione, androsterone, etiocholanolone, epiandrosterone, 3β-hydroxy-androst-5-en-17-one, androst-4-ene-3,17-dione and the corresponding urea adduct 3α-ureido-androst-4-en-17-one were characterised as natural ingredients of musk over several decades, implicating an issue concerning doping controls if used for the treatment of elite athletes. In the present study, the impact of musk extract administration on sports drug testing results of five females competing in an international sporting event is reported. In the course of routine doping controls, adverse analytical findings concerning the athletes' steroid profile, corroborated by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) data, were obtained. The athletes' medical advisors admitted the prescription of TCM-based musk pod preparations and provided musk pod samples for comparison purposes to clarify the antidoping rule violation. Steroid profiles, IRMS results, literature data and a musk sample obtained from a living musk deer of a local zoo conclusively demonstrated the use of musk pod extracts in all cases which, however, represented a doping offence as prohibited anabolic-androgenic steroids were administered.

  17. Controlled release of lidocaine hydrochloride from the surfactant-doped hybrid xerogels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhijian; Joo, Hyeonwoo; Lee, Tai Gyu; Lee, Kangtaek

    2005-06-02

    We investigate the controlled release of lidocaine hydrochloride from the doped silica-based xerogels. In the xerogel preparation, tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), methyltriethoxysilane (MTES), and propyltriethoxysilane (PTES) are used as precursors, and a nonionic surfactant Igepal CO 720 is used as a dopant. The experimental results suggest that the release of lidocaine hydrochloride can be easily controlled by partially substituting TEOS with the organosilanes, and/or by adding the dopant. Adding the organosilane precursors lowers the release of both the drug and the surfactant in the order of TEOS, MTES/TEOS, and PTES/TEOS xerogels. The release from the PTES/TEOS xerogels is much lower than that from the other xerogels. The release of lidocaine hydrochloride is obviously suppressed by the addition of Igepal CO 720, while the release of Igepal CO 720 is slightly promoted by the addition of the drug. The overall release process is found to be diffusion-controlled, and the release behaviors can be well explained by considering the effects of the textual properties of the xerogels and the interactions among the drug, the surfactant, and the xerogel matrices.

  18. Assessment of the suitability of public mobile data networks for aircraft telemetry and control purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, F.; Walker, R.; Rutherford, N.; Turner, C.

    2011-04-01

    This paper provides a review of the state of the art of relevant work on the use of public mobile data networks for aircraft telemetry and control proposes. Moreover, it describes the characterisation for airborne uses of the public mobile data communication systems known broadly as 3G. The motivation for this study was to explore how this mature public communication systems could be used for aviation purposes. An experimental system was fitted to a light aircraft to record communication latency, line speed, RF level, packet loss and cell tower identifier. Communications was established using internet protocols and connection was made to a local server. The aircraft was flown in both remote and populous areas at altitudes up to 8500 ft in a region located in South East Queensland, Australia. Results show that the average airborne RF levels are better than those on the ground by 21% and in the order of -77 dbm. Latencies were in the order of 500 ms (1/2 the latency of Iridium), an average download speed of 0.48 Mb/s, average uplink speed of 0.85 Mb/s, a packet of information loss of 6.5%. The maximum communication range was also observed to be 70 km from a single cell station. The paper also describes possible limitations and utility of using such communications architecture for both manned and unmanned aircraft systems.

  19. A non-destructive n-doping method for graphene with precise control of electronic properties via atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyu Seok; Kalode, Pranav Y; Koo Lee, Yong-Eun; Kim, Hongbum; Lee, Lynn; Sung, Myung Mo

    2016-03-07

    Graphene applications require high precision control of the Fermi level and carrier concentration via a nondestructive doping method. Here, we develop an effective n-doping technique using atomic layer deposition (ALD) of ZnO thin films on graphene through a reactive molecular layer. This ALD doping method is nondestructive, simple, and precise. The ZnO thin films on graphene are uniform, conformal, of good quality with a low density of pinholes, and finely tunable in thickness with 1 Å resolution. We demonstrate graphene transistor control in terms of the Dirac point, carrier density, and doping state as a function of the ZnO thickness. Moreover, ZnO functions as an effective thin-film barrier against air-borne water and oxygen on the graphene, resulting in extraordinary stability in air for graphene devices. ZnO ALD was also applied to other two-dimensional materials including MoS2 and WSe2, which substantially enhanced electron mobility.

  20. Shape controlled Sn doped ZnO nanostructures for tunable optical emission and transport properties

    SciTech Connect

    Rakshit, T.; Manna, I.; Ray, S. K.

    2013-11-15

    Pure and Sn doped ZnO nanostructures have been grown on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates by vapor-solid technique without using any catalysts. It has been found that the morphology of the nanostructures depend strongly on the growth temperature and doping concentration. By proper tuning of the growth temperature, morphology of pure ZnO can be changed from tetrapods to multipods. On the other hand, by varying the doping concentration of Sn in ZnO, the morphology can be tuned from tetrapods to flower-like multipods to nanowires. X-ray diffraction pattern reveals that the nanostructures have a preferred (0002) growth orientation, and they are tensile strained with the increase of Sn doping in ZnO. Temperature-dependent photoluminescence characteristics of these nanostructures have been investigated in the range from 10 to 300 K. Pure ZnO tetrapods exhibited less defect state emissions than that of pure ZnO multipods. The defect emission is reduced with low concentration of Sn doping, but again increases at higher concentration of doping because of increased defects. Transport properties of pure and Sn doped ZnO tetrapods have been studied using complex-plane impedance spectroscopy. The contribution from the arms and junctions of a tetrapod could be distinguished. Sn doped ZnO samples showed lower conductivity but higher relaxation time than that of pure ZnO tetrapods.

  1. Controlled Growth of Platinum Nanowire Arrays on Sulfur Doped Graphene as High Performance Electrocatalyst

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongyue; Higgins, Drew C.; Hoque, Md Ariful; Lee, DongUn; Hassan, Fathy; Chen, Zhongwei

    2013-01-01

    Graphene supported Pt nanostructures have great potential to be used as catalysts in electrochemical energy conversion and storage technologies; however the simultaneous control of Pt morphology and dispersion, along with ideally tailoring the physical properties of the catalyst support properties has proven very challenging. Using sulfur doped graphene (SG) as a support material, the heterogeneous dopant atoms could serve as nucleation sites allowing for the preparation of SG supported Pt nanowire arrays with ultra-thin diameters (2–5 nm) and dense surface coverage. Detailed investigation of the preparation technique reveals that the structure of the resulting composite could be readily controlled by fine tuning the Pt nanowire nucleation and growth reaction kinetics and the Pt-support interactions, whereby a mechanistic platinum nanowire array growth model is proposed. Electrochemical characterization demonstrates that the composite materials have 2–3 times higher catalytic activities toward the oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation reaction compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst. PMID:23942256

  2. Hair analysis of anabolic steroids in connection with doping control-results from horse samples.

    PubMed

    Anielski, P

    2008-07-01

    Doping control of anabolic substances is normally carried out with urine samples taken from athletes and horses. Investigation of alternative specimens, e.g. hair samples, is restricted to special cases, but can also be worthwhile, in addition to urine analysis. Moreover, hair material is preferred in cases of limited availability or complicated collection of urine samples, e.g. from horses. In this work, possible ways of interpretation of analytical results in hair samples are discussed and illustrated by practical experiences. The results demonstrate the applicability of hair analysis to detect anabolic steroids and also to obtain further information about previous abuse. Moreover, the process of incorporation of steroids into hairs is described and the consequences on interpretation are discussed, e.g. on the retrospective estimation of the application date. The chosen examples deal with the detection of the anabolic agent testosterone propionate. Hair samples of an application study, as well as a control sample taken from a racing horse, were referred to. Hair material was investigated by a screening procedure including testosterone, nandrolone and several esters (testosterone propionate, phenylpropionate, decanoate, undecanoate, cypionate; nandrolone decanoate, dodecanoate and phenylpropionate; limits of detection (LODs) between 0.1 and 5.0 pg/mg). Confirmation of testosterone propionate (LOD 0.1 pg/mg) was carried out by an optimised sample preparation. Trimethylsilyl (TMS) and tert-butyl dimethylsilyl derivatives were detected by gas chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS) and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS).

  3. The Nature and Purpose of the DBA: A Case for Clarity and Quality Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarros, James C.; Willis, Robert J.; Palmer, Gill

    2005-01-01

    Purpose--To explore the nature component parts, degree structure and purpose intended outcomes of the Doctor of Business Administration DBA degree, identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the degree as they stand presently, using Australian experience. Design/methodology/approach?-A review of DBA programme offerings in Australia identified…

  4. Control of the competition between a magnetic phase and a superconducting phase in cobalt-doped and nickel-doped NaFeAs using electron count.

    PubMed

    Parker, Dinah R; Smith, Matthew J P; Lancaster, Tom; Steele, Andrew J; Franke, Isabel; Baker, Peter J; Pratt, Francis L; Pitcher, Michael J; Blundell, Stephen J; Clarke, Simon J

    2010-02-05

    Using a combination of neutron, muon, and synchrotron techniques we show how the magnetic state in NaFeAs can be tuned into superconductivity by replacing Fe by either Co or Ni. The electron count is the dominant factor, since Ni doping has double the effect of Co doping for the same doping level. We follow the structural, magnetic, and superconducting properties as a function of doping to show how the superconducting state evolves, concluding that the addition of 0.1 electrons per Fe atom is sufficient to traverse the superconducting domain, and that magnetic order coexists with superconductivity at doping levels less than 0.025 electrons per Fe atom.

  5. Control of ferromagnetism in (In{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1}){sub 2}O{sub 3} via F doping of electron carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Shiming Ou, Haifeng; Zhang, Liying; He, Jie; Yu, Jingxin

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • F doping was achieved by a process of low temperature reaction with PVDF. • RTFM was obtained in the F-doped (In{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1}){sub 2}O{sub 3.} • Magnetism and electric resistivity can be controlled by the content of doped F. • The FM can be ascribed to a long range exchange interaction induced by carriers. - Abstract: Ferromagnetism in (In{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1}){sub 2}O{sub 3} was obtained by fluorine (F) doping. The ferromagnetism can be controlled by changing the electron carrier concentration via F doping. With increasing the F concentration, the electron carrier concentration increases, and samples undergo a paramagnetic insulator to ferromagnetic metal transition. For the ferromagnetic samples, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) was observed. These results indicate that electron carriers play an important role in inducing the ferromagnetism.

  6. Quantifying cobalt in doping control urine samples--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Krug, Oliver; Kutscher, Daniel; Piper, Thomas; Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Since first reports on the impact of metals such as manganese and cobalt on erythropoiesis were published in the late 1920s, cobaltous chloride became a viable though not widespread means for the treatment of anaemic conditions. Today, its use is de facto eliminated from clinical practice; however, its (mis)use in human as well as animal sport as an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent has been discussed frequently. In order to assess possible analytical options and to provide relevant information on the prevalence of cobalt use/misuse among athletes, urinary cobalt concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) from four groups of subjects. The cohorts consisted of (1) a reference population with specimens of 100 non-elite athletes (not being part of the doping control system), (2) a total of 96 doping control samples from endurance sport athletes, (3) elimination study urine samples collected from six individuals having ingested cobaltous chloride (500 µg/day) through dietary supplements, and (4) samples from people supplementing vitamin B12 (cobalamin) at 500 µg/day, accounting for approximately 22 µg of cobalt. The obtained results demonstrated that urinary cobalt concentrations of the reference population as well as the group of elite athletes were within normal ranges (0.1-2.2 ng/mL). A modest but significant difference between these two groups was observed (Wilcoxon rank sum test, p < 0.01) with the athletes' samples presenting slightly higher urinary cobalt levels. The elimination study urine specimens yielded cobalt concentrations between 40 and 318 ng/mL during the first 6 h post-administration, and levels remained elevated (>22 ng/mL) up to 33 h. Oral supplementation of 500 µg of cobalamin did not result in urinary cobalt concentrations > 2 ng/mL. Based on these pilot study data it is concluded that measuring the urinary concentration of cobalt can provide information indicating the use

  7. Detection of stanozolol O- and N-sulfate metabolites and their evaluation as additional markers in doping control.

    PubMed

    Balcells, Georgina; Matabosch, Xavier; Ventura, Rosa

    2016-10-07

    Stanozolol (STAN) is one of the most frequently detected anabolic androgenic steroids in sports drug testing. STAN misuse is commonly detected by monitoring metabolites excreted conjugated with glucuronic acid after enzymatic hydrolysis or using direct detection by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). It is well known that some of the previously described metabolites are the result of the formation of sulfate conjugates in C17, which are converted to their 17-epimers in urine. Therefore, sulfation is an important phase II metabolic pathway of STAN that has not been comprehensively studied. The aim of this work was to evaluate the sulfate fraction of STAN metabolism by LC-MS/MS to establish potential long-term metabolites valuable for doping control purposes. STAN was administered to six healthy male volunteers involving oral or intramuscular administration and urine samples were collected up to 31 days after administration. Sulfation of the phase I metabolites commercially available as standards was performed in order to obtain MS data useful to develop analytical strategies (neutral loss scan, precursor ion scan and selected reaction monitoring acquisitions modes) to detect potential sulfate metabolites. Eleven sulfate metabolites (M-I to M-XI) were detected and characterized by LC-MS/MS. This paper provides valuable data on the ionization and fragmentation of O-sulfates and N-sulfates. For STAN, results showed that sulfates do not improve the retrospectivity of the detection compared to the previously described long-term metabolite (epistanozolol-N-glucuronide). However, sulfate metabolites could be additional markers for the detection of STAN misuse.

  8. Controlled fabrication and tunable photoluminescence properties of Mn{sup 2+} doped graphene–ZnO composite

    SciTech Connect

    Luan, Xinglong; Zhang, Yihe Tong, Wangshu; Shang, Jiwu; An, Qi; Huang, Hongwei

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Graphene–ZnO composites were synthesized by a mixed solvothermal method. • ZnO quantum dots are distributed uniformly on the graphene sheets. • A possible hypothesis is raised for the influence of graphene oxide on the nucleation of ZnO. • Mn{sup 2+} doped graphene–ZnO composites were fabricated and the emission spectra can be tuned by doping. - Abstract: Graphene–ZnO composites (G–ZnO) with controlled morphology and photoluminescence property were synthesized by a mixed solvothermal method. Mixed solvent were composed by dimethyl sulfoxide and ethylene glycol. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence spectra were used to characterize G–ZnO. Graphene as a substrate can help the distribution and the dispersity of ZnO, and a possible model of the interaction between graphene oxide and ZnO particles is proposed. At the same time, graphene also reduce the size of ZnO particles to about 5 nm. Furthermore, Mn{sup 2+} ions dopes G–ZnO successfully by the mixed solvothermal synthesis and the doping of Mn{sup 2+} makes G–ZnO shift red from 465 nm to 548 nm and 554 nm in the emission spectrum. The changes of the emission spectrum by the adding of Mn{sup 2+} make G–ZnO have tunable photoluminescence spectrum which is desirable for practical applications.

  9. Fabrication of Composite Films by Controlling Molecular Doping Processes between Polyaniline and Soluble Multiwalled Nanotubes and Their Optical Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wei; Zhou, Feng; Wang, Xiaogong; Bai, Xiaodong; Liang, Ji; Yoshino, Katsumi

    2003-09-01

    An efficient approach to composite film fabrication that involves the control of doping processes between soluble multiwalled nanotubes (s-MWNTs) and polyaniline (PAN) molecules has been developed in this work. The s-MWNTs were prepared by introducing carboxylic acid and sulfonic acid groups to the surfaces of nanotubes. The s-MWNT was used as a dopant to react with the imine nitrogens of emeraldine PAN via the protonation doping process in a layer-by-layer manner. The resultant composite films on the quartz substrates were characterized by UV/Vis spectroscopy, photoluminescence, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron micrograph and X-ray diffraction. Results showed that s-MWNTs were doped into polyaniline layers, which caused changes in the composite film characteristics such as electrical properties, spectroscopic features and morphology. Unlike the already-used layer-by-layer process based on electrostatic attraction, our process is based on the acid-base reaction between emeraldine and s-MWNT. Owing to the protonation doping, the bond between the carboxyl group and the imine nitrogen group becomes covalent, which enhances the stability of the film.

  10. Electric-field strength and doping level controlled spin-valley transport in a silicene np junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Tao; Zhai, Xuechao; Yang, Zhihong; Wang, Shendong; Li, Bin

    2016-10-01

    The performance of np junction, as the basic unit of electronic devices, often determines the prospect of a material. We here investigate the spin- and valley-polarized transport in a silicene np junction, where a ferromagnetic field and a perpendicular electric field are applied in the p-doped region. It is found that pure spin current with valley polarization can be obtained under the control of electric-field strength and doping level, arising from the specific dispersion with spin- and valley-polarizations. By tuning the electric field properly, one can even realize a controllable state that supports 100% spin- and valley-polarized transport. At fixed electric field, we also demonstrate that the ferromagnetic field can greatly affect the ratios of spin- and valley-polarizations. These findings suggest that silicene is a promising material for application in future spintronics and valleytronics devices.

  11. Doping controlled spin reorientation in dysprosium-samarium orthoferrite single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shixun; Zhao, Weiyao; Kang, Baojuan; Zhang, Jincang; Ren, Wei

    2015-03-01

    As one of the most important phase transitions, spin reorientation (SR) in rare earth transition metal oxides draws much attention of emerging materials technologies. The origin of SR is the competition between different spin configurations which possess different free energy. We report the control of spin reorientation (SR) transition in perovskite rare earth orthoferrite Dy1-xSmxFeO3, a whole family of single crystals grown by optical floating zone method from x =0 to 1. Temperature dependence of the magnetizations under zero-field-cooling (ZFC) and field-cooling (FC) processes are studied. We have found a remarkable linear change of SR transition temperature in Sm-rich samples for x>0.2, which covers an extremely wide temperature range including room temperature. The a-axis magnetization curves under FCC process bifurcate from and then jump down to that of warming process (ZFC and FCW curves) in single crystals when x =0.5-0.9, suggesting complicated 4f-3d electron interactions among Dy3+-Sm3+, Dy3+-Fe3+, and Sm3+-Fe3+ sublattices of diverse magnetic configurations for materials physics and design. The magnetic properties and the doping effect on SR transition temperature in these single crystals might be useful in the spintronics device application. This work is supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB921600), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC, Nos. 51372149, 50932003, 11274222).

  12. Optically controllable and focus-tunable Fresnel lens in azo-dye-doped liquid crystals using a Sagnac interferometer.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hui-Chen; Kuo, Yi-Chieh; Lin, Shih-Hung; Lin, Jia-De; Mo, Ting-Shan; Huang, Shuan-Yu

    2011-04-15

    This study demonstrates a tunable Fresnel lens in an azo-dye-doped liquid crystal (ADDLC) film using an interference technique. One Fresnel-patterned green beam using a Sagnac interferometer irradiated the UV-illuminated ADDLC cell, yielding a concentric zone plate distribution with homeotropic and isotropic structures in bright and dark regions of the green interference pattern. The proposed Fresnel lens is polarization independent, focus tunable, and the focusing efficiency of the device can be optically controlled.

  13. Doping-controlled Coherent Electron-Phonon Coupling in Vanadium Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Appavoo, Kannatassen; Wang, Bin; Nag, Joyeeta; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Haglund, Richard F.

    2015-05-10

    Broadband femtosecond transient spectroscopy and density functional calculations reveal that substitutional tungsten doping of a VO2 film changes the coherent phonon response compared to the undoped film due to altered electronic and structural dynamics.

  14. Controlled doping of silicon nanocrystals investigated by solution-processed field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Gresback, Ryan; Kramer, Nicolaas J; Ding, Yi; Chen, Ting; Kortshagen, Uwe R; Nozaki, Tomohiro

    2014-06-24

    The doping of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs), which is vital for the optimization of NC-based devices, remains a significant challenge. While gas-phase plasma approaches have been successful in incorporating dopant atoms into NCs, little is known about their electronic activation. Here, we investigate the electronic properties of doped silicon NC thin films cast from solution by field effect transistor analysis. We find that, analogous to bulk silicon, boron and phosphorus electronically dope Si NC thin films; however, the dopant activation efficiency is only ∼10(-2)-10(-4). We also show that surface doping of Si NCs is an effective way to alter the carrier concentrations in Si NC films.

  15. Size-controlled synthesis and optical properties of doped nanoparticles prepared by soft solution processing.

    PubMed

    Ullah, M H; Ha, Chang-Sik

    2005-09-01

    In this review, we outline the synthesis and luminescence properties of metal-ion-incorporated doped nanoparticles and surface-passivated doped nanoparticles. The synthetic routes we describe are limited to those involving soft solution processing. The doping effects are discussed in this review on the semiconductor nanoparticles confining the size range near to the 'quantum dot size.' The effects on luminescence with respect to ionic valance of dopants and the luminescence phenomena on mismatching of ionic radii between the host-guest are also provided. In addition, we discuss the role of passivated organic surfactants and the necessity of surface passivation of doped or undoped nanoparticles with other semiconductor materials that possess larger band gaps. Biocompatible semiconductor nanoparticles and some of their applications are also mentioned briefly.

  16. Dynamic control of mode field diameter and effective area by germanium doping of hexagonal photonic crystal fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, Kazuya; Namihira, Yoshinori; Kasamatsu, Yuho; Hossain, Md. Anwar

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate dynamic control of the effective area ( A eff) of photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) in the range of 18.1-8.22 μm2 and the mode field diameter in the range of 4.78-3.42 μm. This control was realized by altering their structural properties and varying the germanium (Ge) doping rate, which changed the refractive index difference (Δ n Ge) between 1.0 and 3.0% relative to the refractive index of the silica cladding. This was achieved by adjusting the Ge doping rate in the core and changing the radius ( d core) of the doped region, i.e., by changing the equivalent refractive index, using numerical calculations. Numerical results were verified by comparison with experimental results for a fabricated Gedoped PCF obtained by far-field scanning based on the ITU-T Petermann II definition. The proposed approach will simultaneously decrease Aeff and achieves high light confinement and high nonlinearity in PCFs. It enables architectonics/controllability of highly nonlinear PCFs with passive optical devices in photonic networks and life science applications.

  17. Controlled thermodynamics for tunable electron doping of graphene on Ir(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struzzi, C.; Praveen, C. S.; Scardamaglia, M.; Verbitskiy, N. I.; Fedorov, A. V.; Weinl, M.; Schreck, M.; Grüneis, A.; Piccinin, S.; Fabris, S.; Petaccia, L.

    2016-08-01

    The electronic properties and surface structures of K-doped graphene supported on Ir(111) are characterized as a function of temperature and coverage by combining low-energy electron diffraction, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Deposition of K on graphene at room temperature (RT) yields a stable (√ 3 ×√ 3 ) R30° surface structure having an intrinsic electron doping that shifts the graphene Dirac point by ED=1.30 eV below the Fermi level. Keeping the graphene substrate at 80 K during deposition generates instead a (2 ×2 ) phase, which is stable until full monolayer coverage. Further deposition of K followed by RT annealing develops a double-layer K-doped graphene that effectively doubles the K coverage and the related charge transfer, as well as maximizing the doping level (ED=1.61 eV ). The measured electron doping and the surface reconstructions are rationalized by DFT calculations. These indicate a large thermodynamic driving force for K intercalation below the graphene layer. The electron doping and Dirac point shifts calculated for the different structures are in agreement with the experimental measurements. In particular, the K4 s bands are shown to be sensitive to both the K intercalation and periodicity and are therefore suggested as a fingerprint for the location and ordering of the K dopants.

  18. Controlling the Photocorrosion of Zinc Sulfide Nanoparticles in Water by Doping with Chloride and Cobalt Ions.

    PubMed

    Weide, Philipp; Schulz, Katharina; Kaluza, Stefan; Rohe, Markus; Beranek, Radim; Muhler, Martin

    2016-12-06

    Photodegradation under UV light irradiation is a major drawback in photocatalytic applications of sulfide semiconductors. ZnS nanoparticles were doped with very low amounts of chloride or cobalt ions in the ppm range and codoped with chloride and cobalt ions during their synthesis by precipitation in aqueous solution followed by calcination. The high-temperature wurtzite phase annealed at 800 °C had a high susceptibility to UV irradiation in water, while the low-temperature zincblende phase annealed at 400 °C was found to be stable. Chlorine doping increased the rate of photocorrosion in water, whereas cobalt doping led to a stabilization of the ZnS nanoparticles. Based on photochemical and spectroscopic investigations applying UV/vis, X-ray photoelectron, and photoluminescence spectroscopy, the increased susceptibility of Cl-doped ZnS is ascribed to a higher number of surface point defects, whereas the stabilization by Co(2+) is caused by additional recombination pathways for the charge carriers in the bulk, thus avoiding photocorrosion processes at the surface. Additional doping of Cl-doped ZnS with cobalt ions was found to counteract the detrimental effect of the chloride ions efficiently.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of recombinant human erythropoietin in athletes. Blood sampling and doping control

    PubMed Central

    SOUILLARD, AGNES; AUDRAN, MICHEL; BRESSOLLE, FRANÇOISE; GAREAU, RAYNALD; DUVALLET, ALAIN; CHANAL, JEAN-LOUIS

    1996-01-01

    1The pharmacokinetics of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) were initially determined in two healthy volunteers after a single subcutaneous dose (50 u kg−1). Twenty subjects then received repeated subcutaneous administrations of high dose (200 u kg−1) rHuEpo and 10 subjects received placebo. An immunoradiometric assay was used to measure the concentrations of erythropoietin (Epo) in serum and urine. 2Serum Epo concentration-time profiles were best described by a one-compartment open model with zero-order input. The mean elimination half-life (±s.d.) was 42.0±34.2 h. Clearance, uncorrected for bioavailability, was 0.05±0.01 l h−1 kg& minus;1. Erythropoietin concentrations returned to normal values in serum and urine, 7 and 4 days after the last administration, respectively. 3The recombinant hormone was well tolerated. Significant changes in reticulocytes and red blood cells, haemoglobin concentrations and haematocrit were observed after administration of rHuEpo. In the control group, these parameters remained unchanged. 4The change in reticulocytes was used as an index of the therapeutic effect of rHuEpo. The concentration-effect relationship was best described by an exponential model. 5These data show the limitations of the measurement of Epo concentrations in blood and urine samples, collected in athletes during competition, for antidoping control. Epo doping can be detected only during or within 4 to 7 days of ending, a course of rHuEpo. PMID:8877027

  20. Bilingual Language Control and General Purpose Cognitive Control among Individuals with Bilingual Aphasia: Evidence Based on Negative Priming and Flanker Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Tanya; Kar, Bhoomika R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Bilingualism results in an added advantage with respect to cognitive control. The interaction between bilingual language control and general purpose cognitive control systems can also be understood by studying executive control among individuals with bilingual aphasia. Objectives. The current study examined the subcomponents of cognitive control in bilingual aphasia. A case study approach was used to investigate whether cognitive control and language control are two separate systems and how factors related to bilingualism interact with control processes. Methods. Four individuals with bilingual aphasia performed a language background questionnaire, picture description task, and two experimental tasks (nonlinguistic negative priming task and linguistic and nonlinguistic versions of flanker task). Results. A descriptive approach was used to analyse the data using reaction time and accuracy measures. The cumulative distribution function plots were used to visualize the variations in performance across conditions. The results highlight the distinction between general purpose cognitive control and bilingual language control mechanisms. Conclusion. All participants showed predominant use of the reactive control mechanism to compensate for the limited resources system. Independent yet interactive systems for bilingual language control and general purpose cognitive control were postulated based on the experimental data derived from individuals with bilingual aphasia. PMID:24982591

  1. Photo-controllable electro-optics of aerosil/7CB nanocomposite nematic doped with azo-bonded molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, Y. G.; Hadjichristov, G. B.; Petrov, A. G.; Krishna Prasad, S.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate that the electro-optics of nanostructured nematic liquid crystal (LC) doped with a small amount of photoactive LC molecules can be efficiently controlled by light. In particular, the inclusion of 3 wt.% azobenzene LC 4-(4'-ethoxyphenylazo)phenyl hexanoate (EPH) into a gel nanocomposite material produced from nematic LC heptylcyanobiphenyl (7CB) and 3 wt.% hydrophilic silica nanoparticles of size ca. 7 nm (Aerosil 300) allows both the static (the transmittance versus the voltage) and the dynamic (amplitude-frequency electrooptic modulation) characteristics of thin films (25 μm) of such a complex LC system in an alternating-current electric field to be enhanced by UV light at a wavelength of 375 nm. This photo-effect that is reversed with white light is based on the photo-isomerization of the doped azobenzene molecules. The efficient photo control makes the considered EPH-doped Aerosil/7CB photo-responsive nematic nanocomposites attractive for specific electro-optic applications.

  2. Bi-Sn alloy catalyst for simultaneous morphology and doping control of silicon nanowires in radial junction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhongwei; Lu, Jiawen; Qian, Shengyi; Xu, Jun; Xu, Ling; Wang, Junzhuan; Shi, Yi; Chen, Kunji; Yu, Linwei E-mail: linwei.yu@polytechnique.edu

    2015-10-19

    Low-melting point metals such as bismuth (Bi) and tin (Sn) are ideal choices for mediating a low temperature growth of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) for radial junction thin film solar cells. The incorporation of Bi catalyst atoms leads to sufficient n-type doping in the SiNWs core that exempts the use of hazardous dopant gases, while an easy morphology control with pure Bi catalyst has never been demonstrated so far. We here propose a Bi-Sn alloy catalyst strategy to achieve both a beneficial catalyst-doping and an ideal SiNW morphology control. In addition to a potential of further growth temperature reduction, we show that the alloy catalyst can remain quite stable during a vapor-liquid-solid growth, while providing still sufficient n-type catalyst-doping to the SiNWs. Radial junction solar cells constructed over the alloy-catalyzed SiNWs have demonstrated a strongly enhanced photocurrent generation, thanks to optimized nanowire morphology, and largely improved performance compared to the reference samples based on the pure Bi or Sn-catalyzed SiNWs.

  3. Enhancement of thermoelectric figure of merit in β-Zn4Sb3 by indium doping control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Pai-Chun; Yang, Chun-Chuen; Chen, Jeng-Lung; Sankar, Raman; Chen, Chi-Liang; Hsu, Chia-Hao; Chang, Chung-Chieh; Chen, Cheng-Lung; Dong, Chung-Li; Chou, Fang-Cheng; Chen, Kuei-Hsien; Wu, Maw-Kuen; Chen, Yang-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate the control of phase composition in Bridgman-grown β-Zn4Sb3 crystals by indium doping, an effective way to overcome the difficulty of growing very pure β-Zn4Sb3 thermoelectric material. The crystal structures are characterized by Rietveld refinement with synchrotron X-ray diffraction data. The results show an anisotropic lattice expansion in In-doped β-Zn4Sb3 wherein the zinc atoms are partially substituted by indium ones at 36f site of R-3c symmetry. Through the elimination of ZnSb phase, all the three individual thermoelectric properties are simultaneously improved, i.e., increasing electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient while reducing thermal conductivity. Under an optimal In concentration (x = 0.05), pure phase β-Zn4Sb3 crystal can be obtained, which possesses a high figure of merit (ZT) of 1.4 at 700 K.

  4. Distinction of clenbuterol intake from drug or contaminated food of animal origin in a controlled administration trial - the potential of enantiomeric separation for doping control analysis.

    PubMed

    Parr, Maria Kristina; Blokland, Marco H; Liebetrau, Franz; Schmidt, Alexander H; Meijer, Thijs; Stanic, Mijo; Kwiatkowska, Dorota; Waraksa, Emilia; Sterk, Saskia S

    2017-04-01

    The differentiation of clenbuterol abuse and unintentional ingestion from contaminated meat is crucial with respect to the valuation of an adverse analytical finding in human sports doping control. The proportion of the two enantiomers of clenbuterol may serve as potential discriminating parameter. For the determination of the individual enantiomers, specific methods were developed and validated for the different matrices under investigation based on chiral chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Data are presented from the administration to humans of clenbuterol from a pharmaceutical preparation, and from cattle meat and liver containing residues. A shift in the proportion of the enantiomers in cattle meat is detected and this signature is also found in human urine after ingestion. Thus, an altered enantiomeric composition of clenbuterol may be used to substantiate athletes' claims following adverse analytical findings in doping control. However, in meat, the enantiomeric composition was found to be highly variable. Species as well as tissue dependent variances need to be considered in interpreting enantiomer discrimination. Analysis of post administration urines from a controlled experiment comparing the administration of racemic clenbuterol from a registered pharmaceutical preparation and the administration of residue-containing meat and liver (nonracemic mixture) from treated animals is reported. Furthermore doping control samples from Mexican U17 World Championship 2011 of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), with adverse analytical findings for clenbuterol, were re-analysed.

  5. Doping controlled roughness and defined mesoporosity in chemically etched silicon nanowires with tunable conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSweeney, W.; Lotty, O.; Mogili, N. V. V.; Glynn, C.; Geaney, H.; Tanner, D.; Holmes, J. D.; O'Dwyer, C.

    2013-07-01

    By using Si(100) with different dopant type (n++-type (As) or p-type (B)), we show how metal-assisted chemically etched (MACE) nanowires (NWs) can form with rough outer surfaces around a solid NW core for p-type NWs, and a unique, defined mesoporous structure for highly doped n-type NWs. We used high resolution electron microscopy techniques to define the characteristic roughening and mesoporous structure within the NWs and how such structures can form due to a judicious choice of carrier concentration and dopant type. The n-type NWs have a mesoporosity that is defined by equidistant pores in all directions, and the inter-pore distance is correlated to the effective depletion region width at the reduction potential of the catalyst at the silicon surface in a HF electrolyte. Clumping in n-type MACE Si NWs is also shown to be characteristic of mesoporous NWs when etched as high density NW layers, due to low rigidity (high porosity). Electrical transport investigations show that the etched nanowires exhibit tunable conductance changes, where the largest resistance increase is found for highly mesoporous n-type Si NWs, in spite of their very high electronic carrier concentration. This understanding can be adapted to any low-dimensional semiconducting system capable of selective etching through electroless, and possibly electrochemical, means. The process points to a method of multiscale nanostructuring NWs, from surface roughening of NWs with controllable lengths to defined mesoporosity formation, and may be applicable to applications where high surface area, electrical connectivity, tunable surface structure, and internal porosity are required.

  6. Control over the performance characteristics of a passively mode-locked erbium-doped fibre ring laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chernysheva, M A; Krylov, A A; Dianov, E M; Ogleznev, A A; Arutyunyan, N R; Pozharov, A S; Obraztsova, E D

    2013-08-31

    We report an all-fibre ultrashort pulse erbium-doped ring laser passively mode-locked by single-wall carbon nanotubes dispersed in carboxymethylcellulose-based polymer films. Owing to intracavity dispersion management and controlled absorption in the polymer films, the laser is capable of generating both femto- and picosecond pulses of various shapes in the spectral range 1.53 – 1.56 μm. We have demonstrated and investigated the generation of almost transform- limited, inversely modified solitons at a high normal cavity dispersion. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  7. Controlled growth of antimony-doped tin dioxide thin films by atomic layer epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viirola, H.; Niinistoe, L.

    1994-11-01

    Antimony-doped tin dioxide thin films were deposited on glass substrates by atomic layer epitaxy using SnCl4, SbCl5 and H2O as reactants. The growth experiments were carried out at 500 C. The effect of Sb doping on the growth rate, crystal texture and electrical and optical properties was studied. Spectrophotometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, as well as sheet resistance and Hall measurements were used to characterize the films. The films were highly uniform with only small thickness and sheet resistance variations. The films were polycrystalline with their crystallites having a preferred orientation, which depended on the Sb doping level and film thickness.

  8. Magnetism in alkali-metal-doped wurtzite semiconductor materials controlled by strain engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, J. H.; Li, T. H.; Liu, L. Z.; Hu, F. R.

    2016-09-01

    The study of the magnetism and optical properties of semiconductor materials by defect engineering has attracted much attention because of their potential uses in spintronic and optoelectronic devices. In this paper, first-principle calculations discloses that cationic vacancy formation energy of the doped wurtzite materials can be sharply decreased due to alkali metal dopants and shows that their magnetic properties strongly depend on defect and doping concentration. This effect can be ascribed to the volume change induced by foreign elements doped into the host system and atomic population's difference. The symmetric deformation induced by biaxial strain can further regulate this behavior. Our results suggest that the formation of cationic vacancy can be tailored by strain engineering and dopants incorporation.

  9. Controlling sources of preanalytical variability in doping samples: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Mattiuzzi, Camilla; Banfi, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    The use of illicit substances and methods contravenes the ethics of sports and may be associated with side effects. Antidoping testing is an essential tool for preventing or limiting the consequences of cheating in sports. As for conventional laboratory testing, major emphasis has been placed on analytical quality, overlooking the inherent risks that may arise from analysis of unsuitable doping samples. The adherence to scrupulous criteria for collection, handling, transportation and storage of samples, especially blood and urine samples, is essential. The leading preanalytical variables that influence doping sample quality include biological variability, sample collection, venous stasis, spurious hemolysis and presence of other interfering substances, sample manipulation and degradation, and inappropriate conditions for transportation and storage. This article provides a personal overview about the current challenges in preanalytical management of doping samples, as well as potential solutions for preventing the negative impact of preanalytical variables on sample quality and test results.

  10. Fermi energy tuning with light to control doping profiles during epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, C. E.; Beaton, D. A.; Reedy, R. C.; Alberi, K.

    2015-05-04

    The influence of light stimulation and photogenerated carriers on the process of dopant surface segregation during growth is studied in molecular beam epitaxially grown Si-doped GaAs structures. The magnitude of surface segregation decreases under illumination by above-bandgap photons, wherein splitting of the quasi Fermi levels reduces the band bending at the growth surface and raises the formation energy of compensating defects that can enhance atomic diffusion. We further show that light-stimulated epitaxy can be used as a practical approach to diminish dopant carry-forward in device structures and improve the performance of inverted modulation-doped quantum wells.

  11. "Pictures with a purpose": the birth control debate on the big screen.

    PubMed

    Parry, Manon

    2011-01-01

    In the first half of the twentieth century, birth control advocates used the mass media to reframe contraception from a private, secret matter to an acceptable part of life fit for public discussion. Although their campaign began in print, they quickly embraced the more far-reaching medium of film to deliver their message. This article argues that birth control advocates circumvented the Comstock Act in the early decades of the twentieth century by taking up this new medium as part of a long-running strategy to publicize the birth control movement. Their efforts shaped both the public debate on the topic and the development of motion picture censorship.

  12. Analytical approaches for the detection of emerging therapeutics and non-approved drugs in human doping controls.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2014-12-01

    The number and diversity of potentially performance-enhancing substances is continuously growing, fueled by new pharmaceutical developments but also by the inventiveness and, at the same time, unscrupulousness of black-market (designer) drug producers and providers. In terms of sports drug testing, this situation necessitates reactive as well as proactive research and expansion of the analytical armamentarium to ensure timely, adequate, and comprehensive doping controls. This review summarizes literature published over the past 5 years on new drug entities, discontinued therapeutics, and 'tailored' compounds classified as doping agents according to the regulations of the World Anti-Doping Agency, with particular attention to analytical strategies enabling their detection in human blood or urine. Among these compounds, low- and high-molecular mass substances of peptidic (e.g. modified insulin-like growth factor-1, TB-500, hematide/peginesatide, growth hormone releasing peptides, AOD-9604, etc.) and non-peptidic (selective androgen receptor modulators, hypoxia-inducible factor stabilizers, siRNA, S-107 and ARM036/aladorian, etc.) as well as inorganic (cobalt) nature are considered and discussed in terms of specific requirements originating from physicochemical properties, concentration levels, metabolism, and their amenability for chromatographic-mass spectrometric or alternative detection methods.

  13. Collapse and control of the MnAu2 spin-spiral state through pressure and doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasbrenner, J. K.

    2016-05-01

    MnAu2 is a spin-spiral material with in-plane ferromagnetic Mn layers that form a screw-type pattern around a tetragonal c axis. The spiral angle θ was shown using neutron diffraction experiments to decrease with pressure, and in later studies it was found to suffer a collapse to a ferromagnetic state above a critical pressure, although the two separate experiments did not agree on whether this phase transition is first or second order. To resolve this contradiction, we use density functional theory calculations to investigate the spiral state as a function of pressure, charge doping, and also electronic correlations via a Hubbard-like U . We fit the results to the one-dimensional J1-J2-J3-J4 Heisenberg model, which predicts either a first- or second-order spiral-to-ferromagnetic phase transition for different regions of parameter space. At ambient pressure, MnAu2 sits close in parameter space to a dividing line separating first- and second-order transitions, and a combination of pressure and electron doping shifts the system from the first-order region into the second-order region. Our findings demonstrate that the contradiction in pressure experiments regarding the kind of phase transition are likely due to variations in sample quality. Our results also suggest that MnAu2 is amenable to engineering via chemical doping and to controlling θ using pressure and gate voltages, which holds potential for integration in spintronic devices.

  14. All-solid very large mode area ytterbium-doped silica microstructured fiber based on accurate control on cladding index.

    PubMed

    Wei, Huifeng; Chen, Kangkang; Yang, Yucheng; Li, Jinyan

    2016-04-18

    We have demonstrated a new approach for developing very large mode area silica-based microstructured Ytterbium (Yb)-doped fibers. The microstructured region acting as pump cladding around the core is composed by periodically arranged low-index Fluorine-doped silica inclusions with an extremely low filling ratio of 0.088. To the best of our knowledge, we achieved the most accurate controlling on cladding index by 1 × 10-5 via our passively doped cladding (PDC) method. Two fibers with 127μm and 50μm core diameter respectively were fabricated from the same final preform designed by this approach. It is verified that our 50μm core diameter fiber can maintain robust single mode behavior at 1064nm wavelength. The advantage of an all-solid structure along with a much simpler fabrication process makes our approach very suitable for realizing very large mode area fibers for high power fiber laser application.

  15. Purposeful gazing in active vision through phase-based disparity and dynamic vergence control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Liwei; Marefat, Michael M.

    1994-10-01

    In this research we propose solutions to the problems involved in gaze stabilization of a binocular active vision system, i.e., vergence error extraction, and vergence servo control. Gazing is realized by decreasing the disparity which represents the vergence error. A Fourier transform based approach that robustly and efficiently estimates vergence disparity is developed for holding gaze on selected visual target. It is shown that this method has certain advantages over existing approaches. Our work also points out that vision sensor based vergence control system is a dual sampling rate system. Feedback information prediction and dynamic vision-based self-tuning control strategy are investigated to implement vergence control. Experiments on the gaze stabilization using the techniques developed in this paper are performed.

  16. Dynamics and Control of Tethered Satellite Formations for the Purpose of Space-Based Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    Full Springs, Programmed Reels – “Single Satellite Ellipse”, β=40◦, w/ Perturbations, 10K secs) 184 Obviously, this is a problem: formation integrity ... approach of this next control scheme is to spin the system at a high enough rate such that formation integrity is no longer an issue, and now use thrusters...Delay Times . 172 6.1.4 Adding Perturbations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 6.1.5 “ Optimized ” Formation Parameters Case . . . . 178 6.2 Control

  17. Controlled synthesis of bright and compatible lanthanide-doped upconverting nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Bruce E.; Ostrowski, Alexis D.; Chan, Emory M.; Gargas, Daniel J.; Katz, Elan M.; Schuck, P. James; Milliron, Delia J.

    2017-01-31

    Certain nanocrystals possess exceptional optical properties that may make them valuable probes for biological imaging, but rendering these nanoparticles biocompatible requires that they be small enough not to perturb cellular systems. This invention describes a phosphorescent upconverting sub-10 nm nanoparticle comprising a lanthanide-doped hexagonal .beta.-phase NaYF.sub.4 nanocrystal and methods for making the same.

  18. Harnessing denatured protein for controllable bipolar doping of a monolayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung Kyu; Jang, Ji-Ryang; Choe, Woo-Seok; Lee, Sungjoo

    2015-01-21

    In this work, we demonstrated tunable p- and/or n-type doping of chemical vapor deposition-grown graphene with the use of protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a dopant. BSA undergoes protonation or deprotonation reaction subject to solution pH, thereby acting as either an electron donor or an electron acceptor on the graphene surface layered with denatured BSA through π-stacking interaction. This direct annealing of graphene with denatured BSA of amphoteric nature rendered facilitated fabrication of a p- and/or n-type graphene transistor by modulating pH-dependent net charges of the single dopant. Following AFM confirmation of the BSA/graphene interface assembly, the carrier transport properties of BSA-doped graphene transistors were assessed by I-V measurement and Raman spectra to show effective charge modulation of the graphene enabled by BSA doping at various pH conditions. The protein-mediated bipolar doping of graphene demonstrated in our work is simple, scalable, and straightforward; the proposed scheme is therefore expected to provide a useful alternative for fabricating graphene transistors of novel properties and promote their implementation in practice.

  19. Pursuit, Avoidance, and Cohesion in Flight: Multi-Purpose Control Laws and Neuromorphic VLSI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    As the next step (past the head-direction cell system) in our spatial navigation efforts, we are developing a neuromorphic analog VLSI -based model...but have begun circuit designs that utilize a floating-gate memory synaptic array. The episodic memory uses a two stage neural network: a feature...Control Laws and Neuromorphic VLSI 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 070402-7705 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-07-1-0446 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  20. Pulse bursts with a controllable number of pulses from a mode-locked Yb-doped all fiber laser system.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingliang; Zhang, Shumin; Hao, Yanping; Yang, Zhenjun

    2014-03-24

    Pulse bursts with a controllable number of pulses per burst have been produced directly from a mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser for the first time. Each output burst contained numerous pulses with a high pulse repetition rate of 29.4 MHz. The duration of a single pulse was 680 ps. The pulse burst had a repetition rate of 251.6 kHz. The pulse burst could easily be further amplified to a total pulse burst energy of ~795 nJ, corresponding to a total average power of 200 mW.

  1. Special purpose parallel computer architecture for real-time control and simulation in robotic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir (Inventor); Bejczy, Antal K. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    This is a real-time robotic controller and simulator which is a MIMD-SIMD parallel architecture for interfacing with an external host computer and providing a high degree of parallelism in computations for robotic control and simulation. It includes a host processor for receiving instructions from the external host computer and for transmitting answers to the external host computer. There are a plurality of SIMD microprocessors, each SIMD processor being a SIMD parallel processor capable of exploiting fine grain parallelism and further being able to operate asynchronously to form a MIMD architecture. Each SIMD processor comprises a SIMD architecture capable of performing two matrix-vector operations in parallel while fully exploiting parallelism in each operation. There is a system bus connecting the host processor to the plurality of SIMD microprocessors and a common clock providing a continuous sequence of clock pulses. There is also a ring structure interconnecting the plurality of SIMD microprocessors and connected to the clock for providing the clock pulses to the SIMD microprocessors and for providing a path for the flow of data and instructions between the SIMD microprocessors. The host processor includes logic for controlling the RRCS by interpreting instructions sent by the external host computer, decomposing the instructions into a series of computations to be performed by the SIMD microprocessors, using the system bus to distribute associated data among the SIMD microprocessors, and initiating activity of the SIMD microprocessors to perform the computations on the data by procedure call.

  2. Controllable Synthesis of Mn6+ Doped Nanoparticles by a Facile Anion Exchange Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaowen; Li, Yang; Liao, Chenxing; Chen, Zhi; Qiu, Jianrong

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II, 1000-1400 nm) is attracting extensive attention. Mn6+ doped BaSO4 with broadband emission from 900 nm to 1400 nm is emerging as a new class of NIR phosphor for fluorescence imaging. Manganese has diverse valence states, thus it is difficult to prevent valence change of Mn6+ during traditional synthesis process. In this work, BaSO4:Mn6+ nanoparticles with uniform size and morphology were first successfully prepared through a fast liquid-solid solution route at room temperature. The nanoparticles exhibit broadband NIR emission from Mn6+ when excited by 808 nm lasers. This convenient strategy, based on an efficient anion exchange reaction, is proved effective for synthesizing nano-sized materials. The results reveal that our strategy has great potential in fabricating special valence state ion doped nanomaterials.

  3. Flood mitigation through optimal control of a network of multi-purpose reservoirs by using Model Predictive Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MyoLin, Nay; Rutten, Martine; van de Giesen, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Flooding is a common natural disaster in the world. Construction of reservoirs, sluice gates, dikes, embankments and sea walls are implemented to minimize loss of life and property in a flood event. Rather than completely relying on large structural measures, non-structural measures such as real time control of a reservoir system can also improve flood prevention and water supply in a river basin. In this paper, we present the optimal operation of a multi-reservoir system by using Model Predictive Control (MPC) and particular attention is focused on flood mitigation of the Sittaung River Basin, Myanmar. The main challenges are non-linearity in the dynamic behavior of the water system and exponential growth of computational complexity with the state and control dimension. To deal with an issue related to non-linearity, we applied simplified internal model based on linearization scheme with a large grid length. For solving curse of dimensionality, we utilize the reduced model in which the states of the system are reduced by considering outflows from uncontrolled catchments as disturbances in the water system. We also address the computational time for real time control by using large time step scheme. Simulation results indicate that this model is able to use for real time control of a reservoir system addressing trade-offs between the multiple objectives.

  4. Sodium-Doped Molybdenum Targets for Controllable Sodium Incorporation in CIGS Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, L. M.; Repins, I. L.; Glynn, S.; Carducci, M. D.; Honecker, D. M.; Pankow, J.l W.; Young, M. R.; DeHart, C.; Sundaramoorthy, R.; Beall, C. L.; To, B.

    2011-01-01

    The efficiency of Cu(In, Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells is enhanced when Na is incorporated in the CIGS absorber layer. This work examines Na incorporation in CIGS utilizing Na-doped Mo sputtered from targets made with sodium molybdate-doped (MONA) powder. Mo:Na films with varying thicknesses were sputtered onto Mo-coated borosilicate glass (BSG) or stainless steel substrates for CIGS solar cells. By use of this technique, the Na content of CIGS can be varied from near-zero to higher than that obtained from a soda-lime glass (SLG) substrate. Targets and deposition conditions are described. The doped Mo films are analyzed, and the resulting devices are compared to devices fabricated on Mo-coated SLG as well as Mo-coated BSG with NaF. Completed devices utilizing MONA exceeded 15.7% efficiency without anti-reflective coating, which was consistently higher than devices prepared with the NaF precursor. Strategies for minimizing adhesion difficulties are presented.

  5. Sodium-Doped Molybdenum Targets for Controllable Sodium Incorporation in CIGS Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, L. M.; Repins, I. L.; Glynn, S.; Carducci, M. D.; Honecker, D. M.; Pankow, J.; Young, M.; DeHart, C.; Sundaramoorthy, R.; Beall, C. L.; To, B.

    2011-07-01

    The efficiency of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells is enhanced when Na is incorporated in the CIGS absorber layer. This work examines Na incorporation in CIGS utilizing Na-doped Mo sputtered from targets made with sodium molybdate-doped (MONA) powder. Mo:Na films with varying thicknesses were sputtered onto Mo-coated borosilicate glass (BSG) or stainless steel substrates for CIGS solar cells. By use of this technique, the Na content of CIGS can be varied from near-zero to higher than that obtained from a soda-lime glass (SLG) substrate. Targets and deposition conditions are described. The doped Mo films are analyzed, and the resulting devices are compared to devices fabricated on Mo-coated SLG as well as Mo-coated BSG with NaF. Completed devices utilizing MONA exceeded 15.7% efficiency without anti-reflective coating, which was consistently higher than devices prepared with the NaF precursor. Strategies for minimizing adhesion difficulties are presented.

  6. Mn(2+)-Doped Lead Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals with Dual-Color Emission Controlled by Halide Content.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenyong; Lin, Qianglu; Li, Hongbo; Wu, Kaifeng; Robel, István; Pietryga, Jeffrey M; Klimov, Victor I

    2016-11-16

    Impurity doping has been widely used to endow semiconductor nanocrystals with novel optical, electronic, and magnetic functionalities. Here, we introduce a new family of doped NCs offering unique insights into the chemical mechanism of doping, as well as into the fundamental interactions between the dopant and the semiconductor host. Specifically, by elucidating the role of relative bond strengths within the precursor and the host lattice, we develop an effective approach for incorporating manganese (Mn) ions into nanocrystals of lead-halide perovskites (CsPbX3, where X = Cl, Br, or I). In a key enabling step not possible in, for example, II-VI nanocrystals, we use gentle chemical means to finely and reversibly tune the nanocrystal band gap over a wide range of energies (1.8-3.1 eV) via postsynthetic anion exchange. We observe a dramatic effect of halide identity on relative intensities of intrinsic band-edge and Mn emission bands, which we ascribe to the influence of the energy difference between the corresponding transitions on the characteristics of energy transfer between the Mn ion and the semiconductor host.

  7. Paramagnetic behavior of Co doped TiO2 nanocrystals controlled by self-purification mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anitha, B.; Khadar, M. Abdul; Banerjee, Alok

    2016-07-01

    Doping in nanocrystals is a challenging process because of the self- purification mechanism which tends to segregate out the dopants resulting in a greater dopant concentration near the surface than at the interior of nanocrystals. In the present work nanocrystals of TiO2 doped with different atom % of Co were synthesized by peroxide gel method. XRD analysis confirmed the tetragonal anatase structure and HRTEM images showed the rod-like morphology of the samples. Raman modes of anatase phase of TiO2 along with weak intensity peaks of Co3O4 for higher Co dopant concentrations were observed for the samples. EPR measurements revealed the presence of cobalt in +2 oxidation state in the TiO2 matrix. SQUID measurements indicated paramagnetic behavior of the Co doped TiO2 nanocrystals. The paramagnetic behavior is attributed to an increased concentration of Co2+ ions and an increased presence of Co3O4 phase near the surface of the TiO2 nanocrystals due to self-purification mechanism.

  8. Controlling the 1 μm spontaneous emission in Er/Yb co-doped fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Sobon, Grzegorz; Kaczmarek, Pawel; Antonczak, Arkadiusz; Sotor, Jaroslaw; Abramski, Krzysztof M

    2011-09-26

    In this paper we present our experimental studies on controlling the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from Yb(3+) ions in Er/Yb co-doped fiber amplifiers. We propose a new method of controlling the Yb-ASE by stimulating a laser emission at 1064 nm in the amplifier, by providing a positive 1 μm signal feedback loop. The results are discussed and compared to a conventional amplifier setup without 1 μm ASE control and to an amplifier with auxiliary 1064 nm seeding. We have shown, that applying a 1064 nm signal loop in an Er/Yb amplifier can increase the output power at 1550 nm and provide stable operation without parasitic lasing at 1 μm.

  9. Conductivity control of Sn-doped α-Ga2O3 thin films grown on sapphire substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akaiwa, Kazuaki; Kaneko, Kentaro; Ichino, Kunio; Fujita, Shizuo

    2016-12-01

    We achieved the successful fabrication of Sn-doped α-Ga2O3 thin films with higher electron mobility and wider conductivity controls by improving the crystal quality. α-Ga2O3 films showed n-type conductivity with a maximum electron mobility of 24 cm2 V-1 s-1. The carrier concentration was successfully controlled in the range of 1017-1019 cm-3. Crystal defects such as dislocations severely compensate the free carriers in α-Ga2O3 films and restrict the mobility at low carrier concentrations. Therefore, to achieve further conductivity control and higher mobility, improving the crystallinity of α-Ga2O3 films is necessary.

  10. In Situ Control of Underwater-Pinning of Organic Droplets on a Surfactant-Doped Conjugated Polymer Surface.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Xu, Jian; Choi, Chang-Hwan; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2015-11-25

    Controlling the pinning of organic droplets on solid surfaces is of fundamental and practical interest in the field of material science and engineering, which has numerous applications such as surface cleaning, water treatment, and microfluidics. Here, a rapid in situ control of pinning and actuation of organic droplets is demonstrated on dodecylbenzenesulfonate-doped polypyrrole (PPy(DBS)) surfaces in an aqueous environment via an electrochemical redox process. A dramatic change of the pinning results from the transport of DBS(-) molecules between the PPy(DBS) surface and the aqueous environment, as well as from a simultaneous alternation of the surface oleophobicity to organic liquids during the redox process. This in situ control of the droplet pinning enables a stop-and-go droplet actuation, applicable to both polar and apolar organic droplets, at low voltages (∼0.9 V) with an extremely low roll-off angle (∼0.4°).

  11. Doping control analysis of 46 polar drugs in horse plasma and urine using a 'dilute-and-shoot' ultra high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry approach.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Wai Him; Choi, Timmy L S; Kwok, Karen Y; Chan, George H M; Wong, Jenny K Y; Wan, Terence S M

    2016-06-17

    The high sensitivity of ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS) allows the identification of many prohibited substances without pre-concentration, leading to the development of simple and fast 'dilute-and-shoot' methods for doping control for human and equine sports. While the detection of polar drugs in plasma and urine is difficult using liquid-liquid or solid-phase extraction as these substances are poorly extracted, the 'dilute-and-shoot' approach is plausible. This paper describes a 'dilute-and-shoot' UHPLC-HRMS screening method to detect 46 polar drugs in equine urine and plasma, including some angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, sympathomimetics, anti-epileptics, hemostatics, the new doping agent 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR), as well as two threshold substances, namely dimethyl sulfoxide and theobromine. For plasma, the sample (200μL) was protein precipitated using trichloroacetic acid, and the resulting supernatant was diluted using Buffer A with an overall dilution factor of 3. For urine, the sample (20μL) was simply diluted 50-fold with Buffer A. The diluted plasma or urine sample was then analysed using a UHPLC-HRMS system in full-scan ESI mode. The assay was validated for qualitative identification purpose. This straightforward and reliable approach carried out in combination with other screening procedures has increased the efficiency of doping control analysis in the laboratory. Moreover, since the UHPLC-HRMS data were acquired in full-scan mode, the method could theoretically accommodate an unlimited number of existing and new doping agents, and would allow a retrospectively search for drugs that have not been targeted at the time of analysis.

  12. Use of RF Metrology Subsystem for Formation Flying Command & Control Purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sougmagne, R.; Andreis, O.; Dellandrea, B.; Mehlen, C.; Alison, B.

    2007-08-01

    The development of the "RF metrology and data-link instrument" for formation flying missions was initiated in 2001 by ESA/CNES for the DARWIN mission in order to define a subsystem able to provide both relative positioning service and inter-vehicle communication data link for formation flying missions. Today, the number of target missions is wide: SIMBOL-X, PEGASE, PROBA-3, XEUS, DARWIN, … THALES ALENIA SPACE is currently developing and manufacturing the first European multi-mission RF metrology and data link instrument (called FFRFS for Formation Flying Radio-Frequency Sensor) in the frame of the FFIORD (Formation Flying In Orbit RF Demonstration) contribution of CNES to the Swedish PRISMA mission: flight models will be delivered in early 2008. The first goal of the FFRFS is to provide relative positioning (accuracy better than 1cm for distance and 1 degree for the line of sight) for formation of 2 to 4 vehicles over a large operational range (3m to 30km). One of its key features is its omni-directional coverage, providing safe conditions during deployment phase or failure recovery situations. Moreover, it offers an omni- directional communication link for the formations allowing inter-vehicle data rate of 12kbps for transmission of telemetry, telecommands or GNC data. These characteristics make the FFRFS the key element of the command & control of a formation flying. The paper presents the outcomes of a study performed under CNES contract on the use of the FFRFS for: Data exchange between vehicles when the formation is established Synchronisation of the on-board time of all the formation's spacecrafts Failure Detection, Isolation and Recovery (FDIR) mainly for the anti-collision aspects. The proposed concepts are illustrated by their application to SIMBOL-X mission, an hard X-ray telescope constituted of 2 satellites flying at 20m distance, currently on study at THALES ALENIA SPACE under CNES phase A contract.

  13. A controllable growth-doping approach to synthesize bright white-light-emitting Cd:In2S3 nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jian; Zhu, Hui; Yang, Xiurong

    2013-07-21

    A new type of doped Cd:In2S3 NC, which exhibits bright white-light emission with a QY of about 18%, synthesized by a one-pot G-doping synthesis approach is presented. The successful realization of temporal separation of nucleation doping and growth doping makes this approach a facile method to synthesize the In2S3/Cd:In2S3 core/shell nanostructure.

  14. Controlled double-jet precipitation of uniform colloidal crystalline particles of Zr- and Sr-doped barium titanates

    SciTech Connect

    Her, Y.; Matijevic, E.; Chon, M.C.

    1996-12-01

    The synthesis of uniform colloidal crystalline particles of Zr- and Sr-doped barium titanates at a low temperature of 85{degree}C by the controlled double-jet precipitation (CDJP) technique is described. The stoichiometry of the powders can be precisely controlled by adjusting the compositions of the starting reactant solutions. Barium titanate with 20{percent} Zr substitution, sintered at 1275{degree}C, satisfied the requirements for the Y5V multilayer capacitors application. The grain sizes are uniform and small, ranging from 1 to 3 {mu}m. Solids with an extremely sharp change in the dielectric constant as a function of temperature, which are suitable for thermal IR detectors application, can be obtained when both Sr and Zr are incorporated as dopants. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  15. Light-controlled electric Freedericksz threshold in dye doped liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lucchetti, L.; Catani, L.; Simoni, F.

    2014-05-28

    We report the results of measurements of the threshold of Freedericksz transition in a nematic liquid crystal doped by Methyl-red. We show that in case of dc field the threshold voltage can decrease or increase depending on the light dose, due to the light-induced desorption and adsorption of charge complexes from and on the irradiated surface, that has been recently demonstrated. This effect has the potential to be exploited in optical devices such as liquid crystal microlenses and spatial light modulators.

  16. Polarization-controlled contrasted images using dye-doped nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Porras Aguilar, R; Ramirez-San-Juan, J C; Baldovino-Pantaleon, O; May-Arrioja, D; Arroyo Carrasco, M L; Iturbe-Castillo, M D; Sánchez-de-la-Llave, D; Ramos-Garcia, R

    2009-03-02

    We explore the polarization dependence of the nonlinear response of a planar nematic liquid crystal cell doped with 1% wt of methyl red dye. The results obtained show that the refractive index change can be switched from a positive value to a negative one as the polarization of the beam changes from parallel to perpendicular with respect to the rubbing direction. This property is exploited in a phase contrast system, where a dynamic phase filter is photoinduced in a liquid crystal cell placed in the system's Fourier plane. Real-time contrast inversion in the resulting images is demonstrated.

  17. Gene doping.

    PubMed

    Azzazy, Hassan M E

    2010-01-01

    Gene doping abuses the legitimate approach of gene therapy. While gene therapy aims to correct genetic disorders by introducing a foreign gene to replace an existing faulty one or by manipulating existing gene(s) to achieve a therapeutic benefit, gene doping employs the same concepts to bestow performance advantages on athletes over their competitors. Recent developments in genetic engineering have contributed significantly to the progress of gene therapy research and currently numerous clinical trials are underway. Some athletes and their staff are probably watching this progress closely. Any gene that plays a role in muscle development, oxygen delivery to tissues, neuromuscular coordination, or even pain control is considered a candidate for gene dopers. Unfortunately, detecting gene doping is technically very difficult because the transgenic proteins expressed by the introduced genes are similar to their endogenous counterparts. Researchers today are racing the clock because assuring the continued integrity of sports competition depends on their ability to develop effective detection strategies in preparation for the 2012 Olympics, which may mark the appearance of genetically modified athletes.

  18. Enhancement of thermoelectric figure of merit in β-Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 3} by indium doping control

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Pai-Chun E-mail: cheny2@phys.sinica.edu.tw; Hsu, Chia-Hao; Chang, Chung-Chieh; Chen, Cheng-Lung; Wu, Maw-Kuen; Chen, Yang-Yuan E-mail: cheny2@phys.sinica.edu.tw; Yang, Chun-Chuen; Chen, Jeng-Lung; Sankar, Raman; Chou, Fang-Cheng; Chen, Chi-Liang; Dong, Chung-Li; Chen, Kuei-Hsien

    2015-09-21

    We demonstrate the control of phase composition in Bridgman-grown β-Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 3} crystals by indium doping, an effective way to overcome the difficulty of growing very pure β-Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 3} thermoelectric material. The crystal structures are characterized by Rietveld refinement with synchrotron X-ray diffraction data. The results show an anisotropic lattice expansion in In-doped β-Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 3} wherein the zinc atoms are partially substituted by indium ones at 36f site of R-3c symmetry. Through the elimination of ZnSb phase, all the three individual thermoelectric properties are simultaneously improved, i.e., increasing electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient while reducing thermal conductivity. Under an optimal In concentration (x = 0.05), pure phase β-Zn{sub 4}Sb{sub 3} crystal can be obtained, which possesses a high figure of merit (ZT) of 1.4 at 700 K.

  19. Controllable synthesis and upconversion emission of ultrasmall lanthanide-doped Sr2GdF7 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Lijun; Ren, Guozhong; Mao, Yifu; He, Jin; Su, Rui

    2015-11-01

    The effect of rare-earth ions content on the phase structure, crystal size and morphology of SrF2-GdF3 system were studied under solvothermal conditions. By tuning the molar ratio of reactants, tetragonal phase Sr2GdF7 nanocrystals (NCs) were synthesized via solvothermal method using oleic acid as capping ligands. The effects of reaction conditions on the phase structure, crystal size, morphology, and upconversion (UC) emission properties of the products were investigated. The results reveal that apropos Gd3+ ions content (0.30-0.45 mmol) is favorable to the formation of pure phase Sr2GdF7 NCs with more uniform size distribution. The average crystalline size of the products can be controlled less than 10 nm. The energy transfer UC mechanisms for the fluorescent intensity were also investigated. Following Yb3+, Er3+, Tm3+ and Ho3+ ions doping, the Sr2GdF7 NCs show intense green, yellow, and white-color UC emission under the excitation of a 980 nm laser, and the doping concentration of lanthanide ions was optimized, which makes the NCs show maximum intensities under the excitation of a 980 nm laser.

  20. Porosity control in metal-assisted chemical etching of degenerately doped silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Balasundaram, Karthik; Sadhu, Jyothi S; Shin, Jae Cheol; Azeredo, Bruno; Chanda, Debashis; Malik, Mohammad; Hsu, Keng; Rogers, John A; Ferreira, Placid; Sinha, Sanjiv; Li, Xiuling

    2012-08-03

    We report the fabrication of degenerately doped silicon (Si) nanowires of different aspect ratios using a simple, low-cost and effective technique that involves metal-assisted chemical etching (MacEtch) combined with soft lithography or thermal dewetting metal patterning. We demonstrate sub-micron diameter Si nanowire arrays with aspect ratios as high as 180:1, and present the challenges in producing solid nanowires using MacEtch as the doping level increases in both p- and n-type Si. We report a systematic reduction in the porosity of these nanowires by adjusting the etching solution composition and temperature. We found that the porosity decreases from top to bottom along the axial direction and increases with etching time. With a MacEtch solution that has a high [HF]:[H(2)O(2)] ratio and low temperature, it is possible to form completely solid nanowires with aspect ratios of less than approximately 10:1. However, further etching to produce longer wires renders the top portion of the nanowires porous.

  1. Porosity control in metal-assisted chemical etching of degenerately doped silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasundaram, Karthik; Sadhu, Jyothi S.; Shin, Jae Cheol; Azeredo, Bruno; Chanda, Debashis; Malik, Mohammad; Hsu, Keng; Rogers, John A.; Ferreira, Placid; Sinha, Sanjiv; Li, Xiuling

    2012-08-01

    We report the fabrication of degenerately doped silicon (Si) nanowires of different aspect ratios using a simple, low-cost and effective technique that involves metal-assisted chemical etching (MacEtch) combined with soft lithography or thermal dewetting metal patterning. We demonstrate sub-micron diameter Si nanowire arrays with aspect ratios as high as 180:1, and present the challenges in producing solid nanowires using MacEtch as the doping level increases in both p- and n-type Si. We report a systematic reduction in the porosity of these nanowires by adjusting the etching solution composition and temperature. We found that the porosity decreases from top to bottom along the axial direction and increases with etching time. With a MacEtch solution that has a high [HF]:[H2O2] ratio and low temperature, it is possible to form completely solid nanowires with aspect ratios of less than approximately 10:1. However, further etching to produce longer wires renders the top portion of the nanowires porous.

  2. Manipulation and control of the interfacial polarization in organic light-emitting diodes by dipolar doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Lars; Schmidt, Tobias D.; Brütting, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Most of the commonly used electron transporting materials in organic light-emitting diodes exhibit interfacial polarization resulting from partially aligned permanent dipole moments of the molecules. This property modifies the internal electric field distribution of the device and therefore enables an earlier flat band condition for the hole transporting side, leading to improved charge carrier injection. Recently, this phenomenon was studied with regard to different materials and degradation effects, however, so far the influence of dilution has not been investigated. In this paper we focus on dipolar doping of the hole transporting material 4,4-bis[N-(1-naphthyl)-N-phenylamino]-biphenyl (NPB) with the polar electron transporting material tris-(8-hydroxyquinolate) aluminum (Alq3). Impedance spectroscopy reveals that changes of the hole injection voltage do not scale in a simple linear fashion with the effective thickness of the doped layer. In fact, the measured interfacial polarization reaches a maximum value for a 1:1 blend. Taking the permanent dipole moment of Alq3 into account, an increasing degree of dipole alignment is found for decreasing Alq3 concentration. This observation can be explained by the competition between dipole-dipole interactions leading to dimerization and the driving force for vertical orientation of Alq3 dipoles at the surface of the NPB layer.

  3. Fit-for-purpose shellfish reference materials for internal and external quality control in the analysis of phycotoxins.

    PubMed

    Hess, Philipp; McCarron, Pearse; Quilliam, Michael A

    2007-04-01

    The need for reference materials for quality control of analysis of foodstuffs has been stressed frequently. This has been particularly true in the phycotoxins field, where there is a great shortage of both pure calibration standards and reference materials. Worldwide there are very few independent bodies that produce certified reference materials for phycotoxins, the main producers currently being the National Research Council Canada and the Japanese Food Research Laboratory. Limited availability of contaminated shellfish and algae, as well as the time and knowledge necessary for the production of adequate reference materials, continuously lead to limited editions of certified reference materials and even more limited production of in-house reference materials. The restricted availability of in-house quality control materials promotes the rapid use of the limited certified reference materials, which in turn hampers the production of the suite of materials required globally for complete protection of public health. This paper outlines the various options that analysts can pursue in the use of reference materials for internal and external quality control, with a view to optimising the efforts of both reference materials users and reference materials producers. For this purpose, the logical sequence is reviewed from the discovery of a new bioactive compound in shellfish, through initial method development up to regulation for food safety purposes including accepted reference methods. Subsequently, the requirements for and efforts typically spent in the production and characterisation of laboratory reference materials, certified reference materials and other test materials used in inter-laboratory studies or proficiency testing, in the area of marine biotoxins are evaluated. Particular emphasis is put on practical advice for the preparation of in-house reference materials. The intricate link between reference material characterisation and method performance is

  4. Tc enhancement of excess Sr-doped Bi-2223 oxides by control of oxygen content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, N.; Sakata, F.; Shimizu, Y.; Deshimaru, Y.; Yamazoe, N.

    1994-12-01

    The superconducting properties of excess Sr-doped 2223 phase samples, Bi 1.84Pb 0.34Sr 1.91+xCa 2.03Cu 3.06O y ( x=0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5), were examined. All the oxides as-prepared showed almost the same Tc of 109∼110 K, After heat-treatment in He at 600 °C for 3h, however, Tc increased up to 114∼115 K for the oxides with x=0.3∼, and decreased down to 102∼106 K for x=0∼0.1. The oxygen contents of the oxides as determined by iodometry increased with increasing x and slightly decreased with the heat-treatment in He. The heat treatment also brough about small increases in lattice constant of c-axis.

  5. High rate reactive magnetron sputter deposition of Al-doped ZnO with unipolar pulsing and impedance control system

    SciTech Connect

    Nishi, Yasutaka; Hirohata, Kento; Tsukamoto, Naoki; Sato, Yasushi; Oka, Nobuto; Shigesato, Yuzo

    2010-07-15

    Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films were deposited on quartz glass substrates, unheated and heated to 200 deg. C, using reactive sputtering with a special feedback system of discharge impedance combined with midfrequency pulsing. A planar Zn-Al alloy target was connected to the switching unit, which was operated in a unipolar pulse mode. The oxidation of the target surface was precisely controlled by a feedback system for the entire O{sub 2} flow ratio including ''the transition region''. The deposition rate was about 10-20 times higher than that for films deposited by conventional sputtering using an oxide target. A deposition rate of AZO films of 390 nm/min with a resistivity of 3.8x10{sup -4} {Omega} cm and a transmittance in the visible region of 85% was obtained when the films were deposited on glass substrates heated to 200 deg. C with a discharge power of 4 kW.

  6. Mass spectrometric characterization of urinary metabolites of the selective androgen receptor modulator S-22 to identify potential targets for routine doping controls.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Thomas, Andreas; Möller, Ines; Geyer, Hans; Dalton, James T; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2011-08-15

    Drugs that promote anabolic processes with limited undesirable effects are of considerable therapeutic interest; some notable examples include those for the treatment of cancer cachexia and muscle-wasting diseases. Anabolic properties are not only therapeutically beneficial to critically ill and debilitated patients, but are also desirable to athletes seeking artificial enhancements in endurance, strength and accelerated recovery. The use of anabolic agents in the clinical setting is being reconsidered with the emergence of a new class of drugs referred to as SARMs (selective androgen receptor modulators). SARMs have the potential to complement or even replace anabolic androgenic steroidal use with the benefit of a reduction of the undesirable side effects associated with steroid administration alone. Arylpropionamide-based SARMs such as andarine (S-4) and S-22 have shown promising therapeutic properties and have attracted the interest of elite and amateur athletes despite the absence of clinical approval, and evidence for trafficking and misuse in sport has been obtained by doping control authorities. In this communication, the elucidation of urinary metabolites of the SARM drug candidate S-22 is compared with earlier in vitro metabolism studies. Following oral administration of illicit S-22, urine samples were collected after 62 and 135 h and analyzed for the active drug and its major metabolic products. Liquid chromatography interfaced with high-resolution/high-accuracy (tandem) mass spectrometry was used to identify and/or confirm the predicted target analytes for sports drug testing purposes. S-22 was detected in both specimens accompanied by its glucuronic acid conjugate. This was the B-ring hydroxylated derivative of S-22 plus the corresponding glucuronide (with the phase-II metabolites being the more abundant analytes). In addition, the samples collected 62 h post-administration also contained the phase-I metabolite hydroxylated at the methyl residue (C-20

  7. Hierarchically controlled helical graphite films prepared from iodine-doped helical polyacetylene films using morphology-retaining carbonization.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Satoshi; Kyotani, Mutsumasa; Akagi, Kazuo

    2011-11-09

    One-handed helical graphite films with a hierarchically controlled morphology were prepared from iodine-doped helical polyacetylene (H-PA) films using the recently developed morphology-retaining carbonization method. Results from scanning electron microscopy indicate that the hierarchical helical morphology of the H-PA film remains unchanged even after carbonization at 800 °C. The weight loss of the film due to carbonization was very small; only 10-29% of the weight of the film before doping was lost. Furthermore, the graphite film prepared by subsequent heating at 2600 °C retained the same morphology as that of the original H-PA film and that of the helical carbon film prepared at 800 °C. The screwed direction, twisted degree, and vertical or horizontal alignment of the helical graphite film were well controlled by changing the helical sense, helical pitch, and orientation state of the chiral nematic liquid crystal (N*-LC) used as an asymmetric LC reaction field. X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering measurements showed that graphitic crystallization proceeds in the carbon film during heat treatment at 2600 °C. Transmission electron microscopy measurements indicate that ultrasonication of the helical graphite film in ethanol for several hours gives rise to a single helical graphite fibril. The profound potentiality of the present graphite films is exemplified in their electrical properties. The horizontally aligned helical graphite film exhibits an enhancement in electrical conductivity and an evolution of electrical anisotropy in which conductivity parallel to the helical axis of the fibril bundle is higher than that perpendicular to the axis.

  8. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in Cr-doped Si achieved by controlling atomic structure, Cr concentration, and carrier densities: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xin-Yuan; Yang, Zhong-Qin; Zhu, Yan; Li, Yun

    2015-04-28

    By using first-principles calculations, we investigated how to achieve a strong ferromagnetism in Cr-doped Si by controlling the atomic structure and Cr concentration as well as carrier densities. We found that the configuration in which the Cr atom occupies the tetrahedral interstitial site can exist stably and the Cr atom has a large magnetic moment. Using this doping configuration, room-temperature ferromagnetism can be achieved in both n-type and p-type Si by tuning Cr concentration and carrier densities. The results indicate that the carrier density plays a crucial role in realizing strong ferromagnetism in diluted magnetic semiconductors.

  9. Factors influencing doping control and abrupt metallurgical transitions during atmospheric pressure MOVPE growth of AlGaAs and GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J. S.; Mason, N. J.; Robinson, M.

    1984-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure MOVPE of GaAs and AlGaAs has been investigated using two gas handling systems and a conventional horizontal reactor. Initially a simple source/carrier gas manifold design was assessed but severe retention of reagents in the pipework resulted in poor control of doping and interface abruptness. However, integration of the reagent and carrier gas in a pressure balanced vent/run configuration gave a significant improvement. AlGaAs/GaAs multilayers and n +/n - GaAs transitions have been used to assess the performance of both systems. Abrupt p-type doping transitions using bis-cyclopentadienylmagnesium proved unsuccessful as long doping tails were observed.

  10. Multi-purpose droop controllers incorporating a passivity-based stabilizer for unified control of electronically interfaced distributed generators including primary source dynamics.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Seyed Mohammad; Afsharnia, Saeed

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents multi-purpose droop controllers for electronically-interfaced distributed generators (EI-DGs). These controllers allow the micro-grids to operate in grid-connected mode, islanded mode and mode transition transients with a unique control configuration. The active and reactive-power sharing among EI-DGs are satisfied by the proposed droop controllers in islanded mode. On the other hand, in the grid-connected mode, the droop controllers adjust the output active and reactive-powers of EI-DGs at the pre-programmed constant levels. The provision of sufficient damping capability and maintenance of the transient stability in all operational modes of EI-DGs are warranted by the suggested stabilizer. This stabilizer, which is designed using the passivity-based control (PBC) approach, is incorporated in the droop controllers to dampen power-angle, frequency and voltage deviations during large transients using solely local information. The primary source dynamics of EI-DGs are also considered. It is analytically proven that the presence of the primary source dynamics leads to attenuation of the damping capability of EI-DGs in transients. To compensate the adverse effect of the primary source dynamics during transients a novel compensator is inserted in the frequency-droop loop. Finally, time-domain simulations are performed on a multi-resources MG to verify the analytical results compared to those obtained, based on a recently-developed strategy.

  11. Controlling Proton Conductivity with Light: A Scheme Based on Photoacid Doping of Materials.

    PubMed

    Haghighat, Shima; Ostresh, Sarah; Dawlaty, Jahan M

    2016-02-11

    Transducing light energy to changes in material properties is central to a large range of functional materials, including those used in light harvesting. In conventional semiconductors, photoconductivity arises due to generation of mobile electrons or holes with light. Here we demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, an analogue of this effect for protons in an organic polymer solution and in water. We show that when a material is doped with photoacids, light excitation generates extra mobile protons that change the low-frequency conductivity of the material. We measure such change both in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and in water sandwiched between two transparent electrodes and doped with a well-known photoacid 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (HPTS). The complex impedance of the material is measured over a range of 0.1 Hz-1 MHz in both the presence and absence of light, and it is found that shining light changes the low frequency impedance significantly. We model the impedance spectra of the material with a minimal circuit composed of a diffusive impedance (Warburg element), a parallel capacitance, and a resistance. Fitting the light and dark impedance spectra to the model reveals that light reduces the low-frequency diffusive impedance of the material, which is consistent with generation of extra free carriers by light. We further suggest that the light-induced conductivity change arises mainly due to those photoreleased protons that manage to escape the zone of influence of the parent ion and avoid recapture. Such escape is more likely in materials with larger diffusion coefficient for protons and shorter electrostatic screening lengths for the parent ion. This explanation is consistent with our observed differences in the photoconductivity of solution of HPTS in water and in PEG. We anticipate that this scheme can be employed in protonic circuits where direct transduction of energy from light to protonic gradients or protonic currents is

  12. Comparison of urine analysis and dried blood spot analysis for the detection of ephedrine and methylephedrine in doping control.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Asami; Nishitani, Yasunori; Sato, Mitsuhiko; Kageyama, Shinji; Dohi, Michiko; Okano, Masato

    2016-02-01

    When the misuse of stimulants is determined in doping control tests conducted during the in-competition period, athletes are asked to account for the violation of the rules. This study was designed to evaluate whether the urinary threshold values (10 µg/mL) for ephedrine and methylephedrine set by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) can be exceeded after the oral administration of each substance (25 mg). In addition, the study describes the validity of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method using dried blood spot testing to detect ephedrine and methylephedrine by comparing it to a quantitative laboratory urine assay. After administration of ephedrine, the urinary concentration of ephedrine did not exceed the threshold at 4-10 h in two subjects, whereas the threshold was exceeded in both the subjects at 12 h after administration. For methylephedrine, the urinary concentrations of all the subjects failed to reach the threshold for up to 10 h after administration. The concentrations reached the threshold at 12-24 h after administration in some volunteers. In contrast, the blood concentrations of ephedrine and methylephedrine reached their maximum levels at 2-8 h after administration. The blood concentrations showed a low inter-individual variability, and the results suggested that the urinary excretion of ephedrine and methylephedrine can be strongly affected by urine pH and/or urine volume. These facts suggest that urinary concentrations cannot reflect the psychoactive level of ephedrines in circulation. Thus, dried blood analysis might be suitable for the adequate detection of stimulants during in-competition testing.

  13. Enantioselective disposition of (R)-salmeterol and (S)-salmeterol in urine following inhaled dosing and application to doping control.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Glenn A; Hostrup, Morten; Narkowicz, Christian K; Nichols, David S; Haydn Walters, E

    2016-11-07

    Salmeterol (USAN, INN, BAN) is a long-acting beta2-adrenoceptor agonist (LABA) widely used in the treatment of airways disease. Although salmeterol is permitted via inhalation by athletes and supratherapeutic dosing may enhance performance, no urine threshold has been established by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Salmeterol is a chiral compound consisting of (R)- and (S)-enantiomers, normally administered as racemic (rac-) mixture via inhalation. Levels of rac-salmeterol in urine are often below detectable levels and there is surprisingly little information regarding the enantioselectivity of salmeterol pharmacokinetics. In this study, subjects inhaled either 50 (n = 6) or 200 µg (n = 4; generally regarded as maximum therapeutic dose) of salmeterol and urine was then collected for 24 h and analyzed by enantioselective ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Maximum rac-salmeterol urine concentrations were obtained at 2 h for both doses with medians of 0.084 ng/mL after the 50 µg dose and 2.1 ng/mL after the 200 µg dose, with an individual maximum of 5.7 ng/mL. Levels were detectable at 24 h for both doses. Salmeterol displayed enantioselective pharmacokinetics, with a mean ± SD log (S):(R) = 0.055 ± 0.025 (P < 0.0001) equivalent to (S):(R) of 1.13. In conclusion, rac-salmeterol by inhalation exhibits modest enantioselectivity in urine following single dose administration and can be detected following a single 50 µg dose for up to 24 h after inhalation. The present findings are of relevance if a urine threshold limit is to be introduced for salmeterol on the list of prohibited substances. The application of an enantiomer ratio analysis may offer improved discriminatory detection capability for doping control analysis applications.

  14. Development of a purpose built landfill system for the control of methane emissions from municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Yedla, Sudhakar; Parikh, Jyoti K

    2002-01-01

    In the present paper, a new system of purpose built landfill (PBLF) has been proposed for the control of methane emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW), by considering all favourable conditions for improved methane generation in tropical climates. Based on certain theoretical considerations multivariate functional models (MFMs) are developed to estimate methane mitigation and energy generating potential of the proposed system. Comparison was made between the existing waste management system and proposed PBLF system. It has been found that the proposed methodology not only controlled methane emissions to the atmosphere but also could yield considerable energy in terms of landfill gas (LFG). Economic feasibility of the proposed system has been tested by comparing unit cost of waste disposal in conventional as well as PBLF systems. In a case study of MSW management in Mumbai (INDIA), it was found that the unit cost of waste disposal with PBLF system is seven times lesser than that of the conventional waste management system. The proposed system showed promising energy generation potential with production of methane worth of Rs. 244 millions/y ($5.2 million/y). Thus, the new waste management methodology could give an adaptable solution for the conflict between development, environmental degradation and natural resources depletion.

  15. Short term impact of Tribulus terrestris intake on doping control analysis of endogenous steroids.

    PubMed

    Saudan, Christophe; Baume, Norbert; Emery, Caroline; Strahm, Emmanuel; Saugy, Martial

    2008-06-10

    Tribulus terrestris is a nutritional supplement highly debated regarding its physiological and actual effects on the organism. The main claimed effect is an increase of testosterone anabolic and androgenic action through the activation of endogenous testosterone production. Even if this biological pathway is not entirely proven, T. terrestris is regularly used by athletes. Recently, the analysis of two female urine samples by GC/C/IRMS (gas chromatography/combustion/isotope-ratio-mass-spectrometry) conclusively revealed the administration of exogenous testosterone or its precursors, even if the testosterone glucuronide/epitestosterone glucuronide (T/E) ratio and steroid marker concentrations were below the cut-off values defined by World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). To argue against this adverse analytical finding, the athletes recognized having used T. terrestris in their diet. In order to test this hypothesis, two female volunteers ingested 500 mg of T. terrestris, three times a day and for two consecutive days. All spot urines were collected during 48 h after the first intake. The (13)C/(12)C ratio of ketosteroids was determined by GC/C/IRMS, the T/E ratio and DHEA concentrations were measured by GC/MS and LH concentrations by radioimmunoassay. None of these parameters revealed a significant variation or increased above the WADA cut-off limits. Hence, the short-term treatment with T. terrestris showed no impact on the endogenous testosterone metabolism of the two subjects.

  16. Doping control analysis for adrafinil and its major metabolites in human urine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianghai; Wang, Xiaobing; Yang, Shuming; Liu, Xin; Qin, Yang; Shen, Li; Wu, Yun; Xu, Youxuan; Wu, Moutian; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2009-06-01

    A new and reliable two-step liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method in combination with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) for the screening and confirmation of adrafinil and its major metabolites, modafinil and modafinil acid, in human urine has been developed and validated. The method involved reversed-phase C18 solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge extraction and MS analysis by means of LC/MS/MS and GC/MS. The study illustrated that the ESI capillary temperature played a key role in the formation of the protonated molecule. The limits of detection (LODs) of the developed method for the three compounds were lower than the minimum required performance limit (MRPL) of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). The human urine samples obtained after the oral administration of modafinil and from the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games were analyzed by using the described method, which has also been successfully applied to routine analyses and the WADA Proficiency Test.

  17. Rapid Size- Controlled Synthesis of Dextran-Coated, Copper-Doped Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Ray M.

    2011-12-01

    Development of dual modality probes enabled for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) has been on the rise in recent years due to the potential for these probes to facilitate combining the complementary high resolution of MRI and the high sensitivity of PET. The efficient synthesis of multimodal probes that include the radiolabels for PET can be hindered due to prolonged reaction times during radioisotope incorporation, and the resulting decay of the radiolabel. Along with a time-efficient synthesis, one also needs an optimal synthesis that yields products in a desirable size range (between 20-100 nm) to increase blood retention time. In this work, we describe a novel, rapid, microwave-based synthesis of dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles doped with copper (DIO/Cu). Traditional methods for synthesizing dextran-coated iron oxide particles require refluxing for 2 hours and result in approximately 50 nm particles. We demonstrate that microwave synthesis can produce 50 nm nanoparticles in 5 minutes of heating. We discuss the various parameters used in the microwave synthesis protocol to vary the size distribution of DIO/Cu, and demonstrate the successful incorporation of copper into these particles with the aim of future use for rapid 64Cu incorporation.

  18. A controllable growth-doping approach to synthesize bright white-light-emitting Cd:In2S3 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jian; Zhu, Hui; Yang, Xiurong

    2013-06-01

    A new type of doped Cd:In2S3 NC, which exhibits bright white-light emission with a QY of about 18%, synthesized by a one-pot G-doping synthesis approach is presented. The successful realization of temporal separation of nucleation doping and growth doping makes this approach a facile method to synthesize the In2S3/Cd:In2S3 core/shell nanostructure.A new type of doped Cd:In2S3 NC, which exhibits bright white-light emission with a QY of about 18%, synthesized by a one-pot G-doping synthesis approach is presented. The successful realization of temporal separation of nucleation doping and growth doping makes this approach a facile method to synthesize the In2S3/Cd:In2S3 core/shell nanostructure. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed synthetic procedure, ICP-MS, TEM, HRTEM, PL decay curves, CIE coordinates and CCT of Cd:In2S3 NCs, and PL spectra of In2S3 and CdS. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00878a

  19. Can user testing of a clinical trial patient information sheet make it fit-for-purpose? - a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The participant information sheet (PIS) provided to potential trial participants is a critical part of the process of valid consent. However, there is long-standing concern that these lengthy and complex documents are not fit-for-purpose. This has been supported recently through the application of a performance-based approach to testing and improving readability called user testing. This method is now widely used to improve patient medicine leaflets - determining whether people can find and understand key facts. This study applied for the first time a controlled design to determine whether a PIS developed through user testing had improved readability over the original, using a sheet from a UK trial in acute myeloid leukemia (AML16). Methods In the first phase the performance of the original PIS was tested on people in the target group for the trial. There were three rounds of testing including 50 people in total - with the information revised according to its performance after each of the first 2 rounds. In the second phase, the revised PIS was compared with the original in a parallel groups randomised controlled trial (RCT) A total of 123 participants were recruited and randomly allocated to read one version of the PIS to find and show understanding of 21 key facts. Results The first, developmental phase produced a revised PIS significantly altered in its wording and layout. In the second, trial phase 66% of participants who read the revised PIS were able to show understanding of all aspects of the trial, compared with 15% of those reading the original version (Odds Ratio 11.2; Chi-square = 31.5 p < .001). When asked to state a preference, 87.1% participants chose the revised PIS (Sign test p < .001). Conclusions The original PIS for the AML16 trial may not have enabled valid consent. Combining performance-based user testing with expertise in writing for patients and information design led to a significantly improved and preferred information sheet

  20. Control of magnetic properties of epitaxial Mn5Ge3Cx films induced by carbon doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiesser, A.; Slipukhina, I.; Dau, M.-T.; Arras, E.; Le Thanh, V.; Michez, L.; Pochet, P.; Saito, H.; Yuasa, S.; Jamet, M.; Derrien, J.

    2011-10-01

    We report the effects of carbon incorporation on the structural and magnetic properties of epitaxial Mn5Ge3Cx films grown on Ge(111) by the solid phase epitaxy method. This variation of molecular beam epitaxy favors the diffusion process of carbon atoms. We show that up to a carbon molar concentration x of ˜0.6-0.7, the atoms are incorporated in the interstitial sites of the Mn5Ge3 lattice. Such a process results in a linear increase of the Curie temperature TC of the alloy, which can reach a value as high as ˜430 K [TC≈460 K at M(TC)=0]. Above this carbon content, TC is found to decrease. Structural characterizations reveal that Mn5Ge3Cx films are in perfect epitaxy when x ≤ 0.6, whereas cluster formation in the grown layers is detected above that threshold. The clusters can be attributed to manganese carbide (MnC) compounds which are formed when the carbon content exceeds the saturation value of 0.6 by consuming previously deposited carbon. Theoretical calculations accurately reproduce the main trend of TC variation as well as the cluster formation for x larger than the saturation content. In addition, we also show that after post-thermal annealing, the carbon-doped Mn5Ge3Cx alloys remain magnetically and structurally stable up to a temperature as high as 850 °C. The results are very promising for integrating Mn5Ge3Cx into ferromagnetic-semiconductor heterostructures, the ultimate goal being the realization of spintronic devices.

  1. High Field-Emission Stability of Offset-Thin-Film Transistor-Controlled Al-Doped Zinc Oxide Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Po-Yu; Wang, Jyh-Liang; Tsai, Wei-Chih; Wang, Shui-Jinn; Lin, Jia-Chuan; Lee, I.-Che; Chang, Chia-Tsung; Cheng, Huang-Chung

    2011-04-01

    Aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) nanowire (NW) arrays incorporating an offset thin-film transistor (offset-TFT) have been proposed to achieve high field-emission (FE) stability. The AZO NW field emission arrays (FEAs) were hydrothermally grown at a low temperature of 85 °C. The uncontrolled AZO NW FEAs demonstrated superior FE characteristics (i.e., turn-on field of ˜2.17 V/µm and threshold field of ˜3.43 V/µm) compared with those of the conventional CNT FEAs grown at a temperature below 600 °C. However, uncontrolled AZO NW FEAs show a larger current fluctuation of 15.6%. Therefore, the offset-TFTs were used to control the AZO NW FEAs. Consequently, the fluctuation of AZO NW FEAs could be significantly reduced to less than 2%. This novel field emission device exhibits good emission stability, low-voltage controllability, low-temperature processing, and structural simplicity, making it promising for applications in flat panel displays.

  2. Control of the local devitrification on oxyfluoride glass doped with Er{sup 3+} ions under diode laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Perez, S.; Martin, I. R.; Jaque, D.; Haro-Gonzalez, P.; Capuj, N.

    2010-11-15

    Temperature control of the devitrification process in an erbium doped oxyfluoride glass under laser irradiation is reported. The green upconversion emissions around 525 and 545 nm originated from the thermalized {sup 2}H{sub 11/2} and {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} levels were studied when the glass structure changes to glass ceramic during irradiation with a laser beam. Power dependence of the fluorescence intensity ratio was used to determine the temperature of the irradiated zone. The transition from glass to glass ceramic takes place under 2300 mW of laser power with an estimated temperature around 783 K. This result agrees with the one obtained in the samples devitrified under conventional furnace treatment. Therefore, the estimation of the temperature of the irradiated zone through the fluorescence intensity ratio method allows a controlled devitrification. Moreover, an irradiated line has been written in the glass showing an important diffusion of the Pb{sup 2+} and F{sup -} ions. These results confirm that nanocrystals have been created due to the laser action.

  3. Controllable synthesis of nitrogen-doped hollow mesoporous carbon spheres using ionic liquids as template for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Aibing; Li, Yunqian; Liu, Lei; Yu, Yifeng; Xia, Kechan; Wang, Yuying; Li, Shuhui

    2017-01-01

    We have demonstrated a facile and controllable synthesis of monodispersed nitrogen-doped hollow mesoporous carbon spheres (N-HMCSs) using resorcinol/formaldehyde resin as a carbon precursor, tetraethyl orthosilicate as a structure-assistant agent, ionic liquids (ILs) as soft template, partial carbon sources, and nitrogen sources. The sizes and the architectures including hollow and yolk-shell of resultant carbon spheres can be efficiently controlled through the adjustment of the content of ILs. Alkyl chain length of the ILs also has an important effect on the formation of N-HMCSs. With proper alkyl chain length and content of ILs, the resultant N-HMCSs show monodispersed hollow spheres with high surface areas (up to 1158 m2 g-1), large pore volumes (up to 1.70 cm3 g-1), and uniform mesopore size (5.0 nm). Combining the hollow mesoporous structure, high porosity, large surface area, and nitrogen functionality, the as-synthesized N-HMCSs have good supercapacitor performance with good capacitance (up to 159 F g-1) and favorable capacitance retention (88% capacitive retention after 5000 cycles).

  4. Current trends in mass spectrometry of peptides and proteins: Application to veterinary and sports-doping control.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Irene; Blokland, Marco; Nessen, Merel A; Sterk, Saskia

    2015-01-01

    Detection of misuse of peptides and proteins as growth promoters is a major issue for sport and food regulatory agencies. The limitations of current analytical detection strategies for this class of compounds, in combination with their efficacy in growth-promoting effects, make peptide and protein drugs highly susceptible to abuse by either athletes or farmers who seek for products to illicitly enhance muscle growth. Mass spectrometry (MS) for qualitative analysis of peptides and proteins is well-established, particularly due to tremendous efforts in the proteomics community. Similarly, due to advancements in targeted proteomic strategies and the rapid growth of protein-based biopharmaceuticals, MS for quantitative analysis of peptides and proteins is becoming more widely accepted. These continuous advances in MS instrumentation and MS-based methodologies offer enormous opportunities for detection and confirmation of peptides and proteins. Therefore, MS seems to be the method of choice to improve the qualitative and quantitative analysis of peptide and proteins with growth-promoting properties. This review aims to address the opportunities of MS for peptide and protein analysis in veterinary control and sports-doping control with a particular focus on detection of illicit growth promotion. An overview of potential peptide and protein targets, including their amino acid sequence characteristics and current MS-based detection strategies is, therefore, provided. Furthermore, improvements of current and new detection strategies with state-of-the-art MS instrumentation are discussed for qualitative and quantitative approaches.

  5. [Doping: effectiveness, consequences, prevention].

    PubMed

    Guezennec, C Y

    2001-02-01

    The use of doping is linked with the history of sports. Doping abuse escalated until the mid sixties when government and sports authorities responded with antidoping laws and drug testing. Today, the details of substances detected in controls give a good indication on the importance of doping use. Three classes of pharmaceuticals account for most of the positive controls. They are anabolic steroids, stimulants and narcotics. Their use can be related with the goal of the athletes. Anabolic steroids are mainly used in sports such as bodybuilding or weight lifting in order to develop strength. Stimulants are used in sports were speed favors performance. All the products that enhance blood oxygen transportation are used in endurance sports, their efficacy is not scientifically demonstrated, but their use does result in real risks. Several studies have evidenced the medical problems resulting from prolonged doping. Doping control is impaired by the fact that many products now used, e.g. EPO or rhGH, are not detectable. Regular medical examination of athletes could help prevent use of doping.

  6. Electrostatic versus Electrochemical Doping and Control of Ferromagnetism in Ion-Gel-Gated Ultrathin La0.5Sr0.5CoO3-δ.

    PubMed

    Walter, Jeff; Wang, Helin; Luo, Bing; Frisbie, C Daniel; Leighton, Chris

    2016-08-23

    Recently, electrolyte gating techniques employing ionic liquids/gels in electric double layer transistors have proven remarkably effective in tuning charge carrier density in a variety of materials. The ability to control surface carrier densities at levels above 10(14) cm(-2) has led to widespread use in the study of superconductivity, insulator-metal transitions, etc. In many cases, controversy remains over the doping mechanism, however (i.e., electrostatic vs electrochemical (e.g., redox-based)), and the technique has been less applied to magnetic materials. Here, we discuss ion gel gating of nanoscale 8-unit-cell-thick hole-doped La0.5Sr0.5CoO3-δ (LSCO) films, probing in detail the critical bias windows and doping mechanisms. The LSCO films, which are under compressive stress on LaAlO3(001) substrates, are metallic and ferromagnetic (Curie temperature, TC ∼ 170 K), with strong anomalous Hall effect and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Transport measurements reveal that negative gate biases lead to reversible hole accumulation (i.e., predominantly electrostatic operation) up to some threshold, whereas positive bias immediately induces irreversibility. Experiments in inert/O2 atmospheres directly implicate oxygen vacancies in this irreversibility, supported by atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results are thus of general importance, suggesting that hole- and electron-doped oxides may respond very differently to electrolyte gating. Reversible voltage control of electronic/magnetic properties is then demonstrated under hole accumulation, including resistivity, magnetoresistance, and TC. The sizable anomalous Hall coefficient and perpendicular anisotropy in LSCO provide a particularly powerful probe of magnetism, enabling direct extraction of the voltage-dependent order parameter and TC shift. The latter amounts to ∼7%, with potential for much stronger modulation at lower Sr doping.

  7. Development and validation of an open screening method for diuretics, stimulants and selected compounds in human urine by UHPLC-HRMS for doping control.

    PubMed

    Girón, A Jiménez; Deventer, K; Roels, K; Van Eenoo, P

    2012-04-06

    A new doping control screening method for the analysis of diuretics and stimulants using ultra high pressure liquid chromatography-high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry has been developed. The screening was performed in full scan MS with scan-to-scan polarity switching which allowed to detect more than 120 target analytes. Sample preparation was limited to 10-fold dilution of the urine into the internal standard solution followed by injection. Total run time per sample was 10 min. Validation of the method yielded detection limits for diuretics between 25 and 250 ng mL(-1) and for stimulants between 5 and 500 ng mL(-1). The screening method has been implemented in routine doping control.

  8. Fluorescence enhancement in rare earth doped sol-gel glass by N , N dimethylformamide as a drying control chemical additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyler, A. P.; Boye, D. M.; Hoffman, K. R.; Silversmith, A. J.

    Studies of terbium fluorescence intensity as a function of annealing temperature reveal the cause of increased fluorescence yields observed in rare earth doped sol-gel silicates prepared using N , N-dimethylformamide (DMF) as a drying control chemical additive (DCCA). While gels prepared with DMF actually have lower fluorescence yields than gels prepared without DMF at lower annealing temperatures, DMF gels can be annealed at much higher temperatures while retaining high optical quality. At these higher temperatures, terbium fluorescence yields increase dramatically as the sol-gel network undergoes densification, closing the pores of the network and eliminating the fluorescence quenching silanols on pore surfaces. DMF is therefore found to enhance the fluorescence properties of rare earth sol-gel glasses by reducing micro-fracturing and facilitating network densification. Further investigations are underway to determine the effectiveness of other promising DCCAs, such as glycerol, and to explore the possibility of exploiting the solubility properties of DCCAs to improve rare earth dopant dispersion.

  9. Bichromatic coherent random lasing from dye-doped polymer stabilized blue phase liquid crystals controlled by pump light polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Meng; Yang, Mingchao; Shi, Li-Jie; Deng, Luogen; Yang, Huai

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the bichromatic coherent random lasing actions from the dye-doped polymer stabilized blue phase liquid crystals. Two groups of lasing peaks, of which the full widith at half maximum is about 0.3 nm, are clearly observed. The shorter- and longer-wavelength modes are associated with the excitation of the single laser dye (DCM) monomers and dimers respectively. The experimental results show that the competition between the two groups of the lasing peaks can be controlled by varying the polarization of the pump light. When the polarization of the pump light is rotated from 0° to 90°, the intensity of the shorter-wavelength lasing peak group reduces while the intensity of the longer-wavelength lasing peak group increases. In addition, a red shift of the longer-wavelength modes is also observed and the physical mechanisms behind the red-shift phenomenon are discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474021 and 51333001), the Key Program for International S&T Cooperation Projects of China (Grant No. 2013DFB50340), the Issues of Priority Development Areas of the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120001130005), and the Key (Key Grant) Project of Chinese Ministry of Education (Grant No. 313002).

  10. Fit-for-purpose chromatographic method for the determination of amikacin in human plasma for the dosage control of patients.

    PubMed

    Ezquer-Garin, C; Escuder-Gilabert, L; Martín-Biosca, Y; Lisart, R Ferriols; Sagrado, S; Medina-Hernández, M J

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a simple, rapid and sensitive method based on liquid chromatography with fluorimetric detection (HPLC-FLD) for the determination of amikacin (AMK) in human plasma is developed. Determination is performed by pre-column derivatization of AMK with ortho-phtalaldehyde (OPA) in presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) at pH 9.5 for 5 min at 80 °C. In our knowledge, this is the first time that NAC has been used in AMK derivatization. Derivatization conditions (pH, AMK/OPA/NAC molar ratios, temperature and reaction time) are optimized to obtain a single and stable, at room temperature, derivative. Separation of the derivative is achieved on a reversed phase LC column (Kromasil C18, 5 μm, 150 × 4.6 i.d. mm) with a mobile phase of 0.05 M phosphate buffer:acetonitrile (80:20, v/v) pumped at flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Detection is performed using 337 and 439 nm for excitation and emission wavelengths, respectively. The method is fitted for the purpose of being a competitive alternative to the currently used method in many hospitals for AMK dosage control: fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA). The method exhibits linearity in the 0.17-10 µg mL(-1) concentration range with a squared correlation coefficient higher than 0.995. Trueness and intermediate precision are estimated using spiked drug free plasma samples, which fulfill current UNE-EN ISO15189:2007 accreditation schemes. Finally, for the first time, statistical comparison against the FPIA method is demonstrated using plasma samples from 31 patients under treatment with AMK.

  11. Airplane dopes and doping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W H

    1919-01-01

    Cellulose acetate and cellulose nitrate are the important constituents of airplane dopes in use at the present time, but planes were treated with other materials in the experimental stages of flying. The above compounds belong to the class of colloids and are of value because they produce a shrinking action on the fabric when drying out of solution, rendering it drum tight. Other colloids possessing the same property have been proposed and tried. In the first stages of the development of dope, however, shrinkage was not considered. The fabric was treated merely to render it waterproof. The first airplanes constructed were covered with cotton fabric stretched as tightly as possible over the winds, fuselage, etc., and flying was possible only in fine weather. The necessity of an airplane which would fly under all weather conditions at once became apparent. Then followed experiments with rubberized fabrics, fabrics treated with glue rendered insoluble by formaldehyde or bichromate, fabrics treated with drying and nondrying oils, shellac, casein, etc. It was found that fabrics treated as above lost their tension in damp weather, and the oil from the motor penetrated the proofing material and weakened the fabric. For the most part the film of material lacked durability. Cellulose nitrate lacquers, however were found to be more satisfactory under varying weather conditions, added less weight to the planes, and were easily applied. On the other hand, they were highly inflammable, and oil from the motor penetrated the film of cellulose nitrate, causing the tension of the fabric to be relaxed.

  12. Controlled transition dipole alignment of energy donor and energy acceptor molecules in doped organic crystals, and the effect on intermolecular Förster energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Yue, Bailing; Xie, Zengqi; Gao, Bingrong; Xu, Yuanxiang; Liu, Linlin; Sun, Hongbo; Ma, Yuguang

    2013-03-14

    The orientation factor κ(2) ranging from 0 to 4, which depends on the relative orientation of the transition dipoles of the energy donor (D) and the energy acceptor (A) in space, is one of the pivotal factors deciding the efficiency and directionality of resonance energy transfer (RET) in a D-A molecular system. In this work, tetracene (Tc) and pentacene (Pc) are successfully doped in a trans-1,4-distyrylbenzene (DSB) crystalline lattice to form definite D-A mutually perpendicular transition dipole orientations. The cross D-A dipole arrangement results in an extremely small orientation factor, which is about two orders smaller than that in the disordered films. The energy transfer properties from the host (DSB) to the guest (Tc/Pc) were investigated in detail by steady-state as well as time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Our experimental research results show that the small value of κ(2) allows less or partial energy transfer from the host (DSB) to the guest (Tc) in a wide range of guest concentration, with the Förster distance of around 1.5 nm. By controlling the doping concentrations in the Tc and Pc doubly doped DSB crystals, we demonstrate, as an example, for the first time the application of the restricted energy transfer by D-A cross transition dipole arrangement for preparation of a large-size, white-emissive organic crystal with the CIE coordinates of (0.36, 0.37) approaching an ideal white light. In contrast, Tc is also doped in an anthracene crystalline lattice to form head-to-tail D-A transition dipole alignment, which is proved to be highly effective to promote the intermolecular energy transfer. In this doped system, the orientation factor is relatively large and the Förster distance is around 7 nm.

  13. Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism in electrodeposited Co-doped ZnO nanostructured thin films by controlling the oxygen vacancy defects

    SciTech Connect

    Simimol, A.; Anappara, Aji A.; Greulich-Weber, S.; Chowdhury, Prasanta; Barshilia, Harish C.

    2015-06-07

    We report the growth of un-doped and cobalt doped ZnO nanostructures fabricated on FTO coated glass substrates using electrodeposition method. A detailed study on the effects of dopant concentration on morphology, structural, optical, and magnetic properties of the ZnO nanostructures has been carried out systematically by varying the Co concentration (c.{sub Co}) from 0.01 to 1 mM. For c.{sub Co }≤ 0.2 mM, h-wurtzite phase with no secondary phases of Co were present in the ZnO nanostructures. For c.{sub Co} ≤ 0.2 mM, the photoluminescence spectra exhibited a decrease in the intensity of ultraviolet emission as well as band-gap narrowing with an increase in dopant concentration. All the doped samples displayed a broad emission in the visible range and its intensity increased with an increase in Co concentration. It was found that the defect centers such as oxygen vacancies and zinc interstitials were the source of the visible emission. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies revealed, Co was primarily in the divalent state, replacing the Zn ion inside the tetrahedral crystal site of ZnO without forming any cluster or secondary phases of Co. The un-doped ZnO nanorods exhibited diamagnetic behavior and it remained up to a c.{sub Co} of 0.05 mM, while for c.{sub Co }> 0.05 mM, the ZnO nanostructures exhibited ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature. The coercivity increased to 695 G for 0.2 mM Co-doped sample and then it decreased for c.{sub Co }> 0.2 mM. Our results illustrate that up to a threshold concentration of 0.2 mM, the strong ferromagnetism is due to the oxygen vacancy defects centers, which exist in the Co-doped ZnO nanostructures. The origin of strong ferromagnetism at room temperature in Co-doped ZnO nanostructures is attributed to the s-d exchange interaction between the localized spin moments resulting from the oxygen vacancies and d electrons of Co{sup 2+} ions. Our findings provide a new insight for tuning the

  14. Structure and mechanism of formation of an important ion in doping control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, Chad R.; Taccogno, James; Crouch, Dennis J.; Le, Ly; Truong, Thanh N.

    2005-12-01

    An ion with m/z 143 serves as a biomarker that is often continuously monitored in urine samples undergoing screening by electron ionization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (EI GC/MS) for banned anabolic agents. The ion is known to arise from trimethylsilyl (TMS)-derivatized synthetic 17-hydroxy, 17-methyl steroids. The purpose of this work was to characterize, in detail, the origin(s), structure(s), and mechanism(s) of formation of such ions with m/z 143. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) data revealed the elemental composition of the D-ring derived m/z 143 ion to be C7H15OSi. Analysis of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and its 2-methyl substituted analog dromostanolone by HRMS revealed that an elementally equivalent ion of m/z 143 could be derived from the A-ring of TMS-derivatized 3-keto-enol steroids demonstrating that an abnormally intense peak in the m/z 143 extracted ion chromatogram of urine samples undergoing screening for banned anabolic agents does not necessarily indicate the presence of a 17-hydroxy, 17-methyl steroid. To gain information on ion structure, breakdown curves for the most abundant product ions of the m/z 143 ion were generated using both native and perdeutero-TMS derivatives, providing structures for second, third, and fourth generation product ions. An EI-mass spectrum of [16,16,17-2H3]-DHT (DHT-d3) demonstrated that one of the C-16 hydrogen atoms is removed prior to the formation of an ion that is highly analogous to the ion with m/z 143 strongly suggesting, in accord with all other evidence, one particular fragmentation pathway and resulting product: a resonance stabilized 3-(O-trimethylsilyl)but-1-ene ion.

  15. Biocompatibility and bioactivity enhancement of Ce stabilized ZrO(2) doped HA coatings by controlled porosity change of Al(2) O(3) substrates.

    PubMed

    Sima, Felix; Ristoscu, Carmen; Caiteanu, Diana; Mihailescu, Cristian N; Stefan, Nicolaie; Mihailescu, Ion N; Prodan, Gabriel; Ciupina, Victor; Palcevskis, Eriks; Krastins, Janis; Sima, Livia E; Petrescu, Stefana M

    2011-02-01

    Al(2) O(3) substrates with controlled porosity were manufactured from nanosized powders obtained by plasma processing. It was observed that when increasing the sintering temperature the overall porosity was decreasing, but the pores got larger. In a second step, Ce stabilized ZrO(2) doped hydroxyapatite coatings were pulsed laser deposited onto the Al(2) O(3) substrates. It was shown that the surface morphology, consisting of aggregates and particulates in micrometric range, was altered by the substrate porosity and interface properties, respectively. TEM studies evidenced that Ce stabilized ZrO(2) doped HA particulates ranged from 10 to 50 nm, strongly depending on the Al(2) O(3) porosity. The coatings consisted of HA nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous matrix quite similar to the bone structure. These findings were congruent with the increased biocompatibility and bioactivity of these layers confirmed by enhanced growing and proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

  16. Morphology Control of Metal-Organic Frameworks Based on Paddle-Wheel Units on Ion-Doped Polymer Substrate Using an Interfacial Growth Approach.

    PubMed

    Tsuruoka, Takaaki; Mantani, Koji; Miyanaga, Ayumi; Matsuyama, Tetsuhiro; Ohhashi, Takashi; Takashima, Yohei; Akamatsu, Kensuke

    2016-06-21

    A three-dimensional metal-organic framework (MOF) consisting of pillared square-grid nets based on paddle-wheel units was synthesized by interfacial self-assembly of the frameworks on a metal-ion-doped polymer substrate. Although this type of Cu-based MOF is typically synthesized by a two-step solvothermal method, the utilization of a metal-ion-doped polymer substrate as a metal source for the framework allowed for the one-pot growth of MOF crystals on the substrate. The morphology of the obtained MOF crystals could be controlled from tetragonal to elongated tetragonal with different aspect ratios by changing the concentrations of the dicarboxylate layer ligands and diamine pillar ligands. The present approach provides a new route for the design and synthesis of MOF crystals and thin films for future applications such as gas membranes, catalysts, and electronic devices.

  17. Nanocrystal diffusion doping.

    PubMed

    Vlaskin, Vladimir A; Barrows, Charles J; Erickson, Christian S; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2013-09-25

    A diffusion-based synthesis of doped colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals is demonstrated. This approach involves thermodynamically controlled addition of both impurity cations and host anions to preformed seed nanocrystals under equilibrium conditions, rather than kinetically controlled doping during growth. This chemistry allows thermodynamic crystal compositions to be prepared without sacrificing other kinetically trapped properties such as shape, size, or crystallographic phase. This doping chemistry thus shares some similarities with cation-exchange reactions, but proceeds without the loss of host cations and excels at the introduction of relatively unreactive impurity ions that have not been previously accessible using cation exchange. Specifically, we demonstrate the preparation of Cd(1-x)Mn(x)Se (0 ≤ x ≤ ∼0.2) nanocrystals with narrow size distribution, unprecedentedly high Mn(2+) content, and very large magneto-optical effects by diffusion of Mn(2+) into seed CdSe nanocrystals grown by hot injection. Controlling the solution and lattice chemical potentials of Cd(2+) and Mn(2+) allows Mn(2+) diffusion into the internal volumes of the CdSe nanocrystals with negligible Ostwald ripening, while retaining the crystallographic phase (wurtzite or zinc blende), shape anisotropy, and ensemble size uniformity of the seed nanocrystals. Experimental results for diffusion doping of other nanocrystals with other cations are also presented that indicate this method may be generalized, providing access to a variety of new doped semiconductor nanostructures not previously attainable by kinetic routes or cation exchange.

  18. Optimizing the Binding Energy of Hydrogen on Nanostructured Carbon Materials through Structure Control and Chemical Doping

    SciTech Connect

    Jie Liu

    2011-02-01

    The DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) was formed in 2005 to develop materials for hydrogen storage systems to be used in light-duty vehicles. The HSCoE and two related centers of excellence were created as follow-on activities to the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE’s) Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Solicitation issued in FY 2003. The Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) focuses on developing high-capacity sorbents with the goal to operate at temperatures and pressures approaching ambient and be efficiently and quickly charged in the tank with minimal energy requirements and penalties to the hydrogen fuel infrastructure. The work was directed at overcoming barriers to achieving DOE system goals and identifying pathways to meet the hydrogen storage system targets. To ensure that the development activities were performed as efficiently as possible, the HSCoE formed complementary, focused development clusters based on the following four sorption-based hydrogen storage mechanisms: 1. Physisorption on high specific surface area and nominally single element materials 2. Enhanced H2 binding in Substituted/heterogeneous materials 3. Strong and/or multiple H2 binding from coordinated but electronically unsatruated metal centers 4. Weak Chemisorption/Spillover. As a member of the team, our group at Duke studied the synthesis of various carbon-based materials, including carbon nanotubes and microporous carbon materials with controlled porosity. We worked closely with other team members to study the effect of pore size on the binding energy of hydrogen to the carbon –based materials. Our initial project focus was on the synthesis and purification of small diameter, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with well-controlled diameters for the study of their hydrogen storage properties as a function of diameters. We developed a chemical vapor deposition method that synthesized gram quantities of carbon nanotubes with

  19. Controllable Synthesis of Monodisperse Er3+-Doped Lanthanide Oxyfluorides Nanocrystals with Intense Mid-Infrared Emission

    PubMed Central

    He, Huilin; Liu, Qiang; Yang, Dandan; Pan, Qiwen; Qiu, Jianrong; Dong, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Monodisperse lanthanide oxyfluorides LnOF (Ln = Gd, Y) with mid-infrared emissions were controllably synthesized via a mild co-precipitation route and a subsequent heat-treatment. The detailed composition and morphology were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The results showed that monodisperse GdOF:Er3+ were nano-riced shape with length about 350 nm and width about 120 nm, while the quasi-spherical YOF:Er3+ were uniform nanocrystals with an average size around 100 nm. The influence of calcination temperature on the size and phase transition of LnOF nanocrystals was also investigated. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra indicated that the 2.7 μm emission of Er3+ had achieved in both GdOF and YOF nanocrystals, which were calcined at different temperatures. In addition, the decay time of both 4I13/2 and 4I13/2 energy levels corresponding to Er3+ in YOF nanocrystals were also studied in detail. The results suggested that both rice-shaped GdOF nanocrystals and YOF nanocrystals could provide suitable candidate materials for nanocrystals-glass composites, which could be a step forward to the realization of mid-infrared laser materials. PMID:27748411

  20. Erbium-doped slot waveguides containing size-controlled silicon nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, R.; Beyer, J.; Klemm, V.; Rafaja, D.; Johnson, B. C.; McCallum, J. C.; Heitmann, J.

    2015-04-01

    Silicon based slot waveguides with a slot containing Si nanocrystals (Si-nc) and Erbium ions (Er3+) inside a silica matrix were prepared using sputter deposition and low-energy ion implantation. This sequence enabled independent optimization of nanocrystal formation and Er3+ incorporation parameters. Using a superlattice approach, the size of the Si-nc inside the slot could be controlled and optimized for maximum Er3+ luminescence yield at 1.54 μm. Er3+ is found to be efficiently pumped by Si-nc of sizes around 3 to 4 nm. Increasing Er3+ photoluminescence at 1.54 μm with increasing post-implantation annealing temperatures up to 1000 °C is attributed to annealing of matrix or Si-nc interface defects mainly. Additionally, a dependence of the Er3+ luminescence intensity on both the excitation and emission linear polarization orientation is shown, which demonstrates efficient field enhancement in sputtered slot waveguide structures.

  1. Erbium-doped slot waveguides containing size-controlled silicon nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, R.; Beyer, J. Heitmann, J.; Klemm, V.; Rafaja, D.; Johnson, B. C.; McCallum, J. C.

    2015-04-28

    Silicon based slot waveguides with a slot containing Si nanocrystals (Si-nc) and Erbium ions (Er{sup 3+}) inside a silica matrix were prepared using sputter deposition and low-energy ion implantation. This sequence enabled independent optimization of nanocrystal formation and Er{sup 3+} incorporation parameters. Using a superlattice approach, the size of the Si-nc inside the slot could be controlled and optimized for maximum Er{sup 3+} luminescence yield at 1.54 μm. Er{sup 3+} is found to be efficiently pumped by Si-nc of sizes around 3 to 4 nm. Increasing Er{sup 3+} photoluminescence at 1.54 μm with increasing post-implantation annealing temperatures up to 1000 °C is attributed to annealing of matrix or Si-nc interface defects mainly. Additionally, a dependence of the Er{sup 3+} luminescence intensity on both the excitation and emission linear polarization orientation is shown, which demonstrates efficient field enhancement in sputtered slot waveguide structures.

  2. Controllable Synthesis of Monodisperse Er3+-Doped Lanthanide Oxyfluorides Nanocrystals with Intense Mid-Infrared Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Huilin; Liu, Qiang; Yang, Dandan; Pan, Qiwen; Qiu, Jianrong; Dong, Guoping

    2016-10-01

    Monodisperse lanthanide oxyfluorides LnOF (Ln = Gd, Y) with mid-infrared emissions were controllably synthesized via a mild co-precipitation route and a subsequent heat-treatment. The detailed composition and morphology were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The results showed that monodisperse GdOF:Er3+ were nano-riced shape with length about 350 nm and width about 120 nm, while the quasi-spherical YOF:Er3+ were uniform nanocrystals with an average size around 100 nm. The influence of calcination temperature on the size and phase transition of LnOF nanocrystals was also investigated. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra indicated that the 2.7 μm emission of Er3+ had achieved in both GdOF and YOF nanocrystals, which were calcined at different temperatures. In addition, the decay time of both 4I13/2 and 4I13/2 energy levels corresponding to Er3+ in YOF nanocrystals were also studied in detail. The results suggested that both rice-shaped GdOF nanocrystals and YOF nanocrystals could provide suitable candidate materials for nanocrystals-glass composites, which could be a step forward to the realization of mid-infrared laser materials.

  3. Optically controlled spin-polarization memory effect on Mn delta-doped heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Balanta, M A G; Brasil, M J S P; Iikawa, F; Mendes, Udson C; Brum, J A; Danilov, Yu A; Dorokhin, M V; Vikhrova, O V; Zvonkov, B N

    2016-04-15

    We investigated the dynamics of the interaction between spin-polarized photo-created carriers and Mn ions on InGaAs/GaAs: Mn structures. The carriers are confined in an InGaAs quantum well and the Mn ions come from a Mn delta-layer grown at the GaAs barrier close to the well. Even though the carriers and the Mn ions are spatially separated, the interaction between them is demonstrated by time-resolved spin-polarized photoluminescence measurements. Using a pre-pulse laser excitation with an opposite circular-polarization clearly reduces the polarization degree of the quantum-well emission for samples where a strong magnetic interaction is observed. The results demonstrate that the Mn ions act as a spin-memory that can be optically controlled by the polarization of the photocreated carriers. On the other hand, the spin-polarized Mn ions also affect the spin-polarization of the subsequently created carriers as observed by their spin relaxation time. These effects fade away with increasing time delays between the pulses as well as with increasing temperatures.

  4. Graphene coated with controllable N-doped carbon layer by molecular layer deposition as electrode materials for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao; Gao, Zhe; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Shichao; Qin, Yong

    2016-05-01

    In this work, graphene is coated with nitrogen-doped carbon layer, which is produced by a carbonization process of aromatic polyimide (PI) films deposited on the surfaces of graphene by molecular layer deposition (MLD). The utilization of MLD not only allows uniform coating of PI layers on the surfaces of pristine graphene without any surface treatment, but also enables homogenous dispersion of doped nitrogen atoms in the carbonized products. The as-prepared N-doped carbon layer coated graphene (NC-G) exhibited remarkable capacitance performance as electrode materials for supercapacitor, showing a high specific capacitance of 290.2 F g-1 at current density of 1 A g-1 in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolyte, meanwhile maintaining good rate performance and stable cycle capability. The NC-G synthesized by this way represents an alternative promising candidate as electrode material for supercapacitors.

  5. Paramagnetic behavior of Co doped TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals controlled by self-purification mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Anitha, B.; Khadar, M. Abdul; Banerjee, Alok

    2016-07-15

    Doping in nanocrystals is a challenging process because of the self- purification mechanism which tends to segregate out the dopants resulting in a greater dopant concentration near the surface than at the interior of nanocrystals. In the present work nanocrystals of TiO{sub 2} doped with different atom % of Co were synthesized by peroxide gel method. XRD analysis confirmed the tetragonal anatase structure and HRTEM images showed the rod-like morphology of the samples. Raman modes of anatase phase of TiO{sub 2} along with weak intensity peaks of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} for higher Co dopant concentrations were observed for the samples. EPR measurements revealed the presence of cobalt in +2 oxidation state in the TiO{sub 2} matrix. SQUID measurements indicated paramagnetic behavior of the Co doped TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals. The paramagnetic behavior is attributed to an increased concentration of Co{sup 2+} ions and an increased presence of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase near the surface of the TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals due to self-purification mechanism. - Graphical abstract: Variation of the intensity ratios of XRD peaks as a function of atomic ratio of Co. Inset: variation of structure factor for (101) reflection as a function of atomic ratio of Co. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Co doped TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals were synthesized by peroxide gel method. • HRTEM images showed Co doped TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals to be rod-like. • EPR spectra showed +2 oxidation states for Co in the samples. • Co doped TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals showed paramagnetic behavior.

  6. Precise control of photoluminescence of silicon-vacancy color centers in homoepitaxial single-crystal diamond: evaluation of efficiency of Si doping from gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralchenko, Victor; Sedov, Vadim; Saraykin, Vladimir; Bolshakov, Andrey; Zavedeev, Evgeny; Ashkinazi, Evgeny; Khomich, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Ability to precisely control the Si-related color center abundance in diamond is important for the use of silicon-vacancy (SiV) defects with bright photoluminescence (PL) in quantum information technologies and optical biomarkers. Here, we evaluated the efficiency of Si incorporation in (100) plane of homoepitaxial diamond layers upon in situ doping by adding silane SiH4 in the course of diamond chemical vapor deposition in microwave plasma using CH4-H2 mixtures. Both the Si concentration in the doped samples, as determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and PL intensity of SiV centers at 738 nm wavelength, measured at excitation wavelength of 473 nm, demonstrate a linear increase with silane content in feed gas in the range. The incorporation efficiency f, defined as the ratio of Si concentration in diamond to that in gas, f = [Si/C]dia/[Si/C]gas is found to be (1.1 ± 0.5) × 10-3 for the silane concentrations explored, [SiH4/CH4] < 0.7 %; thus, the Si atoms are accommodated in (100) diamond face easier than nitrogen and phosphorus, but more difficult than boron. This finding allows a tailoring of the Si content and photoluminescence intensity of SiV centers in in situ doped CVD diamond.

  7. Synthesis and controllable oxidation of monodisperse cobalt-doped wüstite nanoparticles and their core-shell stability and exchange-bias stabilization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Jung; Chiang, Ray-Kuang; Kamali, Saeed; Wang, Sue-Lein

    2015-09-14

    Cobalt-doped wüstite (CWT), Co0.33Fe0.67O, nanoparticles were prepared via the thermal decomposition of CoFe2-oleate complexes in organic solvents. A controllable oxidation process was then performed to obtain Co0.33Fe0.67O/CoFe2O4 core-shell structures with different core-to-shell volume ratios and exchange bias properties. The oxidized core-shell samples with a ∼4 nm CoFe2O4 shell showed good resistance to oxygen transmission. Thus, it is inferred that the cobalt ferrite shell provides a better oxidation barrier performance than magnetite in the un-doped case. The hysteresis loops of the oxidized 19 nm samples exhibited a high exchange bias field (H(E)), an enhanced coercivity field (H(C)), and a pronounced vertical shift, thus indicating the presence of a strong exchange bias coupling effect. More importantly, the onset temperature of H(E) was found to be higher than 200 K, which suggests that cobalt doping increases the Néel temperature (T(N)) of the CWT core. In general, the results show that the homogeneous dispersion of Co in iron precursors improves the stability of the final CWT nanoparticles. Moreover, the CoFe2O4 shells formed following oxidation increase the oxidation resistance of the CWT cores and enhance their anisotropy energy.

  8. General Design Memorandum. Phase I and Environmental Impact Statement for Flood Control and Related Purposes, Sheyenne River, North Dakota.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    not increase down- stream flood problems and that existing drainage projects be reassessed to determine if additional controls are needed. The North...More Land Treatment Use of more land treatment measures throughout the basin could provide water quality and erosion control benefits. Encouragement of...National Grasslands is managed under the multiple-use concept with emphasis on grazing and erosion control . In the future, increased emphasis will be

  9. Controllable nitrogen doping in as deposited TiO{sub 2} film and its effect on post deposition annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Shaoren; Devloo-Casier, Kilian; Devulder, Wouter; Dendooven, Jolien; Deduytsche, Davy; Detavernier, Christophe; Lenaerts, Silvia; Martens, Johan A.; Van den Berghe, Sven

    2014-01-15

    In order to narrow the band gap of TiO{sub 2}, nitrogen doping by combining thermal atomic layer deposition (TALD) of TiO{sub 2} and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of TiN has been implemented. By altering the ratio between TALD TiO{sub 2} and PEALD TiN, the as synthesized TiO{sub x}N{sub y} films showed different band gaps (from 1.91 eV to 3.14 eV). In situ x-ray diffraction characterization showed that the crystallization behavior of these films changed after nitrogen doping. After annealing in helium, nitrogen doped TiO{sub 2} films crystallized into rutile phase while for the samples annealed in air a preferential growth of the anatase TiO{sub 2} along (001) orientation was observed. Photocatalytic tests of the degradation of stearic acid were done to evaluate the effect of N doping on the photocatalytic activity.

  10. DC sputtered W-doped VO2 thermochromic thin films for smart windows with active solar control.

    PubMed

    Batista, C; Ribeiro, R; Carneiro, J; Teixeira, V

    2009-07-01

    Doped VO2 thin films, with different W at.% and consequent dissimilar transition temperatures, were successfully deposited onto SiO2-coated float-glass substrates by reactive direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering. Structural analyses have shown, for undoped films, single phase VO2(M) films with c-axis (002) direction as the preferred crystal orientation. The addition of tungsten into the VO2 solid solution favored the crystallization in the (011) direction which became dominant above a critical level of dopant concentration. The surface morphology of pure VO2 films revealed elongated grains oriented within the film plane. The doped films evidenced an increased tendency to be oriented out of the film plane which has resulted in increased roughness levels. The doping methodology associated with optimized processing conditions allowed the production of W-doped VO2 films with reduced transition temperatures, from 63 down to 28 degrees C, and maximum transmittances at the visible region ranging 40%. The relationship between tungsten content in the film and consequent transition temperature expressed a linear behavior.

  11. Controlling the electronic structure of Co1-xFe2+xO4 thin films through iron doping

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, J.A.; Arena, D.; Vaz, C.A.F.; Negusse, E.; Henrich, V.E.

    2011-01-19

    The electronic, magnetic and transport properties of iron-doped cobalt ferrite (Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2+x}O{sub 4}) thin films grown epitaxially on MgO (001) substrates are investigated by soft x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, and resistivity measurements. The crystal structure for Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2+x}O{sub 4} is determined to be nearly inverse spinel, with the degree of inversion increasing for increased doping until it becomes fully inverse spinel for Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The doped iron cations have a valency of 2+ and reside solely on octahedral sites, which allows for conduction owing to hopping between Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} octahedral cations. The addition of Fe{sup 2+} cations increases the electron density of states near the Fermi energy, shifting the Fermi level from 0.75 to 0 eV with respect to the top of the valence band, as the doping increases from x = 0.01 to 1. This change in electronic structure results in a change in resistivity by over two orders of magnitude. In contrast, the magnetic properties of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin films, characterized by a significantly reduced saturation magnetization compared to the bulk and large magnetic anisotropies, are affected less significantly by doping in the range from 0 to 0.63. These results show that Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2+x}O{sub 4} has tunable electronic properties while maintaining magnetic properties similar to CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  12. En route to controlled catalytic CVD synthesis of densely packed and vertically aligned nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube arrays

    PubMed Central

    Pattinson, Sebastian W; Geiser, Valérie; Shaffer, Milo S P

    2014-01-01

    Summary The catalytic chemical vapour deposition (c-CVD) technique was applied in the synthesis of vertically aligned arrays of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs). A mixture of toluene (main carbon source), pyrazine (1,4-diazine, nitrogen source) and ferrocene (catalyst precursor) was used as the injection feedstock. To optimize conditions for growing the most dense and aligned N-CNT arrays, we investigated the influence of key parameters, i.e., growth temperature (660, 760 and 860 °C), composition of the feedstock and time of growth, on morphology and properties of N-CNTs. The presence of nitrogen species in the hot zone of the quartz reactor decreased the growth rate of N-CNTs down to about one twentieth compared to the growth rate of multi-wall CNTs (MWCNTs). As revealed by electron microscopy studies (SEM, TEM), the individual N-CNTs (half as thick as MWCNTs) grown under the optimal conditions were characterized by a superior straightness of the outer walls, which translated into a high alignment of dense nanotube arrays, i.e., 5 × 108 nanotubes per mm2 (100 times more than for MWCNTs grown in the absence of nitrogen precursor). In turn, the internal crystallographic order of the N-CNTs was found to be of a ‘bamboo’-like or ‘membrane’-like (multi-compartmental structure) morphology. The nitrogen content in the nanotube products, which ranged from 0.0 to 3.0 wt %, was controlled through the concentration of pyrazine in the feedstock. Moreover, as revealed by Raman/FT-IR spectroscopy, the incorporation of nitrogen atoms into the nanotube walls was found to be proportional to the number of deviations from the sp2-hybridisation of graphene C-atoms. As studied by XRD, the temperature and the [pyrazine]/[ferrocene] ratio in the feedstock affected the composition of the catalyst particles, and hence changed the growth mechanism of individual N-CNTs into a ‘mixed base-and-tip’ (primarily of the base-type) type as compared to the purely

  13. 1.6 μm emission based on linear loss control in a Er:Yb doped double-clad fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Guesmi, Khmaies; Meng, Yichang; Niang, Alioune; Mouchel, Paul; Salhi, Mohamed; Bahloul, Faouzi; Attia, Rabah; Sanchez, François

    2014-11-15

    Based on the control of the linear losses of the cavity, we demonstrate the possibility to achieve filterless laser emission above 1.6 μm, from a C-band double-clad Er:Yb doped fiber amplifier. The concept is validated in both continuous wave and mode-locked regimes, using a figure-of-eight geometry. A unidirectional ring cavity is also tested in the continuous regime. Spectral properties of laser emissions are characterized as a function of the intracavity linear losses.

  14. A realistic bi-hemispheric model of the cerebellum uncovers the purpose of the abundant granule cells during motor control.

    PubMed

    Pinzon-Morales, Ruben-Dario; Hirata, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellar granule cells (GCs) have been proposed to perform lossless, adaptive spatio-temporal coding of incoming sensory/motor information required by downstream cerebellar circuits to support motor learning, motor coordination, and cognition. Here we use a physio-anatomically inspired bi-hemispheric cerebellar neuronal network (biCNN) to selectively enable/disable the output of GCs and evaluate the behavioral and neural consequences during three different control scenarios. The control scenarios are a simple direct current motor (1 degree of freedom: DOF), an unstable two-wheel balancing robot (2 DOFs), and a simulation model of a quadcopter (6 DOFs). Results showed that adequate control was maintained with a relatively small number of GCs (< 200) in all the control scenarios. However, the minimum number of GCs required to successfully govern each control plant increased with their complexity (i.e., DOFs). It was also shown that increasing the number of GCs resulted in higher robustness against changes in the initialization parameters of the biCNN model (i.e., synaptic connections and synaptic weights). Therefore, we suggest that the abundant GCs in the cerebellar cortex provide the computational power during the large repertoire of motor activities and motor plants the cerebellum is involved with, and bring robustness against changes in the cerebellar microcircuit (e.g., neuronal connections).

  15. A realistic bi-hemispheric model of the cerebellum uncovers the purpose of the abundant granule cells during motor control

    PubMed Central

    Pinzon-Morales, Ruben-Dario; Hirata, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellar granule cells (GCs) have been proposed to perform lossless, adaptive spatio-temporal coding of incoming sensory/motor information required by downstream cerebellar circuits to support motor learning, motor coordination, and cognition. Here we use a physio-anatomically inspired bi-hemispheric cerebellar neuronal network (biCNN) to selectively enable/disable the output of GCs and evaluate the behavioral and neural consequences during three different control scenarios. The control scenarios are a simple direct current motor (1 degree of freedom: DOF), an unstable two-wheel balancing robot (2 DOFs), and a simulation model of a quadcopter (6 DOFs). Results showed that adequate control was maintained with a relatively small number of GCs (< 200) in all the control scenarios. However, the minimum number of GCs required to successfully govern each control plant increased with their complexity (i.e., DOFs). It was also shown that increasing the number of GCs resulted in higher robustness against changes in the initialization parameters of the biCNN model (i.e., synaptic connections and synaptic weights). Therefore, we suggest that the abundant GCs in the cerebellar cortex provide the computational power during the large repertoire of motor activities and motor plants the cerebellum is involved with, and bring robustness against changes in the cerebellar microcircuit (e.g., neuronal connections). PMID:25983678

  16. Significant increase of salivary testosterone levels after single therapeutic transdermal administration of testosterone: suitability as a potential screening parameter in doping control.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Detlef; Rautenberg, Claudia; Grosse, Joachim; Schoenfelder, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The legally defensible proof of the abuse of endogenous steroids in sports is currently based on carbon isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), i.e. a comparison between (13)C/(12)C ratios of diagnostic precursors and metabolites of testosterone. The application of this technique requires a chromatographic baseline separation of respective steroids prior to IRMS detection and hence laborious sample pre-processing of the urinary steroid extracts including clean up by solid-phase extraction and/or liquid chromatography. Consequently, an efficient pre-selection of suspicious control urine samples is essential for appropriate follow up confirmation by IRMS and effective doping control. Two single transdermal administration studies of testosterone (50 mg Testogel® and Testopatch® at 3.8 mg in 16 h, respectively) were conducted and resulting profiles of salivary testosterone and urinary steroid profiles and corresponding carbon isotope ratios were determined. Conventional doping control markers (testosterone/epitestosterone ratio, threshold concentrations of androsterone, etiocholanolone, or androstanediols) did not approach or exceed critical thresholds. In contrast to these moderate variations, the testosterone concentration in oral fluid increased from basal values (30-142 pg/mg) to peak concentrations above 1000 pg/mg. It is likely that this significant increase in oral fluid is due to a pulsatile elevation of free (protein unbound) circulating testosterone after transdermal administration and may be assumed to represent a more diagnostic marker for transdermal testosterone administration.

  17. Development and applications of a multi-purpose digital controller with a System-on-Chip FPGA for accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurimoto, Yoshinori; Nakamura, Keigo

    2016-12-01

    J-PARC Main Ring (MR) is a high intensity proton synchrotron which accelerates protons from 3 GeV to 30 GeV. It has operated at a beam intensity of 390 kW and an upgrade toward the megawatt rating is scheduled. For higher beam intensity, some of the accelerator components require more intelligent and complicated functions. To consolidate such functions among various components, we developed multi-purpose digital boards using a System-on-Chip Field-Programmable Gated Array (SoC FPGA). In this paper, we describe the details of our developed boards as well as their possible applications. As an application of the boards, we have successfully performed the measurement of the betatron amplitude function during beam acceleration in J-PARC MR. The experimental setup and results of the measurement are also described in detail.

  18. Mass spectrometric characterization of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) stabilizer drug candidate BAY 85-3934 (molidustat) and its glucuronidated metabolite BAY-348, and their implementation into routine doping controls.

    PubMed

    Dib, Josef; Mongongu, Cynthia; Buisson, Corinne; Molina, Adeline; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thuss, Uwe; Thevis, Mario

    2017-01-01

    The development of new therapeutics potentially exhibiting performance-enhancing properties implicates the risk of their misuse by athletes in amateur and elite sports. Such drugs necessitate preventive anti-doping research for consideration in sports drug testing programmes. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) stabilizers represent an emerging class of therapeutics that allows for increasing erythropoiesis in patients. BAY 85-3934 is a novel HIF stabilizer, which is currently undergoing phase-2 clinical trials. Consequently, the comprehensive characterization of BAY 85-3934 and human urinary metabolites as well as the implementation of these analytes into routine doping controls is of great importance. The mass spectrometric behaviour of the HIF stabilizer drug candidate BAY 85-3934 and a glucuronidated metabolite (BAY-348) were characterized by electrospray ionization-(tandem) mass spectrometry (ESI-MS(/MS)) and multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n) ). Subsequently, two different laboratories established different analytical approaches (one each) enabling urine sample analyses by employing either direct urine injection or solid-phase extraction. The methods were cross-validated for the metabolite BAY-348 that is expected to represent an appropriate target analyte for human urine analysis. Two test methods allowing for the detection of BAY-348 in human urine were applied and cross-validated concerning the validation parameters specificity, linearity, lower limit of detection (LLOD; 1-5 ng/mL), ion suppression/enhancement (up to 78%), intra- and inter-day precision (3-21%), recovery (29-48%), and carryover. By means of ten spiked test urine samples sent blinded to one of the participating laboratories, the fitness-for-purpose of both assays was provided as all specimens were correctly identified applying both testing methods. As no post-administration study samples were available, analyses of authentic urine specimens remain desirable. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley

  19. PULSION® HP: Tunable, High Productivity Plasma Doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felch, S. B.; Torregrosa, F.; Etienne, H.; Spiegel, Y.; Roux, L.; Turnbaugh, D.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma doping has been explored for many implant applications for over two decades and is now being used in semiconductor manufacturing for two applications: DRAM polysilicon counter-doping and contact doping. The PULSION HP is a new plasma doping tool developed by Ion Beam Services for high-volume production that enables customer control of the dominant mechanism—deposition, implant, or etch. The key features of this tool are a proprietary, remote RF plasma source that enables a high density plasma with low chamber pressure, resulting in a wide process space, and special chamber and wafer electrode designs that optimize doping uniformity.

  20. Motor imagery, P300 and error-related EEG-based robot arm movement control for rehabilitation purpose.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Saugat; Konar, Amit; Tibarewala, D N

    2014-12-01

    The paper proposes a novel approach toward EEG-driven position control of a robot arm by utilizing motor imagery, P300 and error-related potentials (ErRP) to align the robot arm with desired target position. In the proposed scheme, the users generate motor imagery signals to control the motion of the robot arm. The P300 waveforms are detected when the user intends to stop the motion of the robot on reaching the goal position. The error potentials are employed as feedback response by the user. On detection of error the control system performs the necessary corrections on the robot arm. Here, an AdaBoost-Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier is used to decode the 4-class motor imagery and an SVM is used to decode the presence of P300 and ErRP waveforms. The average steady-state error, peak overshoot and settling time obtained for our proposed approach is 0.045, 2.8% and 44 s, respectively, and the average rate of reaching the target is 95%. The results obtained for the proposed control scheme make it suitable for designs of prosthetics in rehabilitative applications.

  1. Enhancing CO2 electrolysis through synergistic control of non-stoichiometry and doping to tune cathode surface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Lingting; Zhang, Minyi; Huang, Ping; Guo, Guocong; Hong, Maochun; Li, Chunsen; Irvine, John T. S.; Xie, Kui

    2017-03-01

    Sustainable future energy scenarios require significant efficiency improvements in both electricity generation and storage. High-temperature solid oxide cells, and in particular carbon dioxide electrolysers, afford chemical storage of available electricity that can both stabilize and extend the utilization of renewables. Here we present a double doping strategy to facilitate CO2 reduction at perovskite titanate cathode surfaces, promoting adsorption/activation by making use of redox active dopants such as Mn linked to oxygen vacancies and dopants such as Ni that afford metal nanoparticle exsolution. Combined experimental characterization and first-principle calculations reveal that the adsorbed and activated CO2 adopts an intermediate chemical state between a carbon dioxide molecule and a carbonate ion. The dual doping strategy provides optimal performance with no degradation being observed after 100 h of high-temperature operation and 10 redox cycles, suggesting a reliable cathode material for CO2 electrolysis.

  2. Enhancing CO2 electrolysis through synergistic control of non-stoichiometry and doping to tune cathode surface structures

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Lingting; Zhang, Minyi; Huang, Ping; Guo, Guocong; Hong, Maochun; Li, Chunsen; Irvine, John T. S.; Xie, Kui

    2017-01-01

    Sustainable future energy scenarios require significant efficiency improvements in both electricity generation and storage. High-temperature solid oxide cells, and in particular carbon dioxide electrolysers, afford chemical storage of available electricity that can both stabilize and extend the utilization of renewables. Here we present a double doping strategy to facilitate CO2 reduction at perovskite titanate cathode surfaces, promoting adsorption/activation by making use of redox active dopants such as Mn linked to oxygen vacancies and dopants such as Ni that afford metal nanoparticle exsolution. Combined experimental characterization and first-principle calculations reveal that the adsorbed and activated CO2 adopts an intermediate chemical state between a carbon dioxide molecule and a carbonate ion. The dual doping strategy provides optimal performance with no degradation being observed after 100 h of high-temperature operation and 10 redox cycles, suggesting a reliable cathode material for CO2 electrolysis. PMID:28300066

  3. Nucleation, Growth Mechanism, and Controlled Coating of ZnO ALD onto Vertically Aligned N-Doped CNTs.

    PubMed

    Silva, R M; Ferro, M C; Araujo, J R; Achete, C A; Clavel, G; Silva, R F; Pinna, N

    2016-07-19

    Zinc oxide thin films were deposited on vertically aligned nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) from diethylzinc and water. The study demonstrates that doping CNTs with nitrogen is an effective approach for the "activation" of the CNTs surface for the ALD of metal oxides. Conformal ZnO coatings are already obtained after 50 ALD cycles, whereas at lower ALD cycles an island growth mode is observed. Moreover, the process allows for a uniform growth from the top to the bottom of the vertically aligned N-CNT arrays. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrates that ZnO nucleation takes place at the N-containing species on the surface of the CNTs by the formation of the Zn-N bonds at the interface between the CNTs and the ZnO film.

  4. Controlling polymorphic structures and investigating electric properties of Ca-doped zirconia using solid state ceramic method

    SciTech Connect

    Emam, W.I.; Mabied, Ahmed F.; Hashem, H.M.; Selim, M.M.; El-Shabiny, A.M.; Ahmed Farag, I.S.

    2015-08-15

    Structural study of Zr{sub 1−x}Ca{sub x}O{sub 2−x} samples with x=0.01–0.15 were prepared using solid state ceramic method. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed a mixture of the high temperature phase and the monoclinic one for the samples with x≤0.05. On the other hand, the formation of a single high temperature cubic phase was observed within a concentration range of x=0.06–0.10. At concentrations higher than 0.10 the calcium zirconate phase was observed besides the dominant high temperature one. Rietveld refinement of the single phase data clearly revealed, that substitution of zirconium by calcium increases both the lattice parameters as well as the tetrahedral bond length. Ionic to electronic conductivity ratio enhanced considerably as Ca-doping level ascends. The dielectric constant shows strong temperature dependence at lower frequencies. The dielectric loss factor increases rapidly with the increase in temperature at lower frequencies, while decreases with the increase in frequency at higher temperatures. The ionic conduction is considered as the dominant process at higher temperatures. - Graphical abstract: Forming a high temperature cubic zirconia phase at 1200 °C using ceramic solid state method and aliovalent cation. - Highlights: • Formation the high temperature cubic polymorph of zirconia using Ca-doping. • Solid state ceramic method was used for preparing the cubic Ca-doped zirconia. • Substitution of zirconium by calcium increases the lattice parameters and the bond length. • Ionic to electronic conductivity ratio enhanced considerably as Ca-doping level increases.

  5. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Passive laser Q switches made of glass doped with oxidised nanoparticles of copper selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumashev, K. V.

    2000-01-01

    Passive Q switching of Nd3+:YAG (λ = 1060 nm) and YAlO3:Nd3+ (1340 nm) lasers, as well as of an Er3+ (1540 nm) glass laser was realised by using glass doped with oxidised nanoparticles of copper selenide. Nonlinear optical properties of the nanoparticles (radius of 25 nm) in a glass matrix were studied by the picosecond absorption spectroscopy technique.

  6. SDS-PAGE of recombinant and endogenous erythropoietins: benefits and limitations of the method for application in doping control.

    PubMed

    Reichel, Christian; Kulovics, Ronald; Jordan, Veronika; Watzinger, Martina; Geisendorfer, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Doping of athletes with recombinant and genetically modified erythropoietins (EPO) is currently detected by isoelectric focusing (IEF). The application of these drugs leads to a significant change in the isoform profile of endogenous urinary erythropoietin (uhEPO). Dynepo, MIRCERA, biosimilars with variable IEF-profiles as well as active urines and effort urines have made additional testing strategies necessary. The new generation of small molecule EPO-receptor stimulating agents like Hematide will also challenge the analytical concept of detecting the abuse of erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESA). By determining their apparent molecular masses with SDS-PAGE a clear differentiation between endogenous and exogenous substances also concerning new EPO modifications is possible. Due to the orthogonal character of IEF- and SDS-PAGE both methods complement each other. The additional benefits of SDS-PAGE especially in relation to active and effort urines as well as the detection of Dynepo were investigated. Due to significant differences between the apparent molecular masses of uhEPO/serum EPO (shEPO) and recombinant, genetically or chemically modified erythropoietins the presence of active or effort urines was easily revealed. The characteristic band shape and apparent molecular mass of Dynepo on SDS-PAGE additionally evidenced the presence of this substance in urine. A protocol for the detection of EPO-doping in serum and plasma by SDS-PAGE was developed. Blood appears to be the ideal matrix for detecting all forms ESA-doping in the future.

  7. Controlling of group velocity via terahertz signal radiation in a defect medium doped by four-level InGaN/GaN quantum dot nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarzadeh, Hossein; Sangachin, Elnaz Ahmadi; Asadpour, Seyyed Hossein

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel scheme for controlling the group velocity of transmitted and reflected pulse from defect medium doped with four-level InGaN/GaN quantum dot nanostructure. Quantum dot nanostructure is designed numerically by Schrödinger and Poisson equations which solve self consistently. By size control of quantum dot and external voltage, one can design a four-level quantum dot with appropriate energy levels which can be suitable for controlling the group velocity of pulse transmission and reflection from defect slab with terahertz signal field. It is found that in the presence and absence of terahertz signal field the behaviors of transmission and reflection pulses are completely different. Moreover, it is shown that for strong terahertz signal field, by changing the thickness of the slab, simultaneous peak and dip for transmission and reflection pulse are obtained.

  8. [Changes of the elastomer impression materials after their immersion in some disinfection agents for AIDS infection control purposes].

    PubMed

    Pissiotis, A; Panagiotoyni, E; Kapari, D; Kaloyiannides, A

    1989-01-01

    In achieving infection control in the dental office and the dental laboratory it has been suggested that impressions made in the dental office should be disinfected before they are send to the dental laboratory. In this study we examined the solubility and the linear changes of some elastomer impression materials after their immersion in disinfection agents after ten, twenty and forty minute time intervals. The disinfection agents used were: 75% alcohol, domestic chlorine 10%, the agent sterile pack (isopropyl alcohol) and 2% activated glutaraldehyde (SIDEX). Water was used as control. Our findings show that all types of elastomer impression materials appear to suffer insignificant changes both linear and weight-wise but polyether impression materials show significant changes in almost all the disinfection agents that were used and the time intervals that were studied.

  9. Distributed Blowing and Suction for the Purpose of Streak Control in a Boundary Layer Subjected to a Favorable Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forgoston, Eric; Tumin, Anatoli; Ashpis, David E.

    2005-01-01

    An analysis of the optimal control by blowing and suction in order to generate stream- wise velocity streaks is presented. The problem is examined using an iterative process that employs the Parabolized Stability Equations for an incompressible uid along with its adjoint equations. In particular, distributions of blowing and suction are computed for both the normal and tangential velocity perturbations for various choices of parameters.

  10. Mildronate (Meldonium) in professional sports - monitoring doping control urine samples using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography - high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Görgens, Christian; Guddat, Sven; Dib, Josef; Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2015-01-01

    To date, substances such as Mildronate (Meldonium) are not on the radar of anti-doping laboratories as the compound is not explicitly classified as prohibited. However, the anti-ischemic drug Mildronate demonstrates an increase in endurance performance of athletes, improved rehabilitation after exercise, protection against stress, and enhanced activations of central nervous system (CNS) functions. In the present study, the existing evidence of Mildronate's usage in sport, which is arguably not (exclusively) based on medicinal reasons, is corroborated by unequivocal analytical data allowing the estimation of the prevalence and extent of misuse in professional sports. Such data are vital to support decision-making processes, particularly regarding the ban on drugs in sport. Due to the growing body of evidence (black market products and athlete statements) concerning its misuse in sport, adequate test methods for the reliable identification of Mildronate are required, especially since the substance has been added to the 2015 World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) monitoring program. In the present study, two approaches were established using an in-house synthesized labelled internal standard (Mildronate-D3 ). One aimed at the implementation of the analyte into routine doping control screening methods to enable its monitoring at the lowest possible additional workload for the laboratory, and another that is appropriate for the peculiar specifics of the analyte, allowing the unequivocal confirmation of findings using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry (HILIC-HRMS). Here, according to applicable regulations in sports drug testing, a full qualitative validation was conducted. The assay demonstrated good specificity, robustness (rRT=0.3%), precision (intra-day: 7.0-8.4%; inter-day: 9.9-12.9%), excellent linearity (R>0.99) and an adequate lower limit of detection (<10 ng/mL).

  11. Mildronate (Meldonium) in professional sports – monitoring doping control urine samples using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography – high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Görgens, Christian; Dib, Josef; Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2015-01-01

    To date, substances such as Mildronate (Meldonium) are not on the radar of anti‐doping laboratories as the compound is not explicitly classified as prohibited. However, the anti‐ischemic drug Mildronate demonstrates an increase in endurance performance of athletes, improved rehabilitation after exercise, protection against stress, and enhanced activations of central nervous system (CNS) functions. In the present study, the existing evidence of Mildronate's usage in sport, which is arguably not (exclusively) based on medicinal reasons, is corroborated by unequivocal analytical data allowing the estimation of the prevalence and extent of misuse in professional sports. Such data are vital to support decision‐making processes, particularly regarding the ban on drugs in sport. Due to the growing body of evidence (black market products and athlete statements) concerning its misuse in sport, adequate test methods for the reliable identification of Mildronate are required, especially since the substance has been added to the 2015 World Anti‐Doping Agency (WADA) monitoring program. In the present study, two approaches were established using an in‐house synthesized labelled internal standard (Mildronate‐D3). One aimed at the implementation of the analyte into routine doping control screening methods to enable its monitoring at the lowest possible additional workload for the laboratory, and another that is appropriate for the peculiar specifics of the analyte, allowing the unequivocal confirmation of findings using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography‐high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry (HILIC‐HRMS). Here, according to applicable regulations in sports drug testing, a full qualitative validation was conducted. The assay demonstrated good specificity, robustness (rRT=0.3%), precision (intra‐day: 7.0–8.4%; inter‐day: 9.9–12.9%), excellent linearity (R>0.99) and an adequate lower limit of detection (<10 ng/mL). © 2015 The Authors

  12. Generation of Q-switched mode locking controlled rectangular noise-like soliton bunching in a Tm-doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Tian; Chen, Weicheng; Lin, Wei; Yang, Zhongmin

    2016-08-08

    We report on an interesting phenomenon of the combination of Q-switched mode locked pulses (QSMLP) and rectangular noise-like pulses (RNLP) as a unit in a Tm-doped ring fiber laser which contains a Fabry-Perot (F-P) subcavity based on the nonlinear polarization evolution (NPE) technique. The RNLP and QSMLP are independently generated in the ring cavity and F-P subcavity, respectively. A notable characteristic is that the physical parameters of RNLP, e.g. repetition rate and pulse duration, are controlled by QSMLP. Thus, they form as a composite bunching, which is termed as "Q-switched mode locking controlled rectangular noise-like soliton bunching (QRNSB)". Further investigation shows that the existence of QRNSB only occurs in high pumping conditions, while both fundamental mode-locking pulses and the coexistence of QSMLP and solitons are achieved in low pumping ones. Our work can enrich the understanding of the nonlinear dynamics in fiber lasers.

  13. Rare earth doped LiYbF{sub 4} phosphors with controlled morphologies: Hydrothermal synthesis and luminescent properties

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wenjuan; Lu, Chunhua; Jiang, Chenfei; Jin, Junyang; Ding, Mingye; Ni, Yaru; Xu, Zhongzi

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► LiYbF{sub 4} microparticles as an excellent upconverting materials. ► High temperature and long time can favor high crystalline LiYbF{sub 4} microparticles. ► The shape of LiYbF{sub 4} microparticles can be tuned by the molar ratio of EDTA to Yb{sup 3+}. ► Bright green emission can be obtained by changing the doping concentration of Er{sup 3+}. -- Abstract: High quality monodisperse LiYbF{sub 4} microparticles with shape of octahedron had been prepared via a facile hydrothermal route. The crystalline phase, size, morphology and luminescence properties were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), photoluminescence (PL) spectra and Commission Internationale de L’Eclairage (CIE 1931) chromaticity coordinates, respectively. The influences of reaction temperature, reaction time and the molar ratio of EDTA to Yb{sup 3+} on the crystal phases and shapes of as-prepared products had been investigated in detail. The upconversion (UC) luminescence properties of LiYb{sub 1−x}F{sub 4}:xEr{sup 3+} (x =0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 10 mol%) particles with octahedral microstructures were studied under 976 nm excitation. The results showed that the luminescence colors of the corresponding products could be tuned to bright green by changing the doping concentration of Er{sup 3+} ion. The luminescence mechanisms for the doped Er{sup 3+} ion were thoroughly analyzed, showing great potential in applications such as biolabels, displays and other optical technologies.

  14. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Picosecond pulse generation in a passively mode-locked Bi-doped fibre laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, Aleksandr A.; Kryukov, P. G.; Dianov, Evgenii M.; Okhotnikov, Oleg G.

    2009-10-01

    CW passive mode locking is achieved in a bismuth-doped fibre laser using a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror optimised for operation in the range 1100-1200 nm. The pump source is a cw ytterbium fibre laser (1075 nm, maximum output power of 2.7 W), and the pulse parameters can be tuned by varying the intracavity group velocity dispersion using a diffraction grating pair. Stable laser pulses are obtained with a duration down to τp approx 1.1 ps.

  15. Examples of doping control analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: ephedrines, beta-receptor blocking agents, diuretics, sympathomimetics, and cross-linked hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2005-01-01

    The application of modern and powerful analytical instruments consisting of liquid chromatographs (LCs), sophisticated atmospheric pressure ion sources, and sensitive mass analyzers has improved quality as well as speed of doping control analyses markedly during the last 5 years. Numerous compounds such as beta-receptor blocking agents or diuretics require derivatization prior to gas chromatographic (GC) and mass spectrometric (MS) measurement, which is the reason for extended sample preparation periods. In addition, several substances demonstrate poor GC-MS properties even after chemical modification, and peptide hormones such as cross-linked hemoglobins cannot be analyzed at all by means of GC-MS. With the availability of electrospray ionization and robust tandem MSs (e.g., triple-stage quadrupole or ion trap instruments) many new or complementary screening and confirmation assays have been developed, providing detailed qualitative and quantitative information on prohibited drugs. With selected categories of compounds (ephedrines, beta-blockers, b2-agonists, diuretics, and bovine hemoglobin-based oxygen therapeutics) that are banned according to the rules of the World Anti-Doping Agency and International Olympic Committee, the advantages of LC-MS-MS procedures over conventional GC-MS assays are demonstrated, such as enhanced separation of analytes, shorter sample pretreatment, and identification of substances that are not identified by GC-MS.

  16. Ti-doped indium tin oxide thin films for transparent field-effect transistors: control of charge-carrier density and crystalline structure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-In; Ji, Kwang Hwan; Jang, Mi; Yang, Hoichang; Choi, Rino; Jeong, Jae Kyeong

    2011-07-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) films are representative transparent conducting oxide media for organic light-emitting diodes, liquid crystal displays, and solar cell applications. Extending the utility of ITO films from passive electrodes to active channel layers in transparent field-effect transistors (FETs), however, has been largely limited because of the materials' high carrier density (>1 × 10(20) cm(-3)), wide band gap, and polycrystalline structure. Here, we demonstrate that control over the cation composition in ITO-based oxide films via solid doping of titanium (Ti) can optimize the carrier concentration and suppress film crystallization. On 120 nm thick SiO(2)/Mo (200 nm)/glass substrates, transparent n-type FETs prepared with 4 at % Ti-doped ITO films and fabricated via the cosputtering of ITO and TiO(2) exhibited high electron mobilities of 13.4 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), a low subthreshold gate swing of 0.25 V decade(-1), and a high I(on/)I(off) ratio of >1 × 10(8).

  17. Controlling the Al-doping profile and accompanying electrical properties of rutile-phased TiO2 thin films.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Woojin; Rha, Sang Ho; Lee, Woongkyu; Yoo, Yeon Woo; An, Cheol Hyun; Jung, Kwang Hwan; Kim, Seong Keun; Hwang, Cheol Seong

    2014-05-28

    The role of Al dopant in rutile-phased TiO2 films in the evaluation of the mechanism of leakage current reduction in Al-doped TiO2 (ATO) was studied in detail. The leakage current of the ATO film was strongly affected by the Al concentration at the interface between the ATO film and the RuO2 electrode. The conduction band offset of the interface increased with the increase in the Al dopant concentration in the rutile TiO2, which reduced the leakage current in the voltage region pertinent to the next-generation dynamic random access memory application. However, the Al doping in the anatase TiO2 did not notably increase the conduction band offset even with a higher Al concentration. The detailed analyses of the leakage conduction mechanism based on the quantum mechanical transfer-matrix method showed that Schottky emission and Fowler-Nordheim tunneling was the dominant leakage conduction mechanism in the lower and higher voltage regions, respectively. The chemical analyses using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy corroborated the electrical test results.

  18. Genetic Doping and Health Damages

    PubMed Central

    Fallahi, AA; Ravasi, AA; Farhud, DD

    2011-01-01

    Background: Use of genetic doping or gene transfer technology will be the newest and the lethal method of doping in future and have some unpleasant consequences for sports, athletes, and outcomes of competitions. The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) defines genetic doping as “the non-therapeutic use of genes, genetic elements, and/or cells that have the capacity to enhance athletic performance ”. The purpose of this review is to consider genetic doping, health damages and risks of new genes if delivered in athletes. Methods: This review, which is carried out by reviewing relevant publications, is primarily based on the journals available in GOOGLE, ELSEVIER, PUBMED in fields of genetic technology, and health using a combination of keywords (e.g., genetic doping, genes, exercise, performance, athletes) until July 2010. Conclusion: There are several genes related to sport performance and if they are used, they will have health risks and sever damages such as cancer, autoimmunization, and heart attack. PMID:23113049

  19. A p → n transition for Sn-doped Cu(In,Ga)Se2 bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsefi, Mehrdad; Kuo, Dong-Hau

    2013-08-01

    Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) pellets at different Sn contents were fabricated by reactive liquid-phase sintering at 600-700 °C with the help of sintering aids of Sb2S3 and Te. Powder preparation was based upon the molecular formula of Cu0.9[(In0.7-xSnxGa0.3)0.9Sb0.1](S0.15Te0.2Se1.65) or Sn-x-CIGSe. Morphology, structure, and electrical property of Sn-doped CIGSe bulks were investigated. The composition of Sn-doped CIGSe is purposely designed for studying the doping effect on the CIGSe performance. The unexpected increase in hole concentration of CIGSe due to the donor doping is rationalized. A controllable n-type semiconductor is deliberately achieved for Sn-0.15-CIGSe and important for making a p/n homojunction in CIGSe solar cells.

  20. OMICS-strategies and methods in the fight against doping.

    PubMed

    Reichel, Christian

    2011-12-10

    During the past decade OMICS-methods not only continued to have their impact on research strategies in life sciences and in particular molecular biology, but also started to be used for anti-doping control purposes. Research activities were mainly reasoned by the fact that several substances and methods, which were prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), were or still are difficult to detect by direct methods. Transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics in theory offer ideal platforms for the discovery of biomarkers for the indirect detection of the abuse of these substances and methods. Traditionally, the main focus of transcriptomics and proteomics projects has been on the prolonged detection of the misuse of human growth hormone (hGH), recombinant erythropoietin (rhEpo), and autologous blood transfusion. An additional benefit of the indirect or marker approach would also be that similarly acting substances might then be detected by a single method, without being forced to develop new direct detection methods for new but comparable prohibited substances (as has been the case, e.g. for the various forms of Epo analogs and biosimilars). While several non-OMICS-derived parameters for the indirect detection of doping are currently in use, for example the blood parameters of the hematological module of the athlete's biological passport, the outcome of most non-targeted OMICS-projects led to no direct application in routine doping control so far. The main reason is the inherent complexity of human transcriptomes, proteomes, and metabolomes and their inter-individual variability. The article reviews previous and recent research projects and their results and discusses future strategies for a more efficient application of OMICS-methods in doping control.

  1. Doped colorimetric assay liposomes

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides compositions comprising colorimetric assay liposomes. The present invention also provides methods for producing colorimetric liposomes and calorimetric liposome assay systems. In preferred embodiments, these calorimetric liposome systems provide high levels of sensitivity through the use of dopant molecules. As these dopants allow the controlled destabilization of the liposome structure, upon exposure of the doped liposomes to analyte(s) of interest, the indicator color change is facilitated and more easily recognized.

  2. Doping in sport: a review of elite athletes' attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge.

    PubMed

    Morente-Sánchez, Jaime; Zabala, Mikel

    2013-06-01

    Doping in sport is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied mainly from a biomedical point of view, even though psychosocial approaches are also key factors in the fight against doping. This phenomenon has evolved greatly in recent years, and greater understanding of it is essential for developing efficient prevention programmes. In the psychosocial approach, attitudes are considered an index of doping behaviour, relating the use of banned substances to greater leniency towards doping. The aim of this review is to gather and critically analyse the most recent publications describing elite athletes' attitudes, beliefs and knowledge of doping in sport, to better understand the foundations provided by the previous work, and to help develop practical strategies to efficiently combat doping. For this purpose, we performed a literature search using combinations of the terms "doping", "sport", "elite athletes", "attitudes", "beliefs", "knowledge", "drugs", and "performance-enhancing substances" (PES). A total of 33 studies were subjected to comprehensive assessment using articles published between 2000 and 2011. All of the reports focused on elite athletes and described their attitudes, beliefs and knowledge of doping in sport. The initial reasons given for using banned substances included achievement of athletic success by improving performance, financial gain, improving recovery and prevention of nutritional deficiencies, as well as the idea that others use them, or the "false consensus effect". Although most athletes acknowledge that doping is cheating, unhealthy and risky because of sanctions, its effectiveness is also widely recognized. There is a general belief about the inefficacy of anti-doping programmes, and athletes criticise the way tests are carried out. Most athletes consider the severity of punishment is appropriate or not severe enough. There are some differences between sports, as team-based sports and sports requiring motor skills could be less

  3. Possible size control and emission characteristics of Eu3+-doped Y2O3 nanoparticles synthesized by surfactant-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, Yukihiko; Harada, Takashi; Sasai, Ryo; Tomita, Koji; Nishiyama, Katsura

    2016-08-01

    Yttrium oxide nanoparticles doped with 2.0 wt% Eu (Eu@Y2O3) were synthesized via the surfactant-assembly method. The average diameter of Eu@Y2O3 (dav) depends on the alkyl chain number (N) of the sodium alkyl sulfates employed as surfactants. Using surfactants with N = 8, 10, and 12, Eu@Y2O3 with dav = 35, 200, and 500 nm, respectively were obtained. Such changes in dav are ascribed to the difference in the micelle aggregation numbers, supporting the use of rare-earth ions in the assembly. The Eu@Y2O3 particles synthesized presently emitted through Eu3+ transitions under UV excitation of Y2O3, making them applicable to nanoemitters.

  4. Nanostructured biocompatible thermal/electrical stimuli-responsive biopolymer-doped polypyrrole for controlled release of chlorpromazine: kinetics studies.

    PubMed

    Shamaeli, Ehsan; Alizadeh, Naader

    2014-09-10

    Biocompatible nanostructured conductive heparin-doped polypyrrole film was fabricated and employed as a high-capacity cation exchanger for programmable release of neuroleptic drug, chlorpromazine (CPZ) with thermally and electrical dual-stimulation. Releasing behavior were studied at different applied potentials and temperatures by in-situ monitoring of UV absorbance measurements. Three mathematical models (Higuchi, Power, and Avrami equation) were employed to investigate kinetics of the release. Based on the obtained results, the Avrami model found to be more comprehensive than two other ones for mathematical description of electro-stimulated release of CPZ. A quantitative relationship between activation energy parameters (Ea, ΔG(≠), ΔH(≠), and ΔS(≠)) and release conditions (applied potential and temperature) has been developed and established to predict release rate constants at various applied conditions.

  5. Optimization and control of the sweeping range in an Yb-doped self-sweeping fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobach, I. A.; Tkachenko, A. Yu; Kablukov, S. I.

    2016-04-01

    Influence of the laser cavity parameters (an active fiber length and output coupling losses) and the temperature of elements (active fiber and pump laser diode) on the sweeping range in an Yb-doped self-sweeping laser is investigated. The obtained results show that the sweeping spectral region is shifted to shorter wavelengths for shorter active fibers and with increasing absorbed power. This allows one to obtain self-sweeping operation in a broad range within a ytterbium gain bandwidth from 1028 to 1080 nm. At the same time, there are optimal cavity parameters at which the sweeping span is the broadest (>20 nm). Good agreement between the experimental sweeping range and the calculated maximum gain wavelength is demonstrated.

  6. Repetition rate stabilization of an erbium-doped all-fiber laser via opto-mechanical control of the intracavity group velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xuling; He, Boqu; Zhao, Jian; Liu, Yang; Bai, Dongbi; Wang, Chao; Liu, Geping; Luo, Daping; Liu, Fengjiang; Li, Wenxue; Zeng, Heping; Yang, Kangwen; Hao, Qiang

    2015-01-19

    We present a method for stabilizing the repetition rate of an erbium-doped all-fiber laser by inserting an electronic polarization controller (EPC) in the fiber laser cavity. The device exhibited good integration, low cost, and convenient operation. Such a repetition rate stabilization may facilitate an all-fiber laser comb system with high integration. The repetition rate was phase-locked to a Rb reference more than 72 h with a low feedback voltage applied to one channel of the EPC. The repetition rate was 74.6 MHz. The standard deviation and the repetition rate linewidth were 1.4 and 1.7 mHz, respectively.

  7. Homogeneous double-layer amorphous Si-doped indium oxide thin-film transistors for control of turn-on voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizu, Takio; Aikawa, Shinya; Nabatame, Toshihide; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Ito, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Makoto; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito

    2016-07-01

    We fabricated homogeneous double-layer amorphous Si-doped indium oxide (ISO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) with an insulating ISO cap layer on top of a semiconducting ISO bottom channel layer. The homogeneously stacked ISO TFT exhibited high mobility (19.6 cm2/V s) and normally-off characteristics after annealing in air. It exhibited normally-off characteristics because the ISO insulator suppressed oxygen desorption, which suppressed the formation of oxygen vacancies (VO) in the semiconducting ISO. Furthermore, we investigated the recovery of the double-layer ISO TFT, after a large negative shift in turn-on voltage caused by hydrogen annealing, by treating it with annealing in ozone. The recovery in turn-on voltage indicates that the dense VO in the semiconducting ISO can be partially filled through the insulator ISO. Controlling molecule penetration in the homogeneous double layer is useful for adjusting the properties of TFTs in advanced oxide electronics.

  8. High-speed gas chromatography in doping control: fast-GC and fast-GC/MS determination of beta-adrenoceptor ligands and diuretics.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Claudio; Bicchi, Carlo; Di Stilo, Antonella; Salomone, Alberto; Vincenti, Marco

    2006-12-01

    In official doping controls, about 300 drugs and metabolites have to be screened for each sample. Moreover, the number of determinations to be routinely processed increases continuously as the number of both samples and potential illicit drugs keeps growing. As a consequence, increasingly specific, sensitive, and, above all, fast methods for doping controls are needed. The present study presents an efficient fast-GC/MS approach to the routine screening of two different classes of doping agents, namely beta-adrenoceptor ligands and diuretics (belonging to the S3, P2, and S5 groups of the WADA list of prohibited substances). Narrow bore columns (100 mm id) of different lengths and coated with apolar stationary phases were successfully used to separate the derivatized analytes; preliminary experiments (results not shown) showed better performances with OV-1701 for the separation of beta-adrenoceptor ligands. On the same stationary phase some diuretics required too high a temperature or a long isothermal time for elution, in which case a DB1-MS column was preferred. Two methods of sample preparation, derivatization, and analysis were used on aqueous standard mixtures of, respectively, (i) eight beta-adrenoceptor ligands, including five beta-antagonists (acebutolol, alprenolol, atenolol, metoprolol, pindolol) and three beta2-agonists (salbutamol, clenbuterol, terbutaline) and (ii) seventeen diuretic drugs (acetazolamide, althiazide, bendroflumethiazide, bumethanide, canrenone, chlorothiazide, chlortalidone, clopamide, ethacrinic acid, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide, hydroflumethiazide, indapamide, indomethacine, spironolactone, triamterene, trichloromethiazide) and one masking agent (probenecid). The mixture of beta-adrenoceptor ligand derivatives was efficiently separated in about 5.6 min, while the one of 18 diuretics and masking agents required less than 5 min for analysis. Limits of detection were from 1 microg/L for pindolol, ethacrinic acid, furosemide

  9. Programmed Control of Purposive Movement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    intensity, and time-course of current is programmed by a Linc-8 computer. Several subprojects were carried out analyzing behavior for programmed brain ... stimulation , including perception, learning, level of arousal, and a brain prosthesis for motor deficits and blindness. (Author)

  10. Reversible control of the chromium valence in chemically reduced Cr-doped SrTiO3 bulk powders.

    PubMed

    Lehuta, Keith A; Kittilstved, Kevin R

    2016-06-14

    The effect of chemical reduction by NaBH4 on the electronic structure of Cr-doped SrTiO3-δ bulk powders prepared by a solid-state reaction was systematically studied as a function of reduction temperature. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopies (DRS) were utilized to monitor changes in the electronic structures of both intrinsic defects (oxygen vacancies and/or Ti(3+)) and extrinsic dopants (Cr(3+)) at different reduction temperatures. We identify the existence of two temperature regimes where changes occur within 30 min. The first temperature regime occurs between 300-375 °C and results in (1) reduction of oxygen-related surface defects, and (2) an increase in the concentration of Cr(3+) by over an order of magnitude, suggesting that EPR-silent Cr(4+) or Cr(6+) is being reduced to Cr(3+) by NaBH4. The second temperature regime occurs between 375-430 °C where we observe clear evidence of Ti(3+) formation by EPR spectroscopy that indicates chemical reduction of the SrTiO3 lattice. In addition, the oxygen-related surface defects observed in regime 1 are not formed in regime 2, but instead lattice oxygen vacancies (VO) are observed by EPR. The changes to the Cr-doped SrTiO3 electronic structure after chemical reduction in regime 1 are quantitatively reversible after aerobic annealing at 400 °C for 30 min. The internal oxygen vacancies formed during the higher temperature reductions in regime 2 require increased temperatures of at least 600 °C to be fully reoxidized in 30 min. The effect of these different oxygen-related defects on the EPR spectrum of substitutional Cr(3+) dopants is discussed. These results allow us to independently tune the dopant and host electronic structures of a technologically-relevant multifunctional material by a simple ex situ chemical perturbation.

  11. A brief review of co-doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingzhao; Tse, Kinfai; Wong, Manhoi; Zhang, Yiou; Zhu, Junyi

    2016-12-01

    Dopants and defects are important in semiconductor and magnetic devices. Strategies for controlling doping and defects have been the focus of semiconductor physics research during the past decades and remain critical even today. Co-doping is a promising strategy that can be used for effectively tuning the dopant populations, electronic properties, and magnetic properties. It can enhance the solubility of dopants and improve the stability of desired defects. During the past 20 years, significant experimental and theoretical efforts have been devoted to studying the characteristics of co-doping. In this article, we first review the historical development of co-doping. Then, we review a variety of research performed on co-doping, based on the compensating nature of co-dopants. Finally, we review the effects of contamination and surfactants that can explain the general mechanisms of co-doping.

  12. Sports doping: emerging designer and therapeutic β2-agonists.

    PubMed

    Fragkaki, A G; Georgakopoulos, C; Sterk, S; Nielen, M W F

    2013-10-21

    Beta2-adrenergic agonists, or β2-agonists, are considered essential bronchodilator drugs in the treatment of bronchial asthma, both as symptom-relievers and, in combination with inhaled corticosteroids, as disease-controllers. The use of β2-agonists is prohibited in sports by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) due to claimed anabolic effects, and also, is prohibited as growth promoters in cattle fattening in the European Union. This paper reviews the last seven-year (2006-2012) literature concerning the development of novel β2-agonists molecules either by modifying the molecule of known β2-agonists or by introducing moieties producing indole-, adamantyl- or phenyl urea derivatives. New emerging β2-agonists molecules for future therapeutic use are also presented, intending to emphasize their potential use for doping purposes or as growth promoters in the near future.

  13. Chemical approaches for doping nanodevice architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, John; Biswas, Subhajit; Duffy, Ray; Holmes, Justin D.

    2016-08-01

    Advanced doping technologies are key for the continued scaling of semiconductor devices and the maintenance of device performance beyond the 14 nm technology node. Due to limitations of conventional ion-beam implantation with thin body and 3D device geometries, techniques which allow precise control over dopant diffusion and concentration, in addition to excellent conformality on 3D device surfaces, are required. Spin-on doping has shown promise as a conventional technique for doping new materials, particularly through application with other dopant methods, but may not be suitable for conformal doping of nanostructures. Additionally, residues remain after most spin-on-doping processes which are often difficult to remove. In situ doping of nanostructures is especially common for bottom-up grown nanostructures but problems associated with concentration gradients and morphology changes are commonly experienced. Monolayer doping has been shown to satisfy the requirements for extended defect-free, conformal and controllable doping on many materials ranging from traditional silicon and germanium devices to emerging replacement materials such as III-V compounds but challenges still remain, especially with regard to metrology and surface chemistry at such small feature sizes. This article summarises and critically assesses developments over the last number of years regarding the application of gas and solution phase techniques to dope silicon-, germanium- and III-V-based materials and nanostructures to obtain shallow diffusion depths coupled with high carrier concentrations and abrupt junctions.

  14. Controlling sensitivity and stability of ferrous-xylenol orange-gelatin 3D gel dosimeters by doping with phenanthroline-type ligands and glyoxal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penev, Kalin I.; Mequanint, Kibret

    2013-03-01

    The ferrous-xylenol orange-gelatin (FXG) dosimeter is widely used for three-dimensional ionizing radiation field mapping through optical scanning. Upon irradiation, the ferrous iron (Fe2+) is oxidized to ferric iron (Fe3+), which forms an intensely coloured complex with xylenol orange (XO). XO also acts as a diffusion-limiting additive; however, its presence may cause rapid auto-oxidation of Fe2+ during storage and low stability of the dose response. In this work, phenanthroline-type ligands were added to FXG system in a bid to bind the ferrous iron in a stable complex and minimize the rate of the auto-oxidation, whereas glyoxal was used as a chemical cross-linker, aiming to minimize the ferric iron diffusion. It was found that addition of either 1,10-phenanthroline or 5-nitro-1,10-phenanthroline can improve the auto-oxidation behaviour of the gels. However, the initial background absorbance was slightly increased, and the sensitivity of the dosimeters was decreased. Doping with glyoxal led to a moderate decrease of the diffusion only in those gels that also contained a phenanthroline-type ligand, and did not affect the initial dose response. Glyoxal also afforded an extended period of stable background absorbance level after an initial period of bleaching of the gel. Following re-irradiation, most glyoxal-containing dosimeters showed an excellent linearity of the dose response, albeit at a decreased sensitivity. We recommend further testing of FXG dosimeters, doped with phenanthroline-type ligands and glyoxal as a means for controlling the dose response and improving the long-term storage properties of the gels and the potential for dose fractionation.

  15. Electrochemical inactivation of cyanobacteria and microcystin degradation using a boron-doped diamond anode - A potential tool for cyanobacterial bloom control.

    PubMed

    Meglič, Andrej; Pecman, Anja; Rozina, Tinkara; Leštan, Domen; Sedmak, Bojan

    2017-03-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms are global phenomena that can occur in calm and nutrient-rich (eutrophic) fresh and marine waters. Human exposure to cyanobacteria and their biologically active products is possible during water sports and various water activities, or by ingestion of contaminated water. Although the vast majority of harmful cyanobacterial products are confined to the interior of the cells, these are eventually released into the surrounding water following natural or artificially induced cell death. Electrochemical oxidation has been used here to damage cyanobacteria to halt their proliferation, and for microcystin degradation under in-vitro conditions. Partially spent Jaworski growth medium with no addition of supporting electrolytes was used. Electrochemical treatment resulted in the cyanobacterial loss of cell-buoyancy regulation, cell proliferation arrest, and eventual cell death. Microcystin degradation was studied separately in two basic modes of treatment: batch-wise flow, and constant flow, for electrolytic-cell exposure. Batch-wise exposure simulates treatment under environmental conditions, while constant flow is more appropriate for the study of boron-doped diamond electrode efficacy under laboratory conditions. The effectiveness of microcystin degradation was established using high-performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array detector analysis, while the biological activities of the products were estimated using a colorimetric protein phosphatase-1 inhibition assay. The results indicate potential for the application of electro-oxidation methods for the control of bloom events by taking advantage of specific intrinsic ecological characteristics of bloom-forming cyanobacteria. The applicability of the use of boron-doped diamond electrodes in remediation of water exposed to cyanobacteria bloom events is discussed.

  16. Direct quantification of 11-nor-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in urine by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry in relation to doping control analysis.

    PubMed

    Chebbah, C; Pozo, O J; Deventer, K; Van Eenoo, P; Delbeke, F T

    2010-04-30

    An accurate and precise method for the quantification of 11-nor-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THCA) in urine by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) for doping analysis purposes has been developed. The method involves the use of only 200 microL of urine and the use of D(9)-THCA as internal standard. No extraction procedure is used. The urine samples are hydrolysed using sodium hydroxide and diluted with a mixture of methanol/glacial acetic acid (1:1). Chromatographic separation is achieved using a C8 column with gradient elution. All MS and MS/MS parameters were optimised in both positive and negative electrospray ionisation modes. For the identification and the quantification of THCA three product ions are monitored in both ionisation modes. The method is linear over the studied range (5-40 ng/mL), with satisfactory intra-and inter-assay precision, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) are lower than 15%. Good accuracy is achieved with bias less than 10% at all levels tested. No significant matrix effects are observed. The selectivity and specificity are satisfactory, and no interferences are detected. The LC/MS/MS method was applied for the analysis of 48 real urine samples previously analysed with a routine gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method. A good correlation between the two methods was obtained (r(2) > 0.98) with a slope close to 1.

  17. Morphological appearances and photo-controllable coloration of dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal/polymer coaxial microfibers fabricated by coaxial electrospinning technique.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-De; Chen, Che-Pei; Chen, Lin-Jer; Chuang, Yu-Chou; Huang, Shuan-Yu; Lee, Chia-Rong

    2016-02-08

    This study systematically investigates the morphological appearance of azo-chiral dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal (DDCLC)/polymer coaxial microfibers obtained through the coaxial electrospinning technique and examines, for the first time, their photocontrollable reflection characteristics. Experimental results show that the quasi-continuous electrospun microfibers can be successfully fabricated at a high polymer concentration of 17.5 wt% and an optimum ratio of 2 for the feeding rates of sheath to core materials at 25 °C and a high humidity of 50% ± 2% in the spinning chamber. Furthermore, the optical controllability of the reflective features for the electrospun fibers is studied in detail by changing the concentration of the azo-chiral dopant in the core material, the UV irradiation intensity, and the core diameter of the fibers. Relevant mechanisms are addressed to explain the optical-control behaviors of the DDCLC coaxial fibers. Considering the results, optically controllable DDCLC coaxial microfibers present potential applications in UV microsensors and wearable smart textiles or swabs.

  18. All-optically controllable distributed feedback laser in a dye-doped holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal grating with a photoisomerizable dye.

    PubMed

    Tong, Huai-Pei; Li, Yu-Ren; Lin, Jia-De; Lee, Chia-Rong

    2010-02-01

    This work demonstrates, for the first time, an all-optically controllable distributed feedback (DFB) laser based on a dye-doped holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (DDHPDLC) grating with a photoisomerizable dye. Intensity of the lasing emission can be reduced and increased by raising the irradiation intensity of one CW circularly-polarized green beam and the irradiation time of one CW circularly-polarized red beam, respectively. The all-optical controllability of the lasing emission is owing to the green-beam-induced isothermal nematic-->isotropic and red-beam-induced isothermal isotropic-->nematic phase transitions of the LCs via trans-->cis and cis-->trans back isomerizations of the azo-dye, respectively, in the LC-droplet-rich regions of the grating. The former (latter) mechanism can reduce (increase) the index modulation and thereby the coupling strength in the DFB grating, resulting in the decay (rise) of the lasing emission. Thermal effect is excluded from possible mechanisms causing such an optical controllability of the lasing emission.

  19. Electro-thermal control of aluminum-doped zinc oxide/vanadium dioxide multilayered thin films for smart-device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skuza, J. R.; Scott, D. W.; Mundle, R. M.; Pradhan, A. K.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate the electro-thermal control of aluminum-doped zinc oxide (Al:ZnO) /vanadium dioxide (VO2) multilayered thin films, where the application of a small electric field enables precise control of the applied heat to the VO2 thin film to induce its semiconductor-metal transition (SMT). The transparent conducting oxide nature of the top Al:ZnO film can be tuned to facilitate the fine control of the SMT of the VO2 thin film and its associated properties. In addition, the Al:ZnO film provides a capping layer to the VO2 thin film, which inhibits oxidation to a more energetically favorable and stable V2O5 phase. It also decreases the SMT of the VO2 thin film by approximately 5–10 °C because of an additional stress induced on the VO2 thin film and/or an alteration of the oxygen vacancy concentration in the VO2 thin film. These results have significant impacts on technological applications for both passive and active devices by exploiting this near-room-temperature SMT.

  20. Electro-thermal control of aluminum-doped zinc oxide/vanadium dioxide multilayered thin films for smart-device applications.

    PubMed

    Skuza, J R; Scott, D W; Mundle, R M; Pradhan, A K

    2016-02-17

    We demonstrate the electro-thermal control of aluminum-doped zinc oxide (Al:ZnO) /vanadium dioxide (VO2) multilayered thin films, where the application of a small electric field enables precise control of the applied heat to the VO2 thin film to induce its semiconductor-metal transition (SMT). The transparent conducting oxide nature of the top Al:ZnO film can be tuned to facilitate the fine control of the SMT of the VO2 thin film and its associated properties. In addition, the Al:ZnO film provides a capping layer to the VO2 thin film, which inhibits oxidation to a more energetically favorable and stable V2O5 phase. It also decreases the SMT of the VO2 thin film by approximately 5-10 °C because of an additional stress induced on the VO2 thin film and/or an alteration of the oxygen vacancy concentration in the VO2 thin film. These results have significant impacts on technological applications for both passive and active devices by exploiting this near-room-temperature SMT.

  1. Electro-thermal control of aluminum-doped zinc oxide/vanadium dioxide multilayered thin films for smart-device applications

    PubMed Central

    Skuza, J. R.; Scott, D. W.; Mundle, R. M.; Pradhan, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the electro-thermal control of aluminum-doped zinc oxide (Al:ZnO) /vanadium dioxide (VO2) multilayered thin films, where the application of a small electric field enables precise control of the applied heat to the VO2 thin film to induce its semiconductor-metal transition (SMT). The transparent conducting oxide nature of the top Al:ZnO film can be tuned to facilitate the fine control of the SMT of the VO2 thin film and its associated properties. In addition, the Al:ZnO film provides a capping layer to the VO2 thin film, which inhibits oxidation to a more energetically favorable and stable V2O5 phase. It also decreases the SMT of the VO2 thin film by approximately 5–10 °C because of an additional stress induced on the VO2 thin film and/or an alteration of the oxygen vacancy concentration in the VO2 thin film. These results have significant impacts on technological applications for both passive and active devices by exploiting this near-room-temperature SMT. PMID:26884225

  2. Bifunctional Li and Co Doped ZnO Nanostructures Synthesized by Solvothermal Method: Stabilizer Controlled Shape and Size Tuning.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, O D; Sudarsan, V; Tyagi, A K

    2015-04-01

    1D nanostructures of ZnO, Zn0.95Co0.05O and Zn0.85Co0.05Li0.10 were synthesized by a solvothermal chemical method with and without using oleic acid as a stabilizer. We report a very interesting observation of both room temperature ferromagnetism and photoluminescence properties along with development of different morphological transformation of these nanostructures on doping Co and Li in ZnO in the presence and absence of oleic acid. Zn0.95Co0.05O sample prepared in the presence of oleic acid showed increased saturation magnetization value (~ 4.1 emu/g and) compared to Zn0.95Co0.05O prepared without oleic acid (~ 1.1 emu/g). In both the cases it is observed that Li incorporation further enhances the room temperature ferromagnetic (RTFM) behavior and saturation magnetization values (~ 6 emu/g) of luminescent Zn0.95Co0.05 nanostructures. These results are significant, as the luminescent 1 D RTFM materials will have implications in photo magnetic devices like magneto-optical switches and sensors.

  3. Visible-Light-Induced Activity Control of Peroxidase Bound to Fe-Doped Titanate Nanosheets with Nanometric Lateral Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Kai; Ito, Daiki; Soh, Nobuaki

    2015-10-21

    Catalytic performance of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) electrostatically adsorbed on nanometric and semiconducting Fe-doped titanate (FT) nanosheets was successfully manipulated by visible light illumination. A colloidal solution of FT with a narrow band gap corresponding to a visible light region was fabricated through a hydrolysis reaction of metals sources. HRP could be easily bound to the FT at pH = 4 through an electrostatic interaction between them, and the formed HRP-FT was utilized for the visible-light-driven enzymatic reaction. Under exposure to visible light with enough energy for band gap excitation of the FT, catalytic activity of HRP-FT was dramatically enhanced as compared with free (unbound) HRP and was simply adjusted by light intensity. In addition, wavelength dependence of an enzymatic reaction rate was analogous to an optical absorption spectrum of the FT. These results substantiated an expected reaction mechanism in which the photoenzymatic reaction was initiated by band gap excitation of FT followed by transferring holes generated in the valence band of irradiated FT to HRP. The excited HRP oxidized substrates (amplex ultrared: AUR) accompanied by two-electron reduction to regenerate the resting state. In addition, the catalytic activity was clearly switched by turning on and off the light source.

  4. Reactive pulsed-DC sputtered Nb-doped VO2 coatings for smart thermochromic windows with active solar control.

    PubMed

    Batista, C; Carneiro, J; Ribeiro, R M; Teixeira, V

    2011-10-01

    Thermochromic VO2 thin films have successfully been grown on SiO2-coated float glass by reactive pulsed-DC magnetron sputtering. Different Nb doping amounts were introduced in the VO2 solid solution during the film growing which resulted in films with distinct semiconducting-metal phase transition temperatures. Pure VO2 showed improved thermochromic behavior as compared with VO2 films prepared by conventional DC sputtering. The transition temperatures were linearly decreased from 59 down to 34 degrees C with the increase in Nb content. However, the luminous transmittance and the infrared modulation efficiency were markedly affected. The surface morphology of the films was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and showed a tendency for grain sized reduction due to Nb addition. Moreover, the films were found to be very dense with no columnar microstructure. Structural analyses carried out by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) revealed that Nb introduces significant amount of defects in the crystal lattice which clearly degrade the optical properties.

  5. Iron-Doped (La,Sr)MnO3 Manganites as Promising Mediators of Self-Controlled Magnetic Nanohyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlapa, Yulia; Kulyk, Mykola; Kalita, Viktor; Polek, Taras; Tovstolytkin, Alexandr; Greneche, Jean-Marc; Solopan, Sergii; Belous, Anatolii

    2016-01-01

    Fe-doped La0.77Sr0.23Mn1 - y Fe y O3 nanoparticles have been synthesized by sol-gel method, and ceramic samples based on them were sintered at 1613 K. Crystallographic and magnetic properties of obtained nanoparticles and ceramic samples have been studied. It has been established that cell volume for nanoparticles increases with growing of iron content, while this dependence displays an opposite trend in the case of ceramic samples. Mössbauer investigations have shown that in all samples, the oxidation state of iron is +3. According to magnetic studies, at room temperature, both nanoparticles and ceramic samples with y ≤ 0.06 display superparamagnetic properties and samples with y ≥ 0.08 are paramagnetic. Magnetic fluids based on La0.77Sr0.23Mn1 - y Fe y O3 nanoparticles and aqua solution of agarose have been prepared. It has been established that heating efficiency of nanoparticles under an alternating magnetic field decreases with growing of iron content.

  6. Substitutional doping in nanocrystal superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cargnello, Matteo; Johnston-Peck, Aaron C.; Diroll, Benjamin T.; Wong, Eric; Datta, Bianca; Damodhar, Divij; Doan-Nguyen, Vicky V. T.; Herzing, Andrew A.; Kagan, Cherie R.; Murray, Christopher B.

    2015-08-01

    Doping is a process in which atomic impurities are intentionally added to a host material to modify its properties. It has had a revolutionary impact in altering or introducing electronic, magnetic, luminescent, and catalytic properties for several applications, for example in semiconductors. Here we explore and demonstrate the extension of the concept of substitutional atomic doping to nanometre-scale crystal doping, in which one nanocrystal is used to replace another to form doped self-assembled superlattices. Towards this goal, we show that gold nanocrystals act as substitutional dopants in superlattices of cadmium selenide or lead selenide nanocrystals when the size of the gold nanocrystal is very close to that of the host. The gold nanocrystals occupy random positions in the superlattice and their density is readily and widely controllable, analogous to the case of atomic doping, but here through nanocrystal self-assembly. We also show that the electronic properties of the superlattices are highly tunable and strongly affected by the presence and density of the gold nanocrystal dopants. The conductivity of lead selenide films, for example, can be manipulated over at least six orders of magnitude by the addition of gold nanocrystals and is explained by a percolation model. As this process relies on the self-assembly of uniform nanocrystals, it can be generally applied to assemble a wide variety of nanocrystal-doped structures for electronic, optical, magnetic, and catalytic materials.

  7. Control of mean ionic radius at Ca site by Sr co-doping for Ce doped LiCaAlF6 single crystals and the effects on optical and scintillation properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Yuui; Yamaji, Akihiro; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Kamada, Kei; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2014-10-01

    Sr co-doped Ce:LiCaAlF6 [Ce:Li(Ca,Sr)AlF6] crystals with various Ca/Sr ratios were grown by a micro-pulling-down (μ-PD) method and effects of Sr co-doping on crystal structure, chemical composition, optical and scintillation properties for Ce:LiCaAlF6 crystals were investigated as a neutron scintillator. High transparent Ce2%:Li(Ca,Sr)AlF6 crystals with 2% and 5% Sr contents were obtained while Ce2%:Li(Ca,Sr)AlF6 crystals with 10% and 20% Sr contents included milky parts in the crystals. a- and c-axis lengths of Ce:Li(Ca,Sr)AlF6 phase systematically increased with an increase of Sr content. In addition to the emission at 284 and 308 nm from Ce3+ ion, emission peaks at 367 nm appeared by Sr co-doping.

  8. 46 CFR Section 1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Purpose. Section 1 Section 1 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION B-CONTROL AND UTILIZATION OF PORTS FEDERAL PORT CONTROLLERS Section 1 Purpose. This part prescribes the standard form of the service agreement to be entered into by...

  9. Identification of recombinant equine growth hormone in horse plasma by LC-MS/MS: a confirmatory analysis in doping control.

    PubMed

    Bailly-Chouriberry, Ludovic; Pinel, Gaud; Garcia, Patrice; Popot, Marie-Agnès; Le Bizec, Bruno; Bonnaire, Yves

    2008-11-01

    Equine growth hormone (eGH) has been available since 1998 as an approved drug (EquiGen-5, Bresagen) containing recombinant eGH (reGH). It is suspected of being illegally administered to racehorses in order to improve physical performance and to speed-up wound healing. Thus it may be considered a doping agent which would require a sensitive and reliable method of identification and confirmation in order to regulate its use in racehorses. reGH differs from the native eGH by an additional methionine at the N-terminal (met-eGH) and has never been unambiguously detected in any type of biological matrix at trace concentrations (1-10 microg/L). A plasma sample (4 mL) was treated with ammonium sulfate at the reGH isoelectric point and the pellet was purified by solid-phase extraction. Specific peptides were generated by trypsin digestion and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. The detection limit was 1 microg/L. The method was validated according to European Union regulation (DEC/2002/657/EC) and the Association of Official Racing Chemists (AORC) requirements. Furthermore, it was successfully applied to determining the plasma concentrations of reGH with time using linear ion trap mass analyzer. The presence of this prohibited hormone (reGH) was also successfully detected by triple quadrupole mass spectrometry up to 48 h postadministration of reGH to a horse. The present LC-MS/MS method is the first with adequate sensitivity and specificity for detection of reGH, rbGH, and endogenous eGH. Hence, an efficient analytical tool is proposed as a means to fulfilling the regulation of reGH abuse in the horse racing industry.

  10. The unconventional doping in YBa2Cu3O7-x/La0.7Ca0.3MnO3 heterostructures by termination control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tra, V. T.; Huang, R.; Gao, X.; Chen, Y.-J.; Liu, Y. T.; Kuo, W. C.; Chin, Y. Y.; Lin, H. J.; Chen, J. M.; Lee, J. M.; Lee, J. F.; Shi, P. S.; Jiang, M. G.; Duan, C. G.; Juang, J. Y.; Chen, C. T.; Jeng, H. T.; He, Q.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Lin, J.-Y.; Chu, Y.-H.

    2017-01-01

    In strongly correlated oxides, heterostructures provide a powerful route to manipulate the charge, spin, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom to create distinctive functionalities. In this work, we have achieved atomically precise interface control in YBa2Cu3O7-x/La0.7Ca0.3MnO3 (YBCO/LCMO) heterostructures and find a hidden effective doping. This mechanism is responsible for higher Tc in the sample with the MnO2-terminated interface than in that with the La0.7Ca0.3O-terminated interface. The MnO2-terminated sample also shows a larger magnetic moment of Mn together with a lower valence state. For more than a decade, the control of Tc in these heterostructures prior to this work has been solely via the variation of YBCO or LCMO thickness. This work hints at an alternative way of exploiting and exploring the interactions between superconductivity and magnetism in this system.

  11. Simultaneous size and luminescence control of NaYF4:Yb3+/RE3+ (RE = Tm, Ho) microcrystals via Li+ doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hao; Xu, Dekang; Teng, Dongdong; Yang, Shenghong; Zhang, Yueli

    2015-07-01

    Enhancement of upconversion (UC) luminescence is imperative for the applications of UC microcrystals (MCs). In this work, NaYF4:Yb3+/RE3+ (RE = Tm, Ho) MCs via Li+ doping were successfully prepared by a simple hydrothermal process with the assistance of citric acid. The UC luminescence intensities of NaYF4:Yb3+/RE3+ (RE = Tm, Ho) are significantly enhanced via Li+ doping at different concentrations. Compared to Li+-absent sample, UC luminescence intensities of blue emission (477 nm) and red emission (649 nm) in NaYF4:Yb3+/Tm3+ MCs via 15 mol% Li+ doping are improved by 10 and 9 times, respectively; UC luminescence intensities of green emission (538 nm) and red emission (644 nm) in NaYF4:Yb3+/Ho3+ MCs via 15 mol% Li+ doping are improved by 12 and 3 times, respectively. The mechanism of the enhancement via Li+ doping is discussed in details, which may be attributed to the fact that Li+ doping can cause the distortion of the local symmetry around RE ions. Our results indicate that the enhanced UC luminescence of NaYF4:Yb3+/RE3+ (RE = Tm, Ho) MCs via Li+ doping may have potential applications in optoelectronic devices such as solar cells and plasma display panel.

  12. Copper-doped CdSe/ZnS quantum dots: controllable photoactivated copper(I) cation storage and release vectors for catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bear, Joseph C; Hollingsworth, Nathan; McNaughter, Paul D; Mayes, Andrew G; Ward, Michael B; Nann, Thomas; Hogarth, Graeme; Parkin, Ivan P

    2014-02-03

    The first photoactivated doped quantum dot vector for metal-ion release has been developed. A facile method for doping copper(I) cations within ZnS quantum dot shells was achieved through the use of metal-dithiocarbamates, with Cu(+) ions elucidated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Photoexcitation of the quantum dots has been shown to release Cu(+) ions, which was employed as an effective catalyst for the Huisgen [3+2] cycloaddition reaction. The relationship between the extent of doping, catalytic activity, and the fluorescence quenching was also explored.

  13. Comparison between triple quadrupole, time of flight and hybrid quadrupole time of flight analysers coupled to liquid chromatography for the detection of anabolic steroids in doping control analysis.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Oscar J; Van Eenoo, Peter; Deventer, Koen; Elbardissy, Hisham; Grimalt, Susana; Sancho, Juan V; Hernandez, Felix; Ventura, Rosa; Delbeke, Frans T

    2011-01-17

    Triple quadrupole (QqQ), time of flight (TOF) and quadrupole-time of flight (QTOF) analysers have been compared for the detection of anabolic steroids in human urine. Ten anabolic steroids were selected as model compounds based on their ionization and the presence of endogenous interferences. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses were evaluated. QqQ allowed for the detection of all analytes at the minimum required performance limit (MRPL) established by the World Anti-Doping Agency (between 2 and 10 ng mL(-1) in urine). TOF and QTOF approaches were not sensitive enough to detect some of the analytes (3'-hydroxy-stanozolol or the metabolites of boldenone and formebolone) at the established MRPL. Although a suitable accuracy was obtained, the precision was unsatisfactory (RSD typically higher than 20%) for quantitative purposes irrespective of the analyser used. The methods were applied to 30 real samples declared positives either for the misuse of boldenone, stanozolol and/or methandienone. Most of the compounds were detected by every technique, however QqQ was necessary for the detection of some metabolites in a few samples. Finally, the possibility to detect non-target steroids has been explored by the use of TOF and QTOF. The use of this approach revealed that the presence of boldenone and its metabolite in one sample was due to the intake of androsta-1,4,6-triene-3,17-dione. Additionally, the intake of methandienone was confirmed by the post-target detection of a long-term metabolite.

  14. Determination of the prevalence of anabolic steroids, stimulants, and selected drugs subject to doping controls among elite sport students using analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Thevis, Mario; Sauer, Michael; Geyer, Hans; Sigmund, Gerd; Mareck, Ute; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2008-08-01

    Drug abuse by adolescents has been investigated in various surveys that reported correlations between age, gender, and activity. However, none of these studies included chemical analyses to help substantiate the statements of participants. In the present study, the urine specimens of 964 students (439 females, 525 males; mean age 22.1 years, s = 1.7), who applied to study sports sciences at university, were assessed for anabolic steroids, stimulants, and selected drugs prohibited in sports. In total, 11.2% of the urine specimens provided contained drugs covered by doping controls. The most frequently detected compound was the major metabolite of tetrahydrocannabinol (9.8%) followed by various stimulants related to amphetamine and cocaine (1.0%). Indications of anabolic steroid use were found in 0.4% of urine samples but originated from contraceptives containing norethisterone. The present study provided unambiguous data on the status quo of drug (ab)use by adolescents hoping for a career related to elite sport or sports sciences. No use of anabolic steroids was detected. However, evidence for stimulants and tetrahydrocannabinol administration was obtained, although not reported by any participant, which highlights the issue of under-reporting in surveys based solely on questionnaires.

  15. A Eu3+/Gd3+-EDTA-doped structurally controllable hollow mesoporous carbon for improving the oral bioavailability of insoluble drugs and in vivo tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Zhao, Yating; Cui, Yu; Yue, Yang; Gao, Yikun; Zhao, Qinfu; Liu, Jie; Wang, Siling

    2016-08-01

    A structurally controllable fluorescence-labeled hollow mesoporous carbon (HMC) was simply prepared to improve the oral bioavailability of insoluble drugs and further trace their delivery process in vivo. The hollow structure was derived from an inverse replica process using mesoporous silica as a template and the fluorescent label was prepared by doping the carboxylated HMC with a confinement of Eu3+/Gd3+-EDTA. The physicochemical properties of the composites were systematically characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectra tests prior to studying their effects on drug-release behavior and biodistribution. As a result, the thickness of the carrier’s shell was adjusted from 70 nm to 130 nm and the maximum drug loading was up to 73.6%. The model drug carvedilol (CAR) showed sustained release behavior compared to CAR commercial capsules, and the dissolution rate slowed down as the shells got thicker. AUC0-48h and Tmax were enlarged 2.2 and 6.5 fold, respectively, which demonstrated that oral bioavailability was successfully improved. Bioimaging tests showed that the novel carbon vehicle had a long residence time in the gastrointestinal tract. In short, the newly designed HMC is a promising drug carrier for both oral bioavailability improvement and in vivo tracing.

  16. Deposition and composition-control of Mn-doped ZnO thin films by combinatorial pulsed laser deposition using two delayed plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Ake, C.; Camacho, R.; Moreno, L.

    2012-08-15

    Thin films of ZnO doped with manganese were deposited by double-beam, combinatorial pulsed laser deposition. The laser-induced plasmas were studied by means of fast photography and using a Langmuir probe, whereas the films were analyzed by x-ray-diffraction and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The effect of the relative delay between plasma plumes on the characteristics of the films was analyzed. It was found that using this parameter, it is possible to control the dopant content keeping the oriented wurtzite structure of the films. The minimum content of Mn was found for plume delays between 0 and 10 {mu}s as the interaction between plasmas scatters the dopant species away from the substrate, thus reducing the incorporation of Mn into the films. Results suggest that for delays shorter than {approx}100 {mu}s, the expansion of the second plume through the region behind the first plume affects the composition of the film.

  17. Ethylenediamine-Assisted Hydrothermal Synthesis of NaCaSiO3OH: Controlled Morphology, Mechanism, and Luminescence Properties by Doping Eu(3+)/Tb(3).

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingyue; Xia, Zhiguo; Liu, Quanlin

    2016-11-07

    This paper demonstrates a facile hydrothermal method using ethylenediamine (EDA) as a "shape modifier" for the controlled synthesis of rod bunch, decanedron, spindle, flakiness, and flowerlike NaCaSiO3OH microarchitectures. The set of experimental conditions is important to obtain adjustable shape and size of NaCaSiO3OH particles, as the change in either the amount of EDA/H2O or reaction time, or the amount of NaOH. Accordingly, the crystal growth mechanism during the synthesis process is proposed, and it is found that the EDA, acting as the chelating agent and shape modifier, plays a crucial role in fine-tuning the NaCaSiO3OH morphology. Morphology evolution process of flowerlike NaCaSiO3OH as a function of NaOH is also explained in detail. Eu(3+)/Tb(3+) doped NaCaSiO3OH samples exhibit strong red and green emission under ultraviolet excitation, corresponding to the characteristic electronic transitions of Eu(3+) and Tb(3+). These results imply that the morphology-tunable NaCaSiO3OH:Eu(3+)/Tb(3+) microarchitectures with tunable luminescence properties are expected to have promising applications for micro/nano optical functional devices.

  18. Large-Scale Synthesis of Transition-Metal-Doped TiO2 Nanowires with Controllable Overpotential

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bin; Chen, HaoMing; Liu, Chong; Andrews, Sean; Han, Chris; Yang, Peidong

    2013-03-13

    Practical implementation of one-dimensional semiconductors into devices capable of exploiting their novel properties is often hindered by low product yields, poor material quality, high production cost, or overall lack of synthetic control. Here, we show that a molten-salt flux scheme can be used to synthesize large quantities of high-quality, single-crystalline TiO2 nanowires with controllable dimensions. Furthermore, in situ dopant incorporation of various transition metals allows for the tuning of optical, electrical, and catalytic properties. With this combination of control, robustness, and scalability, the molten-salt flux scheme can provide high-quality TiO2 nanowires to satisfy a broad range of application needs from photovoltaics to photocatalysis.

  19. Giant Rashba Splitting in Pb1-x Snx Te (111) Topological Crystalline Insulator Films Controlled by Bi Doping in the Bulk.

    PubMed

    Volobuev, Valentine V; Mandal, Partha S; Galicka, Marta; Caha, Ondřej; Sánchez-Barriga, Jaime; Di Sante, Domenico; Varykhalov, Andrei; Khiar, Amir; Picozzi, Silvia; Bauer, Günther; Kacman, Perla; Buczko, Ryszard; Rader, Oliver; Springholz, Gunther

    2017-01-01

    The topological properties of lead-tin chalcogenide topological crystalline insulators can be widely tuned by temperature and composition. It is shown that bulk Bi doping of epitaxial Pb1-x Snx Te (111) films induces a giant Rashba splitting at the surface that can be tuned by the doping level. Tight binding calculations identify their origin as Fermi level pinning by trap states at the surface.

  20. Investigation of the metabolites of the HIF stabilizer FG-4592 (roxadustat) in five different in vitro models and in a human doping control sample using high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Annelie; Thevis, Mario; Cox, Holly; Miller, Geoff; Eichner, Daniel; Bondesson, Ulf; Hedeland, Mikael

    2017-02-05

    FG-4592 is a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) stabilizer, which can increase the number of red blood cells in the body. It has not been approved by regulatory authorities, but is available for purchase on the Internet. Due to its ability to improve the oxygen transportation mechanism in the body, FG-4592 is of interest for doping control laboratories, but prior to this study, little information about its metabolism was available. In this study, the metabolism of FG-4592 was investigated in a human doping control sample and in five in vitro models: human hepatocytes and liver microsomes, equine liver microsomes and S9 fraction and the fungus Cunninghamella elegans. By using liquid chromatography coupled to a Q-TOF mass spectrometer operated in MS(E) and MSMS modes, twelve different metabolites were observed for FG-4592. One monohydroxylated metabolite was detected in both the human and equine liver microsome incubations. For the fungus Cunninghamella elegans eleven different metabolites were observed of which the identical monohydroxylated metabolite had the highest response. This rich metabolic profile and the higher levels of metabolites produced by Cunninghamella elegans demonstrates its usefulness as a metabolite producing medium. In the doping control urine sample, one metabolite, which was the result of a direct glucuronidation, was observed. No metabolites were detected in neither the human hepatocyte nor in the equine liver S9 fraction incubates.

  1. [Doping, sport and addiction--any links?].

    PubMed

    Foucart, J; Verbanck, P; Lebrun, P

    2015-01-01

    Sport is widely encouraged as it is beneficial for health. However, high-performance sport is more and more associated to rather suspicious practices; doping is one of the best example. From a physician point of view, the use of doping agents is obviously a major concern because taking such products often induce serious adverse effects on health. The present manuscript aims to inform physicians about the most frequent doping practices. It also points out that intensive sport can generate an "addictive" behavior sharing with "common"addictions a loss of practice control, a lack of interest in other activities and even a sport's practice detrimental to athlete's health. Analysis of the doping issue needs to take this reality into account as some doping products display an established " addictive" effect.

  2. Morphology-controlled synthesis of Ti{sup 3+} self-doped yolk–shell structure titanium oxide with superior photocatalytic activity under visible light

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shixiong; Yang, Xiangjun; Wang, Yapeng; Liu, Lixiang; Guo, Yuanyuan; Guo, Hong

    2014-05-01

    Ti{sup 3+} self-doped yolk–shell structure titanium oxide nanoparticle aggregates are fabricated through an environmental template-free route and the reduction reaction at low temperature subsequently. After the Ti{sup 3+} doping, the reduced TiO{sub 2} sample exhibits a wide visible-light absorption ranged from 400 nm to 800 nm. The intrinsic hollow core–shell microstructure can make multiple reflections of light within the chamber, and thus results in more efficient use of the light source compared with solid structure. Besides, the large surface area can render the sample with a high activity. Therefore, Ti{sup 3+} self-doped yolk–shell structure titanium oxide exhibits a superior photocatalytic activity under visible light. This strategy is simple, cheap and mass-productive, which may shed light on a new avenue for large scale production of self-doped yolk–shell structural nano functional materials for catalyst, sensors, energy storage and other new applications. - Graphical abstract: A facile generic strategy is employed to prepare Ti{sup 3+} self-doped yolk–shell structure titanium oxide nanoparticle aggregates with the superior photocatalytic activity under visible light. - Highlights: • Yolk–shell TiO{sub 2} mesospheres are synthesized by solvothermal alcoholysis. • Ti{sup 3+} self-doped yolk–shell structure titanium oxide is obtained at low temperature. • It exhibits a remarkable photocatalytic activity.

  3. 23 CFR 650.201 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Erosion and Sediment Control on Highway Construction Projects § 650.201 Purpose. The purpose of this subpart is to prescribe policies and procedures for the control of...

  4. 23 CFR 650.201 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Erosion and Sediment Control on Highway Construction Projects § 650.201 Purpose. The purpose of this subpart is to prescribe policies and procedures for the control of...

  5. 23 CFR 650.201 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Erosion and Sediment Control on Highway Construction Projects § 650.201 Purpose. The purpose of this subpart is to prescribe policies and procedures for the control of...

  6. 23 CFR 650.201 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Erosion and Sediment Control on Highway Construction Projects § 650.201 Purpose. The purpose of this subpart is to prescribe policies and procedures for the control of...

  7. 23 CFR 650.201 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., STRUCTURES, AND HYDRAULICS Erosion and Sediment Control on Highway Construction Projects § 650.201 Purpose. The purpose of this subpart is to prescribe policies and procedures for the control of...

  8. 46 CFR Sec. 1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Purpose. Sec. 1 Section 1 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION B-CONTROL AND UTILIZATION OF PORTS OPERATING CONTRACT Sec. 1 Purpose. This part prescribes the standard form of marine terminal contract to be entered into by the...

  9. PULSION registered HP: Tunable, High Productivity Plasma Doping

    SciTech Connect

    Felch, S. B.; Torregrosa, F.; Etienne, H.; Spiegel, Y.; Roux, L.; Turnbaugh, D.

    2011-01-07

    Plasma doping has been explored for many implant applications for over two decades and is now being used in semiconductor manufacturing for two applications: DRAM polysilicon counter-doping and contact doping. The PULSION HP is a new plasma doping tool developed by Ion Beam Services for high-volume production that enables customer control of the dominant mechanism--deposition, implant, or etch. The key features of this tool are a proprietary, remote RF plasma source that enables a high density plasma with low chamber pressure, resulting in a wide process space, and special chamber and wafer electrode designs that optimize doping uniformity.

  10. Sub-10 nm lanthanide doped BaLuF{sub 5} nanocrystals: Shape controllable synthesis, tunable multicolor emission and enhanced near-infrared upconversion luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Ling; Lu, Wei; Wang, Haibo; Yi, Zhigao; Zeng, Songjun; Li, Zheng

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • Sub-10 nm cubic phase BaLuF{sub 5} nanocrystals were synthesized by a hydrothermal method for the first time. • Tunable multicolor from yellow to yellow-green was achieved by controlling Gd{sup 3+} content in BaLuF{sub 5}:Yb/Er system. • Intense near-infrared upconversion luminescence in BaLuF{sub 5}:Gd/Yb/Tm nanocrystal. • The enhancement near-infrared luminescence can be realized by adjusting the content of Gd{sup 3+} in BaLuF{sub 5}:Gd/Yb/Tm system. - Abstract: In this study, sub-10 nm BaLuF{sub 5} nanocrystals with cubic phase structure were synthesized by a solvothermal method using oleic acid as the stabilizing agent. The as-prepared BaLuF{sub 5} nanocrystals were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and analyzed by the upconversion (UC) spectra. The TEM results reveal that these samples present high uniformity. Compared with Gd-free samples, the size of BaLuF{sub 5}:Yb/Er doped with 10% Gd{sup 3+} decreased to 5.6 nm. In addition, BaLuF{sub 5}:Yb/Tm/Gd upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) presented efficient near-infrared (NIR)-NIR UC luminescence. Therefore, it is expected that these ultra-small BaLuF{sub 5} nanocrystals with well-controlled shape, size, and UC emission have potential applications in biomedical imaging fields.

  11. FIFA's approach to doping in football

    PubMed Central

    Dvorak, J; Graf‐Baumann, T; D'Hooghe, M; Kirkendall, D; Taennler, H; Saugy, M

    2006-01-01

    Background and objectives FIFA's anti‐doping strategy relies on education and prevention. A worldwide network of physicians guarantees doping control procedures that are straightforward and leave no place for cheating. FIFA actively acknowledges its responsibility to protect players from harm and ensure equal chances for all competitors by stringent doping control regulations, data collection of positive samples, support of research, and collaboration with other organisations. This article aims to outline FIFA's approach to doping in football. Method Description of FIFA's doping control regulations and procedures, statistical analysis of FIFA database on doping control, and comparison with data obtained by WADA accredited laboratories as for 2004. Results Data on positive doping samples per substance and confederation/nation documented at the FIFA medical office from 1994 to 2005 are provided. According to the FIFA database, the incidence of positive cases over the past 11 years was 0.12%, with about 0.42% in 2004 (based on the assumption of 20 750 samples per year) and 0.37% in 2005. Especially important in this regard is the extremely low incidence of the true performance enhancing drugs such as anabolic steroids and stimulants. However, there is a need for more consistent data collection and cross checks among international anti‐doping agencies as well as for further studies on specific substances, methods, and procedures. With regard to general health impairments in players, FIFA suggests that principles of occupational medicine should be considered and treatment with banned substances for purely medical reasons should be permitted to enable players to carry out their profession. At the same time, a firm stand has to be taken against suppression of symptoms by medication with the aim of meeting the ever increasing demands on football players. Conclusion Incidence of doping in football seems to be low, but much closer collaboration and further

  12. Doping and musculoskeletal system: short-term and long-lasting effects of doping agents.

    PubMed

    Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios D; Spiliopoulou, Chara; Theocharis, Stamatios E

    2011-10-01

    Doping is a problem that has plagued the world of competition and sports for ages. Even before the dawn of Olympic history in ancient Greece, competitors have looked for artificial means to improve athletic performance. Since ancient times, athletes have attempted to gain an unfair competitive advantage through the use of doping substances. A Prohibited List of doping substances and methods banned in sports is published yearly by the World Anti-Doping Agency. Among the substances included are steroidal and peptide hormones and their modulators, stimulants, glucocorticosteroids, β₂-agonists, diuretics and masking agents, narcotics, and cannabinoids. Blood doping, tampering, infusions, and gene doping are examples of prohibited methods indicated on the List. Apart from the unethical aspect of doping, as it abrogates fair-play's principle, it is extremely important to consider the hazards it presents to the health and well-being of athletes. The referred negative effects for the athlete's health have to do, on the one hand, by the high doses of the performance-enhancing agents and on the other hand, by the relentless, superhuman strict training that the elite or amateur athletes put their muscles, bones, and joints. The purpose of this article is to highlight the early and the long-lasting consequences of the doping abuse on bone and muscle metabolism.

  13. 40 CFR 35.580 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Water Pollution Control (sections 106 and 518) § 35.580 Purpose. (a) Purpose of section. Sections 35.580 through 35.588 govern water pollution control grants to... the Clean Water Act. (b) Purpose of program. Water pollution control grants are awarded to...

  14. 40 CFR 35.580 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Water Pollution Control (sections 106 and 518) § 35.580 Purpose. (a) Purpose of section. Sections 35.580 through 35.588 govern water pollution control grants to... the Clean Water Act. (b) Purpose of program. Water pollution control grants are awarded to...

  15. 40 CFR 35.580 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Water Pollution Control (sections 106 and 518) § 35.580 Purpose. (a) Purpose of section. Sections 35.580 through 35.588 govern water pollution control grants to... the Clean Water Act. (b) Purpose of program. Water pollution control grants are awarded to...

  16. 40 CFR 35.580 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Water Pollution Control (sections 106 and 518) § 35.580 Purpose. (a) Purpose of section. Sections 35.580 through 35.588 govern water pollution control grants to... the Clean Water Act. (b) Purpose of program. Water pollution control grants are awarded to...

  17. 40 CFR 35.580 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Water Pollution Control (sections 106 and 518) § 35.580 Purpose. (a) Purpose of section. Sections 35.580 through 35.588 govern water pollution control grants to... the Clean Water Act. (b) Purpose of program. Water pollution control grants are awarded to...

  18. General Purpose Ground Forces: What Purpose?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-06

    RCH~V~AL COPY NATIONAL WAR COLLEGE "GENERAL PURPOSE GROUND FORCES" WHAT PURPOSE ?" LTC DAN CHALLIS 6 APRIL 1993 N A T I O N A L...06-04-1993 to 06-04-1993 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE General Purpose Ground Forces: What Purpose ? 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...The ~Jarm glow of a much heralded Cold War victory, plus the Gulf War t:ciumph, the growth of democracy in developing countries, and the apparent

  19. Nanophotonics and nanochemistry: controlling the excitation dynamics for frequency up- and down-conversion in lanthanide-doped nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanying; Yang, Chunhui; Prasad, Paras N

    2013-07-16

    Nanophotonics is an emerging science dealing with the interaction of light and matter on a nanometer scale and holds promise to produce new generation nanophosphors with highly efficient frequency conversion of infrared (IR) light. Scientists can control the excitation dynamics by using nanochemistry to produce hierarchically built nanostructures and tailor their interfaces. These nanophosphors can either perform frequency up-conversion from IR to visible or ultraviolet (UV) or down-conversion, which results in the IR light being further red shifted. Nanophotonics and nanochemistry open up numerous opportunities for these photon converters, including in high contrast bioimaging, photodynamic therapy, drug release and gene delivery, nanothermometry, and solar cells. Applications of these nanophosphors in these directions derive from three main stimuli. Light excitation and emission within the near-infrared (NIR) "optical transparency window" of tissues is ideal for high contrast in vitro and in vivo imaging. This is due to low natural florescence, reduced scattering background, and deep penetration in tissues. Secondly, the naked eye is highly sensitive in the visible range, but it has no response to IR light. Therefore, many scientists have interest in the frequency up-conversion of IR wavelengths for security and display applications. Lastly, frequency up-conversion can convert IR photons to higher energy photons, which can then readily be absorbed by solar materials. Current solar devices do not use abundant IR light that comprises almost half of solar energy. In this Account, we present our recent work on nanophotonic control of frequency up- and down-conversion in fluoride nanophosphors, and their biophotonic and nanophotonic applications. Through nanoscopic control of phonon dynamics, electronic energy transfer, local crystal field, and surface-induced non-radiative processes, we were able to produce new generation nanophosphors with highly efficient frequency

  20. Nucleation Control for Large, Single Crystalline Domains of Monolayer Hexagonal Boron Nitride via Si-Doped Fe Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The scalable chemical vapor deposition of monolayer hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) single crystals, with lateral dimensions of ∼0.3 mm, and of continuous h-BN monolayer films with large domain sizes (>25 μm) is demonstrated via an admixture of Si to Fe catalyst films. A simple thin-film Fe/SiO2/Si catalyst system is used to show that controlled Si diffusion into the Fe catalyst allows exclusive nucleation of monolayer h-BN with very low nucleation densities upon exposure to undiluted borazine. Our systematic in situ and ex situ characterization of this catalyst system establishes a basis for further rational catalyst design for compound 2D materials. PMID:25664483

  1. In-situ monitoring by Raman spectroscopy of the thermal doping of graphene and MoS2 in O2-controlled atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Aurora; Giannazzo, Filippo; Buscarino, Gianpiero; Fisichella, Gabriele; Magna, Antonino La; Roccaforte, Fabrizio; Cannas, Marco; Gelardi, Franco Mario

    2017-01-01

    The effects of temperature and atmosphere (air and O2) on the doping of monolayers of graphene (Gr) on SiO2 and Si substrates, and on the doping of MoS2 multilayer flakes transferred on the same substrates have been investigated. The investigations were carried out by in situ micro-Raman spectroscopy during thermal treatments up to 430 °C, and by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The spectral positions of the G and 2D Raman bands of Gr undergo only minor changes during treatment, while their amplitude and full width at half maximum (FWHM) vary as a function of the temperature and the used atmosphere. The thermal treatments in oxygen atmosphere show, in addition to a thermal effect, an effect attributable to a p-type doping through oxygen. The thermal broadening of the line shape, found during thermal treatments by in situ Raman measurements, can be related to thermal phonon effects. The absence of a band shift results from the balance between a red shift due to thermal effects and a blue shift induced by doping. This shows the potential of in situ measurements to follow the doping kinetics. The treatment of MoS2 in O2 has evidenced a progressive erosion of the flakes without relevant spectral changes in their central zone during in situ measurements. The formation of MoO3 on the edges of the flakes is observed indicative of the oxygen-activated transformation. PMID:28326231

  2. Improvement of device efficiency for blue organic light emitting diodes by controlling the Cs2CO3-doped electron transport layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Richard; Shi, Jianmin; Forsythe, Eric; Blomquist, Steven; Srour, Merric; Morton, David

    2014-01-01

    The electronic transport properties of 1, 3, 5-tri(1-phenyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)phenyl (TPBI) electron transporting layers (ETLs) have been investigated as a function of cesium carbonate (Cs2CO3) doping for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The current density-voltage and light emission characteristics were measured as a function of the Cs2CO3-doped ETL thickness. Cs2CO3-doped TPBI decreased OLED operating voltage by 26% and increased device luminance by 17% in a wide concentration range (3.5% to 10.5%) compared to undoped devices. The effects of 7% Cs2CO3-doped ETL thickness indicated that the operating voltage continuously decreased to 37% when the ETL thickness increased to 600 Å and luminance output continued to increase to 21% at ETL thickness 525 Å. The blue OLED can be optimized by adjusting the thicknesses of Cs2CO3-doped TPBI ETL to balance the electron and hole injection.

  3. Controlling the Active Sites of Sulfur-Doped Carbon Nanotube-Graphene Nanolobes for Highly Efficient Oxygen Evolution and Reduction Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sawy, Abdelhamid M.; Mosa, Islam M.; Su, Dong; Guild, Curtis J.; Khalid, Syed; Joesten, Raymond; Rusling, James F.; Suib, Steven L.

    2015-12-03

    Controlling active sites of metal-free catalysts is an important strategy to enhance activity of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). We made many attempts have been made to develop metal-free catalysts, but the lack of understanding of active-sites at the atomic-level has slowed the design of highly active and stable metal-free catalysts. We also developed a sequential two-step strategy to dope sulfur into carbon nanotube–graphene nanolobes. This bidoping strategy introduces stable sulfur–carbon active-sites. Fluorescence emission of the sulfur K-edge by X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and scanning transmission electron microscopy electron energy loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS) mapping and spectra confirm that increasing the incorporation of heterocyclic sulfur into the carbon ring of CNTs not only enhances OER activity with an overpotential of 350 mV at a current density of 10 mA cm-2, but also retains 100% of stability after 75 h. Furthermore, the bidoped sulfur carbon nanotube–graphene nanolobes behave like the state-of-the-art catalysts for OER but outperform those systems in terms of turnover frequency (TOF) which is two orders of magnitude greater than (20% Ir/C) at 400 mV overpotential with very high mass activity 1000 mA cm-2 at 570 mV. Moreover, the sulfur bidoping strategy shows high catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Stable bifunctional (ORR and OER) catalysts are low cost, and light-weight bidoped sulfur carbon nanotubes are potential candidates for next-generation metal-free regenerative fuel cells.

  4. New drostanolone metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry and their application for doping control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Lu, Jianghai; Yang, Sheng; Zhang, Qingying; Xu, Youxuan

    2016-04-01

    Drostanolone is one of the most frequently detected anabolic androgenic steroids in doping control analysis. Here, we studied drostanolone urinary metabolic profiles using liquid chromatography quadruple time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) in full scan and targeted MS/MS modes with accurate mass measurement. The drug was administered to one healthy male volunteer and liquid-liquid extraction along with direct-injection were used to analyze urine samples. Chromatographic peaks for potential metabolites were identified with the theoretical [M-H](-) as a target ion in a full scan experiment and actual deprotonated ions were analyzed in targeted MS/MS mode. Eleven metabolites including five new sulfates, five glucuronide conjugates, and one free metabolite were confirmed for drostanolone. Due to the absence of useful fragment ions to illustrate the steroid ring structure of drostanolone phase II metabolites, gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to obtain structural details of the trimethylsilylated phase I metabolite released after enzymatic hydrolysis and a potential structure was proposed using a combined MS approach. Metabolite detection times were recorded and S4 (2α-methyl-5α-androstan-17-one-6β-ol-3α-sulfate) and G1 (2α-methyl-5α-androstan-17-one-3α-glucuronide) were thought to be new potential biomarkers for drostanolone misuse which can be detected up to 24days by liquid-liquid extraction and 7days by direct-injection analysis after intramuscular injection. S4 and G1 were also detected in two drostanolone-positive routine urine samples.

  5. Controlling the Active Sites of Sulfur-Doped Carbon Nanotube-Graphene Nanolobes for Highly Efficient Oxygen Evolution and Reduction Catalysis

    DOE PAGES

    El-Sawy, Abdelhamid M.; Mosa, Islam M.; Su, Dong; ...

    2015-12-03

    Controlling active sites of metal-free catalysts is an important strategy to enhance activity of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). We made many attempts have been made to develop metal-free catalysts, but the lack of understanding of active-sites at the atomic-level has slowed the design of highly active and stable metal-free catalysts. We also developed a sequential two-step strategy to dope sulfur into carbon nanotube–graphene nanolobes. This bidoping strategy introduces stable sulfur–carbon active-sites. Fluorescence emission of the sulfur K-edge by X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and scanning transmission electron microscopy electron energy loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS) mapping and spectra confirm thatmore » increasing the incorporation of heterocyclic sulfur into the carbon ring of CNTs not only enhances OER activity with an overpotential of 350 mV at a current density of 10 mA cm-2, but also retains 100% of stability after 75 h. Furthermore, the bidoped sulfur carbon nanotube–graphene nanolobes behave like the state-of-the-art catalysts for OER but outperform those systems in terms of turnover frequency (TOF) which is two orders of magnitude greater than (20% Ir/C) at 400 mV overpotential with very high mass activity 1000 mA cm-2 at 570 mV. Moreover, the sulfur bidoping strategy shows high catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Stable bifunctional (ORR and OER) catalysts are low cost, and light-weight bidoped sulfur carbon nanotubes are potential candidates for next-generation metal-free regenerative fuel cells.« less

  6. Doping monolayer graphene with single atom substitutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Qingxiao; Cheng, Yingchun; Li, Kun; Yao, Yingbang; Zhang, Qiang; Dong, Cezhou; Wang, Peng; Schwingenschlögl, Udo; Yang, Wei; Zhang, X X

    2012-01-11

    Functionalized graphene has been extensively studied with the aim of tailoring properties for gas sensors, superconductors, supercapacitors, nanoelectronics, and spintronics. A bottleneck is the capability to control the carrier type and density by doping. We demonstrate that a two-step process is an efficient way to dope graphene: create vacancies by high-energy atom/ion bombardment and fill these vacancies with desired dopants. Different elements (Pt, Co, and In) have been successfully doped in the single-atom form. The high binding energy of the metal-vacancy complex ensures its stability and is consistent with in situ observation by an aberration-corrected and monochromated transmission electron microscope.

  7. Current anti-doping policy: a critical appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Bengt; Mauron, Alexandre; Miah, Andy

    2007-01-01

    Background Current anti-doping in competitive sports is advocated for reasons of fair-play and concern for the athlete's health. With the inception of the World Anti Doping Agency (WADA), anti-doping effort has been considerably intensified. Resources invested in anti-doping are rising steeply and increasingly involve public funding. Most of the effort concerns elite athletes with much less impact on amateur sports and the general public. Discussion We review this recent development of increasingly severe anti-doping control measures and find them based on questionable ethical grounds. The ethical foundation of the war on doping consists of largely unsubstantiated assumptions about fairness in sports and the concept of a "level playing field". Moreover, it relies on dubious claims about the protection of an athlete's health and the value of the essentialist view that sports achievements reflect natural capacities. In addition, costly antidoping efforts in elite competitive sports concern only a small fraction of the population. From a public health perspective this is problematic since the high prevalence of uncontrolled, medically unsupervised doping practiced in amateur sports and doping-like behaviour in the general population (substance use for performance enhancement outside sport) exposes greater numbers of people to potential harm. In addition, anti-doping has pushed doping and doping-like behaviour underground, thus fostering dangerous practices such as sharing needles for injection. Finally, we argue that the involvement of the medical profession in doping and anti-doping challenges the principles of non-maleficience and of privacy protection. As such, current anti-doping measures potentially introduce problems of greater impact than are solved, and place physicians working with athletes or in anti-doping settings in an ethically difficult position. In response, we argue on behalf of enhancement practices in sports within a framework of medical supervision

  8. Carbon doping of GaAs NWs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehzadeh Einabad, Omid

    Nanowires (NWs) have been proposed and demonstrated as the building blocks for nanoscale electronic and photonic devices such as NW field effect transistors and NW solar cells which rely on doping and trap-free carrier transport. Controlled doping of NWs and a high degree of structure and morphology control are required for device applications. However, doping of III-V nanowires such as GaAs nanowires has not been reported extensively in the literature. Carbon is a well known p-type dopant in planar GaAs due to its low diffusivity and high solubility in bulk GaAs; however its use as an intentional dopant in NW growth has not yet been investigated. In this work we studied the carbon doping of GaAs nanowires using CBr4 as the dopant source. Gold nanoparticles (NP) at the tip ofthe NWs have been used to drive the NW growth. We show that carbon doping suppresses the migration ofthe gold NPs from the tip of the NWs. In addition, we show that the carbon doping of GaAs NWs is accompanied by an increase of the axial growth rate and decrease of the lateral growth rate ofthe NWs. Carbon-doped GaAs NWs, unlike the undoped ones which are highly tapered, are rod-like. The origin of the observed morphological changes is attributed to the carbon adsorbates on the sidewalls ofthe nanowires which suppress the lateral growth of the nanowires and increase the diffusion length of the gallium adatoms on the sidewalls. Stacking fault formation consisting of alternating regIOns of zincblende and wurtzite structures has been commonly observed in NWs grown along the (111) direction. In this work, based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, we show that carbon doping ofGaAs NWs eliminates the stacking fault formation. Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the effects of carbon doping on the vibrational properties of the carbon-doped GaAs nanowires. Carbon doping shows a strong impact on the intrinsic longitudinal and transverse optical (La and TO) modes of the Ga

  9. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal based fluorescent cellular imaging probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Palmal, Sharbari; Basiruddin, Sk; Karan, Niladri Sekhar; Sarkar, Suresh; Pradhan, Narayan; Jana, Nikhil R.

    2013-05-01

    functionalisation of doped nanocrystals, property of functionalized nanocrystals, quantification of cell labeling and control labeling experiments. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00549f

  10. Controlled cobalt doping in the spinel structure of magnetosome magnetite: new evidences from element- and site-specific X-ray magnetic circular dichroism analyses.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhua; Menguy, Nicolas; Arrio, Marie-Anne; Sainctavit, Philippe; Juhin, Amélie; Wang, Yinzhao; Chen, Haitao; Bunau, Oana; Otero, Edwige; Ohresser, Philippe; Pan, Yongxin

    2016-08-01

    The biomineralization of magnetite nanocrystals (called magnetosomes) by magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) has attracted intense interest in biology, geology and materials science due to the precise morphology of the particles, the chain-like assembly and their unique magnetic properties. Great efforts have been recently made in producing transition metal-doped magnetosomes with modified magnetic properties for a range of applications. Despite some successful outcomes, the coordination chemistry and magnetism of such metal-doped magnetosomes still remain largely unknown. Here, we present new evidences from X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) for element- and site-specific magnetic analyses that cobalt is incorporated in the spinel structure of the magnetosomes within Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 through the replacement of Fe(2+) ions by Co(2+) ions in octahedral (Oh) sites of magnetite. Both XMCD at Fe and Co L2,3 edges, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy on transmission electron microscopy analyses reveal a heterogeneous distribution of cobalt occurring either in different particles or inside individual particles. Compared with non-doped one, cobalt-doped magnetosome sample has lower Verwey transition temperature and larger magnetic coercivity, related to the amount of doped cobalt. This study also demonstrates that the addition of trace cobalt in the growth medium can significantly improve both the cell growth and the magnetosome formation within M. magneticum AMB-1. Together with the cobalt occupancy within the spinel structure of magnetosomes, this study indicates that MTB may provide a promising biomimetic system for producing chains of metal-doped single-domain magnetite with an appropriate tuning of the magnetic properties for technological and biomedical applications.

  11. Novel Fiber Preforms: Rare Earth Doping.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-31

    proposed by the group at Southampton, and future experiments with axial laser heating of terbium metal are planned. As noted, much of the effort during...been doped with terbium , in our learning to control the doping concentration, we have observed bands of undesired microcrystailinity in some terbium ...preforms with terbium (not yet pulled into fibers), and rare earth glasses formed by sol-gel tech- niques. Future efforts will be to prepare fibers

  12. Three-Dimensional Network of N-Doped Carbon Ultrathin Nanosheets with Closely Packed Mesopores: Controllable Synthesis and Application in Electrochemical Energy Storage.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shan; Li, Jiajun; Ma, Liying; Guo, Lichao; Li, Qunying; He, Chunnian; Liu, Enzuo; He, Fang; Shi, Chunsheng; Zhao, Naiqin

    2016-05-11

    A flexible one-pot strategy for fabricating a 3D network of nitrogen-doped (N-doped) carbon ultrathin nanosheets with closely packed mesopores (N-MCN) via an in situ template method is reported in this research. The self-assembly soluble salts (NaCl and Na2SiO3) serve as hierarchical templates and support the formation of a 3D glucose-urea complex. The organic complex is heat-treated to obtain a 3D N-doped carbon network constructed by mesoporous nanosheets. Especially, both the mesoporous structure and doping content can be easily tuned by adjusting the ratio of raw materials. The large specific surface area and closely packed mesopores facilitate the lithium ion intercalation/deintercalation accordingly. Besides, the nitrogen content improves the lithium storage ability and capacitive properties. Due to the synergistic effect of hierarchical structure and heteroatom composition, the 3D N-MCN shows excellent characteristics as the electrode of a lithium ion battery and supercapacitor, such as ultrahigh reversible storage capacity (1222 mAh g(-1) at 0.1 A g(-1)), stable long cycle performance at high current density (600 cycles at 2 A g(-1)), and high capacitive properties (225 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) and 163 F g(-1) at 50 A g(-1)).

  13. Controllable growth of vertically aligned Bi-doped TiO2 nanorod arrays for all-oxide solid-state DSSCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asemi, Morteza; Ghanaatshoar, Majid

    2016-09-01

    In this study, vertically aligned Bi-doped TiO2 nanorod arrays as photoanodes were successfully grown on the fluorine-doped tin oxide by hydrothermal method. Structural analysis showed that bismuth was successfully incorporated into the TiO2 lattice at low concentration, but at higher concentration, phase segregation of Bi2O3 in the TiO2 matrix was occurred. TiO2 nanorods with 3 % bismuth concentration had minimum electrical resistivity. As the solid-state electrolyte, Mg-doped CuCrO2 nanoparticles with p-type conductivity were synthesized by sol-gel method. The fabricated all-oxide solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells with Bi-doped TiO2 nanorods displayed better photovoltaic performance due to the presence of Bi. The improved cell performance was correlated with the higher dye loading, slower charge recombination rate and the higher electrical conductivity of the photoanodes. After mechanical pressing, the all-oxide solid-state DSSC exhibited enhanced photovoltaic performance due to the formation of the large neck between adjacent nanoparticles by mechanical sintering. The open-circuit photovoltage decay measurement of the devices and electrical conductivity of the nanoparticles before and after pressing revealed that the mechanical pressing technique reduces charge recombination rate and facilitates electron transport through the interconnected nanoparticles.

  14. 38 CFR 1.670 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Purpose. 1.670 Section 1... Administrative Control of Funds § 1.670 Purpose. The following regulations establish a system of administrative... following purposes: (a) Establish an administrative subdivision of controls to restrict obligations...

  15. Cat-doping: Novel method for phosphorus and boron shallow doping in crystalline silicon at 80 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Hideki; Hayakawa, Taro; Ohta, Tatsunori; Nakashima, Yuki; Miyamoto, Motoharu; Thi, Trinh Cham; Koyama, Koichi; Ohdaira, Keisuke

    2014-09-01

    Phosphorus (P) or boron (B) atoms can be doped at temperatures as low as 80 to 350 °C, when crystalline silicon (c-Si) is exposed only for a few minutes to species generated by catalytic cracking reaction of phosphine (PH3) or diborane (B2H6) with heated tungsten (W) catalyzer. This paper is to investigate systematically this novel doping method, "Cat-doping", in detail. The electrical properties of P or B doped layers are studied by the Van der Pauw method based on the Hall effects measurement. The profiles of P or B atoms in c-Si are observed by secondary ion mass spectrometry mainly from back side of samples to eliminate knock-on effects. It is confirmed that the surface of p-type c-Si is converted to n-type by P Cat-doping at 80 °C, and similarly, that of n-type c-Si is to p-type by B Cat-doping. The doping depth is as shallow as 5 nm or less and the electrically activated doping concentration is 1018 to 1019 cm-3 for both P and B doping. It is also found that the surface potential of c-Si is controlled by the shallow Cat-doping and that the surface recombination velocity of minority carriers in c-Si can be enormously lowered by this potential control.

  16. Sensitive determination of prohibited drugs in dried blood spots (DBS) for doping controls by means of a benchtop quadrupole/Orbitrap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andreas; Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Crone, Catharina; Kellmann, Markus; Moehring, Thomas; Thevis, Mario

    2012-05-01

    In the present study, a new type of mass spectrometer combining a quadrupole mass filter, a higher collision dissociation (HCD) cell and an Orbitrap detector, was evaluated for the analysis of dried blood spots (DBS) in doping controls. DBS analysis is characterized by the necessity to detect prohibited compounds in sub-nanogram-per-milliliter levels with high identification capacity. After extraction of DBS with an organic solvent and liquid chromatographic separation (using a regular C18-RP-analytical UHPLC-column) of target analytes, mass spectrometry is performed with a high-resolution full scan in positive and negative mode by means of electrospray ionisation. Single-product ion mass spectra are acquired using the data-dependent analysis mode (employing an inclusion list) for previously selected precursors of known prohibited compounds with fixed retention time ranges. Besides, a sensitive screening in a targeted approach, non-targeted analysis for retrospective data evaluation is thus possible. The chosen experimental design enables the determination of various drugs from different classes with one generic sample preparation which is shown for 26 selected model compounds (Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH), methylhexaneamine, methylphenidate, cocaine, nikethamide, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, N-methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, strychnine, mesocarb, salbutamol, formoterol, clenbuterol, metandienone, stanozolol, bisoprolol, propranolol, metoprolol, anastrazole, clomiphene, exemestane, dexamethasone, budesonide, selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) S4 (andarine), SARM S1, hydrochlorothiazide). Generally, only qualitative result interpretation was focussed upon, but for target analytes with deuterium-labelled internal standards (salbutamol, clenbuterol, cocaine, dexamethasone, THC-COOH and THC) quantitative analysis was also possible. Especially the most challenging analytes, THC and its carboxy

  17. 49 CFR 585.82 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PHASE-IN REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Electronic Stability Control System Phase-In Reporting Requirements § 585.82 Purpose. The purpose of these reporting requirements is...

  18. 49 CFR 585.82 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PHASE-IN REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Electronic Stability Control System Phase-In Reporting Requirements § 585.82 Purpose. The purpose of these reporting requirements is...

  19. 49 CFR 585.82 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PHASE-IN REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Electronic Stability Control System Phase-In Reporting Requirements § 585.82 Purpose. The purpose of these reporting requirements is...

  20. 49 CFR 585.82 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PHASE-IN REPORTING REQUIREMENTS Electronic Stability Control System Phase-In Reporting Requirements § 585.82 Purpose. The purpose of these reporting requirements is...

  1. 43 CFR 4700.0-1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HORSES AND BURROS General § 4700.0-1 Purpose. The purpose of these regulations is to implement the laws relating to the protection, management, and control of wild horses and burros under the administration...

  2. Performance analysis of a concatenated erbium-doped fiber amplifier supporting four mode groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zujun; Fan, Di; Zhang, Wentao; Xiong, Xianming

    2016-05-01

    An erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) supporting four mode groups has been theoretically designed by concatenating two sections of erbium-doped fibers (EDFs). Each EDF has a simple erbium doping profile for the purpose of reducing its fabrication complexity. We propose a modified genetic algorithm (GA) to provide detailed investigations on the concatenated amplifier. Both the optimal fiber length and erbium doping radius in each EDF have been found to minimize the gain difference between signal modes. Results show that the parameters of the central-doped EDF have a greater impact on the amplifier performance compared to those of the annular-doped one. We then investigate the influence of the small deviations of the erbium fiber length, doping radius and doping concentration of each EDF from their optimal values upon the amplifier performance, and discuss their design tolerances in obtaining a desirable amplification characteristics.

  3. The Athlete Biological Passport from the perspective of an anti-doping organization.

    PubMed

    Zorzoli, Mario

    2011-09-01

    The introduction of the Athlete Biological Passport is a landmark in the fight against doping. Contrary to traditional toxicological anti-doping analysis, its aim is to detect the biological consequences of doping through the measurement of different specific biomarkers which generate individual profiles for each athlete. This new approach allows anti-doping organizations to convict those athletes showing abnormal profiles for the use (not the presence!) of even undetectable forbidden substances or methods. Additionally, these data can be used for other purposes: to conduct targeted conventional anti-doping tests on those athletes showing unusual results and to evaluate the prevalence of doping within a population of athletes. By now only the hematological biomarkers of blood doping have been validated, but in the future additional modules will be introduced to detect other forms of doping.

  4. A p → n transition for Sn-doped Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} bulk materials

    SciTech Connect

    Monsefi, Mehrdad; Kuo, Dong-Hau

    2013-08-15

    Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGSe) pellets at different Sn contents were fabricated by reactive liquid-phase sintering at 600–700 °C with the help of sintering aids of Sb{sub 2}S{sub 3} and Te. Powder preparation was based upon the molecular formula of Cu{sub 0.9}[(In{sub 0.7−x}Sn{sub x}Ga{sub 0.3}){sub 0.9}Sb{sub 0.1}](S{sub 0.15}Te{sub 0.2}Se{sub 1.65}) or Sn-x-CIGSe. Morphology, structure, and electrical property of Sn-doped CIGSe bulks were investigated. The composition of Sn-doped CIGSe is purposely designed for studying the doping effect on the CIGSe performance. The unexpected increase in hole concentration of CIGSe due to the donor doping is rationalized. A controllable n-type semiconductor is deliberately achieved for Sn-0.15-CIGSe and important for making a p/n homojunction in CIGSe solar cells. - Graphical abstract: The controls in defect type and electrical properties of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} by doping Sn{sup 4+} on the In{sup 3+} site. Highlights: • n-type Sn-CIGSe with n{sub e} of 6.4×10{sup 16} cm{sup −3} and μ{sub e} of 2.3 cm{sup 2}/V s was obtained. • This n-type Sn-CIGSe was obtained by material design and composition control. • The reported n-type CIGSe was obtained from the Zn/CIGSe and CdS/CIGSe bilayers. • Extrinsic donor doping was explored through the results of electrical properties. • A n/p homojunction with Sn-CIGSe and undoped one can be used for solar cell devices.

  5. Languages for Specific Purposes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swales, John M.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on languages for specific purposes, providing a brief historical perspective, examining it as a profession, discipline, or neither; its role in science and law; language for business purposes; and the position of English worldwide. (Author/VWL)

  6. Porous allograft bone scaffolds: doping with strontium.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yantao; Guo, Dagang; Hou, Shuxun; Zhong, Hongbin; Yan, Jun; Zhang, Chunli; Zhou, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Strontium (Sr) can promote the process of bone formation. To improve bioactivity, porous allograft bone scaffolds (ABS) were doped with Sr and the mechanical strength and bioactivity of the scaffolds were evaluated. Sr-doped ABS were prepared using the ion exchange method. The density and distribution of Sr in bone scaffolds were investigated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Controlled release of strontium ions was measured and mechanical strength was evaluated by a compressive strength test. The bioactivity of Sr-doped ABS was investigated by a simulated body fluid (SBF) assay, cytotoxicity testing, and an in vivo implantation experiment. The Sr molar concentration [Sr/(Sr+Ca)] in ABS surpassed 5% and Sr was distributed nearly evenly. XPS analyses suggest that Sr combined with oxygen and carbonate radicals. Released Sr ions were detected in the immersion solution at higher concentration than calcium ions until day 30. The compressive strength of the Sr-doped ABS did not change significantly. The bioactivity of Sr-doped material, as measured by the in vitro SBF immersion method, was superior to that of the Sr-free freeze-dried bone and the Sr-doped material did not show cytotoxicity compared with Sr-free culture medium. The rate of bone mineral deposition for Sr-doped ABS was faster than that of the control at 4 weeks (3.28 ± 0.23 µm/day vs. 2.60 ± 0.20 µm/day; p<0.05). Sr can be evenly doped into porous ABS at relevant concentrations to create highly active bone substitutes.

  7. Validity for What Purpose?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Lorrie A.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Context: The evolution of validity understandings from mid-century to now has emphasized that test validity depends on test purpose--adding consequence considerations to issues of interpretation and evidentiary warrants. Purpose: To consider the tensions created by multiple purposes for assessment and sketch briefly how we got to where…

  8. The Meanings of "Purpose."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walzer, Arthur E.

    "Purpose" is an important term in rhetorical theory and writing pedagogy. An analysis of the presentation of "purpose" in three well-regarded, theory-based textbooks ("Writing in the Liberal Arts Tradition: A Rhetoric with Readings,""Writing with a Purpose," and "Form and Surprise in Composition")…

  9. Polarization induced doped transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Huili; Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  10. Detecting doping use: more than an analytical problem.

    PubMed

    Delanghe, J R; Maenhout, T M; Speeckaert, M M; De Buyzere, M L

    2014-01-01

    The recent Armstrong case, where more than 250 negative doping tests are confronted with the athlete's confession of erythropoietin use, blood doping, steroid, and growth hormone abuse, illustrates the limitations of current laboratory tests in detecting doping in sport. Despite numerous doping controls and simultaneous indications of common doping abuse among professional athletes in the last two decades, the number of positive urine tests for recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) remains remarkably low. Athletes are using various masking strategies, among them protease inhibitors, intravenous injections of rHuEPO and alternative erythropoiesis stimulating agents. As one of the countermeasures, the Athlete's Biological Passport has been introduced. The sensitivity of the Athlete's Biological Passport is limited if the effect of a low-dose doping remains within the intra-individual reference range. A possible solution could be the use of a novel Epo test (MAIIA Diagnostics). Another performance-enhancing strategy is the return to 'old' doping techniques, such as autologous blood transfusions. Several indirect methods to detect autologous blood transfusions have been proposed with the majority relying on changes in erythropoiesis-sensitive blood markers. Currently, an algorithm based on the haemoglobin (Hb) level concentration and the percentage of reticulocytes (OFF-hr model; Hb(g/l)-60·√%ret) is approved by the World Anti-Doping Agency. Genetic factors have been identified which may interfere with test interpretation. A large inter- and intra-ethnic variation in testosterone glucuronidation and excretion has been described. Consideration of genetic variation should improve performance of the testosterone doping test. Taking into account the pre-analytical care and better tailoring of the threshold values could increase test sensitivity. Anti-doping laboratories should routinely adjust for multiple testing as failure of doping control to detect cheaters

  11. Temperature dependence of nonlinear optical properties in Li doped nano-carbon bowl material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei-qi; Zhou, Xin; Chang, Ying; Quan Tian, Wei; Sun, Xiu-Dong

    2013-04-01

    The mechanism for change of nonlinear optical (NLO) properties with temperature is proposed for a nonlinear optical material, Li doped curved nano-carbon bowl. Four stable conformations of Li doped corannulene were located and their electronic properties were investigated in detail. The NLO response of those Li doped conformations varies with relative position of doping agent on the curved carbon surface of corannulene. Conversion among those Li doped conformations, which could be controlled by temperature, changes the NLO response of bulk material. Thus, conformation change of alkali metal doped carbon nano-material with temperature rationalizes the variation of NLO properties of those materials.

  12. Metal-Organic Coordination Polymer to Prepare Density Controllable and High Nitrogen-Doped Content Carbon/Graphene for High Performance Supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinwei; Zhong, Wenbin; Zou, Yubo; Xiong, Changlun; Yang, Wantai

    2017-01-11

    Design and preparation of carbon-based electrode material with high nitrogen-doping ratio and appropriate density attract much interest for supercapacitors in practical application. Herein, three porous carbon/graphene (NCGCu, NCGFe, and NCGZn) with high doping ratio of nitrogen have been prepared via directly pyrolysis of graphene oxide (GO)/metal-organic coordination polymer (MOCP) composites, which were formed by reacting 4,4'-bipyridine (BPD) with CuCl2, FeCl3, and ZnCl2, respectively. As-prepared NCGCu, NCGFe and NCGZn showed high nitrogen doping ratio of 10.68, 12.99, and 11.21 at. %; and high density of 1.52, 0.84, and 1.15 g cm(-3), respectively. When as-prepared samples were used as supercapacitor electrodes, NCGCu, NCGFe and NCGZn exhibited high gravimetric specific capacitances of 369, 298.5, 309.5 F g(-1), corresponding to high volumetric specific capacitances of 560.9, 250.7, 355.9 F cm(-3) at a current density of 0.5 A g(-1), as well as good cycling stability, nearly 100% of the capacitance retained after 1000 cycles even at a large current density of 10 A g(-1). It is expected that the provided novel strategy can be used to develop electrode materials in high performance energy conversion/storage devices.

  13. Boron-doped superlattices and Bragg mirrors in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Fiori, A.; Bousquet, J.; Eon, D.; Omnès, F.; Bustarret, E.; Bellet-Amalric, E.

    2014-08-25

    A periodic modulation of the boron doping level of single crystal diamond multilayers over more than three orders of magnitude during epitaxial growth by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is shown to yield Bragg mirrors in the visible. The thicknesses and doping level of the individual layers were controlled by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry, enabling to tune the reflectance peak to the wavelength range of diamond color centers, such as NV{sup 0} or NV{sup −}. The crystalline quality, periodicity, and sharpness of the doping transitions in these doping superlattices over tens of periods were confirmed by high resolution X-ray diffraction.

  14. Sintering behaviour of niobia-doped large grain UO2 pellet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Y.

    1996-11-01

    The densification and grain growth of niobia-doped UO2 pellets have been studied with the purpose of obtaining a large grain size. The solid solution limit of niobium oxides in UO2 was about 0.5 wt% Nb2O5 as measured by the variation of the lattice parameter. The addition of 0.3 wt% Nb2O5 or NbO2 increased the grain size more when the oxygen partial pressure in the sintering atmosphere was above the equilibrium value for Mb5+ than when it was above that of Nb4+. This effect of the oxygen partial pressure made it possible to manufacture a large grain UO2 pellet doped with a small amount of niobia below the solid solution limit and sintered at a low temperature in a sintering atmosphere in which the oxygen partial pressure was controlled.

  15. Normal-state charge dynamics in doped BaFe2As2: Roles of doping and necessary ingredients for superconductivity

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, M.; Ishida, S.; Tanaka, T.; Kihou, K.; Tomioka, Y.; Saito, T.; Lee, C. H.; Fukazawa, H.; Kohori, Y.; Kakeshita, T.; Iyo, A.; Ito, T.; Eisaki, H.; Uchida, S.

    2014-01-01

    In high-transition-temperature superconducting cuprates and iron arsenides, chemical doping plays an important role in inducing superconductivity. Whereas in the cuprate case, the dominant role of doping is to inject charge carriers, the role for the iron arsenides is complex owing to carrier multiplicity and the diversity of doping. Here, we present a comparative study of the in-plane resistivity and the optical spectrum of doped BaFe2As2, which allows for separation of coherent (itinerant) and incoherent (highly dissipative) charge dynamics. The coherence of the system is controlled by doping, and the doping evolution of the charge dynamics exhibits a distinct difference between electron and hole doping. It is found in common with any type of doping that superconductivity with high transition temperature emerges when the normal-state charge dynamics maintains incoherence and when the resistivity associated with the coherent channel exhibits dominant temperature-linear dependence. PMID:25077444

  16. Efficient use of retention time for the analysis of 302 drugs in equine plasma by liquid chromatography-MS/MS with scheduled multiple reaction monitoring and instant library searching for doping control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Uboh, Cornelius E; Soma, Lawrence R; Li, Xiaoqing; Guan, Fuyu; You, Youwen; Chen, Jin-Wen

    2011-09-01

    Multiple drug target analysis (MDTA) used in doping control is more efficient than single drug target analysis (SDTA). The number of drugs with the potential for abuse is so extensive that full coverage is not possible with SDTA. To address this problem, a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric method was developed for simultaneous analysis of 302 drugs using a scheduled multiple reaction monitoring (s-MRM) algorithm. With a known retention time of an analyte, the s-MRM algorithm monitors each MRM transition only around its expected retention time. Analytes were recovered from plasma by liquid-liquid extraction. Information-dependent acquisition (IDA) functionality was used to combine s-MRM with enhanced product ion (EPI) scans within the same chromatographic analysis. An EPI spectrum library was also generated for rapid identification of analytes. Analysis time for the 302 drugs was 7 min. Scheduled MRM improved the quality of the chromatograms, signal response, reproducibility, and enhanced signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), resulting in more data points. Reduction in total cycle time from 2.4 s in conventional MRM (c-MRM) to 1 s in s-MRM allowed completion of the EPI scan at the same time. The speed for screening and identification of multiple drugs in equine plasma for doping control analysis was greatly improved by this method.

  17. 42 CFR 456.500 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Review Plans: FFP, Waivers, and Variances for Hospitals and Mental Hospitals § 456.500 Purpose. For hospitals and mental hospitals, this subpart—...

  18. Multiple delta doping of single crystal cubic boron nitride films heteroepitaxially grown on (001)diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, H.; Ziemann, P.

    2014-06-01

    Phase pure cubic boron nitride (c-BN) films have been epitaxially grown on (001) diamond substrates at 900 °C. The n-type doping of c-BN epitaxial films relies on the sequential growth of nominally undoped (p-) and Si doped (n-) layers with well-controlled thickness (down to several nanometer range) in the concept of multiple delta doping. The existence of nominally undoped c-BN overgrowth separates the Si doped layers, preventing Si dopant segregation that was observed for continuously doped epitaxial c-BN films. This strategy allows doping of c-BN films can be scaled up to multiple numbers of doped layers through atomic level control of the interface in the future electronic devices. Enhanced electronic transport properties with higher hall mobility (102 cm2/V s) have been demonstrated at room temperature as compared to the normally continuously Si doped c-BN films.

  19. Foam core shield (FCS) systems : a new dual - purpose technology for shielding against meteoroid strike damage and for thermal control of spacecrafts/satellite components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Marc A.; Zwissler, James G.; Hayes, Charles; Fabensky, Beth; Cornelison, Charles; Alexander, Lesley; Bishop, Karen

    2005-01-01

    A new technology is being developed that can protect spacecraft and satellite components against damage from meteoroid strikes and control the thermal environment of the protected components. This technology, called Foam Core Shield (FCS) systems, has the potential to replace the multi-layer insulation blankets (MLI) that have been used on spacecraft for decades. In order to be an attractive candidate for replacing MLI, FCS systems should not only provide superior protection against meteoroid strikes but also provide an equal or superior ability to control the temperature of the protected component. Properly designed FCS systems can provide these principal functions, meteoroid strike protection and thermal control, with lower system mass and a smaller system envelope than ML.

  20. Cat-doping: Novel method for phosphorus and boron shallow doping in crystalline silicon at 80 °C

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Hideki; Hayakawa, Taro; Ohta, Tatsunori; Nakashima, Yuki; Miyamoto, Motoharu; Thi, Trinh Cham; Koyama, Koichi; Ohdaira, Keisuke

    2014-09-21

    Phosphorus (P) or boron (B) atoms can be doped at temperatures as low as 80 to 350 °C, when crystalline silicon (c-Si) is exposed only for a few minutes to species generated by catalytic cracking reaction of phosphine (PH₃) or diborane (B₂H₆) with heated tungsten (W) catalyzer. This paper is to investigate systematically this novel doping method, “Cat-doping”, in detail. The electrical properties of P or B doped layers are studied by the Van der Pauw method based on the Hall effects measurement. The profiles of P or B atoms in c-Si are observed by secondary ion mass spectrometry mainly from back side of samples to eliminate knock-on effects. It is confirmed that the surface of p-type c-Si is converted to n-type by P Cat-doping at 80 °C, and similarly, that of n-type c-Si is to p-type by B Cat-doping. The doping depth is as shallow as 5 nm or less and the electrically activated doping concentration is 10¹⁸ to 10¹⁹cm⁻³ for both P and B doping. It is also found that the surface potential of c-Si is controlled by the shallow Cat-doping and that the surface recombination velocity of minority carriers in c-Si can be enormously lowered by this potential control.

  1. Aero dopes and varnishes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, H T S

    1927-01-01

    Before proceeding to discuss the preparation of dope solutions, it will be necessary to consider some of the essential properties which should be possessed of a dope film, deposited in and on the surface of an aero fabric. The first is that it should tighten the material and second it should withstand weathering.

  2. Doped graphene supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashok Kumar, Nanjundan; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2015-12-01

    Heteroatom-doped graphitic frameworks have received great attention in energy research, since doping endows graphitic structures with a wide spectrum of properties, especially critical for electrochemical supercapacitors, which tend to complement or compete with the current lithium-ion battery technology/devices. This article reviews the latest developments in the chemical modification/doping strategies of graphene and highlights the versatility of such heteroatom-doped graphitic structures. Their role as supercapacitor electrodes is discussed in detail. This review is specifically focused on the concept of material synthesis, techniques for electrode fabrication and metrics of performance, predominantly covering the last four years. Challenges and insights into the future research and perspectives on the development of novel electrode architectures for electrochemical supercapacitors based on doped graphene are also discussed.

  3. 21 CFR 1401.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Purpose. 1401.1 Section 1401.1 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION § 1401.1 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to prescribe rules, guidelines and procedures to implement the Freedom of...

  4. 21 CFR 1401.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Purpose. 1401.1 Section 1401.1 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION § 1401.1 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to prescribe rules, guidelines and procedures to implement the Freedom of...

  5. 21 CFR 1401.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Purpose. 1401.1 Section 1401.1 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION § 1401.1 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to prescribe rules, guidelines and procedures to implement the Freedom of...

  6. 21 CFR 1401.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Purpose. 1401.1 Section 1401.1 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION § 1401.1 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to prescribe rules, guidelines and procedures to implement the Freedom of...

  7. 40 CFR 35.140 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Purpose. 35.140 Section 35.140 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants Air Pollution Control (section 105) § 35.140 Purpose. (a) Purpose...

  8. 40 CFR 35.700 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Indoor Radon Grants (section 306) § 35.700 Purpose. (a) Purpose of section. Sections 35.700 through 35.708 govern Indoor Radon Grants to Tribes and Intertribal Consortia under section 306 of the Toxic Substances Control Act. (b) Purpose of program. (1) Indoor...

  9. 40 CFR 35.290 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants State Indoor Radon Grants (section 306) § 35.290 Purpose. (a) Purpose of section. Sections 35.290 through 35.298 govern Indoor Radon Grants to States (as defined in...) under section 306 of the Toxic Substances Control Act. (b) Purpose of program. (1) State Indoor...

  10. 40 CFR 35.290 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants State Indoor Radon Grants (section 306) § 35.290 Purpose. (a) Purpose of section. Sections 35.290 through 35.298 govern Indoor Radon Grants to States (as defined in...) under section 306 of the Toxic Substances Control Act. (b) Purpose of program. (1) State Indoor...

  11. 40 CFR 35.700 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Indoor Radon Grants (section 306) § 35.700 Purpose. (a) Purpose of section. Sections 35.700 through 35.708 govern Indoor Radon Grants to Tribes and Intertribal Consortia under section 306 of the Toxic Substances Control Act. (b) Purpose of program. (1) Indoor...

  12. 40 CFR 35.290 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants State Indoor Radon Grants (section 306) § 35.290 Purpose. (a) Purpose of section. Sections 35.290 through 35.298 govern Indoor Radon Grants to States (as defined in...) under section 306 of the Toxic Substances Control Act. (b) Purpose of program. (1) State Indoor...

  13. 40 CFR 35.290 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants State Indoor Radon Grants (section 306) § 35.290 Purpose. (a) Purpose of section. Sections 35.290 through 35.298 govern Indoor Radon Grants to States (as defined in...) under section 306 of the Toxic Substances Control Act. (b) Purpose of program. (1) State Indoor...

  14. 40 CFR 35.700 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Indoor Radon Grants (section 306) § 35.700 Purpose. (a) Purpose of section. Sections 35.700 through 35.708 govern Indoor Radon Grants to Tribes and Intertribal Consortia under section 306 of the Toxic Substances Control Act. (b) Purpose of program. (1) Indoor...

  15. 40 CFR 35.700 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Indoor Radon Grants (section 306) § 35.700 Purpose. (a) Purpose of section. Sections 35.700 through 35.708 govern Indoor Radon Grants to Tribes and Intertribal Consortia under section 306 of the Toxic Substances Control Act. (b) Purpose of program. (1) Indoor...

  16. 33 CFR 153.201 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Purpose. 153.201 Section 153.201 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION CONTROL OF... Substance § 153.201 Purpose. The purpose of this subpart is to prescribe the manner in which the...

  17. 21 CFR 1401.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 1401.1 Section 1401.1 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY PUBLIC AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION § 1401.1 Purpose. The purpose of this part is to prescribe rules, guidelines and procedures to implement the Freedom of...

  18. Al-doped ZnO seed layer-dependent crystallographic control of ZnO nanorods by using electrochemical deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Hyo-Soo; Choi, Nak-Jung; Kim, Kyoung-Bo; Kim, Moojin; Lee, Sung-Nam

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Polar and semipolar ZnO NRs were successfully achieved by hydrothermal synthesis. • Semipolar and polar ZnO NRs were grown on ZnO and AZO/m-sapphire, respectively. • Al % of AZO/m-sapphire enhanced the lateral growth rate of polar ZnO NRs. - Abstract: We investigated the effect of an Al-doped ZnO film on the crystallographic direction of ZnO nanorods (NRs) using electrochemical deposition. From high-solution X-ray diffraction measurements, the crystallographic plane of ZnO NRs grown on (1 0 0) ZnO/m-plane sapphire was (1 0 1). The surface grain size of the (100) Al-doped ZnO (AZO) film decreased with increasing Al content in the ZnO seed layer, implying that the Al dopant accelerated the three-dimensional (3D) growth of the AZO film. In addition, it was found that with increasing Al doping concentration of the AZO seed layer, the crystal orientation of the ZnO NRs grown on the AZO seed layer changed from [1 0 1] to [0 0 1]. With increasing Al content of the nonpolar (1 0 0) AZO seed layer, the small surface grains with a few crystallographic planes of the AZO film changed from semipolar (1 0 1) ZnO NRs to polar (0 0 1) ZnO NRs due to the increase of the vertical [0 0 1] growth rate of the ZnO NRs owing to excellent electrical properties.

  19. Communities of Purpose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stukes, Felesia

    2016-01-01

    Communities of Purpose are commonly known to enact their purposes through social movements, grassroots efforts, semi-formal groups, and through organizations in the voluntary sector. They carry out charitable missions and goals and are often committed to the pursuit of social welfare and social change. In this research, I explain why Communities…

  20. Doping against the native propensity of MoS₂: Degenerate hole doping by cation substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Joonki; Park, Tae-Eon; Lin, Der-Yuh; Fu, Deyi; Park, Joonsuk; Jung, Hee Joon; Chen, Yabin; Ko, Changhyun; Jang, Chaun; Sun, Yinghui; Sinclair, Robert; Chang, Joonyeon; Tongay, Sefaattin; Wu, Junqiao

    2014-12-10

    Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) draw much attention as the key semiconducting material for two-dimensional electrical, optoelectronic, and spintronic devices. For most of these applications, both n- and p-type materials are needed to form junctions and support bipolar carrier conduction. However, typically only one type of doping is stable for a particular TMD. For example, molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) is natively an n-type presumably due to omnipresent electron-donating sulfur vacancies, and stable/controllable p-type doping has not been achieved. The lack of p-type doping hampers the development of charge-splitting p–n junctions of MoS₂, as well as limits carrier conduction to spin-degenerate conduction bands instead of the more interesting, spin-polarized valence bands. Traditionally, extrinsic p-type doping in TMDs has been approached with surface adsorption or intercalation of electron-accepting molecules. However, practically stable doping requires substitution of host atoms with dopants where the doping is secured by covalent bonding. In this work, we demonstrate stable p-type conduction in MoS₂ by substitutional niobium (Nb) doping, leading to a degenerate hole density of ~3 × 10¹⁹ cm⁻³. Structural and X-ray techniques reveal that the Nb atoms are indeed substitutionally incorporated into MoS₂ by replacing the Mo cations in the host lattice. van der Waals p–n homojunctions based on vertically stacked MoS₂ layers are fabricated, which enable gate-tunable current rectification. A wide range of microelectronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic devices can be envisioned from the demonstrated substitutional bipolar doping of MoS₂. From the miscibility of dopants with the host, it is also expected that the synthesis technique demonstrated here can be generally extended to other TMDs for doping against their native unipolar propensity.

  1. 33 CFR 273.10 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PLANT CONTROL § 273.10 Purpose. This regulation prescribes policies, procedures and guidelines for research, planning and operations for the Aquatic Plant Control Program under authority of section 302...

  2. 33 CFR 273.10 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PLANT CONTROL § 273.10 Purpose. This regulation prescribes policies, procedures and guidelines for research, planning and operations for the Aquatic Plant Control Program under authority of section 302...

  3. 33 CFR 273.10 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PLANT CONTROL § 273.10 Purpose. This regulation prescribes policies, procedures and guidelines for research, planning and operations for the Aquatic Plant Control Program under authority of section 302...

  4. Perspective: Extremely fine tuning of doping enabled by combinatorial molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Božović, I.

    2015-06-01

    Chemical doping provides an effective method to control the electric properties of complex oxides. However, the state-of-art accuracy in controlling doping is limited to about 1%. This hampers elucidation of the precise doping dependences of physical properties and phenomena of interest, such as quantum phase transitions. Using the combinatorial molecular beam epitaxy, we improve the accuracy in tuning the doping level by two orders of magnitude. We illustrate this novel method by two examples: a systematic investigation of the doping dependence of interface superconductivity, and a study of the competing ground states in the vicinity of the insulator-to-superconductor transition.

  5. Minnesota River at Chaska, Minnesota. Technical Appendixes. Limited Reevaluation Report and Final Supplement to the Final Environmental Impact Statement for Flood Control and Related Purposes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    PROJECT With passage of the Water Resources Development Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-587), Congress authorized the Chaska flood control project. As approved...miles of levee along the MinnCota River. DEGREE OF PROTECTION Minnes.ota li e r - i he P roposld lekVe on th -innesota livr would provide protcction a...the channel uli.;n- nent has been changed. (2) I’here is a high SLt r 11 bank coo biled sith a nar row, passage be .t,’c_’,, to the north, ’ii:i 21

  6. To develop a dynamic model of a collector loop for purpose of improved control of solar heating and cooling. Final technical report. [TRNSYS code

    SciTech Connect

    Herczfeld, P R; Fischl, R

    1980-01-01

    The program objectives were to (1) assess the feasibility of using the TRNSYS computer code for solar heating and cooling control studies and modify it wherever possible, and (2) develop a new dynamic model of the solar collector which reflects the performance of the collector under transient conditions. Also, the sensitivity of the performance of this model to the various system parameters such as collector time constants, flow rates, turn-on and turn-off temperature set points, solar insolation, etc., was studied. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

  7. Doping induced structural changes in colloidal semiconductor nanowires.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Krishna Prasad; Pietsch, Ullrich; Li, Zhen; Oztürk, Ozgül Kurtulus

    2013-03-28

    Undoped and Mn(2+)-doped CdSe nanowires (NWs) grown by a solution-liquid-solid (SLS) method using Bi nanocatalysts have been studied by X-ray powder diffraction measurements. Except for heavily doped nanowires no measurable changes in nanowire lattice parameters were observed. The lattice parameter of heavily doped nanowires shrinks by about 0.5% compared with the undoped ones, which corresponds to a doping concentration of 1.6%. For the other samples no change in lattice parameter is measured referring to a doping level much below 1%. Real structural parameters of nanowires were found to vary as a function of doping level, such as the zinc blende to wurtzite ratio, the static Debye-Waller factor, axial strain, and the number of stacking faults. Compared with the undoped nanowires the overall perfection is slightly improved for low doping but deteriorates drastically for higher doping. Our results highlight the importance of controlling the dopant concentration during the preparation of doped nanostructures.

  8. Epidemiological analysis of doping offences in the professional tennis circuit

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Tennis is a professional sport under a strict anti-doping control. However, since the first violation of the code, the positive cases have not been statistically studied. The objective of this study was to analyze doping offences in the international professional tennis circuit. Methods All offences to the Doping Code committed by tennis players during 2003-2009 were collected from the ITF official webpage, registered and analyzed. Results An average of 1905.7 (±174.5) samples was obtained per year. Fifty-two doping offences were reported and the overall incidence of positive doping samples accounted for 0.38% and 7.4 (±4.1) cases/year. Male players showed higher incidence doping offences than females (p = 0.0004). The incidence in wheelchair players was higher than in non-handicapped subjects (p = 0.0001) Banned substance distribution showed: stimulants 32.69%, cannabis 23.07%; anabolic 11.53%, diuretics and masking agents 11.53, β2-agonists 9.61%; corticosteroids 3.84%, others 3.84%. The overall incidence of 'social drugs' (cocaine, cannabis) was 36.53%. All EPO and blood samples were normal, while the incidence of 'out-of-competition' offences was 0.12%. The lower incidence of doping was found in Grand Slams tournaments. Conclusions The incidence of positive doping samples among professional tennis players is quite low supporting the assumption that there is no evidence of systematic doping in Tennis. "Social drugs" misuse constitutes the main problem of doping in tennis. Male and wheelchair tennis players showed higher risk of infringing the doping code than their females and non-handicapped counterparts. Findings of this study should help to determine the direction of the ongoing strategy in the fight against doping in Tennis. PMID:21159201

  9. Fibrous guided tissue regeneration membrane loaded with anti-inflammatory agent prepared by coaxial electrospinning for the purpose of controlled release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Min; Xue, Jiajia; Geng, Huan; Gu, Hao; Chen, Dafu; Shi, Rui; Zhang, Liqun

    2015-04-01

    Here, with the aim of inhibiting inflammation during guided tissue regeneration membrane (GTRM) implant surgery, coaxial electrospinning was used to fabricate drug-loaded core/sheath nanofiber GTRMs capable of controlled drug release. Various amounts of the anti-inflammatory agent metronidazole (MNA) were encapsulated into the core/sheath nanofibers (where PCL was the core, gelatin the sheath, and the gelatin shell was crosslinked with genipin) in order to establish the minimal drug content necessary to achieve the appropriate anti-inflammatory effect. By using TEM and SEM, the core/sheath structure was confirmed. In vitro drug disolution results showed that the core/sheath nanofibers exhibited sustained release profiles that were superior to those nanofibers produced by blending electrospinning. Additionally, the membrane significantly inhibited the colonization of anaerobic bacteria. Furthermore, with gelatin as a shell, the core/shell nanofiber membranes showed improved hydrophilicity, which resulted in better cell adhesion and proliferation without cytotoxicity. Therefore, in this study, a simple and effective coaxial electrospinning approach was demonstrated for the fabrication of anti-inflammatory GTRMs capable of providing controlled drug release.

  10. The dawn of computer-assisted robotic osteotomy with ytterbium-doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Sotsuka, Yohei; Nishimoto, Soh; Tsumano, Tomoko; Kawai, Kenichiro; Ishise, Hisako; Kakibuchi, Masao; Shimokita, Ryo; Yamauchi, Taisuke; Okihara, Shin-ichiro

    2014-05-01

    Currently, laser radiation is used routinely in medical applications. For infrared lasers, bone ablation and the healing process have been reported, but no laser systems are established and applied in clinical bone surgery. Furthermore, industrial laser applications utilize computer and robot assistance; medical laser radiations are still mostly conducted manually nowadays. The purpose of this study was to compare the histological appearance of bone ablation and healing response in rabbit radial bone osteotomy created by surgical saw and ytterbium-doped fiber laser controlled by a computer with use of nitrogen surface cooling spray. An Ytterbium (Yb)-doped fiber laser at a wavelength of 1,070 nm was guided by a computer-aided robotic system, with a spot size of 100 μm at a distance of approximately 80 mm from the surface. The output power of the laser was 60 W at the scanning speed of 20 mm/s scan using continuous wave system with nitrogen spray level 0.5 MPa (energy density, 3.8 × 10(4) W/cm(2)). Rabbits radial bone osteotomy was performed by an Yb-doped fiber laser and a surgical saw. Additionally, histological analyses of the osteotomy site were performed on day 0 and day 21. Yb-doped fiber laser osteotomy revealed a remarkable cutting efficiency. There were little signs of tissue damage to the muscle. Lased specimens have shown no delayed healing compared with the saw osteotomies. Computer-assisted robotic osteotomy with Yb-doped fiber laser was able to perform. In rabbit model, laser-induced osteotomy defects, compared to those by surgical saw, exhibited no delayed healing response.

  11. Analytical development of a binuclear oxo-manganese complex bio-inspired on oxidase enzyme for doping control analysis of acetazolamide.

    PubMed

    Machini, Wesley B S; Teixeira, Marcos F S

    2016-05-15

    A bio-inspired electrochemical sensor using a binuclear oxo-manganese complex was evaluated and applied in the detection of a substance associated with doping in sports: acetazolamide (ACTZ). Investigation was made of the influence of different experimental variables on the electrocatalytic oxidation of ACTZ by the bio-inspired sensor, such as pH and interfering species. The bio-inspired sensor showed the best response in the range from 5.00×10(-9) to 7.00×10(-8) mol L(-1) ACTZ, with a linear range from 5.00×10(-9) to 2.50×10(-8) mol L(-1) and a detection limit of 4.76×10(-9) mol L(-1). The sensor exhibited characteristics similar to the Michaelis-Menten model of an enzymatic electrode, due to the use of a multinucleated complex of manganese with μ-oxo units, which was able to mimic the properties of enzymes with manganese as a cofactor in their composition, such as Mn-containing oxidase. The determination of ACTZ with the bio-inspired sensor was evaluated using three different synthetic biological fluids (plasma, saliva, and urine), demonstrating its viability for use with real samples. The analysis of ACTZ in real urine samples using the bio-inspired sensor, simulating the method adopted by the World Anti-Doping Agency, which revealed viable, suggesting a new and promising platform to be used in these analysis.

  12. Precipitation control and activation enhancement in boron-doped p{sup +}-BaSi{sub 2} films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, M. Ajmal; Nakamura, K.; Du, W.; Toko, K.; Usami, N.; Suemasu, T.

    2014-06-23

    Precipitation free boron (B)-doped as-grown p{sup +}-BaSi{sub 2} layer is essential for the BaSi{sub 2} p-n junction solar cells. In this article, B-doped p-BaSi{sub 2} layers were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on Si(111) substrates, and the influence of substrate growth temperature (T{sub S}) and B temperature (T{sub B}) in the Knudsen cell crucible were investigated on the formation of B precipitates and the activation efficiency. The hole concentration, p, reached 1.0 × 10{sup 19 }cm{sup −3} at room temperature for T{sub S} = 600 and T{sub B} = 1550 °C. However, the activation rate of B was only 0.1%. Furthermore, the B precipitates were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). When the T{sub S} was raised to 650 °C and the T{sub B} was decreased to 1350 °C, the p reached 6.8 × 10{sup 19 }cm{sup −3}, and the activation rate increased to more than 20%. No precipitation of B was also confirmed by TEM.

  13. 21 CFR 1402.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Purpose. 1402.1 Section 1402.1 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY MANDATORY DECLASSIFICATION REVIEW § 1402.1 Purpose. Other... files of the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) be reviewed for possible...

  14. 21 CFR 1402.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Purpose. 1402.1 Section 1402.1 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY MANDATORY DECLASSIFICATION REVIEW § 1402.1 Purpose. Other... files of the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) be reviewed for possible...

  15. 21 CFR 1402.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Purpose. 1402.1 Section 1402.1 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY MANDATORY DECLASSIFICATION REVIEW § 1402.1 Purpose. Other... files of the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) be reviewed for possible...

  16. 21 CFR 1402.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Purpose. 1402.1 Section 1402.1 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY MANDATORY DECLASSIFICATION REVIEW § 1402.1 Purpose. Other... files of the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) be reviewed for possible...

  17. 23 CFR 750.701 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Outdoor Advertising Control § 750.701 Purpose. This subpart prescribes the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) policies and requirements relating to the effective control of outdoor advertising under 23 U.S.C. 131. The purpose of these policies and requirements is to assure that there is effective State...

  18. 40 CFR 35.570 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants for Tribes Air Pollution Control (section 105) § 35.570 Purpose. (a) Purpose of section. Sections 35.570 through 35.578 govern air pollution control grants to Tribes (as defined in section 302(r) of the Clean Air Act (CAA)) authorized under sections 105 and 301(d) of the...

  19. 40 CFR 35.140 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Environmental Program Grants Air Pollution Control (section 105) § 35.140 Purpose. (a) Purpose of section. Sections 35.140 through 35.148 govern Air Pollution Control Grants to State, local,...

  20. 44 CFR 2.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose. 2.1 Section 2.1 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL OMB CONTROL NUMBERS § 2.1 Purpose. This part collects and displays the control numbers assigned...

  1. 21 CFR 1402.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose. 1402.1 Section 1402.1 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY MANDATORY DECLASSIFICATION REVIEW § 1402.1 Purpose. Other... files of the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) be reviewed for possible...

  2. 33 CFR 153.101 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION CONTROL OF POLLUTION BY OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES, DISCHARGE REMOVAL General § 153.101 Purpose. The purpose of this... hazardous substances as required by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (FWPCA);...

  3. 33 CFR 153.101 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION CONTROL OF POLLUTION BY OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES, DISCHARGE REMOVAL General § 153.101 Purpose. The purpose of this... hazardous substances as required by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (FWPCA);...

  4. 33 CFR 153.101 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION CONTROL OF POLLUTION BY OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES, DISCHARGE REMOVAL General § 153.101 Purpose. The purpose of this... hazardous substances as required by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (FWPCA);...

  5. 33 CFR 153.101 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION CONTROL OF POLLUTION BY OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES, DISCHARGE REMOVAL General § 153.101 Purpose. The purpose of this... hazardous substances as required by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (FWPCA);...

  6. 33 CFR 153.101 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION CONTROL OF POLLUTION BY OIL AND HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES, DISCHARGE REMOVAL General § 153.101 Purpose. The purpose of this... hazardous substances as required by the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (FWPCA);...

  7. 10 CFR 861.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Purpose. 861.1 Section 861.1 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTROL OF TRAFFIC AT NEVADA TEST SITE § 861.1 Purpose. The regulations in this part are designed to facilitate the control of traffic at the Nevada Test Site....

  8. 10 CFR 861.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Purpose. 861.1 Section 861.1 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTROL OF TRAFFIC AT NEVADA TEST SITE § 861.1 Purpose. The regulations in this part are designed to facilitate the control of traffic at the Nevada Test Site....

  9. 10 CFR 861.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Purpose. 861.1 Section 861.1 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTROL OF TRAFFIC AT NEVADA TEST SITE § 861.1 Purpose. The regulations in this part are designed to facilitate the control of traffic at the Nevada Test Site....

  10. 10 CFR 861.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Purpose. 861.1 Section 861.1 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTROL OF TRAFFIC AT NEVADA TEST SITE § 861.1 Purpose. The regulations in this part are designed to facilitate the control of traffic at the Nevada Test Site....

  11. 10 CFR 861.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Purpose. 861.1 Section 861.1 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTROL OF TRAFFIC AT NEVADA TEST SITE § 861.1 Purpose. The regulations in this part are designed to facilitate the control of traffic at the Nevada Test Site....

  12. Phase transitions and doping in semiconductor nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Ayaskanta

    impurities (or doping) allows further control over the electrical and optical properties of nanocrystals. However, while impurity doping in bulk semiconductors is now routine, doping of nanocrystals remains challenging. In particular, evidence for electronic doping, in which additional electrical carriers are introduced into the nanocrystals, has been very limited. Here, we adopt a new approach to electronic doping of nanocrystals. We utilize a partial cation exchange to introduce silver impurities into cadmium selenide (CdSe) and lead selenide (PbSe) nanocrystals. Results indicate that the silver-doped CdSe nanocrystals show a significant increase in fluorescence intensity, as compared to pure CdSe nanocrystals. We also observe a switching from n- to p-type doping in the silver-doped CdSe nanocrystals with increased silver amounts. Moreover, the silver-doping results in a change in the conductance of both PbSe and CdSe nanocrystals and the magnitude of this change depends on the amount of silver incorporated into the nanocrystals. In the bulk, silver chalcogenides (Ag2E, E=S, Se, and Te) possess a wide array of intriguing properties, including superionic conductivity. In addition, they undergo a reversible temperature-dependent phase transition which induces significant changes in their electronic and ionic properties. While most of these properties have been examined extensively in bulk, very few studies have been conducted at the nanoscale. We have recently developed a versatile synthesis that yields colloidal silver chalcogenide nanocrystals. Here, we study the size dependence of their phase-transition temperatures. We utilize differential scanning calorimetry and in-situ X-ray diffraction analyses to observe the phase transition in nanocrystal assemblies. We observe a significant deviation from the bulk alpha (low-temperature) to beta (high-temperature) phase-transition temperature when we reduce their size to a few nanometers. Hence, these nanocrystals provide great

  13. Isoelectronic co-doping

    DOEpatents

    Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2004-11-09

    Isoelectronic co-doping of semiconductor compounds and alloys with deep acceptors and deep donors is used to decrease bandgap, to increase concentration of the dopant constituents in the resulting alloys, and to increase carrier mobilities lifetimes. Group III-V compounds and alloys, such as GaAs and GaP, are isoelectronically co-doped with, for example, N and Bi, to customize solar cells, thermal voltaic cells, light emitting diodes, photodetectors, and lasers on GaP, InP, GaAs, Ge, and Si substrates. Isoelectronically co-doped Group II-VI compounds and alloys are also included.

  14. Antimicrobial activity of silver doped fabrics for the production of hospital uniforms.

    PubMed

    Condò, Carla; Messi, Patrizia; Anacarso, Immacolata; Sabia, Carla; Iseppi, Ramona; Bondi, Moreno; de Niederhausern, Simona

    2015-10-01

    Among several alternatives to control hospital-acquired infections (HAIs), a strategy could be the use of hospital uniforms imbued with antimicrobial substances. For this purpose we evaluated the antibacterial activity of two different silver doped fabrics employed for the production of hospital uniforms. The study was conducted in two-step. In the first the antimicrobial activity was evaluated in vitro against Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212. In the second, we tested the total viable counts detected from beginning to end of the work shift on experimental silver doped uniforms worn by doctors, nurses, allied health assistants in different hospital wards. The in vitro tests showed a remarkable antibacterial activity of both silver doped samples (>99.9% reduction within 4h of exposure for Gram-positive and within 24 h for Gram-negative bacteria). The experimental uniforms provided results only slightly in agreement with in vitro data. Even if the increase of total viable counts was somewhat lower for experimental uniforms than traditional ones, significant differences were not observed. Despite the results on the uniforms worn, the addition of silver in fabrics to make medical equipment (supplies) remains an interesting option for HAI control.

  15. Silicon solar cells improved by lithium doping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berman, P. A.

    1970-01-01

    Results of conference on characteristics of lithium-doped silicon solar cells and techniques required for fabrication indicate that output of cells has been improved to point where cells exhibit radiation resistance superior to those currently in use, and greater control and reproducibility of cell processing have been achieved.

  16. Aluminum doping improves silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Aluminum doped silicon solar cells with resistivities in the 10- to 20-ohm centimeter range have broad spectral response, high efficiency and long lifetimes in nuclear radiation environments. Production advantages include low material rejection and increased production yields, and close tolerance control.

  17. Controlled synthesis, asymmetrical transport behavior and luminescence properties of lanthanide doped ZnO mushroom-like 3D hierarchical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Dan; Lu, Wei; Jin, Lin; Li, Chunyang; Luo, Wen; Wang, Mengnan; Wang, Zhenling; Hao, Jianhua

    2014-10-01

    Lanthanide doped ZnO mushroom-like 3D hierarchical structures have been fabricated by polyol-mediated method and characterized by various microstructural and optical techniques. The results indicate that the as-prepared ZnO:Ln3+ (Ln = Tb, Eu) samples have a hexagonal phase structure and possess a mushroom-like 3D hierarchical morphology. The length of the whole mushroom from stipe bottom to pileus top is about 1.0 μm, and the diameters of pileus and stipe are about 0.8 μm and 0.4 μm, respectively. It is found that the flow of N2 is the key parameter for the formation of the novel ZnO structure and the addition of (NH4)2HPO4 has a prominent effect on the phase structure and the growth of mushroom-like morphology. The potential mechanism of forming this morphology is proposed. The pileus of the formed mushroom is assembled by several radial ZnO:Ln3+ nanorods, whereas the stipe is composed of over layered ZnO:Ln3+ nanosheets. Moreover, asymmetrical I-V characteristic curves of ZnO:Ln3+ mushrooms indicate that the texture composition of the 3D hierarchical morphology might lead to the asymmetrical transport behavior of electrical conductivity. Lanthanide doped ZnO samples can exhibit red or green emission under the excitation of UV light.Lanthanide doped ZnO mushroom-like 3D hierarchical structures have been fabricated by polyol-mediated method and characterized by various microstructural and optical techniques. The results indicate that the as-prepared ZnO:Ln3+ (Ln = Tb, Eu) samples have a hexagonal phase structure and possess a mushroom-like 3D hierarchical morphology. The length of the whole mushroom from stipe bottom to pileus top is about 1.0 μm, and the diameters of pileus and stipe are about 0.8 μm and 0.4 μm, respectively. It is found that the flow of N2 is the key parameter for the formation of the novel ZnO structure and the addition of (NH4)2HPO4 has a prominent effect on the phase structure and the growth of mushroom-like morphology. The potential

  18. Doping Control Using High and Ultra-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Based Non-Targeted Metabolomics-A Case Study of Salbutamol and Budesonide Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Fildier, Aurélie; Buisson, Corinne; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Cren-Olivé, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    We have detected differences in metabolite levels between doped athletes, clean athletes, and volunteers (non athletes). This outcome is obtained by comparing results of measurements from two analytical platforms: UHPLC-QTOF/MS and FT-ICR/MS. Twenty-seven urine samples tested positive for glucocorticoids or beta-2-agonists and twenty samples coming from volunteers and clean athletes were analyzed with the two different mass spectrometry approaches using both positive and negative electrospray ionization modes. Urine is a highly complex matrix containing thousands of metabolites having different chemical properties and a high dynamic range. We used multivariate analysis techniques to unravel this huge data set. Thus, the several groups we created were studied by Principal Components Analysis (PCA) and Partial Least Square regression (PLS-DA and OPLS) in the search of discriminating m/z values. The selected variables were annotated and placed on pathway by using MassTRIX. PMID:24058591

  19. Use of ion trap gas chromatography-multiple mass spectrometry for the detection and confirmation of 3'hydroxystanozolol at trace levels in urine for doping control.

    PubMed

    Mateus-Avois, Lidia; Mangin, Patrice; Saugy, Martial

    2005-02-25

    Stanozolol, a synthetic anabolic androgenic steroid, is often abused in sports to enhance performance. Consequently, the anti-doping laboratories daily screen for its metabolites (3'hydroxystanozolol and 4beta hydroxystanozolol) in all urines, mainly by GC-MS, after enzymatic hydrolysis and TMS derivatization. A sensitive and specific method by GC-MS(3) has been developed for the identification in urine of 3'hydroxystanozolol at trace levels. Full mass spectra and diagnostic ions are presented and a case report is commented. In this case, it was possible to attest the presence of a low concentration of stanozolol metabolite in a sample obtained from a competition test. This would have not been possible with other analytical techniques used in the laboratory. Through this case report, it was also possible to demonstrate the importance of sampling and the difficulties that has to face the laboratory when the pre-analytical step is not correctly performed.

  20. Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Quantum Dots@SiO2 Nanoparticles as Electrochemiluminescence and Fluorescence Signal Indicators for Magnetically Controlled Aptasensor with Dual Detection Channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengquan; Qian, Jing; Wang, Kun; Hua, Mengjuan; Liu, Qian; Hao, Nan; You, Tianyan; Huang, Xingyi

    2015-12-09

    We proposed a facile method to prepare the nitrogen-doped graphene quantum dots (NGQDs) doped silica (NGQDs@SiO2) nanoparticles (NPs). The NGQDs@SiO2 NPs were further explored as a versatile signal indicator for ochratoxin A (OTA) aptasensing by combination with electrochemiluminescence (ECL) and fluorescence (FL) detection. In this strategy, the core-shell Fe3O4@Au magnetic beads (MBs) acted as a nanocarrier to immobilize the thiolated aptamer specific for OTA, and the amino modified capture DNA (cDNA) was efficiently tagged with NGQDs@SiO2 NPs. The multifunctional aptasensor was thus fabricated by assembly of the NGQDs@SiO2 NPs onto the surface of Fe3O4@Au MBs through the high specific DNA hybridization between aptamer and cDNA. Upon OTA incubation, the aptamer linked with Fe3O4@Au MBs preferred to form an aptamer-OTA complex, which resulted in the partial release of the preloaded NGQDs@SiO2 NPs. The more OTA molecules in the detection system, the more NGQDs@SiO2 NPs were released into the bulk solution and the less preloaded NGQDs@SiO2 NPs were accumulated on the magnetic electrode surface. This provided a dual channel for OTA detection by combination with the enriched solid-state ECL and homogeneous FL detection. The FL assay exhibits a wide dynamic range and is more reproducible due to the homogeneous detection while the ECL assay possesses a lower detection limit and is preferable by using a cheaper instrument. One can obtain a preliminary screen from FL assay and a more accurate result from ECL assay. Integrating the virtues of dual analytical modality, this aptasensing strategy well-balanced the rapidity, sensitivity, and dynamic range, making it promising to other targets with aptamer sequences.

  1. [Doping-related problems in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Villiger, B; Monnat, A

    2001-04-01

    The complexity of the new antidoping regulations of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), the International Federations (IF) and the National Olympic Committees (NOC) rises a lot of problems in handling the prescriptions of medication in athletes in the daily practice. In addition, several countries have passed antidoping laws which makes the prescription and the delivery of doping agens illegal. This may have severe consequences for the prescribing doctors. It is therefore the goal of the article to inform the practitioning doctors about the new antidoping regulations and their impact on prescribing or delivering potential doping agens to athletes. It will focus on the new dopinglists, the different doping control systems, the problems with the pharmacological treatment of certain diseases as asthma and the necessary reports which have to be sent to the NOC's or the IF's after prescribing certain medications or methods.

  2. Spectroscopic investigation of nitrogen doped graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Podila, R.; Spear, J. T.; Chacon-Torres, J.; Pichler, T.; Ayala, P.; Rao, A. M.

    2012-09-17

    Current research efforts are aimed at controlling the electronic properties via doping graphene. Previously, dopant-induced changes in the Fermi velocity were observed to result in an effectively downshifted Raman peak below the G Prime -band for n-doped carbon nanotubes. However, in the case of N-doped graphene, we find that several Raman features vary depending upon both dopant concentration and its bonding environment. For instance, only pyridinic/pyrrolic dopants were observed to result in intense D/D Prime -bands with a concomitant downshift in the G Prime -band. Here, we correlate x-ray photoelectron measurements with Raman spectra to elucidate effects of dopant bonding configuration on vibrational properties of graphene.

  3. Manipulable MR effect in a δ-doped magnetic nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yong-Hong; Jiang, Ya-Qing; Fu, Xi; Li, Ai-Hua

    2016-05-01

    A magnetoresistance (MR) device was proposed by depositing two nanosized ferromagnetic strips on top and bottom of the semiconductor heterostructure. For the sake of manipulating its performance, we introduce a tunable δ-potential into this device with the help of the atomic-layer doping technique such as molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) or metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition (MOCVD). We investigate theoretically the impact of the δ-doping on the magnetoresistance ratio (MMRR) of the MR device. Although the δ-doping is embedded in the device, a considerable MR effect still exists due to different transmissions for the electron across parallel (P) and antiparallel (AP) configurations. Moreover, its MMRR varies sensitively with the magnitude and/or position of the δ-doping. Such an MR device can be controlled by changing the δ-doping, resulting in an adjustable MR device for magnetoelectronics applications.

  4. Optical method for the screening of doping substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, J.; Shevtsova, J.; Patzelt, A.; Richter, H.; Gladkowa, N. D.; Gelikonov, V. M.; Gonchukov, S. A.; Sterry, W.; Blume-Peytavi, U.

    2008-12-01

    During the last years, an increased misuse of doping substances in sport has been observed. The action of doping substances characterized by the stimulation of blood flow and metabolic processes is also reflected in the hair structure. In the present study it was demonstrated that optical coherent tomography is well suited for the analysis of hair parameters influenced by doping. Analyzing 20 patients, systemically treated with steroids which also represent doping substances, it was found that in all cases a significant increase in the cross-section of the hairs could be detected. The results obtained in the study are not only important for the screening of doping substances but also for medical diagnostics and control of compliance of patients.

  5. Heteroatom-doped graphene materials: syntheses, properties and applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuewan; Sun, Gengzhi; Routh, Parimal; Kim, Dong-Hwan; Huang, Wei; Chen, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Heteroatom doping can endow graphene with various new or improved electromagnetic, physicochemical, optical, and structural properties. This greatly extends the arsenal of graphene materials and their potential for a spectrum of applications. Considering the latest developments, we comprehensively and critically discuss the syntheses, properties and emerging applications of the growing family of heteroatom-doped graphene materials. The advantages, disadvantages, and preferential doping features of current synthesis approaches are compared, aiming to provide clues for developing new and controllable synthetic routes. We emphasize the distinct properties resulting from various dopants, different doping levels and configurations, and synergistic effects from co-dopants, hoping to assist a better understanding of doped graphene materials. The mechanisms underlying their advantageous uses for energy storage, energy conversion, sensing, and gas storage are highlighted, aiming to stimulate more competent applications.

  6. Marijuana as doping in sports.

    PubMed

    Campos, Daniel R; Yonamine, Mauricio; de Moraes Moreau, Regina L

    2003-01-01

    A high incidence of positive cases for cannabinoids, in analyses for doping control in sports, has been observed since the International Olympic Committee (IOC) included them in the 1989 list of prohibited drugs under the title of classes of prohibited substances in certain circumstances. Where the rules of sports federations so provide, tests are conducted for marijuana, hashish or any other cannabis product exposure by means of urinalysis of 11-nor-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (carboxy-THC) the main metabolite of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Concentrations >15 ng/mL (cut-off value) in confirmatory analytical procedures are considered doping. Cannabis is an illicit drug in several countries and has received much attention in the media for its potential therapeutic uses and the efforts to legalise its use. Studies have demonstrated that the use of cannabinoids can reduce anxiety, but it does not have ergogenic potential in sports activities. An increase in heart rate and blood pressure, decline of cardiac output and reduced psychomotor activity are some of the pharmacological effects of THC that will determine a decrease in athletic performance. An ergolytic activity of cannabis products has been observed in athletes of several different sport categories. In Brazil, analyses for doping control in sports, performed in our laboratories, have detected positive cases for carboxy-THC in urine samples of soccer, volleyball, cycling and other athletes. It is our intention to discuss in this article some points that may discourage individuals from using cannabis products during sports activities, even in the so-called permitted circumstances defined by the IOC and some sports federations.

  7. Absence of ferromagnetism in Mn-doped tetragonal zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, S. K.; Lejay, P.; Barbara, B.; Boisron, O.; Pailhès, S.; Bouzerar, G.

    2011-08-01

    In a recent letter, it has been predicted within first principle studies that Mn-doped ZrO2 compounds could be good candidates for spintronics application because expected to exhibit ferromagnetism far beyond room temperature. Our purpose is to address this issue experimentally for Mn-doped tetragonal zirconia. We have prepared polycrystalline samples of Y0.15(Zr0.85-yMny)O2 (y = 0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20) by using standard solid state method at equilibrium. The obtained samples were carefully characterized by using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, elemental color mapping, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and magnetization measurements. From the detailed structural analyses, we have observed that the 5% Mn doped compound crystallized into two symmetries (dominating tetragonal and monoclinic), whereas higher Mn doped compounds are found to be in the tetragonal symmetry only. The spectral splitting of the Mn 3s core-level x-ray photoelectron spectra confirms that Mn ions are in the Mn3+ oxidation state and indicate a local magnetic moment of about 4.5 μB/Mn. Magnetic measurements showed that compounds up to 10% of Mn doping are paramagnetic with antiferromagnetic interactions. However, higher Mn doped compound exhibits local ferrimagnetic ordering. Thus, no ferromagnetism has been observed for all Mn-doped tetragonal ZrO2 samples.

  8. Doping profile measurements in silicon using terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) via electrochemical anodic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulsyan, Gaurav

    Doping profiles are engineered to manipulate device properties and to determine electrical performances of microelectronic devices frequently. To support engineering studies afterward, essential information is usually required from physically characterized doping profiles. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), Spreading Resistance Profiling (SRP) and Electrochemical Capacitance Voltage (ECV) profiling are standard techniques for now to map profile. SIMS yields a chemical doping profile via ion sputtering process and owns a better resolution, whereas ECV and SRP produce an electrical doping profile detecting free carriers in microelectronic devices. The major difference between electrical and chemical doping profiles is at heavily doped regions greater than 1020 atoms/cm3. At the profile region over the solubility limit, inactive dopants induce a flat plateau and detected by electrical measurements only. Destructive techniques are usually designed as stand-alone systems to study impurities. For an in-situ process control purpose, non-contact methods, such as ellipsometry and non-contact capacitance voltage (CV) techniques are current under development. In this theses work, terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) is utilized to achieve electrical doping profile in both destructive and non-contact manners. In recent years the Terahertz group at Rochester Institute Technology developed several techniques that use terahertz pulses to non-destructively map doping profiles. In this thesis, we study a destructive but potentially higher resolution version of the terahertz based approach to map the profile of activated dopants and augment the non-destructive approaches already developed. The basic idea of the profile mapping approach developed in this MS thesis is to anodize, and thus oxidize to silicon dioxide, thin layers (down to below 10 nm) of the wafer with the doping profile to be mapped. Since the dopants atoms and any free carriers in the silicon oxide thin

  9. Meaningful and Purposeful Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clementi, Donna

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a graphic, designed by Clementi and Terrill, the authors of "Keys to Planning for Learning" (2013), visually representing the components that contribute to meaningful and purposeful practice in learning a world language, practice that leads to greater proficiency. The entire graphic is centered around the letter…

  10. Reading with Purpose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linderholm, Tracy

    2006-01-01

    In college-level courses, the vast majority of students read expository textbooks with a primary purpose in mind: to memorize and, hopefully, understand enough information to receive a particular grade on a course exam. Intuitively, this kind of reading is different than the kind of reading that these same students do when reading a novel while…

  11. Delta-doping of Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, E. F.

    2005-08-01

    Part I: 1. Introduction E. F. Schubert; Part II: 2. Electronic structure of delta-doped semiconductors C. R. Proetto; Part III: 3. Recent progress in delta-like confinement of impurities in GaAs K. H. Ploog; 4. Flow-rate modulation epitaxy (FME) of III-V semiconductors T. Makimoto and Y. Horikoshi; 5. Gas source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) of delta-doped III-V semiconductors D. Ritter; 6. Solid phase epitaxy for delta-doping in silicon I. Eisele; 7. Low temperature MBE of silicon H.-J. Gossmann; Part IV: 8. Secondary ion mass spectrometry of delta-doped semiconductors H. S. Luftmann; 9. Capacitance-voltage profiling E. F. Schubert; 10. Redistribution of impurities in III-V semiconductors E. F. Schubert; 11. Dopant diffusion and segregation in delta-doped silicon films H.-J. Gossmann; 12. Characterisation of silicon and delta-doped structures in GaAs R. C. Newman; 13. The DX-center in silicon delta-doped GaAs and AlxGa1-xAs P. M. Koenraad; Part V: 14. Luminescence and ellipsometry spectroscopy H. Yao and E. F. Schubert; 15. Photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy of single delta-doped III-V semiconductor heterostructures J. Wagner and D. Richards; 16. Electron transport in delta-doped quantum wells W. T. Masselink; 17. Electron mobility in delta-doped layers P. M. Koenraad; 18. Hot electrons in delta-doped GaAs M. Asche; 19. Ordered delta-doping R. L. Headrick, L. C. Feldman and B. E. Weir; Part IV: 20. Delta-doped channel III-V field effect transistors (FETs) W.-P. Hong; 21. Selectively doped heterostructure devices E. F. Schubert; 22. Silicon atomic layer doping FET K. Nakagawa and K. Yamaguchi; 23. Planar doped barrier devices R. J. Malik; 24. Silicon interband and intersubband photodetectors I. Eisele; 25. Doping superlattice devices E. F. Schubert.

  12. Substitutional doping of carbon nanotubes with heteroatoms and their chemical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yexin; Zhang, Jian; Su, Dang Sheng

    2014-05-01

    The electronic properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be tuned by substitutional doping with heteroatoms (mainly B and N) to expand the applications of CNTs. Based on the comprehensive understanding of the substitutional doping of CNTs, it should be possible to deliberately design doped CNTs for specific purposes. Thus, relevant experimental and theoretical works are reviewed herein in an attempt to correlate the synthetic methods, electronic properties, and applications of heteroatom-doped CNTs. The distribution and arrangement of heteroatoms in the graphitic lattice of CNTs can be modulated through the choice of synthetic conditions, which would further lead to different electronic properties of CNTs for their chemical applications.

  13. Plasmonic doped semiconductor nanocrystals: Properties, fabrication, applications and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriegel, Ilka; Scotognella, Francesco; Manna, Liberato

    2017-02-01

    Degenerately doped semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) are of recent interest to the NC community due to their tunable localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) in the near infrared (NIR). The high level of doping in such materials with carrier densities in the range of 1021cm-3 leads to degeneracy of the doping levels and intense plasmonic absorption in the NIR. The lower carrier density in degenerately doped semiconductor NCs compared to noble metals enables LSPR tuning over a wide spectral range, since even a minor change of the carrier density strongly affects the spectral position of the LSPR. Two classes of degenerate semiconductors are most relevant in this respect: impurity doped semiconductors, such as metal oxides, and vacancy doped semiconductors, such as copper chalcogenides. In the latter it is the density of copper vacancies that controls the carrier concentration, while in the former the introduction of impurity atoms adds carriers to the system. LSPR tuning in vacancy doped semiconductor NCs such as copper chalcogenides occurs by chemically controlling the copper vacancy density. This goes in hand with complex structural modifications of the copper chalcogenide crystal lattice. In contrast the LSPR of degenerately doped metal oxide NCs is modified by varying the doping concentration or by the choice of host and dopant atoms, but also through the addition of capacitive charge carriers to the conduction band of the metal oxide upon post-synthetic treatments, such as by electrochemical- or photodoping. The NIR LSPRs and the option of their spectral fine-tuning make accessible important new features, such as the controlled coupling of the LSPR to other physical signatures or the enhancement of optical signals in the NIR, sensing application by LSPR tracking, energy production from the NIR plasmon resonance or bio-medical applications in the biological window. In this review we highlight the recent advances in the synthesis of various different plasmonic

  14. Vitalism, purpose and superstition.

    PubMed

    Lindeman, Marjaana; Saher, Marieke

    2007-02-01

    Developmental studies have shown that children assign purpose to objects more liberally than adults, and that they explain biological processes in terms of vitalistic causality. This study tested the hypothesis that similar misconceptions can be found among superstitious adults. The results from 116 superstitious and 123 sceptical individuals showed that more than sceptics, superstitious individuals attributed purpose to objects, and explained biological processes in terms of organ intentionality and energy transmission. In addition, they thought of energy as a vital force, attributing life and mental properties to it. These conceptual confusions were positively associated to all types of superstitions as well as belief in alternative medicine. The results support the argument that category mistakes and ontological confusions underlie superstitious and vitalistic thinking.

  15. Doping in Zinc Selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Edward Dean

    An experimental technique ensuring the incorporation of substitutional arsenic and copper doping in ZnSe is presented. Two techniques are investigated. In each, neutron transmutation doping is employed to introduce arsenic and copper dopants in ZnSe. In the first technique, as-grown crystals of ZnSe are exposed to thermal neutrons. The crystals are thermally annealed after irradiation in order to repair the neutron induced lattice damage. The thermal annealing schedules employed in this work, however, do not fully repair the ZnSe lattice. In the second technique, homoepitaxial layers of ZnSe are deposited with irradiated zinc and selenium as source materials. High quality layers of ZnSe, characterized by x-ray diffraction and low temperature photoluminescence, are produced. The long half lives of As^ {75} and Zn^{65} allow the epitaxial layers to be formed prior to nuclear decay. Since the nuclear recoil associated with the decays are not sufficient to displace the dopant nuclei from their substitutional lattice sites, the technique results in isolated As_{Se } or isolated Cu_{Zn } being introduced in layers of ZnSe after crystal growth. Since the dopants are introduced in the bulk crystal after crystal growth, the doping process is decoupled from any interactions present during crystal growth. A technique in which crystal doping is decoupled from crystal growth provides several unique probes for arsenic and copper doping in ZnSe.

  16. Detection of Stimulants and Narcotics by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry for Sports Doping Control.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Brian D; Kucherova, Yulia; Butch, Anthony W

    2016-01-01

    Sports drug testing laboratories are required to detect several classes of compounds that are prohibited at all times, which include anabolic agents, peptide hormones, growth factors, beta-2 agonists, hormones and metabolic modulators, and diuretics/masking agents. Other classes of compounds such as stimulants, narcotics, cannabinoids, and glucocorticoids are also prohibited, but only when an athlete is in competition. A single class of compounds can contain a large number of prohibited substances and all of the compounds should be detected by the testing procedure. Since there are almost 70 stimulants on the prohibited list it can be a challenge to develop a single screening method that will optimally detect all the compounds. We describe a combined liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) testing method for detection of all the stimulants and narcotics on the World Anti-Doping Agency prohibited list. Urine for LC-MS/MS testing does not require sample pretreatment and is a direct dilute and shoot method. Urine samples for the GC-MS method require a liquid-liquid extraction followed by derivatization with trifluoroacetic anhydride.

  17. Utilizing ionic liquids for controlled N-doping in hard-templated, mesoporous carbon electrodes for high-performance electrochemical double-layer capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Benjamin E.; He, Siyao; Buffington, Keegan; Rudisill, Stephen; Smyrl, William H.; Stein, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    The specific energy of electrochemical double-layer capacitors (EDLCs) can be increased by design of the pore architecture to provide large interfaces between electrodes and electrolyte and efficient access to these surfaces. Colloidal-crystal templated carbon electrodes with interconnected, uniform mesopores have demonstrated high capacitances at fast charge/discharge rates in EDLCs used with ionic liquid electrolytes. Here we aim to enhance capacitive performance further through nitrogen doping, by combining a phenol-formaldehyde precursor with the ionic liquid (IL) 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanoamide (EMI-DCA) as the nitrogen source. The IL content in this precursor affects the resistance, structural integrity, and specific capacitance of the porous electrodes. With an IL content up to 50 wt%, the electrode resistance is reduced while the bicontinuous mesoporous structure of the resulting carbon is preserved. The specific capacitance of an electrode prepared with 50% IL in the precursor increases over 40% at 10 A g-1 compared to mesoporous carbons prepared using only the phenol-formaldehyde resol. With an ionic liquid electrolyte, the maximum specific capacitance is 237 F g-1 at 0.1 A g-1, and a specific capacitance of at least 195 F g-1 is maintained after 1000 cycles at 1 A g-1. A higher IL content in the precursor results in reduced structural order and capacitive performance.

  18. Gate control of ferromagnetic insulating phase in lightly-doped La0.875Sr0.125MnO3-δ film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, H.; Wang, J.; Hu, F. X.; Zhao, Y. Y.; Liu, Y.; Wu, R. R.; Sun, J. R.; Shen, B. G.

    2016-02-01

    The electric field effect on the lightly doped La0.875Sr0.125MnO3-δ (LSMO) thin film in electric double-layer transistors was investigated by measuring transport properties of the film under various gate voltages. It was found that the positive gate bias leads to an increase of the charge-orbital ordering (COO) transition temperature and a decrease of the Curie temperature TC, indicating the suppression of ferromagnetic metal (FMM) phases and preference of COO/ferromagnetic insulator (FMI) with the hole depletion by gate bias. Such different electric field effects can be ascribed to the weakening of the ferromagnetic interaction and enhancement of Jahn-Teller (JT) distortion caused by the transformation of JT inactive Mn4+-ions to JT active Mn3+-ions. Moreover, a step-like increase in the high temperature region of the ρ-T curve, which is related to the transition of cooperative JT distortion, was found to develop with increasing the positive bias, indicating that the cooperative JT distorted phase is stabilized by the depletion of holes in LSMO film. These results demonstrate that the modulation of holes via electric field strongly affects the balance between energy gains of different interactions and thus produce different effects on the competing FMI, FMM, and cooperative JT distorted phases in LSMO film.

  19. Use of ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry for fast screening in high throughput doping control.

    PubMed

    Musenga, Alessandro; Cowan, David A

    2013-05-03

    We describe a sensitive, comprehensive and fast screening method based on liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry for the detection of a large number of analytes in sports samples. UHPLC coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry with polarity switching capability is applied for the rapid screening of a large number of analytes in human urine samples. Full scan data are acquired alternating both positive and negative ionisation. Collision-induced dissociation with positive ionisation is also performed to produce fragment ions to improve selectivity for some analytes. Data are reviewed as extracted ion chromatograms based on narrow mass/charge windows (±5ppm). A simple sample preparation method was developed, using direct enzymatic hydrolysis of glucuronide conjugates, followed by solid phase extraction with mixed mode ion-exchange cartridges. Within a 10min run time (including re-equilibration) the method presented allows for the analysis of a large number of analytes from most of the classes in the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Prohibited List, including anabolic agents, β2-agonists, hormone antagonists and modulators, diuretics, stimulants, narcotics, glucocorticoids and β-blockers, and does so while meeting the WADA sensitivity requirements. The high throughput of the method and the fast sample pre-treatment reduces analysis cost and increases productivity. The method presented has been used for the analysis of over 5000 samples in about one month and proved to be reliable.

  20. Simple quantitation of formoterol and 11-nor-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in human urine by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in doping control.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Mi; Kim, Ho Jun; Son, Junghyun; Park, Ju-Hyung; Kwon, Oh-Seung; Lee, Jaeick

    2014-09-15

    11-nor-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) and formoterol are newly revised prohibited threshold substances (150 ng/mL for THC-COOH and 40 ng/mL for formoterol) by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). In continuation of our direct quantitation work of the prohibited threshold substances, direct LC-MS/MS methods combined with a simple sample preparation procedure have been developed and validated for the measurement of these two threshold substances in urine samples. After the enzymatic hydrolysis of urine samples, the resulting samples were diluted with acetonitrile and centrifuged. The supernatant was directly analyzed by LC-MS/MS using the selected reaction monitoring mode. The calibration curve range of the assay was ranged over 50-200% of the threshold value according to WADA guidelines. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were 6.1 and 18.4 ng/mL for THC-COOH and 2.0 and 6.2 ng/mL for formoterol, respectively. Intra- and inter-day precisions were between 2.08% and 7.28% and the accuracies ranged from 95.16% to 104.49%. The present methods were successfully applied to the analysis of the proficiency test samples.