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Sample records for doppler ultrasound scan

  1. Doppler ultrasound monitoring technology.

    PubMed

    Docker, M F

    1993-03-01

    Developments in the signal processing of Doppler ultrasound used for the detection of fetal heart rate (FHR) have improved the operation of cardiotocographs. These developments are reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages of the various Doppler and signal processing methods are compared.

  2. Clinical applications of doppler ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.J.W.; Burns, P.N.; Well, P.N.T.

    1987-01-01

    This book introduces a guide to the physical principles and instrumentation of duplex Doppler ultrasound and its applications in obstetrics, gynecology, neonatology, gastroentology, and evaluation of peripheral vascular disease. The book provides information needed to perform Doppler ultrasound examinations and interpret the results. An introduction to Doppler physics and instrumentation is followed by a thorough review of hemodynamics, which explains the principles underlying interpretation of Doppler signals. Of special note is the state-of-the-art coverage of new applications of Doppler in recognition of high-risk pregnancy, diagnosis of intrauterine growth retardation, investigation of neonatal blood flow, evaluation of first-trimester pregnancy, and diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease. The book also offers guidelines on the use of Doppler ultrasound in diagnosing carotid disease, deep venous thrombosis, and aorta/femoral disease.

  3. Doppler Ultrasound: What Is It Used for?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in your neck (carotid artery stenosis) A Doppler ultrasound can estimate how fast blood flows by measuring the rate of change in its pitch (frequency). During a Doppler ultrasound, a technician trained in ultrasound imaging (sonographer) presses ...

  4. Real-time virtual Doppler ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshniat, Mahdieh; Thorne, Meghan L.; Poepping, Tamie L.; Holdsworth, David W.; Steinman, David A.

    2004-04-01

    Doppler ultrasound (DUS) is widely used to diagnose and plan treatments for vascular diseases, but the relationship between complex blood flow dynamics and the observed DUS signal is not completely understood. In this paper, we demonstrate that Doppler ultrasound can be realistically simulated in a real-time manner via the coupling of a known, previously computed velocity field with a simple model of the ultrasound physics. In the present case a 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of physiologically pulsatile flow a stenosed carotid bifurcation was interrogated using a sample volume of known geometry and power distribution. Velocity vectors at points within the sample volume were interpolated using a fast geometric search algorithm and, using the specified US probe characteristics and orientation, converted into Doppler shifts for subsequent display as a Doppler spectrogram or color DUS image. The important effect of the intrinsic spectral broadening was simulated by convolving the velocity at each point within the sample volume by a triangle function whose width was proportional to velocity. A spherical sample volume with a Gaussian power distribution was found to be adequate for producing realistic Doppler spectrogram in regions of uniform, jet, and recirculation flow. Fewer than 1000 points seeded uniformly within a radius comprising more than 99% of the total power were required, allowing spectra to be generated from high resolution CFD data at 100Hz frame rates on an inexpensive desktop workstation.

  5. Applications of Doppler ultrasound in clinical vascular disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, R. W.; Hokanson, D. E.; Sumner, D. S.; Strandness, D. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound has become the most useful and versatile noninvasive technique for objective evaluation of clinical vascular disease. Commercially available continuous-wave instruments provide qualitative and quantitative assessment of venous and arterial disease. Pulsed Doppler ultrasound was developed to provide longitudinal and transverse cross-sectional images of the arterial lumen with a resolution approaching that of conventional X-ray techniques. Application of Doppler ultrasound in venous, peripheral arterial, and cerebrovascular diseases is reviewed.

  6. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N; Choi, James J

    2016-08-21

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  10(4)-5  ×  10(7) microbubbles ml(-1)) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75-366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s(-1), prior to the onset

  7. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N.; Choi, James J.

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  104-5  ×  107 microbubbles ml-1) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75-366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s-1, prior to the onset of

  8. Adaptive Spectral Envelope Estimation for Doppler Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kathpalia, Aditi; Karabiyik, Yucel; Eik-Nes, Sturla; Tegnander, Eva; Ekroll, Ingvild; Kiss, Gabriel; Torp, Hans

    2016-07-07

    Estimation of accurate maximum velocities and spectral envelope in ultrasound Doppler blood flow spectrograms are both essential for clinical diagnostic purposes. However, obtaining accurate maximum velocity is not straightforward due to intrinsic spectral broadening and variance in the power spectrum estimate. The method proposed in this work for maximum velocity point detection has been developed by modifying an existing method - Signal Noise Slope Intersection (SNSI), incorporating in it steps from an altered version of another method called Geometric Method (GM). Adaptive noise estimation from the spectrogram ensures that a smooth spectral envelope is obtained post detection of these maximum velocity points. The method has been tested on simulated Doppler signal with scatterers possessing a parabolic flow velocity profile constant in time, steady and pulsatile string phantom recordings as well as in vivo recordings from uterine, umbilical, carotid and subclavian arteries. Results from simulation experiments indicate a bias of less than 2.5% in maximum velocities when estimated for a range of peak velocities, Doppler angles and SNR levels. Standard deviation in the envelope is low - less than 2% in case of experiments done by varying the peak velocity and Doppler angle for steady phantom and simulated flow; and also less than 2% in case of experiments done by varying SNR but keeping constant flow conditions for in vivo and simulated flow. Low variability in the envelope makes the prospect of using the envelope for automated blood flow measurements possible and is illustrated for the case of Pulsatility Index estimation in uterine and umbilical arteries.

  9. Adaptive Spectral Envelope Estimation for Doppler Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kathpalia, Aditi; Karabiyik, Yucel; Eik-Nes, Sturla H; Tegnander, Eva; Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Kiss, Gabriel; Torp, Hans

    2016-11-01

    Estimation of accurate maximum velocities and spectral envelope in ultrasound Doppler blood flow spectrograms are both essential for clinical diagnostic purposes. However, obtaining accurate maximum velocity is not straightforward due to intrinsic spectral broadening and variance in the power spectrum estimate. The method proposed in this paper for maximum velocity point detection has been developed by modifying an existing method-signal noise slope intersection, incorporating in it steps from an altered version of another method called geometric method. Adaptive noise estimation from the spectrogram ensures that a smooth spectral envelope is obtained postdetection of these maximum velocity points. The method has been tested on simulated Doppler signal with scatterers possessing a parabolic flow velocity profile constant in time, steady and pulsatile string phantom recordings, as well as in vivo recordings from uterine, umbilical, carotid, and subclavian arteries. The results from simulation experiments indicate a bias of less than 2.5% in maximum velocities when estimated for a range of peak velocities, Doppler angles, and SNR levels. Standard deviation in the envelope is low-less than 2% in the case of experiments done by varying the peak velocity and Doppler angle for steady phantom and simulated flow, and also less than 2% in the case of experiments done by varying SNR but keeping constant flow conditions for in vivo and simulated flow. Low variability in the envelope makes the prospect of using the envelope for automated blood flow measurements possible and is illustrated for the case of pulsatility index estimation in uterine and umbilical arteries.

  10. Detection of microemboli by transcranial Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed Central

    Grosset, D G; Georgiadis, D; Kelman, A W; Cowburn, P; Stirling, S; Lees, K R; Faichney, A; Mallinson, A; Quin, R; Bone, I; Pettigrew, L; Brodie, E; MacKay, T; Wheatley, D J

    1996-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound detection of abnormally high-pitched signals within the arterial waveform offers a new method for diagnosis, and potentially for prediction, of embolic complications in at-risk patients. The nature of Doppler "microembolic" signals is of particular interest in patients with prosthetic heart valves, where a high prevalence of these signals is observed. Monitoring the middle cerebral artery with 2-MHz transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TC-2000, Nicolet Biomedical; Warwick, UK), we looked for microemboli signals in 150 patients (95 women and 55 men), and found 1 or more signals during a 30-min recording in 89% of 70 patients with Bjork-Shiley valves (principally monostrut), 54% of 50 patients with Medtronic-Hall valves, and 50% of 30 patients with Carpentier-Edwards valves (p < 0.001, chi 2). In the patients with Bjork-Shiley valves, the mean number of signals per hour was 59 (range, 42-86; 95% confidence interval), which was significantly higher than the mean in patients with Medtronic-Hall and Carpentier-Edwards valves (1.5[range, 0.5-2.5] and 1 [range, 0-5.3], respectively; both p < 0.04, multiple comparisons. Bonferroni correction). In the patients undergoing serial pre- and postoperative studies, the causative role of the valve implant was emphasized. There was no correlation between the number of emboli signals and a prior history of neurologic deficit, cardiac rhythm, previous cardiac surgery, or the intensity of oral anticoagulation, in patients with prosthetic heart valves. In Bjork-Shiley patients, dual (mitral and aortic) valves were associated with more signals than were single valves. In Medtronic-Hall patients, the signal count was greater for valves in the aortic position than it was for valves in the mitral position. Comparative studies of Doppler emboli signals in other clinical settings suggest a difference in composition or size of the underlying maternal between prosthetic valve patients and patients with carotid stenosis. These

  11. Measurement of the Doppler power of flowing blood using ultrasound Doppler devices.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Chou, Hung-Lung; Chen, Pay-Yu

    2015-02-01

    Measurement of the Doppler power of signals backscattered from flowing blood (henceforth referred to as the Doppler power of flowing blood) and the echogenicity of flowing blood have been used widely to assess the degree of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation for more than 20 y. Many studies have used Doppler flowmeters based on an analogue circuit design to obtain the Doppler shifts in the signals backscattered from flowing blood; however, some recent studies have mentioned that the analogue Doppler flowmeter exhibits a frequency-response problem whereby the backscattered energy is lost at higher Doppler shift frequencies. Therefore, the measured Doppler power of flowing blood and evaluations of RBC aggregation obtained using an analogue Doppler device may be inaccurate. To overcome this problem, the present study implemented a field-programmable gate array-based digital pulsed-wave Doppler flowmeter to measure the Doppler power of flowing blood, in the aim of providing more accurate assessments of RBC aggregation. A clinical duplex ultrasound imaging system that can acquire pulsed-wave Doppler spectrograms is now available, but its usefulness for estimating the ultrasound scattering properties of blood is still in doubt. Therefore, the echogenicity and Doppler power of flowing blood under the same flow conditions were measured using a laboratory pulser-receiver system and a clinical ultrasound system, respectively, for comparisons. The experiments were carried out using porcine blood under steady laminar flow with both RBC suspensions and whole blood. The experimental results indicated that a clinical ultrasound system used to measure the Doppler spectrograms is not suitable for quantifying Doppler power. However, the Doppler power measured using a digital Doppler flowmeter can reveal the relationship between backscattering signals and the properties of blood cells because the effects of frequency response are eliminated. The measurements of the Doppler power and

  12. Ultrasound imaging for the rheumatologist. XVII. Role of colour Doppler and power Doppler.

    PubMed

    Iagnocco, A; Epis, O; Delle Sedie, A; Meenagh, G; Filippucci, E; Riente, L; Scirè, C A; Montecucco, C; Bombardieri, S; Grassi, W; Valesini, G

    2008-01-01

    The use of Doppler ultrasound in rheumatology has grown in recent years. This is partly due to the increasing number of rheumatologists who perform US in their daily clinical practise and also to the technological advances of US systems. Both colour Doppler and power Doppler are used to evaluate the degree of intra- and peri-articular soft tissue inflammation. Moreover, Doppler US has been found to be of help in the assessment of vascular pathologies such as the vasculitides. In this review we provide an update of the data regarding the use of colour Doppler and power Doppler in rheumatology.

  13. Is Doppler ultrasound useful for evaluating gestational trophoblastic disease?

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lawrence H; Bernardes, Lisandra S; Hase, Eliane A; Fushida, Koji; Francisco, Rossana P V

    2015-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound is a non-invasive method for evaluating vascularization and is widely used in clinical practice. Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia includes a group of highly vascularized malignancies derived from placental cells. This review summarizes data found in the literature regarding the applications of Doppler ultrasound in managing patients with gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. The PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, Cochrane and LILACS databases were searched for articles published in English until 2014 using the following keywords: “Gestational trophoblastic disease AND Ultrasonography, Doppler.” Twenty-eight articles met the inclusion criteria and were separated into the 4 following groups according to the aim of the study. 1 Doppler ultrasound does not seem to be capable of differentiating partial from complete moles, but it might be useful when evaluating pregnancies in which a complete mole coexists with a normal fetus. 2 There is controversy in the role of uterine artery Doppler velocimetry in the prediction of development of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. 3 Doppler ultrasound is a useful tool in the diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia because abnormal myometrial vascularization and lower uterine artery Doppler indices seem to be correlated with invasive disease. 4 Lower uterine artery Doppler indices in the diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia are associated with methotrexate resistance and might play a role in prognosis. CONCLUSION: Several studies support the importance of Doppler ultrasound in the management of patients with gestational trophoblastic neoplasia, particularly the role of Doppler velocimetry in the prediction of trophoblastic neoplasia and the chemoresistance of trophoblastic tumors. Doppler findings should be used as ancillary tools, along with human chorionic gonadotropin assessment, in the diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. PMID:26735221

  14. The role of tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound in the diagnosis of childhood febrile urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    İlarslan, Nisa Eda Çullas; Fitöz, Ömer Suat; Öztuna, Derya Gökmen; Küçük, Nuriye Özlem; Yalçınkaya, Fatma Fatoş

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study assessed the ability of tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound in the detection of childhood febrile urinary tract infections in comparison with the gold standard reference method: Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinicacid renal cortical scintigraphy. Material and Methods: This prospective study included 60 patients who were hospitalized with a first episode of febrile urinary tract infections. All children were examined with dimercaptosuccinicacid scan and tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound within the first 3 days of admission. Results: Signs indicative of acute infection were observed in 29 patients according to the results of tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound while dimercaptosuccinicacid scan revealed abnormal findings in 33 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of tissue harmonic imaging combined with power Doppler ultrasound using dimercaptosuccinicacid scintigraphy as the reference method in patients diagnosed with first episode febrile urinary tract infections were calculated as 57.58% (95% confidence interval: 40.81%–72.76%); 62.96% (95% confidence interval: 44.23%–78.47%); 65.52% (95% confidence interval: 52.04%–77%); 54.84% (95% confidence interval: 41.54%–67.52%); respectively. Conclusions: Although current results exhibit inadequate success of power Doppler ultrasound, this practical and radiation-free method may soon be comprise a part of the routine ultrasonographic evaluation of febrile urinary tract infections of childhood if patients are evaluated early and under appropriate sedation. PMID:26265892

  15. The leicester Doppler phantom--a digital electronic phantom for ultrasound pulsed Doppler system testing.

    PubMed

    Gittins, John; Martin, Kevin

    2010-04-01

    Doppler flow and string phantoms have been used to assess the performance of ultrasound Doppler systems in terms of parameters such as sensitivity, velocity accuracy and sample volume registration. However, because of the nature of their construction, they cannot challenge the accuracy and repeatability of modern digital ultrasound systems or give objective measures of system performance. Electronic Doppler phantoms are able to make use of electronically generated test signals, which may be controlled precisely in terms of frequency, amplitude and timing. The Leicester Electronic Doppler Phantom uses modern digital signal processing methods and field programmable gate array technology to overcome some of the limitations of previously described electronic phantoms. In its present form, it is able to give quantitative graphical assessments of frequency response and range gate characteristics, as well as measures of dynamic range and velocity measurement accuracy. The use of direct acoustic coupling eliminates uncertainties caused by Doppler beam effects, such as intrinsic spectral broadening, but prevents their evaluation.

  16. Oxygen consumption estimation with combined color doppler ultrasound and photoacoustic microscopy: a phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan; Harrison, Tyler; Forbrich, Alex; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-03-01

    The metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (MRO2) quantifies tissue metabolism, which is important for diagnosis of many diseases. For a single vessel model, the MRO2 can be estimated in terms of the mean flow velocity, vessel crosssectional area, total concentration of hemoglobin (CHB), and the difference between the oxygen saturation (sO2) of blood flowing into and out of the tissue region. In this work, we would like to show the feasibility to estimate MRO2 with our combined photoacoustic and high-frequency ultrasound imaging system. This system uses a swept-scan 25-MHz ultrasound transducer with confocal dark-field laser illumination optics. A pulse-sequencer enables ultrasonic and laser pulses to be interlaced so that photoacoustic and Doppler ultrasound images are co-registered. Since the mean flow velocity can be measured by color Doppler ultrasound, the vessel cross-sectional area can be measured by power Doppler or photoacoustic imaging, and multi-wavelength photoacoustic methods can be used to estimate sO2 and CHB, all of these parameters necessary for MRO2 estimation can be provided by our system. Experiments have been performed on flow phantoms to generate co-registered color Doppler and photoacoustic images. To verify the sO2 estimation, two ink samples (red and blue) were mixed in various concentration ratios to mimic different levels of sO2, and the result shows a good match between the calculated concentration ratios and actual values.

  17. Pediatric imaging/doppler ultrasound of the chest: Extracardiac diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Huhta, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    In this book the author spells out new diagnostic applications in pediatrics for high resolution cross-sectional ultrasonography, and demonstrates the ways in which Doppler techniques complement the cross-sectional method. This reference presents practical, step-by-step methods for non-invasive ultrasound examination of extra-cardiac anatomy and assessment of vascular blood flow.

  18. Fetal and umbilical Doppler ultrasound in high-risk pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Alfirevic, Zarko; Stampalija, Tamara; Gyte, Gillian ML

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal blood flow patterns in fetal circulation detected by Doppler ultrasound may indicate poor fetal prognosis. It is also possible false positive Doppler ultrasound findings could encourage inappropriate early delivery. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the effects of Doppler ultrasound used to assess fetal well-being in high-risk pregnancies on obstetric care and fetal outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (September 2009) and the reference lists of identified studies. Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of Doppler ultrasound for the investigation of umbilical and fetal vessels waveforms in high-risk pregnancies compared to no Doppler ultrasound. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed the studies for inclusion, assessed risk of bias and carried out data extraction. Data entry was checked. Main results Eighteen completed studies involving just over 10,000 women were included. The trials were generally of unclear quality with some evidence of possible publication bias. The use of Doppler ultrasound in high-risk pregnancy was associated a reduction in perinatal deaths (risk ratio (RR) 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.52 to 0.98, 16 studies, 10,225 babies, 1.2% versus 1.7 %, numbers needed to treat = 203; 95%CI 103 to 4352). There were also fewer inductions of labour (average RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.80 to 0.99, 10 studies, 5633 women, random effects) and fewer caesarean sections (RR 0.90, 95% CI 0.84 to 0.97, 14 studies, 7918 women). No difference was found in operative vaginal births (RR 0.95, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.14, four studies, 2813 women) nor in Apgar scores less than seven at five minutes (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.69 to 1.24, seven studies, 6321 babies). Authors’ conclusions Current evidence suggests that the use of Doppler ultrasound in high-risk pregnancies reduced the risk of perinatal deaths and resulted in less

  19. Robust estimation of fetal heart rate variability using Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Kumari L; Mathews, V John; Varner, Michael W; Clark, Edward B

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents a new measure of heart rate variability (HRV) that can be estimated using Doppler ultrasound techniques and is robust to variations in the angle of incidence of the ultrasound beam and the measurement noise. This measure employs the multiple signal characterization (MUSIC) algorithm which is a high-resolution method for estimating the frequencies of sinusoidal signals embedded in white noise from short-duration measurements. We show that the product of the square-root of the estimated signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the mean-square error of the frequency estimates is independent of the noise level in the signal. Since varying angles of incidence effectively changes the input SNR, this measure of HRV is robust to the input noise as well as the angle of incidence. This paper includes the results of analyzing synthetic and real Doppler ultrasound data that demonstrates the usefulness of the new measure in HRV analysis.

  20. Simultaneous fetal magnetocardiography and ultrasound/Doppler imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui; Chen, Mingli; Van Veen, Barry D; Strasburger, Janette F; Wakai, Ronald T

    2007-06-01

    The difficulty of utilizing multimodality diagnostic imaging techniques for fetal surveillance remains one of the greatest challenges in providing enhanced prenatal care. In this Letter we demonstrate the feasibility of performing fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG) and ultrasound/Doppler imaging simultaneously, using a multichannel SQUID magnetometer and a portable ultrasound scanner. Despite large magnetic interference from the scanner, the implementation of simple noise reduction procedures and appropriate signal processing techniques yielded fMCG recordings of sufficient quality for assessment of fetal heart rate and rhythm. A variation of reference channel filtering, referred to here as synthetic reference channel filtering, was used to reduce nonstationary low-frequency interference. The combination of fMCG and/or fMEG with ultrasound/Doppler offers new possibilities for assessment of fetal well-being and fetal cardiac function.

  1. Compressed Sensing Doppler Ultrasound Reconstruction Using Block Sparse Bayesian Learning.

    PubMed

    Lorintiu, Oana; Liebgott, Herve; Friboulet, Denis

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we propose a framework for using duplex Doppler ultrasound systems. These type of systems need to interleave the acquisition and display of a B-mode image and of the pulsed Doppler spectrogram. In a recent study (Richy , 2013), we have shown that compressed sensing-based reconstruction of Doppler signal allowed reducing the number of Doppler emissions and yielded better results than traditional interpolation and at least equivalent or even better depending on the configuration than the study estimating the signal from sparse data sets given in Jensen, 2006. We propose here to improve over this study by using a novel framework for randomly interleaving Doppler and US emissions. The proposed method reconstructs the Doppler signal segment by segment using a block sparse Bayesian learning (BSBL) algorithm based CS reconstruction. The interest of using such framework in the context of duplex Doppler is linked to the unique ability of BSBL to exploit block-correlated signals and to recover non-sparse signals. The performance of the technique is evaluated from simulated data as well as experimental in vivo data and compared to the recent results in Richy , 2013.

  2. Live ultrasound volume reconstruction using scout scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Amelie; Lasso, Andras; Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided interventions often necessitate scanning of deep-seated anatomical structures that may be hard to visualize. Visualization can be improved using reconstructed 3D ultrasound volumes. High-resolution 3D reconstruction of a large area during clinical interventions is challenging if the region of interest is unknown. We propose a two-stage scanning method allowing the user to perform quick low-resolution scouting followed by high-resolution live volume reconstruction. Scout scanning is accomplished by stacking 2D tracked ultrasound images into a low-resolution volume. Then, within a region of interest defined in the scout scan, live volume reconstruction can be performed by continuous scanning until sufficient image density is achieved. We implemented the workflow as a module of the open-source 3D Slicer application, within the SlicerIGT extension and building on the PLUS toolkit. Scout scanning is performed in a few seconds using 3 mm spacing to allow region of interest definition. Live reconstruction parameters are set to provide good image quality (0.5 mm spacing, hole filling enabled) and feedback is given during live scanning by regularly updated display of the reconstructed volume. Use of scout scanning may allow the physician to identify anatomical structures. Subsequent live volume reconstruction in a region of interest may assist in procedures such as targeting needle interventions or estimating brain shift during surgery.

  3. Power Doppler ultrasound appearances of neonatal ischaemic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Steventon, D M; John, P R

    1997-02-01

    Following neonatal ischaemic brain injury, irregular vessels increase in size owing to luxury perfusion. These may be demonstrated by conventional colour flow Doppler (CFD) imaging at the periphery of the infarcted area. We present a case in which power Doppler imaging (PDI) was performed in addition to CFD in a neonate with unexplained seizures and which proved more sensitive than CFD in demonstrating luxury perfusion. Ultrasound appearances were compared with those seen on cranial CT. PDI can be a useful adjunct to conventional CFD examination of the neonatal brain in cerebral infarction.

  4. Effects of transducer, velocity, Doppler angle, and instrument settings on the accuracy of color Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Stewart, S F

    2001-04-01

    The accuracy of a commercial color Doppler ultrasound (US) system was assessed in vitro using a rotating torus phantom. The phantom consisted of a thin rubber tube filled with a blood-mimicking fluid, joined at the ends to form a torus. The torus was mounted on a disk suspended in water, and rotated at constant speeds by a motor. The torus fluid was shown in a previous study to rotate as a solid body, so that the actual fluid velocity was dependent only on the motor speed and sample volume radius. The fluid velocity could, thus, be easily compared to the color Doppler-derived velocity. The effects of instrument settings, velocity and the Doppler angle was assessed in four transducers: a 2.0-MHz phased-array transducer designed for cardiac use, a 4.0-MHz curved-array transducer designed for general thoracic use, and two linear transducers designed for vascular use (one 4.0 MHz and one 6.0 MHz). The color Doppler accuracy was found to be significantly dependent on the transducer used, the pulse-repetition frequency and wall-filter frequency, the actual fluid velocity and the Doppler angle (p < 0.001 by analysis of variance). In particular, the phased array and curved array were observed to be significantly more accurate than the two linear arrays. The torus phantom was found to provide a sensitive measure of color Doppler accuracy. Clinicians need to be aware of these effects when performing color Doppler US exams.

  5. [The value of Doppler ultrasound studies in threatened premature labor].

    PubMed

    Jörn, H; Funk, A; Fendel, H

    1993-01-01

    95 patients were investigated using Doppler ultrasound to evaluate its usefulness during the clinical management of patients with preterm labor, preterm rupture of membranes and incompetent cervix. Cases with additional pregnancy complications as preeclampsia or intrauterine growth retardation or infection of the amnion or the birth canal were excluded from our study. We examined the umbilical artery and the uterine arteries. Predicting preterm birth we found a sensitivity of 31.4% and a specificity of 70% for the former and a sensitivity of 34.3% and a specificity of 83.3% for the latter. As a result of our investigation we have to conclude that Doppler ultrasound is not able to predict sufficiently reliable preterm birth to use it in clinical management. Normal uterine blood flow in cases with preterm labor seems to indicate birth at term in a high degree.

  6. Adaptive clutter rejection for ultrasound color Doppler imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Yang Mo; Managuli, Ravi; Kim, Yongmin

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a new adaptive clutter rejection technique where an optimum clutter filter is dynamically selected according to the varying clutter characteristics in ultrasound color Doppler imaging. The selection criteria have been established based on the underlying clutter characteristics (i.e., the maximum instantaneous clutter velocity and the clutter power) and the properties of various candidate clutter filters (e.g., projection-initialized infinite impulse response and polynomial regression). We obtained an average improvement of 3.97 dB and 3.27 dB in flow signal-to-clutter-ratio (SCR) compared to the conventional and down-mixing methods, respectively. These preliminary results indicate that the proposed adaptive clutter rejection method could improve the sensitivity and accuracy in flow velocity estimation for ultrasound color Doppler imaging. For a 192 x 256 color Doppler image with an ensemble size of 10, the proposed method takes only 57.2 ms, which is less than the acquisition time. Thus, the proposed method could be implemented in modern ultrasound systems, while providing improved clutter rejection and more accurate velocity estimation in real time.

  7. Sevoflurane Used for Color Doppler Ultrasound Examination in Children.

    PubMed

    Fan, Conghai; Zhang, Fengchao; Huang, Xiaomei; Wen, Cheng; Shan, Chengjing

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the feasibility of sevoflurane inhalation in pediatric color doppler ultrasound examination. In this study, 30 cases of children under 1 year were selected. They were all I or II levels according to American Society of Anesthesiology. Children with severe cyanotic congenital heart disease or severe pneumonia were excluded. All the children received anesthesia with sevoflurane. The University of Michigan Sedation Scale was assessed and bispectral index (BIS) was recorded before induction (T0), after induction (T1), when maintaining (T2), and when waking-up (T3). Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored during the color doppler ultrasound examination, the time to receive sedation examination and anesthesia recovery time were also recorded. (1) Score for UMSS was zero at T0 and 3 at T1; (2) BIS value was 93.18 ± 2.94 at T0 and decreased to 87.6 ± 3.9 at T1; (3) Blood pressure or heart rate did not decline obviously; (4) The time to receive sedation examination was 46.4 ± 13.1 s and anesthesia recovery time was 7.8 ± 5.3 min. In conclusion, sevoflurane can be used in pediatric color doppler ultrasound examination safely and effectively.

  8. Scanning phononic lattices with ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Vines, R.E.; Wolfe, J.P.; Every, A.V.

    1999-11-01

    A method for probing the elastic properties of newly developed periodic structures using acoustic waves is introduced. Highly anisotropic transmission of surface acoustic waves is observed by continuously scanning the wave vector angle. Preliminary models of wave propagation through multilayers and two-dimensional lattices explain some of the experimental features, while other features can be attributed to the resonant excitation of interface waves. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Are Prenatal Ultrasound Scans Associated with the Autism Phenotype? Follow-Up of a Randomised Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoch, Yonit K.; Williams, Cori J.; Granich, Joanna; Hunt, Anna M.; Landau, Lou I.; Newnham, John P.; Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.

    2012-01-01

    An existing randomised controlled trial was used to investigate whether multiple ultrasound scans may be associated with the autism phenotype. From 2,834 single pregnancies, 1,415 were selected at random to receive ultrasound imaging and continuous wave Doppler flow studies at five points throughout pregnancy (Intensive) and 1,419 to receive a…

  10. Phase relation recovery for scanning laser Doppler vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alveringh, D.; Sanders, R. G. P.; Wiegerink, R. J.; Lötters, J. C.

    2017-02-01

    Laser Doppler vibrometers are able to measure the velocity of a single point compared to a reference point by analyzing the Doppler shift of the laser beams. In many commercially available laser Doppler vibrometers, the laser point can be scanned to obtain an out-of-plane velocity profile of a surface. It is essential that the phase information of the velocities between points is measured as well to be able to fully reproduce the velocity profile of the surface. If this cannot be done by triggering on the actuation signal, the proposed two stage method can be used. This method measures the surface in two stages: one scan with the reference beam at a fixed point and one scan with the reference beam on a moving point. The algorithm in this article calculates the phase and reconstructs the velocity of each point. This is experimentally verified on three different micro structures. The postprocessing algorithm is not intensive in computing power.

  11. A new clutter rejection algorithm for Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Guy; Chen, Danmin; Durand, Louis-Gilles

    2003-04-01

    Several strategies, known as clutter or wall Doppler filtering, were proposed to remove the strong echoes produced by stationary or slow moving tissue structures from the Doppler blood flow signal. In this study, the matching pursuit (MP) method is proposed to remove clutter components. The MP method decomposes the Doppler signal into wavelet atoms that are selected in a decreasing energy order. Thus, the high-energy clutter components are extracted first. In the present study, the pulsatile Doppler signal s(n) was simulated by a sum of random-phase sinusoids. Two types of high-amplitude clutter signals were then superimposed on s(n): time-varying low-frequency components, covering systole and early diastole, and short transient clutter signals, distributed within the whole cardiac cycle. The Doppler signals were modeled with the MP method and the most dominant atoms were subtracted from the time-domain signal s(n) until the signal-to-clutter (S/C) ratio reached a maximum. For the low-frequency clutter signal, the improvement in S/C ratio was 19.0 +/- 0.6 dB, and 72.0 +/- 4.5 atoms were required to reach this performance. For the transient clutter signal, ten atoms were required and the maximum improvement in S/C ratio was 5.5 +/- 0.5 dB. The performance of the MP method was also tested on real data recorded over the common carotid artery of a normal subject. Removing 15 atoms significantly improved the appearance of the Doppler sonogram contaminated with low-frequency clutter. Many more atoms (over 200) were required to remove transient clutter components. These results suggest the possibility of using this signal processing approach to implement clutter rejection filters on ultrasound commercial instruments.

  12. Doppler ultrasound and renal artery stenosis: An overview.

    PubMed

    Granata, A; Fiorini, F; Andrulli, S; Logias, F; Gallieni, M; Romano, G; Sicurezza, E; Fiore, C E

    2009-12-01

    Renovascular disease is a complex disorder, most commonly caused by fibromuscular dysplasia and atherosclerotic diseases. It can be found in one of three forms: asymptomatic renal artery stenosis (RAS), renovascular hypertension, and ischemic nephropathy. Particularly, the atherosclerotic form is a progressive disease that may lead to gradual and silent loss of renal function. Thus, early diagnosis of RAS is an important clinical objective since interventional therapy may improve or cure hypertension and preserve renal function. Screening for RAS is indicated in suspected renovascular hypertension or ischemic nephropathy, in order to identify patients in whom an endoluminal or surgical revascularization is advisable. Screening tests for RAS have improved considerably over the last decade. While captopril renography was widely used in the past, Doppler ultrasound (US) of the renal arteries (RAs), angio-CT, or magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) have replaced other modalities and they are now considered the screening tests of choice. An arteriogram is rarely needed for diagnostic purposes only. Color-Doppler US (CDUS) is a noninvasive, repeatable, relatively inexpensive diagnostic procedure which can accurately screen for renovascular diseases if performed by an expert. Moreover, the evaluation of the resistive index (RI) at Doppler US may be very useful in RAS affected patients for predicting the response to revascularization. However, when a discrepancy exists between clinical data and the results of Doppler US, additional tests are mandatory.

  13. An ideal blood mimicking fluid for doppler ultrasound phantoms.

    PubMed

    Samavat, H; Evans, J A

    2006-10-01

    In order to investigate the problems of detecting tumours by ultrasound it is very important to have a portable Doppler flow test object to use as a standardising tool. The flow Doppler test objects are intended to mimic the flow in human arteries. To make the test meaningful, the acoustic properties of the main test object components (tissue and blood mimic) should match closely the properties of the corresponding human tissues, while the tube should ideally have little influence. The blood mimic should also represent the haemodynamic properties of blood. An acceptable flow test object has been designed to closely mimic blood flow in arteries. We have evaluated the properties of three blood mimicking fluid: two have been described recently in the literature, the third is a local design. One of these has emerged as being particularly well matched to the necessary characteristics for in-vitro work.

  14. Rotational Dove prism scanning dual angle Doppler OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatter, Cedric; Coquoz, Séverine; Grajciar, Branislav; Singh, Amardeep S. G.; Werkmeister, René M.; Schmetterer, Leopold; Leitgeb, Rainer A.

    2013-03-01

    Traditional Doppler OCT is highly sensitive to motion artifacts due to the dependence on the Doppler angle. This limits its reproducibility in clinical practice. To overcome this limitation, we use a bidirectional technique with a novel rotating scanning scheme. The volume is probed simultaneously from two distinct illumination directions with variable controlled orientations, allowing reconstruction of the true flow velocity, independently of the vessel orientation. A Dove prism in the sample arm permits a rotation of the illumination directions that can be synchronized with the standard beam steering device. The principle is implemented with Swept Source OCT at 1060nm with 100,000 A-Scans/s. We apply the system to human retinal absolute blood velocity measurement by performing segment and circumpapillary time series scans around the optic nerve head. We also demonstrate microvasculature imaging by calculation of squared intensity differences between successive tomograms.

  15. [Noise and speckle reduction in ultrasound Doppler blood flow spectrograms by using MP-PCNN].

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Ma, Yue; Zhang, Yufeng; Shu, Xinling

    2011-10-01

    To reduce background noise and Dopplar speckle in the spectrogram of ultrasound Doppler blood flow signals, a novel method, called Matching Pursuit with threshold decaying pulse coupled neural network (MP-PCNN), has been proposed. The proposed method used an iterative algorithm, which decomposed the ultrasound Doppler signals into linear expansion of atoms in a time-frequency dictionary by using the Matching Pursuit (MP) for de-noising the ultrasound Doppler signal. Subsequently, a simplified unidirectional pulse coupled neural network was applied to calculate the firing matrix of the denoised spectrogram. The Doppler speckles were located and removed through analyzing and processing the PCNN firing matrix. Experiments were conducted on simulation signals which SNRs were 0dB, 5dB and 10dB. The result showed that the MP-PCNN performed effectively in reducing noise, eliminating Doppler speckles, and achieved better performance than exiting noise and speckle suppression algorithm for Doppler ultrasound blood flow spectrogram.

  16. Laser-scanning Doppler photoacoustic microscopy based on temporal correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Liu, Wenzhong; Zhang, Hao F.

    2013-05-01

    We present a methodology to measure absolute flow velocity using laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy. To obtain the Doppler angle, the angle between ultrasonic detection axis and flow direction, we extracted the distances between the transducer and three adjacent scanning points along the flow and repeatedly applied the law of cosines. To measure flow velocity along the ultrasonic detection axis, we calculated the time shift between two consecutive photoacoustic waves at the same scanning point, then converted the time shift to velocity according to the sound velocity and time interval between two laser illuminations. We verified our method by imaging flow phantoms.

  17. Nonmechanical axial scanning laser Doppler velocimeter with directional discrimination.

    PubMed

    Maru, Koichi; Hata, Takahiro

    2012-07-10

    An axial scanning laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) with directional discrimination not requiring any moving mechanism in its probe is proposed. The proposed LDV utilizes frequency shift induced by acousto-optic modulators (AOMs) for discriminating the direction of velocity. The measurement position is axially scanned by changing the wavelength of the light input to the probe. The experimental result reveals that both the axial scan and the directional discrimination can be realized by using the proposed method without any moving element in the probe.

  18. An audit of a hospital-based Doppler ultrasound quality control protocol using a commercial string Doppler phantom.

    PubMed

    Cournane, S; Fagan, A J; Browne, J E

    2014-05-01

    Results from a four-year audit of a Doppler quality assurance (QA) program using a commercially available Doppler string phantom are presented. The suitability of the phantom was firstly determined and modifications were made to improve the reliability and quality of the measurements. QA of Doppler ultrasound equipment is very important as data obtained from these systems is used in patient management. It was found that if the braided-silk filament of the Doppler phantom was exchanged with an O-ring rubber filament and the velocity range below 50 cm/s was avoided for Doppler quality control (QC) measurements, then the maximum velocity accuracy (MVA) error and intrinsic spectral broadening (ISB) results obtained using this device had a repeatability of 18 ± 3.3% and 19 ± 3.5%, respectively. A consistent overestimation of the MVA of between 12% and 56% was found for each of the tested ultrasound systems. Of more concern was the variation of the overestimation within each respective transducer category: MVA errors of the linear, curvilinear and phased array probes were in the range 12.3-20.8%, 32.3-53.8% and 27-40.7%, respectively. There is a dearth of QA data for Doppler ultrasound; it would be beneficial if a multicentre longitudinal study was carried out using the same Doppler ultrasound test object to evaluate sensitivity to deterioration in performance measurements.

  19. Real-time and interactive virtual Doppler ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirji, Samira; Downey, Donal B.; Holdsworth, David W.; Steinman, David A.

    2005-04-01

    This paper describes our "virtual" Doppler ultrasound (DUS) system, in which colour DUS (CDUS) images and DUS spectrograms are generated on-the-fly and displayed in real-time in response to position and orientation cues provided by a magnetically tracked handheld probe. As the presence of complex flow often confounds the interpretation of Doppler ultrasound data, this system will serve to be a fundamental tool for training sonographers and gaining insight into the relationship between ambiguous DUS images and complex blood flow dynamics. Recently, we demonstrated that DUS spectra could be realistically simulated in real-time, by coupling a semi-empirical model of the DUS physics to a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a clinically relevant flow field. Our system is an evolution of this approach where a motion-tracking device is used to continuously update the origin and orientation of a slice passing through a CFD model of a stenosed carotid bifurcation. After calibrating our CFD model onto a physical representation of a human neck, virtual CDUS images from an instantaneous slice are then displayed at a rate of approximately 15 Hz by simulating, on-the-fly, an array of DUS spectra and colour coding the resulting spectral mean velocity using a traditional Doppler colour scale. Mimicking a clinical examination, the operator can freeze the CDUS image on-screen, and a spectrogram corresponding to the selected sample volume location is rendered at a higher frame rate of at least 30 Hz. All this is achieved using an inexpensive desktop workstation and commodity graphics card.

  20. Comparison of blood flow velocity through the internal carotid artery based on Doppler ultrasound and numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Hassani-Ardekani, Hajar; Ghalichi, Farzan; Niroomand-Oscuii, Hanieh; Farhoudi, Mehdi; Tarzmani, Mohammad Kazem

    2012-12-01

    Doppler ultrasound is a usual non-invasive method to estimate the stenosis percentage in large arteries such as carotid by measuring maximum velocity of blood flow. Based on clinical investigations, because of vessel wall motions, Doppler positioning and angle correction, some errors can arise in Doppler results which lead to incorrect diagnosis. The aim of this study was to compare the results of Doppler test and the numerical simulation of blood flow in the same case. For this evaluation, two patients including an 87-year-old man and a 72-year-old woman suffering from stenosis in the internal carotid artery were selected. First, clinical information of each patient such as CT-Angio scan images and Doppler ultrasound results on different locations of the stenosed artery were obtained. Then, the geometries were reconstructed and numerical simulations were carried out using ANSYS software. Results showed that the velocity profile of Doppler test and numerical simulation were in good agreement at the regions of pre-and post-stenosis. However, the value of maximum velocity at the stenotic region had significant differences.

  1. Color Doppler ultrasound of the hand: observations on clinical utility in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Saadeh, Constantine; Gaylor, Patrick; Lee, Doohi; Malacara, Jan; Gaylor, Michael

    2004-02-01

    The use of ultrasound with color Doppler in the evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis was followed in 25 patients with joint complaints. Small joint ultrasound of the metacarpophalangeal joints (MCPs) as well as the wrists was performed with supplementation by color Doppler. In addition, 6 patients were followed for at least 3 months after start of treatment of rheumatoid arthritis using the same technique. In patients with what appeared to be definite rheumatoid arthritis, ultrasound supported this diagnosis as evidenced by the finding of cortical defects, extensor tendon sheath thickening, and synovial proliferation. Increased activity by color Doppler ultrasonography was the most common finding. Significant decrease in color Doppler activity was noted in the 6 patients who were followed up after 3 months of therapy with disease-modifying agents. Therefore, the use of ultrasound with color Doppler could aid in the diagnosis and follow up of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. TU-A-9A-02: Analysis of Variations in Clinical Doppler Ultrasound Peak Velocity Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Stekel, S; Tradup, D; Hangiandreou, N

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Doppler ultrasound (US) peak velocity (Vmax) measurements show considerable variations due to intrinsic spectral broadening with different scanning techniques, machines and manufacturers. We developed a semi-automated Vmax estimation method and used this method to investigate the performance of a US system for clinical Doppler Vmax measurement. Methods: Semi-automated Vmax is defined as the velocity at which the computed mean spectral profile falls to within 1 background standard deviation of the background mean. GE LOGIQ E9 system with 9L and ML6-15 probes were studied with steady flow (5.3 – 12.5 ml/s) in a Gammex OPTIMIZER 1425A phantom. All Doppler spectra were acquired by 1 operator at the distal end of 5 mm angular tube using a modified clinical carotid artery protocol. Repeatability and variation of Vmax to scanning parameters and probes were analyzed and reported as percentage, i.e. (max-min)/mean. Results: Vmax estimation had good repeatability (3.1% over 6 days for 9L, and 3.6% for ML6-15). For 9L probe, varying gain, compression, scale, SV depth and length, and frequency had minimal impact on Vmax (all variations less than 4.0%). Beam steering had slightly higher influence (largest variations across flow rates were 4.9% for 9L and 6.9% for ML6-15). For both probes, Doppler angle had the greatest effect on Vmax. Percentage increase of Vmax was largely independent of actual flow rates. For Doppler angle varied from 30 to 60°, Vmax increased 24% for 9L, and 20% for ML6-15. Vmax measured by ML6-15 were lower than that by 9L at each Doppler angle with differences less than 5%. Conclusion: The proposed Vmax estimation method is shown to be a useful tool to evaluate clinical Doppler US system performance. For the tested system and probes, Doppler angle had largest impact in measured Vmax.

  3. Doppler ultrasound study and venous mapping in chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    García Carriazo, M; Gómez de las Heras, C; Mármol Vázquez, P; Ramos Solís, M F

    2016-01-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency of the lower limbs is very prevalent. In recent decades, Doppler ultrasound has become the method of choice to study this condition, and it is considered essential when surgery is indicated. This article aims to establish a method for the examination, including venous mapping and preoperative marking. To this end, we review the venous anatomy of the lower limbs and the pathophysiology of chronic venous insufficiency and explain the basic hemodynamic concepts and the terminology required to elaborate a radiological report that will enable appropriate treatment planning and communication with other specialists. We briefly explain the CHIVA (the acronym for the French term "cure conservatrice et hémodynamique de l'insuffisance veineuse en ambulatoire"=conservative hemodynamic treatment for chronic venous insufficiency) strategy, a minimally invasive surgical strategy that aims to restore correct venous hemodynamics without resecting the saphenous vein.

  4. Role of Ultrasound with Color Doppler in Acute Scrotum Management

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Alka M.; Tripathi, Prem Siddharth; Shankhwar, Amit; Naveen, C.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: An acute scrotum is defined as acute pain with or without scrotal swelling, may be accompanied by local signs or general symptoms. Acute scrotal pain is a medical emergency. Depending on cause, the management is entirely different. Torsion of testis and strangulated hernia are surgical emergency; whereas, epididymo-orchitis is treated by medicines. Testicular trauma and obstructed hernia can be differentiated by taking history from patient. Physical examination adds only a little information. Color Doppler ultrasound (US) is the modality of choice to differentiate testicular torsion from inflammatory conditions and can thus help in avoiding unnecessary surgical explorations. Subjects and Methods: A study on 50 patients was conducted who were referred with history of acute scrotal pain to our department between January 2013 and January 2014. Trauma and scrotal mass were excluded from the study. The clinical presentation, outcome, and US results were analyzed. Results: Color Doppler sonography yielded a positive and negative predictive value (PPV and NPV) of 100% each for torsion, whereas, 93.9 and 70.6% for epididymo-orchitis, respectively; a sensitivity and specificity of 100% for torsion, whereas, for epididymo-orchitis it was found to be 86.1 and 85.7%, respectively. In cases of incomplete or early torsion, some residual perfusion may be detected leading to false-negative results. Conclusion: We therefore conclude that color Doppler sonography can reliably rule out testicular torsion and can thus help in avoiding unnecessary surgical explorations. Hence, it can significantly improve outcome and decrease morbidity of patient. It is an accurate, rapid, nonexpensive, nonionizing, important adjunct to clinical assessment of scrotum. PMID:25657954

  5. [Doppler ultrasound diagnosis in post-term pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Jörn, H; Funk, A; Fendel, H

    1993-09-01

    The capability of Doppler flow velocimetry to predict intrauterine growth retardation is well known. The increased morbidity and mortality rate of postterm newborns is also well known. The aim of our study was to examine if Doppler flow velocimetry is able to indicate foetal jeopardy in the postterm period. Flow velocimetry of the foetal descending aorta, the umbilical artery, the uterine arteries and in 59 cases also the foetal middle cerebral artery was obtained from 167 pregnancies after 40 completed weeks of gestation. We found significant changes of normal values in prolonged pregnancy compared to third trimester normal values, examining the mean velocity of the foetal descending aorta and the S/D-ratio of the umbilical artery. No clinically significant changes were found examining the S/D-ratio of the uterine arteries and the pulsatility index of the foetal middle cerebral artery. Daily examinations of the foetal descending aorta were carried out in 23 and of the umbilical artery in 19 cases during the last four days before delivery, and in 11 cases of the foetal middle cerebral artery during the last three days before delivery. We did not find significant changes in the medians of the mean velocity of the foetal aorta, of the S/D-ratio of the umbilical artery and of the pulsatility index of the foetal middle cerebral artery. Measurement of sensitivity and positive predictive value of the four arteries examined showed, that Doppler ultrasound could not predict small for date infants or Caesarean section because of foetal distress.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. B-mode Ultrasound Versus Color Doppler Twinkling Artifact in Detecting Kidney Stones

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Jonathan D.; Hsi, Ryan S.; Shah, Anup R.; Dighe, Manjiri K.; Carter, Stephen J.; Moshiri, Mariam; Paun, Marla; Lu, Wei; Bailey, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose To compare color Doppler twinkling artifact and B-mode ultrasonography in detecting kidney stones. Patients and Methods Nine patients with recent CT scans prospectively underwent B-mode and twinkling artifact color Doppler ultrasonography on a commercial ultrasound machine. Video segments of the upper pole, interpolar area, and lower pole were created, randomized, and independently reviewed by three radiologists. Receiver operator characteristics were determined. Results There were 32 stones in 18 kidneys with a mean stone size of 8.9±7.5 mm. B-mode ultrasonography had 71% sensitivity, 48% specificity, 52% positive predictive value, and 68% negative predictive value, while twinkling artifact Doppler ultrasonography had 56% sensitivity, 74% specificity, 62% positive predictive value, and 68% negative predictive value. Conclusions When used alone, B-mode is more sensitive, but twinkling artifact is more specific in detecting kidney stones. This information may help users employ twinkling and B-mode to identify stones and developers to improve signal processing to harness the fundamental acoustic differences to ultimately improve stone detection. PMID:23067207

  7. Measurement of Thermal Effects of Doppler Ultrasound: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Helmy, Samir; Bader, Yvonne; Koch, Marianne; Tiringer, Denise; Kollmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Objective Ultrasound is considered a safe imaging modality and is routinely applied during early pregnancy. However, reservations are expressed concerning the application of Doppler ultrasound in early pregnancy due to energy emission of the ultrasound probe and its conversion to heat. The objective of this study was to evaluate the thermal effects of emitted Doppler ultrasound of different ultrasound machines and probes by means of temperature increase of in-vitro test-media. Methods We investigated the energy-output of 5 vaginal and abdominal probes of 3 ultrasound machines (GE Healthcare, Siemens, Aloka). Two in-vitro test objects were developed at the Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University Vienna (water bath and hydrogel bath). Temperature increase during Doppler ultrasound emission was measured via thermal sensors, which were placed inside the test objects or on the probes’ surface. Each probe was emitting for 5 minutes into the absorbing test object with 3 different TI/MI settings in Spectral Doppler mode. Results During water bath test, temperature increase varied between 0.1 and 1.0°C, depending on probe, setting and focus, and was found highest for spectral Doppler mode alone. Maximum temperature increase was found during the surface heating test, where values up to 2.4°C could be measured within 5 minutes of emission. Conclusions Activation of Doppler ultrasound in the waterbath model causes a significant increase of temperature within one minute. Thermally induced effects on the embryo cannot be excluded when using Doppler ultrasound in early pregnancy. PMID:26302465

  8. The effect of dead elements on the accuracy of Doppler ultrasound measurements.

    PubMed

    Vachutka, Jaromir; Dolezal, Ladislav; Kollmann, Christian; Klein, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of multiple dead elements in an ultrasound probe on the accuracy of Doppler ultrasound measurements. For this work, we used a specially designed ultrasound imaging system, the Ultrasonix Sonix RP, that provides the user with the ability to disable selected elements in the probe. Using fully functional convex, linear, and phased array probes, we established a performance baseline by measuring the parameters of a laminar parabolic flow profile. These same parameters were then measured using probes with 1 to 10 disabled elements. The acquired velocity spectra from the functional probes and the probes with disabled elements were then analyzed to determine the overall Doppler power, maximum flow velocity, and average flow velocity. Color Flow Doppler images were also evaluated in a similar manner. The analysis of the Doppler spectra indicates that the overall Doppler power as well as the detected maximum and average velocities decrease with the increasing number of disabled elements. With multiple disabled elements, decreases in the detected maximum and average velocities greater than 20% were recorded. Similar results were also observed with Color Flow Doppler measurements. Our results confirmed that the degradation of the ultrasound probe through the loss of viable elements will negatively affect the quality of the Doppler-derived diagnostic information. We conclude that the results of Doppler measurements cannot be considered accurate or reliable if there are four or more contiguous dead elements in any given probe.

  9. Direct Measurement of Basilar Membrane Motion Using Pulsed-Wave Doppler High-Frequency Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbatian, Z.; Garland, P.; Adamson, R. B. A.; Bance, M.; Brown, J. A.

    2011-11-01

    We present a preliminary report on the use of a new technique for measuring the motion of the basilar membrane, high-frequency ultrasound Doppler vibrometry. Using a custom-built, 1 mm diameter probe, we collected ultrasonic reflections from intracochlear structures and applied pulsed-wave Doppler vibrometry to measure the basilar membrane response to pressure applied in the ear canal.

  10. [Ultrasound and color Doppler applications in nephrology. The normal kidney: anatomy, vessels and congenital anomalies].

    PubMed

    Meola, Mario; Petrucci, Ilaria; Giovannini, Lisa; Samoni, Sara; Dellafiore, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Gray-scale ultrasound is the diagnostic technique of choice in patients with suspected or known renal disease. Knowledge of the normal and abnormal sonographic morphology of the kidney and urinary tract is essential for a successful diagnosis. Conventional sonography must always be complemented by Doppler sampling of the principal arterial and venous vessels. B-mode scanning is performed with the patient in supine, prone or side position. The kidney can be imaged by the anterior, lateral or posterior approach using coronal, transverse and oblique scanning planes. Morphological parameters that must be evaluated are the coronal diameter, the parenchymal thickness and echogenicity, the structure and state of the urinary tract, and the presence of congenital anomalies that may mimic a pseudomass. The main renal artery and the hilar-intraparenchymal branches of the arterial and venous vessels should be accurately evaluated using color Doppler. Measurement of intraparenchymal resistance indices (IP, IR) provides an indirect and quantitative parameter of the stiffness and eutrophic or dystrophic remodeling of the intrarenal microvasculature. These parameters differ depending on age, diabetic and hypertensive disease, chronic renal glomerular disease, and interstitial, vascular and obstructive nephropathy.

  11. Breast tumor angiogenesis analysis using 3D power Doppler ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ruey-Feng; Huang, Sheng-Fang; Lee, Yu-Hau; Chen, Dar-Ren; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2006-03-01

    Angiogenesis is the process that correlates to tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Breast cancer angiogenesis has been the most extensively studied and now serves as a paradigm for understanding the biology of angiogenesis and its effects on tumor outcome and patient prognosis. Most studies on characterization of angiogenesis focus on pixel/voxel counts more than morphological analysis. Nevertheless, in cancer, the blood flow is greatly affected by the morphological changes, such as the number of vessels, branching pattern, length, and diameter. This paper presents a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) system that can quantify vascular morphology using 3-D power Doppler ultrasound (US) on breast tumors. We propose a scheme to extract the morphological information from angiography and to relate them to tumor diagnosis outcome. At first, a 3-D thinning algorithm helps narrow down the vessels into their skeletons. The measurements of vascular morphology significantly rely on the traversing of the vascular trees produced from skeletons. Our study of 3-D assessment of vascular morphological features regards vessel count, length, bifurcation, and diameter of vessels. Investigations into 221 solid breast tumors including 110 benign and 111 malignant cases, the p values using the Student's t-test for all features are less than 0.05 indicating that the proposed features are deemed statistically significant. Our scheme focuses on the vascular architecture without involving the technique of tumor segmentation. The results show that the proposed method is feasible, and have a good agreement with the diagnosis of the pathologists.

  12. Wind Measurements from Arc Scans with Doppler Wind Lidar

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Clifton, Andy; ...

    2015-11-25

    When defining optimal scanning geometries for scanning lidars for wind energy applications, we found that it is still an active field of research. Our paper evaluates uncertainties associated with arc scan geometries and presents recommendations regarding optimal configurations in the atmospheric boundary layer. The analysis is based on arc scan data from a Doppler wind lidar with one elevation angle and seven azimuth angles spanning 30° and focuses on an estimation of 10-min mean wind speed and direction. When flow is horizontally uniform, this approach can provide accurate wind measurements required for wind resource assessments in part because of itsmore » high resampling rate. Retrieved wind velocities at a single range gate exhibit good correlation to data from a sonic anemometer on a nearby meteorological tower, and vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed, though derived from range gates located on a conical surface, match those measured by mast-mounted cup anemometers. Uncertainties in the retrieved wind velocity are related to high turbulent wind fluctuation and an inhomogeneous horizontal wind field. Moreover, the radial velocity variance is found to be a robust measure of the uncertainty of the retrieved wind speed because of its relationship to turbulence properties. It is further shown that the standard error of wind speed estimates can be minimized by increasing the azimuthal range beyond 30° and using five to seven azimuth angles.« less

  13. Wind Measurements from Arc Scans with Doppler Wind Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Clifton, Andy; Pryor, S. C.

    2015-11-25

    When defining optimal scanning geometries for scanning lidars for wind energy applications, we found that it is still an active field of research. Our paper evaluates uncertainties associated with arc scan geometries and presents recommendations regarding optimal configurations in the atmospheric boundary layer. The analysis is based on arc scan data from a Doppler wind lidar with one elevation angle and seven azimuth angles spanning 30° and focuses on an estimation of 10-min mean wind speed and direction. When flow is horizontally uniform, this approach can provide accurate wind measurements required for wind resource assessments in part because of its high resampling rate. Retrieved wind velocities at a single range gate exhibit good correlation to data from a sonic anemometer on a nearby meteorological tower, and vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed, though derived from range gates located on a conical surface, match those measured by mast-mounted cup anemometers. Uncertainties in the retrieved wind velocity are related to high turbulent wind fluctuation and an inhomogeneous horizontal wind field. Moreover, the radial velocity variance is found to be a robust measure of the uncertainty of the retrieved wind speed because of its relationship to turbulence properties. It is further shown that the standard error of wind speed estimates can be minimized by increasing the azimuthal range beyond 30° and using five to seven azimuth angles.

  14. The commodification of obstetric ultrasound scanning in Hanoi, Viet Nam.

    PubMed

    Gammeltoft, Tine; Nguyen, Hanh Thi Thuý

    2007-05-01

    Growing numbers of pregnant women across the world now routinely have ultrasound scans as part of antenatal care, including in low-income countries. This article presents the findings of anthropological research on the use of obstetric ultrasonography in routine antenatal care in Hanoi, Viet Nam. The findings come from observation, a survey and interviews with women seeking ultrasound scans at a main maternity hospital and interviews with doctors providing ultrasound there. We found a dramatic overuse of ultrasound scanning; the 400 women surveyed had had an average of 6.6 scans and 8.3 antenatal visits during pregnancy, while one-fifth had had ten scans or more. Doctors considered obstetric ultrasound an indispensable part of modern antenatal care. For two-thirds of the women, the main reason for frequent scans was reassurance of normal fetal development. However, the women often also said their doctor had recommended the scans. This overuse must be seen in the context of growing commercialisation in the Vietnamese health care system, where ultrasound provides an important source of revenue for both private and public providers. There is an urgent need in Viet Nam for policy and practice guidelines on the appropriate use of ultrasonography in pregnancy and how best to combine it with essential antenatal care, and information dissemination to women.

  15. Design and Implementation of High Frequency Ultrasound Pulsed-Wave Doppler Using FPGA

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chang-hong; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2009-01-01

    The development of a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based pulsed-wave Doppler processing approach in pure digital domain is reported in this paper. After the ultrasound signals are digitized, directional Doppler frequency shifts are obtained with a digital-down converter followed by a low-pass filter. A Doppler spectrum is then calculated using the complex fast Fourier transform core inside the FPGA. In this approach, a pulsed-wave Doppler implementation core with reconfigurable and real-time processing capability is achieved. PMID:18986909

  16. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Vascular ultrasound; Peripheral vascular ultrasound ... A duplex ultrasound combines: Traditional ultrasound: This uses sound waves that bounce off blood vessels to create pictures. Doppler ultrasound: This ...

  17. Transthoracic needle biopsy of thoracic tumours by a colour Doppler ultrasound puncture guiding device.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H. C.; Yu, C. J.; Chang, D. B.; Yuan, A.; Lee, Y. C.; Yang, P. C.; Kuo, S. H.; Luh, K. T.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Ultrasound guided transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy has recently been used to obtain specimens for histological diagnosis of pulmonary and mediastinal tumours. Conventional real time, grey scale puncture guiding devices cannot differentiate vascular structures, and clear visualisation of the needle shaft or tip within a desired target is not always possible. This study describes a new built-in colour Doppler ultrasound puncture guiding device and assesses the relative safety of transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy of thoracic tumours by grey scale or colour Doppler ultrasound guidance. METHODS--Thirty patients with radiographic evidence of pulmonary (22 patients) or mediastinal tumours (eight patients) underwent ultrasonographic evaluation and transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy by using the colour Doppler ultrasound puncture guiding device (Aloka UST 5045P-3.5). These tumours were initially examined by grey scale ultrasound, and colour Doppler imaging was then used to evaluate the number of blood vessels surrounding and within the target tumour and the possibility of visualisation of the needle shaft or needle tip during the aspiration biopsy procedure. RESULTS--The colour Doppler ultrasound guiding device was far superior to the grey scale device for identification of the number of vessels surrounding or within the target tumour (83% v 20%) and for visualisation of the needle shaft or needle tip (80% v 17%). CONCLUSIONS--By using the colour Doppler ultrasound puncture device, vascular structures surrounding or within the target tumour can be verified. Visualisation of the needle shaft or tip is also better. Biopsy routes can be selected to avoid puncturing vessels. This approach should be particularly helpful for guiding biopsies of mediastinal tumours, where puncturing the heart or great vessels is a potential complication. Images PMID:8553297

  18. [Duplex ultrasound and color-coded Doppler ultrasound of visceral blood vessels in abdominal diseases].

    PubMed

    Mostbeck, G; Mallek, R; Gebauer, A; Tscholakoff, D

    1992-01-01

    Duplex Doppler sonography (DS) and color-flow Doppler sonography (FDS) are noninvasive diagnostic methods for the evaluation of a patient with suspected vascular disease of the abdomen. They represent a useful adjunct to realtime sonography in the identification of normal and variant visceral vascular anatomy. Aneurysms and pseudo-aneurysms of visceral arteries are readily differentiated from other cystic lesions. DS and FDS have a high sensitivity in the detection of portal vein thrombosis and stenosis. Both methods allow the observation and measurement of splanchnic hemodynamics in patients with chronic liver disease and portal hypertension. Hence, DS and FDS already play an important role in the pre- and postoperative assessment of patients undergoing liver or pancreas transplantation. The possibility that DS and FDS may enable discrimination between hypovascular and hypervascular tumors is under clinical investigation. FDS facilitates an excellent anatomic display of the abdominal vasculature and allows easy placement of the Doppler sample volume. Consequently, quantitative data acquired with DS are accomplished within short scanning times. However, the diagnostic impact of both modalities depends to a great extent on the experience of the investigator.

  19. Prevalence in a volunteer population of pelvic cancer detected with transvaginal ultrasound and color flow Doppler.

    PubMed

    Schulman, H; Conway, C; Zalud, I; Farmakides, G; Haley, J; Cassata, M

    1994-09-01

    Our objective was to find the prevalence of non-symptomatic endometrial and ovarian neoplasms in a volunteer population of women, aged 40 and over. We offered a free volunteer screening program to asymptomatic women for a study using transvaginal ultrasound and color flow Doppler for the detection of pelvic cancer. In the first 2 years, 2117 women were examined, 51.3% post-menopausal. An ovarian cyst was defined as having a maximum diameter of more than 2.4 cm. Color flow was used to identify blood vessels feeding pelvic organs and adnexal enlargements. An abnormal Doppler flow velocity for the ovary was defined as a resistance index of less than 0.41. Ovarian cysts of less than 5 cm with normal Doppler indices were followed up in 6 months to 1 year. An adnexal morphology score was created to quantify the usefulness of this parameter, particularly in postmenopausal women. Indications for surgery were pre-defined as a persistent ovarian cyst of more than 5 cm, a persistent suspicious Doppler and a total endometrial thickness of greater than 0.59 cm in postmenopausal women not taking hormones.A total of 202 women (9.5%) had ovarian cysts. Fourteen women were operated upon because of size criteria, one because of family history and three for persistent abnormal flow. By Doppler study, 15 cysts were predicted to be benign and histology was confirmatory. There were two false positives and one true positive, a stage Ib ovarian cancer. There were no false negatives, although a stage I endometrioid cancer of the ovary was detected 8 months after a negative scan. In those cases in which follow-up data were available, 56% of the cysts regressed in premenopausal women. In postmenopausal women, 28% regressed. Twenty of 1086 postmenopausal women had endometrial biopsies. Three had endometrial cancer, two stage I and one stage IIA. Five had atypical or adenomatous hyperplasia, and seven had benign polyps. So many women have small asymptomatic cysts of the ovary that a major

  20. Investigation of a scanned cylindrical ultrasound system for breast hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Ju, Kuen-Cheng; Tseng, Li-Te; Chen, Yung-Yaw; Lin, Win-Li

    2006-02-07

    This paper investigates the feasibility of a scanned cylindrical ultrasound system for producing uniform heating from the central to the superficial portions of the breast or localized heating within the breast at a specific location. The proposed system consists of plane ultrasound transducer(s) mounted on a scanned cylindrical support. The breast was immersed in water and surrounded by this system during the treatment. The control parameters considered are the size of the transducer, the ultrasound frequency, the scan angle and the shifting distance between the axes of the breast and the system. Three-dimensional acoustical and thermal models were used to calculate the temperature distribution. Non-perfused phantom experiments were performed to verify the simulation results. Simulation results indicate that high frequency ultrasound could be used for the superficial heating, and the scan angle of the transducer could be varied to obtain an appropriate high temperature region to cover the desired treatment region. Low frequency ultrasound could be used for deep heating and the high temperature region could be moved by shifting the system. In addition, a combination of low and high frequency ultrasound could result in a portion treatment from the central to the superficial breast or an entire breast treatment. Good agreement was obtained between non-perfused experiments and simulation results. The findings of this study can be used to determine the effects of the control parameters of this system, as well as to select the optimal parameters for a specific treatment.

  1. Using rotation for steerable needle detection in 3D color-Doppler ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Mignon, Paul; Poignet, Philippe; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2015-08-01

    This paper demonstrates a new way to detect needles in 3D color-Doppler volumes of biological tissues. It uses rotation to generate vibrations of a needle using an existing robotic brachytherapy system. The results of our detection for color-Doppler and B-Mode ultrasound are compared to a needle location reference given by robot odometry and robot ultrasound calibration. Average errors between detection and reference are 5.8 mm on needle tip for B-Mode images and 2.17 mm for color-Doppler images. These results show that color-Doppler imaging leads to more robust needle detection in noisy environment with poor needle visibility or when needle interacts with other objects.

  2. Sensitivity evaluation of DSA-based parametric imaging using Doppler ultrasound in neurovascular phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramoniam, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.; Ionita, C. N.

    2016-03-01

    An evaluation of the relation between parametric imaging results obtained from Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) images and blood-flow velocity measured using Doppler ultrasound in patient-specific neurovascular phantoms is provided. A silicone neurovascular phantom containing internal carotid artery, middle cerebral artery and anterior communicating artery was embedded in a tissue equivalent gel. The gel prevented movement of the vessels when blood mimicking fluid was pumped through it to obtain Colour Doppler images. The phantom was connected to a peristaltic pump, simulating physiological flow conditions. To obtain the parametric images, water was pumped through the phantom at various flow rates (100, 120 and 160 ml/min) and 10 ml contrast boluses were injected. DSA images were obtained at 10 frames/sec from the Toshiba C-arm and DSA image sequences were input into LabVIEW software to get parametric maps from time-density curves. The parametric maps were compared with velocities determined by Doppler ultrasound at the internal carotid artery. The velocities measured by the Doppler ultrasound were 38, 48 and 65 cm/s for flow rates of 100, 120 and 160 ml/min, respectively. For the 20% increase in flow rate, the percentage change of blood velocity measured by Doppler ultrasound was 26.3%. Correspondingly, there was a 20% decrease of Bolus Arrival Time (BAT) and 14.3% decrease of Mean Transit Time (MTT), showing strong inverse correlation with Doppler measured velocity. The parametric imaging parameters are quite sensitive to velocity changes and are well correlated to the velocities measured by Doppler ultrasound.

  3. A new fringeline-tracking approach for color Doppler ultrasound imaging phase unwrapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Ashraf A.; Shapiro, Linda G.

    2008-03-01

    Color Doppler ultrasound imaging is a powerful non-invasive diagnostic tool for many clinical applications that involve examining the anatomy and hemodynamics of human blood vessels. These clinical applications include cardio-vascular diseases, obstetrics, and abdominal diseases. Since its commercial introduction in the early eighties, color Doppler ultrasound imaging has been used mainly as a qualitative tool with very little attempts to quantify its images. Many imaging artifacts hinder the quantification of the color Doppler images, the most important of which is the aliasing artifact that distorts the blood flow velocities measured by the color Doppler technique. In this work we will address the color Doppler aliasing problem and present a recovery methodology for the true flow velocities from the aliased ones. The problem is formulated as a 2D phase-unwrapping problem, which is a well-defined problem with solid theoretical foundations for other imaging domains, including synthetic aperture radar and magnetic resonance imaging. This paper documents the need for a phase unwrapping algorithm for use in color Doppler ultrasound image analysis. It describes a new phase-unwrapping algorithm that relies on the recently developed cutline detection approaches. The algorithm is novel in its use of heuristic information provided by the ultrasound imaging modality to guide the phase unwrapping process. Experiments have been performed on both in-vitro flow-phantom data and in-vivo human blood flow data. Both data types were acquired under a controlled acquisition protocol developed to minimize the distortion of the color Doppler data and hence to simplify the phase-unwrapping task. In addition to the qualitative assessment of the results, a quantitative assessment approach was developed to measure the success of the results. The results of our new algorithm have been compared on ultrasound data to those from other well-known algorithms, and it outperforms all of them.

  4. Common carotid artery pseudoaneurysm after neck dissection: colour Doppler ultrasound and multidetector computed tomography findings.

    PubMed

    Flor, N; Sardanelli, F; Ghilardi, G; Tentori, A; Franceschelli, G; Felisati, G; Cornalba, G P

    2007-05-01

    Common carotid artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare disease, which has been previously unreported in association with neck dissection. We describe the Doppler ultrasound and multidetector computed tomography (CT) findings of a case of carotid pseudoaneurysm, one month after pharyngolaryngectomy with bilateral neck dissection. Multidetector CT confirmed the diagnosis made on the basis of Doppler ultrasound; the high image quality of axial and three-dimensional reconstructions avoided the need for pre-operative conventional angiography. In the presence of a pulsatile cervical mass after neck surgery, pseudoaneurysm of the carotid artery should be included in the differential diagnosis, and multidetector CT can be the sole pre-operative diagnostic imaging modality.

  5. The effect of foot position on Power Doppler Ultrasound grading of Achilles enthesitis.

    PubMed

    Zappia, Marcello; Cuomo, Giovanna; Martino, Maria Teresa; Reginelli, Alfonso; Brunese, Luca

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether foot position could modify power Doppler grading in evaluation of the Achilles enthesis. Eighteen patients with clinical Achilles enthesitis were studied with power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) in five different positions of the foot: active and passive dorsiflexion, neutral position, active and passive plantar flexion. The Doppler signal was graded in any position and compared with the others. The Doppler signal was higher with the foot in plantar flexion and decreased gradually, sometimes till to disappear, while increasing dorsiflexion. The Doppler signal was always less during the active keeping of the position of the joint, than during the passive. The PDUS examination of the Achilles enthesis should be performed also with the foot in passive plantar flexion, in order not to underestimate the degree of vascularization.

  6. Acute Effects of Lateral Thigh Foam Rolling on Arterial Tissue Perfusion Determined by Spectral Doppler and Power Doppler Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hotfiel, Thilo; Swoboda, Bernd; Krinner, Sebastian; Grim, Casper; Engelhardt, Martin; Uder, Michael; Heiss, Rafael U

    2017-04-01

    Hotfiel, T, Swoboda, B, Krinner, S, Grim, C, Engelhardt, M, Uder, M, and Heiss, R. Acute effects of lateral thigh foam rolling on arterial tissue perfusion determined by spectral Doppler and power Doppler ultrasound. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 893-900, 2017-Foam rolling has been developed as a popular intervention in training and rehabilitation. However, evidence on its effects on the cellular and physiological level is lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of foam rolling on arterial blood flow of the lateral thigh. Twenty-one healthy participants (age, 25 ± 2 years; height, 177 ± 9 cm; body weight, 74 ± 9 kg) were recruited from the medical and sports faculty. Arterial tissue perfusion was determined by spectral Doppler and power Doppler ultrasound, represented as peak flow (Vmax), time average velocity maximum (TAMx), time average velocity mean (TAMn), and resistive index (RI), and with semiquantitative grading that was assessed by 4 blindfolded investigators. Measurement values were assessed under resting conditions and twice after foam rolling exercises of the lateral thigh (0 and 30 minutes after intervention). The trochanteric region, mid portion, and distal tibial insertion of the lateral thigh were representative for data analysis. Arterial blood flow of the lateral thigh increased significantly after foam rolling exercises compared with baseline (p ≤ 0.05). We detected a relative increase in Vmax of 73.6% (0 minutes) and 52.7% (30 minutes) (p < 0.001), in TAMx of 53.2% (p < 0.001) and 38.3% (p = 0.002), and in TAMn of 84.4% (p < 0.001) and 68.2% (p < 0.001). Semiquantitative power Doppler scores at all portions revealed increased average grading of 1.96 after intervention and 2.04 after 30 minutes compared with 0.75 at baseline. Our results may contribute to the understanding of local physiological reactions to self-myofascial release.

  7. Time-resolved volumetric MRI blood flow: a Doppler ultrasound perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Pelt, Roy; Oliván Bescós, Javier; Nagel, Eike; Vilanova, Anna

    2014-03-01

    Hemodynamic information is increasingly inspected to assess cardiovascular disease. Abnormal blood-flow patterns include high-speed jet flow and regurgitant flow. Such pathological blood-flow patterns are nowadays mostly inspected by means of color Doppler ultrasound imaging. To date, Doppler ultrasound has been the prevailing modality for blood-flow analysis, providing non-invasive and cost-effective blood-flow imaging. Since recent years, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly employed to measure time-resolved blood-flow data. Albeit more expensive, MRI enables volumetric velocity encoding, providing true vector-valued data with less noise. Domain experts in the field of ultrasound and MRI have extensive experience in the interpretation of blood-flow information, although they employ different analysis techniques. We devise a visualization framework that extends on common Doppler ultrasound visualizations, exploiting the added value of MRI velocity data, and aiming for synergy between the domain experts. Our framework enables experts to explore the advantages and disadvantages of the current renditions of their imaging data. Furthermore, it facilitates the transition from conventional Doppler ultrasound images to present-day high-dimensional velocity fields. To this end, we present a virtual probe that enables direct exploration of MRI-acquired blood-flow velocity data using user-friendly interactions. Based on the probe, Doppler ultrasound inspired visualizations convey both in-plane and through-plane blood-flow velocities. In a compound view, these two-dimensional visualizations are linked to state-of-the-art three-dimensional blood-flow visualizations. Additionally, we introduce a novel volume rendering of the blood-flow velocity data that emphasizes anomalous blood-flow patterns. The visualization framework was evaluated by domain experts, and we present their feedback.

  8. Doppler Scanning of Sediment Cores: A Useful Method for Studying Sedimentary Structures and Defining the Cutting Angle for Half Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar, Dursun; Cagatay, Namik; Biltekin, Demet; Eris, Kadir; Albut, Gulum; Ogretmen, Nazik; Arslan, Tugce; Sari, Erol

    2014-05-01

    We tested the doppler ultrasound scanning of sediment cores in PVC liners using 8 megahertz ultrasonic waves for detection of angular laminations. The method was tested with artificially prepared cores as well as marine and lake sediment cores, and proven to be a useful and fast technique for imaging and determining the vertical angularity of sedimentary structures, such as laminations and beddings. Random cutting axes provide two angularities on X and Y dimensions. In this study, the main scientific problem is 'sequential angular disconformity'. Importance of detection of these anomalies on whole cores before dividing into half cores based on determining the right cutting axes. Successful imaging was obtained from top three centimeter depth of the sediments below the PVC liner, using a linear Doppler probe. Other Doppler probes (e.g., convex probe) did not work for core scanning because of their wave-form and reflection characteristics. Longitudinal and rotational scanning with gap filler and ultrasonic wave conductive gel material for keeping energy range of wave is necessary for detecting the variation in the dip of the bedding and laminae in the cores before separation. Another angular reasoned problem is about horizontal surface and can be easily solved with adjustable position of sensor or ray source placement. Border of sampling points between two different lithology must be stay with regard to neighbour sediment angles. Vertical angularity correction is not easy and its effect on signal propagation, detection biases and effectible to mixed samples contamination during physical sampling (particle size analyzing). Determining the attitude of angled bedding before core splitting is important for further core analyses such as elemental analysis and digital X-ray radiography. After Doppler scanning, the splitting direction (i.e., vertical to bedding and lamination) can be determined. The method is cheap, quick and non- hazardous to health, unlike the x

  9. Atypical Cerebral Lateralisation in Adults with Compensated Developmental Dyslexia Demonstrated Using Functional Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illingworth, Sarah; Bishop, Dorothy V. M.

    2009-01-01

    Functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound (fTCD) is a relatively new and non-invasive technique that assesses cerebral lateralisation through measurements of blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral arteries. In this study fTCD was used to compare functional asymmetry during a word generation task between a group of 30 dyslexic adults and a…

  10. Doppler ultrasound in the measurement of pulse wave velocity: agreement with the Complior method

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aortic stiffness is an independent predictor factor for cardiovascular risk. Different methods for determining pulse wave velocity (PWV) are used, among which the most common are mechanical methods such as SphygmoCor or Complior, which require specific devices and are limited by technical difficulty in obtaining measurements. Doppler guided by 2D ultrasound is a good alternative to these methods. We studied 40 patients (29 male, aged 21 to 82 years) comparing the Complior method with Doppler. Agreement of both devices was high (R = 0.91, 0.84-0.95, 95% CI). The reproducibility analysis revealed no intra-nor interobserver differences. Based on these results, we conclude that Doppler ultrasound is a reliable and reproducible alternative to other established methods for the measurement of aortic PWV. PMID:21496271

  11. Remote Electromagnetic Vibration of Steerable Needles for Imaging in Power Doppler Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Cabreros, Sarah S.; Jimenez, Nina M.; Greer, Joseph D.; Adebar, Troy K.; Okamura, Allison M.

    2015-01-01

    Robotic needle steering systems for minimally invasive medical procedures require complementary medical imaging systems to track the needles in real time. Ultrasound is a promising imaging modality because it offers relatively low-cost, real-time imaging of the needle. Previous methods applied vibration to the base of the needle using a voice coil actuator, in order to make the needle visible in power Doppler ultrasound. We propose a new method for needle tip vibration, using electromagnetic actuation of small permanent magnets placed inside the needle to improve needle tip visibility in power Doppler imaging. Robotic needle insertion experiments using artificial tissue and ex vivo porcine liver showed that the electromagnetic tip vibration method can generate a stronger Doppler response compared to the previous base vibration method, resulting in better imaging at greater needle depth in tissue. It also eliminates previous issues with vibration damping along the shaft of the needle. PMID:26413379

  12. Remote Electromagnetic Vibration of Steerable Needles for Imaging in Power Doppler Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Cabreros, Sarah S; Jimenez, Nina M; Greer, Joseph D; Adebar, Troy K; Okamura, Allison M

    2015-05-01

    Robotic needle steering systems for minimally invasive medical procedures require complementary medical imaging systems to track the needles in real time. Ultrasound is a promising imaging modality because it offers relatively low-cost, real-time imaging of the needle. Previous methods applied vibration to the base of the needle using a voice coil actuator, in order to make the needle visible in power Doppler ultrasound. We propose a new method for needle tip vibration, using electromagnetic actuation of small permanent magnets placed inside the needle to improve needle tip visibility in power Doppler imaging. Robotic needle insertion experiments using artificial tissue and ex vivo porcine liver showed that the electromagnetic tip vibration method can generate a stronger Doppler response compared to the previous base vibration method, resulting in better imaging at greater needle depth in tissue. It also eliminates previous issues with vibration damping along the shaft of the needle.

  13. Ultrasound scanning of the acute abdomen by surgeons in training.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, R. J.; Windsor, A. C.; Rosin, R. D.; Mann, D. V.; Crofton, M.

    1994-01-01

    Ultrasound is widely used in the investigation of abdominal symptoms. Its increasing popularity may lead to pressure on radiological services, diagnostic delay and prolonged hospital stay. Immediate imaging performed by radiologists can contribute useful information in acute emergencies. This study assessed the accuracy and value of abdominal ultrasonography when carried out by admitting surgeons. Three surgical registrars were first instructed for two half days by a consultant radiologist. Patients with acute symptoms were scanned at the time of initial presentation using an Aloka SSD-620 scanner with 3.5 and 5 MHz probes. A total of 205 scans was performed--124 of the upper and 81 of the lower abdomen. Immediate ultrasound provided information that contributed to the establishment or refutal of a diagnosis in 138 patients (67.3%), predominantly by confirming or excluding hepatobiliary disease, tubo-ovarian pathology or aortic aneurysms and in blunt abdominal trauma. The diagnosis was altered in a small proportion (7.8%). Scanning proved unhelpful in 62 patients and misleading in five. Findings concurred with those of a radiologist in 86% of the 139 patients subsequently scanned. Abdominal ultrasound is a useful tool in the hands of surgeons dealing with emergencies and may occasionally provide vital information. If access to radiological facilities is delayed, ultrasound by the admitting surgeon could lead to improved patient management and cost savings. PMID:8074382

  14. Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremity arteries: anatomy and scanning guidelines

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremity arteries is a valuable technique, although it is less frequently indicated for peripheral arterial disease than for deep vein thrombosis or varicose veins. Ultrasonography can diagnose stenosis through the direct visualization of plaques and through the analysis of the Doppler waveforms in stenotic and poststenotic arteries. To perform Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremity arteries, the operator should be familiar with the arterial anatomy of the lower extremities, basic scanning techniques, and the parameters used in color and pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography. PMID:28219004

  15. Doppler Frequency-Shift Compensated Photorefractive Interferometer for Ultrasound Detection on Objects in Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagne, B.; Blouin, A.; Néron, C.; Monchalin, J.-P.

    2003-03-01

    Two-wave mixing based interferometry has been demonstrated to be a powerful technique for non-contact, broadband and speckle insensitive measurements of the small surface displacements produced by ultrasonic waves propagating in an object. When the object is in rapid motion along the line-of-sight of the probing laser or when the laser beam is rapidly scanned on a wavy surface, the two-wave mixing photorefractive interferometer loses sensitivity to the point it could become useless. To circumvent the Doppler frequency-shift produced by this relative motion, we propose a dynamic compensation scheme. We report a particularly simple scheme to implement this concept by monitoring the low-frequency output signal of a balanced two-wave mixing demodulator whose output is proportional to the frequency difference between the pump and signal beams, and feeding this signal back to the acousto-optic shifter. With this new concept, the two-wave mixing interferometer can operate on objects in rapid motion while maintaining its sensitivity to low frequency ultrasound.

  16. Doppler ultrasound spectral enhancement using the Gabor transform-based spectral subtraction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Hong

    2005-10-01

    Most of the important clinical indices of blood flow are estimated from the spectrograms of Doppler ultrasound (US) signals. Any noise may degrade the readability of the spectrogram and the precision of the clinical indiCes, so the spectral enhancement plays an important role in Doppler US signal processing. A new Doppler US spectral enhancement method is proposed in this paper and implemented in three main steps: the Gabor transform is used to compute the Gabor coefficients of a Doppler US signal, the spectral subtraction is performed on the magnitude of the Gabor coefficients, and the Gabor expansion with the spectral subtracted Gabor coefficients is used to reconstruct the denoised Doppler US signal. The different analysis and synthesis windows are examined in the Gabor transform and expansion. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) improvement together with the overall enhancement of spectrograms are examined on the simulated Doppler US signals from a femoral artery. The results show the denoising method based on the orthogonal-like Gabor expansion achieves the best denoising performance. The experiments on some clinical Doppler US signals from umbilical arteries confirm the superior denoising performance of the new method.

  17. Use of power Doppler ultrasound-guided biopsies to locate regions of tumour hypoxia.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, S. M.; Laughlin, K. M.; Pugh, C. R.; Sehgal, C. M.; Saunders, H. M.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether power Doppler ultrasound techniques could be used to direct biopsies into tumour regions with relatively low red blood cell flux, and therefore preferentially sample regions that were relatively hypoxic. Subcutaneous 9L glioma rat tumours were biopsied using power Doppler ultrasound guidance. Immunohistochemical detection of the 2-nitroimidazole EF5 was performed to determine the presence and level of hypoxia in the biopsy samples. Comparisons between the power Doppler-determined red blood cell flux and EF5 binding were made. In seven out of eight tumours studied, power Doppler ultrasound allowed differentiation of a relatively hypoxic region from a relatively oxic region by localizing relatively low vs high red blood cell flux areas respectively. In one of these seven tumours, RBC flux was high in both biopsied sites and hypoxia was not present in either. In two of these seven tumours, hypoxia was present in each biopsy and both of the red blood cell flux measurements were low. In the eighth tumour, both the EF5 binding and the red blood cell flux measurements were low. In this tumour, low EF5 binding was due to the dominance of necrotic cells, which will not reduce or bind EF5 in the biopsy specimen. Using EF5-binding techniques, we have confirmed that regions of relatively low red blood cell flux are more hypoxic than those with relatively high red blood cell flux. Counterstaining specimens with haematoxylin and eosin allows differentiation of low EF5-binding regions due to oxia vs necrosis. These methods have clinical implications for the expanded use of power Doppler ultrasound as a means to direct tissue sampling when it is important to identify the presence of hypoxia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9374376

  18. Cerebral blood flow in the newborn infant: comparison of Doppler ultrasound and /sup 133/xenon clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Greisen, G.; Johansen, K.; Ellison, P.H.; Fredriksen, P.S.; Mali, J.; Friis-Hansen, B.

    1984-03-01

    Two techniques of Doppler ultrasound examination, continuous-wave and range-gated, applied to the anterior cerebral artery and to the internal carotid artery, were compared with /sup 133/xenon clearance after intravenous injection. Thirty-two sets of measurements were obtained in 16 newborn infants. The pulsatility index, the mean flow velocity, and the end-diastolic flow velocity were read from the Doppler recordings. Mean cerebral blood flow was estimated from the /sup 133/Xe clearance curves. The correlation coefficients between the Doppler and the /sup 133/Xe measurements ranged from 0.41 to 0.82. In the subset of 16 first measurements in each infant, there were no statistically significant differences between the correlation coefficients of the various Doppler ultrasound variables, but the correlation coefficients were consistently lower for the pulsatility index than for mean flow velocity or end-diastolic flow velocity, and they were consistently higher for the range-gated than for the continuous-wave Doppler technique.

  19. The role of Doppler ultrasound in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Porta, Francesco; Radunovic, Goran; Vlad, Violeta; Micu, Mihaela C; Nestorova, Rodina; Petranova, Tzvetanka; Iagnocco, Annamaria

    2012-06-01

    The use of Doppler techniques, including power, colour and spectral Doppler, has greatly increased in rheumatology in recent years. This is due to the ability of Doppler US (DUS) to detect pathological vascularization within joints and periarticular soft tissues, thereby demonstrating the presence of active inflammation, which has been reported to be correlated with the local neo-angiogenesis. In synovitis, DUS showed a high correlation with histological and MRI findings, thus it is considered a valid tool to detect pathological synovial vascularization. Moreover, it is more sensitive than clinical examination in detecting active joint inflammation and in the evaluation of response to treatment. In addition, DUS may be considered as a reference imaging modality in the assessment of enthesitis, MRI being not sensitive and histology not feasible. Moreover, it has been demonstrated to be able to detect changes in asymptomatic enthesis. In conclusion, DUS is a useful and sensitive tool in the evaluation and monitoring of active inflammation. Its widespread use in clinical rheumatological practice is recommended. The aim of this article is to review the current literature about the role of DUS in rheumatic diseases, analysing its validity, reliability and feasibility.

  20. Ventricular septal defect after myocardial infarction: assessment by cross sectional echocardiography with pulsed wave Doppler scanning.

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, D; Fananapazir, L; de Bono, D; Bloomfield, P

    1987-01-01

    Eight patients who developed a ventricular septal defect after myocardial infarction were assessed by cross sectional echocardiography and pulsed wave Doppler scanning. Cross sectional echocardiography visualised the defect in four patients and gave an accurate assessment of global and regional left ventricular function in all eight. In all patients pulsed wave Doppler scanning detected turbulent flow at the apex of the right ventricle or adjacent to a wall motion abnormality affecting the interventricular septum. Pulsed wave Doppler detected coexisting mitral regurgitation in one patient and tricuspid regurgitation in another two. In all patients a left to right shunt was confirmed by oximetry and the location of the defect was identified by angiography or at operation or necropsy. Cross sectional echocardiography in combination with pulsed wave Doppler scanning is useful in the rapid bedside evaluation of patients with ventricular septal defect after myocardial infarction. Images Fig PMID:3663420

  1. Prediction of trabecular bone qualitative properties using scanning quantitative ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yi-Xian; Lin, Wei; Mittra, Erik; Xia, Yi; Cheng, Jiqi; Judex, Stefan; Rubin, Clint; Müller, Ralph

    2013-11-01

    Microgravity induced bone loss represents a critical health problem in astronauts, particularly occurred in weight-supporting skeleton, which leads to osteopenia and increase of fracture risk. Lack of suitable evaluation modality makes it difficult for monitoring skeletal status in long term space mission and increases potential risk of complication. Such disuse osteopenia and osteoporosis compromise trabecular bone density, and architectural and mechanical properties. While X-ray based imaging would not be practical in space, quantitative ultrasound may provide advantages to characterize bone density and strength through wave propagation in complex trabecular structure. This study used a scanning confocal acoustic diagnostic and navigation system (SCAN) to evaluate trabecular bone quality in 60 cubic trabecular samples harvested from adult sheep. Ultrasound image based SCAN measurements in structural and strength properties were validated by μCT and compressive mechanical testing. This result indicated a moderately strong negative correlations observed between broadband ultrasonic attenuation (BUA) and μCT-determined bone volume fraction (BV/TV, R2=0.53). Strong correlations were observed between ultrasound velocity (UV) and bone's mechanical strength and structural parameters, i.e., bulk Young's modulus (R2=0.67) and BV/TV (R2=0.85). The predictions for bone density and mechanical strength were significantly improved by using a linear combination of both BUA and UV, yielding R2=0.92 for BV/TV and R2=0.71 for bulk Young's modulus. These results imply that quantitative ultrasound can characterize trabecular structural and mechanical properties through measurements of particular ultrasound parameters, and potentially provide an excellent estimation for bone's structural integrity.

  2. Prediction of trabecular bone qualitative properties using scanning quantitative ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yi-Xian; Lin, Wei; Mittra, Erik; Xia, Yi; Cheng, Jiqi; Judex, Stefan; Rubin, Clint; Müller, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Microgravity induced bone loss represents a critical health problem in astronauts, particularly occurred in weight-supporting skeleton, which leads to osteopenia and increase of fracture risk. Lack of suitable evaluation modality makes it difficult for monitoring skeletal status in long term space mission and increases potential risk of complication. Such disuse osteopenia and osteoporosis compromise trabecular bone density, and architectural and mechanical properties. While X-ray based imaging would not be practical in space, quantitative ultrasound may provide advantages to characterize bone density and strength through wave propagation in complex trabecular structure. This study used a scanning confocal acoustic diagnostic and navigation system (SCAN) to evaluate trabecular bone quality in 60 cubic trabecular samples harvested from adult sheep. Ultrasound image based SCAN measurements in structural and strength properties were validated by μCT and compressive mechanical testing. This result indicated a moderately strong negative correlations observed between broadband ultrasonic attenuation (BUA) and μCT-determined bone volume fraction (BV/TV, R2=0.53). Strong correlations were observed between ultrasound velocity (UV) and bone’s mechanical strength and structural parameters, i.e., bulk Young’s modulus (R2=0.67) and BV/TV (R2=0.85). The predictions for bone density and mechanical strength were significantly improved by using a linear combination of both BUA and UV, yielding R2=0.92 for BV/TV and R2=0.71 for bulk Young’s modulus. These results imply that quantitative ultrasound can characterize trabecular structural and mechanical properties through measurements of particular ultrasound parameters, and potentially provide an excellent estimation for bone’s structural integrity. PMID:23976803

  3. Prediction of trabecular bone qualitative properties using scanning quantitative ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yi-Xian; Lin, Wei; Mittra, Erik; Xia, Yi; Cheng, Jiqi; Judex, Stefan; Rubin, Clint; Müller, Ralph

    2013-11-01

    Microgravity induced bone loss represents a critical health problem in astronauts, particularly occurred in weight-supporting skeleton, which leads to osteopenia and increase of fracture risk. Lack of suitable evaluation modality makes it difficult for monitoring skeletal status in long term space mission and increases potential risk of complication. Such disuse osteopenia and osteoporosis compromise trabecular bone density, and architectural and mechanical properties. While X-ray based imaging would not be practical in space, quantitative ultrasound may provide advantages to characterize bone density and strength through wave propagation in complex trabecular structure. This study used a scanning confocal acoustic diagnostic and navigation system (SCAN) to evaluate trabecular bone quality in 60 cubic trabecular samples harvested from adult sheep. Ultrasound image based SCAN measurements in structural and strength properties were validated by μCT and compressive mechanical testing. This result indicated a moderately strong negative correlations observed between broadband ultrasonic attenuation (BUA) and μCT-determined bone volume fraction (BV/TV, R(2)=0.53). Strong correlations were observed between ultrasound velocity (UV) and bone's mechanical strength and structural parameters, i.e., bulk Young's modulus (R(2)=0.67) and BV/TV (R(2)=0.85). The predictions for bone density and mechanical strength were significantly improved by using a linear combination of both BUA and UV, yielding R(2)=0.92 for BV/TV and R(2)=0.71 for bulk Young's modulus. These results imply that quantitative ultrasound can characterize trabecular structural and mechanical properties through measurements of particular ultrasound parameters, and potentially provide an excellent estimation for bone's structural integrity.

  4. High frequency ultrasound with color Doppler in dermatology*

    PubMed Central

    Barcaui, Elisa de Oliveira; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Lopes, Flavia Paiva Proença Lobo; Piñeiro-Maceira, Juan; Barcaui, Carlos Baptista

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a method of imaging that classically is used in dermatology to study changes in the hypoderma, as nodules and infectious and inflammatory processes. The introduction of high frequency and resolution equipments enabled the observation of superficial structures, allowing differentiation between skin layers and providing details for the analysis of the skin and its appendages. This paper aims to review the basic principles of high frequency ultrasound and its applications in different areas of dermatology. PMID:27438191

  5. Duplex Doppler ultrasound study of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Stagnitti, A; Marini, A; Impara, L; Drudi, F M; Lo Mele, L; Lillo Odoardi, G

    2012-06-01

    Sommario INTRODUZIONE: La fisiologia articolare dell’articolazione temporo-mandibolare (ATM) può essere esaminata sia dal punto di vista clinico che strumentale. La diagnostica per immagini ha da tempo contribuito con la risonanza magnetica (RM) e anche con la radiografia (Rx) e la tomografia computerizzata (TC) all’analisi della morfologia dei capi articolari e della cinetica condilare. L’esame duplex-ecodoppler è una metodica di largo impiego nello studio delle strutture in movimento in particolar modo a livello delle strutture del sistema vascolare. MATERIALI E METODI: È stata utilizzata un’apparecchiatura Toshiba APLIO SSA-770A, con l’uso di tecnica duplex-ecodoppler multi display, che consente la visualizzazione contemporanea dell’immagine ecografica e dei segnali Doppler utilizzando una sonda lineare del tipo phased array con cristalli trasduttori funzionanti ad una frequenza fondamentale di 6 MHz per gli spettri Doppler pulsati e 7.5 MHz per l’imaging ecografico. Sono stati esaminati nel Dipartimento di Scienze Radiologiche, Oncologiche e Anatomo-patologiche dell’Università “Sapienza” di Roma, 30 pazienti del reparto di Ortognatodonzia dell’Istituto di Odontoiatria della stessa Università. RISULTATI: Nei pazienti normali si è ottenuta un’alternanza regolare degli spettri Doppler, mentre nei soggetti con disfunzioni del complesso condilo-meniscale, si è persa la regolarità della sommatoria degli spettri di Fourier, con altezze incostanti in relazione a spostamenti irregolari del complesso condilo-meniscale. CONCLUSIONI: L’esame ecodoppler si è dimostrato, in tutti i pazienti, capace di discriminare quelli normali dai patologici e tra questi ultimi ha permesso di identificare gli aspetti più significativi delle patologie disfunzionali.

  6. Doppler ultrasound study of penis in men with systemic sclerosis: a correlation with Doppler indices of renal and digital arteries.

    PubMed

    Rosato, E; Barbano, B; Gigante, A; Cianci, R; Molinaro, I; Quarta, S; Digiulio, M A; Messineo, D; Pisarri, S; Salsano, F

    2013-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) prevalence in male systemic sclerosis (SSc) is high and its pathogenesis is unclear. The aim of the study is to assess correlation between Doppler ultrasound indices of penis and kidneys or digital arteries in male systemic sclerosis. Fourteen men with systemic sclerosis were enrolled in this study. Erectile function was investigated by the International Index of Erectile Function-5. Peak systolic velocity, end diastolic velocity, resistive index, pulsative index, and systolic/diastolic ratio were measured on the cavernous arteries at the peno-scrotal junction in the flaccid state, on the interlobar artery of both kidneys and all ten proper palmar digital arteries. Ten (71 percent) patients have an International Index of Erectile Function-5 less than 21. Reduction of penis peak systolic velocity was observed in all SSc subjects. Doppler indices of cavernous arteries correlate with the International Index of Erectile Function-5. The renal and digital arteries resistive index demonstrated a good correlation (p less than 0.0001) with International Index of Erectile Function-5. A positive correlation exists between penis and kidney arteries Doppler indices: end diastolic velocity (p less than 0.05, r=0.54), resistive index (p less than 0.0001, r=0.90), systolic/diastolic ratio (p less than 0.01, r=0.69). A positive correlation was observed between penis and digital arteries Doppler indices: peak systolic velocity (p less than 0.01, r=0.68), end diastolic velocity (p less than 0.01, r=0.75), resistive index (p less than 0.001, r=0.79), systolic/diastolic ratio (p less than 0.05, r=0.59). A correlation exists between arterial impairment of penis and renal or digital arteries.

  7. Doppler ultrasound wall removal based on the spatial correlation of wavelet coefficients.

    PubMed

    Jin, Dawei; Wang, Yuanyuan

    2007-11-01

    In medical Doppler ultrasound systems, a high-pass filter is commonly used to reject echoes from the vessel wall. However, this leads to the loss of the information from the low velocity blood flow. Here a spatially selective noise filtration algorithm cooperating with a threshold denoising based on wavelets coefficients is applied to estimate the wall clutter. Then the blood flow signal is extracted by subtracting the wall clutter from the mixed signal. Experiments on computer simulated signals with various clutter-to-blood power ratios indicate that this method achieves a lower mean relative error of spectrum than the high-pass filtering and other two previously published separation methods based on the recursive principle component analysis and the irregular sampling and iterative reconstruction, respectively. The method also performs well when applied to in vivo carotid signals. All results suggest that this approach can be implemented as a clutter rejection filter in Doppler ultrasound instruments.

  8. [Digital scanning converter for medical endoscopic ultrasound imaging].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zhang, Hongxu; Zhou, Peifan; Wen, Shijie; Yu, Daoyin

    2009-02-01

    This paper mainly introduces the design of digital scanning converter (DSC) for medical endoscopic ultrasound imaging. Fast modified vector totational CORDIC (FMVR-CORDIC) arithmetic complete coordinate conversion is used to increase the speed of ultrasonic scanning imaging. FPGA is used as the kernel module to control data transferring, related circuits and relevant chips' working, and to accomplish data preprocessing. With the advantages of simple structure, nice flexibility and convenience, it satisfies the demand for real-time displaying in this system. Finally, the original polar coordinate image is transformed to rectangular coordinate grey image through coordinate transformation. The system performances have been validated by the experimental result.

  9. A real-time device for converting Doppler ultrasound audio signals into fluid flow velocity.

    PubMed

    Herr, Michael D; Hogeman, Cynthia S; Koch, Dennis W; Krishnan, Anandi; Momen, Afsana; Leuenberger, Urs A

    2010-05-01

    A Doppler signal converter has been developed to facilitate cardiovascular and exercise physiology research. This device directly converts audio signals from a clinical Doppler ultrasound imaging system into a real-time analog signal that accurately represents blood flow velocity and is easily recorded by any standard data acquisition system. This real-time flow velocity signal, when simultaneously recorded with other physiological signals of interest, permits the observation of transient flow response to experimental interventions in a manner not possible when using standard Doppler imaging devices. This converted flow velocity signal also permits a more robust and less subjective analysis of data in a fraction of the time required by previous analytic methods. This signal converter provides this capability inexpensively and requires no modification of either the imaging or data acquisition system.

  10. Embedded System for Real-Time Digital Processing of Medical Ultrasound Doppler Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, S.; Dallai, A.; Boni, E.; Bassi, L.; Guidi, F.; Cellai, A.; Tortoli, P.

    2008-12-01

    Ultrasound (US) Doppler systems are routinely used for the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. Depending on the application, either single tone bursts or more complex waveforms are periodically transmitted throughout a piezoelectric transducer towards the region of interest. Extraction of Doppler information from echoes backscattered from moving blood cells typically involves coherent demodulation and matched filtering of the received signal, followed by a suitable processing module. In this paper, we present an embedded Doppler US system which has been designed as open research platform, programmable according to a variety of strategies in both transmission and reception. By suitably sharing the processing tasks between a state-of-the-art FGPA and a DSP, the system can be used in several medical US applications. As reference examples, the detection of microemboli in cerebral circulation and the measurement of wall _distension_ in carotid arteries are finally presented.

  11. Use of an ultrasound blood-mimicking fluid for Doppler investigations of turbulence in vitro.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Meghan L; Poepping, Tamie L; Rankin, Richard N; Steinman, David A; Holdsworth, David W

    2008-07-01

    Turbulence is an important factor in the assessment of stenotic disease and a possible causative mechanism for thromboembolism. Previous Doppler studies of turbulence have typically used whole-blood preparations or suspensions of erythrocytes. Recently, a water-glycerol based blood-mimicking fluid (BMF) has been developed for use in Doppler ultrasound studies. This fluid has desirable ultrasound properties but it has not previously been described during in vitro investigations of turbulence intensity. We report on investigations of grid-generated and constrained-jet turbulence in an in vitro test system. The BMF was found to generate significant levels of turbulence during steady flow at physiological flow rates, producing turbulent patterns in the distal region that were consistent with previous studies. Turbulence intensity increased significantly with flow rate (p < 0.005) for both the constrained jet and the constrained grid. Based on our observations, we conclude that a water-glycerol based BMF provides a suitable working fluid during in vitro investigations of turbulence using Doppler ultrasound.

  12. Preoperative color Doppler ultrasound assessment of the lateral thoracic artery perforator flap and its branching pattern.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Kensuke; Harima, Mitsunobu; Mito, Daisuke; Shibata, Takashi; Furuya, Megumi; Kato, Motoi; Yamamoto, Takumi; Yamashita, Shuji; Narushima, Mitsunaga; Iida, Takuya; Koshima, Isao

    2015-06-01

    The anatomy of the lateral thoracic artery perforator flap remains controversial, but this region is extremely useful as a reconstructive donor site. In this report, we describe the usefulness of the preoperative color Doppler ultrasound evaluation for the harvesting of the lateral thoracic artery perforator flap, and we clarify its branching pattern. Twenty-seven patients underwent the preoperative color Doppler ultrasound assessment before perforator flaps were harvested. We evaluated the branching pattern and the diameter of the flaps by direct observation. All flaps were successfully transferred, and it was found that the branching pattern of the lateral thoracic perforator is divided into three groups: the superficial branch, the medial branch, and the deep branch. Their appearance ratios were 48.1% (13/27), 14.8% (4/27), and 81.5% (22/27), respectively. The lateral thoracic artery perforator flap has a great deal of anatomical variation, and vessels with relatively small diameters compared to those of other flaps. This is why flaps from this region are not currently popular. This study revealed the superiority of the color Doppler ultrasound for preoperative planning of the lateral thoracic artery perforator flap elevation. Furthermore, the branching pattern and the diameters of the different branches were specified.

  13. Quantitative investigation of in vitro flow using three-dimensional colour Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Guo, Z; Moreau, M; Rickey, D W; Picot, P A; Fenster, A

    1995-01-01

    A quantitative in vitro flow study was performed by using a three-dimensional colour Doppler imaging system. This system was based on a clinical ultrasound instrument with its transducer mounted on a motor-driven translation stage. A vascular and tissue-mimicking phantom containing two wall-less vessels, one normal and another stenotic, was used to quantify the measurement accuracy of the flow velocity and the flow field. Steady state flows, having Reynolds numbers ranging between 460 and 1300, were generated by a computer-controlled positive displacement pump. Effects of the parameter settings of the ultrasound instrument on results of the estimation of flow field were also studied. Experimental results show that our three-dimensional colour Doppler system's velocity accuracy was better than 7% of the Nyquist velocity and its spatial accuracy was better than 0.5 mm. The system showed a good correlation (r = 0.999) between the estimated and the true mean flow velocity, and a good correlation (r = 0.998) between the estimated maximum and the true mean flow velocity. This study is our first step toward validating the measurement of the three-dimensional velocity and wall shear stress distributions by using three-dimensional colour Doppler ultrasound

  14. Activity of Crohn's disease assessed by colour Doppler ultrasound analysis of the affected loops.

    PubMed

    Esteban, J M; Maldonado, L; Sanchiz, V; Minguez, M; Benages, A

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate with colour Doppler ultrasound the vascular changes in the wall of the loops affected by Crohn's disease, and to establish whether these changes reflects clinical or biochemical activity of Crohn's disease. Seventy-nine patients with Crohn's disease (44 with active disease and 35 inactive patients) were studied with frequency- and amplitude-encoded duplex Doppler sonography. A group of 35 healthy volunteers were also included. The exam consisted of the search for colour signals in the walls of the loops affected by Crohn's disease, classifying the degree of vascularity with a simple scoring system into three groups: absence of colour signal (score of 0); weak or scattered colour signals (score of 1); and multiple colour signals or clear identification of vessels in the loops walls (score of 2). Doppler curves were obtained of the detected vessels with measurement of the resistive index (RI). There was a visible increase in the gut walls' vascularity in the active patients compared with those with inactive disease. The mean RI was statistically significantly lower in the gut wall vessels of the patients with active illness than that obtained in the inactive patients. Colour Doppler ultrasound is a useful tool in the assessment of activity in Crohn's disease.

  15. Interactive realtime Doppler-ultrasound visualization of the heart.

    PubMed

    Heid, V; Evers, H; Henn, C; Glombitza, G; Meinzer, H P

    2000-01-01

    Heart valve insufficiencies can optimally be assessed using transesophageal, triggered, three-dimensional ultrasound imaging. The dynamic ultrasound data contain morphological as well as functional components which are recorded and displayed simultaneously. It allows the visualization of intracardiac motion which is an important parameter to detect abnormal flow caused by defect valves. A realtime reconstruction is desired to get a spatial impression on the one hand and to interactively clip parts of the volume on the other hand. Therefore, we use the OpenGL Volumizer API. Scalability of the visualization was tested with respect to different workstations and graphics resources using a Multipipe Utility library. The combination of both APIs enables a visualization of volumetric and functional data with frame rates up to 10 frames per second. By using the proposed method, it is possible to visualize the jet in the original color-coding which is employed during a conventional two-dimensional examination for displaying the velocity values. The morphological and the functional data are handled as two independent data channels. A good scalability from low cost up to high end graphic workstations is given by the use of the MPU. The quality of the resulting 3D images allows exact differentiation of heart valve insufficiencies to support the diagnostic procedure.

  16. Doppler ultrasound venous mapping of the lower limbs

    PubMed Central

    Galeandro, Aldo Innocente; Quistelli, Giovanni; Scicchitano, Pietro; Gesualdo, Michele; Zito, Annapaola; Caputo, Paola; Carbonara, Rosa; Galgano, Giuseppe; Ciciarello, Francesco; Mandolesi, Sandro; Franceschi, Claude; Ciccone, Marco Matteo

    2012-01-01

    Background The study aim was to test the accuracy (intra and interobserver variability), sensitivity, and specificity of a simplified noninvasive ultrasound methodology for mapping superficial and deep veins of the lower limbs. Methods 62 consecutive patients, aged 62 ± 11 years, were enrolled. All underwent US-examinations, performed by two different investigators, of both legs, four anatomical parts, and 17 veins, to assess the interobserver variability of evaluation of superficial and deep veins of the lower limbs. Results Overall the agreement between the second versus the first operator was very high in detecting reflux (sensitivity 97.9, specificity 99.7, accuracy 99.5; P = 0.80 at McNemar test). The higher CEAP classification stages were significantly associated with reflux (odds ratio: 1.778, 95% confidence interval: 1.552–2.038; P < 0.001) as well as with thrombosis (odds ratio: 2.765, 95% confidence interval: 1.741–4.389; P < 0.001). Thus, our findings show a strict association between the symptoms of venous disorders and ultrasound evaluation results for thrombosis or reflux. Conclusion This study demonstrated that our venous mapping protocol is a reliable method showing a very low interobserver variability, which makes it accurate and reproducible for the assessment of the morphofunctional status of the lower limb veins. PMID:22371652

  17. Two-dimensional blood flow vectors obtained with bidirectional Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Masuno, Genta; Nagaoka, Ryo; Omori, Aiko; Ishikawa, Yasuo; Akagawa, Osamu; Arakawa, Mototaka; Saijo, Yoshifumi

    2014-01-01

    Precise measurement of blood flow is important because blood flow closely correlates formation of thrombus and atherosclerotic plaque. Among clinically applied modalities for blood flow measurement, color Doppler ultrasound shows two-dimensional (2D) distribution of one-dimensional blood flow component along the ultrasound beam. In the present study, 2D blood flow vector is obtained with high temporal and bidirectional Doppler ultrasound technique. Linear array probe with the central frequency of 7.5 MHz and an ultrasound data acquisition system with 128 transmit and 128 receive channels were equipped. Frame rate of 5 kHz was achieved by parallel receive beam forming with a wide transmitted wave. The flow velocity was measured from two different angles by beam steering. The interval of two measurements was 0.8 msec and it was considered as almost one moment to obtain 2D blood flow vector. B-mode image and 2D blood flow vector of the pulsatile flow in a carotid artery model showed small vortex at the bifurcation area. The method was also applied for visualization of in vivo blood flow vector in human carotid arteries. 2D blood flow measurement may predict the risk area of thrombus and plaque formation induced by abnormal blood flow.

  18. Experimental characterization of a vector Doppler system based on a clinical ultrasound scanner.

    PubMed

    Eranki, Avinash; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a vector Doppler system using a clinical ultrasound scanner with a research interface. In this system, vector Doppler estimation is performed by electronically dividing a linear array transducer into a transmit sub-aperture and two receive sub-apertures. The receive beams are electronically steered, and two velocity components are estimated from echoes received from the beam overlap region. The velocity vector is reconstructed from these two estimates. The goal of this study was to characterize this vector Doppler system in vitro using a string phantom with a pulsatile velocity waveform. We studied the effect of four parameters on the estimation error: beam steering angle, angle of the velocity vector, depth of the scatterer relative to the beam overlap region and the transmit focus depth. Our results show that changing these parameters have minimal effect on the velocity and angle estimates, and robust velocity vector estimates can be obtained under a variety of conditions. The mean velocity error was less than 0.06 x pulse repetition frequency. The velocity estimates are sensitive to the Doppler estimation method. Our results indicate that vector Doppler using a linear array transducer is feasible for a wide range of imaging parameters. Such a system would facilitate the investigation of complex blood flow and tissue motion in human subjects.

  19. Color Doppler Ultrasound in Diagnosis and Assessment of Carotid Body Tumors: Comparison with Computed Tomography Angiography.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhan-Qiang; He, Wen; Wu, Dong-Fang; Lin, Mei-Ying; Jiang, Hua-Tang

    2016-09-01

    A carotid body tumor (CBT) is a rare, non-chromaffin paraganglioma, and its diagnosis mainly depends on imaging modalities. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of color Doppler ultrasound (CDU) in the diagnosis and assessment of CBT based on computed tomography (CT). We retrospectively reviewed the CDU and CT features of 49 consecutive CBTs and 23 schwannomas from 67 patients and compared these findings with surgical resection specimens. The mean size of CBT lesions on ultrasound scans and CT angiography (CTA) was 3.24 cm ± 0.82 cm (range, 1.6-5.2 cm) and 3.84 cm ± 1.08 cm (range, 1.8-6.8 cm), respectively, which had statistically significant difference (t = 9.815, p = 0.000). The vascularity of CBT lesions was richer than that of schwannoma lesions (p < 0.05). Intra-lesional vascularities feeding CBT mostly arose from the external carotid artery and had spectrum characteristics including low velocity and resistance. Peak systolic velocity (PSV) and resistance index (RI) of the vasa vasorum were 39.8 cm/s ± 19.8 cm/s and 0.54 ± 0.06, respectively. There was the correlation between CTA and CDU in identifying Shamblin type I CBT lesions, while CTA technique was superior for CDU, identifying Shamblin type II and III CBT lesions. Accuracy, specificity and sensitivity of CDU in diagnosing CBTs were 87.5% (63 of 72), 82.6% (19 of 23) and 89.8% (44 of 49), respectively. Both accuracy and sensitivity of CTA in diagnosing CBTs were 100%. CDU can be useful for assessment of Shamblin's type and intra-lesional blood flow of CBTs before its metastases, while CT imaging can reveal the relationship between lesions and adjacent arteries, as well as the involvement of the skull base. CDU combined with CT imaging can be used as an optimal detection modality for the assessment and management of CBT.

  20. Transcranial power M-mode Doppler ultrasound for diagnosis of patent foramen ovale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehring, Mark; Spencer, Merrill

    2005-04-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a right-to-left shunt (RLS) which communicates blood from the right to left atrium of the heart. PFO has been associated with stroke and, more recently, with migraine headache. Diagnosis of RLS can be accomplished effectively with transcranial power M-mode Doppler ultrasound (PMD). PMD is a modality which can be performed without the sedation required by the more invasive diagnostic technique using transesophageal echocardiography. PMD for this application consists of 2 MHz pulse Doppler ultrasound with placement of sample gates at 2 mm intervals along the single-transducer beam axis, and 8 kHz pulse repetition rate (PMD100M, Spencer Technologies). Doppler power versus depth is constructed every 4ms, using 33 sample gates. Bubble microemboli injected in the venous system and moving across a PFO present as high intensity tracks on a PMD image, as emboli transit from the heart to the brain and through the observed cerebral vasculature. Use of PMD in this context has been reported in the clinical literature [M. P. Spencer, M. A. Moehring, J. Jesurum et al, J. Neuroimaging 14, 342-349 (2004)]. This talk surveys the basic technical features of PMD for sensing PFO-related showers of bubble microemboli, and how these features provide clues to the severity of PFO.

  1. The removal of wall components in Doppler ultrasound signals by using the empirical mode decomposition algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yufeng; Gao, Yali; Wang, Le; Chen, Jianhua; Shi, Xinling

    2007-09-01

    Doppler ultrasound systems, used for the noninvasive detection of the vascular diseases, normally employ a high-pass filter (HPF) to remove the large, low-frequency components from the vessel wall from the blood flow signal. Unfortunately, the filter also removes the low-frequency Doppler signals arising from slow-moving blood. In this paper, we propose to use a novel technique, called the empirical mode decomposition (EMD), to remove the wall components from the mixed signals. The EMD is firstly to decompose a signal into a finite and usually small number of individual components named intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). Then a strategy based on the ratios between two adjacent values of the wall-to-blood signal ratio (WBSR) has been developed to automatically identify and remove the relevant IMFs that contribute to the wall components. This method is applied to process the simulated and clinical Doppler ultrasound signals. Compared with the results based on the traditional high-pass filter, the new approach obtains improved performance for wall components removal from the mixed signals effectively and objectively, and provides us with more accurate low blood flow.

  2. Sonographic imaging of extra-testicular focal lesions: comparison of grey-scale, colour Doppler and contrast-enhanced ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Rafailidis, Vasileios; Robbie, Hasti; Konstantatou, Eleni; Huang, Dean Y; Deganello, Annamaria; Sellars, Maria E; Cantisani, Vito; Isidori, Andrea M

    2016-01-01

    Extra-testicular lesions are usually benign but present with nonspecific grey-scale sonography findings. This study assesses conventional sonographic characteristics in the differentiation of extra-testicular tumoural from inflammatory lesions and whether contrast-enhanced ultrasound has a role. A retrospective database analysis was performed. All patients were examined by experienced sonographers employing standard techniques combining grey-scale, colour Doppler sonography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound. Features recorded were: clinical symptoms, size, location, echogenicity, colour Doppler sonography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound enhancement. Vascularity on colour Doppler sonography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound was graded and compared. The lesions were classified as tumoural or inflammatory. The Chi-square test was used to analyse the sonographic patterns and kappa coefficient to measure the agreement between colour Doppler sonography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound. A total of 30 lesions were reviewed (median diameter 12 mm, range 5–80 mm, median age 52 years, range 18–86 years), including 13/30 tumoural and 17/30 inflammatory lesions. Lesions were hypoechoic (n = 12), isoechoic (n = 6), hyperechoic (n = 2) or mixed (n = 10). Grey-scale characteristics of tumoural vs. inflammatory lesions differed significantly (P = 0.026). On colour Doppler sonography, lesions had no vessels (n = 16), 2–3 vessels (n = 10) and ≥4 vessels (n = 4). On contrast-enhanced ultrasound, lesions showed no vascularity (n = 17), perfusion similar to testis (n = 7) and higher (n = 6). All abscesses identified (n = 9) showed no vascularity on both colour Doppler sonography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound. There was good agreement between these techniques in evaluating vascularity (κ = 0.719) and no significant difference between colour Doppler sonography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound of tumoural vs. inflammatory

  3. Scanning laser Doppler Technique for velocity profile sensing on a moving surface.

    PubMed

    Sriram, P; Hanagud, S; Craig, J; Komerath, N M

    1990-06-01

    A scanning laser Doppler technique based on Chebyshev demodulation has been developed for the rapid measurement of spatially distributed velocity profiles. Scan frequencies up to 100 Hz can be used over scan lengths up to 270 mm. The Doppler signals are processed in the conventional manner using a frequency counter. The analog velocity output from the counter is post-processed to obtain the velocity profile. The Chebyshev demodulation post-processing technique for processing the velocity signals from solid surfaces has been introduced. The data processing technique directly yields the spatial velocity distribution in approximate functional form through frequency domain analysis of the scanning LDV velocity output. Results from a rotating disk setup are presented to illustrate the concept.

  4. Image analysis of placental issues using three-dimensional ultrasound and color power doppler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Cheng, Qiong; Liu, J. G.

    2007-12-01

    With the development of birthing-process medical science, and insurance requirement of prepotency, the ultrasound technique is widely used in the application of obstetrics realm, especially on the monitoring of embryo's growth. In the recent decade, the introduction of high resolution three-dimensional ultrasonic and color power Doppler scanner provides a much more direct, sensitive, forerunner method for the monitoring of embryo and gravida's prediction. A novel method that depends on examining images of vasculature of placenta to determine the growth of embryo is introduced in this paper. First, get a set of placenta vascularity images of the pregnant woman, taken by Color Doppler Ultrasonic Scanner, then mark some points in these images, where we get a section image, thus we can observe the internal blood vessel distribution at those points. This method provides an efficient tool for doctors.

  5. Wrist ultrasound examination – scanning technique and ultrasound anatomy. Part 1: Dorsal wrist

    PubMed Central

    Łasecki, Mateusz; Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging of the musculoskeletal system is superior to other imaging methods in many aspects, such as multidimensional character of imaging, possibility of dynamic evaluation and precise assessment of soft tissues. Moreover, it is a safe and relatively inexpensive method, broadly available and well-tolerated by patients. A correctly conducted ultrasound examination of the wrist delivers detailed information concerning the condition of tendons, muscles, ligaments, nerves and vessels. However, the knowledge of anatomy is crucial to establish a correct ultrasound diagnosis, also in wrist assessment. An ultrasound examination of the wrist is one of the most common US examinations conducted in patients with rheumatological diseases. Ultrasonographic signs depend on the advancement of the disease. The examination is equally frequently conducted in patients with pain or swelling of the wrist due to non-rheumatological causes. The aim of this publication was to present ultrasound images and anatomic schemes corresponding to them. The correct scanning technique of the dorsal part of the wrist was discussed and some practical tips, thanks to which highly diagnostic images can be obtained, were presented. The following anatomical structures should be visualized in an ultrasound examination of the dorsal wrist: distal radio-ulnar joint, radiocarpal joint, midcarpal joint, carpometacarpal joints, dorsal radiocarpal ligament, compartments of extensor tendons, radial artery, cephalic vein, two small branches of the radial nerve: superficial and deep, as well as certain midcarpal ligaments, particularly the scapholunate ligament and lunotriquetral ligament. The paper was distinguished in 2014 as the “poster of the month” (poster number C-1896) during the poster session of the European Congress of Radiology in Vienna. PMID:26675810

  6. Limited Accuracy of Colour Doppler Ultrasound Dynamic Tissue Perfusion Measurement in Diabetic Adults

    PubMed Central

    Stoperka, Felix; Karger, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic tissue perfusion measurement (DTPM) is a pre-described and available method in pediatric ultrasound to quantify tissue perfusion in renal Doppler ultrasound by particular video analysis software. This study evaluates DTPM during single and between repeated visits after 6 months, calibrates repeated DTPM within different region of interest (ROI) and compares DTPM with kidney function markers in adult patients with early diabetic nephropathy (n = 17). During repeated measurements, no association of readings at the same patients in the same (n = 3 readings) as well as repeated visit (n = 2 visits) could be retrieved. No association between DTPM, MDRD-GFR, albuminuria, age and duration of diabetes was observed. These negative results are presumably related to inconsistency of DTPM due to non-fixed ROI position as could be shown in calibrating series. Further development of the method should be performed to enable reproducible DTPM readings in adults. PMID:28033403

  7. The ultrasound brain helmet: early human feasibility study of multiple simultaneous 3D scans of cerebral vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Brooks D.; Ivancevich, Nikolas M.; Whitman, John; Light, Edward; Fronheiser, Matthew; Nicoletto, Heather A.; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2009-02-01

    We describe early stage experiments to test the feasibility of an ultrasound brain helmet to produce multiple simultaneous real-time 3D scans of the cerebral vasculature from temporal and suboccipital acoustic windows of the skull. The transducer hardware and software of the Volumetrics Medical Imaging real-time 3D scanner were modified to support dual 2.5 MHz matrix arrays of 256 transmit elements and 128 receive elements which produce two simultaneous 64° pyramidal scans. The real-time display format consists of two coronal B-mode images merged into a 128° sector, two simultaneous parasagittal images merged into a 128° × 64° C-mode plane, and a simultaneous 64° axial image. Real-time 3D color Doppler images acquired in initial clinical studies after contrast injection demonstrate flow in several representative blood vessels. An offline Doppler rendering of data from two transducers simultaneously scanning via the temporal windows provides an early visualization of the flow in vessels on both sides of the brain. The long-term goal is to produce real-time 3D ultrasound images of the cerebral vasculature from a portable unit capable of internet transmission, thus enabling interactive 3D imaging, remote diagnosis and earlier therapeutic intervention. We are motivated by the urgency for rapid diagnosis of stroke due to the short time window of effective therapeutic intervention.

  8. Time-resolved measurement of bubble cavitation by using power Doppler ultrasound image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Ren; Izumi, Yosuke; Nagai, Hayato; Yamakoshi, Yoshiki

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a novel measurement method for a secondary ultrasound wave irradiated by microbubble cavitation is proposed. High-intensity ultrasound (h-US, 1.0–1.5 MPa), which produces bubble cavitation, is irradiated with a fixed time delay after introducing imaging US, whose frequency is different from that of the h-US. The bubble cavitation signal (BCS) is detected by the signal-processing unit of an ultrasound power Doppler imaging instrument. By this method, both a spatially resolved bubble image (S-image) and the temporal transition of the BCS (T-image) are monitored simultaneously. A feature of the method is that the BCS is observed in situ with sub-µs time resolution. The accuracy of the method is evaluated and it is found that the maximum deviation of the amplitude of the simulated BCS is 4.80%. This method is applied to measure the BCS of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles. As a result, the dependence of the inherent temporal transition of the BCS on the sound pressure of the h-US (0.6–1.2 MPa) is observed.

  9. Design and Development of a Scanning Airborne Direct Detection Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce; McGill, Matthew; Schwemmer, Geary; Hardesty, Michael; Brewer, Alan; Wilkerson, Thomas; Atlas, Robert; Sirota, Marcos; Lindemann, Scott

    2006-01-01

    In the fall of 2005 we began developing an airborne scanning direct detection molecular Doppler lidar. The instrument is being built as part of the Tropospheric Wind Lidar Technology Experiment (TWiLiTE), a three year project selected by the NASA Earth Sun Technology Office under the Instrument Incubator Program. The TWiLiTE project is a collaboration involving scientists and engineers from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, NOAA ESRL, Utah State University Space Dynamics Lab, Michigan Aerospace Corporation and Sigma Space Corporation. The TWiLiTE instrument will leverage significant research and development investments made by NASA Goddard and it's partners in the past several years in key lidar technologies and sub-systems (lasers, telescopes, scanning systems, detectors and receivers) required to enable spaceborne global wind lidar measurement. These sub-systems will be integrated into a complete molecular direct detection Doppler wind lidar system designed for autonomous operation on a high altitude aircraft, such as the NASA WB57. The WB57 flies at an altitude of 18 km and from this vantage point the nadir viewing Doppler lidar will be able to profile winds through the full troposphere. The TWiLiTE integrated airborne Doppler lidar instrument will be the first demonstration of a airborne scanning direct detection Doppler lidar and will serve as a critical milestone on the path to a future spaceborne tropospheric wind system. In addition to being a technology testbed for space based tropospheric wind lidar, when completed the TWiLiTE high altitude airborne lidar will be used for studying mesoscale dynamics and storm research (e.g. winter storms, hurricanes) and could be used for calibration and validation of satellite based wind systems such as ESA's Aeolus Atmospheric Dynamics Mission. The TWiLiTE Doppler lidar will have the capability to profile winds in clear air from the aircraft altitude of 18 km to the surface with 250 m vertical resolution and < 2mls

  10. Development of a Mechanical Scanning-type Intravascular Ultrasound System Using a Miniature Ultrasound Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Masayuki; Xie, Shangping; Tagawa, Norio; Moriya, Tadashi; Furukawa, Yuji

    2007-07-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) plays an important role for the detection of arteriosclerosis, which causes the ischemic heart disease. In mechanical scanning-type IVUS, it is necessary to rotate a transducer or a reflecting mirror. A method that involves rotating the transducer using a torque wire causes image distortion (NURD: non uniform rotation distortion). For a method that involves placing an electromagnetic motor on the tip of an IVUS probe is difficult to miniaturize the probe. Our objectives are to miniaturize the probe (1 mm in diameter, 5 mm in length) and to remove NURD. Therefore, we conducted a study to assess the feasibility of attaining these objectives by constructing a prototype IVUS system, in which an ultrasound motor using a stator in the form of a helical coil (abbreviated as CS-USM: coiled stator-ultrasonic motor) is incorporated, and to clarify problems that need to be solved in constructing the probe.

  11. Microscopic observation of glass bead movement in soft tissue-mimicking phantom under ultrasound PW mode scanning.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Funamoto, Kenichi; Tanabe, Masayuki; Hayase, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that stones and calcification in soft tissue show special enhancement in response to color flow (CF) or pulse Doppler (PW) mode ultrasound scan. This phenomenon is known as the "twinkling sign (TS)". The authors conducted an in vitro experiment to investigate the mechanism of TS occurrence by observing a glass bead in a transparent PVA-H soft tissue-mimicking phantom. The TS in PW mode showed a low-power and slow-velocity spectrum. At the same time, analysis of images by high-speed camera showed that the glass bead in the phantom oscillated following the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of the PW mode ultrasound scan. The harmonic oscillations were confirmed, as well. The ultrasound radiation force-driven micro-oscillation possibly affects the ultrasound propagation around the scatterer and triggers random signals in the received echo signals. The results indicate that TS is a phenomenon based on complicated acoustic-mechanical interaction of multiple mechanisms. Further investigation is required for gaining a full understanding of the mechanism of TS occurrence and its clinical application.

  12. Exploiting continuous scanning laser Doppler vibrometry (CSLDV) in time domain correlation methods for noise source identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiariotti, Paolo; Martarelli, Milena; Revel, Gian Marco

    2014-07-01

    This paper proposes the use of continuous scanning laser Doppler vibrometry (CSLDV) in time domain correlation techniques that aim at characterizing the structure-borne contributions of the noise emission of a mechanical system. The time domain correlation technique presented in this paper is based on the use of FIR (finite impulse response) filters obtained from the vibro-acoustic transfer matrix when vibration data are collected by laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) exploited in continuous scan mode (CSLDV). The advantages, especially in terms of source decorrelation capabilities, related to the use of CSLDV for such purpose, with respect to standard discrete scan (SLDV), are discussed throughout the paper. To validate this approach, vibro-acoustic measurements were performed on a planetary gear motor for home appliances. The analysis of results is also supported by a simulation.

  13. Neovascularity in patellar tendinopathy and the response to eccentric training: a case report using Power Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    McCreesh, Karen M; Riley, Sara J; Crotty, James M

    2013-12-01

    This report describes the case of an amateur soccer player with chronic patellar tendinopathy who underwent ultrasound imaging before and after engaging in an 8-week programme of eccentric exercise. On initial assessment, greyscale ultrasound imaging demonstrated tendon thickening and reduced echogenicity, while Power Doppler imaging demonstrated a large amount of neovascularity. After 8 weeks of an eccentric loading programme, the patient reported significantly improved symptoms and functional scores, while follow-up imaging demonstrated improvement in the echo appearance of the tendon and complete resolution of the neovascularity. The association between neovascularity and symptoms in tendinopathy research is conflicting, with a paucity of research in the area of patellar tendinopathy. While further research is needed to clarify the significance of greyscale and Power Doppler ultrasound changes in relation to symptoms in patellar tendinopathy, ultrasound imaging was shown to be a useful adjunct to diagnosis and outcome assessment in this case.

  14. Real-time numerical simulation of Doppler ultrasound in the presence of nonaxial flow.

    PubMed

    Khoshniat, Mahdieh; Thorne, Meghan L; Poepping, Tamie L; Hirji, Samira; Holdsworth, David W; Steinman, David A

    2005-04-01

    Numerical simulations of Doppler ultrasound (DUS) relying on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of nonaxial flow have traditionally employed detailed (but computationally intensive) models of the DUS physics, or have sacrificed much of the physics in the interest of computational or conceptual simplicity. In this paper, we present a compromise between these extremes, with the objective of simulating the essential characteristics of DUS spectrograms in a real-time manner. Specifically, a precomputed pulsatile CFD velocity field is interrogated at some number, N, of discrete points distributed spatially within a sample volume of prescribed geometry and power distribution and temporally within a prescribed sampling window. Intrinsic spectral broadening is accounted for by convolving each of the point velocities with a semiempirical broadening function. Real-time performance is facilitated through the use of an efficient algorithm for interpolating the unstructured CFD data. A spherical sample volume with Gaussian power distribution, N = 1000 sampling points, and quadratic broadening function are shown to be adequate for simulating, at frame rates of 86 Hz on a 1.5 GHz desktop workstation, realistic-looking spectrograms at representative locations within a stenosed carotid bifurcation model. Via qualitative comparisons with matched in vitro data, these simulated spectrograms are shown to mimic the distinctive spectral envelopes, broadening and power characteristics associated with common carotid, stenotic jet and poststenotic recirculating flows. We conclude that the complex interaction between Doppler ultrasound and complicated clinically relevant blood flow dynamics can be simulated in real time via this relatively straightforward semiempirical approach.

  15. New adaptive clutter rejection for ultrasound color Doppler imaging: in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yang Mo; Kim, Yongmin

    2010-03-01

    Clutter rejection is essential for accurate flow estimation in ultrasound color Doppler imaging. In this article, we present a new adaptive clutter rejection (ACR) technique where an optimum filter is dynamically selected depending upon the underlying clutter characteristics (e.g., tissue acceleration and power). We compared the performance of the ACR method with other adaptive methods, i.e., down-mixing (DM) and adaptive clutter filtering (ACF), using in vivo data acquired from the kidney, liver and common carotid artery. With the kidney data, the ACR method provided an average improvement of 3.05 dB and 1.7 dB in flow signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) compared with DM and ACF, respectively. With the liver data, SCR was improved by 2.75 dB and 1.8 dB over DM and ACF while no significant improvement with ACR was found in the common carotid artery data. Thus, the proposed adaptive method could provide more accurate flow estimation by improving clutter rejection in abdominal ultrasound color Doppler imaging pending validation.

  16. Renal transplantation parenchymal complications: what Doppler ultrasound can and cannot do.

    PubMed

    Granata, Antonio; Di Nicolò, Pierpaolo; Scarfia, Viviana R; Insalaco, Monica; Lentini, Paolo; Veroux, Massimiliano; Fatuzzo, Pasquale; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2015-06-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice in end-stage renal disease, given the better quality of life of transplanted patients when compared with patients on maintenance dialysis. In spite of surgical improvements and new immunosuppressive regimens, parts of transplanted grafts still develop chronic dysfunction. Ultrasonography, both in B-mode and with Doppler ultrasound, is an important diagnostic tool in case of clinical conditions which might impair kidney function. Even though ultrasonography is considered fundamental in the diagnosis of vascular and surgical complications of the transplanted kidney, its role is not fully understood in case of parenchymal complications of the graft. The specificity of Doppler is low both in case of acute complications, such as acute tubular necrosis, drugs toxicity and acute rejection, and in case of chronic conditions, such as chronic allograft nephropathy. Single determinations of resistance indices present low diagnostic accuracy, which is higher in case of successive measurements performed during the follow-up of the graft. Modern techniques such as tissue pulsatility index, maximal fractional area and contrast-enhanced ultrasound increase ultrasonography diagnostic power in case of parenchymal complications of the transplanted kidney.

  17. Assessment of Spectral Doppler for an Array-Based Preclinical Ultrasound Scanner Using a Rotating Phantom.

    PubMed

    Kenwright, David A; Anderson, Tom; Moran, Carmel M; Hoskins, Peter R

    2015-08-01

    Velocity measurement errors were investigated for an array-based preclinical ultrasound scanner (Vevo 2100, FUJIFILM VisualSonics, Toronto, ON, Canada). Using a small-size rotating phantom made from a tissue-mimicking material, errors in pulse-wave Doppler maximum velocity measurements were observed. The extent of these errors was dependent on the Doppler angle, gate length, gate depth, gate horizontal placement and phantom velocity. Errors were observed to be up to 172% at high beam-target angles. It was found that small gate lengths resulted in larger velocity errors than large gate lengths, a phenomenon that has not previously been reported (e.g., for a beam-target angle of 0°, the error was 27.8% with a 0.2-mm gate length and 5.4% with a 0.98-mm gate length). The error in the velocity measurement with sample volume depth changed depending on the operating frequency of the probe. Some edge effects were observed in the horizontal placement of the sample volume, indicating a change in the array aperture size. The error in the velocity measurements increased with increased phantom velocity, from 22% at 2.4 cm/s to 30% at 26.6 cm/s. To minimise the impact of these errors, an angle-dependent correction factor was derived based on a simple ray model of geometric spectral broadening. Use of this angle-dependent correction factor reduces the maximum velocity measurement errors to <25% in all instances, significantly improving the current estimation of maximum velocity from pulse-wave Doppler ultrasound.

  18. Expected Characteristics of Global Wind Profile Measurements with a Scanning, Hybrid, Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Over 20 years of investigation by NASA and NOAA scientists and Doppler lidar technologists into a global wind profiling mission from earth orbit have led to the current favored concept of an instrument with both coherent- and direct-detection pulsed Doppler lidars (i.e., a hybrid Doppler lidar) and a stepstare beam scanning approach covering several azimuth angles with a fixed nadir angle. The nominal lidar wavelengths are 2 microns for coherent detection, and 0.355 microns for direct detection. The two agencies have also generated two sets of sophisticated wind measurement requirements for a space mission: science demonstration requirements and operational requirements. The requirements contain the necessary details to permit mission design and optimization by lidar technologists. Simulations have been developed that connect the science requirements to the wind measurement requirements, and that connect the wind measurement requirements to the Doppler lidar parameters. The simulations also permit trade studies within the multi-parameter space. These tools, combined with knowledge of the state of the Doppler lidar technology, have been used to conduct space instrument and mission design activities to validate the feasibility of the chosen mission and lidar parameters. Recently, the NRC Earth Science Decadal Survey recommended the wind mission to NASA as one of 15 recommended missions. A full description of the wind measurement product from these notional missions and the possible trades available are presented in this paper.

  19. Remote measurement utilizing NASA's scanning laser Doppler systems. Volume 1. Laser Doppler wake vortex tracking at Kennedy Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, M. C.; Wilson, D. J.; Howle, R. E.; Edwards, B. B.; Craven, C. E.; Jetton, J. L.

    1976-01-01

    Test operations of the Scanning Laser Doppler System (SLDS) at Kennedy International Airport (KIA) during August 1974 through June 1975 are reported. A total of 1,619 data runs was recorded with a totally operational system during normal landing operations at KIA. In addition, 53 data runs were made during cooperative flybys with the C880 for a grand total of 1672 recorded vortex tracks. Test crews were in attendance at KIA for 31 weeks, of which 25 weeks were considered operational and the other six were packing, unpacking, setup and check out. Although average activity equates to 67 recorded landing operations per week, two periods of complete runway inactivity spanned 20 days and 13 days, respectively. The operation frequency therefore averaged about 88 operations per week.

  20. [Standardised ultrasound scanning of the shoulder--normal and basic pathological findings].

    PubMed

    Laktasić-Zerjavić, Nadica; Perić, Porin

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound (US) is noninvasive, non-ionisating and cost-effective imaging diagnostic technique. It has emerged as a useful imaging modality for the diagnosis of joint and soft tissue pathology. The shoulder is probably the most frequently analyzed joint. Diagnostic US can be considered as an extension of physical examination and has better sensitivity and specificity for the detection of rotator cuff tendon tear compared to the physical examination. A high frequency linear probe (7.5-15 MHz) with high resolution transducer should be used. US investigation of the shoulder includes scanning of the long head of the biceps, the subskapularis, the supraspinatus, and the infraspinatus tendon in longitudinal and transverse planes, and scanning of the subacromial-subdeltoid (SA/SD) bursa, glenohumeral (GH) and acromioclavicular (AC)joint. The most frequent US findings of the shoulder are effusion in the long head of the biceps tendon, and in the SA/SD bursa, tendinosis or tear of the supraspinatus tendon, and the degenerative changes of the AC joint. In inflammatory arthopahies synovial effusion and hypertrophy of the GH joint can be evaluated. Power Doppler sonography is used for detection of sinovial vascularisation. In this paper standardized techinque for the US examination of the shoulder is described. Pictures of normal and sam basic phathological findings are presented.

  1. Nonmechanical scanning laser Doppler velocimeter for cross-sectional two-dimensional velocity measurement.

    PubMed

    Maru, Koichi; Hata, Takahiro

    2012-12-01

    We propose a two-dimensional scanning laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) that does not require any moving mechanisms in its probe. In the proposed LDV, the measurement position can be scanned in two dimensions on a cross-sectional plane perpendicular to the direction of flow. The combination of the change in wavelength and change in port of the fiber array input to the probe is utilized for the scan. The experimental results using a sensor probe setup indicate that the measurement position can be scanned in two dimensions using the proposed method. The scanning range was estimated to be 39.7 mm in the axial direction over the wavelength range of 1536-1554 nm and 26.1 mm in the transverse direction for the use of 22 ports of the fiber array.

  2. Ultrasound probe and needle-guide calibration for robotic ultrasound scanning and needle targeting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chunwoo; Chang, Doyoung; Petrisor, Doru; Chirikjian, Gregory; Han, Misop; Stoianovici, Dan

    2013-06-01

    Image-to-robot registration is a typical step for robotic image-guided interventions. If the imaging device uses a portable imaging probe that is held by a robot, this registration is constant and has been commonly named probe calibration. The same applies to probes tracked by a position measurement device. We report a calibration method for 2-D ultrasound probes using robotic manipulation and a planar calibration rig. Moreover, a needle guide that is attached to the probe is also calibrated for ultrasound-guided needle targeting. The method is applied to a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe for robot-assisted prostate biopsy. Validation experiments include TRUS-guided needle targeting accuracy tests. This paper outlines the entire process from the calibration to image-guided targeting. Freehand TRUS-guided prostate biopsy is the primary method of diagnosing prostate cancer, with over 1.2 million procedures performed annually in the U.S. alone. However, freehand biopsy is a highly challenging procedure with subjective quality control. As such, biopsy devices are emerging to assist the physician. Here, we present a method that uses robotic TRUS manipulation. A 2-D TRUS probe is supported by a 4-degree-of-freedom robot. The robot performs ultrasound scanning, enabling 3-D reconstructions. Based on the images, the robot orients a needle guide on target for biopsy. The biopsy is acquired manually through the guide. In vitro tests showed that the 3-D images were geometrically accurate, and an image-based needle targeting accuracy was 1.55 mm. These validate the probe calibration presented and the overall robotic system for needle targeting. Targeting accuracy is sufficient for targeting small, clinically significant prostatic cancer lesions, but actual in vivo targeting will include additional error components that will have to be determined.

  3. Three-Dimensional Rapidly Scanning Laser Doppler Velocimeter with Low SNR Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-30

    Three-Dimensional Rapidly Scanning Laser Doppler Velocimeter with Low SNR Signal Processing 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Kevin A. Shinpaugh and Rog er L...curvature for concave mirror or lens surface s .................... object distance from lens s.. ................. image distance from lens SNR ...where the signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR ) of the PMT signal is 20 dB and signal processing is performed via the fast Fourier trasnform (FFT) with zero

  4. Transvaginal 3-d power Doppler ultrasound evaluation of the fetal brain at 10-13 weeks' gestation.

    PubMed

    Hata, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Noguchi, Junko

    2012-03-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the fetal brain volume (FBV) and vascularization and blood flow using transvaginal 3-D power Doppler (3DPD) ultrasound late in the first trimester of pregnancy. 3DPD ultrasound examinations with the VOCAL imaging analysis program were performed on 36 normal fetuses from 10-13 weeks' gestation. FBV and 3DPD indices related to the fetal brain vascularization (vascularization index [VI], flow index [FI] and vascularization flow index [VFI]) were calculated in each fetus. Intra- and interclass correlation coefficients and intra- and interobserver agreements of measurements were assessed. FBV was curvilinearly correlated well with the gestational age (R2 = 0.861, p < 0.0001). All 3-D power Doppler indices (VI, FI and VFI) showed no change at 10-13 weeks' gestation. FBV and all 3-D power Doppler indices (VI, FI and VFI) showed a correlation > 0.82, with good intra- and interobserver agreement. Our findings suggest that 3-D ultrasound is a superior means of evaluating the FBV in utero, and that 3-D power Doppler ultrasound histogram analysis may provide new information on the assessment of fetal brain perfusion.

  5. Resolving the lateral component of blood flow velocity based on ultrasound speckle size change with scan direction and speed.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tiantian; Bashford, Gregory R

    2009-01-01

    Conventional blood flow velocity measurement using ultrasound is capable of resolving the axial component (i.e., that aligned with the ultrasound propagation direction) of the blood flow velocity vector. However, these Doppler-based methods are incapable of detecting blood flow in the direction normal to the ultrasound beam. In addition, these methods require repeated pulse-echo interrogation at the same spatial location. In this paper, we introduce a method which estimates the lateral component of blood flow within a single image frame using the observation that the speckle pattern corresponding to the blood reflectors (typically red blood cells) stretches (i.e., is "smeared") if the blood is moving in the same direction as the electronically-controlled transducer line selection in a 2D image. The situation is analogous to the observed elongation of a subject photographed with a moving camera. Here, we develop a relationship between speckle size, scan speed, and blood flow velocity. Experiments were performed with a blood flow phantom and high-frequency transducer of a commercially available ultrasound machine. Data was captured through an interface allowing access to the raw beam formed data. Blood flow with velocities ranging from 15 to 40 cm/s were investigated in this paper. Results show that there is a linear relationship between the reciprocal of the stretch factor and blood flow velocity. Two scan speeds were used in our experiments. When the scan velocity is 64.8 cm/s, compared with the theoretical model, fitting results based on experimental data gave us a linear relationship with average flow estimation error of 1.74+/-1.48 cm/s. When the scan velocity is 37.4 cm/s, the average estimation error is 0.65+/-0.45 cm/s.

  6. Color Doppler Ultrasound Velocimetry Flow Reconstruction using Vorticity-Streamfunction Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Brett; Vlachos, Pavlos; Goergen, Craig; Scalo, Carlo

    2016-11-01

    Clinicians commonly utilize Color Doppler imaging to qualitatively assess the velocity in patient cardiac or arterial flows. However Color Doppler velocity are restricted to two-dimensional one-component measurements. Recently new methods have been proposed to reconstruct a two-component velocity field from such data. Vector Flow Mapping (VFM), in particular, utilizes the conservation of mass to reconstruct the flow. However, this method over-simplifies the influence of wall and surrounding blood motion on local measurements, which produce large, non-physical velocity gradients, requiring excessive smoothing operations to remove. We propose a new approach based on the Vorticity-Stream Function (Ψ- ω) formulation that yields more physiologically accurate velocity gradients and avoids any added smoothing operations. Zero-penetration conditions are specified at the walls, removing the need for measurement of wall velocity from additional scans, which introduce further uncertainties in the reconstruction. Inflow and outflow boundary conditions are incorporated by prescribing Dirichlet boundary conditions. The proposed solver is compared against the VFM using computational data to evaluate measurement improvement. Finally we demonstrate the method by evaluating murine left ventricle Color Doppler scans.

  7. Hurricane Wind Field Measurements with Scanning Airborne Doppler Lidar During CAMEX-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, D. R.; Howell, J. N.; Darby, L. S.; Hardesty, R. M.; Traff, D. M.; Menzies, R. T.

    2000-01-01

    During the 1998 Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-3), the first hurricane wind field measurements with Doppler lidar were achieved. Wind fields were mapped within the eye, along the eyewall, in the central dense overcast, and in the marine boundary layer encompassing the inflow region. Spatial coverage was determined primarily by cloud distribution and opacity. Within optically-thin cirrus slant range of 20- 25 km was achieved, whereas no propagation was obtained during penetration of dense cloud. Measurements were obtained with the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. MACAWS was developed and operated cooperatively by the atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory. A pseudo-dual Doppler technique ("co-planar scanning") is used to map the horizontal component of the wind at several vertical levels. Pulses from the laser are directed out the left side of the aircraft in the desired directions using computer-controlled rotating prisms. Upon exiting the aircraft, the beam is completely eyesafe. Aircraft attitude and speed are taken into account during real-time signal processing, resulting in determination of the ground-relative wind to an accuracy of about 1 m/s magnitude and about 10 deg direction. Beam pointing angle errors are about 0.1 deg, equivalent to about 17 m at 10 km. Horizontal resolution is about 1 km (along-track) for typical signal processor and scanner settings; vertical resolution varies with range. Results from CAMEX-3 suggest that scanning Doppler wind lidar can complement airborne Doppler radar by providing wind field measurements in regions that are devoid of hydrometeors. At present MACAWS observations are being assimilated into experimental forecast models and satellite Doppler wind lidar simulations to evaluate the relative impact.

  8. The remote measurement of tornado-like flows employing a scanning laser Doppler system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffreys, H. B.; Bilbro, J. W.; Dimarzio, C.; Sonnenschein, C.; Toomey, D.

    1977-01-01

    The paper deals with a scanning laser Doppler velocimeter system employed in a test program for measuring naturally occurring tornado-like phenomena, known as dust devils. A description of the system and the test program is followed by a discussion of the data processing techniques and data analysis. The system uses a stable 15-W CO2 laser with the beam expanded and focused by a 12-inch telescope. Range resolution is obtained by focusing the optical system. The velocity of each volume of air (scanned in a horizontal plane) is determined from spectral analysis of the heterodyne signal. Results derived from the measurement program and data/system analyses are examined.

  9. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound in the diagnosis of brain death. Is it useful or does it delay the diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Escudero, D; Otero, J; Quindós, B; Viña, L

    2015-05-01

    Transcranial Doppler ultrasound is able to demonstrate cerebral circulatory arrest associated to brain death, being especially useful in sedated patients, or in those in which complete neurological exploration is not possible. Transcranial Doppler ulstrasound is a portable, noninvasive and high-availability technique. Among its limitations, mention must be made of the absence of acoustic windows and false-negative cases. In patients clinically diagnosed with brain death, with open skulls or with anoxia as the cause of death, cerebral blood flow can be observed by ultrasound, since cerebral circulatory arrest is not always synchronized to the clinical diagnosis. The diagnostic rate is therefore time-dependent, and this fact that must be recognized in order to avoid delays in death certification. Despite its limitations, transcranial Doppler ulstrasound helps solve common diagnostic problems, avoids the unnecessary consumption of resources, and can optimize organ harvesting for transplantation.

  10. Compounding of ultrasound B-scans of a transfemoral residual limb using a genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Tania S.; Lee, Peter; Solomonidis, Stephan E.; Spence, William D.

    1998-06-01

    Ultrasound may be used for imaging the trans-femoral residual limb in order to provide information for the improvement of prosthetic socket design. Compounding of several ultrasound B-scans is required for obtaining transverse images of the residual limb. In this paper, a method is presented by which a genetic algorithm is used to match B-scans taken in a horizontal plane around the residual limb for image compounding in order to reduce the effects of patient motion during scanning.

  11. Acoustical imaging and processing of blood vessel and the related materials using ultrasound Doppler effect.

    PubMed

    Yokobori, A T; Ohkuma, T; Yoshinari, H; Yokobori, T; Ohuchi, H; Mori, S

    1991-01-01

    In the present paper a method is proposed to measure the degree of the degradation of the elasticity in natural blood vessel and the related materials by using ultrasound Doppler effect. It was found that the deformation rate and its acceleration in the radial direction of the blood vessel can be detected by acoustical imaging and processing using this method. These results were proven to correspond to the degree of the degradation of the elasticity, that is, the degree of viscoelasticity in the blood vessel from the wave versus time pattern detected and its simple analysis. This method was applied to predicting the arteriosclerosis of blood vessels of humans by acoustical imaging and processing uninvadedly, as the characteristics of viscoelasticity in blood vessels.

  12. Modelflow Estimates of Stroke Volume Do Not Correlate With Doppler Ultrasound Estimates During Upright Posture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Connor R.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steven H.; Laurie, Steven S.

    2014-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance affects 60-80% of astronauts returning from long-duration missions, representing a significant risk to completing mission-critical tasks. While likely multifactorial, a reduction in stroke volume (SV) represents one factor contributing to orthostatic intolerance during stand and head up tilt (HUT) tests. Current measures of SV during stand or HUT tests use Doppler ultrasound and require a trained operator and specialized equipment, restricting its use in the field. BeatScope (Finapres Medical Systems BV, The Netherlands) uses a modelflow algorithm to estimate SV from continuous blood pressure waveforms in supine subjects; however, evidence supporting the use of Modelflow to estimate SV in subjects completing stand or HUT tests remain scarce. Furthermore, because the blood pressure device is held extended at heart level during HUT tests, but allowed to rest at the side during stand tests, changes in the finger arterial pressure waveform resulting from arm positioning could alter modelflow estimated SV. The purpose of this project was to compare Doppler ultrasound and BeatScope estimations of SV to determine if BeatScope can be used during stand or HUT tests. Finger photoplethysmography was used to acquire arterial pressure waveforms corrected for hydrostatic finger-to-heart height using the Finometer (FM) and Portapres (PP) arterial pressure devices in 10 subjects (5 men and 5 women) during a stand test while simultaneous estimates of SV were collected using Doppler ultrasound. Measures were made after 5 minutes of supine rest and while subjects stood for 5 minutes. Next, SV estimates were reacquired while each arm was independently raised to heart level, a position similar to tilt testing. Supine SV estimates were not significantly different between all three devices (FM: 68+/-20, PP: 71+/-21, US: 73+/-21 ml/beat). Upon standing, the change in SV estimated by FM (-18+/-8 ml) was not different from PP (-21+/-12), but both were significantly

  13. Evaluation of a fractional filter-based receive beamforming method for low-cost ultrasound color Doppler imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hana; Kang, Jeeun; Chang, Jin Ho; Yoo, Yangmo

    2012-03-01

    In medical ultrasound imaging, dynamic receive beamforming has been used for improving signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and spatial resolution. For low-cost portable ultrasound imaging systems, a fractional filter-based receive beamforming (FFRB) method was previously proposed to reduce the hardware complexity compared to conventional interpolation filter-based receive beamforming methods (IFRB). While this new beamforming method substantially reduces the hardware complexity, it yields the nonlinear phase response for high frequencies due to the limited length of fractional filter coefficients, leading to the bias on flow estimation in ultrasound color Doppler imaging. In this paper, to evaluate the FFRB method for ultrasound color Doppler imaging, the Field II simulation and string phantom experiments were conducted. In Field II simulation, the radio-frequency (RF) data were generated by assuming a 7.5-MHz linear array probe with the transmit frequency of 6 MHz, the ensemble size of 8, and the sampling frequencies of 20 MHz. In string phantom experiments, the RF channel data were obtained with a commercial SonixTouch ultrasound scanner equipped with a research package (Ultrasonix Corp., Vancouver, BC, Canada; a 5-MHz linear array connected to a SonixDAQ parallel system. The ensemble size and the sampling frequency were set to 10 and 20 MHz, respectively. For the Field II simulation and string phantom experiments, only 1.2% and 2.3 % in color Doppler estimation error ratio was observed with mean and standard deviation along the lateral direction. This result indicates that the proposed FFRB method could be utilized for a low-cost ultrasound color Doppler imaging system with lowered hardware complexity and minimized phase errors.

  14. Doppler ultrasound compatible plastic material for use in rigid flow models.

    PubMed

    Wong, Emily Y; Thorne, Meghan L; Nikolov, Hristo N; Poepping, Tamie L; Holdsworth, David W

    2008-11-01

    A technique for the rapid but accurate fabrication of multiple flow phantoms with variations in vascular geometry would be desirable in the investigation of carotid atherosclerosis. This study demonstrates the feasibility and efficacy of implementing numerically controlled direct-machining of vascular geometries into Doppler ultrasound (DUS)-compatible plastic for the easy fabrication of DUS flow phantoms. Candidate plastics were tested for longitudinal speed of sound (SoS) and acoustic attenuation at the diagnostic frequency of 5 MHz. Teflon was found to have the most appropriate SoS (1376 +/- 40 m s(-1) compared with 1540 m s(-1) in soft tissue) and thus was selected to construct a carotid bifurcation flow model with moderate eccentric stenosis. The vessel geometry was machined directly into Teflon using a numerically controlled milling technique. Geometric accuracy of the phantom lumen was verified using nondestructive micro-computed tomography. Although Teflon displayed a higher attenuation coefficient than other tested materials, Doppler data acquired in the Teflon flow model indicated that sufficient signal power was delivered throughout the depth of the vessel and provided comparable velocity profiles to that obtained in the tissue-mimicking phantom. Our results indicate that Teflon provides the best combination of machinability and DUS compatibility, making it an appropriate choice for the fabrication of rigid DUS flow models using a direct-machining method.

  15. In vitro Doppler ultrasound investigation of turbulence intensity in pulsatile flow with simulated cardiac variability.

    PubMed

    Thorne, Meghan L; Poepping, Tamie L; Nikolov, Hristo N; Rankin, Richard N; Steinman, David A; Holdsworth, David W

    2009-01-01

    An in vitro investigation of turbulence intensity (TI) associated with a severe carotid stenosis in the presence of physiological cardiac variability is described. The objective of this investigation was to determine if fluctuations due to turbulence could be quantified with conventional Doppler ultrasound (DUS) in the presence of normal physiological cycle-to-cycle cardiac variability. An anthropomorphic model of a 70% stenosed carotid bifurcation was used in combination with a programmable flow pump to generate pulsatile flow with a mean flow rate of 6 mL/s. Utilizing the pump, we studied normal, nonrepetitive cycle-to-cycle cardiac variability (+/-3.9%) in flow, as well as waveform shapes with standard deviations equal to 0, 2 and 3 times the normal variation. Eighty cardiac cycles of Doppler data were acquired at two regions within the model, representing either laminar or turbulent flow; each measurement was repeated six times. Turbulence intensity values were found to be 11 times higher (p < 0.001), on average, in the turbulent region than in the laminar region, with a mean difference of 24 cm/s. Twenty cardiac cycles were required for confidence in TI values. In conclusion, these results indicate that it is possible to quantify TI in vitro, even in the presence of normal and exaggerated cycle-to-cycle cardiac variability.

  16. Doppler ultrasound in vitro modeling of turbulence in carotid vascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, Meghan L.; Poepping, Tamie L.; Rankin, Richard N.; Nikolov, Hristo N.; Holdsworth, David W.

    2004-04-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous to many systems in nature, except the human vasculature. Development of turbulence in the human vasculature is an indication of abnormalities and disease. A severely stenosed vessel is one such example. In vitro modeling of common vascular diseases, such as a stenosis, is necessary to develop a better understanding of the fluid dynamics for a characteristic geometry. Doppler ultrasound (DUS) is the only available non-invasive technique for in vivo applications. Using Doppler velocity-derived data, turbulence intensity (TI) can be calculated. We investigate a realistic 70% stenosed bifurcation model in pulsatile flow and the performance of this model for turbulent flow. Blood-mimicking fluid (BMF) was pumped through the model using a flow simulator, which generated pulsatile flow with a mean flow rate of 6 ml/s. Twenty-five cycles of gated DUS data were acquired within regions of laminar and turbulent flow. The data was digitized at 44.1 kHz and analyzed at 79 time-points/cardiac cycle with a 1024-point FFT, producing a 1.33 cm/s velocity resolution. We found BMF to exhibit DUS characteristics similar to blood. We demonstrated the capabilities to generate velocities comparable to that found in the human carotid artery and calculated TI in the case of repetitive pulsatile flow.

  17. Doppler ultrasound in kidney diseases: a key parameter in clinical long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Spatola, Leonardo; Andrulli, Simeone

    2016-12-01

    Doppler ultrasound has been extensively used in detecting reno-vascular diseases, showing to be a non-invasive, safe, low cost and repeatable tool. The Renal Resistive Index (RRI) [(peak systolic velocity - end diastolic velocity)/peak systolic velocity] is a semi-quantitative index derived by Doppler evaluation of renal vascular bed. Normally RRI is in the range of 0.47-0.70, it increases with aging and, usually, it shows a difference between the two kidneys less than 5-8 %. RRI is an important prognostic marker in chronic kidney diseases (CKD), both in diabetic and non-diabetic kidney diseases, because, in longitudinal prospective studies, it significantly correlated with hemodynamic (ABPM, SBP, DBP, pulse pressure) and histopathological parameters (glomerular sclerosis, arteriolosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy, interstitial infiltration). In acute kidney injury (AKI) RI is a valid tool in differentiating between pre-renal and renal failure and in predicting renal response to vaso-active agents. In addition a RRI >0.74 can predict the onset of AKI in septic patients. Renal Resistive Index is a useful marker in allograft diseases because it has been widely showed a correlation with histological lesions during worsening of renal function, both in acute rejection and in chronic allograft nephropathy. Recent studies suggest its role in the risk of new onset diabetes after transplantation and it could be one of the parameters to evaluate to shift or withdrawal immunological and/or hypertensive therapy.

  18. Arterial pulse wave propagation velocity in healthy dogs by pulse wave Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Rodrigo B; Pereira, Lucas A; Basso, Alice F; da Fonseca, Ingrid S; Alves, Lorena A

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) values in healthy dogs using pulse wave Doppler ultrasound. A secondary aim was to determine the feasibility of this method and to report the intra- and interobserver reproducibilities of the PWV in conscious dogs. The data were studied in 30 healthy, adult, male (n = 15) and female (n = 15) dogs. The time interval marked between the R wave peak of the electrocardiogram and the intersection of the blood flow wave upstroke of the Doppler spectrum with the baseline of zero frequency was determined for the carotid (T1) and for the femoral (T2) arteries. The distance covered by the pulse wave (L) was determined. The PWV was then calculated using the following formula: L/T2 - T1. The mean values of PWV calculated from the total sample (n = 30) evaluated were 13.41 ± 2.20 m/s. No significant statistical difference was observed for the PWV measurements between males (14.82 ± 3.18 m/s) and females (12.64 ± 2.45 m/s). The analysis revealed no intra nor interobserver differences. A reasonable reproducibility of the PWV measurements was showed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), and the coefficients of variation (CV). These data demonstrate that noninvasive vascular Doppler analysis is a feasible and reproducible method to determine the carotid-femoral PWV in dogs.

  19. Field Evaluation in Four NEEMO Divers of a Prototype In-suit Doppler Ultrasound Bubble Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acock, K. E.; Gernhardt, M. L.; Conkin, J.; Powell, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    It is desirable to know if astronauts produce venous gas emboli (VGE) as a result of their exposure to 4.3 psia during space walks. The current prototype in-suit Doppler (ISD) ultrasound bubble detector provides an objective assessment of decompression stress by monitoring for VGE. The NOAA Aquarius habitat and NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) series of dives provided an opportunity to assess the ability of the prototype ISDs to record venous blood flow and possibly detect VGE in the pulmonary artery. From July 16 to 29,2003, four aquanauts (two males and two females) donned the ISD for a 4 hr automated recording session, following excursion dives (up to 6hrs and 29 MSW below storage depth) from air saturation at 17 MSW. Doppler recordings for 32 excursion dives were collected. The recordings consisted of approximately 150 digital wave files. Each wave file contained 24 sec of recording for each min. A 1 - 4 Doppler Quality Score (DQS) was assigned to each wave file in 17 of the 32 records evaluated to date. A DQS of 1 indicates a poor flow signal and a score of 4 indicates an optimum signal. Only 23% of all wave files had DQSs considered adequate to detect low grade VGE (Spencer I-II). The distribution of DQS in 2,356 wave files is as follows: DQS 1-56%, DQS 2-21%, DQS 3-18% and DQS 4-5%. Six of the 17 records had false positive VGE (Spencer I-IV) detected in one or more wave files per dive record. The false positive VGE recordings are attributable to air entrainment associated with drinking (verified by control tests), and this observation is important as astronauts drink water during space walks. The current ISD design provides quality recordings only over a narrow range of chest anatomy.

  20. Fetal Echocardiography and Pulsed-wave Doppler Ultrasound in a Rabbit Model of Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Ryan; Endo, Masayuki; La Gerche, Andre; Eixarch, Elisenda; DeKoninck, Philip; Ferferieva, Vessilina; D'hooge, Jan; Wallace, Euan M.; Deprest, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Fetal intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) results in abnormal cardiac function that is apparent antenatally due to advances in fetoplacental Doppler ultrasound and fetal echocardiography. Increasingly, these imaging modalities are being employed clinically to examine cardiac function and assess wellbeing in utero, thereby guiding timing of birth decisions. Here, we used a rabbit model of IUGR that allows analysis of cardiac function in a clinically relevant way. Using isoflurane induced anesthesia, IUGR is surgically created at gestational age day 25 by performing a laparotomy, exposing the bicornuate uterus and then ligating 40-50% of uteroplacental vessels supplying each gestational sac in a single uterine horn. The other horn in the rabbit bicornuate uterus serves as internal control fetuses. Then, after recovery at gestational age day 30 (full term), the same rabbit undergoes examination of fetal cardiac function. Anesthesia is induced with ketamine and xylazine intramuscularly, then maintained by a continuous intravenous infusion of ketamine and xylazine to minimize iatrogenic effects on fetal cardiac function. A repeat laparotomy is performed to expose each gestational sac and a microultrasound examination (VisualSonics VEVO 2100) of fetal cardiac function is performed. Placental insufficiency is evident by a raised pulsatility index or an absent or reversed end diastolic flow of the umbilical artery Doppler waveform. The ductus venosus and middle cerebral artery Doppler is then examined. Fetal echocardiography is performed by recording B mode, M mode and flow velocity waveforms in lateral and apical views. Offline calculations determine standard M-mode cardiac variables, tricuspid and mitral annular plane systolic excursion, speckle tracking and strain analysis, modified myocardial performance index and vascular flow velocity waveforms of interest. This small animal model of IUGR therefore affords examination of in utero cardiac function that is

  1. Two-dimensional ultrasound Doppler velocimeter for flow mapping of unsteady liquid metal flows.

    PubMed

    Franke, S; Lieske, H; Fischer, A; Büttner, L; Czarske, J; Räbiger, D; Eckert, S

    2013-03-01

    We present a novel pulsed-wave ultrasound Doppler system for fluid flow investigations being able to determine two-dimensional vector fields of flow velocities. Electromagnetically-driven liquid metal flows appear as an attractive application field for such a measurement system. Two linear ultrasound transducer arrays each equipped with 25 transducer elements are used to measure the flow field in a square plane of 67×67 mm(2). The application of advanced processing methods as a multi-beam operation, an interlaced echo signal acquisition and a segmental array technique enable high data acquisition rates and concurrently a high spatial resolution, which have not been obtained so far for flow measurements in liquid metals. The extended pulsing strategy and essential operation principles such as the multiplexing electronic concept will be presented within this paper. The capabilities of the measuring system make it suitable for investigations of non-transparent, turbulent flows. Here, we present measurements of liquid metal flows driven by a rotating magnetic field for demonstration purposes. The measuring setup realized here reveals details of the swirling fluid motion in a horizontal section of a cube. Frame acquisition rates up to 30 fps were achieved for a complete two-dimensional flow mapping.

  2. A novel two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer for handheld 3D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the development of a new two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer for handheld 3D ultrasound imaging. It consists of a miniaturized single-element ultrasound transducer driven by a unique 2-axis liquid-immersible electromagnetic microactuator. With a mechanical scanning frequency of 19.532 Hz and an ultrasound pulse repetition rate of 5 kHz, the scanning transducer was scanned along 60 concentric paths with 256 detection points on each to simulate a physical 2D ultrasound transducer array of 60 × 256 elements. Using the scanning transducer, 3D pulse-echo ultrasound imaging of two silicon discs immersed in water as the imaging target was successfully conducted. The lateral resolution of the 3D ultrasound image was further improved with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT). The new two-axis micromechanical scanning transducer doesn't require complex and expensive multi-channel data acquisition (DAQ) electronics. Therefore, it could provide a new approach to achieve compact and low-cost 3D ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging systems, especially for handheld operations.

  3. Low-level mixing height detection in coastal locations with a scanning Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakkari, V.; O'Connor, E. J.; Nisantzi, A.; Mamouri, R. E.; Hadjimitsis, D. G.

    2015-04-01

    Mixing layer height (MLH) is one of the key parameters in describing lower tropospheric dynamics and capturing its diurnal variability is crucial, especially for interpreting surface observations. In this paper we introduce a method for identifying MLH below the minimum range of a scanning Doppler lidar when operated at vertical. The method we propose is based on velocity variance in low-elevation-angle conical scanning and is applied to measurements in two very different coastal environments: Limassol, Cyprus, during summer and Loviisa, Finland, during winter. At both locations, the new method agrees well with MLH derived from turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate profiles obtained from vertically pointing measurements. The low-level scanning routine frequently indicated non-zero MLH less than 100 m above the surface. Such low MLHs were more common in wintertime Loviisa on the Baltic Sea coast than during summertime in Mediterranean Limassol.

  4. Axial scanning laser Doppler velocimeter using wavelength change without moving mechanism in sensor probe.

    PubMed

    Maru, Koichi

    2011-03-28

    A scanning laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) without any moving mechanism in its sensor probe is proposed. In the proposed scanning LDV, the measurement position is axially scanned by change in the wavelength of the light input to the sensor probe, instead of using a moving mechanism in the sensor probe. For this purpose, a tunable laser and diffraction gratings are used, and the sensor probe including the gratings is separated from the main body including the tunable laser. To demonstrate the scanning function based on the proposed concept, an experiment was conducted using optical fibers, a commercial tunable laser and a setup of the sensor probe consisting of bulk optical components. As the experimental result, it is found that the measurement positions estimated from the measured beat frequencies are in good agreement with the theoretical values. The scan ranges over a wavelength range of 30 nm are estimated to be 29.3 mm when the beam angle to the measurement position at the wavelength of 1540 nm is 10° and 20.8 mm when the beam angle is 15°. The result indicates that the scanning function by means of changing the wavelength input to the sensor probe is successfully demonstrated for the first time. The proposed method has the potential for realizing a scanning LDV with a simple, compact and reliable sensor probe.

  5. Assessment of arterial distension based on continuous wave Doppler ultrasound with an improved Hilbert-Huang processing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yufeng; Su, Nafeng; Li, Zhiyao; Gou, Zhengpin; Chen, Qiuying; Zhang, Yan

    2010-01-01

    A novel approach based on continuous wave (CW) Doppler ultrasound and the Hilbert-Huang transform with end-effect restraint by mirror extending is proposed to assess arterial distension. In the approach, bidirectional Doppler signals were first separated using the phasing-filter technique from the mixed quadrature Doppler signals, which were produced by bidirectional blood and vessel wall movements. Each separated unidirectional signal was decomposed into intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) using the empirical mode decomposition with end effect restraint by mirror extending algorithm, and then the relevant IMFs that contribute to the vessel wall components were identified. Finally, the displacement waveforms of the vessel wall were calculated by integrating its moving velocity waveforms, which were extracted from the bidirectional Hilbert spectrum estimated from the identified wall IMFs. This approach was applied to simulated and clinical Doppler signals from normal common carotid arteries (CCAs). In the simulation study, the estimated wall moving velocity and displacement waveforms were compared with the theoretical ones, respectively. The mean and standard deviation of the root-mean-square errors between the estimated and theoretical wall distension of the 30 realizations was 4.2 +/- 0.4 microm. In the clinical study, peak-to-peak distension was extracted in a subject and then averaged over 15 cardiac cycles, resulting in 603 +/- 22 microm. The mean and standard deviation of the CCA distension averaged over the experimental measurements of 12 healthy subjects gave the result of 620 +/- 154 microm. The clinical results were in agreement with those measured by using the multigate Doppler ultrasound and echo tracking systems. The results show that based on the CW Doppler ultrasound, the proposed approach is practical for extracting arterial wall peak-to-peak distension correctly and could be an alternative method for the vessel wall distension estimation.

  6. Heel Ultrasound Scan in Detecting Osteoporosis in Low Trauma Fracture Patients.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Faiz R; Elfandi, Khaled O

    2016-06-27

    Osteoporosis is the most common metabolic disease with significant impact on the morbidity and mortality of affected patients. Osteoporosis has a significant impact on the economy worldwide. The aim of this study was to find out whether heel ultrasound is as good as central bone densitometry scanning in diagnosing osteoporosis in patients who are at high risk of osteoporosis. This was a prospective study of patients comparing heel ultrasound to central bone densitometry scanning (dual X-ray absorptiometry, DEXA) in patients. The recruited patients attended for a DEXA scan of the left hip and lumbar spine. All subjects had an ultrasound of the left heel using the quantitative heel ultrasound machine. The results of DEXA scan were blinded from the results of ultrasound and vice versa. There were 59 patients who took part in the study, 12 men and 47 women. The mean age was 66 years (SD 11.9) and mean weight was 62.5 kg (SD 10.7). The sensitivity and specificity of the ultrasound heel test to predict osteoporosis were 53% (95%CI: 29-77) and 86% (95%CI: 75-96) respectively. Specificity for predicting bone mineral density (BMD)-defined osteoporosis was high (86%), but sensitivity was low (53%). A heel ultrasound result in the osteoporotic range was highly predictive of BMD-defined osteoporosis. A positive ultrasound heel test in high risk patients is more useful in ruling in osteoporosis than a negative test to rule out osteoporosis.

  7. Use of ultrasound scanning and body condition score to evaluate composition traits in mature beef cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The experiment was designed to validate the use of ultrasound to evaluate body composition in mature beef cows. Both precision and accuracy of measurement were assessed. Cull cows (n = 87) selected for highly variable fatness were used. Two experienced ultrasound technicians scanned and assigned ...

  8. PE-CMOS based C-scan ultrasound for foreign object detection in soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chu-Chuan; Lo, Shih-Chung Ben; Freedman, Matthew T; Lasser, Marvin E; Kula, John; Sarcone, Anita; Wang, Yue

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a C-scan ultrasound prototype and three imaging modalities for the detection of foreign objects inserted in porcine soft tissue. The object materials include bamboo, plastics, glass and aluminum alloys. The images of foreign objects were acquired using the C-scan ultrasound, a portable B-scan ultrasound, film-based radiography, and computerized radiography. The C-scan ultrasound consists of a plane wave transducer, a compound acoustic lens system, and a newly developed ultrasound sensor array based on the complementary metal-oxide semiconductor coated with piezoelectric material (PE-CMOS). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the images were analyzed to quantitatively evaluate the detectability using different imaging modalities. The experimental results indicate that the C-scan prototype has better CNR values in 4 out of 7 objects than other modalities. Specifically, the C-scan prototype provides more detail information of the soft tissues without the speckle artifacts that are commonly seen with conventional B-scan ultrasound, and has the same orientation as the standard radiographs but without ionizing radiation.

  9. Evaluation of gridded scanning ARM cloud radar reflectivity observations and vertical doppler velocity retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamer, K.; Tatarevic, A.; Jo, I.; Kollias, P.

    2014-04-01

    The scanning Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) cloud radars (SACRs) provide continuous atmospheric observations aspiring to capture the 3-D cloud-scale structure. Sampling clouds in 3-D is challenging due to their temporal-spatial scales, the need to sample the sky at high elevations and cloud radar limitations. Thus, a suggested scan strategy is to repetitively slice the atmosphere from horizon to horizon as clouds advect over the radar (Cross-Wind Range-Height Indicator - CW-RHI). Here, the processing and gridding of the SACR CW-RHI scans are presented. First, the SACR sample observations from the ARM Southern Great Plains and Cape Cod sites are post-processed (detection mask, gaseous attenuation correction, insect filtering and velocity de-aliasing). The resulting radial Doppler moment fields are then mapped to Cartesian coordinates with time as one of the dimensions. Next the Cartesian-gridded Doppler velocity fields are decomposed into the horizontal wind velocity contribution and the vertical Doppler velocity component. For validation purposes, all gridded and retrieved fields are compared to collocated zenith-pointing ARM cloud radar measurements. We consider that the SACR sensitivity loss with range, the cloud type observed and the research purpose should be considered in determining the gridded domain size. Our results also demonstrate that the gridded SACR observations resolve the main features of low and high stratiform clouds. It is established that the CW-RHI observations complemented with processing techniques could lead to robust 3-D cloud dynamical representations up to 25-30 degrees off zenith. The proposed gridded products are expected to advance our understanding of 3-D cloud morphology, dynamics and anisotropy and lead to more realistic 3-D radiative transfer calculations.

  10. Noninvasive measurement of acoustic field inside mother's uterus generated by ultrasound scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonets, V. A.; Kazakov, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    Sounds in the audible range arising in mother's uterus during conventional ultrasound scanning were recorded noninvasively for the first time. It was found that their level is comparable with the level of spoken language.

  11. Multi-frequency, 3D ODS measurement by continuous scan laser Doppler vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekes, Ben; Ewins, David

    2015-06-01

    Continuous scan laser Doppler vibrometry (CSLDV) is a technique which has been described and explored in the literature for over two decades, but remains niche compared to SLDV inspection by a series of discrete-point measurements. This is in part because of the unavoidable phenomenon of laser speckle, which deteriorates signal quality when velocity data is captured from a moving spot measurement. Further, applicability of CSLDV has typically been limited to line scans and rectangular areas by the application of sine, step, or ramp functions to the scanning mirrors which control the location of the measurement laser spot. In this paper it is shown that arbitrary functions to scan any area can easily be derived from a basic calibration routine, equivalent to the calibration performed in conventional discrete-point laser vibrometry. This is extended by performing the same scan path upon a test surface from three independent locations of the laser head, and decomposing the three sets of one-dimensional deflection shapes into a single set of three-dimensional deflection shapes. The test was performed with multi-sine excitation, yielding 34 operating deflection shapes from each scan.

  12. 'Son et lumière': a new combined optical and Doppler ultrasound approach to the detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Watmough, D J; Moran, C; Watmough, J A

    1988-04-01

    X-ray mammography is the gold standard for diagnosis of lesions within the female breast. It is also recognized as the technique of choice for breast cancer screening in women over 50-years-old. Notwithstanding these important roles it has shortcomings in terms of limited sensitivity and specificity, especially in younger women. This paper describes the concept of a combined optical density and Doppler ultrasound method proposed initially as a supplement to mammography. A specially devised tissue compressor is also described. Results obtained using test phantoms and initial clinical studies are presented. Neovascularization at the advancing front of neoplastic lesions is believed to underlie detection of lesions by both telediaphanography and Doppler ultrasound.

  13. Color Doppler ultrasound and gamma imaging of intratumorally injected 500 nm iron-silica nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Alexander; Wu, Zhe; Barback, Christopher V; Viveros, Robert; Blair, Sarah L; Ellies, Lesley G; Vera, David R; Mattrey, Robert F; Kummel, Andrew C; Trogler, William C

    2013-07-23

    Perfluoropentane gas filled iron-silica nanoshells have been developed as stationary ultrasound contrast agents for marking tumors to guide surgical resection. It is critical to establish their long-term imaging efficacy, as well as biodistribution. This work shows that 500 nm Fe-SiO2 nanoshells can be imaged by color Doppler ultrasound over the course of 10 days in Py8119 tumor bearing mice. The 500 nm nonbiodegradable SiO2 and biodegradable Fe-SiO2 nanoshells were functionalized with diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) ligand and radiolabeled with (111)In(3+) for biodistribution studies in nu/nu mice. The majority of radioactivity was detected in the liver and kidneys following intravenous (IV) administration of nanoshells to healthy animals. By contrast, after nanoshells were injected intratumorally, most of the radioactivity remained at the injection site; however, some nanoshells escaped into circulation and were distributed similarly as those given intravenously. For intratumoral delivery of nanoshells and IV delivery to healthy animals, little difference was seen between the biodistribution of SiO2 and biodegradable Fe-SiO2 nanoshells. However, when nanoshells were administered IV to tumor bearing mice, a significant increase was observed in liver accumulation of SiO2 nanoshells relative to biodegradable Fe-SiO2 nanoshells. Both SiO2 and Fe-SiO2 nanoshells accumulate passively in proportion to tumor mass, during intravenous delivery of nanoshells. This is the first report of the biodistribution following intratumoral injection of any biodegradable silica particle, as well as the first report demonstrating the utility of DTPA-(111)In labeling for studying silica nanoparticle biodistributions.

  14. Doppler Ultrasound Detection of Preclinical Changes in Foot Arteries in Early Stage of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Leoniuk, Jolanta; Łukasiewicz, Adam; Szorc, Małgorzata; Sackiewicz, Izabela; Janica, Jacek; Łebkowska, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background There are few reports regarding the changes within the vessels in the initial stage of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to estimate the hemodynamic and morphological parameters in foot arteries in type 2 diabetes subjects and to compare these parameters to those obtained in a control group of healthy volunteers. Material/Methods Ultrasound B-mode, color Doppler and pulse wave Doppler imaging of foot arteries was conducted in 37 diabetic patients and 36 non-diabetic subjects to determine their morphological (total vascular diameter and flow lumen diameter) and functional parameters (spectral analysis). Results In diabetic patients, the overall vascular diameter and wall thickness were statistically significantly larger when compared to the control group in the right dorsalis pedis artery (P=0.01; P=0.001), left dorsalis pedis artery (P=0.007; P=0.006), right posterior tibial artery (P=0.005; P=0.0005), and left posterior tibial artery (P=0.007; P=0.0002). No significant differences were observed in both groups in flow lumen diameters and blood flow parameters (PSV, EDV, PI, RI). In the diabetic group, the level of HbA1c positively correlated with flow resistance index in the right dorsalis pedis artery (r=0.38; P=0.02), right posterior tibial artery (r=0.38; P=0.02) and left posterior tibial artery (r=0.42; P=0.009). The pulsatility index within the dorsalis pedis artery decreased with increased trophic skin changes (r=–0.431, P=0.009). Conclusions In the diabetic group, overall artery diameters larger than and flow lumina comparable to the control group suggest vessel wall thickening occurring in the early stage of diabetes. Doppler flow parameters are comparable in both groups. In the diabetic group, the level of HbA1c positively correlated with flow resistance index and negative correlation was observed between the intensity of trophic skin changes and the pulsatility index. PMID:25202434

  15. Improved determination of vascular blood-flow shear rate using Doppler ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farison, James B.; Begeman, Garett A.; Salles-Cunha, Sergio X.; Beebe, Hugh G.

    1997-05-01

    Shear rate has been linked to endothelial and smooth muscle cell function, neointimal hyperplasia, poststenotic dilation and progression of atherosclerotic plaque. In vivo studies of shear rate have been limited in humans due to the lack of a truly accurate noninvasive method of measuring blood flow. In clinical vascular laboratories, the primary method of wall shear rate estimation is the scaled ratio between the center line systolic velocity and the local arterial radius. The present study compares this method with the shear rate calculated directly from data collected using a Doppler ultrasound scanner. Blood flow in the superficial femoral artery of 20 subjects was measured during three stages of distal resistance. Analysis and display programs were written for use with the MATLAB image processing software package. The experimental values of shear rate were calculated using the formal definition and then compared to the standard estimate. In all three states of distal resistance, the experimental values were significantly higher than the estimated values by a factor of approximately 1.57. These results led to the conclusion that the direct method of measuring shear rate is more precise and should replace the estimation model in the clinical laboratory.

  16. Clinical value of color doppler ultrasound in prenatal diagnosis of umbilical cord entry abnormity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiandong; Wang, Li; Li, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical value of prenatal diagnosis of umbilical cord entry abnormity (UCEA) by means of color Doppler ultrasound (CDUS). Methods: Clinical data of sixty-four cases with confirmed umbilical cord entry abnormity were reviewed and the specific UCEA conditions and the outcomes of perinatal infants were analyzed. Results: Detection rates of marginal umbilical cord entry abnormity and velamentous umbilical cord entry abnormity by means of CDUS at second trimester were 94.1% and 93.8% respecdtively much higher than 80.0% and 68.8% which were those of third trimester. Discrepancy had statistical significance (P<0.05). True positive rate of prenatal diagnosis of UCEA by means of CDUS was 85.9% (55/64), and false negative rate was 14.1% (9/64). Among sixty four patients with UCEA, seventeen patients (26.6%) underwent selective caesarean delivery; twenty-six patients (35.9%) underwent emergency caesarean delivery and twenty-four patients (37.5%) had normal delivery. Conclusion: Prenatal diagnosis of UCEA by means of CDUS is intuitive and accurate. It provides an evidence for determination of the best time to diagnose UCEA, and also offers a proper advice for pregnant women about delivery mode to ensure the fetus survival rate, which is clinically valuable. PMID:28083036

  17. Estimation of the viscoelastic properties of vessel walls using a computational model and Doppler ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balocco, Simone; Basset, Olivier; Courbebaisse, Guy; Boni, Enrico; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Tortoli, Piero; Cachard, Christian

    2010-06-01

    Human arteries affected by atherosclerosis are characterized by altered wall viscoelastic properties. The possibility of noninvasively assessing arterial viscoelasticity in vivo would significantly contribute to the early diagnosis and prevention of this disease. This paper presents a noniterative technique to estimate the viscoelastic parameters of a vascular wall Zener model. The approach requires the simultaneous measurement of flow variations and wall displacements, which can be provided by suitable ultrasound Doppler instruments. Viscoelastic parameters are estimated by fitting the theoretical constitutive equations to the experimental measurements using an ARMA parameter approach. The accuracy and sensitivity of the proposed method are tested using reference data generated by numerical simulations of arterial pulsation in which the physiological conditions and the viscoelastic parameters of the model can be suitably varied. The estimated values quantitatively agree with the reference values, showing that the only parameter affected by changing the physiological conditions is viscosity, whose relative error was about 27% even when a poor signal-to-noise ratio is simulated. Finally, the feasibility of the method is illustrated through three measurements made at different flow regimes on a cylindrical vessel phantom, yielding a parameter mean estimation error of 25%.

  18. Estimation of the viscoelastic properties of vessel walls using a computational model and Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Balocco, Simone; Basset, Olivier; Courbebaisse, Guy; Boni, Enrico; Frangi, Alejandro F; Tortoli, Piero; Cachard, Christian

    2010-06-21

    Human arteries affected by atherosclerosis are characterized by altered wall viscoelastic properties. The possibility of noninvasively assessing arterial viscoelasticity in vivo would significantly contribute to the early diagnosis and prevention of this disease. This paper presents a noniterative technique to estimate the viscoelastic parameters of a vascular wall Zener model. The approach requires the simultaneous measurement of flow variations and wall displacements, which can be provided by suitable ultrasound Doppler instruments. Viscoelastic parameters are estimated by fitting the theoretical constitutive equations to the experimental measurements using an ARMA parameter approach. The accuracy and sensitivity of the proposed method are tested using reference data generated by numerical simulations of arterial pulsation in which the physiological conditions and the viscoelastic parameters of the model can be suitably varied. The estimated values quantitatively agree with the reference values, showing that the only parameter affected by changing the physiological conditions is viscosity, whose relative error was about 27% even when a poor signal-to-noise ratio is simulated. Finally, the feasibility of the method is illustrated through three measurements made at different flow regimes on a cylindrical vessel phantom, yielding a parameter mean estimation error of 25%.

  19. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound and the etiology of neurologic decompression sickness during altitude decompression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norfleet, W. T.; Powell, M. R.; Kumar, K. Vasantha; Waligora, J.

    1993-01-01

    The presence of gas bubbles in the arterial circulation can occur from iatrogenic mishaps, cardiopulmonary bypass devices, or following decompression, e.g., in deep-sea or SCUBA diving or in astronauts during extravehicular activities (EVA). We have examined the pathophysiology of neurological decompression sickness in human subjects who developed a large number of small gas bubbles in the right side of the heart as a result of hypobaric exposures. In one case, gas bubbles were detected in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and the subject developed neurological symptoms; a 'resting' patent foramen ovalae (PFO) was found upon saline contrast echocardiography. A PFO was also detected in another individual who developed Spencer Grade 4 precordial Doppler ultrasound bubbles, but no evidence was seen of arterialization of bubbles upon insonation of either the MCA or common carotid artery. The reason for this difference in the behavior of intracardiac bubbles in these two individuals is not known. To date, we have not found evidence of right-to-left shunting of bubbles through pulmonary vasculature. The volume of gas bubbles present following decompression is examined and compared with the number arising from saline contrast injection. The estimates are comparable.

  20. Utility of transcranial Doppler ultrasound for the integrative assessment of cerebrovascular function.

    PubMed

    Willie, C K; Colino, F L; Bailey, D M; Tzeng, Y C; Binsted, G; Jones, L W; Haykowsky, M J; Bellapart, J; Ogoh, S; Smith, K J; Smirl, J D; Day, T A; Lucas, S J; Eller, L K; Ainslie, P N

    2011-03-30

    There is considerable utility in the use of transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) to assess cerebrovascular function. The brain is unique in its high energy and oxygen demand but limited capacity for energy storage that necessitates an effective means of regional blood delivery. The relative low cost, ease-of-use, non-invasiveness, and excellent temporal resolution of TCD make it an ideal tool for the examination of cerebrovascular function in both research and clinical settings. TCD is an efficient tool to access blood velocities within the cerebral vessels, cerebral autoregulation, cerebrovascular reactivity to CO(2), and neurovascular coupling, in both physiological states and in pathological conditions such as stroke and head trauma. In this review, we provide: (1) an overview of TCD methodology with respect to other techniques; (2) a methodological synopsis of the cerebrovascular exam using TCD; (3) an overview of the physiological mechanisms involved in regulation of the cerebral blood flow; (4) the utility of TCD for assessment of cerebrovascular pathology; and (5) recommendations for the assessment of four critical and complimentary aspects of cerebrovascular function: intra-cranial blood flow velocity, cerebral autoregulation, cerebral reactivity, and neurovascular coupling. The integration of these regulatory mechanisms from an integrated systems perspective is discussed, and future research directions are explored.

  1. Effect of low level laser therapy on revascularization of free gingival graft using ultrasound Doppler flowmetry

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, Lalitha T.; Sudhakar, Uma; Janarthanam, Akila Sivaranjani; Das, Nimisha Mithra

    2014-01-01

    Low level laser therapy (LLLT) is widely used during the post-operative period to accelerate the healing process. It promotes beneficial biological action on neovascularization with anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects. Two systemically healthy patients with Miller's grade II recession on 33 and 41, respectively, were treated with free gingival graft. After surgery, second patient received LLLT using a 830 nm diode laser, with output power of 0.1 W on the first day half hour following surgery, on the third day, seventh day, and lastly on the ninth day. Both the patients were asked to assess the pain on second, fourth and tenth day using a Numerical Rating Scale and revascularization of the grafted area was assessed using a color Doppler ultrasound imaging on the fourth and the ninth day. Neovascularization was noted in both the patients but the second patient elicited marked increase in vascularity on the fourth as well as the tenth day and drastic reduction in pain on day four, with no change on the tenth day. The results showed that LLLT was an effective adjunctive treatment in promoting reevascularization and pain control during early healing of free gingival graft. PMID:25024560

  2. Scalpel versus electrosurgery: Comparison of gingival perfusion status using ultrasound Doppler flowmetry

    PubMed Central

    Manivannan, N.; Ahathya, R. S.; Rajaram, P. C.

    2013-01-01

    The main prerequisites of any surgical procedure are achievement of good visibility and access to the site with minimal bleeding and rapid and painless healing. With the advancement of technology the armamentarium for oral surgical procedures has also widened. The use of alternate methods to the traditional scalpel such as electrosurgery, laser, and chemicals has been widely experimented with. This article aims to report the gingival perfusion pre-operatively and post-operatively, comparing the use of scalpel and electrosurgery in different anatomic sites in patient. Since wound healing is influenced by its revascularization rate, which follows the pattern of new connective tissue formation, the perfusion status of the gingiva has been studied using ultrasound spectral Doppler. The results of our study show that there was 30% more blood flow by 7th day, 19% more blood flow by 15th day and 11% more blood flow by 30th day in sites where the scalpel was used compared with sites where electrosurgery technique was used. PMID:23956596

  3. Pulsatility Produced by the Hemodialysis Roller Pump as Measured by Doppler Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Fulker, David; Keshavarzi, Gholamreza; Simmons, Anne; Pugh, Debbie; Barber, Tracie

    2015-11-01

    Microbubbles have previously been detected in the hemodialysis extracorporeal circuit and can enter the blood vessel leading to potential complications. A potential source of these microbubbles is highly pulsatile flow resulting in cavitation. This study quantified the pulsatility produced by the roller pump throughout the extracorporeal circuit. A Sonosite S-series ultrasound probe (FUJIFILM Sonosite Inc., Tokyo, Japan) was used on a single patient during normal hemodialysis treatment. The Doppler waveform showed highly pulsatile flow throughout the circuit with the greatest pulse occurring after the pump itself. The velocity pulse after the pump ranged from 57.6 ± 1.74 cm/s to -72 ± 4.13 cm/s. Flow reversal occurred when contact between the forward roller and tubing ended. The amplitude of the pulse was reduced from 129.6 cm/s to 16.25 cm/s and 6.87 cm/s following the dialyzer and venous air trap. This resulted in almost nonpulsatile, continuous flow returning to the patient through the venous needle. These results indicate that the roller pump may be a source of microbubble formation from cavitation due to the highly pulsatile blood flow. The venous air trap was identified as the most effective mechanism in reducing the pulsatility. The inclusion of multiple rollers is also recommended to offer an effective solution in dampening the pulse produced by the pump.

  4. Chest wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound scans.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tao; Platel, Bram; Mann, Ritse M; Huisman, Henkjan; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic method to segment the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images. Determining the location of the chest wall in automated 3D breast ultrasound images is necessary in computer-aided detection systems to remove automatically detected cancer candidates beyond the chest wall and it can be of great help for inter- and intra-modal image registration. We show that the visible part of the chest wall in an automated 3D breast ultrasound image can be accurately modeled by a cylinder. We fit the surface of our cylinder model to a set of automatically detected rib-surface points. The detection of the rib-surface points is done by a classifier using features representing local image intensity patterns and presence of rib shadows. Due to attenuation of the ultrasound signal, a clear shadow is visible behind the ribs. Evaluation of our segmentation method is done by computing the distance of manually annotated rib points to the surface of the automatically detected chest wall. We examined the performance on images obtained with the two most common 3D breast ultrasound devices in the market. In a dataset of 142 images, the average mean distance of the annotated points to the segmented chest wall was 5.59 ± 3.08 mm.

  5. Coupling airborne laser scanning and acoustic Doppler current profiler data to model stream rating curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, N.; Lyon, S. W.; Kean, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The rating curve enables the translation of water depth into discharge through a reference cross section. Errors in estimating stream channel geometry can therefore result in increased discharge uncertainty. This study investigates coupling national-scale airborne laser scanning (ALS) and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) bathymetric survey data for generating stream rating curves. Specifically, stream channel geometries were generated from coupled ALS and ADCP scanning data collected for a well-monitored site located in northern Sweden. These data were used to define the hydraulic geometry required by a physically-based 1-D hydraulic model. The results of our study demonstrate that the effects of potential scanning data errors on the model generated rating curve were less than the uncertainties due to stream gauging measurements and empirical rating curve fitting. Further analysis of the ALS data showed that an overestimation of the streambank elevation (the main scanning data error) was primarily due to vegetation that could be adjusted for through a root-mean-square-error bias correction. We consider these findings encouraging as hydrometric agencies can potentially leverage national-scale ALS and ADCP instrumentation to reduce the cost and effort required for maintaining and establish rating curves at gauging stations.

  6. Velocity profiles inside volcanic clouds from three-dimensional scanning microwave dual-polarization Doppler radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, Mario

    2016-07-01

    In this work, velocity profiles within a volcanic tephra cloud obtained by dual-polarization Doppler radar acquisitions with three-dimensional (3-D) mechanical scanning capability are analyzed. A method for segmenting the radar volumes into three velocity regimes: vertical updraft, vertical fallout, and horizontal wind advection within a volcanic tephra cloud using dual-polarization Doppler radar moments is proposed. The horizontal and vertical velocity components within the regimes are retrieved using a novel procedure that makes assumptions concerning the characteristics of the winds inside these regimes. The vertical velocities retrieved are combined with 1-D simulations to derive additional parameters including particle fallout, mass flux, and particle sizes. The explosive event occurred on 23 November 2013 at the Mount Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy), is considered a demonstrative case in which to analyze the radar Doppler signal inside the tephra column. The X-band radar (3 cm wavelength) in the Catania, Italy, airport observed the 3-D scenes of the Etna tephra cloud ~32 km from the volcano vent every 10 min. From the radar-derived vertical velocity profiles of updraft, particle fallout, and horizontal transportation, an exit velocity of 150 m/s, mass flux rate of 1.37 • 107 kg/s, particle fallout velocity of 18 m/s, and diameters of precipitating tephra particles equal to 0.8 cm are estimated on average. These numbers are shown to be consistent with theoretical 1-D simulations of plume dynamics and local reports at the ground, respectively. A thickness of 3 ± 0.36 km for the downwind ash cloud is also inferred by differentiating the radar-derived cloud top and the height of transition between the convective and buoyancy regions, the latter being inferred by the estimated vertical updraft velocity profile. The unique nature of the case study as well as the novelty of the segmentation and retrieval methods presented potentially give new insights into the

  7. Viewing ultrasound scan images prior to termination of pregnancy: choice for women or conflict for ultrasonographers?

    PubMed

    Graham, O; Ankrett, S; Killick, S R

    2010-01-01

    Establishing pregnancy location is key to minimising the risks of abortion, and establishing gestational age optimises women's choice of procedure and timing. There is limited information in UK practice about the views of women having an ultrasound before an abortion with regards to whether they would wish to see the scan image of their fetus. We therefore surveyed the views of women having pre-abortion ultrasound scans and the views of ultrasonographers, using self-completed anonymous questionnaires. Responses were available for analysis from 191 women aged 16 to over 45. A total of 25 (13%) women had seen their scan. Of those who did not see their scan, 40 (24%) said they would have liked to see it, to aid their decision-making, as a right, or out of curiosity. Nine out of 17 ultrasonographers completed their questionnaires. Four ultrasonographers thought that women having scans before an abortion should see their scan images if they wished and another four thought they should not because of possible psychological effects. Their response also highlighted possible effects of such scans on those performing them. Given the choice, a larger number of women would like to see their scan images than actually ask. Women request to see their pre-abortion ultrasound images for their own individual reasons, which should be respected. Ultrasonographers may have conflict or ethical dilemmas when performing pre-abortion scans and they should be supported in identifying women for whom looking at their scan images would be of benefit.

  8. Human abdomen recognition using camera and force sensor in medical robot system for automatic ultrasound scan.

    PubMed

    Bin Mustafa, Ammar Safwan; Ishii, Takashi; Matsunaga, Yoshiki; Nakadate, Ryu; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Kouji; Saito, Akiko; Sugawara, Motoaki; Niki, Kiyomi; Takanishi, Atsuo

    2013-01-01

    Physicians use ultrasound scans to obtain real-time images of internal organs, because such scans are safe and inexpensive. However, people in remote areas face difficulties to be scanned due to aging society and physician's shortage. Hence, it is important to develop an autonomous robotic system to perform remote ultrasound scans. Previously, we developed a robotic system for automatic ultrasound scan focusing on human's liver. In order to make it a completely autonomous system, we present in this paper a way to autonomously localize the epigastric region as the starting position for the automatic ultrasound scan. An image processing algorithm marks the umbilicus and mammary papillae on a digital photograph of the patient's abdomen. Then, we made estimation for the location of the epigastric region using the distances between these landmarks. A supporting algorithm distinguishes rib position from epigastrium using the relationship between force and displacement. We implemented these algorithms with the automatic scanning system into an apparatus: a Mitsubishi Electric's MELFA RV-1 six axis manipulator. Tests on 14 healthy male subjects showed the apparatus located the epigastric region with a success rate of 94%. The results suggest that image recognition was effective in localizing a human body part.

  9. Treatment of in-vivo bladder tissue with electronically scanned high-intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feuillu, Benoit; Lacoste, Francois; Schlosser, Jacques; Vallancien, Guy

    1998-04-01

    Introduction: The efficacy of extracorporeal High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) on bladder wall has been demonstrated. However, the treatment is still slow, needing about 15 min to treat 1 cm2. Objectives: Demonstrate the feasibility of HIFU with electronic scanning and reduce the during of HIFU treatments. Conclusions: Necrotic lesions on bladder posterior wall can be obtained with HIFU treatments using electronic scanning of the focal point. Average treatment duration with electronic scanning is reduced to 3 min 30 sec/cm2.

  10. Ultrasound detection of pneumothorax compared with chest X-ray and computed tomography scan.

    PubMed

    Nagarsheth, Khanjan; Kurek, Stanley

    2011-04-01

    Pneumothorax after trauma can be a life threatening injury and its care requires expeditious and accurate diagnosis and possible intervention. We performed a prospective, single blinded study with convenience sampling at a Level I trauma center comparing thoracic ultrasound with chest X-ray and CT scan in the detection of traumatic pneumothorax. Trauma patients that received a thoracic ultrasound, chest X-ray, and chest CT scan were included in the study. The chest X-rays were read by a radiologist who was blinded to the thoracic ultrasound results. Then both were compared with CT scan results. One hundred and twenty-five patients had a thoracic ultrasound performed in the 24-month period. Forty-six patients were excluded from the study due to lack of either a chest X-ray or chest CT scan. Of the remaining 79 patients there were 22 positive pneumothorax found by CT and of those 18 (82%) were found on ultrasound and 7 (32%) were found on chest X-ray. The sensitivity of thoracic ultrasound was found to be 81.8 per cent and the specificity was found to be 100 per cent. The sensitivity of chest X-ray was found to be 31.8 per cent and again the specificity was found to be 100 per cent. The negative predictive value of thoracic ultrasound for pneumothorax was 0.934 and the negative predictive value for chest X-ray for pneumothorax was found to be 0.792. We advocate the use of chest ultrasound for detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients.

  11. Anticoagulant therapy for venous thromboembolism detected by Doppler ultrasound in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer receiving bevacizumab

    PubMed Central

    Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Shinozaki, Eiji; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Ozaka, Masato; Ogura, Mariko; Chin, Keisho; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Background Doppler ultrasound imaging is useful for management of venous thromboembolism associated with a subclavicular implantable central venous access system in patients receiving bevacizumab (Bev). We investigated the efficacy and safety of our anticoagulant regimen based on Doppler findings. Methods Patients aged ≤75 years with metastatic colorectal cancer, no history of thromboembolism, and no prior use of Bev received chemotherapy plus Bev. Doppler ultrasound imaging of the deep venous system to detect thrombosis was performed after the first course of Bev and repeated after the third course in patients with asymptomatic thrombosis. Indications for anticoagulant therapy in patients with asymptomatic thrombosis were as follows: enlarging thrombus (E), thrombus >40 mm in diameter (S), thrombus involving the superior vena cava (C), and decreased blood flow (V). Results Among 79 patients enrolled in this study, asymptomatic thrombosis was detected in 56 patients (70.9%) by Doppler ultrasound imaging after the first course of Bev and there was no thrombus in 23 patients (29.1%). Of these 56 patients, 11 (19.6%) received anticoagulant therapy with warfarin, including eight after the first course and three after follow-up imaging. S + V was observed in four of 11 patients (36.4%), as well as V in two (18.2%), S + V + C in one (9.1%), E + S + V in one (9.1%), E + C in one (9.1%), E in one (9.1%), and C in one (9.1%). All patients resumed chemotherapy, including seven who resumed Bev. Improvement or stabilization of thrombi was achieved in ten patients (90.9%). Only one patient had symptomatic thromboembolism. Mild bleeding due to anticoagulant therapy occurred in six patients (54.5%), but there were no treatment-related severe adverse events or deaths. Severe thromboembolism was not observed in the other 68 patients. Conclusion Our anticoagulant protocol for asymptomatic thrombosis detected by Doppler ultrasound imaging was effective at preventing severe

  12. Comparison of time-frequency distribution techniques for analysis of simulated Doppler ultrasound signals of the femoral artery.

    PubMed

    Guo, Z; Durand, L G; Lee, H C

    1994-04-01

    The time-frequency distribution of the Doppler ultrasound blood flow signal is normally computed by using the short-time Fourier transform or autoregressive modeling. These two techniques require stationarity of the signal during a finite interval. This requirement imposes some limitations on the distribution estimate. In the present study, three new techniques for nonstationary signal analysis (the Choi-Williams distribution, a reduced interference distribution, and the Bessel distribution) were tested to determine their advantages and limitations for analysis of the Doppler blood flow signal of the femoral artery. For the purpose of comparison, a model stimulating the quadrature Doppler signal was developed, and the parameters of each technique were optimized based on the theoretical distribution. Distributions computed using these new techniques were assessed and compared with those computed using the short-time Fourier transform and autoregressive modeling. Three indexes, the correlation coefficient, the integrated squared error, and the normalized root-mean-squared error of the mean frequency waveform, were used to evaluate the performance of each technique. The results showed that the Bessel distribution performed the best, but the Choi-Williams distribution and autoregressive modeling are also techniques which can generate good time-frequency distributions of Doppler signals.

  13. Exploiting Continuous Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometry in timing belt dynamic characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiariotti, P.; Martarelli, M.; Castellini, P.

    2017-03-01

    Dynamic behaviour of timing belts has always interested the engineering community over the years. Nowadays, there are several numerical methods to predict the dynamics of these systems. However, the tuning of such models by experimental approaches still represents an issue: an accurate characterisation does require a measurement in operating conditions since the belt mounting condition might severely affect its dynamic behaviour. Moreover, since the belt is constantly moving during running conditions, non-contact measurement methods are needed. Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) and imaging techniques do represent valid candidates for this purpose. This paper aims at describing the use of Continuous Scanning LDV (CSLDV) as a tool for the dynamic characterisation of timing belts in IC (Internal Combustion) engines (cylinder head). The high-spatial resolution data that can be collected in short testing time makes CSLDV highly suitable for such application. The measurement on a moving surface, however, represents a challenge for CSLDV. The paper discusses how the belt in-plane speed influences CSLDV signal and how an order-based multi-harmonic excitation might affect the recovery of Operational Deflection Shapes in a CSLDV test. A comparison with a standard Discrete Scanning LDV measurement is also given in order to show that a CSLDV test, if well designed, can indeed provide the same amount of information in a drastically reduced amount of time.

  14. Image analysis of placental issues using three-dimensional ultrasound and color power Doppler based on Support Vector Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Xu, Diyun; Liu, Jianguo

    2009-10-01

    With the development of medical science, three-dimensional ultrasound and color power Doppler tomography shooting placenta is widely used. To determine whether the fetus's development is abnormal or not is mainly through the analysis of the capillary's distribution of the obtained images which are shot by the Doppler scanner. In this classification process, we will adopt Support Vector Machine classifier. SVM achieves substantial improvements over the statistical learning methods and behaves robustly over a variety of different learning tasks. Furthermore, it is fully automatic, eliminating the need for manual parameter tuning and can solve the small sample problem wonderfully well. So SVM classifier is valid and reliable in the identification of placentas and is more accurate with the lower error rate.

  15. Automated assessment of joint synovitis activity from medical ultrasound and power doppler examinations using image processing and machine learning methods

    PubMed Central

    Ziębiński, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common rheumatic disease with arthritis, and causes substantial functional disability in approximately 50% patients after 10 years. Accurate measurement of the disease activity is crucial to provide an adequate treatment and care to the patients. The aim of this study is focused on a computer aided diagnostic system that supports an assessment of synovitis severity. Material and methods This paper focus on a computer aided diagnostic system that was developed within joint Polish–Norwegian research project related to the automated assessment of the severity of synovitis. Semiquantitative ultrasound with power Doppler is a reliable and widely used method of assessing synovitis. Synovitis is estimated by ultrasound examiner using the scoring system graded from 0 to 3. Activity score is estimated on the basis of the examiner’s experience or standardized ultrasound atlases. The method needs trained medical personnel and the result can be affected by a human error. Results The porotype of a computer-aided diagnostic system and algorithms essential for an analysis of ultrasonic images of finger joints are main scientific output of the MEDUSA project. Medusa Evaluation System prototype uses bone, skin, joint and synovitis area detectors for mutual structural model based evaluation of synovitis. Finally, several algorithms that support the semi-automatic or automatic detection of the bone region were prepared as well as a system that uses the statistical data processing approach in order to automatically localize the regions of interest. Conclusions Semiquantitative ultrasound with power Doppler is a reliable and widely used method of assessing synovitis. Activity score is estimated on the basis of the examiner’s experience and the result can be affected by a human error. In this paper we presented the MEDUSA project which is focused on a computer aided diagnostic system that supports an assessment of synovitis severity

  16. Remote Sensing of Multi-Level Wind Fields with High-Energy Airborne Scanning Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Olivier, Lisa D.; Banta, Robert M.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Howell, James N.; Cutten, Dean R.; Johnson, Steven C.; Menzies, Robert T.; Tratt, David M.

    1997-01-01

    The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory have developed and flown a scanning, 1 Joule per pulse, CO2 coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping a three-dimensional volume of atmospheric winds and aerosol backscatter in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. Applications include the study of severe and non-severe atmospheric flows, intercomparisons with other sensors, and the simulation of prospective satellite Doppler lidar wind profilers. Examples of wind measurements are given for the marine boundary layer and near the coastline of the western United States.

  17. Remote sensing of multi-level wind fields with high-energy airborne scanning coherent Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Rothermel, J; Olivier, L; Banta, R; Hardesty, R M; Howell, J; Cutten, D; Johnson, S; Menzies, R; Tratt, D M

    1998-01-19

    The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory have developed and flown a scanning, 1 Joule per pulse, CO2 coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping a three-dimensional volume of atmospheric winds and aerosol backscatter in the planetary boundary layer, free troposphere, and lower stratosphere. Applications include the study of severe and non-severe atmospheric flows, intercomparisons with other sensors, and the simulation of prospective satellite Doppler lidar wind profilers. Examples of wind measurements are given for the marine boundary layer and near the coastline of the western United States.

  18. Continuous-scanning laser Doppler vibrometry: Extensions to arbitrary areas, multi-frequency and 3D capture

    SciTech Connect

    Weekes, B.; Ewins, D.; Acciavatti, F.

    2014-05-27

    To date, differing implementations of continuous scan laser Doppler vibrometry have been demonstrated by various academic institutions, but since the scan paths were defined using step or sine functions from function generators, the paths were typically limited to 1D line scans or 2D areas such as raster paths or Lissajous trajectories. The excitation was previously often limited to a single frequency due to the specific signal processing performed to convert the scan data into an ODS. In this paper, a configuration of continuous-scan laser Doppler vibrometry is demonstrated which permits scanning of arbitrary areas, with the benefit of allowing multi-frequency/broadband excitation. Various means of generating scan paths to inspect arbitrary areas are discussed and demonstrated. Further, full 3D vibration capture is demonstrated by the addition of a range-finding facility to the described configuration, and iteratively relocating a single scanning laser head. Here, the range-finding facility was provided by a Microsoft Kinect, an inexpensive piece of consumer electronics.

  19. Continuous-scanning laser Doppler vibrometry: Extensions to arbitrary areas, multi-frequency and 3D capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekes, B.; Ewins, D.; Acciavatti, F.

    2014-05-01

    To date, differing implementations of continuous scan laser Doppler vibrometry have been demonstrated by various academic institutions, but since the scan paths were defined using step or sine functions from function generators, the paths were typically limited to 1D line scans or 2D areas such as raster paths or Lissajous trajectories. The excitation was previously often limited to a single frequency due to the specific signal processing performed to convert the scan data into an ODS. In this paper, a configuration of continuous-scan laser Doppler vibrometry is demonstrated which permits scanning of arbitrary areas, with the benefit of allowing multi-frequency/broadband excitation. Various means of generating scan paths to inspect arbitrary areas are discussed and demonstrated. Further, full 3D vibration capture is demonstrated by the addition of a range-finding facility to the described configuration, and iteratively relocating a single scanning laser head. Here, the range-finding facility was provided by a Microsoft Kinect, an inexpensive piece of consumer electronics.

  20. Colour Doppler ultrasound hemodynamic characteristics of patients with priapism before and after therapeutic interventions.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Rei K; Aggarwal, Himanshu; Chiou, Christopher R; Broughton, Fleur; Liu, Susan

    2009-08-01

    BACKGROUND: Information in the literature on the hemodynamic characteristics of priapism, especially after therapeutic intervention, is very limited. We analyzed our colour Doppler ultrasound (CDU) studies performed for patients with various durations of priapism before and after therapeutic intervention. METHODS: We reviewed 52 CDU studies for 24 patients with priapism before and after treatment for the period 1997-2007. The duration of priapism ranged from 4 hours to 8 days. We performed 17 CDU studies in 8 patients who presented with a duration of priapism of 7 hours or less, 9 studies in 4 patients who presented with duration of priapism of more than 20 hours, 23 studies in 11 patients referred to us after they had failed prior therapeutic intervention at other institutions and 3 studies in 1 patient with priapism related to perineal trauma. RESULTS: Among the 8 patients who presented with a duration of priapism of 7 hours or less, CDU studies on presentation showed detectible cavernosal arterial flow in all except 1 study. Among the 4 patients who presented with a duration of more than 20 hours, the studies showed no detectible cavernosal arterial blood flow. We repeated CDU studies after therapeutic intervention, and they showed restoration of cavernosal arterial flow with relief of veno-occlusive status. Among the 11 patients in whom prior treatments failed before they were referred to us, CDU studies performed on presentation showed no detectible cavernosal arterial flow in 10 of the 11 patients. We performed 12 CDU studies in 8 patients after placing a penile cavernosa-dorsal vein (CD) shunt. We observed the presence of blood flow in the CD shunt, indicating its patency in all 8 patients. Some patients showed high cavernosal arterial flow (peak systolic velocity [PSV] up to 27.6 cm/s) after surgery. These patients appeared to have residual priapism of primarily arteriogenic status that improved after observation. CONCLUSION: After therapeutic intervention

  1. Power Doppler ultrasound phenotyping of expanding versus collapsed popliteal lymph nodes in murine inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bouta, Echoe M; Ju, Yawen; Rahimi, Homaira; de Mesy-Bentley, Karen L; Wood, Ronald W; Xing, Lianping; Schwarz, Edward M

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease manifested by episodic flares in affected joints that are challenging to predict and treat. Longitudinal contrast enhanced-MRI (CE-MRI) of inflammatory arthritis in tumor necrosis factor-transgenic (TNF-Tg) mice has demonstrated that popliteal lymph nodes (PLN) increase in volume and contrast enhancement during the pre-arthritic "expanding" phase of the disease, and then suddenly "collapse" during knee flare. Given the potential of this biomarker of arthritic flare, we aimed to develop a more cost-effective means of phenotyping PLN using ultrasound (US) imaging. Initially we attempted to recapitulate CE-MRI of PLN with subcutaneous footpad injection of US microbubbles (DEFINITY®). While this approach allowed for phenotyping via quantification of lymphatic sinuses in PLN, which showed a dramatic decrease in collapsed PLN versus expanding or wild-type (WT) PLN, electron microscopy demonstrated that DEFINITY® injection also resulted in destruction of the lymphatic vessels afferent to the PLN. In contrast, Power Doppler (PD) US is innocuous to and efficiently quantifies blood flow within PLN of WT and TNF-Tg mice. PD-US demonstrated that expanding PLN have a significantly higher normalized PD volume (NPDV) versus collapsed PLN (0.553 ± 0.007 vs. 0.008 ± 0.003; p<0.05). Moreover, we define the upper (>0.030) and lower (<0.016) quartile NPDVs in this cohort of mice, which serve as conservative thresholds to phenotype PLN as expanding and collapsed, respectively. Interestingly, of the 12 PLN phenotyped by the two methods, there was disagreement in 4 cases in which they were determined to be expanding by CE-MRI and collapsed by PD-US. Since the adjacent knee had evidence of synovitis in all 4 cases, we concluded that the PD-US phenotyping was correct, and that this approach is currently the safest and most cost-effective in vivo approach to phenotype murine PLN as a biomarker of arthritic flare.

  2. [The analysis and comparison of different edge detection algorithms in ultrasound B-scan images].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luo-ping; Yang, Bo-yuan; Wang, Chun-hong

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, some familiar algorithms of edge detection in ultrasound B-scan images are analyzed and studied. The results show that Sobel, Prewitt and Laplacian operators are sensitive to noise, Hough transform adapts to the whole detection, while LoG algorithm's average is zero and it couldn't change the whole dynamic area. Accordingly LoG algorithm is preferable.

  3. Doppler ultrasound surveillance in deep tunneling compressed-air work with Trimix breathing: bounce dive technique compared to saturation-excursion technique.

    PubMed

    Vellinga, T P van Rees; Sterk, W; de Boer, A G E M; van der Beek, A J; Verhoeven, A C; van Dijk, F J H

    2008-01-01

    The Western Scheldt Tunneling Project in The Netherlands provided a unique opportunity to evaluate two deep-diving techniques with Doppler ultrasound surveillance. Divers used the bounce diving techniques for repair and maintenance of the TBM. The tunnel boring machine jammed at its deepest depth. As a result the work time was not sufficient. The saturation diving technique was developed and permitted longer work time at great depth. Thirty-one divers were involved in this project. Twenty-three divers were examined using Doppler ultrasound. Data analysis addressed 52 exposures to Trimix at 4.6-4.8 bar gauge using the bounce technique and 354 exposures to Trimix at 4.0-6.9 bar gauge on saturation excursions. No decompression incidents occurred with either technique during the described phase of the project. Doppler ultrasound revealed that the bubble loads assessed in both techniques were generally low. We find out, that despite longer working hours, shorter decompression times and larger physical workloads, the saturation-excursion technique was associated with significant lower bubble grades than in the bounce technique using Doppler Ultrasound. We conclude that the saturation-excursion technique with Trimix is a good option for deep and long exposures in caisson work. The Doppler technique proved valuable, and it should be incorporated in future compressed-air work.

  4. Focal bowel wall changes detected with colour Doppler ultrasound: diagnostic value in acute non-diverticular diseases of the colon.

    PubMed

    Danse, E M; Jamart, J; Hoang, P; Laterre, P F; Kartheuser, A; Van Beers, B E

    2004-11-01

    We performed a study to determine if colour Doppler findings may help to identify the cause of wall thickening in acute non-diverticular diseases of the colon. The study group included 66 patients admitted to the emergency department with a final diagnosis of infectious colitis (n=23), inflammatory colitis (n=10), ischaemic colitis (n=23) and malignant tumours (n=10). The following ultrasound features were assessed: maximal wall thickness, wall stratification, arterial flow in the colonic wall and arteriolar resistive index. Higher values of wall thickness were observed in malignant tumour (18.2+/-6.2 mm, p<0.001). Moderately thickened wall (6.6+/-1.3 mm, p< or =0.06), preserved stratification (90% versus 46% in the remainder of the study population) and lower resistive index (0.51+/-0.10, p< or =0.05) were significantly related to inflammatory colitis. Absence of arterial flow was more frequently observed in ischaemia (43% versus 12% in the remainder of the study population). In conclusion, despite some overlap, both ultrasound and colour Doppler features are helpful in the differential diagnosis of colonic thickening related to non-diverticular colonic lesions.

  5. Accuracy of velocity and shear rate measurements using pulsed Doppler ultrasound: a comparison of signal analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Markou, C P; Ku, D N

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation was instituted to evaluate the performance of Doppler ultrasound signal processing techniques for measuring fluid velocity under well-defined flow conditions using a 10-MHz multigated pulsed ultrasound instrument. Conditions of fully developed flow in a rigid, circular tube were varied over a Reynolds number range between 500 and 8000. The velocity across the tube was determined using analog and digital zero crossing detectors and three digital spectrum estimators. Determination of the Doppler frequency from analog or digital zero crossing detectors gave accurate velocity values for laminar and moderately turbulent flow away from the wall (0.969 less than or equal to r less than or equal to 0.986). Three digital spectrum estimators, Fast Fourier Transform, Burg autoregressive method, and minimum variance method, were slightly more accurate than the zero crossing detector (0.984 less than or equal to r less than or equal to 0.994), especially at points close to the walls and with higher levels of turbulence. Steep velocity gradients and transit-time-effects from high velocities produced significantly larger errors in velocity measurement. Wall shear rate estimates were most precise when calculated using the position of the wall and two velocity points. The calculated wall shears were within 20%-30% of theoretically predicted values.

  6. Measurements of underwater acoustic pressure fields using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Gerard P.

    2004-05-01

    Laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV) are designed to measure structural vibration velocity by sensing the phase shift in the laser signal reflected from a vibrating source. It is known that index of refraction modulations resulting from acoustic pressure distributions along a laser light path will also cause a phase shift. Simpson et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 99(4), 2521(A) (1996)] have investigated this acousto-optic phase modulation as a possible contaminating effect for underwater LDV vibration measurements. This paper will investigate acousto-optic phase modulations measured by a scanning LDV as a method for measuring pressure radiating from underwater vibrating surfaces. This is done by passing the laser beam through the radiating pressure field and measuring the backscattered laser signal which is reflected off a rigid and retroreflective surface (outside the pressure field). It is shown experimentally, using the average pressure measured with an LDV over a plane in the vicinity of a vibrating structure, that the pressure at a far-field location normal to the plane can be determined.

  7. Identification of pavement material properties using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasheminejad, Navid; Vuye, Cedric; Van den Bergh, Wim; Dirckx, Joris; Leysen, Jari; Sels, Seppe; Vanlanduit, Steve

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an inverse modeling approach to estimate mechanical properties of asphalt concrete (i.e. Young's modulus E, Poisson ratio ν and damping coefficients). Modal analysis was performed on an asphalt slab using a shaker to excite the specimen and an optical measurement system (a Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer or SLDV) to measure the velocity of a measurement grid on the surface of the slab. The SLDV has the ability to measure the vibration pattern of an object with high accuracy, short testing time and without making any contact. The measured data were used as inputs for a frequency domain model parameter estimation method (the Polymax estimator). Meanwhile, natural frequencies and damping ratios of the system were calculated using a Finite Element Modeling (FEM) method. Then, the Modal Assurance Criterion (MAC) was used to pair the mode shapes of the structure determined by measurements and estimated by FEM. By changing the inputs of the FEM analysis (E, ν and damping coefficients of the material) iteratively and minimizing the discrepancy between paired natural frequencies and damping ratios of the system estimated using the Polymax estimator and calculated by FEM, the Young's modulus, Poisson ratio and damping coefficients of the asphalt slab were estimated.

  8. Parabolic BM-scan technique for full range Doppler spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Jaillon, Franck; Makita, Shuichi; Yabusaki, Masaki; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-18

    A full range spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) technique that relies on the linear phase modulation of one of the interferometer arms has been widely utilized. Although this method is useful, the mirror image elimination is not perfect for samples in which regions with high axial motion exist. In this paper, we introduce a new modulation pattern to overcome this mirror image elimination failure. This new modulation is a parabolic phase modulation in the transverse scanning direction, and is applied to the SD-OCT reference beam by an electro-optic modulator. Flow phantom and in vivo experiments demonstrate that for moving structures with large velocities, this parabolic phase modulation technique presents better mirror image elimination than a standard linear phase modulation method. A direct consequence of this enhanced mirror image removal is an improved velocity range obtained with phase-resolved Doppler imaging. Consequently, applying the proposed technique in retinal blood flow measurements may be useful for ophthalmologic diagnosis.

  9. Investigation of three-dimensional vibration measurement by a single scanning laser Doppler vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Da-Ming; Zhu, W. D.

    2017-01-01

    A scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) has been widely used in non-contact vibration measurement. This paper presents a novel investigation of three-dimensional (3D) vibration measurement by a single SLDV sequentially placed at three different positions, where 3D vibration is defined as three vibration components along axes of a specified measurement coordinate system (MCS), which can give more precise knowledge of structural dynamic characteristics. A geometric model of the SLDV is proposed and a vibrometer coordinate system (VCS) based on the geometric model is defined and fixed on the SLDV. The pose of a SLDV with respect to a MCS is expressed in the form of a translation vector and a direction cosine matrix from the VCS to the MCS, which can be calculated by four or more target points with known coordinates in both the MCS and the VCS. An improved method based on the least squares method and singular value decomposition is proposed to obtain the pose of the SLDV. Compared with an inverse method, the proposed method can yield an orthogonal direction cosine matrix and be applicable to a two-dimensional structure. Effects of the number of target points on the accuracy and stability of the proposed method are investigated. With three direction cosine matrices of three different positions obtained by the proposed method, measured vibration velocities along laser line-of-sight directions can be transformed to vibration components along axes of the MCS. An experiment was conducted to measure 3D vibration of a target point on a beam under sinusoidal excitation by a single SLDV sequentially placed at three different positions. Vibration components along axes of the MCS obtained by the single SLDV were in good agreement with those from a commercial Polytec 3D scanning laser vibrometer PSV-500-3D.

  10. The development of a combined b-mode, ARFI, and spectral Doppler ultrasound imaging system for investigating cardiovascular stiffness and hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Joshua R.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2011-03-01

    The progression of atherosclerotic disease, caused by the formation of plaques within arteries, is a complex process believed to be a function of the localized mechanical properties and hemodynamic loading associated with the arterial wall. It is hypothesized that measurements of vascular stiffness and wall-shear rate (WSR) may provide important information regarding vascular remodeling, endothelial function, and the growth of soft-lipid filled plaques that could help a clinician better diagnose a patient's risk of clinical events such as stroke. To that end, the approach taken in this work was to combine conventional B-mode, Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI), Shear Wave Elasticity Imaging (SWEI), and spectral Doppler techniques into a single imaging system capable of simultaneously measuring the tissue displacements and WSR throughout the cardiac cycle and over several heartbeats. Implemented on a conventional scanner, the carotid arteries of human subjects were scanned to demonstrate the initial in vivo feasibility of the method. Two non-invasive ultrasound based imaging methods, SAD-SWEI and SAD-Gated Imaging, were developed that measure ARF-induced on-axis tissue displacements, off-axis transverse wave velocities, and WSR throughout the cardiac cycle. Human carotid artery scans were performed in vivo on 5 healthy subjects. Statistical differences were observed in both on-axis proximal wall displacements and transverse wave velocities during diastole compared to systole.

  11. Learning-based scan plane identification from fetal head ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Annangi, Pavan; Gupta, Mithun; Yu, Bing; Padfield, Dirk; Banerjee, Jyotirmoy; Krishnan, Kajoli

    2012-03-01

    Acquisition of a clinically acceptable scan plane is a pre-requisite for ultrasonic measurement of anatomical features from B-mode images. In obstetric ultrasound, measurement of gestational age predictors, such as biparietal diameter and head circumference, is performed at the level of the thalami and cavum septum pelucidi. In an accurate scan plane, the head can be modeled as an ellipse, the thalami looks like a butterfly, the cavum appears like an empty box and the falx is a straight line along the major axis of a symmetric ellipse inclined either parallel to or at small angles to the probe surface. Arriving at the correct probe placement on the mother's belly to obtain an accurate scan plane is a task of considerable challenge especially for a new user of ultrasound. In this work, we present a novel automated learning-based algorithm to identify an acceptable fetal head scan plane. We divide the problem into cranium detection and a template matching to capture the composite "butterfly" structure present inside the head, which mimics the visual cues used by an expert. The algorithm uses the stateof- the-art Active Appearance Models techniques from the image processing and computer vision literature and tie them to presence or absence of the inclusions within the head to automatically compute a score to represent the goodness of a scan plane. This automated technique can be potentially used to train and aid new users of ultrasound.

  12. Settings and artefacts relevant in colour/power Doppler ultrasound in rheumatology.

    PubMed

    Torp-Pedersen, S T; Terslev, L

    2008-02-01

    The paper explains the most important parameters for the use of colour and power Doppler in rheumatology. Recommendations for machine settings are given. The commonly encountered artefacts and their importance for image interpretation are explained.

  13. Renal power Doppler ultrasonographic evaluation of children with acute pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Shajari, Ahmad; Nafisi-Moghadam, Reza; Malek, Mahrooz; Smaili, Agha; Fallah, Mahmud; Pahlusi, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are common in children. The available gold standard method for diagnosis, Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid scan is expensive and exposes patients to considerable amount of radiation. This study was performed to compare and assess the efficacy of Power Doppler Ultrasound versus Tc-99m DMSA scan for diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis. A quasi experimental study was conducted on 34 children with mean age of 2.8 ± 2.7 years who were hospitalized with their first episode of febrile urinary tract infection. All children were evaluated in the first 3 days of admission by Doppler Ultrasound and Tc-99m DMSA scan. Patients with congenital structural anomalies were excluded. Each kidney was divided into three zones. The comparison between efficacy of Doppler Ultrasound and DMSA scan was carried out based on number of patients and on classified renal units. Based on the number of patients enrolled; the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and accuracy of Doppler Ultrasound were 89%, 53%, 70%, 80% and 74%, respectively but based on the renal units, it was 66%, 81%, 46%, 91% and 79% , respectively. Although Doppler Ultrasound has the potential for identifying acute pyelonephritis in children, but it is still soon to replace DMSA scan.

  14. Why Current Doppler Ultrasound Methodology Is Inaccurate in Assessing Cerebral Venous Return: The Alternative of the Ultrasonic Jugular Venous Pulse

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of cerebral venous return is growing interest for potential application in clinical practice. Doppler ultrasound (DUS) was used as a screening tool. However, three meta-analyses of qualitative DUS protocol demonstrate a big heterogeneity among studies. In an attempt to improve accuracy, several authors alternatively measured the flow rate, based on the product of the time average velocity with the cross-sectional area (CSA). However, also the quantification protocols lacked of the necessary accuracy. The reasons are as follows: (a) automatic measurement of the CSA assimilates the jugular to a circle, while it is elliptical; (b) the use of just a single CSA value in a pulsatile vessel is inaccurate; (c) time average velocity assessment can be applied only in laminar flow. Finally, the tutorial describes alternative ultrasound calculation of flow based on the Womersley method, which takes into account the variation of the jugular CSA overtime. In the near future, it will be possible to synchronize the electrocardiogram with the brain inflow (carotid distension wave) and with the outflow (jugular venous pulse) in order to nicely have a noninvasive ultrasound picture of the brain-heart axis. US jugular venous pulse may have potential use in neurovascular, neurocognitive, neurosensorial, and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27006525

  15. Assessment of the Effects of Low-Level Laser Therapy on the Thyroid Vascularization of Patients with Autoimmune Hypothyroidism by Color Doppler Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Höfling, Danilo Bianchini; Chavantes, Maria Cristina; Juliano, Adriana G.; Cerri, Giovanni G.; Knobel, Meyer; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.; Chammas, Maria Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Background. Chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (CAT) frequently alters thyroid vascularization, likely as a result of the autoimmune process. Objective. To evaluate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the thyroid vascularization of patients with hypothyroidism induced by CAT using color Doppler ultrasound parameters. Methods. In this randomized clinical trial, 43 patients who underwent levothyroxine replacement for CAT-induced hypothyroidism were randomly assigned to receive either 10 sessions of LLLT (L group, n = 23) or 10 sessions of a placebo treatment (P group, n = 20). Color Doppler ultrasounds were performed before and 30 days after interventions. To verify the vascularity of the thyroid parenchyma, power Doppler was performed. The systolic peak velocity (SPV) and resistance index (RI) in the superior (STA) and inferior thyroid arteries (ITAs) were measured by pulsed Doppler. Results. The frequency of normal vascularization of the thyroid lobes observed in the postintervention power Doppler examination was significantly higher in the L than in the P group (P = 0.023). The pulsed Doppler examination revealed an increase in the SPV of the ITA in the L group compared with the P group (P = 0.016). No significant differences in the SPV of the STA and in the RI were found between the groups. Conclusion. These results suggest that LLLT can ameliorate thyroid parenchyma vascularization and increase the SPV of the ITA of patients with hypothyroidism caused by CAT. PMID:23316383

  16. Listening to speech recruits specific tongue motor synergies as revealed by transcranial magnetic stimulation and tissue-Doppler ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    D'Ausilio, A; Maffongelli, L; Bartoli, E; Campanella, M; Ferrari, E; Berry, J; Fadiga, L

    2014-01-01

    The activation of listener's motor system during speech processing was first demonstrated by the enhancement of electromyographic tongue potentials as evoked by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over tongue motor cortex. This technique is, however, technically challenging and enables only a rather coarse measurement of this motor mirroring. Here, we applied TMS to listeners' tongue motor area in association with ultrasound tissue Doppler imaging to describe fine-grained tongue kinematic synergies evoked by passive listening to speech. Subjects listened to syllables requiring different patterns of dorso-ventral and antero-posterior movements (/ki/, /ko/, /ti/, /to/). Results show that passive listening to speech sounds evokes a pattern of motor synergies mirroring those occurring during speech production. Moreover, mirror motor synergies were more evident in those subjects showing good performances in discriminating speech in noise demonstrating a role of the speech-related mirror system in feed-forward processing the speaker's ongoing motor plan.

  17. Structure-symptom relationship with wide-area ultrasound scanning of knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Podlipská, Jana; Koski, Juhani M.; Kaukinen, Päivi; Haapea, Marianne; Tervonen, Osmo; Arokoski, Jari P.; Saarakkala, Simo

    2017-01-01

    The aetiology of knee pain in osteoarthritis (OA) is heterogeneous and its relationship with structural changes and function is unclear. Our goal was to determine the prevalence of wide-area scanned ultrasound-defined knee OA structural features and their association with pain and functional impairment in 79 symptomatic and 63 asymptomatic subjects. All subjects underwent ultrasound knee wide-area scanning and the severity of articular cartilage degeneration, the presence and size of osteophytes, and meniscal extrusion were evaluated. Subjects filled in a self-administrated questionnaire on present knee pain, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) on clinical symptoms and function over the past week. Cartilage changes were the most prevalent followed by lateral meniscal extrusion, osteophytes and medial meniscal extrusion. The global femoral cartilage grade associated strongly with pain and the WOMAC index. Site-specifically, early medial cartilage changes and thinning in sulcus and lateral site were associated with symptoms. The presence of femoral lateral osteophytes was also associated with both outcomes. Using the novel wide-area ultrasound scanning technique, we were able to confirm the negative impact of femoral cartilage OA changes on clinical symptoms. Presence, not necessarily size, of lateral femoral osteophytes was also associated with increased pain and disability. PMID:28295049

  18. Sizing of Emboli in Flowing Blood Using Pulse Doppler Ultrasound and the Embolus-To Power Ratio.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehring, Mark Alan

    The embolus to blood ratio (EBR) theoretical model describing pulse Doppler ultrasound observations of emboli in flowing blood is summarized. The EBR model uses the backscattered signal power from blood in the Doppler sample volume as a reference from which to assess embolus size and composition. This EBR is independent of attenuation and reflection loss in intervening tissues between probe and bloodflow. An in vitro investigation is presented that tests the validity of the EBR model. The experimental apparatus includes a novel phantom for Doppler observation of circulating emboli and a Doppler system which uses 1.6 and 2.4 MHz concurrently for interrogation of an embolus. The phantom contains a tubeless flow conduit inside a polyacrylamide gel and a blood-mimicking fluid flowing in the conduit. Time series Doppler shift data which are gathered while polystyrene microsphere "emboli" transit the sample volume are post -processed to calculate the EBR on each embolic signature. EBR measurements from microspheres of three different diameters are summarized and shown to contain pronounced and systematic variability. The hypothesis is presented that this variability is due to a small speed of sound mismatch between the gel and the blood-mimicking fluid, a phenomenon anticipated in vivo. This speed of sound mismatch results in beam refraction and a non-uniformly insonated sample volume (thereby causing variability in embolus signatures). A three dimensional theoretical study is presented that models beam refraction resulting from speed of sound mismatch between the blood mimicking fluid and the surrounding gel. A Monte Carlo study of the EBR behavior in the presence of beam refraction is performed and yields similar results to the data obtained in vitro. This study is evidence that the experimental signal variability is due to speed of sound mismatch between blood-mimicking fluid and gel. A method of extracting embolus size from the dual frequency EBR data based on the

  19. New adaptive clutter rejection based on spectral analysis for ultrasound color Doppler imaging: phantom and in vivo abdominal study.

    PubMed

    Geunyong Park; Sunmi Yeo; Jae Jin Lee; Changhan Yoon; Hyun-Woo Koh; Hyungjoon Lim; Youngtae Kim; Hwan Shim; Yangmo Yoo

    2014-01-01

    Effective rejection of time-varying clutter originating from slowly moving vessels and surrounding tissues is important for depicting hemodynamics in ultrasound color Doppler imaging (CDI). In this paper, a new adaptive clutter rejection method based on spectral analysis (ACR-SA) is presented for suppressing nonstationary clutter. In ACR-SA, tissue and flow characteristics are analyzed by singular value decomposition and tissue acceleration of backscattered Doppler signals to determine an appropriate clutter filter from a set of clutter filters. To evaluate the ACR-SA method, 20 frames of complex baseband data were acquired by a commercial ultrasound system equipped with a research package (Accuvix V10, Samsung Medison, Seoul, Korea) using a 3.5-MHz convex array probe by introducing tissue movements to the flow phantom (Gammex 1425 A LE, Gammex, Middleton, WI, USA). In addition, 20 frames of in vivo abdominal data from five volunteers were captured. From the phantom experiment, the ACR-SA method provided 2.43 dB (p <; 0.001) and 1.09 dB ( ) improvements in flow signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) compared to static (STA) and down-mixing (ACR-DM) methods. Similarly, it showed smaller values in fractional residual clutter area (FRCA) compared to the STA and ACR-DM methods (i.e., 2.3% versus 5.4% and 3.7%, respectively, ). The consistent improvements in SCR from the proposed ACR-SA method were obtained with the in vivo abdominal data (i.e., 4.97 dB and 3.39 dB over STA and ACR-DM, respectively). The ACR-SA method showed less than 1% FRCA values for all in vivo abdominal data. These results indicate that the proposed ACR-SA method can improve image quality in CDI by providing enhanced rejection of nonstationary clutter.

  20. Ultrasound line-by-line scanning method of spatial-temporal active cavitation mapping for high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ting; Zhang, Siyuan; Fu, Quanyou; Xu, Zhian; Wan, Mingxi

    2014-01-01

    This paper presented an ultrasound line-by-line scanning method of spatial-temporal active cavitation mapping applicable in a liquid or liquid filled tissue cavities exposed by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Scattered signals from cavitation bubbles were obtained in a scan line immediately after one HIFU exposure, and then there was a waiting time of 2 s long enough to make the liquid back to the original state. As this pattern extended, an image was built up by sequentially measuring a series of such lines. The acquisition of the beamformed radiofrequency (RF) signals for a scan line was synchronized with HIFU exposure. The duration of HIFU exposure, as well as the delay of the interrogating pulse relative to the moment while HIFU was turned off, could vary from microseconds to seconds. The feasibility of this method was demonstrated in tap-water and a tap-water filled cavity in the tissue-mimicking gelatin-agar phantom as capable of observing temporal evolutions of cavitation bubble cloud with temporal resolution of several microseconds, lateral and axial resolution of 0.50 mm and 0.29 mm respectively. The dissolution process of cavitation bubble cloud and spatial distribution affected by cavitation previously generated were also investigated. Although the application is limited by the requirement for a gassy fluid (e.g. tap water, etc.) that allows replenishment of nuclei between HIFU exposures, the technique may be a useful tool in spatial-temporal cavitation mapping for HIFU with high precision and resolution, providing a reference for clinical therapy.

  1. Abdominal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ultrasound - Abdomen Ultrasound imaging of the abdomen uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures within ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  2. Hip Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Hip Ultrasound Hip ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of muscles, tendons, ligaments, ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  3. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Obstetric Ultrasound Obstetric ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of a baby (embryo ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  4. Operator Auditory Perception and Spectral Quantification of Umbilical Artery Doppler Ultrasound Signals

    PubMed Central

    Thuring, Ann; Brännström, K. Jonas; Ewerlöf, Maria; Hernandez-Andrade, Edgar; Ley, David; Lingman, Göran; Liuba, Karina; Maršál, Karel; Jansson, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Objective An experienced sonographer can by listening to the Doppler audio signals perceive various timbres that distinguish different types of umbilical artery flow despite an unchanged pulsatility index (PI). Our aim was to develop an objective measure of the Doppler audio signals recorded from fetoplacental circulation in a sheep model. Methods Various degrees of pathological flow velocity waveforms in the umbilical artery, similar to those in human complicated pregnancies, were induced by microsphere embolization of the placental bed (embolization model, 7 lamb fetuses, 370 Doppler recordings) or by fetal hemodilution (anemia model, 4 lamb fetuses, 184 recordings). A subjective 11-step operator auditory scale (OAS) was related to conventional Doppler parameters, PI and time average mean velocity (TAM), and to sound frequency analysis of Doppler signals (sound frequency with the maximum energy content [MAXpeak] and frequency band at maximum level minus 15 dB [MAXpeak-15 dB] over several heart cycles). Results We found a negative correlation between the OAS and PI: median Rho −0.73 (range −0.35– −0.94) and −0.68 (range −0.57– −0.78) in the two lamb models, respectively. There was a positive correlation between OAS and TAM in both models: median Rho 0.80 (range 0.58–0.95) and 0.90 (range 0.78–0.95), respectively. A strong correlation was found between TAM and the results of sound spectrum analysis; in the embolization model the median r was 0.91 (range 0.88–0.97) for MAXpeak and 0.91 (range 0.82–0.98) for MAXpeak-15 dB. In the anemia model, the corresponding values were 0.92 (range 0.78–0.96) and 0.96 (range 0.89–0.98), respectively. Conclusion Audio-spectrum analysis reflects the subjective perception of Doppler sound signals in the umbilical artery and has a strong correlation to TAM-velocity. This information might be of importance for clinical management of complicated pregnancies as an addition to conventional Doppler parameters

  5. C-scan transmission ultrasound based on a hybrid microelectronic sensor array and its physical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Chung B.; Rich, David; Lasser, Marvin E.; Kula, John; Zhao, Hui; Lasser, Bob; Freedman, Matthew T.

    2001-05-01

    A C-scan through-transmission ultrasound system has been constructed based on a patented hybrid microelectronic array that is capable of generating ultrasound images with fluoroscopic presentation. To generate real-time images, ultrasound is introduced into the object under study with a large unfocused plane wave source. The resultant pressure wave strikes the object and is attenuated and scattered. The device detects scattered as well as attenuated ultrasound energy which allows the use of an acoustic lens to focus on detected energy from an object plane. The acoustic lens collects the transmitted energy and focuses it onto the ultrasound sensitive array. The array is made up to two components, a silicon detector/readout array and a piezoelectric material that is deposited onto the array through semiconductor processing. The array is 1 cm on a side consisting of 128x128 pixel elements with 85micrometers pixel spacing. The energy that strikes the piezoelectric material is converted to an analog voltage that is digitized and processed by low cost commercial video electronics. The images generated by the device appear with no speckle artifact with fluoroscopy-like presentation. The images show no obvious geometrical distortion. The experimental results indicated that the system has a spatial resolution of 0.32 mm. It can resolve 3mm objects with low differential contrast and an attenuation coefficient difference less than 0.07 dB/cm/MHz. Phase contrast of the objects are also clearly measurable. A presentation of a C- scan image guided breast biopsy was demonstrated. In addition, punctured needle tracks in a tumor was clearly observed. This implies the potential of observing the spiculation of masses in vivo.

  6. Effects of Position and Operator on High-frequency Ultrasound Scan Quality

    PubMed Central

    Burk, Ruth S.; Parker, Angela; Sievers, Lisa; Rooney, Melissa B.; Pepperl, Anathea; Schubert, Christine M.; Grap, Mary Jo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives High-frequency ultrasound may evaluate those at risk for pressure ulcers. Images may be obtained by clinicians with limited training. The prone position is recommended for obtaining sacral scans but may not be feasible in the critically ill. This study investigated image quality using multiple operators and a variety of patient positions. Research Methodology Sacral scans were performed in three randomized positions in 50 volunteers by three different investigators using a 20 MHz ultrasound system. General linear models and ANOVA random effects models were used to examine the effects of operator and position on image quality rating, and measures of dermal thickness, and dermal density. Results The best scan for each position and operator was used for analysis (N=447 images). Image rating varied by operator (p=0.0004), although mean ratings were 3.5 or above for all operators. Dermal thickness was less for the prone position than in 90° or 60° side-lying positions (p=0.0137, p=0.0003). Dermal density was lower for the prone position than for the 90° or 60° positions (p<0.0001 for both). Conclusions These data show that overall scan quality was acceptable in all positions with all operators. However, differences were found between side-lying positions and the prone for dermal thickness and dermal density measures. PMID:25636253

  7. Audio spectrum analysis of umbilical artery Doppler ultrasound signals applied to a clinical material.

    PubMed

    Thuring, Ann; Brännström, K Jonas; Jansson, Tomas; Maršál, Karel

    2014-12-01

    Analysis of umbilical artery flow velocity waveforms characterized by pulsatility index (PI) is used to evaluate fetoplacental circulation in high-risk pregnancies. However, an experienced sonographer may be able to further differentiate between various timbres of Doppler audio signals. Recently, we have developed a method for objective audio signal characterization; the method has been tested in an animal model. In the present pilot study, the method was for the first time applied to human pregnancies. Doppler umbilical artery velocimetry was performed in 13 preterm fetuses before and after two doses of 12 mg betamethasone. The auditory measure defined by the frequency band where the spectral energy had dropped 15 dB from its maximum level (MAXpeak-15 dB ), increased two days after betamethasone administration (p = 0.001) parallel with a less pronounced decrease in PI (p = 0.04). The new auditory parameter MAXpeak-15 dB reflected the changes more sensitively than the PI did.

  8. [Doppler ultrasound assisted hemorrhoid artery ligation. A new therapy in symptomatic hemorrhoids].

    PubMed

    Arnold, S; Antonietti, E; Rollinger, G; Scheyer, M

    2002-03-01

    In 1995, Morinaga et al. (Japan) reported on a new technique in the treatment of hemorrhoids. We report the results of our first 105 patients thus treated. By a specially designed proctoscope coupled with a Doppler transducer, the hemorrhoidal arteries are looked for and ligated. All stages of hemorrhoid were treated. This method is painless, successful, and has a low rate of complications. It is for outpatients and is an alternative to all other methods in the treatment of hemorrhoids.

  9. Understanding quantification of microvascularity with high-frequency power Doppler ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinter, Stephen Z.; Lacefield, James C.

    2009-02-01

    High-frequency power Doppler imaging of angiogenesis can be challenging given the presence of small blood vessels and slow flow velocities. In the presence of substantial Doppler artifacts such as false-positive color pixels or undetected vessels, color pixel density (CPD) and related vascularity metrics do not provide accurate estimates of vascular volume fraction. As a step towards improved microvascular quantification, flow-phantom experiments were performed to establish relationships between CPD and wall filter cut-off velocity for various combinations of vessel size (160, 200, 250, 300, and 360 μm), flow velocity (4, 3, 2, 1, and 0.5 mm/s), and transducer frequency (30 and 40 MHz). Three distinct regions were observed in plots of CPD versus wall filter cut-off velocity: overestimation of CPD at low cut-offs, underestimation of CPD at high cut-offs, and a plateau at intermediate cut-offs. The CPD at the plateau closely matched the phantom's actual vascular volume fraction. The length of the plateau corresponded with the flow-detection performance of the Doppler system, which was assessed using receiver operating characteristic analysis. Color pixel density versus wall filter cut-off curves from analogous in vivo experiments exhibited the same shape, including a distinct CPD plateau. The similar shape of the flow-phantom and in vivo curves suggests that the presence of a plateau can be used to identify the best-estimate CPD value in an in vivo experiment. The ability to identify the best CPD estimate is expected to improve quantification of angiogenesis and anti-angiogenic treatment responses with power Doppler.

  10. Modern spectral analysis techniques for blood flow velocity and spectral measurements with pulsed Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    David, J Y; Jones, S A; Giddens, D P

    1991-06-01

    Four spectral analysis techniques were applied to pulsed Doppler ultrasonic quadrature signals to compare the relative merits of each technique for estimation of flow velocity and Doppler spectra. The four techniques were 1) the fast Fourier transform method, 2) the maximum likelihood method, 3) the Burg autoregressive algorithm, and 4) the modified covariance approach to autoregressive modeling. Both simulated signals and signals obtained from an in vitro flow system were studied. Optimal parameter values (e.g., model orders) were determined for each method, and the effects of signal-to-noise ratio and signal bandwidth were investigated. The modern spectral analysis techniques were shown to be superior to Fourier techniques in most circumstances, provided the model order was chosen appropriately. Robustness considerations tended to recommend the maximum likelihood method for both velocity and spectral estimation. Despite the restrictions of steady laminar flow, the results provide important basic information concerning the applicability of modern spectral analysis techniques to Doppler ultrasonic evaluation of arterial disease.

  11. Remote Sensing of Wind Fields and Aerosol Distribution with Airborne Scanning Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry; Cutten, Dean R.; Johnson, Steven C.; Jazembski, Maurice; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The coherent Doppler laser radar (lidar), when operated from an airborne platform, is a unique tool for the study of atmospheric and surface processes and features. This is especially true for scientific objectives requiring measurements in optically-clear air, where other remote sensing technologies such as Doppler radar are typically at a disadvantage. The atmospheric lidar remote sensing groups of several US institutions, led by Marshall Space Flight Center, have developed an airborne coherent Doppler lidar capable of mapping the wind field and aerosol structure in three dimensions. The instrument consists of an eye-safe approx. 1 Joule/pulse lidar transceiver, telescope, scanner, inertial measurement unit, and flight computer system to orchestrate all subsystem functions and tasks. The scanner is capable of directing the expanded lidar beam in a variety of ways, in order to extract vertically-resolved wind fields. Horizontal resolution is approx. 1 km; vertical resolution is even finer. Winds are obtained by measuring backscattered, Doppler-shifted laser radiation from naturally-occurring aerosol particles (of order 1 micron diameter). Measurement coverage depends on aerosol spatial distribution and composition. Velocity accuracy has been verified to be approx. 1 meter per second. A variety of applications have been demonstrated during the three flight campaigns conducted during 1995-1998. Examples will be shown during the presentation. In 1995, boundary layer winds over the ocean were mapped with unprecedented resolution. In 1996, unique measurements were made of. flow over the complex terrain of the Aleutian Islands; interaction of the marine boundary layer jet with the California coastal mountain range; a weak dry line in Texas - New Mexico; the angular dependence of sea surface scattering; and in-flight radiometric calibration using the surface of White Sands National Monument. In 1998, the first measurements of eyewall and boundary layer winds within a

  12. Using Doppler shift induced by Galvanometric mirror scanning to reach shot noise limit with laser optical feedback imaging setup.

    PubMed

    Jacquin, O; Lacot, E; Hugon, O; Guillet de Chatelus, H

    2015-03-10

    This paper proposes what we believe is a new method to remove the contribution of parasitic reflections in the images of the laser optical feedback imaging (LOFI) technique. This simple method allows us to extend the LOFI technique to long-distance applications, as imaging through a fog or a smoke. The LOFI technique is an ultrasensitive imaging technique that is interesting for imaging objects through a scattering medium. However, the LOFI sensitivity can be dramatically limited by parasitic optical feedback occurring in the experimental setup. In previous papers [Appl. Opt.48, 64 (2009)10.1364/AO.48.000064APOPAI1559-128X, Opt. Lett.37, 2514 (2012)10.1364/OL.37.002514OPLEDP0146-9592], we already have proposed methods to filter a parasitic optical feedback, but they are not well suited to metric working distances. This new method uses a Doppler frequency shift induced by the moving mirror used to scan the object to be imaged. Using this Doppler frequency shift, we can distinguish the photons reflected by the target and the parasitic photons reflected by the optical components in the experimental setup. In this paper, we demonstrated theoretically and experimentally the possibility to filter the parasitic reflection in LOFI images using the Doppler frequency shift. This method significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratio by a factor 15 and we can obtain a shot noise limited image through a scattering medium of an object at 3 m from the detector.

  13. A scanning laser source and a microcantilever ultrasound receiver for detection of surface flaws in microdevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Younghoon; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2005-05-01

    In recent work at Northwestern University, we have shown that near-field scattering of ultrasound generated by a Scanning Laser Source (SLS) can be used to effectively identify surface flaws in macroscale structures. In past work, the laser ultrasound source was in the near-field of a scatterer and a piezoelectric detector was used to measure the ultrasound in the far field. It was observed that distinct variations are observed in the far-field signals as the SLS scans past surface-breaking flaws. These changes were attributed to the near-field scatterer redirecting parts of the ultrasonic beam (which might otherwise have gone into the bulk of the object) towards the far-field detector. We now propose an extension of the SLS approach to map defects in microdevices by bringing both the generator and the receiver to the near-field scattering region of the defects. For the purpose of near-field ultrasound measurement, the receiving transducer has to be made very small as well. To facilitate this, silicon microcantilever probes are fabricated and their acoustical characteristics are first investigated. Silicon cantilevers with tip and chip body are fabricated using isotropic reactive ion etching and anisotropic KOH etching. To characterize the free cantilever vibration, the chip body with the microcantilever is excited by an ultrasonic transducer and a Michelson interferometer is used to monitor the cantilever motion. The fundamental frequency of the microcantilever is measured and compared with analytically calculated fundamental frequency assuming the cross sections of the cantilevers are rectangular. Next, the performance of the fabricated microcantilevers as ultrasound detectors is investigated. The microcantilever is used essentially as a profilometer by contacting it to the specimen surface. Surface and bulk acoustic waves are generated with specific narrowband frequencies and the surface ultrasonic displacements are detected using the microcantilever probe. Next

  14. Stratospheric temperature measurement with scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer for wind retrieval from mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Xia, Haiyun; Dou, Xiankang; Shangguan, Mingjia; Zhao, Ruocan; Sun, Dongsong; Wang, Chong; Qiu, Jiawei; Shu, Zhifeng; Xue, Xianghui; Han, Yuli; Han, Yan

    2014-09-08

    Temperature detection remains challenging in the low stratosphere, where the Rayleigh integration lidar is perturbed by aerosol contamination and ozone absorption while the rotational Raman lidar is suffered from its low scattering cross section. To correct the impacts of temperature on the Rayleigh Doppler lidar, a high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) based on cavity scanning Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI) is developed. By considering the effect of the laser spectral width, Doppler broadening of the molecular backscatter, divergence of the light beam and mirror defects of the FPI, a well-behaved transmission function is proved to show the principle of HSRL in detail. Analysis of the statistical error of the HSRL is carried out in the data processing. A temperature lidar using both HSRL and Rayleigh integration techniques is incorporated into the Rayleigh Doppler wind lidar. Simultaneous wind and temperature detection is carried out based on the combined system at Delhi (37.371°N, 97.374°E; 2850 m above the sea level) in Qinghai province, China. Lower Stratosphere temperature has been measured using HSRL between 18 and 50 km with temporal resolution of 2000 seconds. The statistical error of the derived temperatures is between 0.2 and 9.2 K. The temperature profile retrieved from the HSRL and wind profile from the Rayleigh Doppler lidar show good agreement with the radiosonde data. Specifically, the max temperature deviation between the HSRL and radiosonde is 4.7 K from 18 km to 36 km, and it is 2.7 K between the HSRL and Rayleigh integration lidar from 27 km to 34 km.

  15. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound in combination with color Doppler ultrasound can improve the diagnostic performance of focal nodular hyperplasia and hepatocellular adenoma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wen-Tao; Wang, Wen-Ping; Huang, Bei-Jian; Ding, Hong; Mao, Feng; Si, Qin

    2015-04-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the value of combining color Doppler ultrasound (CDUS) with contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in identifying and comparing features of focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) and hepatocellular adenoma (HCA). Thirty-eight patients with FNH (n = 28) or HCA (n = 10), whose diagnoses were later confirmed by pathology, were examined with conventional ultrasonography and CEUS between 2010 and 2013. Two doctors blinded to the pathology results independently reviewed the conventional ultrasound and CEUS images and then reached a consensus through discussion. The following parameters evaluated for all lesions included vascularity pattern on CDUS or CEUS, enhancement characteristics on CEUS and the presence of a central scar. Statistical analysis was performed with the independent sample t-test and Fisher exact test. On CDUS, FNH was characterized by the presence of abundant blood flow signals exhibiting dendritic (53.6%, 15/28) and spoke-wheel (28.6%, 8/28) patterns, whereas blood flow signal of HCA was slightly less than FNH and often showed subcapsular short rod-like (50%, 5/10) appearance. On CEUS, the most common arterial enhancement pattern was centrifugal or homogeneous enhancement in FNH (both, 12/28, 42.9%) and homogeneous enhancement in HCA (6/10, 60%). Spoke-wheel arteries, feeding artery and central scar were detected in 5 (17.9%), 8 (28.6%) and 5 (17.9%) of 28 FNHs. Hypo-echogenic pattern during delayed phase was more common in HCA (60%, 6/10) than in FNH (3/28, 10.7%) (p = 0.010). A total of 25 (25/38, 65.8%) lesions were correctly assessed using CDUS in combination with CEUS, whereas the number decreased to 15 (15/38, 39.5%) when CDUS was used alone (p = 0.038). The areas under the ROC curves before and after CEUS administration were 0.768 and 0.879, respectively. In conclusion, CEUS in combination with CDUS improve the diagnostic performance of FNH and HCA. Blood signal of HCA was less than FNH on CDUS. The differences of

  16. Comparison of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and Doppler ultrasound in the pre-operative assessment of the portal venous system.

    PubMed

    Naik, K S; Ward, J; Irving, H C; Robinson, P J

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCEMR) with Doppler ultrasound (US) in the assessment of portal venous anatomy and to analyse the causes of discrepancy. Over a 1 year period, 97 patients undergoing assessment prior to hepatic surgery underwent imaging of the liver and portal venous system using US with colour and spectral Doppler and MRI with axial T2 weighted spin echo (SE) and coronal oblique T1 weighted rapid gradient echo (GRE) imaging before and immediately after bolus injection of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol kg-1). When the US and MRI findings were discrepant, the images were reviewed by two observers and compared with surgical findings. US and DCEMR were concordant in 90 patients (portal vein patent in 80, occluded in 10). In three patients with cirrhosis and gross ascites the portal vein was reported as occluded on US and patent on MRI; surgery confirmed the MRI findings. In one patient the portal vein was patient on US but not on MRI, but there was a 3 week interval between the examinations. In three patients the portal vein was patent on US, but MRI detected occlusion of intrahepatic portal vein branches in two, and encasement of an intrahepatic branch in the third case. Spontaneous splenorenal shunts were seen in 15 patients only on MRI; varices were seen in 39 patients on MRI and in 22 patients on US. Both US and DCEMR contribute to the pre-operative assessment of the portal venous system. MRI provides additional information over US in assessing intrahepatic portal branches and detecting varices and splenorenal shunts, and is recommended for all surgical candidates and in patients with abnormal portal venous anatomy and equivocal US findings.

  17. Is dynamic cerebral autoregulation measurement using transcranial Doppler ultrasound reproducible in the presence of high concentration oxygen and carbon dioxide?

    PubMed

    Minhas, Jatinder S; Syed, Nazia F; Haunton, Victoria J; Panerai, Ronney B; Robinson, Thompson G; Mistri, Amit K

    2016-05-01

    Reliability of cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) and dynamic cerebral autoregulation estimates (expressed as autoregulation index: ARI) using spontaneous fluctuations in blood pressure (BP) has been demonstrated. However, reliability during co-administration of O2 and CO2 is unknown. Bilateral CBFV (using transcranial Doppler), BP and RR interval recordings were performed in healthy volunteers (seven males, four females, age: 54  ±  10 years) on two occasions over 9  ±  4 d. Four 5 min recordings were made whilst breathing air (A), then 5%CO2 (C), 80%O2 (O) and mixed O2  +  CO2 (M), in random order. CBFV was recorded; ARI was calculated using transfer function analysis. Precision was quantified as within-visit standard error of measurement (SEM) and the coefficient of variation (CV). CBFV and ARI estimates with A (SEM: 3.85 & 0.87; CV: 7.5% & 17.8%, respectively) were comparable to a previous reproducibility study. The SEM and CV with C and O were similar, though higher values were noted with M; Bland-Altman plots indicated no significant bias across all gases for CBFV and ARI (bias  <0.06 cm s(-1) and  <0.05, respectively). Thus, transcranial-Doppler-ultrasound-estimated CBFV and ARI during inhalation of O2 and CO2 have acceptable levels of reproducibility and can be used to study the effect of these gases on cerebral haemodynamics.

  18. Mathematical modelling of the human foetal cardiovascular system based on Doppler ultrasound data.

    PubMed

    Pennati, G; Bellotti, M; Fumero, R

    1997-06-01

    A lumped parameter model of the human foetal circulation primarily based on blood velocity data derived from the Doppler analysis was developed in this study. It consists of two major parts, the heart and the foetal vascular circulation. The heart model accounts for both ventricular and atrial contractility. The circulation was divided into 19 compliant vascular compartments in order to describe all of the clinically monitored sites. The model parameters refer to the final gestation period and were derived either from literature on foetal sheep circulation or from anatomical dimension monitoring of the human foetus. No control mechanism is incorporated into the model. The model was validated by comparing several index values of simulated velocity curves to those of the experimental Doppler waveforms. The mean and maximum percentual errors in the estimation of the experimental results by the model are 7.7% and 20.1%, respectively. Velocity and pressure tracings of the foetal circulation were investigated, as well as regional blood flow rate distribution.

  19. Turbulence in wind turbine wakes under different atmospheric conditions from static and scanning Doppler LiDARs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumer, Valerie; Reuder, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Wake characteristics are of great importance for wind park performances and turbine loads. Wind tunnel experiments helped to validate wake model simulations under neutral atmospheric conditions. However, recent studies show strongest wake characteristics and power losses in stable atmospheric conditions. Considering all three occurring atmospheric conditions this study presents a turbulence analysis of wind turbine wake flows measured by static and scanning Doppler LiDARs at the coast of the Netherlands. We use data collected by three Windcubes v1, a scanning Windcube 100S and sonic anemometers during the Wind Turbine Wake Experiment - Wieringermeer (WINTWEX-W). Turbulence parameters such as Turbulence Intensity (TI) and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) are retrieved from the collected raw data. Results show highest turbulence on the flanks of the wake where strong wind shear dominates. On average the spatial turbulence distribution becomes more homogeneous with conical areas of enhanced TI. Highest turbulence and strongest wind deficits occur during stable weather conditions. Despite the ongoing research on the reliability of turbulence retrievals of Doppler LiDAR data, the results are consistent with sonic anemometer measurements and show promising opportunities for a qualitative study of wake characteristics such as wake strength and wake peak frequencies.

  20. New applications of scanning laser Doppler vibrometry (SLDV) to nondestructive diagnosis of artwork: mosaics, ceramics, inlaid wood, and easel painting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellini, Paolo; Esposito, Enrico; Marchetti, Barbara; Paone, Nicola; Tomasini, Enrico P.

    2001-10-01

    During the last years the growing importance of the correct determination of the state of conservation of artworks has been stated by all personalities in care of Cultural Heritage. There exist many analytical methodologies and techniques to individuate the physical and chemical characteristics of artworks, but at present their structural diagnostics mainly rely on the expertise of the restorer and the typical diagnostic process is accomplished mainly through manual and visual inspection of the object surface. The basic idea behind the proposed technique is to substitute human senses with measurement instruments: surfaces are very slightly vibrated by mechanical actuators, while a laser Doppler vibrometer scans the objects measuring surface velocity and producing 2D or 3D maps. Where a defect occurs velocity is higher than neighboring areas so defects can be easily spotted. Laser vibrometers also identify structural resonance frequencies thus leading to a complete characterization of defects. This work will present the most recent results coming out of the application of Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometers (SLDV) to different types of artworks: mosaics, ceramics, inlaid wood and easel painting. Real artworks and samples realized on purpose have been studied using the proposed technique and different measuring issues resulting from each artwork category will be described.

  1. Assessment of cerebral autoregulation with transcranial Doppler sonography in poor bone windows using constant infusion of an ultrasound contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Matthias W; Thoelen, Nina; Loesel, Nadine; Lienerth, Christian; Gonzalez, Marilen; Humpich, Marek; Roelz, Waltraud; Dvorak, Florian; Sitzer, Matthias

    2008-03-01

    Cerebral autoregulation is an important pathophysiological and prognostic parameter for a variety of neurologic conditions. It can be assessed quickly and safely using transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD). In elderly patients, poor insonation conditions decrease the number of examinable patients and can cause a systematic bias in autoregulation parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a constant infusion of an ultrasound contrast agent (Levovist((R))) can counteract these effects. We examined two cohorts of unselected neurologic patients. In 45 patients with good insonation windows (cohort 1), we used a thin aluminium foil between the skin and the TCD probe to artificially decrease the insonation quality. We determined two parameters of cerebral autoregulation (phase difference [PD] and a cross-correlation coefficient [Mx]) in native patients, with aluminium foil and with aluminium foil and a constant infusion of Levovist. In 30 patients with poor insonation windows (cohort 2), we measured the autoregulation twice, with and without an infusion of Levovist, to assess the reproducibility of the autoregulation parameters. In cohort 1, the foil model significantly decreased the Doppler signal quality, i.e., the mean spectrum energy decreased from 33.9 +/- 2.7 dB to 26.3 +/- 2.4 dB (p < 0.001). This introduced a significant bias to all autoregulation parameters (PD: decreased from 38.2 +/- 10.0 degrees to 27.9 +/- 12.5 degrees (p < 0.001); Mx: decreased from 0.308 +/- 0.170 to 0.254 +/- 0.162 (p < 0.01)). Both effects were compensated largely by a constant infusion of Levovist (300 mg/min). In cohort 2, infusion of the contrast agent at the same rate increased insonation quality, too, but to a lesser degree (27.4 +/- 2.4 dB to 32.0 +/- 3.7 dB, p < 0.001). This smaller increase did not cause a significant change in the autoregulation parameters, but the reproducibility of the PD was significantly improved (intraclass coefficient coefficient [ICC] 0

  2. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... your test will be done. Alternative Names Sonogram Images Abdominal ultrasound Ultrasound in pregnancy 17 week ultrasound ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  3. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound is a type of imaging. It uses high-frequency sound waves to look at organs and ... liver, and other organs. During pregnancy, doctors use ultrasound to view the fetus. Unlike x-rays, ultrasound ...

  4. Semen quality, testicular B-mode and Doppler ultrasound, and serum testosterone concentrations in dogs with established infertility.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Mírley Barbosa; England, Gary C W; Mota Filho, Antônio Cavalcante; Ackermann, Camila Louise; Sousa, Carmen Vládia Soares; de Carvalho, Gabriela Guedelha; Silva, Herlon Victor Rodrigues; Pinto, José Nicodemos; Linhares, Jussiara Candeira Spíndola; Oba, Eunice; da Silva, Lúcia Daniel Machado

    2015-09-15

    Retrospective examination of breeding records enabled the identification of 10 dogs of normal fertility and 10 dogs with established infertility of at least 12 months of duration. Comparisons of testicular palpation, semen evaluation, testicular ultrasound examination, Doppler ultrasound measurement of testicular artery blood flow, and measurement of serum testosterone concentration were made between the two groups over weekly examinations performed on three occasions. There were no differences in testicular volume (cm(3)) between the two groups (fertile right testis = 10.77 ± 1.66; fertile left testis = 12.17 ± 2.22); (infertile right testis = 10.25 ± 3.33; infertile left testis = 11.37 ± 3.30), although the infertile dogs all had subjectively softer testes compared with the fertile dogs. Infertile dogs were either azoospermic or when they ejaculated, they had lower sperm concentration, sperm motility, and percentage of morphologically normal spermatozoa than fertile dogs. Furthermore, infertile dogs had reduced sperm membrane integrity measured via the hypoosmotic swelling test. Infertile dogs had significantly lower basal serum testosterone concentrations (1.40 ± 0.62 ng/mL) than fertile dogs (1.81 ± 0.87 ng/mL; P < 0.05). There were subjective differences in testicular echogenicity in some of the infertile dogs, and important differences in testicular artery blood flow with lower peak systolic and end-diastolic velocities measured in the distal supratesticular artery, marginal testicular artery, and intratesticular artery of infertile dogs (P < 0.05). Notably, resistance index and pulsatility index did not differ between infertile and fertile dogs. These findings report important differences between infertile and fertile dogs which may be detected within an expanded breeding soundness examination.

  5. A-scan ultrasound system for real-time puncture safety assessment during percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Pedro L.; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Fonseca, Jaime C.; von Krüger, M. A.; Pereira, W. C. A.; Vilaça, João. L.

    2015-03-01

    Background: Kidney stone is a major universal health problem, affecting 10% of the population worldwide. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is a first-line and established procedure for disintegration and removal of renal stones. Its surgical success depends on the precise needle puncture of renal calyces, which remains the most challenging task for surgeons. This work describes and tests a new ultrasound based system to alert the surgeon when undesirable anatomical structures are in between the puncture path defined through a tracked needle. Methods: Two circular ultrasound transducers were built with a single 3.3-MHz piezoelectric ceramic PZT SN8, 25.4 mm of radius and resin-epoxy matching and backing layers. One matching layer was designed with a concave curvature to work as an acoustic lens with long focusing. The A-scan signals were filtered and processed to automatically detect reflected echoes. Results: The transducers were mapped in water tank and tested in a study involving 45 phantoms. Each phantom mimics different needle insertion trajectories with a percutaneous path length between 80 and 150 mm. Results showed that the beam cross-sectional area oscillates around the ceramics radius and it was possible to automatically detect echo signals in phantoms with length higher than 80 mm. Conclusions: This new solution may alert the surgeon about anatomical tissues changes during needle insertion, which may decrease the need of X-Ray radiation exposure and ultrasound image evaluation during percutaneous puncture.

  6. Real-time 3-D ultrasound scan conversion using a multicore processor.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Bo; Shamdasani, Vijay; Sikdar, Siddhartha; Managuli, Ravi; Kim, Yongmin

    2009-07-01

    Real-time 3-D ultrasound scan conversion (SC) in software has not been practical due to its high computation and I/O data handling requirements. In this paper, we describe software-based 3-D SC with high volume rates using a multicore processor, Cell. We have implemented both 3-D SC approaches: 1) the separable 3-D SC where two 2-D coordinate transformations in orthogonal planes are performed in sequence and 2) the direct 3-D SC where the coordinate transformation is directly handled in 3-D. One Cell processor can scan-convert a 192 x 192 x 192 16-bit volume at 87.8 volumes/s with the separable 3-D SC algorithm and 28 volumes/s with the direct 3-D SC algorithm.

  7. 5D interactive real time Doppler ultrasound visualization of the heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heid, Volker; Evers, Harald; Henn, Christian; Glombitza, Gerald; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2000-04-01

    Heart valve insufficiencies can optimally be assessed using transesophageal, triggered, three-dimensional ultrasound imaging. The dynamic ultrasound data contain morphological as well as functional components which are recorded and displayed simultaneously. It allows the visualization of intracardiac motion which is an important parameter to detect abnormal flow caused by defect valves. A realtime reconstruction is desired to get a spatial impression on the one hand and to interactively clip parts of the volume on the other hand. OpenGL Volumizer is used for visualization. Scalability of the visualization was tested with respect to different workstations and graphics resources using a Multipipe Utility library (MPU). The combination of both APIs enables a visualization of volumetric and functional data with frame rates up to 10 frames per second. By using the proposed method, it is possible to visualize the jet in the original color-coding which is employed during a conventional two- dimensional examination for displaying the velocity values. A good scalability from low cost up to high end graphic workstations is given by the use of the MPU. The quality of the resulting 3D images allows exact differentiation of heart valve insufficiencies to support the diagnostic procedure.

  8. Can simple clinical features be used to identify patients with severe carotid stenosis on Doppler ultrasound?

    PubMed Central

    Mead, G.; Wardlaw, J.; Lewis, S.; McDowall, M.; Dennis, M.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Carotid endarterectomy reduces the risk of stroke in symptomatic patients with severe ipsilateral carotid stenosis. Symptomatic patients should therefore undergo carotid Doppler imaging, but in some centres access to imaging is limited. It was therefore investigated whether simple clinical features alone or in combination could be used to identify patients with severe carotid stenosis, so that they could be referred preferentially for carotid imaging.
METHODS—1041 patients with acute stroke, cerebral or retinal transient ischaemic attacks, and retinal strokes admitted to Western General Hospital or seen in neurovascular clinics were assessed by a stroke physician. Their carotid arteries were investigated using colour Doppler imaging by a consultant neuroradiologist. Patients with primary intracerebral haemorrhage, total anterior circulation strokes, posterior circulation strokes, or posterior circulation transient ischaemic attacks were excluded because carotid surgery would be inappropriate.
RESULTS—726 patients were used in the analysis. Stepwise logistic regression showed that there were significant positive associations between severe carotid stenosis and an ipsilateral bruit, diabetes mellitus, and previous transient ischaemic attacks; and a negative association with lacunar events. The strategy with the highest specificity (97%) was "any three of these four features" but sensitivity was only 17%. The strategy with the highest sensitivity (99%) was to use one or more of the four features, but specificity was only 22%.
CONCLUSION—None of the strategies identified all patients with severe carotid stenosis with a reasonable specificity. When access to carotid imaging is severely limited, simple clinical features are of some use in prioritising patients for imaging, but access to carotid imaging should be improved. 

 PMID:9886444

  9. Ultrasound resistive index, power Doppler, and clinical parameters in established rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bisi, Melissa Cláudia; do Prado, Aline Defaveri; Piovesan, Deise Marcela; Bredemeier, Markus; da Silveira, Inês Guimarães; de Mendonça, José Alexandre; Staub, Henrique Luiz

    2017-04-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is a useful tool for the evaluation of sinovial vascularization and proliferation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Accordingly, resistive index (RI) on spectral Doppler (sD) US provides a quantitative analysis of vascular inflammation, but its utility in the evaluation of RA activity has not been established. Our objective was to determine the association of RI with other US parameters of synovitis and with clinical disease activity in established RA. Patients with positive power Doppler (pD) were included in a prospective cross-sectional study. Disease activity and disability were evaluated using the Disease Activity Score in 28-joints (DAS28) and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), respectively. Gray scale (GS) synovitis, pD, and sD analyses were performed by one of two examiners in wrists and the second and third metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints. The 10-joint GS and 10-joint pD scores and mean RI were then calculated. Weighted kappa (WK) values were employed to assess interobserver reability, and correlations were tested using the Spearman coefficient. Ninety-five RA patients (median duration of disease of 7 years and mean DAS28 of 4.32 ± 1.66) were included. WK values in real-time US were 0.77 for synovitis, 0.87 for pD, and 0.68 for RI. There were no significant correlations of RI with 10-joint GS, 10-joint pD, DAS28, joint counts, or HAQ (P > 0.10 for all tests). Patients in remission had a mean RI similar to those with high disease activity (0.62 ± 0.10, n = 15 versus 0.63 ± 0.13, n = 34, respectively). The addition of the RI score did not seem to improve US performance in patients with established RA.

  10. Noninvasive Ultrasound Imaging for Bone Quality Assessment Using Scanning Confocal Acoustic Diagnosis, μCT, DXA Measurements, and Mechanical Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yi-Xian; Xia, Yi; Lin, Wei; Mittra, Erik; Rubin, Clint; Gruber, Barry

    Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by decreased bone mass and progressive deterioration of the microstructure, affecting both mineral density and bone's fragility. Current diagnoses are only measuring apparent bone mineral density (AppBMD). Using our newly developed scanning confocal acoustic diagnostic (SCAD) system, we evaluated the ability of quantitative ultrasound in noninvasively predicting bone's quantity and quality on 19 human cadaver calcanei. Results show that ultrasound attenuation image on intact calcaneus represents bone mass distribution. High correlation (R=0.82) exists between SCAD determined broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and DXA determined AppBMD at the calcaneus, as well as in the AppBMD result at femoral neck (R=0.81). SCAD determined BUA and ultrasound velocity (UV) are highly correlated with the micro-CT and mechanical testing determined bone quantity and quality parameters. These results suggest that image-based quantitative ultrasound is able to identify ROI and predict both bone mass and strength.

  11. Assessment of flow distribution in the mouse fetal circulation at late gestation by high-frequency Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu-Qing; Cahill, Lindsay S; Wong, Michael D; Seed, Mike; Macgowan, Christopher K; Sled, John G

    2014-08-15

    This study used high-frequency ultrasound to evaluate the flow distribution in the mouse fetal circulation at late gestation. We studied 12 fetuses (embryonic day 17.5) from 12 pregnant CD1 mice with 40 MHz ultrasound to assess the flow in 11 vessels based on Doppler measurements of blood velocity and M-mode measurements of diameter. Specifically, the intrahepatic umbilical vein (UVIH), ductus venosus (DV), foramen ovale (FO), ascending aorta (AA), main pulmonary artery (MPA), ductus arteriosus (DA), descending thoracic aorta (DTA), common carotid artery (CCA), inferior vena cava (IVC), and right and left superior vena cavae (RSVC, LSVC) were examined, and anatomically confirmed by micro-CT. The mouse fetal circulatory system was found to be similar to that of the humans in terms of the major circuit and three shunts, but characterized by bilateral superior vena cavae and a single umbilical artery. The combined cardiac output (CCO) was 1.22 ± 0.05 ml/min, with the left ventricle (flow in AA) contributing 47.8 ± 2.3% and the right ventricle (flow in MPA) 52.2 ± 2.3%. Relative to the CCO, the flow percentages were 13.6 ± 1.0% for the UVIH, 10.4 ± 1.1% for the DV, 35.6 ± 2.4% for the DA, 41.9 ± 2.6% for the DTA, 3.8 ± 0.3% for the CCA, 29.5 ± 2.2% for the IVC, 12.7 ± 1.0% for the RSVC, and 9.9 ± 0.9% for the LSVC. The calculated flow percentage was 16.6 ± 3.4% for the pulmonary circulation and 31.2 ± 5.3% for the FO. In conclusion, the flow in mouse fetal circulation can be comprehensively evaluated with ultrasound. The baseline data of the flow distribution in normal mouse fetus serve as the reference range for future studies.

  12. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound blood flow velocity and pulsatility index as systemic indicators for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Roher, Alex E.; Garami, Zsolt; Tyas, Suzanne L.; Maarouf, Chera L.; Kokjohn, Tyler A.; Belohlavek, Marek; Vedders, Linda J.; Connor, Donald; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Beach, Thomas G.; Emmerling, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Multiple lines of evidence suggest cardiovascular co-morbidities hasten the onset of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or accelerate its course. Methods To evaluate the utility of cerebral vascular physical function/condition parameters as potential systemic indicators of AD, we employed transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound to assess cerebral blood flow and vascular resistance of the 16 arterial segments comprising the circle of Willis and its major tributaries. Results Our study revealed decreased arterial mean flow velocity (MFV) and increased pulsatility index (PI) are associated with a clinical diagnosis of presumptive AD. Cerebral blood flow impairment revealed by these parameters reflects the global hemodynamic and structural consequences of a multifaceted disease process yielding diffuse congestive microvascular pathology, increased arterial rigidity, and decreased arterial compliance combined with putative age-associated cardiovascular output declines. Conclusions TCD evaluation offers direct physical confirmation of brain perfusion impairment and may ultimately provide a convenient, noninvasive means to assess the efficacy of medical interventions on cerebral blood flow or reveal incipient AD. In the near term, TCD-based direct assessments of brain perfusion may offer the prospect of preventing or mitigating AD simply by revealing patients who would benefit from interventions to improve circulatory system function. PMID:21388892

  13. Does cerebral lateralization develop? A study using functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound assessing lateralization for language production and visuospatial memory.

    PubMed

    Groen, Margriet A; Whitehouse, Andrew J O; Badcock, Nicholas A; Bishop, Dorothy V M

    2012-05-01

    In the majority of people, language production is lateralized to the left cerebral hemisphere and visuospatial skills to the right. However, questions remain as to when, how, and why humans arrive at this division of labor. In this study, we assessed cerebral lateralization for language production and for visuospatial memory using functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound in a group of 60 typically developing children between the ages of six and 16 years. The typical pattern of left-lateralized activation for language production and right-lateralized activation for visuospatial memory was found in the majority of the children (58%). No age-related change in direction or strength of lateralization was found for language production. In contrast, the strength of lateralization (independent of direction) for visuospatial memory function continued to increase with age. In addition, boys showed a trend for stronger right-hemisphere lateralization for visuospatial memory than girls, but there was no gender effect on language laterality. We tested whether having language and visuospatial functions in the same hemisphere was associated with poor cognitive performance and found no evidence for this "functional crowding" hypothesis. We did, however, find that children with left-lateralized language production had higher vocabulary and nonword reading age-adjusted standard scores than other children, regardless of the laterality of visuospatial memory. Thus, a link between language function and left-hemisphere lateralization exists, and cannot be explained in terms of maturational change.

  14. Novel automatic detection of pleura and B-lines (comet-tail artifacts) on in vivo lung ultrasound scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshavegh, Ramin; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Møller Sørensen, Hasse; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Ewertsen, Caroline; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a novel automatic method for detection of B-lines (comet-tail artifacts) in lung ultrasound scans. B-lines are the most commonly used artifacts for analyzing the pulmonary edema. They appear as laser-like vertical beams, which arise from the pleural line and spread down without fading to the edge of the screen. An increase in their number is associated with presence of edema. All the scans used in this study were acquired using a BK3000 ultrasound scanner (BK Ultrasound, Denmark) driving a 192-element 5:5 MHz wide linear transducer (10L2W, BK Ultrasound). The dynamic received focus technique was employed to generate the sequences. Six subjects, among those three patients after major surgery and three normal subjects, were scanned once and Six ultrasound sequences each containing 50 frames were acquired. The proposed algorithm was applied to all 300 in-vivo lung ultrasound images. The pleural line is first segmented on each image and then the B-line artifacts spreading down from the pleural line are detected and overlayed on the image. The resulting 300 images showed that the mean lateral distance between B-lines detected on images acquired from patients decreased by 20% in compare with that of normal subjects. Therefore, the method can be used as the basis of a method of automatically and qualitatively characterizing the distribution of B-lines.

  15. Renal length discrepancy by ultrasound is a reliable predictor of an abnormal DMSA scan in children.

    PubMed

    Khazaei, Mahmood R; Mackie, Fiona; Rosenberg, Andrew R; Kainer, Gad

    2008-01-01

    A renal length discrepancy (RLD) of more than 10 mm by ultrasound (US) is accepted as a potential indicator of an underlying renal pathology; however, there are few supporting data for this in children. Our objective was to determine a cutoff at which RLD on US is a reliable predictor of dimercaptosuccinate acid (DMSA) scan abnormality. We present data from 90 patients who had both renal US and a DMSA scan, as well as DMSA scan results compared with bipolar RLD by US. Positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values were calculated for renal RLD from 6 to >10 mm. The left kidney was longer in 56%, whereas the right kidney was longer in 37%; their lengths were equal in 8%. For children at all ages, a left kidney longer than the right by >or=10 mm or a right kidney longer than the left by >or=7 mm gave a PPV for DMSA abnormality of 79% and 100%, respectively. In children older than 4 years, if the right kidney was longer by >or=7 mm or if the left kidney was longer by >or=10 mm, the PPVs for DMSA abnormality were 100% and 63%, respectively. In children younger than 4 years, when the right kidney was longer by >or=6 mm or the left was kidney longer by >or=10 mm, the PPV were 86% and 100%, respectively. Thus, children with a right kidney longer than the left by even <10 mm is a reliable predictor of an abnormal DMSA scan.

  16. Inverse Problem for Color Doppler Ultrasound-Assisted Intracardiac Blood Flow Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jaeseong

    2016-01-01

    For the assessment of the left ventricle (LV), echocardiography has been widely used to visualize and quantify geometrical variations of LV. However, echocardiographic image itself is not sufficient to describe a swirling pattern which is a characteristic blood flow pattern inside LV without any treatment on the image. We propose a mathematical framework based on an inverse problem for three-dimensional (3D) LV blood flow reconstruction. The reconstruction model combines the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with one-direction velocity component of the synthetic flow data (or color Doppler data) from the forward simulation (or measurement). Moreover, time-varying LV boundaries are extracted from the intensity data to determine boundary conditions of the reconstruction model. Forward simulations of intracardiac blood flow are performed using a fluid-structure interaction model in order to obtain synthetic flow data. The proposed model significantly reduces the local and global errors of the reconstructed flow fields. We demonstrate the feasibility and potential usefulness of the proposed reconstruction model in predicting dynamic swirling patterns inside the LV over a cardiac cycle. PMID:27313657

  17. Denoising embolic Doppler ultrasound signals using Dual Tree Complex Discrete Wavelet Transform.

    PubMed

    Serbes, Gorkem; Aydin, Nizamettin

    2010-01-01

    Early and accurate detection of asymptomatic emboli is important for monitoring of preventive therapy in stroke-prone patients. One of the problems in detection of emboli is the identification of an embolic signal caused by very small emboli. The amplitude of the embolic signal may be so small that advanced processing methods are required to distinguish these signals from Doppler signals arising from red blood cells. In this study instead of conventional discrete wavelet transform, the Dual Tree Complex Discrete Wavelet Transform was used for denoising embolic signals. Performances of both approaches were compared. Unlike the conventional discrete wavelet transform discrete complex wavelet transform is a shift invariant transform with limited redundancy. Results demonstrate that the Dual Tree Complex Discrete Wavelet Transform based denoising outperforms conventional discrete wavelet denoising. Approximately 8 dB improvement is obtained by using the Dual Tree Complex Discrete Wavelet Transform compared to the improvement provided by the conventional Discrete Wavelet Transform (less than 5 dB).

  18. Characterization of intraventricular flow patterns in healthy neonates from conventional color-Doppler ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejman-Yarden, Shai; Rzasa, Callie; Benito, Yolanda; Alhama, Marta; Leone, Tina; Yotti, Raquel; Bermejo, Javier; Printz, Beth; Del Alamo, Juan C.

    2012-11-01

    Left ventricular vortices have been difficult to visualize in the clinical setting due to the lack of quantitative non-invasive modalities, and this limitation is especially important in pediatrics. We have developed and validated a new technique to reconstruct two-dimensional time-resolved velocity fields in the LV from conventional transthoracic color-Doppler images. This non-invasive modality was used to image LV flow in 10 healthy full-term neonates, ages 24-48 hours. Our results show that, in neonates, a diastolic vortex developed during LV filling, was maintained during isovolumic contraction, and decayed during the ejection period. The vortex was created near the base of the ventricle, moved toward the apex, and then back toward the base and LVOT during ejection. In conclusion, we have characterized for the first time the properties of the LV filling vortex in normal neonates, demonstrating that this vortex channels blood from the inflow to the outflow tract of the LV. Together with existing data from adults, our results confirm that the LV vortex is conserved through adulthood. Funded by NIH Grant R21HL108268.

  19. Use of Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound for Diagnosis of Brain Death in Patients with Severe Cerebral Injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuequn; Liu, Shangwei; Xun, Fangfang; Liu, Zhan; Huang, Xiuying

    2016-06-06

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to investigate the use of transcranial Doppler (TCD) for diagnosis of brain death in patients with severe cerebral injury. MATERIAL AND METHODS This retrospective study enrolled 42 patients based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. All patients were divided into either the brain death group or the survival group according to prognosis. Blood flow of the brain was examined by TCD and analyzed for spectrum changes. The average blood flow velocity (Vm), pulse index (PI), and diastolic blood flow in reverse (RDF) were recorded and compared. RESULTS The data demonstrated that the average speed of bilateral middle cerebral artery blood flow in the brain death group was significantly reduced (P<0.05). However, the PI of the brain death group increased significantly. Moreover, RDF spectrum and nail-like sharp peak spectrum of the brain death group was higher than in the survival group. CONCLUSIONS Due to its simplicity, high repeatability, and specificity, TCD combined with other methods is highly valuable for diagnosis of brain death in patients with severe brain injury.

  20. Bayesian inference of genetic parameters for ultrasound scanning traits of Kivircik lambs.

    PubMed

    Cemal, I; Karaman, E; Firat, M Z; Yilmaz, O; Ata, N; Karaca, O

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound scanning traits have been adapted in selection programs in many countries to improve carcass traits for lean meat production. As the genetic parameters of the traits interested are important for breeding programs, the estimation of these parameters was aimed at the present investigation. The estimated parameters were direct and maternal heritability as well as genetic correlations between the studied traits. The traits were backfat thickness (BFT), skin+backfat thickness (SBFT), eye muscle depth (MD) and live weights at the day of scanning (LW). The breed investigated was Kivircik, which has a high quality of meat. Six different multi-trait animal models were fitted to determine the most suitable model for the data using Bayesian approach. Based on deviance information criterion, a model that includes direct additive genetic effects, maternal additive genetic effects, direct maternal genetic covariance and maternal permanent environmental effects revealed to be the most appropriate for the data, and therefore, inferences were built on the results of that model. The direct heritability estimates for BFT, SBFT, MD and LW were 0.26, 0.26, 0.23 and 0.09, whereas the maternal heritability estimates were 0.27, 0.27, 0.24 and 0.20, respectively. Negative genetic correlations were obtained between direct and maternal effects for BFT, SBFT and MD. Both direct and maternal genetic correlations between traits were favorable, whereas BFT-MD and SBFT-MD had negligible direct genetic correlation. The highest direct and maternal genetic correlations were between BFT and SBFT (0.39) and between MD and LW (0.48), respectively. Our results, in general, indicated that maternal effects should be accounted for in estimation of genetic parameters of ultrasound scanning traits in Kivircik lambs, and SBFT can be used as a selection criterion to improve BFT.

  1. Monostatic coaxial 1.5 μm laser Doppler velocimeter using a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Peter John; Pedersen, Christian

    2013-09-09

    We present a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) in monostatic coaxial arrangement consisting of off-the-shelf telecom-grade components: a single frequency laser (wavelength λ = 1.5 μm) and a high-finesse scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer (sFPI). In contrast to previous 1.5 μm LDV systems based on heterodyne detection, our sFPI-LDV has the advantages of having large remote sensing range not limited by laser coherence, high velocity dynamic range not limited by detector bandwidth and inherent sign discrimination of Doppler shift. The more optically efficient coaxial arrangement where transmitter and receiver optics share a common axis reduces the number of components and greatly simplifies the optical alignment. However, the sensitivity to unwanted backreflections is increased. To circumvent this problem, we employ a custom optical circulator design which compared to commercial fiber-optic circulator achieves ~40 dB reduction in strength of unwanted reflections (i.e. leakage) while maintaining high optical efficiency. Experiments with a solid target demonstrate the performance of the sFPI-LDV system with high sensitivity down to pW level at present update rates up to 10 Hz.

  2. A beam-scan type laser Doppler velocimeter for simultaneous and continuous measurement of velocity profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, M.; Nadaoka, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Sato, Y.; Muramoto, T.

    A beam-scan-type LDV (SLV) with high spatial resolving power has been developed for the continuous measurement of nearly simultaneous velocity profiles in the cross sections of various flows. The SLV consists of a forward-scatter LDV and a beam-scan unit, using a reversed-scan method, capable of high-speed scanning of the measuring volume. An autofocusing device using an image sensor is employed to simplify the alignment of the receiving optics needed to match the transmitting optics. The SLV performance was validated by comparison of experimental results (for a wake flow of a circular cylinder, a reciprocally oscillatory flow, and a Karman vortex street flow) with flow visualization and computational results.

  3. Damage identification of beam structures using free response shapes obtained by use of a continuously scanning laser Doppler vibrometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. F.; Chen, Da-Ming; Zhu, W. D.

    2017-08-01

    Spatially dense operating deflection shapes and mode shapes can be rapidly obtained by use of a continuously scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (CSLDV) system, which sweeps its laser spot over a vibrating structure surface. This paper introduces a new type of vibration shapes called a free response shape (FRS) that can be obtained by use of a CSLDV system, and a new damage identification methodology using FRSs is developed for beam structures. An analytical expression of FRSs of a damped beam structure is derived, and FRSs from the analytical expression compare well with those from a finite element model. In the damage identification methodology, a free-response damage index (FRDI) is proposed, and damage regions can be identified near neighborhoods with consistently high values of FRDIs associated with different modes; an auxiliary FRDI is defined to assist identification of the neighborhoods. A FRDI associated with a mode consists of differences between curvatures of FRSs associated with the mode in a number of half-scan periods of a CSLDV system and those from polynomials that fit the FRSs with properly determined orders. A convergence index is proposed to determine the proper order of a polynomial fit. One advantage of the methodology is that the FRDI does not require any baseline information of an undamaged beam structure, if it is geometrically smooth and made of materials that have no stiffness and mass discontinuities. Another advantage is that FRDIs associated with multiple modes can be obtained using free response of a beam structure measured by a CSLDV system in one scan. The number of half-scan periods for calculation of the FRDI associated with a mode can be determined by use of the short-time Fourier transform. The proposed methodology was numerically and experimentally applied to identify damage in beam structures; effects of the scan frequency of a CSLDV system on qualities of obtained FRSs were experimentally investigated.

  4. [Transabdominal ultrasound examination, contrast-enhanced ultrasound examination and endoscopic ultrasound scanning in the determination of the aetiology and the degree of severity in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Møller Andersen, Anders; Malmstrøm, Marie Louise; Novovic, Srdan; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad; Nissen, Flemming Helge; Hansen, Mark Berner

    2013-05-20

    A transabdominal ultrasound examination is part of the standard work-up for patients with acute pancreatitis. Transabdominal ultrasound examination displays a high sensitivity for the detection of gallbladder stones. With the recent introduction of contrast enhancement in ultrasound it has become possible to determine the severity of acute pancreatitis. Endoscopic ultrasound has shown a high sensitivity in the diagnosis of stones in the common bile duct and is an important peroperative surgical tool in endoscopic transgastric necrosectomi as well.

  5. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  6. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  9. Abdominal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  10. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  11. Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  12. Hip Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  13. Ultrasound - Scrotum

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  14. Design of integrated scanning laser Doppler velocitmeter using arrayed waveguide gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maru, Koichi; Fujii, Yusaku; Obokata, Tomio; Ishima, Tsuneaki; Yupapin, Preecha; Pornsuwancharoen, Nithitroth; Juthanggoon, Thanaprasert

    2009-07-01

    An integrated scanned differential LDV has been proposed using planar lightwave circuit (PLC) technology. By using the proposed LDV, the measurement position can be scanned in depth direction without any mechanical movement. The PLC technology is utilized in the proposed design for achieving a compact optical circuit. The characteristics of the proposed LDV are simulated with a design model based on grating equations for AWGs. The simulation result reveals that the measurement position can be changed over the range of 46 mm in the depth direction without mechanical movement when the displacement between output sides of two waveguide arrays is 30 mm.

  15. A microfabricated water-immersible scanning mirror with a small form factor for handheld ultrasound and photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Song; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Micro scanning mirrors that can operate reliably under water is useful in both ultrasound and photoacoustic microscopic imaging, where fast scanning of focused high-frequency ultrasound beams is desired for pixel-by-pixel data acquisition. This paper reports the development of a new micro-fabricated water-immersible scanning mirror with a small form factor. It consists of an optically and acoustically reflective mirror plate, which is supported onto two flexible polymer hinges and driven by an integrated electromagnetic micro-actuator. It can achieve one-axis scanning of +/-12.1° at a resonant frequency of 250Hz in air and 210Hz in water, respectively. By optimizing the design and enhancing the fabrication with high-precision optical 3D printing, the overall size of the scanning mirror module is less than 7 mm × 5 mm × 7 mm. The small form factor, large scanning angle, and high resonant frequency of the new water-immersible scanning mirror make it suitable for building compact handheld imaging probes for in-vivo high-speed and wide-field ultrasound and photoacoustic microscopy.

  16. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  17. Observations on the female reproductive cycle of captive giant tortoises (Geochelone spp.) using ultrasound scanning.

    PubMed

    Casares, M; Rübel, A; Honegger, R E

    1997-09-01

    The reproductive activities of one adult female Galápagos tortoise (Geochelone nigra) and three adult female Aldabra tortoises (Geochelone gigantea) were monitored over 2 yr using ultrasound scanning. A nonrestraining technique of tactile stimulation was used for all examinations. Developing, preovulatory, and atretic ovarian follicles, as well as eggs at various stages of shell deposition, were identified and measured. In G. nigra, follicles became preovulatory at a diameter of 40-42 mm and eggs were laid 34-84 days (mean = 55.6, n = 5) after the thin-shelled eggs were first detected in the oviducts. Geochelone nigra was capable of retaining eggs, with the shell already formed, until the next breeding season. No eggs have been produced by G. gigantea during their stay in Zürich Zoo although follicles of 38-40 mm have been observed frequently in two animals.

  18. Accuracy of sonographic fetal gender determination: predictions made by sonographers during routine obstetric ultrasound scans

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Karen; Garbett, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of sonographer predictions of fetal gender during routine ultrasounds. Primarily, the study sought to investigate the accuracy of predictions made in the first trimester, as requests from parents wanting to know the gender of their fetus at this early scan are becoming increasingly common. Second and third trimester fetuses were included in the study to confirm the accuracy of later predictions. In addition, the mother's decision to know the gender was recorded to determine the prevalence of women wanting prenatal predictions. Methods: A prospective, cross sectional study was conducted in a specialist private obstetric practice in the Illawarra, NSW. A total of 640 fetuses across three trimesters were examined collectively by seven sonographers. Fetal gender was predicted using the sagittal plane only in the first trimester and either the sagittal or transverse plane in later trimesters. Phenotypic gender confirmation was obtained from hospital records or direct telephone contact with women postnatally. Results: Results confirmed 100% accuracy in predictions made after 14 weeks gestation. The overall success rate in the first trimester group (11–14 weeks) was 75%. When excluding those scans where a prediction could not be made, success rates increased to 91%. Results were less accurate for fetuses younger than 12 weeks, with an overall success rate of 54%. Male fetuses under 13 weeks were more likely to have gender incorrectly or unable to be assigned. After 13 weeks, success rates for correctly predicting males exceeded that of female fetuses. Statistical differences were noted in the success rates of individual sonographers. Sixty seven percent of women were in favour of knowing fetal gender from ultrasound. Publicly insured women were more likely to request gender disclosure than privately insured women. Conclusions: Sonographic gender determination provides high success rates in the

  19. Noninvasive assessment of sympathetic vasoconstriction in human and rodent skeletal muscle using near-infrared spectroscopy and Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Fadel, Paul J; Keller, David M; Watanabe, Hitoshi; Raven, Peter B; Thomas, Gail D

    2004-04-01

    The precise role of the sympathetic nervous system in the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise has been challenging to define in humans, partly because of the limited techniques available for measuring blood flow in active muscle. Recent studies using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to measure changes in tissue oxygenation have provided an alternative method to evaluate vasomotor responses in exercising muscle, but this approach has not been fully validated. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sympathetic activation would evoke parallel changes in tissue oxygenation and blood flow in resting and exercising muscle. We simultaneously measured tissue oxygenation with NIR spectroscopy and blood flow with Doppler ultrasound in skeletal muscle of conscious humans (n = 13) and anesthetized rats (n = 9). In resting forearm of humans, reflex activation of sympathetic nerves with the use of lower body negative pressure produced graded decreases in tissue oxygenation and blood flow that were highly correlated (r = 0.80, P < 0.0001). Similarly, in resting hindlimb of rats, electrical stimulation of sympathetic nerves produced graded decreases in tissue oxygenation and blood flow velocity that were highly correlated (r = 0.93, P < 0.0001). During rhythmic muscle contraction, the decreases in tissue oxygenation and blood flow evoked by sympathetic activation were significantly attenuated (P < 0.05 vs. rest) but remained highly correlated in both humans (r = 0.80, P < 0.006) and rats (r = 0.92, P < 0.0001). These data indicate that, during steady-state metabolic conditions, changes in tissue oxygenation can be used to reliably assess sympathetic vasoconstriction in both resting and exercising skeletal muscle.

  20. Studying cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism using simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy and transcranial Doppler ultrasound: a hyperventilation and caffeine study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Runze; Brugniaux, Julien; Dhaliwal, Harinder; Beaudin, Andrew E; Eliasziw, Misha; Poulin, Marc J; Dunn, Jeff F

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is one of the most widely consumed psycho-stimulants in the world, yet little is known about its effects on brain oxygenation and metabolism. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized cross-over study design, we combined transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to study caffeine's effect on middle cerebral artery peak blood flow velocity (Vp), brain tissue oxygenation (StO2), total hemoglobin (tHb), and cerebral oxygen metabolism (CMRO2) in five subjects. Hyperventilation-induced hypocapnia served as a control to verify the sensitivity of our measurements. During hypocapnia (∼16 mmHg below resting values), Vp decreased by 40.0 ± 2.4% (95% CI, P < 0.001), while StO2 and tHb decreased by 2.9 ± 0.3% and 2.6 ± 0.4%, respectively (P = 0.003 and P = 0.002, respectively). CMRO2, calculated using the Fick equation, was reduced by 29.3 ± 9% compared to the isocapnic-euoxia baseline (P < 0.001). In the pharmacological experiments, there was a significant decrease in Vp, StO2, and tHb after ingestion of 200 mg of caffeine compared with placebo. There was no significant difference in CMRO2 between caffeine and placebo. Both showed a CMRO2 decline compared to baseline showing the importance of a placebo control. In conclusion, this study showed that profound hypocapnia impairs cerebral oxidative metabolism. We provide new insight into the effects of caffeine on cerebral hemodynamics. Moreover, this study showed that multimodal NIRS/TCD is an excellent tool for studying brain hemodynamic responses to pharmacological interventions and physiological challenges. PMID:25907789

  1. Splanchnic Hemodynamics and Intestinal Vascularity in Crohn's Disease: An In Vivo Evaluation Using Doppler and Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound and Biochemical Parameters.

    PubMed

    Maconi, Giovanni; Asthana, Anil K; Bolzacchini, Elena; Dell'Era, Alessandra; Furfaro, Federica; Bezzio, Cristina; Salvatore, Veronica; Maier, Jeanette A M

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by inflammation and angiogenesis of affected bowel. We evaluated the correlation among vascularity of intestinal wall in CD, splanchnic hemodynamics, clinical activity and biochemical parameters of inflammation and angiogenesis. Sixteen patients with ileal CD and 10 healthy controls were investigated by means of Doppler ultrasound of the superior mesenteric artery and color Doppler and contrast-enhanced ultrasound of the ileal wall. In parallel, serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nitric oxide, before and 30 min after a standard meal, were evaluated. In CD patients, there was a significant post-prandial reduction in the resistance index and pulsatility index of the superior mesenteric artery, associated with increased levels of nitric oxide and decreased amounts of TNF-α. A correlation was observed between vascular endothelial growth factor and contrast-enhanced ultrasound parameters of intestinal wall vascularity (r = 0.63-0.71, p < 0.05) and between these parameters and superior mesenteric artery blood flow after fasting (resistance and pulsatility indexes: r = -0.64 and -0.72, p < 0.05). Our results revealed a post-prandial increase in nitric oxide and decrease in TNF-α in CD patients in vivo. They also confirm the role of vascular endothelial growth factor in angiogenesis and in pathologic vascular remodeling of CD and its effect on splanchnic blood flow.

  2. Registration of three-dimensional compound ultrasound scans of the breast for refraction and motion correction.

    PubMed

    Moskalik, A; Carson, P L; Meyer, C R; Fowlkes, J B; Rubin, J M; Roubidoux, M A

    1995-01-01

    Use of multiple look directions, that is, compound imaging, has been shown previously to increase detection of specular reflectors and averaging of speckle noise in gray-scale images, often at the expense of spatial resolution and other misregistration errors. In color flow imaging, additional view angles can fill in vessels missed due to Doppler angle dropout and increase quantitative and visual Doppler accuracy by triangulation or a simple peak-frequency-shift combination algorithm. Image registration and unwarping throughout multiple three-dimensional (3D) volume sets should correct for many refraction artifacts, motion between and during compounded image sets and even, possibly, positioning errors between image sets, acquired months apart, to display growth of abnormalities. The registration described here does not provide sufficient accuracy for formation of enhanced coherent apertures, but shows promise in some cases to provide superior compound images and possibly comparisons of current and prior studies. In this study, the breast is stabilized by mild compression between a flat plate and a scanning membrane. Registration and unwarping is performed retrospectively on two separate volumetric data sets by defining pairs of corresponding points and, in some cases, line and plane segments. Three-dimensional linear affine transforms are performed using identified points, lines and planes. 3D nonlinear warped transforms are also possible given adequate numbers of identifiable points. More than two data sets are registered by selecting one as the standard, and registering the remainder to match. The most appropriate algorithm, such as averaging or maximum amplitude, may be used to combine the data sets for display. Significant success has been achieved in compound display of a test object and of the breast in vivo, even when there was relative motion or warping between image sets. In pulse-echo imaging, homologous feature registration for compounding appears to

  3. The effects of probe placement on measured flow velocity in transcranial Doppler ultrasound imaging in-vitro and in-vivo experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Daan L. K.; Meel-van den Abeelen, Aisha S. S.; Lagro, Joep; Claassen, Jurgen A. H. R.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2014-03-01

    The measurement of the blood flow in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) using transcranial Doppler ultrasound (US) imaging is clinically relevant for the study of cerebral autoregulation. Especially in the aging population, impairement of the autoregulation may coincide or relate to loss of perfusion and consequently loss of brain function. The cerebral autoregulation can be assessed by relating the blood pressure to the blood flow in the brain. Doppler US is a widely used, non-invasive method to measure the blood flow in the MCA. However, Doppler flow imaging is known to produce results that are dependent of the operator. The angle of the probe insonation with respect to the centerline of the blood vessel is a well known factor for output variability. In patients also the skull must be traversed and the MCA must be detected, influencing the US signal intensity. In this contribution we report two studies. We describe first an in-vitro setup to study the Doppler flow in a situation where the ground truth is known. Secondly, we report on a study with healthy volunteers where the effects of small probe displacements on the flow velocity signals are investigated. For the latter purpose, a special probe holder was designed to control the experiment.

  4. Automated kidney detection for 3D ultrasound using scan line searching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Matthias; Nadolny, Anne; Wesarg, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound (U/S) is a fast and non-expensive imaging modality that is used for the examination of various anatomical structures, e.g. the kidneys. One important task for automatic organ tracking or computer-aided diagnosis is the identification of the organ region. During this process the exact information about the transducer location and orientation is usually unavailable. This renders the implementation of such automatic methods exceedingly challenging. In this work we like to introduce a new automatic method for the detection of the kidney in 3D U/S images. This novel technique analyses the U/S image data along virtual scan lines. Here, characteristic texture changes when entering and leaving the symmetric tissue regions of the renal cortex are searched for. A subsequent feature accumulation along a second scan direction produces a 2D heat map of renal cortex candidates, from which the kidney location is extracted in two steps. First, the strongest candidate as well as its counterpart are extracted by heat map intensity ranking and renal cortex size analysis. This process exploits the heat map gap caused by the renal pelvis region. Substituting the renal pelvis detection with this combined cortex tissue feature increases the detection robustness. In contrast to model based methods that generate characteristic pattern matches, our method is simpler and therefore faster. An evaluation performed on 61 3D U/S data sets showed, that in 55 cases showing none or minor shadowing the kidney location could be correctly identified.

  5. Ultrasound Annual, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    The 1984 edition of Ultrasound Annual explores new applications of ultrasound in speech and swallowing and offers guidelines on the use of ultrasound and nuclear medicine in thyroid and biliary tract disease. Other areas covered include Doppler sonography of the abdomen, intraoperative abdominal ultrasound, sonography of the placenta, ultrasound of the neonatal head and abdomen, and sonographic echo patterns created by fat.

  6. Phentolamine re-dosing during penile dynamic colour Doppler ultrasound: a practical method to abolish a false diagnosis of venous leakage in patients with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Gontero, P; Sriprasad, S; Wilkins, C J; Donaldson, N; Muir, G H; Sidhu, P S

    2004-11-01

    Increased sympathetic tone may cause an equivocal response to a prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) penile Doppler ultrasound (US) examination interpreted as a venous leak. We evaluated the US parameters and erectile response to the addition of phentolamine to a PGE1 penile Doppler US examination to ascertain whether addition of phentolamine would abolish a suboptimal response. 32 patients (median age 29 years, range 17-70 years) with either a previous Doppler US pattern of venous leakage or a clinical suspicion of venogenic impotence, underwent Doppler US after a total dose of 20 microg of PGE1. Peak systolic velocity (PSV), end diastolic velocity (EDV) and grade of erection were documented. If erectile response was suboptimal irrespective of the EDV measurement, 2 mg-intracavernosal phentolamine was administered and measurements repeated. Six patients had a normal erectile response, the remaining 26 received phentolamine. A significant increase in PSV between baseline and 20 microg PGE1 (p<0.001) was observed in all cases. Following phentolamine there was a significant increase in grade of erection (p=0.0001) and a significant reduction in the EDV (p=0.0001). A reduction of the EDV to below 0.0 cm s(-1) was observed in 16 patients. Four patients with EDV <5.0 cm s(-1) but >0.0 cm s(-1) had improved erectile response following phentolamine while six showed persistent EDV elevation >5 cm s(-1). No priapism was documented. It is essential to ensure cavernosal relaxation using phentolamine before a Doppler US diagnosis of venous leak is made. This two-stage assessment will allow this to be done efficiently and with a low risk of priapism.

  7. Seminal, clinical and colour-Doppler ultrasound correlations of prostatitis-like symptoms in males of infertile couples.

    PubMed

    Lotti, F; Corona, G; Mondaini, N; Maseroli, E; Rossi, M; Filimberti, E; Noci, I; Forti, G; Maggi, M

    2014-01-01

    'Prostatitis-like symptoms' (PLS) are a cluster of bothersome conditions defined as 'perineal and/or ejaculatory pain or discomfort and National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) pain subdomain score ≥4' (Nickel's criteria). PLS may originate from the prostate or from other portions of the male genital tract. Although PLS could be associated with 'prostatitis', they should not be confused. The NIH-CPSI is considered the gold-standard for assessing PLS severity. Although previous studies investigated the impact of prostatitis, vesiculitis or epididymitis on semen parameters, correlations between their related symptoms and seminal or scrotal/transrectal colour-Doppler ultrasound (CDU) characteristics have not been carefully determined. And no previous study evaluated the CDU features of PLS in infertile men. This study was aimed at investigating possible associations among NIH-CPSI (total and subdomain) scores and PLS, with seminal, clinical and scrotal/transrectal CDU parameters in a cohort of males of infertile couples. PLS of 400 men (35.8 ± 7.2 years) with a suspected male factor were assessed by the NIH-CPSI. All patients underwent, during the same day, semen analysis, seminal plasma interleukin 8 (sIL-8, a marker of male genital tract inflammation), biochemical evaluation, urine/seminal cultures, scrotal/transrectal CDU. PLS was detected in 39 (9.8%) subjects. After adjusting for age, waist and total testosterone (TT), no association among NIH-CPSI (total or subdomain) scores or PLS and sperm parameters was observed. However, we found a positive association with current positive urine and/or seminal cultures, sIL-8 levels and CDU features suggestive of inflammation of the epididymis, seminal vesicles, prostate, but not of the testis. The aforementioned significant associations of PLS were further confirmed by comparing PLS patients with age-, waist- and TT-matched PLS-free patients (1 : 3 ratio). In conclusion, NIH

  8. Physiological aspects of the determination of comprehensive arterial inflows in the lower abdomen assessed by Doppler ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive measurement of splanchnic hemodynamics has been utilized in the clinical setting for diagnosis of gastro-intestinal disease, and for determining reserve blood flow (BF) distribution. However, previous studies that measured BF in a "single vessel with small size volume", such as the superior mesenteric and coeliac arteries, were concerned solely with the target organ in the gastrointestinal area, and therefore evaluation of alterations in these single arterial BFs under various states was sometimes limited to "small blood volumes", even though there was a relatively large change in flow. BF in the lower abdomen (BFAb) is potentially a useful indicator of the influence of comprehensive BF redistribution in cardiovascular and hepato-gastrointestinal disease, in the postprandial period, and in relation to physical exercise. BFAb can be determined theoretically using Doppler ultrasound by subtracting BF in the bilateral proximal femoral arteries (FAs) from BF in the upper abdominal aorta (Ao) above the coeliac trunk. Prior to acceptance of this method of determining a true BFAb value, it is necessary to obtain validated normal physiological data that represent the hemodynamic relationship between the three arteries. In determining BFAb, relative reliability was acceptably high (range in intra-class correlation coefficient: 0.85-0.97) for three arterial hemodynamic parameters (blood velocity, vessel diameter, and BF) in three repeated measurements obtained over three different days. Bland-Altman analysis of the three repeated measurements revealed that day-to-day physiological variation (potentially including measurement error) was within the acceptable minimum range (95% of confidence interval), calculated as the difference in hemodynamics between two measurements. Mean BF (ml/min) was 2951 ± 767 in Ao, 316 ± 97 in left FA, 313 ± 83 in right FA, and 2323 ± 703 in BFAb, which is in agreement with a previous study that measured the sum of BF in the major

  9. Comparison of the biometric formulas used for applanation A-scan ultrasound biometry.

    PubMed

    Özcura, Fatih; Aktaş, Serdar; Sağdık, Hacı Murat; Tetikoğlu, Mehmet

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the accuracy of various biometric formulas for predicting postoperative refraction determined using applanation A-scan ultrasound. This retrospective comparative study included 485 eyes that underwent uneventful phacoemulsification with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation. Applanation A-scan ultrasound biometry and postoperative manifest refraction were obtained in all eyes. Biometric data were entered into each of the five IOL power calculation formulas: SRK-II, SRK/T, Holladay I, Hoffer Q, and Binkhorst II. All eyes were divided into three groups according to axial length: short (≤22.0 mm), average (22.0-25.0 mm), and long (≥25.0 mm) eyes. The postoperative spherical equivalent was calculated and compared with the predicted refractive error using each biometric formula. The results showed that all formulas had significantly lower mean absolute error (MAE) in comparison with Binkhorst II formula (P < 0.01). The lowest MAE was obtained with the SRK-II for average (0.49 ± 0.40 D) and short (0.67 ± 0.54 D) eyes and the SRK/T for long (0.61 ± 0.50 D) eyes. The highest postoperative hyperopic shift was seen with the SRK-II for average (46.8 %), short (28.1 %), and long (48.4 %) eyes. The highest postoperative myopic shift was seen with the Holladay I for average (66.4 %) and long (71.0 %) eyes and the SRK/T for short eyes (80.6 %). In conclusion, the SRK-II formula produced the lowest MAE in average and short eyes and the SRK/T formula produced the lowest MAE in long eyes. The SRK-II has the highest postoperative hyperopic shift in all eyes. The highest postoperative myopic shift is with the Holladay I for average and long eyes and SRK/T for short eyes.

  10. Study on Water Distribution Imaging in the Sand Using Propagation Velocity of Sound with Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Tsuneyoshi; Nakagawa, Yutaka; Shirakawa, Takashi; Sano, Motoaki; Ohaba, Motoyoshi; Shibusawa, Sakae

    2013-07-01

    We propose a method for the monitoring and imaging of the water distribution in the rooting zone of plants using sound vibration. In this study, the water distribution measurement in the horizontal and vertical directions in the soil layer was examined to confirm whether a temporal change in the volume water content of the soil could be estimated from a temporal changes in propagation velocity. A scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) is used for measurement of the vibration velocity of the soil surface, because the highly precise vibration velocity measurement of several many points can be carried out automatically. Sand with a uniform particle size distribution is used for the soil, as it has high plasticity; that is, the sand can return to a dry state easily even if it is soaked with water. A giant magnetostriction vibrator or a flat speaker is used as a sound source. Also, a soil moisture sensor, which measures the water content of the soil using the electric permittivity, is installed in the sand. From the experimental results of the vibration measurement and soil moisture sensors, we can confirm that the temporal changes of the water distribution in sand using the negative pressure irrigation system in both the horizontal and vertical directions can be estimated using the propagation velocity of sound. Therefore, in the future, we plan to develop an insertion-type sound source and receiver using the acceleration sensors, and we intend to examine whether our method can be applied even in commercial soil with growing plants.

  11. Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer Measurements Inside Helicopter Cabins in Running Conditions: Problems and Mock-up Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revel, G. M.; Castellini, P.; Chiariotti, P.; Tomasini, E. P.; Cenedese, F.; Perazzolo, A.

    2010-05-01

    The present work deals with the analysis of problems and potentials of laser vibrometer measurements inside helicopter cabins in running conditions. The paper describes the results of a systematic measurement campaign performed on an Agusta A109MKII mock-up. The aim is to evaluate the applicability of Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer (SLDV) for tests in simulated flying conditions and to understand how performances of the technique are affected when the laser head is placed inside the cabin, thus being subjected to interfering inputs. Firstly a brief description of the performed test cases and the used measuring set-ups are given. Comparative tests between SLDV and accelerometers are presented, analyzing the achievable performances for the specific application. Results obtained measuring with SLDV placed inside the helicopter cabin during operative excitation conditions are compared with those performed with the laser lying outside the mock-up, these last being considered as "reference measurements". Finally, in order to give an estimate of the uncertainty level on measured signals, a study linking the admitted percentage of noise content on vibrometer signals due to laser head vibration levels will be introduced.

  12. Can Doppler or contrast-enhanced ultrasound analysis add diagnostically important information about the nature of breast lesions?

    PubMed Central

    Stanzani, Daniela; Chala, Luciano F.; de Barros, Nestor; Cerri, Giovanni G.; Chammas, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Despite evidence suggesting that Doppler ultrasonography can help to differentiate between benign and malignant breast lesions, it is rarely applied in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to determine whether certain vascular features of breast masses observed by duplex Doppler and color Doppler ultrasonography (before and/or after microbubble contrast injection) add information to the gray-scale analysis and support the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) classification. METHODS: Seventy solid lesions were prospectively evaluated with gray-scale ultrasonography, color Doppler ultrasonography, and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography. The morphological analysis and lesion vascularity were correlated with the histological results. RESULTS: Percutaneous core biopsies revealed that 25/70 (17.5%) lesions were malignant, while 45 were benign. Hypervascular lesions with tortuous and central vessels, a resistive index (RI)≥0.73 before contrast injection, and an RI≥0.75 after contrast injection were significantly predictive of malignancy (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: The combination of gray-scale ultrasonography data with unenhanced or enhanced duplex Doppler and color Doppler US data can provide diagnostically useful information. These techniques can be easily implemented because Doppler devices are already present in most health centers. PMID:24519198

  13. Feasibility of Rotational Scan Ultrasound Imaging by an Angled High Frequency Transducer for the Posterior Segment of the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Paeng, Dong-Guk; Chang, Jin Ho; Chen, Ruimin; Humayun, Mark S.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2009-01-01

    High frequency ultrasound over 40 MHz has been used to image the anterior segment of the eye, but it is not suitable for the posterior segment due to the frequency-dependent attenuation of ultrasound and thus the limitation of penetration depth. This paper proposes a novel scan method to image the posterior segment of the eye with an angled high frequency (beyond 40 MHz) ultrasound needle transducer. In this method, the needle transducer is inserted into the eye through a small incision hole (∼1 mm in diameter) and rotated around the axial direction to form a cone-shaped imaging plane, allowing the spatial information of retinal vessels and diagnosis of their occlusion to be displayed. The feasibility of this novel technique was tested with images of a wire phantom, a polyimide tube, and an excised pig eye obtained by manually rotating a 40-MHz PMN-PT needle transducer with a beveled tip of 45°. From the results, we believe that rotational scan imaging will help expand the minimally invasive applications of high frequency ultrasound to other areas due to the capability of increased closeness of an angled needle transducer to structures of interest buried in other tissues. PMID:19411226

  14. Feasibility of rotational scan ultrasound imaging by an angled high frequency transducer for the posterior segment of the eye.

    PubMed

    Paeng, Dong-Guk; Chang, Jin Ho; Chen, Ruimin; Humayun, Mark S; Shung, K Kirk

    2009-03-01

    High frequency ultrasound over 40 MHz has been used to image the anterior segment of the eye, but it is not suitable for the posterior segment due to the frequency dependent attenuation of ultrasound and thus the limitation of penetration depth. This paper proposes a novel scan method to image the posterior segment of the eye with an angled high frequency (beyond 40 MHz) ultrasound needle transducer. In this method, the needle transducer is inserted into the eye through a small incision hole (approximately 1 mm in diameter) and rotated around the axial direction to form a cone-shaped imaging plane, allowing the spatial information of retinal vessels and diagnosis of their occlusion to be displayed. The feasibility of this novel technique was tested with images of a wire phantom, a polyimide tube, and an excised pig eye obtained by manually rotating a 40-MHz PMN-PT needle transducer with a beveled tip of 45 degrees . From the results, we believe that rotational scan imaging will help expand the minimally invasive applications of high frequency ultrasound to other areas due to the capability of increased closeness of an angled needle transducer to structures of interest buried in other tissues.

  15. Doppler ultrasound in the evaluation of cirrhotic patients: the prevalence of intrahepatic arteriovenous shunting, and implications for diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C R; Garcia-Tsao, G; Henson, B; Case, C Q; Taylor, K J

    1997-01-01

    To establish the prevalence and significance of Doppler-detected hepatic arteriovenous shunting (AVS) in patients with compensated cirrhosis, 115 patients (mean age 55.4 +/- 12.47 SD y) were prospectively screened using real-time ultrasound with pulsed Doppler at 2.5 MHz to detect focal liver lesions and quantify AVS. Focal masses were biopsied and correlated with the US findings. All other patients had clinical follow-up and imaging for at least 12 months. AVS occurred in 28 of 115 (24.3%), and in 18 of 20 proven malignancies (90%) including 11 of 13 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma (85%). However, 9 of 28 (32%) AVS (mean Doppler shift 2.73 +/- 1.51 [SD] kHz [range 0.6-5.41 kHz], n = 9) were in regions of fatty infiltration (4) or isolated (5), unassociated with malignancy. At a prevalence of 17.9% malignancy (11.3% due to hepatocellular carcinoma), specificity for malignancy increased with shunt velocity, from 76% (for mass alone), to 94.8% for mass with AVS, 96.8% for a mass with AVS of 1.75-2.4 kHz, and 100% for a mass with AVS > 2.4 kHz. Doppler US is useful in characterizing liver lesions in cirrhotic patients: the majority of malignant hepatic lesions are associated with AVS and specificity for malignancy increases with shunt velocity. However, isolated AVS or AVS associated with focal fat may be detected in 7.8% of compensated cirrhotics.

  16. Diagnostic performance of axial-strain sonoelastography in confirming clinically diagnosed Achilles tendinopathy: comparison with B-mode ultrasound and color Doppler imaging.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Chin Chin; Schneider, Michal Elisabeth; Malliaras, Peter; Chadwick, Martine; Connell, David Alister

    2015-01-01

    This primary aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of axial-strain sonoelastography (ASE), B-mode ultrasound (US) and color Doppler US in confirming clinically symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy. The secondary aim was to establish the relationship between the strain ratio during sonoelastography and Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) scores. The VISA-A questionnaire is a validated clinical rating scale that evaluates the symptoms and dysfunction of the Achilles tendon. One hundred twenty Achilles tendons of 120 consecutively registered patients with clinical symptoms of Achilles tendinopathy and another 120 gender- and age-matched, asymptomatic Achilles tendons of 120 healthy volunteers were assessed with B-mode US, ASE and color Doppler US. Symptomatic patients had significantly higher strain ratio scores and softer Achilles tendon properties compared with controls (p < 0.001). The strain ratio was moderately correlated with VISA-A scores (r = -0.62, p < 0.001). The diagnostic accuracy of B-mode US, ASE and color Doppler US in confirming clinically symptomatic Achilles tendinopathy was 94.7%, 97.8% and 82.5% respectively. There was excellent correlation between the clinical reference standard and the grade of tendon quality on ASE (κ = 0.91, p < 0.05), compared with B-mode US (κ = 0.74, p < 0.05) and color Doppler imaging (κ = 0.49, p < 0.05). ASE is an accurate clinical tool in the evaluation of Achilles tendinopathy, with results comparable to those of B-mode US and excellent correlation with clinical findings. The strain ratio may offer promise as a supplementary tool for the objective evaluation of Achilles tendon properties.

  17. The Detection and Exclusion of the Prostate Neuro-Vascular Bundle (NVB) in Automated HIFU Treatment Planning Using a Pulsed-Wave Doppler Ultrasound System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wohsing; Carlson, Roy F.; Fedewa, Russell; Seip, Ralf; Sanghvi, Narendra T.; Dines, Kris A.; Pfile, Richard; Penna, Michael A.; Gardner, Thomas A.

    2005-03-01

    Men with prostate cancer are likely to develop impotence after prostate cancer therapy if the treatment damages the neuro-vascular bundles (NVB). The NVB are generally located at the periphery of the prostate gland. To preserve the NVB, a Doppler system is used to detect and localize the associated blood vessels. This information is used during the therapy planning procedure to avoid treatment surrounding the blood vessel areas. The Sonablate®500 (Focus Surgery, Inc.) image-guided HIFU device is enhanced with a pulse-wave multi-gate Doppler system that uses the current imaging transducer and mechanical scanner to acquire Doppler data. Doppler detection is executed after the regular B-mode images are acquired from the base to the apex of the prostate using parallel sector scans. The results are stored and rendered in 3-D display, registered with additional models generated for the capsule, urethra, and rectal wall, and the B-mode data and treatment plan itself. The display of the blood flow can be in 2-D color overlaid on the B-mode image or in 3-D color structure. Based on this 3-D model, the HIFU treatment planning can be executed in automated or manual mode by the physician to remove originally defined treatment zones that overlap with the NVB (for preservation of NVB). The results of the NVB detection in animal experiments, and the 3-D modeling and data registration of the prostate will be presented.

  18. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... called multiples) To screen for birth defects, like spina bifida or heart defects . Screening means seeing if your ... example, if the ultrasound shows your baby has spina bifida, she may be treated in the womb before ...

  19. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two-dimensional image of the baby while inside the mother's uterus. The sound waves bounce off solid structures in the body ...

  20. Carotid Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound - Carotid Carotid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of the carotid arteries ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  1. Thermal therapy for breast tumors by using a cylindrical ultrasound phased array with multifocus pattern scanning: a preliminary numerical study.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheng-Shiao; Ju, Kuen-Cheng; Cheng, Tze-Yuan; Chen, Yung-Yaw; Lin, Win-Li

    2007-08-07

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using a 1 MHz cylindrical ultrasound phased array with multifocus pattern scanning to produce uniform heating for breast tumor thermal therapy. The breast was submerged in water and surrounded by the cylindrical ultrasound phased array. A multifocus pattern was generated and electrically scanned by the phased array to enlarge the treatment lesion in single heating. To prevent overheating normal tissues, a large planning target volume (PTV) would be divided into several planes with several subunits on each plane and sequentially treated with a cooling phase between two successive heatings of the subunit. Heating results for different target temperatures (T(tgt)), blood perfusion rates and sizes of the PTV have been studied. Furthermore, a superficial breast tumor with different water temperatures was also studied. Results indicated that a higher target temperature would produce a slightly larger thermal lesion, and a higher blood perfusion rate would not affect the heating lesion size but increase the heating time significantly. The acoustic power deposition and temperature elevations in ribs can be minimized by orienting the acoustic beam from the ultrasound phased array approximately parallel to the ribs. In addition, a large acoustic window on the convex-shaped breast surface for the proposed ultrasound phased array and the cooling effect of water would prevent the skin overheating for the production of a lesion at any desired location. This study demonstrated that the proposed cylindrical ultrasound phased array can provide effective heating for breast tumor thermal therapy without overheating the skin and ribs within a reasonable treatment time.

  2. Robotic assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy using contrast‐enhanced ultrasound scan to map renal blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Motiwala, Aamir; Eves, Susannah; Gray, Rob; Thomas, Asha; Meiers, Isabelle; Sharif, Haytham; Motiwala, Hanif; Laniado, Marc; Karim, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective The paper describes novel real‐time ‘in situ mapping’ and ‘sequential occlusion angiography’ to facilitate selective ischaemia robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN) using intraoperative contrast enhanced ultrasound scan (CEUS). Materials and methods Data were collected and assessed for 60 patients (61 tumours) between 2009 and 2013. 31 (50.8%) tumours underwent ‘Global Ischaemia’, 27 (44.3%) underwent ‘Selective Ischaemia’ and 3 (4.9%) were removed ‘Off Clamp Zero Ischaemia’. Demographics, operative variables, complications, renal pathology and outcomes were assessed. Results Median PADUA score was 9 (range 7–10). The mean warm ischaemia time in selective ischaemia was less and statistically significant than in global ischaemia (17.1 and 21.4, respectively). Mean operative time was 163 min. Postoperative complications (n = 10) included three (5%) Clavien grade 3 or above. Malignancy was demonstrated in 47 (77%) with negative margin in 43 (91.5%) and positive margin in four (8.5%). Long‐term decrease in eGFR post selective ischaemia robotic partial nephrectomy was less compared with global ischaemia (four and eight, respectively) but not statistically significant. Conclusions This technique is safe, feasible and cost‐effective with comparable perioperative outcomes. The technical aspects elucidate the role of intraoperative CEUS to facilitate and ascertain selective ischaemia. Further work is required to demonstrate long‐term oncological outcomes. © 2016 The Authors. The International Journal of Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26948671

  3. Medical Ultrasound Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Explains the basic principles of ultrasound using everyday physics. Topics include the generation of ultrasound, basic interactions with material, and the measurement of blood flow using the Doppler effect. (Author/MM)

  4. The influence of cortical end-plate on broadband ultrasound attenuation measurements at the human calcaneus using scanning confocal ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yi; Lin, Wei; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2005-09-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) assessment, including broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), is an efficient technique for assessing bone quality in various statuses, e.g., osteoporosis. While assessing trabecular bone loss is essential to bone quality, the existence of cortical bone can substantially reduce the accuracy of BUA measurement. In this study, we developed an approach to quantify the influence of the cortical end-plate in the QUS on 18 cadaver calcanei using both analytical and experimental analyses. A simplified cortical-trabecular-cortical sandwich model has been developed for simulation of wave propagations. Results show that the cortical end-plate has a significant effect on BUA (yielding 8.5+/-3.6 dB/MHz in cortical bone alone), approximately 15% of the BUA value over the whole bone BUA measurement (54.1+/-20.1 dB/MHz). The phenomenon has been predicted by the developed analytical model with a high correlation (r2=0.63,p<0.0001). The data have suggested that the mechanism of the BUA attributed to the cortical end-plate is primarily due to the ultrasonic wave transmission and reflection within the cortical layers. Therefore, the influence of the cortical end-plate in BUA can be quantified and incorporated into the QUS assessment for bone quality, which may provide insight into BUA measurement for accurate diagnosis of bone diseases.

  5. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... sickle cell disease. It is also used to measure conditions affecting blood flow to and within the brain, such as: Stenosis : ... saved. Doppler ultrasound, a special application of ultrasound, measures ... represent the flow of blood through the blood vessels. top of ...

  6. Staging of Fatty Liver Diseases Based on Hierarchical Classification and Feature Fusion for Back-Scan-Converted Ultrasound Images.

    PubMed

    Owjimehr, Mehri; Danyali, Habibollah; Helfroush, Mohammad Sadegh; Shakibafard, Alireza

    2017-03-01

    Fatty liver disease is progressive and may not cause any symptoms at early stages. This disease is potentially fatal and can cause liver cancer in severe stages. Therefore, diagnosing and staging fatty liver disease in early stages is necessary. In this paper, a novel method is presented to classify normal and fatty liver, as well as discriminate three stages of fatty liver in ultrasound images. This study is performed with 129 subjects including 28 normal, 47 steatosis, 42 fibrosis, and 12 cirrhosis images. The proposed approach uses back-scan conversion of ultrasound sector images and is based on a hierarchical classification. The proposed algorithm is performed in two parts. The first part selects the optimum regions of interest from the focal zone of the back-scan-converted ultrasound images. In the second part, discrimination between normal and fatty liver is performed and then steatosis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis are classified in a hierarchical basis. The wavelet packet transform and gray-level co-occurrence matrix are used to obtain a number of statistical features. A support vector machine classifier is used to discriminate between normal and fatty liver, and stage fatty cases. The results of the proposed scheme clearly illustrate the efficiency of this system with overall accuracy of 94.91% and also specificity of more than 90%.

  7. Ultrasound annual, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an analyses of developments in the field of diagnostic ultrasound. Endoscopic ultrasound and ultrasound-guided aspiration of ovarian follicles for in vitro fertilization are addressed. The use of Doppler ultrasound to measure blood flow in obstetrics is also examined.

  8. Cardiac-Gated En Face Doppler Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow Using Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography at 100,000 Axial Scans per Second

    PubMed Central

    Lee, ByungKun; Choi, WooJhon; Liu, Jonathan J.; Lu, Chen D.; Schuman, Joel S.; Wollstein, Gadi; Duker, Jay S.; Waheed, Nadia K.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To develop and demonstrate a cardiac gating method for repeatable in vivo measurement of total retinal blood flow (TRBF) in humans using en face Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) at commercially available imaging speeds. Methods. A prototype swept-source OCT system operating at 100-kHz axial scan rate was developed and interfaced with a pulse oximeter. Using the plethysmogram measured from the earlobe, Doppler OCT imaging of a 1.5- × 2-mm area at the optic disc at 1.8 volumes/s was synchronized to cardiac cycle to improve sampling of pulsatile blood flow. Postprocessing algorithms were developed to achieve fully automatic calculation of TRBF. We evaluated the repeatability of en face Doppler OCT measurement of TRBF in 10 healthy young subjects using three methods: measurement at 100 kHz with asynchronous acquisition, measurement at 100 kHz with cardiac-gated acquisition, and a control measurement using a 400-kHz instrument with asynchronous acquisition. Results. The median intrasubject coefficients of variation (COV) of the three methods were 8.0%, 4.9%, and 6.1%, respectively. All three methods correlated well, without a significant bias. Mean TRBF measured at 100 kHz with cardiac-gated acquisition was 40.5 ± 8.2 μL/min, and the range was from 26.6 to 55.8 μL/min. Conclusions. Cardiac-gated en face Doppler OCT can achieve smaller measurement variability than previously reported methods. Although further validation in older subjects and diseased subjects is required, precise measurement of TRBF using cardiac-gated en face Doppler OCT at commercially available imaging speeds should be feasible. PMID:25744974

  9. Contribution of ultrasound scans in the first episode of urinary tract infection in children.

    PubMed

    Jellouli, Manel; Ben Mansour, Asma; Abidi, Kamel; Ferjani, Meriem; Naija, Ouns; Hammi, Yousra; Zarrouk, Chokri; Gargah, Tahar

    2016-06-01

    Background - Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is a common pediatric urologic disorder. After the first urinary tract infection (UTI), imaging studies are recommended, starting with a renal ultrasound (US) and voiding cystourethrography (VCUG). We propose to determine whether abnormalities found on US can help indicate the necessity of VCUG in children after the first urinary tract infection. Methods - A retrospective study included all children admitted with their first episode of urinary tract infection from January 2007 to December 2012. Results - A total of 311 children were included. The median age was 2.5 years, 72.3% were female. VUR Prevalence was 14%.  Forty-four patients were found to have VUR on VCUG, giving a prevalence of 14%. Of these 44 patients, 11 had grade I reflux, 6 had grade II reflux, 3 had grade III reflux, 15had grade IV reflux, and 9 had grade V reflux. Ultrasound findings were positive for VUR in 43 patients, 19 of them had RVU. Twenty five patients had a normal ultrasound but showed VUR on VCUG (11 had grade I reflux, six grade II reflux, three grade III reflux and five grade IV reflux).  The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound in suggesting VUR were 43% and 91%, respectively. The positive predictive value of ultrasound in suggesting VUR was 44%; the negative predictive value was 91%. Conclusion - Renal ultrasound findings are specific for VUR in children with a first UTI, but no sensitive. Clinicians should consider renal ultrasound results to take decision on whether or not to proceed with a VCUG in the investigation of a first episode UTI in young children.

  10. Semiquantitative Evaluation of Extrasynovial Soft Tissue Inflammation in the Shoulders of Patients with Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Elderly-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis by Power Doppler Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takeshi; Yoshida, Ryochi; Okamoto, Akiko; Seri, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To develop a scoring system for evaluating the extrasynovial soft tissue inflammation of the shoulders in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and elderly-onset rheumatoid arthritis with PMR-like onset (pm-EORA) using ultrasound. Methods. We analyzed stored power Doppler (PD) images obtained by the pretreatment examination of 15 PMR patients and 15 pm-EORA patients. A semiquantitative scoring system for evaluating the severity of PD signals adjacent to the anterior aspect of the subscapularis tendon was designed. Results. A four-point scale scoring for the hyperemia on the subscapularis tendon was proposed as follows in brief: 0 = absent or minimal flow, 1 = single vessel dots or short linear-shape signals, 2 = long linear-shape signals or short zone-shape signals, or 3 = long zone-shape signals. This scoring system showed good intra- and interobserver reliability and good correlation to quantitative pixel-counting evaluation. By using it, we demonstrated that inflammation in PMR is dominantly localized in extrasynovial soft tissue as compared with pm-EORA. Conclusions. We proposed a reliable semiquantitative scoring system using ultrasound for the evaluation of extrasynovial soft tissue inflammation of the shoulders in patients with both PMR and pm-EORA. This system is simple to use and can be utilized in future investigations.

  11. Semiquantitative Evaluation of Extrasynovial Soft Tissue Inflammation in the Shoulders of Patients with Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Elderly-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis by Power Doppler Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Ryochi; Okamoto, Akiko; Seri, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To develop a scoring system for evaluating the extrasynovial soft tissue inflammation of the shoulders in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and elderly-onset rheumatoid arthritis with PMR-like onset (pm-EORA) using ultrasound. Methods. We analyzed stored power Doppler (PD) images obtained by the pretreatment examination of 15 PMR patients and 15 pm-EORA patients. A semiquantitative scoring system for evaluating the severity of PD signals adjacent to the anterior aspect of the subscapularis tendon was designed. Results. A four-point scale scoring for the hyperemia on the subscapularis tendon was proposed as follows in brief: 0 = absent or minimal flow, 1 = single vessel dots or short linear-shape signals, 2 = long linear-shape signals or short zone-shape signals, or 3 = long zone-shape signals. This scoring system showed good intra- and interobserver reliability and good correlation to quantitative pixel-counting evaluation. By using it, we demonstrated that inflammation in PMR is dominantly localized in extrasynovial soft tissue as compared with pm-EORA. Conclusions. We proposed a reliable semiquantitative scoring system using ultrasound for the evaluation of extrasynovial soft tissue inflammation of the shoulders in patients with both PMR and pm-EORA. This system is simple to use and can be utilized in future investigations. PMID:28293635

  12. Effects of Isoflurane on Coronary Blood Flow Velocity in Young, Old, and ApoE−/− Mice Measured by Doppler Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Craig J.; Reddy, Anilkumar K.; Madala, Sridhar; Michael, Lloyd H.; Entman, Mark L.; Taffet, George E.

    2007-01-01

    The commonly used anesthetic agent, isoflurane (ISO), is a potent coronary vasodilator which could potentially be used in the assessment of coronary reserve, but its effects on coronary blood flow in mice are unknown. Coronary reserve is reduced by age, coronary artery disease, and other cardiac pathologies in man, and some of these conditions can now be modeled in mice. Accordingly, we used Doppler ultrasound to measure coronary flow velocity in mice anesthetized at low (1%) and at high (2.5%) levels of ISO to generate baseline (B) and elevated hyperemic (H) coronary flows respectively. A 20 MHz Doppler probe was mounted in a micromanipulator and pointed transthoracically toward the origin of the left main coronary arteries of 10 6-wk (Y), 10 2-yr (O), and 20 2-yr apolipoprotein-E null (ApoE−/−) atherosclerotic (A) mice. In each mouse we measured (B) and (H) peak diastolic velocities. B was 35.4 +/− 1.4 cm/s (Y), 24.8 +/− 1.6 (O), and 51.7 +/− 6.4 (A); H was 83.5 +/− 1.3 (Y), 86.5 +/− 1.9 (O), and 120 +/− 16.9 (A); and H/B was 2.4 +/− 0.1 (Y), 3.6 +/− 0.2 (O), and 2.5 +/− 0.2 (A). The differences in baseline velocities and H/B between O and Y and between A and O were significant (P < 0.01), while the differences in hyperemic velocities were not (P > 0.05). H/B was higher in old mice due to decreased baseline flow rather than increased hyperemic flow velocity. In contrast ApoE−/− mice have increased baseline and hyperemic velocities perhaps due to coronary lesions. The differences in baseline velocities between young and old mice could be due to age-related changes in basal metabolism or to differential sensitivity to isoflurane. We conclude that Doppler ultrasound combined with coronary vasodilation via isoflurane could provide a convenient and noninvasive method to estimate coronary reserve in mice, but also that care must be taken when assessing coronary flow in mice under isoflurane anesthesia because of its potent coronary vasodilator

  13. Non-invasive transcranial ultrasound therapy based on a 3D CT scan: protocol validation and in vitro results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquet, F.; Pernot, M.; Aubry, J.-F.; Montaldo, G.; Marsac, L.; Tanter, M.; Fink, M.

    2009-05-01

    A non-invasive protocol for transcranial brain tissue ablation with ultrasound is studied and validated in vitro. The skull induces strong aberrations both in phase and in amplitude, resulting in a severe degradation of the beam shape. Adaptive corrections of the distortions induced by the skull bone are performed using a previous 3D computational tomography scan acquisition (CT) of the skull bone structure. These CT scan data are used as entry parameters in a FDTD (finite differences time domain) simulation of the full wave propagation equation. A numerical computation is used to deduce the impulse response relating the targeted location and the ultrasound therapeutic array, thus providing a virtual time-reversal mirror. This impulse response is then time-reversed and transmitted experimentally by a therapeutic array positioned exactly in the same referential frame as the one used during CT scan acquisitions. In vitro experiments are conducted on monkey and human skull specimens using an array of 300 transmit elements working at a central frequency of 1 MHz. These experiments show a precise refocusing of the ultrasonic beam at the targeted location with a positioning error lower than 0.7 mm. The complete validation of this transcranial adaptive focusing procedure paves the way to in vivo animal and human transcranial HIFU investigations.

  14. The use of colour-coded and spectral Doppler ultrasound in the differentiation of benign and malignant breast lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Peters-Engl, C.; Medl, M.; Leodolter, S.

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of colour-coded and spectral Doppler sonography to predict the benign or malignant nature of breast lesions. A total of 112 women with mammographically suspicious breast lesions were investigated prior to surgery. Thirty-nine breast carcinomas and 73 benign lesions were evaluated for the resistance index, pulsatility index and the flow velocity. A resistance index of > or = 0.70 was characteristic of malignant tumours with a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 81%. The positive predictive value was 70% and the negative predictive value 89%. Doppler sonography offers one possible method for further investigation of patients with mammographic abnormalities. PMID:7819029

  15. 2013 European Thyroid Association Guidelines for Cervical Ultrasound Scan and Ultrasound-Guided Techniques in the Postoperative Management of Patients with Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leenhardt, L.; Erdogan, M.F.; Hegedus, L.; Mandel, S.J.; Paschke, R.; Rago, T.; Russ, G.

    2013-01-01

    Cervical ultrasound scanning (US) is considered a key examination, by all major thyroid and endocrine specialist societies for the postoperative follow-up of thyroid cancer patients to assess the risk of recurrence. Neck US imaging is readily available, non-invasive, relatively easy to perform, cost-effective, and can guide diagnostic and therapeutic procedures with low complication rates. Its main shortcoming is its operator-dependency. Because of the pivotal role of US in the care of thyroid cancer patients, the European Thyroid Association convened a panel of international experts to review technical aspects, indications, results, and limitations of cervical US in the initial staging and follow-up of thyroid cancer patients. The main aim is to establish guidelines for both a cervical US scanning protocol and US-guided diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in patients with thyroid cancer. This report presents (1) standardization of the US scanning procedure, techniques of US-guided fine-needle aspiration, and reporting of findings; (2) definition of criteria for classification of malignancy risk based on cervical US imaging characteristics of neck masses and lymph nodes; (3) indications for US-guided fine-needle aspiration and for biological in situ assessments; (4) proposal of an algorithm for the follow-up of thyroid cancer patients based on risk stratification following histopathological and cervical US findings, and (5) discussion of the potential use of US-guided localization and ablation techniques for locoregional thyroid metastases. PMID:24847448

  16. SCAN+

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Krebs, John Svoboda

    2009-11-01

    SCAN+ is a software application specifically designed to control the positioning of a gamma spectrometer by a two dimensional translation system above spent fuel bundles located in a sealed spent fuel cask. The gamma spectrometer collects gamma spectrum information for the purpose of spent fuel cask fuel loading verification. SCAN+ performs manual and automatic gamma spectrometer positioning functions as-well-as exercising control of the gamma spectrometer data acquisitioning functions. Cask configuration files are used to determine the positions of spent fuel bundles. Cask scanning files are used to determine the desired scan paths for scanning a spent fuel cask allowing for automatic unattended cask scanning that may take several hours.

  17. Contrast M-mode power Doppler ultrasound in the detection of right-to-left shunts: utility of submandibular internal carotid artery recording.

    PubMed

    Topçuoglu, M A; Palacios, I F; Buonanno, F S

    2003-10-01

    Cardiac right-to-left shunts (RLSs) can be detected by echocardiography and transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD). In patients without adequate transtemporal bone windows, results may be obtained by insonating extracranial arteries; however, the sensitivity and practicality of this approach is unknown. In 34 patients evaluated with echocardiography for RLSs, 73 studies were performed with unilateral, simultaneous contrast TCD (cTCD) of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and submandibular power M-mode Doppler (PMD) ultrasound of the extracranial internal carotid artery (ecICA). The number of microbubble (MB) signals and their times of first appearance were determined. RLS volume was graded on 6 levels (I = trace, II = small, III = medium, IVa = large, IVb = shower, IVc = curtain) and compared between MCA and ecICA recordings. In 2 of 24 cTCD studies in 15 patients without evidence of RLSs on single-gated MCA monitoring, low-volume RLSs (grades I and II) were detected via ecICA insonation; in both, MB signatures were tracked in the ecICA, passing into the ipsilateral ACA. In 40 of 49 studies (26 patients) in which RLSs were demonstrated with single-gated MCA monitoring, more MBs were detected in the ecICA than the MCA, with either single-gated or M-mode images, with increases of 76.9% and 66.1%, respectively (P = .027). Compared to single-gated studies, M-mode technology detected nonsignificant increases in MB number in both the MCA and the ecICA (by 20.2% and 14.0%, respectively). Contrast PMD with cervical ICA recording is at least as sensitive and specific as the traditional MCA method in detecting RLSs; furthermore, this method seems to be more sensitive for low-volume RLSs (grades I-III) because of air MB decay (9.2%) and entry into the ipsilateral ACA (34.2%). This is in concordance with the increase of detected RLS grades observed in 32.7% of patients with echocardiography-documented RLSs. The authors therefore suggest the

  18. Early life exposure to diagnostic radiation and ultrasound scans and risk of childhood cancer: case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Jill; Neta, Gila; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Ansell, Pat; Linet, Martha S; Ron, Elaine; Roman, Eve

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine childhood cancer risks associated with exposure to diagnostic radiation and ultrasound scans in utero and in early infancy (age 0-100 days). Design Case-control study. Setting England and Wales. Participants 2690 childhood cancer cases and 4858 age, sex, and region matched controls from the United Kingdom Childhood Cancer Study (UKCCS), born 1976-96. Main outcome measures Risk of all childhood cancer, leukaemia, lymphoma, and central nervous system tumours, measured by odds ratios. Results Logistic regression models conditioned on matching factors, with adjustment for maternal age and child’s birth weight, showed no evidence of increased risk of childhood cancer with in utero exposure to ultrasound scans. Some indication existed of a slight increase in risk after in utero exposure to x rays for all cancers (odds ratio 1.l4, 95% confidence interval 0.90 to 1.45) and leukaemia (1.36, 0.91 to 2.02), but this was not statistically significant. Exposure to diagnostic x rays in early infancy (0-100 days) was associated with small, non-significant excess risks for all cancers and leukaemia, as well as increased risk of lymphoma (odds ratio 5.14, 1.27 to 20.78) on the basis of small numbers. Conclusions Although the results for lymphoma need to be replicated, all of the findings indicate possible risks of cancer from radiation at doses lower than those associated with commonly used procedures such as computed tomography scans, suggesting the need for cautious use of diagnostic radiation imaging procedures to the abdomen/pelvis of the mother during pregnancy and in children at very young ages. PMID:21310791

  19. FETAL RENAL ARTERY IMPEDANCE AS ASESSED BY DOPPLER ULTRASOUND IN PREGNANCIES COMPLICATED BY INTRA-AMNIOTIC INFLAMMATION AND PRETERM BIRTH

    PubMed Central

    Azpurua, Humberto; Dulay, Antonette T.; Buhimschi, Irina A.; Bahtiyar, Mert O.; Funai, Edmund; Abdel-Razeq, Sonya S.; Luo, Guoyang; Bhandari, Vineet; Copel, Joshua A.; Buhimschi, Catalin S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the fetal renal artery impedance in the context of inflammation-associated preterm birth (PTB). STUDY DESIGN We conducted a prospective Doppler assessment of the fetal renal artery impedance in 70 singleton fetuses. The study group consisted of 56 premature fetuses (28.1 [25.3–30.6] weeks at enrollment). Gestational age (GA) reference ranges were generated based on fetuses with uncomplicated pregnancies (n=14). Doppler studies included renal artery pulsatility index (PI), resistance index (RI), systolic/diastolic (S/D) ratio and presence-or-absence of end-diastolic blood flow. We assessed amniotic fluid (AF) inflammation by proteomic profiling (SELDI-TOF). Data were interpreted in relationship to amniotic fluid index (AFI), cord blood interleukin-6 (IL-6) and erythropoietin (EPO) levels. The cardiovascular and metabolic profiles of the neonates were investigated in the first 24 hours of life. RESULTS Fetuses delivered by mothers with intra-amniotic inflammation had higher cord blood IL-6 but not EPO levels. Fetal inflammation did not affect either renal artery PI,RI,S/D ratio or end-diastolic blood flow. Neonates delivered in the context of intraamniotic inflammation had higher serum blood urea nitrogen levels, which correlated significantly with AF IL-6 levels. The renal artery RI and SD ratio were inversely correlated with the AFI independent of GA, cord blood IL-6 and status of the membranes. CONCLUSION The fetus is capable of sustaining normal renal artery impedance despite inflammation. Resistance in the renal vascular bed affects urine output independent of inflammation. PMID:19185102

  20. Ultrasound of the Thyroid Gland

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound - Thyroid Thyroid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of the thyroid gland ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  2. Venous Ultrasound (Extremities)

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  3. Carotid Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  4. Changes in the central and peripheral circulatory system in response to the cold: own studies using impedance plethysmography and Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Łastowiecka-Moras, Elżbieta; Kozyra-Pydyś, Eliza

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the cardiovascular response to continuous (4 °C for 60 min) and intermittent (10 min at 4 °C and 10 min at room temperature alternately) exposure to the cold in 30 healthy young men. The subjects were equipped with a set of identical clothing (insulation 2.1 clo) and during the stay in the chamber and outside performed the same activities, i.e., walking on a treadmill at a speed of 0.5 km/h. The tests included assessing the central circulatory system using the Holter system and assessing the peripheral circulatory system using impedance plethysmography and Doppler ultrasound. The analysis of the parameters that describe the central and peripheral circulation poses a difficulty in determining which variant of exposure constitutes a greater load on the circulatory system. It should be noted that even the conditions used in the study may cause adverse effects in the cardiovascular system.

  5. Protocol of plain radiographs, hip ultrasound, and triple phase bone scans in the evaluation of the painful pediatric hip

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.E.; Seibert, J.J.; Aronson, J.; Williamson, S.L.; Glasier, C.M.; Rodgers, A.B.; Corbitt, S.L.

    1988-04-01

    A useful protocol for the evaluation of hip pain in the pediatric patient, using a combination of plain radiographs, hip ultrasound (US), and triple phase radionuclide bone scans is presented. Patients with hip pain were initially evaluated by plain radiographs of the pelvis and hips. If no diagnosis was reached, the hips were studied for effusions by real-time hip ultrasonography. If an effusion was present, the joint was aspirated for diagnosis. If no effusion was present by US or if no diagnosis was reached by aspiration, triple phase radionuclide bone scans were performed. Fifty patients were evaluated by this prospective protocol, and the diagnosis was reached in 48 of the 50 cases (10 by plain radiographs, 16 by US, and aspiration of the joint, and 22 by triple phase bone scans). Hip effusions were found in 20 patients by US, with no false positives or false negatives. Previous studies for detecting effusions by US have emphasized absolute measurements of the capsular width, but we report a typical appearance of the hip capsule when fluid is present (a bulging convex capsule). When no effusion is present, the capsule is concave and parallels the long axis of the femoral neck.

  6. A scanning-mode 2D shear wave imaging (s2D-SWI) system for ultrasound elastography.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Wang, Congzhi; Li, Yongchuan; Zhou, Juan; Yang, Ge; Xiao, Yang; Feng, Ge; Jin, Qiaofeng; Mu, Peitian; Qian, Ming; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound elastography is widely used for the non-invasive measurement of tissue elasticity properties. Shear wave imaging (SWI) is a quantitative method for assessing tissue stiffness. SWI has been demonstrated to be less operator dependent than quasi-static elastography, and has the ability to acquire quantitative elasticity information in contrast with acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging. However, traditional SWI implementations cannot acquire two dimensional (2D) quantitative images of the tissue elasticity distribution. This study proposes and evaluates a scanning-mode 2D SWI (s2D-SWI) system. The hardware and image processing algorithms are presented in detail. Programmable devices are used to support flexible control of the system and the image processing algorithms. An analytic signal based cross-correlation method and a Radon transformation based shear wave speed determination method are proposed, which can be implemented using parallel computation. Imaging of tissue mimicking phantoms, and in vitro, and in vivo imaging test are conducted to demonstrate the performance of the proposed system. The s2D-SWI system represents a new choice for the quantitative mapping of tissue elasticity, and has great potential for implementation in commercial ultrasound scanners.

  7. 3-D microvessel-mimicking ultrasound phantoms produced with a scanning motion system.

    PubMed

    Gessner, Ryan C; Kothadia, Roshni; Feingold, Steven; Dayton, Paul A

    2011-05-01

    Ultrasound techniques are currently being developed that can assess the vascularization of tissue as a marker for therapeutic response. Some of these ultrasound imaging techniques seek to extract quantitative features about vessel networks, whereas high-frequency imaging also allows individual vessels to be resolved. The development of these new techniques, and subsequent imaging analysis strategies, necessitates an understanding of their sensitivities to vessel and vessel network structural abnormalities. Constructing in-vitro flow phantoms for this purpose can be prohibitively challenging, because simulating precise flow environments with nontrivial structures is often impossible using conventional methods of construction for flow phantoms. Presented in this manuscript is a method to create predefined structures with <10 μm precision using a three-axis motion system. The application of this technique is demonstrated for the creation of individual vessel and vessel networks, which can easily be made to simulate the development of structural abnormalities typical of diseased vasculature in vivo. In addition, beyond facilitating the creation of phantoms that would otherwise be very challenging to construct, the method presented herein enables one to precisely simulate very slow blood flow and respiration artifacts, and to measure imaging resolution.

  8. Iodine-filter-based mobile Doppler lidar to make continuous and full-azimuth-scanned wind measurements: data acquisition and analysis system, data retrieval methods, and error analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhangjun; Liu, Zhishen; Liu, Liping; Wu, Songhua; Liu, Bingyi; Li, Zhigang; Chu, Xinzhao

    2010-12-20

    An incoherent Doppler wind lidar based on iodine edge filters has been developed at the Ocean University of China for remote measurements of atmospheric wind fields. The lidar is compact enough to fit in a minivan for mobile deployment. With its sophisticated and user-friendly data acquisition and analysis system (DAAS), this lidar has made a variety of line-of-sight (LOS) wind measurements in different operational modes. Through carefully developed data retrieval procedures, various wind products are provided by the lidar, including wind profile, LOS wind velocities in plan position indicator (PPI) and range height indicator (RHI) modes, and sea surface wind. Data are processed and displayed in real time, and continuous wind measurements have been demonstrated for as many as 16 days. Full-azimuth-scanned wind measurements in PPI mode and full-elevation-scanned wind measurements in RHI mode have been achieved with this lidar. The detection range of LOS wind velocity PPI and RHI reaches 8-10 km at night and 6-8 km during daytime with range resolution of 10 m and temporal resolution of 3 min. In this paper, we introduce the DAAS architecture and describe the data retrieval methods for various operation modes. We present the measurement procedures and results of LOS wind velocities in PPI and RHI scans along with wind profiles obtained by Doppler beam swing. The sea surface wind measured for the sailing competition during the 2008 Beijing Olympics is also presented. The precision and accuracy of wind measurements are estimated through analysis of the random errors associated with photon noise and the systematic errors introduced by the assumptions made in data retrieval. The three assumptions of horizontal homogeneity of atmosphere, close-to-zero vertical wind, and uniform sensitivity are made in order to experimentally determine the zero wind ratio and the measurement sensitivity, which are important factors in LOS wind retrieval. Deviations may occur under certain

  9. [Estimation of age-related features of acoustic density and biometric relations of lens based on combined ultrasound scanning].

    PubMed

    Avetisov, K S; Markosian, A G

    2013-01-01

    Results of combined ultrasound scanning for estimation of acoustic lens density and biometric relations of lens and other eye structures are presented. A group of 124 patients (189 eyes) was studied; they were subdivided depending on age and length of anteroposterior axis of the eye. Examination algorithm was developed that allows selective estimation of acoustic density of different lens zones and biometric measurements including volumetric. Age-related increase of acoustic density of different lens zones was revealed that indirectly shows method efficiency. Biometric studies showed almost concurring volumetric lens measurements in "normal" and "short" eyes in spite of significantly thicker central zone of the latter. Significantly lower correlation between anterior chamber volume and width of its angle was revealed in "short" eyes and "normal" and "long" eyes (correlation coefficients 0.37, 0.68 and 0.63 respectively).

  10. Christian Doppler is 200 years young.

    PubMed

    Bollinger, Alfred; Partsch, Hugo

    2003-11-01

    Christian Doppler was born 200 years ago in Salzburg, Austria, on November 29, 1803, worked in Prague and Vienna and died 150 years ago in Venice. In an article of eight pages he described the principle, which made him famous. It appeared in 1842 with the exotic title: "On the Coloured Light of the Double Stars and Certain Other Stars of the Heaven". The validity of his principle for velocity measurement was confirmed by trumpet sounds produced on a train moving towards and away from the observer. Around 1960 Japanese scientists suggested that flow velocity in blood vessels could be determined by analysing the difference of frequency between emitted and backscattered ultrasound. Rushmer and coworkers built machines suitable for medicine in Seattle, where Eugene Strandness recognized their potential and applied them in first studies. In 1967 the technique jumped to Europe and started to be used worldwide. Already by using continuous wave ultrasound it was possible to diagnose occlusive disease of neck and limb arteries, venous thrombosis and valvular insufficiency with accuracy. Measurements of postestenotic ankle blood pressure were facilitated by Doppler sensing. Over the years more sophisticated instruments were developed. Pulsed emission of ultrasound waves opened a way to study flow velocity profiles across large vessels. By combining the method with A or B mode ultrasound blood flow could be quantified and finally perfused segments of blood vessels visualized. Duplex scanning in its simple and then in its colour coded version is nowadays the standard non-invasive technique that nobody would like to miss. Vascular territories like intracranial, renal and intestinal arteries can also be explored. For the assessment of microvascular flow in skin and mucosae laser Doppler instruments were introduced.

  11. Full-field linear and nonlinear measurements using Continuous-Scan Laser Doppler Vibrometry and high speed Three-Dimensional Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrhardt, David A.; Allen, Matthew S.; Yang, Shifei; Beberniss, Timothy J.

    2017-03-01

    Spatially detailed dynamic measurements of thin, lightweight structures can be difficult to obtain due to the structure's low mass and complicated deformations under certain loading conditions. If traditional contacting sensors, such as accelerometers, strain gauges, displacement transducers, etc., are used, the total number of measurement locations available is limited by the weight added and the effect each sensor has on the local stiffness of the contact area. Other non-contacting sensors, such as Laser Doppler Vibrometers (LDV), laser triangulation sensors, proximity sensors, etc., do not affect the dynamics of a structure, but are limited to single point measurements. In contrast, a few recently developed non-contacting measurement techniques have been shown to be capable of simultaneously measuring the response over a wide measurement field. Two techniques are considered here: Continuous-Scan Laser Doppler Vibrometry (CSLDV) and high speed Three-Dimensional Digital Image Correlation (3D DIC). With the use of these techniques, unprecedented measurement resolution can be achieved. In this work, the linear and nonlinear deformations of a clamped, nominally flat beam and plate under steady state sinusoidal loading will be measured using both techniques. In order to assess their relative merits, the linear natural frequencies, mode shapes, and nonlinear deformation shapes measured with each method are compared. Both measurement systems give comparable results in many cases, although 3D DIC is more accurate for spatially complex deformations at large amplitudes and CSLDV is more accurate at low amplitudes and when the spatial deformation pattern is simpler.

  12. Internal iliac and uterine arteries Doppler ultrasound in the assessment of normotensive and chronic hypertensive pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Guedes-Martins, L.; Cunha, A.; Saraiva, J.; Gaio, R.; Macedo, F.; Almeida, H.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to compare Doppler flows pulsatility index (PI) and resistance indexes (RI) of uterine and internal iliac arteries during pregnancy in low risk women and in those with stage-1 essential hypertension. From January 2010 and December 2012, a longitudinal and prospective study was carried out in 103 singleton uneventful pregnancies (72 low-risk pregnancies and 31 with stage 1 essential hypertension)at the 1st, 2nd and 3rd trimesters. Multiple linear regression models, fitted using generalized least squares and whose errors were allowed to be correlated and/or have unequal variances, were employed; a model for the relative differences of both arteries impedance was utilized. In both groups, uterine artery PI and RI exhibited a gestational age related decreasing trend whereas internal iliac artery PI and RI increased. The model testing the hemodynamic adaptation in women with and without hypertension showed similar trend. Irrespective of blood pressure conditions, the internal iliac artery resistance pattern contrasts with the capacitance pattern of its immediate pelvic division, suggesting a pregnancy-related regulatory mechanism in the pelvic circulation. PMID:24445576

  13. Time Course of Isoflurane-Induced Vasodilation: A Doppler Ultrasound Study of the Left Coronary Artery in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lenzarini, Francesca; Di Lascio, Nicole; Stea, Francesco; Kusmic, Claudia; Faita, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Isoflurane is widely used as vasodilator in studies of coronary flow reserve (CFR) in small animals, but the protocols have not been standardized. This study assessed the time course of the increase in isoflurane-induced flow in the mouse coronary artery by pulsed-wave Doppler measurements at 1% isoflurane concentration maintained for 6 min and then increased to 2.5% for 30 min. Velocity-time integral and velocity peak values were best fitted by the sigmoid model, which allowed derivation of the mean time (Tt90 = 14 min) of high-isoflurane needed to reach 90% of the hyperemic plateau value. In subsequent experiments, CFR was measured at 4 min (mean time of literature data) and 14 min of hyperemic response. The 4-min CFR was significantly lower than the 14 -min CFR, and the Bland-Altman plot revealed significant bias of the 4-min CFR against the 14-min CFR. This result suggests that measurements of flow velocity at times shorter than 14 min may be inappropriate for expressing the effective value of CFR.

  14. Stroke and conversion to high risk in children screened with transcranial Doppler ultrasound during the STOP study.

    PubMed

    Adams, Robert J; Brambilla, Donald J; Granger, Suzanne; Gallagher, Dianne; Vichinsky, Elliott; Abboud, Miguel R; Pegelow, Charles H; Woods, Gerald; Rohde, Elizabeth M; Nichols, Fenwick T; Jones, Anne; Luden, Judith P; Bowman, Latonya; Hagner, Susan; Morales, Knashawn H; Roach, E Steve

    2004-05-15

    The Stroke Prevention Trial in Sickle Cell Anemia (STOP) was a randomized multicenter controlled trial comparing prophylactic blood transfusion with standard care in sickle cell anemia (SCA) children aged 2 to 16 years selected for high stroke risk by transcranial Doppler (TCD). More than 2000 children were screened with TCD to identify the 130 high-risk children who entered the randomized trial. A total of 5613 TCD studies from 2324 children were evaluated. We also collected information on stroke. We describe the changes in TCD with repeated testing and report the outcome without transfusion in the STOP screened cohort. Risk of stroke was higher with abnormal TCD than with normal or conditional TCD (P <.001) or inadequate TCD (P =.002), and risk with conditional TCD was higher than with normal TCD (P <.001). Repeated TCD in 1215 children showed that the condition of 9.4% of children became abnormal during observation. Younger patients and those with higher initial flow velocities were most likely to convert to abnormal TCDs. Screening in STOP confirmed the predictive value of TCD for stroke. Substantial differences in the probability of conversion to abnormal TCD were observed, with younger children and those with higher velocity more likely to have an abnormal TCD with rescreening.

  15. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  16. Output-only Modal Analysis using Continuous-Scan Laser Doppler Vibrometry and application to a 20 kW wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shifei; Allen, Matthew S.

    2012-08-01

    Continuous-Scan Laser Doppler Vibrometry (CSLDV) is a technique where the measurement point continuously sweeps over a structure while measuring, capturing both spatial and temporal information. The continuous-scan approach can greatly accelerate measurements, allowing one to capture spatially detailed mode shapes in the same amount of time that conventional methods require to measure the response at a single point. The method is especially beneficial when testing large structures, such as wind turbines, that have low natural frequencies and hence may require very long time records at each measurement point. Several CSLDV methods have been presented that use sinusoidal excitation or impulse excitation, but CSLDV has not previously been employed with an unmeasured, broadband random input. This work extends CSLDV to that class of input, developing an Output-only Modal Analysis method (OMA-CSLDV). A recently developed algorithm for linear time-periodic system identification, which makes use of harmonic power spectra and the harmonic transfer function concept developed by Wereley [17], is used in conjunction with CSLDV measurements. One key consideration, the choice of the scan frequency, is explored. The proposed method is validated on a randomly excited free-free beam, where one-dimensional mode shapes are captured by scanning the laser along the length of the beam. The first seven natural frequencies and mode shapes are extracted from the harmonic power spectrum of the vibrometer signal and show good agreement with the analytically-derived modes of the beam. The method is then applied to identify the mode shapes of a parked 20 kW wind turbine using a ground based laser and with only a light breeze providing excitation.

  17. A 3D Freehand Ultrasound System for Multi-view Reconstructions from Sparse 2D Scanning Planes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A significant limitation of existing 3D ultrasound systems comes from the fact that the majority of them work with fixed acquisition geometries. As a result, the users have very limited control over the geometry of the 2D scanning planes. Methods We present a low-cost and flexible ultrasound imaging system that integrates several image processing components to allow for 3D reconstructions from limited numbers of 2D image planes and multiple acoustic views. Our approach is based on a 3D freehand ultrasound system that allows users to control the 2D acquisition imaging using conventional 2D probes. For reliable performance, we develop new methods for image segmentation and robust multi-view registration. We first present a new hybrid geometric level-set approach that provides reliable segmentation performance with relatively simple initializations and minimum edge leakage. Optimization of the segmentation model parameters and its effect on performance is carefully discussed. Second, using the segmented images, a new coarse to fine automatic multi-view registration method is introduced. The approach uses a 3D Hotelling transform to initialize an optimization search. Then, the fine scale feature-based registration is performed using a robust, non-linear least squares algorithm. The robustness of the multi-view registration system allows for accurate 3D reconstructions from sparse 2D image planes. Results Volume measurements from multi-view 3D reconstructions are found to be consistently and significantly more accurate than measurements from single view reconstructions. The volume error of multi-view reconstruction is measured to be less than 5% of the true volume. We show that volume reconstruction accuracy is a function of the total number of 2D image planes and the number of views for calibrated phantom. In clinical in-vivo cardiac experiments, we show that volume estimates of the left ventricle from multi-view reconstructions are found to be in better

  18. Fetal Cerebellar Vermis Circumference Measured by 2-Dimensional Ultrasound Scan: Reference Range, Feasibility and Reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, M.; Sica, C.; Meglio, L. D.; Bolla, D.; Raio, L.; Surbek, D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To provide 2-dimensional ultrasonographic (2D-US) normograms of cerebellar vermis biometry, as well as to evaluate the feasibility and the reproducibility of these measurements in clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A prospective cross-sectional study of 328 normal singleton pregnancies between 18 and 33 weeks of gestation. Measurements of the fetal cerebellar vermis circumference (VC) in the mid-sagittal plane were performed by both a senior and a junior operator using 2D-US. VC as a function of gestational age (GA) was expressed by regression equations. In 24 fetuses 3-dimensional (3D) reconstructed planes were obtained in order to allow comparisons with 2D-US measurements. The agreement between 2D and 3D measurements and the interobserver variability were assessed by interclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Results: Satisfactory vermis measurements could be obtained in 89.9% of cases. The VC (constant= − 12.21; slope=2.447; r=0.887, p<0.0001) correlated linearly with GA. A high degree of consistency was observed between 2D and 3D ultrasound measurements (ICC=0.846 95% CI 679–0.930) as well as between measurements obtained by different examiners (ICC=0.890 95% CI 989–0.945). Conclusion: 2-dimensional ultrasonographic measurements of cerebellar vermis throughout gestation in the mid-sagittal view seem to be feasible and reproducible enough to be potentially used in clinical practice. Such measurements may supply a tool for accurate identification of posterior fossa anomalies, providing the basis for proper counseling and management and of these conditions. PMID:27921094

  19. Documentation and Instructions for Running Two Python Scripts that Aid in Setting up 3D Measurements using the Polytec 3D Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohe, Daniel Peter

    2015-08-24

    Sandia National Laboratories has recently purchased a Polytec 3D Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer for vibration measurement. This device has proven to be a very nice tool for making vibration measurements, and has a number of advantages over traditional sensors such as accelerometers. The non-contact nature of the laser vibrometer means there is no mass loading due to measuring the response. Additionally, the laser scanning heads can position the laser spot much more quickly and accurately than placing an accelerometer or performing a roving hammer impact. The disadvantage of the system is that a significant amount of time must be invested to align the lasers with each other and the part so that the laser spots can be accurately positioned. The Polytec software includes a number of nice tools to aid in this procedure; however, certain portions are still tedious. Luckily, the Polytec software is readily extensible by programming macros for the system, so tedious portions of the procedure can be made easier by automating the process. The Polytec Software includes a WinWrap (similar to Visual Basic) editor and interface to run macros written in that programming language. The author, however, is much more proficient in Python, and the latter also has a much larger set of libraries that can be used to create very complex macros, while taking advantage of Python’s inherent readability and maintainability.

  20. Pulse subtraction Doppler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahue, Veronique; Mari, Jean Martial; Eckersley, Robert J.; Caro, Colin G.; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances have demonstrated the feasibility of molecular imaging using targeted microbubbles and ultrasound. One technical challenge is to selectively detect attached bubbles from those freely flowing bubbles and surrounding tissue. Pulse Inversion Doppler is an imaging technique enabling the selective detection of both static and moving ultrasound contrast agents: linear scatterers generate a single band Doppler spectrum, while non-linear scatterers generate a double band spectrum, one being uniquely correlated with the presence of contrast agents and non-linear tissue signals. We demonstrate that similar spectrums, and thus the same discrimination, can be obtained through a Doppler implementation of Pulse Subtraction. This is achieved by reconstructing a virtual echo using the echo generated from a short pulse transmission. Moreover by subtracting from this virtual echo the one generated from a longer pulse transmission, it is possible to fully suppress the echo from linear scatterers, while for non-linear scatterers, a signal will remain, allowing classical agent detection. Simulations of a single moving microbubble and a moving linear scatterer subject to these pulses show that when the virtual echo and the long pulse echo are used to perform pulsed Doppler, the power Doppler spectrum allows separation of linear and non-linear moving scattering. Similar results are obtained on experimental data acquired on a flow containing either microbubble contrast agents or linear blood mimicking fluid. This new Doppler method constitutes an alternative to Pulse Inversion Doppler and preliminary results suggest that similar dual band spectrums could be obtained by the combination of any non-linear detection technique with Doppler demodulation.

  1. Characterising the effect of a variety of surface roughness on boundary layer wind and dynamics within the scanning Doppler lidar network in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsikko, Anne; O'Connor, Ewan J.; Wood, Curtis R.; Vakkari, Ville

    2013-04-01

    Aerosol particle and trace gas atmospheric content is controlled by natural and anthropological emissions. However, further dispersion in the atmosphere is driven by wind and dynamic mixing. Atmospheric surface and boundary layer dynamics have direct and indirect effects on weather, air quality and processes affecting climate (e.g. gas exchange between ecosystem and atmosphere). In addition to the amount of solar energy and prevailing meteorological condition, the surface topography has a strong influence on the close to surface wind field and turbulence, particularly in urban areas (e.g. Barlow and Coceal, 2009). In order to characterise the effect of forest, urban and coastal surfaces on boundary layer wind and mixing, we have utilised the Finnish Doppler lidar network (Hirsikko et al., 2013). The network consists of five 1.5 μm Doppler lidars (HALO Photonics, Pearson et al., 2009), of which four are capable of full hemispheric scanning and are located at Helsinki (60.12°N, 25.58°E, 45 m asl.), Utö island (59.47°N, 21.23°E, 8 m asl.), SMEAR II at Hyytiälä (61.50°N, 24.17°E, 181 m asl.) and Kuopio (62.44°N, 27.32°E, 190 m asl.). The fifth lidar at Sodankylä (67.37°N, 26.63°E, 171 m asl.) is a new model designed for the Arctic environment with no external moving parts, but still retains limited scan capability. Investigation of boundary layer wind and mixing condition can now be extended beyond vertical profiles of horizontal wind, and dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy (O'Connor et al., 2010) throughout the boundary layer. We have applied custom designed scanning routines for 3D-observation of the wind fields and simultaneous aerosol particle distribution continuously for over one year at Helsinki and Utö, and began similar scanning routines at Kuopio and Hyytiälä in spring 2013. In this long term project, our aims are to 1) characterise the effect of the land-sea interface and the urban environment on the wind and its turbulent nature

  2. Proper orthogonal decomposition analysis of scanning laser Doppler vibrometer measurements of plaster status at the U.S. Capitol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignola, Joseph F.; Bucaro, Joseph A.; Tressler, James F.; Ellingston, Damon; Kurdila, Andrew J.; Adams, George; Marchetti, Barbara; Agnani, Alexia; Esposito, Enrico; Tomasini, Enrico P.

    2004-06-01

    A large-scale survey (~700 m2) of frescos and wall paintings was undertaken in the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. to identify regions that may need structural repair due to detachment, delamination, or other defects. The survey encompassed eight pre-selected spaces including: Brumidi's first work at the Capitol building in the House Appropriations Committee room; the Parliamentarian's office; the House Speaker's office; the Senate Reception room; the President's Room; and three areas of the Brumidi Corridors. Roughly 60% of the area surveyed was domed or vaulted ceilings, the rest being walls. Approximately 250 scans were done ranging in size from 1 to 4 m2. The typical mesh density was 400 scan points per square meter. A common approach for post-processing time series called Proper Orthogonal Decomposition, or POD, was adapted to frequency-domain data in order to extract the essential features of the structure. We present a POD analysis for one of these panels, pinpointing regions that have experienced severe substructural degradation.

  3. Automatic Evaluation of Scan Adequacy and Dysplasia Metrics in 2-D Ultrasound Images of the Neonatal Hip.

    PubMed

    Quader, Niamul; Hodgson, Antony J; Mulpuri, Kishore; Schaeffer, Emily; Abugharbieh, Rafeef

    2017-03-21

    Ultrasound (US) imaging of an infant's hip joint is widely used for early detection of developmental dysplasia of the hip. In current US-based diagnosis of developmental dysplasia of the hip, trained clinicians acquire US images and, if they judge them to be adequate (i.e., to contain relevant hip joint structures), analyze them manually to extract clinically useful dysplasia metrics. However, both the scan adequacy classification and dysplasia metrics extraction steps exhibit significant variability within and between both clinicians and institutions, which can result in significant over- and undertreatment rates. To reduce the subjectivity resulting from this variability, we propose a computational image analysis technique that automatically identifies adequate images and subsequently extracts dysplasia metrics from these 2-D US images. Our automatic method uses local phase symmetry-based image measures to robustly identify intensity-invariant geometric features of bone/cartilage boundaries from the US images. Using the extracted geometric features, we trained a random forest classifier to classify images as adequate or inadequate, and in the adequate images we used a subset of the geometric features to calculate key dysplasia metrics. We validated our method on a data set of 693 US scans collected from 35 infants. Our approach produces excellent agreement with clinician adequacy classifications (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve = 0.985) and in reducing variability in the measured developmental dysplasia of the hip metrics (p < 0.05). The automatically computed dysplasia metrics appear to be slightly biased toward higher Graf categories than the manually estimated metrics, which could potentially reduce missed early diagnoses.

  4. Fluid mechanics of blood flow in human fetal left ventricles based on patient-specific 4D ultrasound scans.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chang Quan; Lim, Guat Ling; Jamil, Muhammad; Mattar, Citra Nurfarah Zaini; Biswas, Arijit; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2016-10-01

    The mechanics of intracardiac blood flow and the epigenetic influence it exerts over the heart function have been the subjects of intense research lately. Fetal intracardiac flows are especially useful for gaining insights into the development of congenital heart diseases, but have not received due attention thus far, most likely because of technical difficulties in collecting sufficient intracardiac flow data in a safe manner. Here, we circumvent such obstacles by employing 4D STIC ultrasound scans to quantify the fetal heart motion in three normal 20-week fetuses, subsequently performing 3D computational fluid dynamics simulations on the left ventricles based on these patient-specific heart movements. Analysis of the simulation results shows that there are significant differences between fetal and adult ventricular blood flows which arise because of dissimilar heart morphology, E/A ratio, diastolic-systolic duration ratio, and heart rate. The formations of ventricular vortex rings were observed for both E- and A-wave in the flow simulations. These vortices had sufficient momentum to last until the end of diastole and were responsible for generating significant wall shear stresses on the myocardial endothelium, as well as helicity in systolic outflow. Based on findings from previous studies, we hypothesized that these vortex-induced flow properties play an important role in sustaining the efficiency of diastolic filling, systolic pumping, and cardiovascular flow in normal fetal hearts.

  5. Fluid mechanics of human fetal right ventricles from image-based computational fluid dynamics using 4D clinical ultrasound scans.

    PubMed

    Wiputra, Hadi; Lai, Chang Quan; Lim, Guat Ling; Heng, Joel Jia Wei; Guo, Lan; Soomar, Sanah Merchant; Leo, Hwa Liang; Biwas, Arijit; Mattar, Citra Nurfarah Zaini; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2016-12-01

    There are 0.6-1.9% of US children who were born with congenital heart malformations. Clinical and animal studies suggest that abnormal blood flow forces might play a role in causing these malformation, highlighting the importance of understanding the fetal cardiovascular fluid mechanics. We performed computational fluid dynamics simulations of the right ventricles, based on four-dimensional ultrasound scans of three 20-wk-old normal human fetuses, to characterize their flow and energy dynamics. Peak intraventricular pressure gradients were found to be 0.2-0.9 mmHg during systole, and 0.1-0.2 mmHg during diastole. Diastolic wall shear stresses were found to be around 1 Pa, which could elevate to 2-4 Pa during systole in the outflow tract. Fetal right ventricles have complex flow patterns featuring two interacting diastolic vortex rings, formed during diastolic E wave and A wave. These rings persisted through the end of systole and elevated wall shear stresses in their proximity. They were observed to conserve ∼25.0% of peak diastolic kinetic energy to be carried over into the subsequent systole. However, this carried-over kinetic energy did not significantly alter the work done by the heart for ejection. Thus, while diastolic vortexes played a significant role in determining spatial patterns and magnitudes of diastolic wall shear stresses, they did not have significant influence on systolic ejection. Our results can serve as a baseline for future comparison with diseased hearts.

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ... standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  7. Anesthetic Techniques Influence the Induction of Pulmonary Capillary Hemorrhage During Diagnostic Ultrasound Scanning in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas L.; Dou, Chunyan; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Puhnonary apillary hemorrhage can be induced by diagnostic ultrasonnd (US) during direct pulmonary US scanning in rats. The influence of specific anesthetic tedmiques on this bioeffect was examined. Methods Ketamine plus xylazine has been used previously. In this study, the influence of intraperitoneal injections of ketamine and pentobarbital, inhalational isoflurane, and the supplemental use of xylazine with ketamine and isollurane was tested. A diagnostic US machine with a7.6-MHz linear array was used to image the right lung of anesthetized rats in a warmed water bath at different mechanical index (MI) settings. Pulmonary capillary hemorrhage was assessed by measuring comet tail artifacts in the image and by morphometry of the hemorrhagic areas on excised lungs. Results Pulmonary capillary hemorrhage was greatest for pentobarbital, lower for inhalational isoflurane, and lowest for ketamine anesthesia, with occurrence thresholds at at Mis of about 0.44, 0.8, and 0.8, respectively. Addition of xylazine produced a substantial increaseinhemorrhageanda significant proportion of hemorrhage occurrence for ketamineat an MI of 0.7 (P < .01) and forisofluraneat an MI of 0.52 (P < .01). Conclusions Ketamine plus xylazine and pentobarbital yield lower thresholds than ketamine or isoflurane alone by nearly a factor of 2 in MI. These results suggest that the choice of the anesthetic agent substantially modifies the relative risks of pulmonary capillary hemorrhage from pulmonary US. PMID:25614402

  8. Are portable bladder scanning and real-time ultrasound accurate measures of bladder volume in postnatal women?

    PubMed

    Mathew, S; Horne, A W; Murray, L S; Tydeman, G; McKinley, C A

    2007-08-01

    Real-time ultrasound and portable bladder scanners are commonly used instead of catheterisation to determine bladder volumes in postnatal women but it is not known whether these are accurate. Change in bladder volumes measured by ultrasound and portable scanners were compared with actual voided volume (VV) in 100 postnatal women. The VV was on average 41 ml (CI 29 - 54 ml) higher than that measured by ultrasound, and 33 ml (CI 17 - 48 ml) higher than that measured by portable scanners. Portable scanner volumes were 9 ml (CI -8 - 26 ml) higher than those measured by ultrasound. Neither method is an accurate tool for detecting bladder volume in postnatal women.

  9. Ultrasound pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Pregnancy sonogram; Obstetric ultrasonography; Obstetric sonogram; Ultrasound - pregnancy; IUGR - ultrasound; Intrauterine growth - ultrasound; Polyhydramnios - ultrasound; Oligohydramnios - ultrasound; ...

  10. Transvaginal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Uterine bleeding - transvaginal ultrasound; Menstrual bleeding - transvaginal ultrasound; Infertility - transvaginal ultrasound; Ovarian - transvaginal ultrasound; Abscess - transvaginal ultrasound

  11. Assessment of visual quality and spatial accuracy of fast anisotropic diffusion and scan conversion algorithms for real-time three-dimensional spherical ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Qi; Angelini, Elsa D.; Laine, Andrew

    2004-04-01

    Three-dimensional ultrasound machines based on matrix phased-array transducers are gaining predominance for real-time dynamic screening in cardiac and obstetric practice. These transducers array acquire three-dimensional data in spherical coordinates along lines tiled in azimuth and elevation angles at incremental depth. This study aims at evaluating fast filtering and scan conversion algorithms applied in the spherical domain prior to visualization into Cartesian coordinates for visual quality and spatial measurement accuracy. Fast 3d scan conversion algorithms were implemented and with different order interpolation kernels. Downsizing and smoothing of sampling artifacts were integrated in the scan conversion process. In addition, a denoising scheme for spherical coordinate data with 3d anisotropic diffusion was implemented and applied prior to scan conversion to improve image quality. Reconstruction results under different parameter settings, such as different interpolation kernels, scaling factor, smoothing options, and denoising, are reported. Image quality was evaluated on several data sets via visual inspections and measurements of cylinder objects dimensions. Error measurements of the cylinder's radius, reported in this paper, show that the proposed fast scan conversion algorithm can correctly reconstruct three-dimensional ultrasound in Cartesian coordinates under tuned parameter settings. Denoising via three-dimensional anisotropic diffusion was able to greatly improve the quality of resampled data without affecting the accuracy of spatial information after the modification of the introduction of a variable gradient threshold parameter.

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  13. Ultrasound of the Thyroid Gland

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  14. Imaging-based assessment of the mineral composition of urinary stones: an in vitro study of the combination of hounsfield unit measurement in noncontrast helical computerized tomography and the twinkling artifact in color Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Hakim; Raynal, Gauthier; Spie, Romain; Daudon, Michel; Vallée, Jean-Noël

    2012-05-01

    We evaluated the value of combining noncontrast helical computerized tomography (NCHCT) and color Doppler ultrasound in the assessment of the composition of urinary stones. In vitro, we studied 120 stones of known composition, that separate into the five main types: 18 calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) stones, 41 calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) stones, 24 uric acid stones, 25 calcium phosphate stones and 12 cystine calculi. Stones were characterized in terms of their Hounsfield density (HU) in NCHCT and the presence of a twinkling artifact (TA) in color Doppler ultrasound. There were statistically significant HU differences between calcium and non-calcium stones (p < 0.001), calcium oxalate stones and calcium phosphate stones (p < 0.001) and uric acid stones and cystine calculi (p < 0.001) but not between COM and COD stones (p = 0.786). Hence, the HU was a predictive factor of the composition of all types of stones, other than for COM and COD stones within the calcium oxalate class (p > 0.05). We found that the TA does not enable differentiation between calcium and non-calcium stones (p > 0.999), calcium oxalate stones and calcium phosphate stones (p = 0.15), or uric acid stones and cystine calculi (p = 0.079). However, it did reveal a significant difference between COM and COD stones (p = 0.002). The absence of a TA is a predictive factor for the presence of COM stones (p = 0.008). Hence, the association of NCHCT and Doppler enables the accurate classification of the five types of stones in vitro.

  15. Accuracy and precision of a new portable ultrasound scanner, the BME-150A, in residual urine volume measurement: a comparison with the BladderScan BVI 3000.

    PubMed

    Choe, Jin Ho; Lee, Ji Yeon; Lee, Kyu-Sung

    2007-06-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the relative accuracy of a new portable ultrasound unit, BME-150A, and the BladderScan BVI 3000, as assessed in comparison with the catheterized residual urine volume. We used both of these machines to prospectively measure the residual urine volumes of 89 patients (40 men and 49 women) who were undergoing urodynamic studies. The ultrasound measurements were compared with the post-scan bladder volumes obtained by catheterization in the same patients. The ultrasounds were followed immediately (within 5 min) by in-and-out catheterizations while the patients were in a supine position. There were a total of 116 paired measurements made. The BME-150A and the BVI 3000 demonstrated a correlation with the residual volume of 0.92 and 0.94, and a mean difference from the true residual volume of 7.8 and 3.6 ml, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients for the accuracy of the two bladder scans were 0.90 for BME-150A and 0.95 for BVI 3000. The difference of accuracy between the two models was not significant (p = 0.2421). There were six cases in which a follow-up evaluation of falsely elevated post-void residual urine volume measurements on the ultrasound studies resulted in comparatively low catheterized volumes, with a range of differences from 66 to 275.5 ml. These cases were diagnosed with an ovarian cyst, uterine myoma, or uterine adenomyosis on pelvic ultrasonography. The accuracy of the BME-150A is comparable to that of the BVI 3000 in estimating the true residual urine volumes and is sufficient enough for us to recommend its use as an alternative to catheterization.

  16. Assessment of trabecular bone quality in human cadaver calcaneus using scanning confocal ultrasound and dual x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yixian; Xia, Yi; Lin, Wei; Rubin, Clinton; Gruber, Barry

    2004-10-01

    Microgravity and aging induced bone loss is a critical skeleton complication, occurring particularly in the weight-supporting skeleton, which leads to osteoporosis and fracture. Advents in quantitative ultrasound (QUS) provide a unique method for evaluating bone strength and density. Using a newly developed scanning confocal acoustic diagnostic (SCAD) system, QUS assessment for bone quality in the real body region was evaluated. A total of 19 human cadaver calcanei, age 66 to 97 years old, were tested by both SCAD and nonscan mode. The scanning region covered an approximate 40×40 mm2 with 0.5 mm resolution. Broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA, dB/MHz), energy attenuation (ATT, dB), and ultrasound velocity (UV, m/s) were measured. The QUS properties were then correlated to the bone mineral density (BMD) measured by DEXA. Correlations between BMD and QUS parameters were significantly improved by using SCAD as compared to nonscan mode, yielding correlations between BMD and SCAD QUS parameters as R=0.82 (BUA), and R=0.86 (est. BMD). It is suggested that SCAD is feasible for in vivo bone quality mapping. It can be potentially used for monitoring instant changes of bone strength and density. [Work supported by the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (TD00207), and New York Center for Biotechnology.

  17. Distortion of thermospheric air masses by horizontal neutral winds over Poker Flat Alaska measured using an all-sky scanning Doppler imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhadly, M. S.; Conde, M.

    2016-01-01

    An air mass transported by a wind field will become distorted over time by any gradients present in the wind field. To study this effect in Earth's thermosphere, we examine the behavior of a simple parameter that we describe here as the "distortion gradient." It incorporates all of the wind field's departures from uniformity and is thus capable of representing all contributions to the distortion or mixing of air masses. The distortion gradient is defined such that it is always positive, so averaging over time and/or space does not suppress small-scale features. Conventional gradients, by contrast, are signed quantities that would often average to zero. To analyze the climatological behavior of this distortion gradient, we used three years (2010, 2011, and 2012) of thermospheric F region wind observations from a high-latitude ground-based all-sky wavelength scanning Doppler Fabry-Perot interferometer located at Poker Flat Alaska. Climatological averaging of the distortion gradient allowed us to investigate its diurnal and seasonal (annual) behaviors at our observing location. Distortion was observed to be higher before local magnetic midnight and to be seasonally dependent. While maximum distortion occurred before local magnetic midnight under all geomagnetic conditions, the peak distortion occurred earlier under moderate geomagnetic conditions as compared to the quiet geomagnetic conditions and even earlier still when geomagnetic conditions were active. Peak distortion was stronger and appeared earlier when interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) was southward compared to northward. By contrast, we could not resolve any time-shift effect due to the IMF component tangential to Earth's orbit.

  18. Transvaginal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Transvaginal ultrasound is a method of imaging the genital tract in females. A hand held probe is inserted directly ... vaginal cavity to scan the pelvic structures, while ultrasound pictures are viewed on a monitor. The test ...

  19. The ScanTrainer obstetrics and gynaecology ultrasound virtual reality training simulator: A cost model to determine the cost viability of replacing clinical training with simulation training

    PubMed Central

    Ray, AF

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to produce an economic cost model comparing the use of the Medaphor ScanTrainer virtual reality training simulator for obstetrics and gynaecology ultrasound to achieve basic competence, with the traditional training method. A literature search and survey of expert opinion were used to identify resources used in training. An executable model was produced in Excel. The model showed a cost saving for a clinic using the ScanTrainer of £7114 per annum. The uncertainties of the model were explored and it was found to be robust. Threshold values for the key drivers of the model were identified. Using the ScanTrainer is cost saving for clinics with at least two trainees per year to train, if it would take at least six lists to train them using the traditional training method and if a traditional training list has at least two fewer patients than a standard list. PMID:27433245

  20. WE-B-210-02: The Advent of Ultrafast Imaging in Biomedical Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Tanter, M.

    2015-06-15

    In the last fifteen years, the introduction of plane or diverging wave transmissions rather than line by line scanning focused beams has broken the conventional barriers of ultrasound imaging. By using such large field of view transmissions, the frame rate reaches the theoretical limit of physics dictated by the ultrasound speed and an ultrasonic map can be provided typically in tens of micro-seconds (several thousands of frames per second). Interestingly, this leap in frame rate is not only a technological breakthrough but it permits the advent of completely new ultrasound imaging modes, including shear wave elastography, electromechanical wave imaging, ultrafast doppler, ultrafast contrast imaging, and even functional ultrasound imaging of brain activity (fUltrasound) introducing Ultrasound as an emerging full-fledged neuroimaging modality. At ultrafast frame rates, it becomes possible to track in real time the transient vibrations – known as shear waves – propagating through organs. Such “human body seismology” provides quantitative maps of local tissue stiffness whose added value for diagnosis has been recently demonstrated in many fields of radiology (breast, prostate and liver cancer, cardiovascular imaging, …). Today, Supersonic Imagine company is commercializing the first clinical ultrafast ultrasound scanner, Aixplorer with real time Shear Wave Elastography. This is the first example of an ultrafast Ultrasound approach surpassing the research phase and now widely spread in the clinical medical ultrasound community with an installed base of more than 1000 Aixplorer systems in 54 countries worldwide. For blood flow imaging, ultrafast Doppler permits high-precision characterization of complex vascular and cardiac flows. It also gives ultrasound the ability to detect very subtle blood flow in very small vessels. In the brain, such ultrasensitive Doppler paves the way for fUltrasound (functional ultrasound imaging) of brain activity with unprecedented

  1. Quantitative Ultrasound in Cancer Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Feleppa, Ernest J.; Mamou, Jonathan; Porter, Christopher R.; Machi, Junji

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound is a relatively inexpensive, portable, and versatile imaging modality that has a broad range of clinical uses. It incorporates many imaging modes, such as conventional gray-scale “B-mode” imaging to display echo amplitude in a scanned plane; M-mode imaging to track motion at a given fixed location over time; duplex, color, and power Doppler imaging to display motion in a scanned plane; harmonic imaging to display non-linear responses to incident ultrasound; elastographic imaging to display relative tissue stiffness; and contrast-agent imaging with simple contrast agents to display blood-filled spaces or with targeted agents to display specific agent-binding tissue types. These imaging modes have been well described in the scientific, engineering, and clinical literature. A less well-known ultrasonic imaging technology is based on quantitative ultrasound or (QUS), which analyzes the distribution of power as a function of frequency in the original received echo signals from tissue and exploits the resulting spectral parameters to characterize and distinguish among tissues. This article discusses the attributes of QUS-based methods for imaging cancers and providing improved means of detecting and assessing tumors. The discussion will include applications to imaging primary prostate cancer and metastatic cancer in lymph nodes to illustrate the methods. PMID:21362522

  2. Effectiveness of evaluating tumor vascularization using 3D power Doppler ultrasound with high-definition flow technology in the prediction of the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for T2 breast cancer: a preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shia, Wei-Chung; Chen, Dar-Ren; Huang, Yu-Len; Wu, Hwa-Koon; Kuo, Shou-Jen

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of advanced ultrasound (US) imaging of vascular flow and morphological features in the prediction of a pathologic complete response (pCR) and a partial response (PR) to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for T2 breast cancer. Twenty-nine consecutive patients with T2 breast cancer treated with six courses of anthracycline-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy were enrolled. Three-dimensional (3D) power Doppler US with high-definition flow (HDF) technology was used to investigate the blood flow in and morphological features of the tumors. Six vascularity quantization features, three morphological features, and two vascular direction features were selected and extracted from the US images. A support vector machine was used to evaluate the changes in vascularity after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and pCR and PR were predicted on the basis of these changes. The most accurate prediction of pCR was achieved after the first chemotherapy cycle, with an accuracy of 93.1% and a specificity of 85.5%, while that of a PR was achieved after the second cycle, with an accuracy of 79.31% and a specificity of 72.22%. Vascularity data can be useful to predict the effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Determination of changes in vascularity after neoadjuvant chemotherapy using 3D power Doppler US with HDF can generate accurate predictions of the patient response, facilitating early decision-making.

  3. A 1 kHz A-scan rate pump-probe laser-ultrasound system for robust inspection of composites.

    PubMed

    Pelivanov, Ivan; Shtokolov, Alex; Wei, Chen-Wei; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    We recently built a fiber-optic laser-ultrasound (LU) scanner for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aircraft composites and demonstrated its greatly improved sensitivity and stability compared with current noncontact systems. It is also very attractive in terms of cost, stability to environmental noise and surface roughness, simplicity in adjustment, footprint, and flexibility. A new type of a balanced fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is a key component of this all-optical LU pump-probe system. Very high A-scan rates can be achieved because no reference arm or stabilization feedback are needed. Here, we demonstrate LU system performance at 1000 A-scans/s combined with a fast 2-D translator operating at a scanning speed of 100 mm/s with a peak acceleration of 10 m/s(2) in both lateral directions to produce parallel B-scans at high rates. The fast scanning strategy is described in detail. The sensitivity of this system, in terms of noise equivalent pressure, was further improved to be only 8.3 dB above the Nyquist thermal noise limit. To our knowledge, this is the best reported sensitivity for a noncontact ultrasonic detector of this dimension used to inspect aircraft composites.

  4. Trauma Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Suwannanon, Ruedeekorn; Prachanukool, Thidathit; Sricharoen, Pungkava; Saksobhavivat, Nitima; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasound plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of acute trauma patients through the use of multi-site scanning encompassing abdominal, cardiothoracic, vascular and skeletal scans. In a high-speed polytrauma setting, because exsanguinations are the primary cause of trauma morbidity and mortality, ultrasound is used for quick and accurate detection of hemorrhages in the pericardial, pleural, and peritoneal cavities during the primary Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) survey. Volume status can be assessed non-invasively with ultrasound of the inferior vena cava (IVC), which is a useful tool in the initial phase and follow-up evaluations. Pneumothorax can also be quickly detected with ultrasound. During the secondary survey and in patients sustaining low-speed or localized trauma, ultrasound can be used to help detect abdominal organ injuries. This is particularly helpful in patients in whom hemoperitoneum is not identified on an initial scan because findings of organ injuries will expedite the next test, often computed tomography (CT). Moreover, ultrasound can assist in detection of fractures easily obscured on radiography, such as rib and sternal fractures.

  5. Ultrasound diagnosis of bilateral cataracts in a fetus with possible cerebro-ocular congential muscular dystrophy during the routine second trimester anomaly scan.

    PubMed

    Drought, Alexandra; Wimalasundera, Ruwan; Holder, Susan

    2015-08-01

    The finding of bilateral congenital cataracts in the fetus is rare. We report bilateral congenital cataracts detected during the routine second trimester anomaly scan, which subsequently were found to be associated with other congenital anomalies and the parents opted for a termination of pregnancy. At post-mortem, Muscle-Eye Brain disease or Walker-Warburg Syndrome was considered likely, which are autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy disorders associated with cerebral, cerebellar, muscle and eye anomalies. On ultrasound, bilateral cataracts appear as echogenic, solid areas within the fetal orbits. The examination of the fetal face and orbits plays an important role in confirming fetal well-being antenatally. We propose that it should become a routine part of the structural survey of fetal anatomy during the obstetric anomaly scan. This is especially important in pregnancies previously affected by fetal cataracts or pregnancies at risk of rare genetic syndromes.

  6. Perinatal and Neonatal Outcomes of Patients Who Were Diagnosed with Neural Tube Defect in Midtrimester Fetal Ultrasound Scan and Refused Request for Termination of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Eraslan, Sevil; Celik, Ebru; Simsek, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the perinatal and neonatal outcomes of patients who were diagnosed with neural tube defect (NTD) in the midtrimester fetal ultrasound scan and refused the request for termination of pregnancy. Material and Methods. The records of 69 patients, for whom NTD was detected in the midtrimester fetal ultrasound scan and who preferred the continuation of the pregnancy after comprehensive counselling about the possible prognosis and treatment options during the period between January 2011 and February 2016, were reviewed retrospectively. Results. Of these patients, 66.7% were 25–35 years old; 95.7% were multiparous; and 1.4% had a history of a fetus having NTD in previous pregnancies. There were 7 (10.1%) neonatal deaths in these patients. Meningomyelocele closure procedure was the most performed surgery in the postnatal period (92%). Of these patients, 30.7% had paraplegia; 51.6% had neurogenic bladder; and 6.4% had infections due to surgery. Conclusion. The results of this study demonstrated perinatal and neonatal outcomes of fetuses with NTD who were not terminated by the preference of the family in midtrimester. The experience of our centre would be beneficial as a tool for nondirective counselling of these patients when considering the antenatal/postnatal care options and postnatal prognosis. PMID:27999804

  7. Perinatal and Neonatal Outcomes of Patients Who Were Diagnosed with Neural Tube Defect in Midtrimester Fetal Ultrasound Scan and Refused Request for Termination of Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Melekoglu, Rauf; Eraslan, Sevil; Celik, Ebru; Simsek, Yavuz

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the perinatal and neonatal outcomes of patients who were diagnosed with neural tube defect (NTD) in the midtrimester fetal ultrasound scan and refused the request for termination of pregnancy. Material and Methods. The records of 69 patients, for whom NTD was detected in the midtrimester fetal ultrasound scan and who preferred the continuation of the pregnancy after comprehensive counselling about the possible prognosis and treatment options during the period between January 2011 and February 2016, were reviewed retrospectively. Results. Of these patients, 66.7% were 25-35 years old; 95.7% were multiparous; and 1.4% had a history of a fetus having NTD in previous pregnancies. There were 7 (10.1%) neonatal deaths in these patients. Meningomyelocele closure procedure was the most performed surgery in the postnatal period (92%). Of these patients, 30.7% had paraplegia; 51.6% had neurogenic bladder; and 6.4% had infections due to surgery. Conclusion. The results of this study demonstrated perinatal and neonatal outcomes of fetuses with NTD who were not terminated by the preference of the family in midtrimester. The experience of our centre would be beneficial as a tool for nondirective counselling of these patients when considering the antenatal/postnatal care options and postnatal prognosis.

  8. Real Time Fast Ultrasound Imaging Technology and Possible Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruza, J. F.; Perez, M.; Moreno, J. M.; Fritsch, C.

    In this work, a novel hardware architecture for fast ultrasound imaging based on FPGA devices is proposed. A key difference over other approaches is the unlimited scalability in terms of active channels without performance losses. Acquisition and processing tasks share the same hardware, eliminating communication bottlenecks with smaller size and power losses. These features make this system suitable to implement the most demanding imaging applications, like 3D Phased Array, Total Focusing Method, Vector Doppler, Image Compounding, High Speed Part Scanning and advanced elastographic techniques. A single medium sized FPGA allows beamforming up to 200 scan lines simultaneously, which is enough to perform most of the above mentioned applications in strict real time.

  9. Three-dimensional ultrasound imaging of the vasculature.

    PubMed

    Fenster, A; Lee, D; Sherebrin, S; Rankin, R; Downey, D

    1998-02-01

    With conventional ultrasonography, the diagnostician must view a series of two-dimensional images in order to form a mental impression of the three-dimensional anatomy, an efficient and time consuming practice prone to operator variability, which may cause variable or even incorrect diagnoses. Also, a conventional two-dimensional ultrasound image represents a thin slice of the patients anatomy at a single location and orientation, which is difficult to reproduce at a later time. These factors make conventional ultrasonography non-optimal for prospective or follow-up studies. Our efforts have focused on overcoming these deficiencies by developing three-dimensional ultrasound imaging techniques that are capable of acquiring B-mode, colour Doppler and power Doppler images of the vasculature, by using a conventional ultrasound system to acquire a series of two-dimensional images and then mathematically reconstructing them into a single three-dimensional image, which may then be viewed interactively on an inexpensive desktop computer. We report here on two approaches: (1) free-hand scanning, in which a magnetic positioning device is attached to the ultrasound transducer to record the position and orientation of each two-dimensional image needed for the three-dimensional image reconstruction; and (2) mechanical scanning, in which a motor-driven assembly is used to translate the transducer linearly across the neck, yielding a set of uniformly-spaced parallel two-dimensional images.

  10. Ultrasound findings in cutaneous sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Dybiec, Ewa; Pietrzak, Aldona; Kieszko, Robert; Kanitakis, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of cutaneous sarcoidosis relies mainly on the patient's history, presence of characteristic skin lesions and histological examination that shows a granulomatous, non-necrotizing dermal infiltration. The aim of the study was to assess the ultrasonographic features of cutaneous lesions of sarcoidosis before and after treatment. A 38-year-old woman with systemic sarcoidosis and specific cutaneous lesions was treated with systemic steroids followed by hydroxychloroquine. Ultrasonographic examination of the cutaneous sarcoidosis lesions was performed with a Philips iU 22 and Siemens Acuson S 2000 device, with the use of linear 15 MHz and 17 MHz transducers. Histological examination of skin lesions showed characteristic, naked, non-necrotizing granulomas in the upper dermis. Ultrasound examination revealed well-demarcated, hypoechogenic changes. Power-Doppler scan revealed increased vascularity within the lesions and the surrounding tissue. Clinical improvement of the skin lesions was confirmed by ultrasound examination, which showed a decrease in their size and normalization of dermal echogenicity and vascularity. Ultrasound examination can show cutaneous sarcoidosis lesions and their regression after appropriate treatment. PMID:25821428

  11. Doppler echocardiography

    SciTech Connect

    Labovitz, A.J.; Williams, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors are successful in presenting a basic book on clinical quantitative Doppler echocardiography. It is not intended to be a comprehensive text, but it does cover clinical applications in a succinct fashion. Only the more common diseases in the adult are considered. The subjects are presented logically and are easy to comprehend. The illustrations are good, and the book is paperbound. The basic principles of Doppler echocardiography are presented briefly. The book ends with chapters on left ventricular function (stroke volume and cardiac output), congenital heart disease, and color Doppler echo-cardiography. There are numerous references and a good glossary and index.

  12. Role of B-scan ocular ultrasound as an adjuvant for the clinical assessment of eyeball diseases: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Dessì, Gerardo; Lahuerta, Eduardo Ferrer; Puce, Fabrizio Giorgio; Mendoza, Luis Humberto Ros; Stefanini, Teseo; Rosenberg, Ilan; Del Prato, Alberto; Perinetti, Michela; Villa, Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    We report our experience in B-mode ocular ultrasonography, focusing on its contribution when the clinical examination proves to be difficult, mainly due to the existence of intraocular opacities of the ocular fundus or diagnostic doubts. We revise the ocular ultrasound technique, its indications and contraindications, comparing to the other imaging techniques. In our experience ultrasonography revealed pathological findings which confirmed the clinical suspicion in most of cases or provide additional information. With understanding of the indications for ultrasonography and proper examination technique, one can gather a vast amount of information not possible with clinical examination alone.

  13. A longitudinal study assessing lens thickness changes in the eye of the growing beagle using ultrasound scanning: relevance to age of dogs in regulatory toxicology studies.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Juliana; Sykes, Angela; Powell, Helen; Healing, Guy; Scott, Marietta; Holmes, Andrew; Ricketts, Sally-Ann; Stewart, Jane; Davis, Stewart

    2014-12-01

    The lens is formed in utero with new secondary lens fibres added as outer layers throughout life in a growth pattern characteristic of the species. This study examined the time course of beagle lens growth to better understand the optimal starting age of dogs for safety studies to support adult versus paediatric indications, and to assess the feasibility of non-invasively monitoring lens growth with high frequency ultrasound. Ultrasound scanning was performed in six female beagle dogs using the Vevo770. All dogs were imaged in B-mode using local anaesthetic but without sedation. Imaging was carried out every 2 weeks from 8 to 22 weeks of age and then monthly until 62 weeks of age. The dogs tolerated the procedure well. The lens was visible in all dogs and measuring the lens thickness with high frequency ultrasound demonstrated good analytical reproducibility [Root Mean Square (RMS) = 3.13%]. No differences between the left and right eye existed and lens thickness correlated with body weight. The highest weekly growth rate was before 12 weeks of age. A statistically significant difference between monthly thickness was detected until 42 weeks of age at which point growth reached a plateau. During the experiment, lenses grew by 29.7% reaching an average thickness of 6.4 mm ± 0.03. By 10 months of age (the typical age used for routine toxicological evaluation), beagles have reached a plateau in lens growth that is analogous to human adults. Where lens is a target organ of concern it is suggested that beagles under 6 months old may be a better model for determining paediatric safety.

  14. Hyperhomocysteinemia as an Early Predictor of Erectile Dysfunction: International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and Penile Doppler Ultrasound Correlation With Plasma Levels of Homocysteine.

    PubMed

    Giovannone, Riccardo; Busetto, Gian Maria; Antonini, Gabriele; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Ferro, Matteo; Tricarico, Stefano; Del Giudice, Francesco; Ragonesi, Giulia; Conti, Simon L; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Gentile, Vincenzo; De Berardinis, Ettore

    2015-09-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is inability to achieve and maintain an erection to permit satisfactory sexual activity. Homocysteine (Hcys) is a sulfur-containing amino acid synthesized from the essential amino acid methionine. Experimental models have elucidated the role of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcys) as a strong and independent predictor for atherosclerosis progression and impaired cavernosal perfusion. The aim of this study is to investigate the serum levels of Hcys in our cohort of patients with ED, to compare these values with these of control population and to examine Hcys as a predictive marker for those patients who are beginning to complain mild-moderate ED. A total of 431 patients were enrolled in the study. The whole cohort was asked to complete the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) questionnaire. The study population was divided in 3 main groups: Group A: 145 patients with no ED serving as a control group; Group B: 145 patients with mild or mild-moderate ED; Group C: 141 patients with moderate or severe ED. Each participant underwent blood analysis. All patients underwent baseline and dynamic penile Doppler ultrasonography. We found in our cohort mean Hcys plasma concentrations significantly higher than the cut-off point in both groups B and C (18.6 ± 4.7 and 28.38 ± 7.8, respectively). Mean IIEF score was 27.9 ± 1.39, 19.5 ± 2.6, and 11.1 ± 2.5 for groups A, B, and C, respectively (P < 0.0001). In the penile Doppler ultrasonography studies, a high significant inverse correlation was detected between the mean values of the 10th minute's peak-systolic velocity (PSV) and Hcys levels for the groups B and C. This establishes a dose-dependent association between Hcys and ED. Furthermore, we showed that Hcys was an earlier predictor of ED than Doppler studies, as the Hcys increase was present in patients with mild ED even before abnormal Doppler values.

  15. The Effectiveness of Real-Time Feedback with an Audible Pulse: A Preliminary Study in Renal Doppler Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Hee; Lee, Hae Kyung; Choi, Seo-Youn; Yi, Boem Ha

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The effectiveness of real-time feedback using an audible pulse in renal Doppler ultrasonography was evaluated. Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board of our hospital. Written informed consent was provided by all volunteers at enrollment. The 26 healthy volunteers enrolled in this study underwent Doppler ultrasound of both kidneys using audible and inaudible pulses in randomized order and at 1-week intervals. Doppler waveforms were obtained at the interlobar or arcuate arteries using a 2-mm Doppler gate. Each session was considered complete when reproducible waveforms were obtained for 5 s in three predefined regions of the kidney. The scan times needed to obtain waveforms of the right and left kidneys were recorded separately. Measurements were compared using a paired t-test and a two-sample Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results The total recorded Doppler sonography scan time for each kidney ranged from 33 to 146 s. The mean scan time was 56.83 s (right, 58.19 s; left, 55.46 s) in the audible session and 72.58 s (right, 72.08 s; left, 73.08 s) in the inaudible session. The scan times were significantly shorter in the audible than inaudible session (p<0.001), whereas the difference in the scan times between the right and left kidneys was not significant. The order of the sessions had no effect on the total scan time. Conclusion Real-time feedback using an audible pulse may encourage patient cooperation during breath-holding and can shorten the time needed to perform Doppler ultrasonography. PMID:27685667

  16. Scanning Ultrasound (SUS) Causes No Changes to Neuronal Excitability and Prevents Age-Related Reductions in Hippocampal CA1 Dendritic Structure in Wild-Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hatch, Robert John; Leinenga, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Scanning ultrasound (SUS) is a noninvasive approach that has recently been shown to ameliorate histopathological changes and restore memory functions in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model. Although no overt neuronal damage was reported, the short- and long-term effects of SUS on neuronal excitability and dendritic tree morphology had not been investigated. To address this, we performed patch-clamp recordings from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in wild-type mice 2 and 24 hours after a single SUS treatment, and one week and 3 months after six weekly SUS treatments, including sham treatments as controls. In both treatment regimes, no changes in CA1 neuronal excitability were observed in SUS-treated neurons when compared to sham-treated neurons at any time-point. For the multiple treatment groups, we also determined the dendritic morphology and spine densities of the neurons from which we had recorded. The apical trees of sham-treated neurons were reduced at the 3 month time-point when compared to one week; however, surprisingly, no longitudinal change was detected in the apical dendritic trees of SUS-treated neurons. In contrast, the length and complexity of the basal dendritic trees were not affected by SUS treatment at either time-point. The apical dendritic spine densities were reduced, independent of the treatment group, at 3 months compared to one week. Collectively, these data suggest that ultrasound can be employed to prevent an age-associated loss of dendritic structure without impairing neuronal excitability. PMID:27727310

  17. Phase conjugation of the second harmonic of a focused ultrasound beam as a method for improving C-scan acoustical imaging in nonlinear inhomogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutyansky, Leonid M.; Brysev, Andrew P.; Klopotov, Roman V.; Pernod, Philippe J.; Preobrazhensky, Vladimir L.; Yan, Xiang; Hamilton, Mark F.

    2003-10-01

    Acoustical imaging in complex media (e.g., biological tissue) can be affected by phase aberrations introduced in a wave during propagation. Wave phase conjugation (WPC) of ultrasound is known for its ability to compensate for phase distortions due to inhomogeneity of the propagation medium, and it can be used for improvement of acoustical imaging under these conditions. In a nonlinear medium harmonics are generated during propagation of an intense beam of ultrasound, and this principle is used in tissue harmonic imaging. The parametric method of WPC permits phase conjugation of a selected frequency component of the probe beam. In this way the peculiarities of WPC can be combined with advantages of harmonic imaging. Automated WPC-focusing of the conjugated second-harmonic component of a focused nonlinear probe beam is studied experimentally and theoretically for the case of a homogeneous medium, and experimentally for a medium with pseudo-random inhomogeneities. The generated conjugate wave can also be sufficiently intense to generate higher-order harmonics, which display enhanced focusing. Improvement of a C-scan harmonic imaging system operating in an inhomogeneous medium is provided as an example.

  18. [Ultrasound duplex scanning in the assessment of the effectiveness of gravitation therapy and conservative treatment of patients with atherosclerosis obliterans of the lower extremities].

    PubMed

    Galkin, R A; Makarov, I V; Preobrazhenskaia, N M

    2004-01-01

    Ultrasound duplex scanning was used to compare the results of the treatment of 162 patients suffering from atherosclerosis obliterans of the lower extremities. It is to be noted that 50 patients were administered only gravitation therapy, 72 patients underwent a complex of treatment measures including, in addition to gravitation therapy, physiotherapy and drug treatment, and 40 patients received conservative treatment alone. The assessment criteria were the maximal systolic velocity of blood flow (V(max)), end diastolic mean, velocity (V(min)), mean maximal velocity (V(mean)), volume velocity of blood flow (V(vol)), ankle/brachial index (ABI), and index of regional perfusion (IRP), proposed by us and representing the percent ratio of the volume velocity of blood flow to the minute heart volume (MHV). It has been revealed in the course of the treatment that the best clinical outcome was recorded in patients who received a complex of treatment measures. The use of gravitation therapy alone provided better treatment results as compared to those obtained in patients administered standard conservative therapy. Of all the indicators used, only V(mean), V(vol), ABI and IRP are of the clinical significance. However, the most significant information on the segmental blood flow was obtained on the assessment of the IRP whose values did not depend on the changes in central hemodynamics. In contrast to the ABI, the advantage of the IRP lies in the possibility of blood flow assessment in different segments and arteries of the extremities. So, the use of the quantitative indicators of ultrasound duplex scanning and, first of all, of the IRP, allows an objective evaluation of the segmental blood flow and may serve one of the significant criteria of the treatment effectiveness.

  19. Physics and instrumentation of ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, John P

    2007-08-01

    A thorough understanding of the physics of ultrasound waves and the instrumentation will provide the user with a better understanding of the capabilities and limitations of ultrasound equipment. The ultrasound machine combines two technologies: image production (M-mode and 2-dimensional imaging) with Doppler assessment (continuous and pulse wave as well as color-flow mapping). These distinct technologies have been combined to provide the examiner with the ability to make accurate and comprehensive diagnoses and guide therapeutic intervention.

  20. Calibration of non-contact ultrasound as an online sensor for wood characterization: Effects of temperature, moisture, and scanning direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vun, R. Y.; Hoover, K.; Janowiak, J.; Bhardwaj, M.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous handheld moisture meters are available for measuring moisture levels of wood and building materials for a vast range of quality control and moisture diagnosis applications. However, many methods currently available require physical contact of a probe with the test material to operate. The contact requirement of such devices has limited applications for these purposes. There is a tremendous demand for dynamic online quality assessment of in-process materials for moisture content (MC) measurements. In this paper, a non-destructive non-contact ultrasound technology was used to evaluate the effects of increasing temperature in two MC levels and of increasing MC in lumber. The results show that the ultrasonic absolute transmittance and velocity parameters are directly correlated very well (R2≥0.87) with temperature for the two moisture levels in wood. At constant temperature, however, the velocity is inversely correlated with MC. It was also found that the distribution of MC along the length is marginally insignificant to both ultrasonic measurements. The transmittance measurement along the orthogonal thickness direction is insignificant above the fiber saturation MC; similarly, the velocity measurement is marginally insignificant. The study concludes a positive correlation and a good fit for this technology to advance into the development of an automated device for determining wood moisture levels, which will in turn be used to control the dynamics of wood drying/sterilization processes. Further calibration research is recommended to ascertain the constraints and limitations of the technology to specific wood species and dimension.

  1. Atherosclerotic plaque tissue characterization in 2D ultrasound longitudinal carotid scans for automated classification: a paradigm for stroke risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Acharya, U Rajendra; Mookiah, Muthu Rama Krishnan; Vinitha Sree, S; Afonso, David; Sanches, Joao; Shafique, Shoaib; Nicolaides, Andrew; Pedro, L M; Fernandes E Fernandes, J; Suri, Jasjit S

    2013-05-01

    In the case of carotid atherosclerosis, to avoid unnecessary surgeries in asymptomatic patients, it is necessary to develop a technique to effectively differentiate symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. In this paper, we have presented a data mining framework that characterizes the textural differences in these two classes using several grayscale features based on a novel combination of trace transform and fuzzy texture. The features extracted from the delineated plaque regions in B-mode ultrasound images were used to train several classifiers in order to prepare them for classification of new test plaques. Our CAD system was evaluated using two different databases consisting of 146 (44 symptomatic to 102 asymptomatic) and 346 (196 symptomatic and 150 asymptomatic) images. Both these databases differ in the way the ground truth was determined. We obtained classification accuracies of 93.1 and 85.3 %, respectively. The techniques are low cost, easily implementable, objective, and non-invasive. For more objective analysis, we have also developed novel integrated indices using a combination of significant features.

  2. Cerebral laterality for language is related to adult salivary testosterone levels but not digit ratio (2D:4D) in men: A functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound study.

    PubMed

    Papadatou-Pastou, Marietta; Martin, Maryanne

    2017-03-01

    The adequacy of three competing theories of hormonal effects on cerebral laterality are compared using functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD). Thirty-three adult males participated in the study (21 left-handers). Cerebral lateralization was measured by fTCD using an extensively validated word generation task. Adult salivary testosterone (T) and cortisol (C) concentrations were measured by luminescence immunoassay and prenatal T exposure was indirectly estimated by the somatic marker of 2nd to 4th digit length ratio (2D:4D). A significant quadratic relationship between degree of cerebral laterality for language and adult T concentrations was observed, with enhanced T levels for strong left hemisphere dominance and strong right hemisphere dominance. No systematic effects on laterality were found for cortisol or 2D:4D. Findings suggest that higher levels of T are associated with a relatively attenuated degree of interhemispheric sharing of linguistic information, providing support for the callosal and the sexual differentiation hypotheses rather than the Geschwind, Behan and Galaburda (GBG) hypothesis.

  3. Virtual Guidance Ultrasound: A Tool to Obtain Diagnostic Ultrasound for Remote Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caine,Timothy L.; Martin David S.; Matz, Timothy; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steven H.

    2012-01-01

    Astronauts currently acquire ultrasound images on the International Space Station with the assistance of real-time remote guidance from an ultrasound expert in Mission Control. Remote guidance will not be feasible when significant communication delays exist during exploration missions beyond low-Earth orbit. For example, there may be as much as a 20- minute delay in communications between the Earth and Mars. Virtual-guidance, a pre-recorded audio-visual tutorial viewed in real-time, is a viable modality for minimally trained scanners to obtain diagnostically-adequate images of clinically relevant anatomical structures in an autonomous manner. METHODS: Inexperienced ultrasound operators were recruited to perform carotid artery (n = 10) and ophthalmic (n = 9) ultrasound examinations using virtual guidance as their only instructional tool. In the carotid group, each each untrained operator acquired two-dimensional, pulsed, and color Doppler of the carotid artery. In the ophthalmic group, operators acquired representative images of the anterior chamber of the eye, retina, optic nerve, and nerve sheath. Ultrasound image quality was evaluated by independent imaging experts. RESULTS: Eight of the 10 carotid studies were judged to be diagnostically adequate. With one exception the quality of all the ophthalmic images were adequate to excellent. CONCLUSION: Diagnostically-adequate carotid and ophthalmic ultrasound examinations can be obtained by untrained operators with instruction only from an audio/video tutorial viewed in real time while scanning. This form of quick-response-guidance, can be developed for other ultrasound examinations, represents an opportunity to acquire important medical and scientific information for NASA flight surgeons and researchers when trained medical personnel are not present. Further, virtual guidance will allow untrained personnel to autonomously obtain important medical information in remote locations on Earth where communication is

  4. "Holy scan" or "picture of the baby?" Biomedicalization and stratification in the use of obstetric ultrasound in Rio de Janeiro.

    PubMed

    Chazan, Lilian Krakowski; Faro, Livi F T

    2016-01-01

    Based on ethnographic studies conducted at public and private healthcare facilities in Rio de Janeiro, we argue that the dissemination of (bio)medicalization varies in accordance with the social stratum of the expectant mothers, thereby producing thoroughly distinct fetal and pregnant bodies, as well as different gestational processes. Starting from the basic premise that biomedicalization represents a transformation in the process of medicalization, characterized by the growing incorporation of technoscience into biomedicine, the observed universes displayed different stages in this transformation, consonant with the social stratification of the women who underwent the scans.

  5. Ultrasound Thermal Field Imaging of Opaque Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andereck, C. David

    1999-01-01

    We have initiated an experimental program to develop an ultrasound system for non-intrusively imaging the thermal field in opaque fluids under an externally imposed temperature gradient. Many industrial processes involve opaque fluids, such as molten metals, semiconductors, and polymers, often in situations in which thermal gradients are important. For example, one may wish to understand semiconductor crystal growth dynamics in a Bridgman apparatus. Destructive testing of the crystal after the process is completed gives only indirect information about the fluid dynamics of the formation process. Knowledge of the coupled thermal and velocity fields during the growth process is then essential. Most techniques for non-intrusive velocity and temperature measurement in fluids are optical in nature, and hence the fluids studied must be transparent. In some cases (for example, LDV (laser Doppler velocimetry) and PIV (particle imaging velocimetry)) the velocities of small neutrally buoyant seed particles suspended in the fluid, are measured. Without particle seeding one can use the variation of the index of refraction of the fluid with temperature to visualize, through interferometric, Schlieren or shadowgraph techniques, the thermal field. The thermal field in turn gives a picture of the pattern existing in the fluid. If the object of study is opaque, non-optical techniques must be used. In this project we focus on the use of ultrasound, which propagates easily through opaque liquids and solids. To date ultrasound measurements have almost exclusively relied on the detection of sound scattered from density discontinuities inside the opaque material of interest. In most cases it has been used to visualize structural properties, but more recently the ultrasound Doppler velocimeter has become available. As in the optical case, it relies on seed particles that scatter Doppler shifted sound back to the detector. Doppler ultrasound techniques are, however, not useful for

  6. To assess the intimal thickness, flow velocities, and luminal diameter of carotid arteries using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound doppler imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemuru, Madhuri; Jabbar, Afzal; Chandra, Suman

    2004-04-01

    Carotid imaging is a Gold Standard test that provides useful information about the structure and functions of carotid arteries. Spectral imaging helps to evaluate the vessel and hemodynamic changes. High resolution B-mode imaging has emerged as one of the methods of choice for determining the anatomic extent of atherosclerosis and its progression and for assessing cardiovascular risks. The measurements made with Doppler correlate well with pathologic measurements. Recent prospective studies have clearly demonstrated that these measurements of carotid intimal thickness are potent predictors of Myocardial Infarction and Stroke. This method appears very attractive as it is non-invasive, extremely safe, well accepted by the patient and relatively inexpensive. It can be performed serially and has the advantage of visualizing the arterial wall in contrast to angiographic techniques which provide only an outline of the arterial lumen. Recently, there has been an interest in the clinical use of this technique in making difficult clinical decisions like deciding on preventive therapies. 30 subjects aged 21-60 years and 30 subjects aged 61-85 years of both sexes are selected after doing a baseline study to exclude Hypertension, Diabetes, Obesity and Hyperlipidemia. The carotid arteries were examined for intimal thickening, blood flow velocities and luminal diameter. With aging there is a narrowing of the carotid vessels and significant increase in intimal thickening with a consequent increase in the blood flow velocities. Inter-observer, intra-observer and instrument variations are seen and there is no significant change in the values when the distal flow pattern is considered for measurements. Aging produces major cardiovascular changes including decreased elasticity and compliance of great arteries leading to structural and functional alterations in heart and vessels. With aging there is increased intimal thickness and increased pulse wave velocity which is clearly

  7. Two-dimensional intraventricular flow mapping by digital processing conventional color-Doppler echocardiography images.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Damien; Del Alamo, Juan C; Tanne, David; Yotti, Raquel; Cortina, Cristina; Bertrand, Eric; Antoranz, José Carlos; Perez-David, Esther; Rieu, Régis; Fernandez-Aviles, Francisco; Bermejo, Javier

    2010-10-01

    Doppler echocardiography remains the most extended clinical modality for the evaluation of left ventricular (LV) function. Current Doppler ultrasound methods, however, are limited to the representation of a single flow velocity component. We thus developed a novel technique to construct 2D time-resolved (2D+t) LV velocity fields from conventional transthoracic clinical acquisitions. Combining color-Doppler velocities with LV wall positions, the cross-beam blood velocities were calculated using the continuity equation under a planar flow assumption. To validate the algorithm, 2D Doppler flow mapping and laser particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were carried out in an atrio-ventricular duplicator. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance (MR) acquisitions were used to measure in vivo the error due to the 2D flow assumption and to potential scan-plane misalignment. Finally, the applicability of the Doppler technique was tested in the clinical setting. In vitro experiments demonstrated that the new method yields an accurate quantitative description of the main vortex that forms during the cardiac cycle (mean error for vortex radius, position and circulation). MR image analysis evidenced that the error due to the planar flow assumption is close to 15% and does not preclude the characterization of major vortex properties neither in the normal nor in the dilated LV. These results are yet to be confirmed by a head-to-head clinical validation study. Clinical Doppler studies showed that the method is readily applicable and that a single large anterograde vortex develops in the healthy ventricle while supplementary retrograde swirling structures may appear in the diseased heart. The proposed echocardiographic method based on the continuity equation is fast, clinically-compliant and does not require complex training. This technique will potentially enable investigators to study of additional quantitative aspects of intraventricular flow dynamics in the clinical setting by

  8. Sounding out erosion on the Mekong river banks: insights from combined terrestrial laser scanning, multibeam echo sounding and acoustic Doppler profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, J.; Hackney, C. R.; Leyland, J.; Darby, S. E.; Parsons, D. R.; Aalto, R. E.; Nicholas, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of bank erosion processes and rates along very large rivers remains incomplete, primarily due to the difficulties of obtaining morphological and flow data close to the bank across various flow stages. Moreover, obtaining such process information through the entire flow and bank depth has also proved challenging. Here, we present data from a series of high spatial resolution topographic (Terrestrial Laser Scanner and Multibeam Echo Sounder) and flow (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) surveys undertaken on the Mekong River, Cambodia, which reveal the temporal and spatial evolution of a series of embayments on the outer bank of a large meander. These techniques yield unique data that reveal how the flow field responds to the morphology of the outer bank and subaqueous slump blocks. Specifically, we show that in the early stage of embayment growth, deposited slump blocks induce flow upwelling and bank-directed flow that enhances bank erosion. Our data also suggest that as the initial erosion process continues, a threshold embayment size is reached. Below this threshold, flow separation acts to enhance embayment growth along with the fluid dynamic effects of slump blocks, but above the threshold size, the separation zone in the embayments acts as a protective layer, thus slowing erosion. This field data allows proposition of a new conceptual model of embayment evolution.

  9. A Cross-Track Cloud-Scanning Dual-Frequency Doppler (C2D2) Radar for the Proposed ACE Mission and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory; Tanelli, Simone; Chamberlain, Neil; Durden, Stephen; Fung, Andy; Sanchez-Barbetty, Mauricio; Thrivikraman, Tushar

    2013-01-01

    The National Resource Council’s Earth Science Decadal Survey” (NRCDS) has identified the Aerosol/Climate/Ecosystems (ACE) Mission as a priority mission for NASA Earth science. The NRC recommended the inclusion of "a cross-track scanning cloud radar with channels at 94 GHz and possibly 34 GHz for measurement of cloud droplet size, glaciation height, and cloud height". Several radar concepts have been proposed that meet some of the requirements of the proposed ACE mission but none have provided scanning capability at both 34 and 94 GHz due to the challenge of constructing scanning antennas at 94 GHz. In this paper, we will describe a radar design that leverages new developments in microwave monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs) and micro-machining to enable an electronically-scanned radar with both Ka-band (35 GHz) and W-band (94-GHz) channels. This system uses a dual-frequency linear active electronically-steered array (AESA) combined with a parabolic cylindrical reflector. This configuration provides a large aperture (3m x 5m) with electronic-steering but is much simpler than a two-dimension AESA of similar size. Still, the W-band frequency requires element spacing of approximately 2.5 mm, presenting significant challenges for signal routing and incorporation of MMICs. By combining (Gallium Nitride) GaN MMIC technology with micro-machined radiators and interconnects and silicon-germanium (SiGe) beamforming MMICs, we are able to meet all the performance and packaging requirements of the linear array feed and enable simultaneous scanning of Ka-band and W-band radars over swath of up to 100 km.

  10. Assessment of the accuracy of an ultrasound elastography liver scanning system using a PVA-cryogel phantom with optimal acoustic and mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cournane, S.; Cannon, L.; Browne, J. E.; Fagan, A. J.

    2010-10-01

    The accuracy of a transient elastography liver-scanning ultrasound system was assessed using a novel application of PVA-cryogel as a tissue-mimicking material with acoustic and shear elasticity properties optimized to best represent those of liver tissue. Although the liver-scanning system has been shown to offer a safer alternative for diagnosing liver cirrhosis through stiffness measurement, as compared to the liver needle biopsy exam, the scanner's accuracy has not been fully established. Young's elastic modulus values of 5-6 wt% PVA-cryogel phantoms, also containing glycerol and 0.3 µm Al2O3 and 3 µm Al2O3, were measured using a 'gold standard' mechanical testing technique and transient elastography. The mechanically measured values and acoustic velocities of the phantoms ranged between 1.6 and 16.1 kPa and 1540 and 1570 m s-1, respectively, mimicking those observed in liver tissue. The values reported by the transient elastography system overestimated Young's elastic modulus values representative of the progressive stages of liver fibrosis by up to 32%. These results were attributed to the relative rather than absolute nature of the measurement arising from the single-point acoustic velocity calibration of the system, rendering the measurements critically dependent on the speed of sound of the sample under investigation. Given the wide range of acoustic velocities which exist in the liver, spanning healthy tissue to cirrhotic pathology, coupled with the system's assumption that the liver is approximately elastic when it is rather highly viscoelastic, care should be exercised when interpreting the results from this system in patient groups.

  11. Velocity magnitude estimation with linear arrays using Doppler bandwidth.

    PubMed

    Tortoli, P; Guidi, G; Mantovani, L; Newhouse, V L

    2001-04-01

    The dependence of pulsed wave Doppler bandwidth on parameters typical of linear transducer arrays used in commercial Duplex and color flow mapping systems is investigated experimentally. For a single flow line it is observed that this bandwidth generally depends not only on the scatterer velocity and the beam-to-flow angle, but also on the flow line range and orientation. This is due to the fact that in Duplex and color flow systems the transducer is differently focused in the scan and elevation planes and its aperture and focal lengths are often made to vary, depending on the distance of the flow line from the transducer. It is however experimentally demonstrated that, at points where the ultrasound beamwidths in the scan and elevation planes are both comparable to the sample volume length, the Doppler bandwidth is independent of the beam-to-flow angle. It is also shown that this invariance can be extended to other ranges by appropriately modifying the array aperture. Finally, as an application of this independence, the flow-line velocity magnitude in these beam regions is estimated with better than 5% uncertainty through a simple bandwidth measurement.

  12. ANL Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karplus, H. B.; Raptis, A. C.; Lee, S.; Simpson, T.

    1985-10-01

    A flowmeter has been developed for measuring flow velocity in hot slurries. The flowmeter works on an ultrasonic Doppler principle in which ultrasound is injected into the flowing fluid through the solid pipe wall. Isolating waveguides separate the hot pipe from conventional ultrasonic transducers. Special clamp-on high-temperature transducers also can be adapted to work well in this application. Typical flows in pilot plants were found to be laminar, giving rise to broad-band Doppler spectra. A special circuit based on a servomechanism sensor was devised to determine the frequency average of such a broad spectrum. The device was tested at different pilot plants. Slurries with particulates greater than 70 microns (0.003 in.) yielded good signals, but slurries with extremely fine particulates were unpredictable. Small bubbles can replace the coarse particles to provide a good signal if there are not too many. Successful operation with very fine particulate slurries may have been enhanced by the presence of microbubbles.

  13. Determining Directions of Ultrasound in Solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.; Roth, Don J.

    1987-01-01

    Ultrasound shadows cast by grooves. Improved method for determining direction of ultrasound in materials is shadow method using Scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM). Direction of ultrasound calculated from dimensions of groove and portion of surface groove shields from ultrasound. Method has variety of applications in nontraditional quality-control applications.

  14. Skin Ultrasound in Kaposi Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Carrascosa, R; Alfageme, F; Roustán, G; Suarez, M D

    2016-05-01

    The use of ultrasound imaging has recently been increasing in numerous dermatologic diseases. This noninvasive technique provides additional details on the structure and vascularization of skin lesions. Kaposi sarcoma is a vascular tumor that typically arises in the skin and mucosas. It can spread to lymph nodes and internal organs. We performed B-mode and color Doppler ultrasound studies in 3 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Kaposi sarcoma confirmed by histological examination. We found differences in the ultrasound pattern between nodular and plaque lesions, in both B-mode and color Doppler. We believe that skin ultrasound imaging could be a useful technique for studying cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma, providing additional information on the structural and vascular characteristics of the lesion.

  15. Doppler effect's contribution to ultrasonic modulation of multiply scattered coherent light: Monte Carlo modeling.

    PubMed

    Elazar, Jovan M; Steshenko, Oleg

    2008-01-15

    Modulation of light by ultrasound in turbid media is investigated by modified public domain software based on the Monte Carlo algorithm. Apart from the recognized modulation mechanisms, originating in scatterers' displacements and refractive index modulation, an additional mechanism, evolving from Doppler shift during photon scattering, is considered. Comparison of the relative contributions from all three mechanisms to light modulation by ultrasound is performed for different medium scattering properties and ultrasound frequencies. Refractive index modulation remains the strongest mechanism for light modulation by ultrasound, but for high ultrasound frequencies and for large scattering coefficients the Doppler effect can become dominant.

  16. Doppler flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, Henry H. B.; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1983-01-01

    A Doppler flowmeter impulses an ultrasonic fixed-frequency signal obliquely into a slurry flowing in a pipe and a reflected signal is detected after having been scattered off of the slurry particles, whereby the shift in frequencies between the signals is proportional to the slurry velocity and hence slurry flow rate. This flowmeter filters the Doppler frequency-shift signal, compares the filtered and unfiltered shift signals in a divider to obtain a ratio, and then further compares this ratio against a preset fractional ratio. The flowmeter utilizes a voltage-to-frequency convertor to generate a pulsed signal having a determinable rate of repetition precisely proportional to the divergence of the ratios. The pulsed signal serves as the input control for a frequency-controlled low-pass filter, which provides thereby that the cutoff frequency of the filtered signal is known. The flowmeter provides a feedback control by minimizing the divergence. With the cutoff frequency and preset fractional ratio known, the slurry velocity and hence flow will also be determinable.

  17. Doppler flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, H.H.B.; Raptis, A.C.

    1981-11-13

    A Doppler flowmeter impulses an ultrasonic fixed-frequency signal obliquely into a slurry flowing in a pipe and a reflected signal is detected after having been scattered off of the slurry particles, whereby the shift in frequencies between the signals is proportional to the slurry velocity and hence slurry flow rate. This flowmeter filters the Doppler frequency-shift signal, compares the filtered and unfiltered shift signals in a divider to obtain a ratio, and then further compares this ratio against a preset fractional ratio. The flowmeter utilizes a voltage-to-frequency convertor to generate a pulsed signal having a determinable rate of repetition precisely proportional to the divergence of the ratios. The pulsed signal serves as the input control for a frequency-controlled low-pass filter, which provides thereby that the cutoff frequency of the filtered signal is known. The flowmeter provides a feedback control by minimizing the divergence. With the cutoff frequency and preset fractional ratio known, the slurry velocity and hence flow will also be determinable.

  18. Combined photoacoustic and ultrasound biomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tyler; Ranasinghesagara, Janaka C; Lu, Huihong; Mathewson, Kory; Walsh, Andrew; Zemp, Roger J

    2009-11-23

    We report on the development of an imaging system capable of combined ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging based on a fast-scanning single-element 25-MHz ultrasound transducer and a unique light-delivery system. The system is capable of 20 ultrasound frames per second and slower photoacoustic frame rates limited by laser pulse-repetition rates. Laser and ultrasound pulses are interlaced for co-registration of photoacoustic and ultrasound images. In vivo imaging of a human finger permits ultrasonic visualization of vessel structures and speckle changes indicative of blood flow, while overlaid photoacoustic images highlight some small vessels that are not clear from the ultrasound scan. Photoacoustic images provide optical absorption contrast co-registered in the structural and blood-flow context of ultrasound with high-spatial resolution and may prove important for clinical diagnostics and basic science of the microvasculature.

  19. Breast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ueno, E

    1996-03-01

    In ultrasound, ultrasonic images are formed by means of echoes among tissues with different acoustic impedance. Acoustic impedance is the product of sound speed and bulk modulus. The bulk modulus expresses the elasticity of an object, and in the human body, the value is increased by conditions such as fibrosis and calcification. The sound speed is usually high in elastic tissues and low in water. In the body, it is lowest in the fatty tissue. Ultrasound echoes are strong on the surface of bones which are hard and have a high sound speed. In organs filled with air such as the lungs, the bulk modulus is low and the sound speed is extremely low at 340 m/s, which produce strong echoes (the sound speed in solid tissues is 1,530 m/s). Human tissue is constructed of units smaller than the ultrasonic beam, and it is necessary to understand back-scattering in order to understand the ultrasonic images of these tissues. When ultrasound passes through tissue, it is absorbed as thermal energy and attenuated. Fiber is a tissue with a high absorption and attenuation rate. When the rate increases, the posterior echoes are attenuated. However, in masses with a high water content such as cysts, the posterior echoes are accentuated. This phenomenon is an important, basic finding for determining the properties of tumors. Breast cancer can be classified into two types: stellate carcinoma and circumscribed carcinoma. Since stellate carcinoma is rich in fiber, the posterior echoes are attenuated or lacking. However, circumscribed carcinoma has a high cellularity and the posterior echoes are accentuated. The same tendency is also seen in benign tumors. In immature fibroadenomas, posterior echoes are accentuated, while in fibroadenomas with hyalinosis, the posterior echoes are attenuated. Therefore, if the fundamentals of this tissue characterization and the histological features are understood, reading of ultrasound becomes easy. Color Doppler has also been developed and has contributed

  20. Computer-aided diagnosis of prostate cancer with emphasis on ultrasound-based approaches: a review.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Mehdi; Mousavi, Parvin; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2007-07-01

    This paper reviews the state of the art in computer-aided diagnosis of prostate cancer and focuses, in particular, on ultrasound-based techniques for detection of cancer in prostate tissue. The current standard procedure for diagnosis of prostate cancer, i.e., ultrasound-guided biopsy followed by histopathological analysis of tissue samples, is invasive and produces a high rate of false negatives resulting in the need for repeated trials. It is against these backdrops that the search for new methods to diagnose prostate cancer continues. Image-based approaches (such as MRI, ultrasound and elastography) represent a major research trend for diagnosis of prostate cancer. Due to the integration of ultrasound imaging in the current clinical procedure for detection of prostate cancer, we specifically provide a more detailed review of methodologies that use ultrasound RF-spectrum parameters, B-scan texture features and Doppler measures for prostate tissue characterization. We present current and future directions of research aimed at computer-aided detection of prostate cancer and conclude that ultrasound is likely to play an important role in the field.

  1. Brain Surface Heating After Exposure to Ultrasound: An Analysis Using Thermography.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Michal E; Lombardo, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound is the imaging modality of choice to monitor brain pathologies in neonates after complicated deliveries. Animal studies have indicated that ultrasound may cause heating of brain tissues. To date, no study has explored brain surface heating by ultrasound during clinically relevant exposure. Hence, we investigated heating effects of B-mode and pulsed Doppler (PD) mode on ex vivo lamb brains using thermography. Five brains were scanned for 5 min in B-mode or for 3 min, 1 min, 30 s or 15 s in PD mode. Brain surface temperature was measured pre- and post-exposure using thermography. The highest mean temperature increase was recorded by B-mode (3.82 ± 0.43°C). All five PD exposure protocols were associated with surface temperature increases of 2.1-2.7°C. These outcomes highlight for the first time that B-mode ultrasound can contribute to brain surface heating during a routine cranial scan. Scan duration should be minimised whenever possible.

  2. Acoustic output measured by thermal and mechanical indices during fetal echocardiography at the time of the first trimester scan.

    PubMed

    Nemescu, Dragos; Berescu, Anca

    2015-01-01

    We measured acoustic output, expressed as the thermal index (TI) and mechanical index (MI), during fetal echocardiography at the time of the first trimester scan. TI and MI were retrieved from the saved displays during gray-mode, high-definition color flow Doppler and pulsed-wave Doppler (tricuspid flow) ultrasound examinations of the fetal heart and from the ductus venosus assessment. A total of 399 fetal cardiac examinations were evaluated. There was a significant increase in TI values from B-mode studies (0.07 ± 0.04 [mean ± SD]) to color flow mapping (0.2 ± 0.0) and pulsed-wave Doppler studies (0.36 ± 0.05). The TI from ductus venosus assessment (0.1 ± 0.01) was significantly lower than those from Doppler examinations of the heart. MI values from B-mode scans (0.65 ± 0.12) and color flow mapping (0.71 ± 0.11) were comparable, although different, and both values were higher than those from pulsed-wave Doppler tricuspid evaluation (0.39 ± 0.03). There were no differences in MI values from power Doppler assessment between the tricuspid flow and ductus venosus. Safety indices were remarkably stable and were largely constant, especially for color Doppler (TI), tricuspid flow (MI) and ductus venosus assessment (TI, MI). We acquired satisfactory Doppler images and/or signals at acoustic levels that were lower than the actual recommendations and never reached a TI of 0.5.

  3. In-suit Doppler technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Arthur E.; Greene, Ernest R.; Nadeau, John J.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to perform a technology assessment survey of non-invasive air embolism detection utilizing Doppler ultrasound methodologies. The primary application of this technology will be a continuous monitor for astronauts while performing extravehicular activities (EVA's). The technology assessment was to include: (1) development of a full understanding of all relevant background research; and (2) a survey of the medical ultrasound marketplace for expertise, information, and technical capability relevant to this development. Upon completion of the assessment, LSR was to provide an overview of technological approaches and R&D/manufacturing organizations.

  4. Adaptive spectral doppler estimation.

    PubMed

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, 2 adaptive spectral estimation techniques are analyzed for spectral Doppler ultrasound. The purpose is to minimize the observation window needed to estimate the spectrogram to provide a better temporal resolution and gain more flexibility when designing the data acquisition sequence. The methods can also provide better quality of the estimated power spectral density (PSD) of the blood signal. Adaptive spectral estimation techniques are known to provide good spectral resolution and contrast even when the observation window is very short. The 2 adaptive techniques are tested and compared with the averaged periodogram (Welch's method). The blood power spectral capon (BPC) method is based on a standard minimum variance technique adapted to account for both averaging over slow-time and depth. The blood amplitude and phase estimation technique (BAPES) is based on finding a set of matched filters (one for each velocity component of interest) and filtering the blood process over slow-time and averaging over depth to find the PSD. The methods are tested using various experiments and simulations. First, controlled flow-rig experiments with steady laminar flow are carried out. Simulations in Field II for pulsating flow resembling the femoral artery are also analyzed. The simulations are followed by in vivo measurement on the common carotid artery. In all simulations and experiments it was concluded that the adaptive methods display superior performance for short observation windows compared with the averaged periodogram. Computational costs and implementation details are also discussed.

  5. Doppler micro sense and avoid radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorwara, Ashok; Molchanov, Pavlo; Asmolova, Olga

    2015-10-01

    There is a need for small Sense and Avoid (SAA) systems for small and micro Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) to avoid collisions with obstacles and other aircraft. The proposed SAA systems will give drones the ability to "see" close up and give them the agility to maneuver through tight areas. Doppler radar is proposed for use in this sense and avoid system because in contrast to optical or infrared (IR) systems Doppler can work in more harsh conditions such as at dusk, and in rain and snow. And in contrast to ultrasound based systems, Doppler can better sense small sized obstacles such as wires and it can provide a sensing range from a few inches to several miles. An SAA systems comprised of Doppler radar modules and an array of directional antennas that are distributed around the perimeter of the drone can cover the entire sky. These modules are designed so that they can provide the direction to the obstacle and simultaneously generate an alarm signal if the obstacle enters within the SAA system's adjustable "Protection Border". The alarm signal alerts the drone's autopilot to automatically initiate an avoidance maneuver. A series of Doppler radar modules with different ranges, angles of view and transmitting power have been designed for drones of different sizes and applications. The proposed Doppler radar micro SAA system has simple circuitry, works from a 5 volt source and has low power consumption. It is light weight, inexpensive and it can be used for a variety of small unmanned aircraft.

  6. Standards of the Polish Ultrasound Society – update. Ultrasound examination of the kidneys, ureters and urinary bladder

    PubMed Central

    Woźniak, Magdalena Maria; Wieczorek, Andrzej Paweł

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the principles of performing proper ultrasound examinations of the urinary tract. The following are discussed: preparation of patients, type of optimal apparatus, technique of examination and conditions which its description should fulfill. Urinary track examination in adults and in children constitutes an integral part of each abdominal examination. Such examinations should be performed with fasting patients or several hours after the last meal, with filled urinary bladder. Apparatus Ultrasound examinations in children and infants are performed using transducers with the frequency of 5.0–9.0 MHz and in adults – with the frequency of 2.0–6.0 MHz. Doppler options are desirable since they improve diagnostic capacity of sonography in terms of differentiation between renal focal lesions. Scanning technique Renal examinations are performed with the patients in the supine position. The right kidney is examined in the right hypochondriac region using the liver as the ultrasound “window.” The left kidney is examined in the left hypochondriac region, preferably in the posterior axillary line. Ultrasound examinations of the upper segment of the ureters are performed after renal examination when the pelvicalyceal system is dilated. A condition necessary for a proper examination of the perivesical portion of the ureter is full urinary bladder. The scans of the urinary bladder are performed in transverse, longitudinal and oblique planes when the bladder is filled. Description of the examination The description should include patient's personal details, details of the referring unit, of the unit in which the examination is performed, examining physician's details, type of ultrasound apparatus and transducers as well as the description proper. PMID:26673083

  7. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... the examination. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist of a console ... ultrasound that require biopsy are not cancers. Many facilities do not offer ultrasound screening, and the procedure ...

  8. Color Doppler Imaging of Cardiac Catheters Using Vibrating Motors

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Kalyan E.; Light, Edward D.; Rivera, Danny J.; Kisslo, Joseph A.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2010-01-01

    We attached a miniature motor rotating at 11,000 rpm onto the proximal end of cardiac electrophysiological (EP) catheters in order to produce vibrations at the tip which were then visualized by color Doppler on ultrasound scanners. We imaged the catheter tip within a vascular graft submerged in a water tank using the Volumetrics Medical Imaging 3D scanner, the Siemens Sonoline Antares 2D scanner, and the Philips ie33 3D ultrasound scanner with TEE probe. The vibrating catheter tip was visualized in each case though results varied with the color Doppler properties of the individual scanner. PMID:19514134

  9. Lung ultrasound in the critically ill

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    in adults), many disciplines (pulmonology, cardiology…), austere countries, and a help in any procedure (thoracentesis). A 1992, cost-effective gray-scale unit, without Doppler, and a microconvex probe are efficient. Lung ultrasound is a holistic discipline for many reasons (e.g., one probe, perfect for the lung, is able to scan the whole-body). Its integration can provide a new definition of priorities. The BLUE-protocol and FALLS-protocol allow simplification of expert echocardiography, a clear advantage when correct cardiac windows are missing. PMID:24401163

  10. Medical ultrasound systems.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jeff; Kremkau, Frederick

    2011-08-06

    Medical ultrasound imaging has advanced dramatically since its introduction only a few decades ago. This paper provides a short historical background, and then briefly describes many of the system features and concepts required in a modern commercial ultrasound system. The topics addressed include array beam formation, steering and focusing; array and matrix transducers; echo image formation; tissue harmonic imaging; speckle reduction through frequency and spatial compounding, and image processing; tissue aberration; Doppler flow detection; and system architectures. It then describes some of the more practical aspects of ultrasound system design necessary to be taken into account for today's marketplace. It finally discusses the recent explosion of portable and handheld devices and their potential to expand the clinical footprint of ultrasound into regions of the world where medical care is practically non-existent. Throughout the article reference is made to ways in which ultrasound imaging has benefited from advances in the commercial electronics industry. It is meant to be an overview of the field as an introduction to other more detailed papers in this special issue.

  11. Three-dimensional flow vectors from rf ultrasound signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuthill, Theresa A.; Rubin, Jonathan M.; Fowlkes, J. B.

    2002-04-01

    A new ultrasound technique for determining three-dimensional velocity vectors has been devised using radio frequency (RF) data from commercially available scanners. Applied to blood flow, this technique could prove useful for evaluating hemodynamics and detecting stenoses. Three orthogonal velocity vectors are computed from the RF signals of two steered beams from a single array. The in-plane velocities are determined using standard Doppler analysis, while the out-of-plane component is derived from the total velocity as computed from temporal decorrelation and the in-plane components. The technique was tested using contrast agent pumped through a flow tube. A GE Vingmed SystemV scanner with a 10 MHz linear array provided scans at beam steering angles of +/- 20 degree(s). Both Doppler velocities and temporal complex decorrelation were computed for each digitized voxel. Additional studies were done on a blood mimicking fluid and in vivo with a canine femoral artery. Vector plots were constructed to show flow for various transducer angles. Angle estimates were within 20 degree(s), and the mean error for the velocity amplitude was less than 15%. The in vivo results provided velocity estimates consistent with the literature. The proposed method, unlike current Doppler velocity measurement techniques, provides quantitative velocity information independent of transducer orientation.

  12. Thumb ultrasound: Technique and pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jatinder P; Kumar, Shwetam; Kathiria, Atman V; Harjai, Rachit; Jawed, Akram; Gupta, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is ideally suited for the assessment of complex anatomy and pathologies of the thumb. Focused and dynamic thumb ultrasound can provide a rapid real-time diagnosis and can be used for guided treatment in certain clinical situations. We present a simplified approach to scanning technique for thumb-related pathologies and illustrate a spectrum of common and uncommon pathologies encountered. PMID:27857468

  13. Medical Imaging with Ultrasound: Some Basic Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosling, R.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are medical applications of ultrasound. The physics of the wave nature of ultrasound including its propagation and production, return by the body, spatial and contrast resolution, attenuation, image formation using pulsed echo ultrasound techniques, measurement of velocity and duplex scanning are described. (YP)

  14. DOPPLER WEATHER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, Gary J.

    2002-08-05

    The SRS Doppler Weather System consists of a Doppler Server, A Master Server (also known as the Weather Server), several Doppler Slave Servers, and client-side software program called the Doppler Radar Client. This system is used to display near rel-time images taken from the SRS Weather Center's Doppler Radar computer. The Doppler Server is software that resides on the SRS Doppler Computer. It gathers raw data, 24-bit color weather images via screen scraping ever five minutes as requested by the Master Server. The Doppler Server then reduces the 24-bit color images to 8-bit color using a fixed color table for analysis and compression. This preserves the fidelity of the image color and arranges the colors in specific order for display. At the time of color reduction, the white color used for the city names on the background images are remapped to a different index (color) of white that the white on the weather scale. The Weather Server places a time stamp on the image, then compresses the image and passes it to all Doppler Slave servers. Each of the Doppler Slave servers mainitain a circular buffer of the eight most current images representing the last 40 minutes of weather data. As a new image is added, the oldest drops off. The Doppler Radar Client is an optional install program for any site-wide workstation. When a Client session is started, the Client requests Doppler Slave server assignment from the Master Server. Upon its initial request to the Slave Server, the Client obtains all eight current images and maintains its own circular buffer, updating its images every five minutes as the Doppler Slave is updated. Three background reference images are stored as part of the Client. The Client brings up the appropriate background image, decompresses the doppler data, and displays the doppler data on the background image.

  15. Visualizing ultrasound through computational modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Theresa W.

    2004-01-01

    The Doppler Ultrasound Hematocrit Project (DHP) hopes to find non-invasive methods of determining a person s blood characteristics. Because of the limits of microgravity and the space travel environment, it is important to find non-invasive methods of evaluating the health of persons in space. Presently, there is no well developed method of determining blood composition non-invasively. This projects hopes to use ultrasound and Doppler signals to evaluate the characteristic of hematocrit, the percentage by volume of red blood cells within whole blood. These non-invasive techniques may also be developed to be used on earth for trauma patients where invasive measure might be detrimental. Computational modeling is a useful tool for collecting preliminary information and predictions for the laboratory research. We hope to find and develop a computer program that will be able to simulate the ultrasound signals the project will work with. Simulated models of test conditions will more easily show what might be expected from laboratory results thus help the research group make informed decisions before and during experimentation. There are several existing Matlab based computer programs available, designed to interpret and simulate ultrasound signals. These programs will be evaluated to find which is best suited for the project needs. The criteria of evaluation that will be used are 1) the program must be able to specify transducer properties and specify transmitting and receiving signals, 2) the program must be able to simulate ultrasound signals through different attenuating mediums, 3) the program must be able to process moving targets in order to simulate the Doppler effects that are associated with blood flow, 4) the program should be user friendly and adaptable to various models. After a computer program is chosen, two simulation models will be constructed. These models will simulate and interpret an RF data signal and a Doppler signal.

  16. [Current status of 3D/4D volume ultrasound of the breast].

    PubMed

    Weismann, C; Hergan, K

    2007-06-01

    3D/4D volume ultrasound is an established method that offers various options for analyzing and presenting ultrasound volume data. The following imaging techniques are based on automatically acquired ultrasound volumes. The multiplanar view is the typical mode of 3D ultrasound data presentation. The niche mode view is a cut open view of the volume data set. The surface mode is a rendering technique that represents the data within a volume of interest (VOI) with different slice thicknesses (typically 1-4 mm) with a contrast-enhanced surface algorithm. Related to the diagnostic target, the transparency mode helps to present echopoor or echorich structures and their spatial relationships within the ultrasound volume. Glass body rendering is a special type of transparency mode that makes the grayscale data transparent and shows the color flow data in a surface render mode. The inversion mode offers a three-dimensional surface presentation of echopoor lesions. Volume Contrast Imaging (VCI) works with static 3D volume data and is able to be used with 4D for dynamic scanning. Volume calculation of a lesion and virtual computer-assisted organ analysis of the same lesion is performed with VoCal software. Tomographic Ultrasound Imaging (TUI) is the perfect tool to document static 3D ultrasound volumes. 3D/4D volume ultrasound of the breast provides diagnostic information of the coronal plane. In this plane benign lesions show the compression pattern sign, while malignant lesions show the retraction pattern or star pattern sign. The indeterminate pattern of a lesion combines signs of compression and retraction or star pattern in the coronal plane. Glass body rendering in combination with Power-Doppler, Color-Doppler or High-Definition Flow Imaging presents the intra- and peritumoral three-dimensional vascular architecture. 3D targeting shows correct or incorrect needle placement in all three planes after 2D or 4D needle guidance. In conclusion, it is safe to say that 3D/4D

  17. Feasibility of angle independent Doppler color imaging for in vivo application: preliminary study on carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Fei, D Y; Liu, D D; Fu, C T; Makhoul, R G; Fisher, M R

    1997-01-01

    An experimental system has been used to acquire Doppler color images using a linear transducer from an ultrasound scanner to reconstruct angle independent Doppler color (AIDC) images in normal carotid arteries in 21 volunteers. Images were first taken from relatively straight segments in the common carotid artery, and comparisons were made in a small area at the center stream. At peak systole, the correlation coefficient of the velocity amplitudes between AIDC imaging (AIDCI) and duplex scanning was 0.94; the correlation coefficient between the flow angles measured from AIDCI and the angles of the vessel wall was 0.99. Periodic variations of the flow angle over the cardiac cycle were always observed by AIDCI, whereas the changes in the geometric angle of the vessel itself were insignificant. This observation suggests that the AIDCI technique is sensitive to alterations of flow direction. On the other hand, the deviation of the flow angle from a fixed correction angle in duplex scanning may cause a certain degree of error in velocity determination. AIDC images were also obtained at the carotid bifurcation. The results show that the AIDCI technique is able to depict major flow features, such as velocity skewing, flow separation, flow reversal and vortical flow, in a complex flow field.

  18. Use of ultrasound in emergency gynaecology.

    PubMed

    Al Wattar, B H; Frank, M; Fage, E; Gupta, P

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasound scan (USS) is an important tool for assessing and diagnosing early pregnancy and gynaecological emergencies. Providing an ultrasound scanning service at all hours would enable and ease prompt diagnosis and appropriate management. It would also help hospitals in reducing costs secondary to unnecessary admissions due to lack of ultrasound out of hours. We have conducted a retrospective observational study that looked into the out of hours admissions to a busy early pregnancy unit in a general district hospital, over a 3-month period. Our results highlight the important role and possible benefits of using ultrasound out of hours and prove it is a cost-effective approach. However, providing ultrasound scanning out of hours is affected by limitations of staff and resources at each unit. This could be avoided by following a multidisciplinary approach in acute services and providing more training for medical staff in ultrasound scanning.

  19. Christian Doppler and the Doppler effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toman, Kurt

    1984-04-01

    A summary is given of Doppler's life and career. He was born 180 years ago on November 29, 1803, in Salzburg, Austria. He died on March 17, 1853 in Venice. The effect bearing his name was first announced in a presentation before the Royal Bohemian Society of the Sciences in Prague on May 25, 1842. Doppler considered his work a generalization of the aberration theorem as discovered by Bradley. With it came the inference that the perception of physical phenomena can change with the state of motion of the observer. Acceptance of the principle was not without controversy. In 1852, the mathematician Petzval claimed that no useful scientific deductions can be made from Doppler's elementary equations. In 1860, Ernst Mach resolved the misunderstanding that clouded this controversy. The Doppler effect is alive and well. Its role in radio science and related disciplines is enumerated.

  20. [Myocardial function analysis with echocardiography-Doppler in septic shock].

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A; Checinski, A

    2012-02-01

    Septic shock is a severe sepsis associated with cardio-circulatory failure and tissular hypoperfusion. Echocardiography-Doppler remains essential for the assessment of myocardial function in septic shock. This ultrasound procedure helps clinicians for the analysis of left ventricular systolic function, left ventricular diastolic function, right ventricular function and cardiac filling.

  1. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  2. Ultrasound and the IRB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Melissa A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assist researchers in writing their research protocols and subject consent forms so that both the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and subjects are assured of the minimal risk associated with diagnostic B-scan ultrasound as it is used in speech research. There have been numerous epidemiological studies on fetal…

  3. History of intraoperative ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Makuuchi, M; Torzilli, G; Machi, J

    1998-11-01

    Intraoperative ultrasound (IOUS) using A-mode or non-real-time B-mode imaging started in the 1960s; however, it was not widely accepted mainly because of difficulty in image interpretation. In the late 1970s, IOUS became one of the topics in the surgical communities upon the introduction of high-frequency real-time B-mode ultrasound. Special probes for operative use were developed. In the 1980s, all over the world the use of IOUS spread to a variety of surgical fields, such as hepatobiliary pancreatic surgery, neurosurgery, and cardiovascular surgery. IOUS changed hepatic surgery dramatically because IOUS was the only modality that was capable of delineating and examining the interior of the liver during surgery. After 1990, color Doppler imaging and laparoscopic ultrasound were incorporated into IOUS. Currently, IOUS is considered an indispensable operative procedure for intraoperative decision-making and guidance of surgical procedures. For better surgical practice, education of surgeons in the use of ultrasound is the most important issue.

  4. Role of ultrasound in posteromedial tarsal tunnel syndrome: 81 cases.

    PubMed

    Fantino, Olivier

    2014-06-01

    Posteromedial tarsal tunnel syndrome is a disorder affecting the tibial nerve or its branches. Diagnosis is established on the basis of physical examination and can be confirmed by electrophysiological evidence. However, diagnostic imaging is always required to identify the possible site of compression. High-resolution ultrasound (US) is playing an increasingly important role in the study of the nerves thanks to a series of advantages over magnetic resonance imaging, such as lower costs and widespread availability, high spatial resolution, fast examination using axial scans, dynamic and comparative studies, possibility of carrying out a study with the patient in the standing position, US Tinel sign finding, and the contribution of color/power Doppler US. We present the results obtained in a series of 81 patients who underwent US imaging between 2008 and 2013 due to posteromedial tarsal tunnel syndrome.

  5. Refining an Automated Transcranial Doppler System for the Detection of Vasospasm after Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    SUBJECT TERMS traumatic brain injury, ultrasound , transcranial Doppler, vasospasm. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18...Presto’ that they have submitted to the FDA via a 510K for approval. Their system is based upon a novel and proprietary ultrasound platform along...within ultrasound -derived maps of blood flow speed captured by their device. This is reasonable because a view of each of the major cerebral arteries

  6. Photoacoustic imaging system for peripheral small-vessel imaging based on clinical ultrasound technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irisawa, Kaku; Hirota, Kazuhiro; Hashimoto, Atsushi; Murakoshi, Dai; Ishii, Hiroyasu; Tada, Takuji; Wada, Takatsugu; Hayakawa, Toshiro; Azuma, Ryuichi; Otani, Naoki; Itoh, Kenji; Ishihara, Miya

    2016-03-01

    One of the features of photoacoustic (PA) imaging is small-vessel visualization realized without injection of a contrast agent or exposure to X-rays. For carrying out clinical studies in this field, a prototype PA imaging system has been developed. The PA imaging system utilizes a technological platform of FUJIFILM's clinical ultrasound (US) imaging system mounting many-core MPU for enhancing the image quality of US B-mode and US Doppler mode, which can be superposed onto PA images. By evaluating the PA and US Doppler images of the prototyped system, the applicability of the prototype system to small-vessel visualization has been discussed. The light source for PA imaging was on a compact cart of a US unit and emitted 750 nm wavelength laser pulses. The laser light was transferred to illumination optics in a handheld US transducer, which was connected to the US unit. Obtained PA rf data is reconstructed into PA images in the US unit. 3D images were obtained by scanning a mechanical stage, which the transducer is attached to. Several peripheral parts such as fingers, palms and wrists were observed by PA and US Doppler imaging. As for small arteries, US Doppler images were able to visualize the bow-shaped artery in the tip of the finger. Though PA images cannot distinguish arteries and veins, it could visualize smaller vessels and showed good resolution and vascular connectivity, resulting in a complementary image for the US Doppler images. Therefore, superposed images of the PA, US B-mode and US Doppler can visualize from large to small vessels without a contrast agent, which should be a differentiating feature of US/PA combined technology from other clinical vascular imaging modalities.

  7. Advances in Doppler OCT

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gangjun; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    We review the principle and some recent applications of Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT). The advances of the phase-resolved Doppler OCT method are described. Functional OCT algorithms which are based on an extension of the phase-resolved scheme are also introduced. Recent applications of Doppler OCT for quantification of flow, imaging of microvasculature and vocal fold vibration, and optical coherence elastography are briefly discussed. PMID:24443649

  8. Advanced Doppler tracking experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The Doppler tracking method is currently the only technique available for broadband gravitational wave searches in the approx. 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -1) Hz low frequency band. A brief review is given of the Doppler method, a discussion of the main noise sources, and a review of experience with current spacecraft and the prospects for sensitivity improvements in an advanced Doppler tracking experiment.

  9. [Ultrasound scanning of the distraction regenerate in case of multilocus elongation of the fragments in patients with defects of long bones].

    PubMed

    Menshikova, T I; Borzunov, D Iu; Dolganova, T I

    2014-01-01

    It was done ultrasound examination of distraction regenerates in patients with defect of bone tissue. The first group included 4 patients who had the size of congenital bone tissue defect 15.8±8.1 cm; the second group (3 patients) included posttraumatic defects with defect size 11.75±3.6 cm; the third group (4 patients) included posttraumatic defects with defect size 11±5.3 cm. It was discovered the particularities of distraction regenerate structural condition in case of low level of reparative osteogenesis. In the first group "ischemic" regenerate was characterized by slow formation of bone trabecules. In the second group "ischemic" regenerate had one or two hypo-echogenic cystic-like formations in the intermediate regenerate area. All patients of the third group had organotypic remodeling of the regenerate according to terms of distraction and fixation.

  10. Infrared thermography and ultrasound C-scan for non-destructive evaluation of 3D carbon fiber materials: a comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai; Genest, Marc; Robitaille, Francois; Maldague, Xavier; West, Lucas; Joncas, Simon; Leduc, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    3D Carbon fiber polymer matrix composites (3D CF PMCs) are increasingly used for aircraft construction due to their exceptional stiffness and strength-to-mass ratios. However, defects are common in the 3D combining areas and are challenging to inspect. In this paper, Stitching is used to decrease these defects, but causes some new types of defects. Infrared NDT (non-destructive testing) and ultrasound NDT are used. In particular, a micro-laser line thermography technique (micro-LLT) and a micro-laser spot thermography (micro-LST) with locked-in technique are used to detect the micro-defects. In addition, a comparative study is conducted by using pulsed thermography (PT), vibrothermography (VT). In order to confirm the types of the defects, microscopic inspection is carried out before NDT work, after sectioning and polishing a small part of the sample..

  11. Comparison of the biometric values obtained by two different A-mode ultrasound devices (Eye Cubed vs. PalmScan): A Transversal, descriptive, and comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To assess the reliability of the measurements obtained with the PalmScan™, when compared with another standardized A-mode ultrasound device, and assess the consistency and correlation between the two methods. Methods Transversal, descriptive, and comparative study. We recorded the axial length (AL), anterior chamber depth (ACD) and lens thickness (LT) obtained with two A-mode ultrasounds (PalmScan™ A2000 and Eye Cubed™) using an immersion technique. We compared the measurements with a two-sample t-test. Agreement between the two devices was assessed with Bland-Altman plots and 95% limits of agreement. Results 70 eyes of 70 patients were enrolled in this study. The measurements with the Eye Cubed™ of AL and ACD were shorter than the measurements taken by the PalmScan™. The differences were not statistically significant regarding AL (p < 0.4) but significant regarding ACD (p < 0.001). The highest agreement between the two devices was obtained during LT measurement. The PalmScan™ measurements were shorter, but not statistically significantly (p < 0.2). Conclusions The values of AL and LT, obtained with both devices are not identical, but within the limits of agreement. The agreement is not affected by the magnitude of the ocular dimensions (but only between range of 20 mm to 27 mm of AL and 3.5 mm to 5.7 mm of LT). A correction of about 0.5 D could be considered if an intraocular lens is being calculated. However due to the large variability of the results, the authors recommend discretion in using this conversion factor, and to adjust the power of the intraocular lenses based upon the personal experience of the surgeon. PMID:20334670

  12. 3D imaging options and ultrasound contrast agents for the ultrasound assessment of pediatric rheumatic patients.

    PubMed

    Madej, Tomasz

    2013-12-01

    The application of 3D imaging in pediatric rheumatology helps to make the assessment of inflammatory changes more objective and to estimate accurately their volume and the actual response to treatment in the course of follow-up examinations. Additional interesting opportunities are opened up by the vascularity analysis with the help of power Doppler and color Doppler in 3D imaging. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound examinations enable a more sensitive assessment of the vascularity of inflamed structures of the locomotor system, and a more accurate analysis of treatment's effect on changes in vascularity, and thereby the inflammation process activity, as compared to the classical options of power and color Doppler. The equipment required, time limitations, as well as the high price in the case of contrast-enhanced ultrasound, contribute to the fact that the 3D analysis of inflammatory changes and contrast-enhanced ultrasound examinations are not routinely applied for pediatric patients.

  13. 3-D ultrafast Doppler imaging applied to the noninvasive mapping of blood vessels in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Demene, Charlie; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    Ultrafast Doppler imaging was introduced as a technique to quantify blood flow in an entire 2-D field of view, expanding the field of application of ultrasound imaging to the highly sensitive anatomical and functional mapping of blood vessels. We have recently developed 3-D ultrafast ultrasound imaging, a technique that can produce thousands of ultrasound volumes per second, based on a 3-D plane and diverging wave emissions, and demonstrated its clinical feasibility in human subjects in vivo. In this study, we show that noninvasive 3-D ultrafast power Doppler, pulsed Doppler, and color Doppler imaging can be used to perform imaging of blood vessels in humans when using coherent compounding of 3-D tilted plane waves. A customized, programmable, 1024-channel ultrasound system was designed to perform 3-D ultrafast imaging. Using a 32 × 32, 3-MHz matrix phased array (Vermon, Tours, France), volumes were beamformed by coherently compounding successive tilted plane wave emissions. Doppler processing was then applied in a voxel-wise fashion. The proof of principle of 3-D ultrafast power Doppler imaging was first performed by imaging Tygon tubes of various diameters, and in vivo feasibility was demonstrated by imaging small vessels in the human thyroid. Simultaneous 3-D color and pulsed Doppler imaging using compounded emissions were also applied in the carotid artery and the jugular vein in one healthy volunteer.

  14. 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative real-time imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in three dimensions based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32×32 matrix-array probe. Its capability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3-D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging and finally 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3-D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, for the first time, the complex 3-D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, and the 3-D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3-D real-time mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra- and inter-observer variability. PMID:25207828

  15. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Arango, Juan Esteban; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-07

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra--and inter-observer variability.

  16. 3D ultrafast ultrasound imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provost, Jean; Papadacci, Clement; Esteban Arango, Juan; Imbault, Marion; Fink, Mathias; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2014-10-01

    Very high frame rate ultrasound imaging has recently allowed for the extension of the applications of echography to new fields of study such as the functional imaging of the brain, cardiac electrophysiology, and the quantitative imaging of the intrinsic mechanical properties of tumors, to name a few, non-invasively and in real time. In this study, we present the first implementation of Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging in 3D based on the use of either diverging or plane waves emanating from a sparse virtual array located behind the probe. It achieves high contrast and resolution while maintaining imaging rates of thousands of volumes per second. A customized portable ultrasound system was developed to sample 1024 independent channels and to drive a 32  ×  32 matrix-array probe. Its ability to track in 3D transient phenomena occurring in the millisecond range within a single ultrafast acquisition was demonstrated for 3D Shear-Wave Imaging, 3D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging, and, finally, 3D Ultrafast combined Tissue and Flow Doppler Imaging. The propagation of shear waves was tracked in a phantom and used to characterize its stiffness. 3D Ultrafast Doppler was used to obtain 3D maps of Pulsed Doppler, Color Doppler, and Power Doppler quantities in a single acquisition and revealed, at thousands of volumes per second, the complex 3D flow patterns occurring in the ventricles of the human heart during an entire cardiac cycle, as well as the 3D in vivo interaction of blood flow and wall motion during the pulse wave in the carotid at the bifurcation. This study demonstrates the potential of 3D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging for the 3D mapping of stiffness, tissue motion, and flow in humans in vivo and promises new clinical applications of ultrasound with reduced intra—and inter-observer variability.

  17. Abdominal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney - blood and urine flow Abdominal ultrasound References Chen L. Abdominal ultrasound imaging. In: Sahani DV, Samir ... the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should not be used ...

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007646.htm Endoscopic ultrasound To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Endoscopic ultrasound is a type of imaging test. It is ...

  19. Transverse flowmetry of carbon particles based on photoacoustic Doppler standard deviation using an auto-correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Sun, Li-jun

    2015-05-01

    In order to measure the flow velocity of carbon particle suspension perpendicular to the receiving axis of ultrasound transducer, the standard deviation of photoacoustic Doppler frequency spectrum is used to estimate the bandwidth broadening, and the spectrum standard deviation is calculated by an auto-correlation method. A 532 nm pulsed laser with the repetition rate of 20 Hz is used as a pumping source to generate photoacoustic signal. The photoacoustic signals are detected using a focused PZT ultrasound transducer with the central frequency of 10 MHz. The suspension of carbon particles is driven by a syringe pump. The complex photoacoustic signal is calculated by Hilbert transformation from time domain signal before auto-correlation. The standard deviation of the Doppler bandwidth broadening is calculated by averaging the auto-correlation results of several individual A scans. The feasibility of the proposed method is demonstrated by measuring the spectrum standard deviation of the transversal carbon particle flow from 5.0 mm/s to 8.4 mm/s. The experimental results show that the auto-correlation result is approximately linearly distributed within the measuring range.

  20. Thyroid ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid ultrasonography has established itself as a popular and useful tool in the evaluation and management of thyroid disorders. Advanced ultrasound techniques in thyroid imaging have not only fascinated the radiologists but also attracted the surgeons and endocrinologists who are using these techniques in their daily clinical and operative practice. This review provides an overview of indications for ultrasound in various thyroid diseases, describes characteristic ultrasound findings in these diseases, and illustrates major diagnostic pitfalls of thyroid ultrasound. PMID:23776892

  1. Carotid Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Carotid Ultrasound Also known as carotid duplex. Carotid ultrasound is a painless imaging test that uses high- ... of your carotid arteries. This test uses an ultrasound machine, which includes a computer, a screen, and ...

  2. Focused ultrasound in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Ronald H

    2016-01-01

    The use of focused ultrasound to obtain diagnostically significant information about the eye goes back to the 1950s. This review describes the historical and technological development of ophthalmic ultrasound and its clinical application and impact. Ultrasound, like light, can be focused, which is crucial for formation of high-resolution, diagnostically useful images. Focused, single-element, mechanically scanned transducers are most common in ophthalmology. Specially designed transducers have been used to generate focused, high-intensity ultrasound that through thermal effects has been used to treat glaucoma (via ciliodestruction), tumors, and other pathologies. Linear and annular transducer arrays offer synthetic focusing in which precise timing of the excitation of independently addressable array elements allows formation of a converging wavefront to create a focus at one or more programmable depths. Most recently, linear array-based plane-wave ultrasound, in which the array emits an unfocused wavefront and focusing is performed solely on received data, has been demonstrated for imaging ocular anatomy and blood flow. While the history of ophthalmic ultrasound extends back over half-a-century, new and powerful technologic advances continue to be made, offering the prospect of novel diagnostic capabilities. PMID:27757007

  3. Focused ultrasound in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Ronald H

    2016-01-01

    The use of focused ultrasound to obtain diagnostically significant information about the eye goes back to the 1950s. This review describes the historical and technological development of ophthalmic ultrasound and its clinical application and impact. Ultrasound, like light, can be focused, which is crucial for formation of high-resolution, diagnostically useful images. Focused, single-element, mechanically scanned transducers are most common in ophthalmology. Specially designed transducers have been used to generate focused, high-intensity ultrasound that through thermal effects has been used to treat glaucoma (via ciliodestruction), tumors, and other pathologies. Linear and annular transducer arrays offer synthetic focusing in which precise timing of the excitation of independently addressable array elements allows formation of a converging wavefront to create a focus at one or more programmable depths. Most recently, linear array-based plane-wave ultrasound, in which the array emits an unfocused wavefront and focusing is performed solely on received data, has been demonstrated for imaging ocular anatomy and blood flow. While the history of ophthalmic ultrasound extends back over half-a-century, new and powerful technologic advances continue to be made, offering the prospect of novel diagnostic capabilities.

  4. Non-contact photoacoustic tomography with a laser Doppler vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Wang, Cheng; Feng, Ting; Oliver, David E.; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    Most concurrent photoacoustic tomography systems are based on traditional ultrasound measurement regime, which requires the contact or acoustic coupling material between the biological tissue and the ultrasound transducer. This study investigates the feasibility of non-contact measurement of photacoustic signals generated inside biomedical tissues by observing the vibrations at the surface of the tissues with a commercial laser Doppler vibrometer. The vibrometer with 0- 2MHz measurement bandwidth and 5 MHz sampling frequency was integrated to a conventional rotational PAT data acquisition system. The data acquisition of the vibrometer was synchronized to the laser illumination from an Nd:YAG laser with output at 532nm. The laser energy was tuned to 17.5mJ per square centimeter. The PA signals were acquired at 120 angular locations uniformly distributed around the scanned objects. The frequency response of the measurement system was first calibrated. 2-inch-diamater cylindrical phantoms containing small rubber plates and biological tissues were afterwards imaged. The phantoms were made from 5% intralipid solution in 10% porcine gelatin to simulate the light scattering in biological tissue and to backscatter the measurement laser from the vibrometer. Time-domain backprojection method was used for the image reconstruction. Experiments with real-tissue phantoms show that with laser illumination of 17.5 mJ/cm2 at 532 nm, the non-contact photoacoustic (PA) imaging system with 15dB detection bandwidth of 2.5 MHz can resolve spherical optical inclusions with dimension of 500μm and multi-layered structure with optical contrast in strongly scattering medium. The experiment results prompt the potential implementation of the non-contact PAT to achieve "photoacoustic camera".

  5. [Liver ultrasound: focal lesions and diffuse diseases].

    PubMed

    Segura Grau, A; Valero López, I; Díaz Rodríguez, N; Segura Cabral, J M

    2016-01-01

    Liver ultrasound is frequently used as a first-line technique for the detection and characterization of the most common liver lesions, especially those incidentally found focal liver lesions, and for monitoring of chronic liver diseases. Ultrasound is not only used in the Bmode, but also with Doppler and, more recently, contrast-enhanced ultrasound. It is mainly used in the diagnosis of diffuse liver diseases, such as steatosis or cirrhosis. This article presents a practical approach for diagnosis workup, in which the different characteristics of the main focal liver lesions and diffuse liver diseases are reviewed.

  6. The Cognitive Doppler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozoil, Micah E.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the learning needs of students in the concrete operational stage in mathematics. Identifies the phenomenon of reduced cognitive performance in an out-of-class environment as the "Cognitive Doppler." Suggests methods of reducing the pronounced effects of the Cognitive Doppler by capitalizing on the students' ability to memorize…

  7. Repeat scanning technology for laser ultrasonic propagation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Ryul; Yenn Chong, See; Sunuwar, Nitam; Park, Chan Yik

    2013-08-01

    Laser ultrasonic scanning in combination with contact or non-contact sensors provides new paradigms in structural health management (SHM) and non-destructive in-process quality control (IPQC) for large composite structures. Wave propagation imaging technology based on laser ultrasonic scanning and fixed-point sensing shows remarkable advantages, such as minimal need for embedded sensors in SHM, minimum invasive defect visualization in IPQC and general capabilities of curved and complex target inspection, and temporal reference-free inspection. However, as with other SHM methods and non-destructive evaluation based on ultrasound, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is a prevalent issue in real structural applications, especially with non-contact thin-composite sensing or with thick and heterogeneous composites. This study proposes a high-speed repeat scanning technique for laser ultrasonic propagation imaging (UPI) technology, which is realized with the scanning speed of 1 kHz of a Q-switched continuous wave laser, and precise control of the laser beam pulses for identical point scanning. As a result, the technique enables the achievement of significant improvement in the SNR to inspect real-world composite structures. The proposed technique provides enhanced results for impact damage detection in a 2 mm thick wing box made of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic, despite the low sensitivity of non-contact laser ultrasonic sensing. A field-applicable pure laser UPI system has been developed using a laser Doppler vibrometer as the non-contact ultrasonic sensor. The proposed technique enables the visualization of the disbond defect in a 15 mm thick wind blade specimen made of glass-fiber-reinforced plastic, despite the high dissipation of ultrasound in the thick composite.

  8. Toward image analysis and decision support for ultrasound technology.

    PubMed

    Crofts, Gillian; Padman, Rema; Maharaja, Nisha

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is a low cost and efficient method of detecting diseases and abnormalities in the body. Yet there is a lack of precision and reliability associated with the technology, partly due to the operator dependent nature of ultrasound scanning. When scanning is performed to an agreed protocol, ultrasound has been shown to be highly reliable. This research aims to minimize these limitations that arise during ultrasound training, scanning and reporting by developing and evaluating an image analysis and decision support system that can aid the decision making process. We hypothesize that this intervention will likely increase the role of ultrasound in diagnosis when compared with other imaging technologies, particularly in low resource settings.

  9. A New Active Cavitation Mapping Technique for Pulsed HIFU Applications – Bubble Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; Hwang, Joo Ha; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a new active cavitation mapping technique for pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) applications termed bubble Doppler is proposed and its feasibility tested in tissue-mimicking gel phantoms. pHIFU therapy uses short pulses, delivered at low pulse repetition frequency, to cause transient bubble activity that has been shown to enhance drug and gene delivery to tissues. The current gold standard for detecting and monitoring cavitation activity during pHIFU treatments is passive cavitation detection (PCD), which provides minimal information on the spatial distribution of the bubbles. B-mode imaging can detect hyperecho formation, but has very limited sensitivity, especially to small, transient microbubbles. The bubble Doppler method proposed here is based on a fusion of the adaptations of three Doppler techniques that had been previously developed for imaging of ultrasound contrast agents – color Doppler, pulse inversion Doppler, and decorrelation Doppler. Doppler ensemble pulses were interleaved with therapeutic pHIFU pulses using three different pulse sequences and standard Doppler processing was applied to the received echoes. The information yielded by each of the techniques on the distribution and characteristics of pHIFU-induced cavitation bubbles was evaluated separately, and found to be complementary. The unified approach - bubble Doppler – was then proposed to both spatially map the presence of transient bubbles and to estimate their sizes and the degree of nonlinearity. PMID:25265178

  10. Doppler radar flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Petlevich, Walter J.; Sverdrup, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    A Doppler radar flowmeter comprises a transceiver which produces an audio frequency output related to the Doppler shift in frequency between radio waves backscattered from particulate matter carried in a fluid and the radiated radio waves. A variable gain amplifier and low pass filter are provided for amplifying and filtering the transceiver output. A frequency counter having a variable triggering level is also provided to determine the magnitude of the Doppler shift. A calibration method is disclosed wherein the amplifier gain and frequency counter trigger level are adjusted to achieve plateaus in the output of the frequency counter and thereby allow calibration without the necessity of being able to visually observe the flow.

  11. A brief history of ultrasound in rheumatology: where we were.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Walter; Filippucci, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonography in the '70s was a well-known and widely used method within several medical specialties but not in rheumatology. Initial development of the field was led by radiologists who mainly investigated the potential of ultrasound in the assessment of large joints. In the late '80s, the first studies supporting the role of ultrasound in the detection of soft tissue changes and bone erosions in the hands of patients with rheumatoid arthritis were published. In the '90s, the dramatic improvement of spatial resolution due to the new generation high frequency probes opened up new avenues for the exploration of otherwise undetectable anatomical details. Ultrasound research during this period was enhanced by the growing use of colour Doppler and power Doppler and by the first prototypes of three dimensional ultrasound. Over the last 10 years, the buzz words in ultrasound research in rheumatology have been standardisation, early diagnosis and therapy monitoring.

  12. Ultrasound physics.

    PubMed

    Shriki, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Bedside ultrasound has become an important modality for obtaining critical information in the acute care of patients. It is important to understand the physics of ultrasound in order to perform and interpret images at the bedside. The physics of both continuous wave and pulsed wave sound underlies diagnostic ultrasound. The instrumentation, including transducers and image processing, is important in the acquisition of appropriate sonographic images. Understanding how these concepts interplay with each other enables practitioners to obtain the best possible images.

  13. An FPGA-based open platform for ultrasound biomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Yu, Yanyan; Tsang, Fu; Sun, Lei

    2012-07-01

    Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) has been extensively applied to preclinical studies in small animal models. Individual animal study is unique and requires different utilization of the UBM system to accommodate different transducer characteristics, data acquisition strategies, signal processing, and image reconstruction methods. There is a demand for a flexible and open UBM platform to allow users to customize the system for various studies and have full access to experimental data. This paper presents the development of an open UBM platform (center frequency 20 to 80 MHz) for various preclinical studies. The platform design was based on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) embedded in a printed circuit board to achieve B-mode imaging and directional pulsed-wave Doppler. Instead of hardware circuitry, most functions of the platform, such as filtering, envelope detection, and scan conversion, were achieved by FPGA programs; thus, the system architecture could be easily modified for specific applications. In addition, a novel digital quadrature demodulation algorithm was implemented for fast and accurate Doppler profiling. Finally, test results showed that the platform could offer a minimum detectable signal of 25 μV, allowing a 51 dB dynamic range at 47 dB gain, and real-time imaging at more than 500 frames/s. Phantom and in vivo imaging experiments were conducted and the results demonstrated good system performance.

  14. Doppler Lidar (DL) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, RK

    2012-02-13

    The Doppler lidar (DL) is an active remote sensing instrument that provides range- and time-resolved measurements of radial velocity and attenuated backscatter. The principle of operation is similar to radar in that pulses of energy are transmitted into the atmosphere; the energy scattered back to the transceiver is collected and measured as a time-resolved signal. From the time delay between each outgoing transmitted pulse and the backscattered signal, the distance to the scatterer is inferred. The radial or line-of-sight velocity of the scatterers is determined from the Doppler frequency shift of the backscattered radiation. The DL uses a heterodyne detection technique in which the return signal is mixed with a reference laser beam (i.e., local oscillator) of known frequency. An onboard signal processing computer then determines the Doppler frequency shift from the spectra of the heterodyne signal. The energy content of the Doppler spectra can also be used to determine attenuated backscatter.

  15. In vivo imaging of ocular blood flow using high-speed ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Ketterling, Jeffrey A.; Urs, Raksha; Silverman, Ronald H.

    2017-01-01

    Clinical ophthalmic ultrasound is currently performed with mechanically scanned, single-element probes, but these are unable to provide useful information about blood flow with Doppler techniques. Linear arrays are well-suited for the detection of blood flow, but commercial systems generally exceed FDA ophthalmic safety limits. A high-speed plane-wave ultrasound approach with an 18-MHz linear array was utilized to characterize blood flow in the orbit and choroid. Acoustic intensity was measured and the plane-wave mode was within FDA limits. Data were acquired for up to 2 sec and up to 20,000 frames/s with sets of steered plane-wave transmissions that spanned 2*θ degrees where 0 degrees was normal to the array. Lateral resolution was characterized using compounding from 1 to 50 transmissions and -6-dB lateral beamwidths ranged from 320 to 180 μm, respectively. Compounded high-frame-rate data were post-processed using a singular value decomposition spatiotemporal filter and then flow was estimated at each pixel using standard Doppler processing methods. A 1-cm diameter rotating scattering phantom and a 2-mm diameter tube with a flow of blood-mimicking fluid were utilized to validate the flow-estimation algorithms. In vivo data were obtained from the posterior pole of the human eye which revealed regions of flow in the choroid and major orbital vessels supplying the eye. PMID:28275423

  16. Prevalence of defined ultrasound findings of unknown significance at the second trimester fetal anomaly scan and their association with adverse pregnancy outcomes: the Welsh study of mothers and babies population‐based cohort

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, Lisa; Wright, Melissa; Dunstan, Frank; Thomas, Susan; Brook, Fiona; Morris, Susan; Tucker, David; Wills, Marilyn Ann; Davies, Colin; John, Gareth; Fone, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective The aim of this article was to estimate the population prevalence of seven defined ultrasound findings of uncertain significance (‘markers’) in the second trimester and the associated risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Method A prospective record‐linked cohort study of 30 078 pregnant women who had second trimester anomaly scans between July 2008 and March 2011 in Wales was conducted. Results The prevalence of markers ranged from 43.7 per 1000 singleton pregnancies for cardiac echogenic foci [95% confidence interval (CI): 38.8, 51.1] to 0.6 for mild‐to‐moderate ventriculomegaly (95% CI: 0.3, 1.0). Isolated echogenic bowel was associated with an increased risk of congenital anomalies [risk ratio (RR) 4.54, 95% CI: 2.12, 9.73] and preterm birth (RR 2.30, 95% CI: 1.08, 4.90). Isolated pelvicalyceal dilatation was associated with an increased risk of congenital anomalies (RR 3.82, 95% CI: 2.16, 6.77). Multiple markers were associated with an increased risk of congenital anomalies (RR 5.00, 95% CI: 1.35, 18.40) and preterm birth (RR 3.38, 95% CI 1.20, 9.53). Conclusions These data are useful for counselling families and developing clinical guidance and care pathways following the detection of markers in clinical practice, particularly the need for follow‐up scans to monitor placental function and growth in pregnancies with isolated echogenic bowel, and further investigation for multiple markers. © 2015 The Authors. Prenatal Diagnosis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26475362

  17. Doppler Lidar Wind Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, R. K.; Sivaraman, C.; Shippert, T. R.; Riihimaki, L. D.

    2015-07-01

    Wind speed and direction, together with pressure, temperature, and relative humidity, are the most fundamental atmospheric state parameters. Accurate measurement of these parameters is crucial for numerical weather prediction. Vertically resolved wind measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer are particularly important for modeling pollutant and aerosol transport. Raw data from a scanning coherent Doppler lidar system can be processed to generate accurate height-resolved measurements of wind speed and direction in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  18. Software For Clear-Air Doppler-Radar Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Bruce W.

    1990-01-01

    System of software developed to present plan-position-indicator scans of clear-air Doppler radar station on color graphical cathode-ray-tube display. Designed to incorporate latest accepted standards for equipment, computer programs, and meteorological data bases. Includes use of Ada programming language, of "Graphical-Kernel-System-like" graphics interface, and of Common Doppler Radar Exchange Format. Features include portability and maintainability. Use of Ada software packages produced number of software modules reused on other related projects.

  19. Modular high accuracy tracker for dual channel laser Doppler velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridman, J. D.; Young, R. M.; Seavey, R. E.; Orloff, K. L.

    1976-01-01

    In the study described, a scanning dual-channel cross-beam laser Doppler velocimeter (developed for measuring simultaneously the two orthogonal components of flow velocity and turbulence intensity) was used to measure the instantaneous velocity characteristics of a model helicopter rotor and in a vortex wake survey experiment on a Boeing 747 aircraft model. Particular attention is given to a special purpose dual-loop frequency tracker developed to track and demodulate 10 microsecond wide pulse burst Doppler signals with a study cycle of 25% (or narrower signals at a higher duty cycle) generated by the laser Doppler velocimeter.

  20. Role of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in the diagnosis of endometrial pathology

    PubMed Central

    POP, CIPRIAN MIHAITA; MIHU, DAN; BADEA, RADU

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is the reference imaging procedure used for the exploration of endometrial pathology. As medical procedures improve and the requirements of modern medicine become more demanding, gray-scale ultrasound is insufficient in establishing gynecological diagnosis. Thus, more complex examination techniques are required: Doppler ultrasound, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), 3D ultrasound, etc. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound is a special examination technique that gains more and more ground. This allows a detailed real-time evaluation of microcirculation in a certain territory, which is impossible to perform by Doppler ultrasound. The aim of this review is to synthesize current knowledge regarding CEUS applications in endometrial pathology, to detail the technical aspects of endometrial CEUS and the physical properties of the equipment and contrast agents used, as well as to identify the limitations of the method. PMID:26733740

  1. 2014 First-trimester ultrasound forum from the Korean Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Soo-Young; Hong, Joon Seok; Seol, Hyun-Joo; Hwang, Han Sung; Park, Hyun Soo; Kim, Kunwoo; Ko, Hyun Sun; Kwak, Dong-Wook; Kim, Moon Young; Park, Mi Hye; Oh, Min Jeong; Park, Joong Shin

    2015-01-01

    A first-trimester ultrasound scan has become an essential part of antenatal care. The Korean Society of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology held a first-trimester ultrasound forum on April 5, 2014. The forum aimed to present an updated review of the literature on the topic of first-trimester ultrasound in specific lectures and to host a panel discussion on several important issues regarding first-trimester scans. The forum provided evidence- and consensus-based best practice patterns for obstetricians in Korea. Here, we report the review and checklists presented from the forum. PMID:25629012

  2. Laser Doppler dust devil measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilbro, J. W.; Jeffreys, H. B.; Kaufman, J. W.; Weaver, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning laser doppler velocimeter (SLDV) system was used to detect, track, and measure the velocity flow field of naturally occurring tornado-like flows (dust devils) in the atmosphere. A general description of the dust devil phenomenon is given along with a description of the test program, measurement system, and data processing techniques used to collect information on the dust devil flow field. The general meteorological conditions occurring during the test program are also described, and the information collected on two selected dust devils are discussed in detail to show the type of information which can be obtained with a SLDV system. The results from these measurements agree well with those of other investigators and illustrate the potential for the SLDV in future endeavors.

  3. 3-D Ultrafast Doppler Imaging Applied to the Noninvasive and Quantitative Imaging of Blood Vessels in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Provost, J.; Papadacci, C.; Demene, C.; Gennisson, J-L.; Tanter, M.; Pernot, M.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast Doppler Imaging was introduced as a technique to quantify blood flow in an entire 2-D field of view, expanding the field of application of ultrasound imaging to the highly sensitive anatomical and functional mapping of blood vessels. We have recently developed 3-D Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging, a technique that can produce thousands of ultrasound volumes per second, based on three-dimensional plane and diverging wave emissions, and demonstrated its clinical feasibility in human subjects in vivo. In this study, we show that non-invasive 3-D Ultrafast Power Doppler, Pulsed Doppler, and Color Doppler Imaging can be used to perform quantitative imaging of blood vessels in humans when using coherent compounding of three-dimensional tilted plane waves. A customized, programmable, 1024-channel ultrasound system was designed to perform 3-D Ultrafast Imaging. Using a 32X32, 3-MHz matrix phased array (Vermon, France), volumes were beamformed by coherently compounding successive tilted plane wave emissions. Doppler processing was then applied in a voxel-wise fashion. 3-D Ultrafast Power Doppler Imaging was first validated by imaging Tygon tubes of varying diameter and its in vivo feasibility was demonstrated by imaging small vessels in the human thyroid. Simultaneous 3-D Color and Pulsed Doppler Imaging using compounded emissions were also applied in the carotid artery and the jugular vein in one healthy volunteer. PMID:26276956

  4. Perfusion imaging with non-contrast ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, Jaime E.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Byram, Brett C.

    2016-04-01

    A Doppler ultrasound clutter filter that enables estimation of low velocity blood flow could considerably improve ultrasound as a tool for clinical diagnosis and monitoring, including for the evaluation of vascular diseases and tumor perfusion. Conventional Doppler ultrasound is currently used for visualizing and estimating blood flow. However, conventional Doppler is limited by frame rate and tissue clutter caused by involuntary movement of the patient or sonographer. Spectral broadening of the clutter due to tissue motion limits ultrasound's ability to detect blood flow less than about 5mm/s at an 8MHz center frequency. We propose a clutter filtering technique that may increase the sensitivity of Doppler measurements to at least as low as 0.41mm/s. The proposed filter uses an adaptive demodulation scheme that decreases the bandwidth of the clutter. To test the performance of the adaptive demodulation method at removing sonographer hand motion, six volunteer subjects acquired data from a basic quality assurance phantom. Additionally, to test initial in vivo feasibility, an arterial occlusion reactive hyperemia study was performed to assess the efficiency of the proposed filter at preserving signals from blood velocities 2mm/s or greater. The hand motion study resulted in initial average bandwidths of 577Hz (28.5mm/s), which were decreased to 7.28Hz (0.36mm/s) at -60 dB at 3cm using our approach. The in vivo power Doppler study resulted in 15.2dB and 0.15dB dynamic ranges between the lowest and highest blood flow time points for the proposed filter and conventional 50Hz high pass filter, respectively.

  5. Contrast-enhanced power Doppler US in the diagnosis of renal pseudotumors.

    PubMed

    Ascenti, G; Zimbaro, G; Mazziotti, S; Gaeta, M; Lamberto, S; Scribano, E

    2001-01-01

    The term "pseudotumor" is used to refer to several anatomic variants that can simulate a renal mass, the most frequent of which are hypertrophied column of Bertin, persistence of fetal lobation, and the dromedary or splenic hump. We describe the findings of power Doppler US after the ultrasound contrast agent (Levovist, Schering, Berlin, Germany) administration in 4 patients with a renal focal lesion in whom gray-scale and baseline power Doppler US was not able to certainly differentiate pseudotumor from neoplasm.

  6. High-overtone Self-Focusing Acoustic Transducers for High Frequency Ultrasonic Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Lee, Chuangyuan; Kim, Eun Sok; Wu, Dawei; Hu, Changhong; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk.; Wang, Gaofeng; Yu, Hongyu

    2010-01-01

    This work reports the potential use of high-overtone self-focusing acoustic transducers for high frequency ultrasonic Doppler. By using harmonic frequencies of a thick bulk Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) transducer with a novel air-reflector Fresnel lens, we obtained strong ultrasound signals at 60 MHz (3rd harmonic) and 100 MHz (5th harmonic). Both experimental and theoretical analysis has demonstrated that the transducers can be applied to Doppler systems with high frequencies up to 100 MHz. PMID:20206371

  7. High definition ultrasound imaging for battlefield medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, K.S.; Morimoto, A.K.; Kozlowski, D.M.; Krumm, J.C.; Dickey, F.M.; Rogers, B; Walsh, N.

    1996-06-23

    A team has developed an improved resolution ultrasound system for low cost diagnostics. This paper describes the development of an ultrasound based imaging system capable of generating 3D images showing surface and subsurface tissue and bone structures. We include results of a comparative study between images obtained from X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT) and ultrasound. We found that the quality of ultrasound images compares favorably with those from CT. Volumetric and surface data extracted from these images were within 7% of the range between ultrasound and CT scans. We also include images of porcine abdominal scans from two different sets of animal trials.

  8. Doppler ion program description

    SciTech Connect

    Henline, P.

    1980-12-01

    The Doppler spectrometer is a conventional Czerny-Turner grating spectrometer with a 1024 channel multiple detector. Light is dispersed across the detector, and its output yields a spectrum covering approximately 200 A. The width of the spectral peak is directly proportional to the temperature of the emitting ions, and determination of the impurity ion temperature allows one to infer the plasma ion temperature. The Doppler ion software system developed at General Atomic uses a TRACOR Northern 1710-31 and an LSI-11/2. The exact configuration of Doublet III is different from TRACOR Northern systems at other facilities.

  9. Estimation of Measurement Characteristics of Ultrasound Fetal Heart Rate Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Yasuaki; Mamune, Hideyuki; Sugimoto, Suguru; Yoshida, Atsushi; Sasa, Hidenori; Kobayashi, Hisaaki; Kobayashi, Mitsunao

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasound fetal heart rate monitoring is very useful to determine the status of the fetus because it is noninvasive. In order to ensure the accuracy of the fetal heart rate (FHR) obtained from the ultrasound Doppler data, we measure the fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) directly and obtain the Doppler data simultaneously. The FHR differences of the Doppler data from the direct ECG data are concentrated at 0 bpm (beats per minute), and are practically symmetrical. The distribution is found to be very close to the Student's t distribution by the test of goodness of fit with the chi-square test. The spectral density of the FHR differences shows the white noise spectrum without any dominant peaks. Furthermore, the f-n (n>1) fluctuation is observed both with the ultrasound Doppler FHR and with the direct ECG FHR. Thus, it is confirmed that the FHR observation and observation of the f-n (n>1) fluctuation using the ultrasound Doppler FHR are as useful as the direct ECG.

  10. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... plan for their effective treatment. detect blood clots (deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the major veins of ... What are the limitations of Vascular Ultrasound? Vessels deep in the body are harder to see than ...

  11. Neuromuscular Ultrasound of Cranial Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Eman A.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed. PMID:25851889

  12. Finnish Meteorological Institute Doppler Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Ewan OConnor

    2015-03-27

    This doppler lidar system provides co-polar and cross polar attenuated backscatter coefficients,signal strength, and doppler velocities in the cloud and in the boundary level, including uncertainties for all parameters. Using the doppler beam swinging DBS technique, and Vertical Azimuthal Display (VAD) this system also provides vertical profiles of horizontal winds.

  13. The Doppler Pendulum Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, C. K.; Wong, H. K.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment to verify the Doppler effect of sound waves is described. An ultrasonic source is mounted at the end of a simple pendulum. As the pendulum swings, the rapid change of frequency can be recorded by a stationary receiver using a simple frequency-to-voltage converter. The experimental results are in close agreement with the Doppler…

  14. Doppler wind profile experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The data collection phase of a Doppler wind measurement experiment supported by high-resolution Jimsphere/FPS-16 wind data and Windsonde data was carried out at the Kennedy Space Center in February, March and early April of 1985. The Doppler wind measurements were made using a hybrid doppler profiler put in place by the Johnson Space Center and a SOUSY profiler operated by Radian Corporation. Both systems operated at 50 Mhz. Although the doppler profiler systems were located 10 km apart to enable concurrent operation of the systems for data comparison, little concurrent data were obtained due to set-up delays with the SOUSY system, and system problems with the WPL system during the last month of the test. During the test period, special serial Jimsphere soundings were taken at two-hour intervals on six days in March and April in addition to balloon soundings taken in support of the Shuttle launch operations. In addition, there is temperature, moisture and wind information available from the daily morning Radiosonde sounding taken at the Kennedy site. The balloon release point was at the same location as the SOUSY profiler. Vertical resolution of the SOUSY profiler was 150 M to approximately 20 km. The vertical resolution of the WPL profiler was 290 M to 10 km and 870 M to 17 km. Winds determined form the Jimsphere balloon have a vertical resolution of 30 M.

  15. Hybrid ultrasound imaging techniques (fusion imaging).

    PubMed

    Sandulescu, Daniela Larisa; Dumitrescu, Daniela; Rogoveanu, Ion; Saftoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-07

    Visualization of tumor angiogenesis can facilitate non-invasive evaluation of tumor vascular characteristics to supplement the conventional diagnostic imaging goals of depicting tumor location, size, and morphology. Hybrid imaging techniques combine anatomic [ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] and molecular (single photon emission CT and positron emission tomography) imaging modalities. One example is real-time virtual sonography, which combines ultrasound (grayscale, colour Doppler, or dynamic contrast harmonic imaging) with contrast-enhanced CT/MRI. The benefits of fusion imaging include an increased diagnostic confidence, direct comparison of the lesions using different imaging modalities, more precise monitoring of interventional procedures, and reduced radiation exposure.

  16. Doppler detection of arterio-arterial anastomoses in monochorionic twins: feasibility and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M J; Denbow, M L; Tanawattanacharoen, S; Gannon, C; Cox, P M; Fisk, N M

    2000-07-01

    The accuracy of in-vivo detection of arterio-arterial anastomoses (AAA) in monochorionic (MC) twins and its predictive value for twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) was assessed in 105 consecutive MC twins scanned at fortnightly intervals. AAA were sought using spectral and colour energy Doppler and ultrasound findings were compared with placental injection studies. AAA were identified in vivo in 59 (56%) pregnancies and at injection study in 68 (65%). The overall sensitivity and specificity was 85 and 97.3% respectively for the detection of AAA. Detection rates were higher at later gestations, with anterior placentae and with larger diameter AAA. The median insonation time to detect an AAA was 10 min (range 1-30). Where an AAA was identified, 15% of pregnancies (nine of 59) developed TTTS compared to 61% (28 of 46) when no AAA was seen (odds ratio 8.6). We conclude that AAA can be detected in vivo with high sensitivity and specificity without undue prolongation of scanning times and have a role in risk stratification in the antenatal assessment of MC twins.

  17. Quantitative Doppler measures in coiled vessels: investigation on excised umbilical veins.

    PubMed

    Guiot, C; Roatta, S; Piccoli, E; Saccomandi, F; Todros, T

    1999-11-01

    Quantitative assessment of umbilical venous blood velocity with Doppler ultrasound (US) must cope with the coiled structure of the vein inside the cord. Both an experimental and a theoretical approach showed remarkable variations in the insonation angle when the probe was moved along the vein, provided the inclination between the Doppler probe and the cord was kept constant. Inaccurate signal processing, stochastic variability and flow disturbances could, however, mask the influence of the geometry. The above hypotheses were assessed by investigating five cords in vitro a few hours after delivery from normal pregnancies at term. The Doppler signal was sampled at different sites along each cord and the mean Doppler shift estimated by FFT spectral analysis, both directly and through the noise rejection D'Alessio's algorithm, which proved effective in improving the Doppler shift estimate in condition of low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).

  18. Reducing registration error in cross-beam vector doppler imaging with position sensor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Canxing; Beach, Kirk W; Leotta, Daniel; Stuzman, Edward; Kim, Yongmin

    2009-01-01

    Various vector Doppler methods have been proposed in the last several decades to overcome the Doppler angle dependency in both conventional spectral Doppler and color Doppler by measuring both the speed and direction of blood flow. However, they have not been adopted for routine use because most of them require specialized hardware, which is not available in commercial ultrasound systems. An alternative approach (cross-beam method) that uses color Doppler images obtained from different steered beam angles is more feasible, but there is error in registering multiple color Doppler images because they are not acquired simultaneously. To alleviate this problem, we have evaluated a cross-beam vector Doppler system that registers spatially with a position sensor two color Doppler images from two different angles and temporally with ECG synchronization. The registration error was reduced to an average of 0.92 mm from 2.49 mm in 9 human subjects. Vector Doppler carotid artery images of a healthy subject and a patient with atherosclerotic plaques are also presented.

  19. [Use of ultrasound in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Trier, H G

    1982-12-01

    In ophthalmology, ultrasound is applied in diagnostics as well as in surgery and therapy. This paper gives a short survey on both applications. Ultrasonic phacoemulsification is of considerable practical importance for modern cataract micro-surgery with intraocular lens implantation. Applications of that kind require consideration of ultrasonic bioeffects and equipment safety. Diagnostic use of ultrasound includes biometry (echometry), tissue examination and characterization, and vascular investigations in eye and orbit. The application of diagnostic ultrasound on in-patients, its individual indications, and the appropriate methods (A, B, automatic biometric devices for axial length measuring, M, Doppler) are described. Examples of commercially available instruments for the different applications are given. In comparison with other disciplines ophthalmic A-mode and B-mode echography is characterized by: refined depth resolution and lateral resolution; the important part of quantitative methods for clinical evaluation of echograms; and the advanced level of quality assurance for equipment performance. Refined tissue evaluation requires optimized and reproducible equipment parameters. To ensure these conditions the clinical echographer must be educated and willing to test performance and quality of his equipment. Finally, a perspective of actual research in diagnostic ultrasound of the eye is given.

  20. Effects of ultrasound beam angle and surface roughness on the quantitative ultrasound parameters of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Kaleva, E; Saarakkala, S; Jurvelin, J S; Virén, T; Töyräs, J

    2009-08-01

    High-resolution arthroscopic ultrasound imaging provides a potential quantitative technique for the diagnostics of early osteoarthritis. However, an uncontrolled, nonperpendicular angle of an ultrasound beam or the natural curvature of the cartilage surface may jeopardize the reliability of the ultrasound measurements. We evaluated systematically the effect of inclining an articular surface on the quantitative ultrasound parameters. Visually intact (n = 8) and mechanically degraded (n = 6) osteochondral bovine patella samples and spontaneously fibrillated (n = 1) and spontaneously proteoglycan depleted (n = 1) osteochondral human tibial samples were imaged using a 50-MHz scanning acoustic system. The surface of each sample was adjusted to predetermined inclination angles (0, 2, 5 and 7 degrees ) and five ultrasound scan lines along the direction of the inclination were analyzed. For each scan line, reflection coefficient (R), integrated reflection coefficient (IRC) and ultrasound roughness index (URI) were calculated. Nonperpendicularity of the cartilage surface was found to affect R, IRC and URI significantly (p < 0.05). Importantly, all ultrasound parameters were able to distinguish (p < 0.05) the mechanically degraded samples from the intact ones even though the angle of incidence of the ultrasound beam varied between 0 and 5 degrees among the samples. Diagnostically, the present findings are important because the natural curvature of the articular surface varies, and a perfect perpendicularity between the ultrasound beam and the surface of the cartilage may be challenging to achieve in a clinical measurement.

  1. Role of ultrasound in colorectal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bor, Renáta; Fábián, Anna; Szepes, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is an undervalued non-invasive examination in the diagnosis of colonic diseases. It has been replaced by the considerably more expensive magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography, despite the fact that, as first examination, it can usefully supplement the diagnostic process. Transabdominal ultrasound can provide quick information about bowel status and help in the choice of adequate further examinations and treatment. Ultrasonography, as a screening imaging modality in asymptomatic patients can identify several colonic diseases such as diverticulosis, inflammatory bowel disease or cancer. In addition, it is widely available, cheap, non-invasive technique without the use of ionizing radiation, therefore it is safe to use in childhood or during pregnancy, and can be repeated at any time. New ultrasound techniques such as elastography, contrast enhanced and Doppler ultrasound, mini-probes rectal and transperineal ultrasonography have broadened the indication. It gives an overview of the methodology of various ultrasound examinations, presents the morphology of normal bowel wall and the typical changes in different colonic diseases. We will pay particular attention to rectal and transperineal ultrasound because of their outstanding significance in the diagnosis of rectal and perineal disorders. This article seeks to overview the diagnostic impact and correct indications of bowel ultrasound. PMID:27920469

  2. Laser Doppler technology applied to atmospheric environmental operating problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, E. A.; Bilbro, J. W.; Dunkin, J. A.; Jeffreys, H. B.

    1976-01-01

    Carbon dioxide laser Doppler ground wind data were very favorably compared with data from standard anemometers. As a result of these measurements, two breadboard systems were developed for taking research data: a continuous wave velocimeter and a pulsed Doppler system. The scanning continuous wave laser Doppler velocimeter developed for detecting, tracking and measuring aircraft wake vortices was successfully tested at an airport where it located vortices to an accuracy of 3 meters at a range of 150 meters. The airborne pulsed laser Doppler system was developed to detect and measure clear air turbulence (CAT). This system was tested aboard an aircraft, but jet stream CAT was not encountered. However, low altitude turbulence in cumulus clouds near a mountain range was detected by the system and encountered by the aircraft at the predicted time.

  3. Doppler effect in optical velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinkevichius, Bronius S.

    1996-02-01

    The current state of the optical metrology based on the Doppler effect has been reviewed. Some historical and scientific information is given, in addition the contemporary optical methods of the velocity measurement using the Doppler effect are analyzed. The Doppler effect applications in astrophysics, plasma physics, investigations of gas and liquid flows, acoustics, mechanics of the deforming solid body and of the rotational motion are considered. The description is presented for the following techniques of the velocity measurement: laser Doppler anemometry, laser Doppler vibrometry, laser gyroscopy.

  4. 2-D multi-frequency imaging of a tumor inclusion in homogeneous breast phantom using harmonic motion doppler imaging method.

    PubMed

    Kamali Tafreshi, Azadeh; Top, Can; Gencer, Nevzat

    2017-02-02

    Harmonic Motion Microwave Doppler Imaging (HMMDI) is a novel imaging modality to image the coupled electrical and mechanical properties of body tissues. In this paper, we used two experimental systems with different receiver configurations to obtain HMMDI images from tissue mimicking phantoms at multiple vibration frequencies between 15 Hz and 35 Hz. In the first system, we used a spectrum analyzer to obtain the Doppler data in frequency domain, while in the second one, we used a homodyne receiver that was designed to acquire time domain data. The developed phantoms mimic elastic and dielectric properties of breast fat tissue, and include a 14 mm × 9 mm cylindrical inclusion representing tumor. A focused ultrasound probe was mechanically scanned in two lateral dimensions to generate HMMDI images of the phantoms. The inclusions were resolved inside the fat phantom using both experimental setups. Image resolution increased with increasing vibration frequency. The sensitivity of the designed receiver was higher compared to the spectrum analyzer measurements. The results also showed that time domain data acquisition should be used to fully exploit the potential of the HMMDI method.

  5. Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer by Tumor Epithelium-Targeted Molecular Ultrasound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    were examined. 3. Archived ultrasound images were examined off-line, ovarian tumor associated changes in gray scale intensity and Doppler indices...tumor was selected and the average image intensity (in pixel values) was determined using 7 Figure 1: Enhancement of ultrasound signal intensity ...16 targeted imaging agents increased ultrasound signal intensity remarkably in post-targeted imaging. The tumor showed septa of tissue mass during

  6. Laser Doppler anemometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dennis A.

    1988-01-01

    The material in this NASA TM is to appear as a chapter on Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) in the AGARDograph entitled, A Survey of Measurements and Measuring Techniques in Rapidly Distorted Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers. The application of LDA (specifically, the dual-beam, burst-counter approach) to compressible flows is discussed. Subjects treated include signal processing, particle light scattering and tracking, data reduction and sampling bias, and three-dimensional measurements.

  7. Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Werkmeister, René M.; Blatter, Cedric; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has revolutionized ophthalmology. Since its introduction in the early 1990s it has continuously improved in terms of speed, resolution and sensitivity. The technique has also seen a variety of extensions aiming to assess functional aspects of the tissue in addition to morphology. One of these approaches is Doppler OCT (DOCT), which aims to visualize and quantify blood flow. Such extensions were already implemented in time domain systems, but have gained importance with the introduction of Fourier domain OCT. Nowadays phase-sensitive detection techniques are most widely used to extract blood velocity and blood flow from tissues. A common problem with the technique is that the Doppler angle is not known and several approaches have been realized to obtain absolute velocity and flow data from the retina. Additional studies are required to elucidate which of these techniques is most promising. In the recent years, however, several groups have shown that data can be obtained with high validity and reproducibility. In addition, several groups have published values for total retinal blood flow. Another promising application relates to non-invasive angiography. As compared to standard techniques such as fluorescein and indocyanine-green angiography the technique offers two major advantages: no dye is required and depth resolution is required is provided. As such Doppler OCT has the potential to improve our abilities to diagnose and monitor ocular vascular diseases. PMID:24704352

  8. Laser double Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poffo, L.; Goujon, J.-M.; Le Page, R.; Lemaitre, J.; Guendouz, M.; Lorrain, N.; Bosc, D.

    2014-05-01

    The Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a non-invasive method for estimating the tissular blood flow and speed at a microscopic scale (microcirculation). It is used for medical research as well as for the diagnosis of diseases related to circulatory system tissues and organs including the issues of microvascular flow (perfusion). It is based on the Doppler effect, created by the interaction between the laser light and tissues. LDF measures the mean blood flow in a volume formed by the single laser beam, that penetrate into the skin. The size of this measurement volume is crucial and depends on skin absorption, and is not directly reachable. Therefore, current developments of the LDF are focused on the use of always more complex and sophisticated signal processing methods. On the other hand, laser Double Doppler Flowmeter (FL2D) proposes to use two laser beams to generate the measurement volume. This volume would be perfectly stable and localized at the intersection of the two laser beams. With FL2D we will be able to determine the absolute blood flow of a specific artery. One aimed application would be to help clinical physicians in health care units.

  9. Dove prism based rotating dual beam bidirectional Doppler OCT

    PubMed Central

    Blatter, Cedric; Coquoz, Séverine; Grajciar, Branislav; Singh, Amardeep S. G.; Bonesi, Marco; Werkmeister, René M.; Schmetterer, Leopold; Leitgeb, Rainer A.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional Doppler OCT is highly sensitive to motion artifacts due to the dependence on the Doppler angle. This limits its accuracy in clinical practice. To overcome this limitation, we use a bidirectional dual beam technique equipped with a novel rotating scanning scheme employing a Dove prism. The volume is probed from two distinct illumination directions with variable controlled incidence plane, allowing for reconstruction of the true flow velocity at arbitrary vessel orientations. The principle is implemented with Swept Source OCT at 1060nm with 100,000 A-Scans/s. We apply the system to resolve pulsatile retinal absolute blood velocity by performing segment scans around the optic nerve head and circumpapillary scan time series. PMID:23847742

  10. Cerebral Lateralization and General Intelligence: Gender Differences in a Transcranial Doppler Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Njemanze, P.C.

    2005-01-01

    The present study evaluated cerebral lateralization during Raven's progressive matrices (RPM) paradigm in female and male subjects. Bilateral simultaneous transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasound was used to measure mean blood flow velocities (MBFV) in the right and left middle cerebral arteries (MCAs) in 24 (15 females and 9 males) right-handed…

  11. Ultrasound in the evaluation of enthesitis: status and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction An increasing number of studies have applied ultrasound to the evaluation of entheses in spondyloarthritis patients. However, no clear agreement exists on the definition of enthesitis, on the number and choice of entheses to examine and on ultrasound technique, which may all affect the results of the examination. The objectives of this study were to first determine the level of homogeneity in the ultrasound definitions for the principal lesions of enthesitis in the published literature and second, to evaluate the metric properties of ultrasound for detecting enthesitis according to the OMERACT filter. Methods Search was performed in PUBMED and EMBASE. Both grey-scale and Doppler definitions of enthesitis, including describing features of enthesitis, were collected and metrological qualities of studies were assessed. Results After selection, 48 articles were analyzed. The definition of ultrasound enthesitis and elementary features varied among authors. Grey-scale enthesitis was characterized by increasing thickness (94% of studies), hypoechogenicity (83%), enthesophytes (69%), erosions (67%), calcifications (52%), associated bursitis (46%) and cortical irregularities (29%). Only 46% of studies reported the use of Doppler. High discrepancies were observed on frequency, type of probe and Doppler mode used. Face and content validity were the most frequently evaluated criteria (43%) followed by reliability (29%) and responsiveness (19%). Conclusions Ultrasound has evidence to support face, content validity and reliability for the evaluation of enthesitis, though there is a lack of well-reported methodology in most of the studies. Consensus on elementary lesions and standardization of exam is needed to determine the ultrasound definition of enthesitis in grey-scale and in Doppler for future applications. PMID:22093457

  12. Nuclear Scans

    MedlinePlus

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  13. WBC scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the body. It is a type of nuclear scan . How the Test is Performed Blood will ... radiation. Due to the slight radiation exposure, most nuclear scans (including WBC scan) are not recommended for ...

  14. Liver scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nuclear scan - technetium; Nuclear scan - liver or spleen Images Liver scan References Lidofsky S. Jaundice. In: Feldman M, ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  15. PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... may have an allergic reaction to the tracer material. Some people have pain, redness, or swelling at ... with diabetes. Most PET scans are now performed along with a CT scan. This combination scan ...

  16. Standardized ultrasound evaluation of carotid stenosis for clinical trials: University of Washington Ultrasound Reading Center

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Serial monitoring of patients participating in clinical trials of carotid artery therapy requires noninvasive precision methods that are inexpensive, safe and widely available. Noninvasive ultrasonic duplex Doppler velocimetry provides a precision method that can be used for recruitment qualification, pre-treatment classification and post treatment surveillance for remodeling and restenosis. The University of Washington Ultrasound Reading Center (UWURC) provides a uniform examination protocol and interpretation of duplex Doppler velocity measurements. Methods Doppler waveforms from 6 locations along the common carotid and internal carotid artery path to the brain plus the external carotid and vertebral arteries on each side using a Doppler examination angle of 60 degrees are evaluated. The UWURC verifies all measurements against the images and waveforms for the database, which includes pre-procedure, post-procedure and annual follow-up examinations. Doppler angle alignment errors greater than 3 degrees and Doppler velocity measurement errors greater than 0.05 m/s are corrected. Results Angle adjusted Doppler velocity measurements produce higher values when higher Doppler examination angles are used. The definition of peak systolic velocity varies between examiners when spectral broadening due to turbulence is present. Examples of measurements are shown. Discussion Although ultrasonic duplex Doppler methods are widely used in carotid artery diagnosis, there is disagreement about how the examinations should be performed and how the results should be validated. In clinical trails, a centralized reading center can unify the methods. Because the goals of research examinations are different from those of clinical examinations, screening and diagnostic clinical examinations may require fewer velocity measurements. PMID:20822530

  17. Color-Doppler US features of a pyogenic granuloma of the upper dorsum tongue.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Vito; Del Vecchio, Alessandro; Fioravanti, Eloisa; Romeo, Umberto; D'Ambrosio, Ferdinando

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of oral lesions is based on clinical history, clinical examination and imaging exams. Different imaging modalities are available for the diagnosis and follow-up of these lesions such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, color-Doppler ultrasound, angiography and positron emission tomography. To date, color-Doppler ultrasound is considered the first-line imaging approach since it provides a non-invasive, cost-effective, real-time evaluation of oral anomalies. It provides both morphological and vascular information which are useful to determine the best therapeutic options. Differential diagnosis of a bleeding lobular mass of the tongue is, however, not always easy and includes several vascular and non-vascular lesions. We present herein a case of pyogenic granuloma of the tongue that at Color-Doppler US appeared as hypervascular lesion.

  18. Ultrasound - Scrotum

    MedlinePlus

    ... especially when the mass is solid). Blood flow images of the testicles are not always reliable in determining the presence or absence of blood supply to a testicle that has twisted. When searching for an absent testicle, ultrasound may not be ...

  19. Laser Doppler diagnostics for orthodontia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhkova, Anastasia V.; Lebedeva, Nina G.; Sedykh, Alexey V.; Ulyanov, Sergey S.; Lepilin, Alexander V.; Kharish, Natalia A.

    2004-06-01

    The results of statistical analysis of Doppler spectra of intensity fluctuations of light, scattered from mucous membrane of oral cavity of healthy volunteers and patients, abused by the orthodontic diseases, are presented. Analysis of Doppler spectra, obtained from tooth pulp of patients, is carried out. New approach to monitoring of blood microcirculation in orthodontics is suggested. Influence of own noise of Doppler measuring system on formation of the output signal is studied.

  20. Development of quantitative Doppler indices for uteroplacental and fetal blood flow during the third trimester.

    PubMed

    Joern, H; Funk, A; Goetz, M; Kuehlwein, H; Klein, A; Fendel, H

    1996-01-01

    The aim of our study was to describe the development of uteroplacental and fetal blood flow during the third trimester. Doppler examination was carried out on 393 uncomplicated pregnancies with uncomplicated term delivery. Using a pulsed color Doppler, we calculated the maximum systolic, mean and maximum end-diastolic velocity after correcting the angle of insonation. Patients under tocolysis or other medication influencing blood flow parameters were excluded from this cross-sectional study. Summarizing the results gained by Doppler ultrasound investigation of the uteroplacental and fetal blood vessels, we created quantiles as quantitative Doppler indices for the maximum systolic, mean (TAMX = time averaged maximum velocity) and maximum end-diastolic velocity. The following conclusions could be drawn: (1) resistance to the blood flow in the maternal portion of the placenta does not change during the third trimester; (2) resistance to the blood flow on the fetal side of the placenta decreases up to week 42 of gestation; (3) cerebral vascular resistance decreases constantly up to gestational week 42; and (4) vascular resistance to the blood flow of the kidney decreases only slightly during the third trimester. This study offers clinically important values for quantitative Doppler flow velocimetry for the first time. We hope that our findings improve the usefulness of Doppler ultrasound as a diagnostic tool in obstetrical management.

  1. Ultrasound guided fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baoqiang; Lesage, Frederic

    2012-10-01

    In this study, a hybrid-model imaging system combining fluorescence and ultrasound (US) was investigated with the motivation of providing structural priors towards improvement of fluorescence reconstruction. A single element transducer was scanned over the sample for anatomy. In the fluorescence part, a laser source was scanned over the sample with the emission received by an EMCCD camera. Synchronization was achieved by a pair of motorized linear stages. Structural information was derived from the US images and a profilometry and used to constrain reconstruction. In the reconstruction, we employed a GPU-based Monte Carlo simulation for forward modeling and a pattern-based method to take advantage of the huge dataset for the inverse problem. Performance of this system was validated with two phantoms with fluorophore inclusions. The results indicated that the fluorophore distribution could be accurately reconstructed. And the system has a potential for the future in-vivo study.

  2. Immersion ultrasonography: simultaneous A-scan and B-scan.

    PubMed

    Coleman, D J; Dallow, R L; Smith, M E

    1979-01-01

    In eyes with opaque media, ophthalmic ultrasound provides a unique source of information that can dramatically affect the course of patient management. In addition, when an ocular abnormality can be visualized, ultrasonography provides information that supplements and complements other diagnostic testing. It provides documentation and differentiation of abnormal states, such as vitreous hemorrhage and intraocular tumor, as well as differentiation of orbital tumors from inflammatory causes of exophthalmos. Additional capabilities of ultrasound are biometric determinations for calculation of intraocular lens implant powers and drug-effectiveness studies. Maximal information is derived from ultrasonography when A-scan and B-scan techniques are employed simultaneously. Flexibility of electronics, variable-frequency transducers, and the use of several different manual scanning patterns aid in detection and interpretation of results. The immersion system of ultrasonography provides these features optimally.

  3. Laser Doppler velocimetry primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, William D.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced research in experimental fluid dynamics required a familiarity with sophisticated measurement techniques. In some cases, the development and application of new techniques is required for difficult measurements. Optical methods and in particular, the laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) are now recognized as the most reliable means for performing measurements in complex turbulent flows. And such, the experimental fluid dynamicist should be familiar with the principles of operation of the method and the details associated with its application. Thus, the goals of this primer are to efficiently transmit the basic concepts of the LDV method to potential users and to provide references that describe the specific areas in greater detail.

  4. Investigation of Ultrasound-Measured Flow Velocity, Flow Rate and Wall Shear Rate in Radial and Ulnar Arteries Using Simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaowei; Xia, Chunming; Stephen, Gandy; Khan, Faisel; Corner, George A; Hoskins, Peter R; Huang, Zhihong

    2017-02-21

    Parameters of blood flow measured by ultrasound in radial and ulnar arteries, such as flow velocity, flow rate and wall shear rate, are widely used in clinical practice and clinical research. Investigation of these measurements is useful for evaluating accuracy and providing knowledge of error sources. A method for simulating the spectral Doppler ultrasound measurement process was developed with computational fluid dynamics providing flow-field data. Specific scanning factors were adjusted to investigate their influence on estimation of the maximum velocity waveform, and flow rate and wall shear rate were derived using the Womersley equation. The overestimation in maximum velocity increases greatly (peak systolic from about 10% to 30%, time-averaged from about 30% to 50%) when the beam-vessel angle is changed from 30° to 70°. The Womersley equation was able to estimate flow rate in both arteries with less than 3% error, but performed better in the radial artery (2.3% overestimation) than the ulnar artery (15.4% underestimation) in estimating wall shear rate. It is concluded that measurements of flow parameters in the radial and ulnar arteries with clinical ultrasound scanners are prone to clinically significant errors.

  5. Ultrasound lung comets: a clinically useful sign of extravascular lung water.

    PubMed

    Picano, Eugenio; Frassi, Francesca; Agricola, Eustachio; Gligorova, Suzana; Gargani, Luna; Mottola, Gaetano

    2006-03-01

    Assessment of extravascular lung water is a challenging task for the clinical cardiologist and an elusive target for the echocardiographer. Today chest x-ray is considered the best way to assess extravascular lung water objectively, but this requires radiology facilities and specific reading expertise, uses ionizing energy, and poses a significant logistic burden. Recently, a new method was developed using echocardiography (with cardiac probes) of the lung. An increase in extravascular lung water-as assessed independently by chest computed tomography, chest x-ray, and thermodilution techniques-is mirrored by appearance of ultrasound lung comets (ULCs). ULCs consist of multiple comet tails originating from water-thickened interlobular septa and fanning out from the lung surface. The technique requires ultrasound scanning of the anterior right and left chest, from the second to the fifth intercostal space. It is simple (with a learning curve of < 10 examinations) and fast to perform (requiring < 3 minutes). ULC assessment is independent of the cardiac acoustic window, because the lung on the anterior chest is scanned. It requires very basic 2-D technology imaging, even without a second harmonic or Doppler. ULCs probably represent an ultrasonic equivalent of radiologic Kerley B-lines. On still-frame assessment, cardiogenic watery comets can be difficult to distinguish from pneumogenic fibrotic comets, although the latter are usually more localized and are not dissolved by an acute diuretic challenge. Functionally, ULCs are a sign of distress of the alveolar-capillary membrane, often associated with reduced ejection fraction and increased pulmonary wedge pressure. The ULC sign is quantitative, reproducible, and ideally suited to complement conventional echocardiography in the evaluation of heart failure patients in the emergency department (for the differential diagnosis of dyspnea), in-hospital evaluation (for tailoring diuretic therapy), home care (with portable

  6. Ultrasound Techniques for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rooney, James A.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasound has proven to be a safe non-invasive technique for imaging organs and measuring cardiovascular function. It has unique advantages for application to problems with man in space including evaluation of cardiovascular function both in serial studies and during critical operations. In addition, specialized instrumentation may be capable of detecting the onset of decompression sickness during EVA activities. A spatial location and three-dimensional reconstruction system is being developed to improve the accuracy and reproducibility for serial comparative ultrasound studies of cardiovascular function. The three-dimensional method permits the acquisition of ultrasonic images from many views that can be recombined into a single reconstruction of the heart or vasculature. In addition to conventional imaging and monitoring systems, it is sometimes necessary or desirable to develop instrumentation for special purposes. One example of this type of development is the design of a pulsed-Doppler system to monitor cerebral blood flow during critical operations such as re-entry. A second example is the design of a swept-frequency ultrasound system for the detection of bubbles in the circulatory system and/or soft tissues as an early indication of the onset of decompression sickness during EVA activities. This system exploits the resonant properties of bubbles and can detect both fundamental and second harmonic emissions from the insonified region.

  7. Quantitative Analysis of Vascular Heterogeneity in Breast Lesions Using Contrast-Enhanced 3-D Harmonic and Subharmonic Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R.; Machado, Priscilla; Ojeda-Fournier, Haydee; Wilkes, Annina; Sevrukov, Alexander; Mattrey, Robert F.; Wallace, Kirk; Chalek, Carl L.; Thomenius, Kai E.; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Ability to visualize breast lesion vascularity and quantify the vascular heterogeneity using contrast-enhanced 3-D harmonic (HI) and subharmonic (SHI) ultrasound imaging was investigated in a clinical population. Patients (n = 134) identified with breast lesions on mammography were scanned using power Doppler imaging, contrast-enhanced 3-D HI, and 3-D SHI on a modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare). A region of interest corresponding to ultrasound contrast agent flow was identified in 4D View (GE Medical Systems) and mapped to raw slice data to generate a map of time-intensity curves for the lesion volume. Time points corresponding to baseline, peak intensity, and washout of ultrasound contrast agent were identified and used to generate and compare vascular heterogeneity plots for malignant and benign lesions. Vascularity was observed with power Doppler imaging in 84 lesions (63 benign and 21 malignant). The 3-D HI showed flow in 8 lesions (5 benign and 3 malignant), whereas 3-D SHI visualized flow in 68 lesions (49 benign and 19 malignant). Analysis of vascular heterogeneity in the 3-D SHI volumes found benign lesions having a significant difference in vascularity between central and peripheral sections (1.71 ± 0.96 vs. 1.13 ± 0.79 dB, p < 0.001, respectively), whereas malignant lesions showed no difference (1.66 ± 1.39 vs. 1.24 ± 1.14 dB, p = 0.24), indicative of more vascular coverage. These preliminary results suggest quantitative evaluation of vascular heterogeneity in breast lesions using contrast-enhanced 3-D SHI is feasible and able to detect variations in vascularity between central and peripheral sections for benign and malignant lesions. PMID:25935933

  8. Quantitative analysis of vascular heterogeneity in breast lesions using contrast-enhanced 3-D harmonic and subharmonic ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R; Machado, Priscilla; Ojeda-Fournier, Haydee; Wilkes, Annina; Sevrukov, Alexander; Mattrey, Robert F; Wallace, Kirk; Chalek, Carl L; Thomenius, Kai E; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-03-01

    Ability to visualize breast lesion vascularity and quantify the vascular heterogeneity using contrast-enhanced 3-D harmonic (HI) and subharmonic (SHI) ultrasound imaging was investigated in a clinical population. Patients (n = 134) identified with breast lesions on mammography were scanned using power Doppler imaging, contrast-enhanced 3-D HI, and 3-D SHI on a modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare). A region of interest corresponding to ultrasound contrast agent flow was identified in 4D View (GE Medical Systems) and mapped to raw slice data to generate a map of time-intensity curves for the lesion volume. Time points corresponding to baseline, peak intensity, and washout of ultrasound contrast agent were identified and used to generate and compare vascular heterogeneity plots for malignant and benign lesions. Vascularity was observed with power Doppler imaging in 84 lesions (63 benign and 21 malignant). The 3-D HI showed flow in 8 lesions (5 benign and 3 malignant), whereas 3-D SHI visualized flow in 68 lesions (49 benign and 19 malignant). Analysis of vascular heterogeneity in the 3-D SHI volumes found benign lesions having a significant difference in vascularity between central and peripheral sections (1.71 ± 0.96 vs. 1.13 ± 0.79 dB, p < 0.001, respectively), whereas malignant lesions showed no difference (1.66 ± 1.39 vs. 1.24 ± 1.14 dB, p = 0.24), indicative of more vascular coverage. These preliminary results suggest quantitative evaluation of vascular heterogeneity in breast lesions using contrast-enhanced 3-D SHI is feasible and able to detect variations in vascularity between central and peripheral sections for benign and malignant lesions.

  9. Imaging doppler lidar for wind turbine wake profiling

    DOEpatents

    Bossert, David J.

    2015-11-19

    An imaging Doppler lidar (IDL) enables the measurement of the velocity distribution of a large volume, in parallel, and at high spatial resolution in the wake of a wind turbine. Because the IDL is non-scanning, it can be orders of magnitude faster than conventional coherent lidar approaches. Scattering can be obtained from naturally occurring aerosol particles. Furthermore, the wind velocity can be measured directly from Doppler shifts of the laser light, so the measurement can be accomplished at large standoff and at wide fields-of-view.

  10. Robust estimation of fetal heart rate from US Doppler signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voicu, Iulian; Girault, Jean-Marc; Roussel, Catherine; Decock, Aliette; Kouame, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: In utero, Monitoring of fetal wellbeing or suffering is today an open challenge, due to the high number of clinical parameters to be considered. An automatic monitoring of fetal activity, dedicated for quantifying fetal wellbeing, becomes necessary. For this purpose and in a view to supply an alternative for the Manning test, we used an ultrasound multitransducer multigate Doppler system. One important issue (and first step in our investigation) is the accurate estimation of fetal heart rate (FHR). An estimation of the FHR is obtained by evaluating the autocorrelation function of the Doppler signals for ills and healthiness foetus. However, this estimator is not enough robust since about 20% of FHR are not detected in comparison to a reference system. These non detections are principally due to the fact that the Doppler signal generated by the fetal moving is strongly disturbed by the presence of others several Doppler sources (mother' s moving, pseudo breathing, etc.). By modifying the existing method (autocorrelation method) and by proposing new time and frequency estimators used in the audio' s domain, we reduce to 5% the probability of non-detection of the fetal heart rate. These results are really encouraging and they enable us to plan the use of automatic classification techniques in order to discriminate between healthy and in suffering foetus.

  11. Widefield laser doppler velocimeter: development and theory.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansche, Bruce David; Reu, Phillip L.; Massad, Jordan Elias

    2007-03-01

    The widefield laser Doppler velocimeter is a new measurement technique that significantly expands the functionality of a traditional scanning system. This new technique allows full-field velocity measurements without scanning, a drawback of traditional measurement techniques. This is particularly important for tests in which the sample is destroyed or the motion of the sample is non-repetitive. The goal of creating ''velocity movies'' was accomplished during the research, and this report describes the current functionality and operation of the system. The mathematical underpinnings and system setup are thoroughly described. Two prototype experiments are then presented to show the practical use of the current system. Details of the corresponding hardware used to collect the data and the associated software to analyze the data are presented.

  12. Doppler ultrasound exam of an arm or leg

    MedlinePlus

    ... later. The test is done to help diagnose: Arteriosclerosis of the arms or legs Blood clot (deep ... the wrong direction in veins) Arterial occlusion from atherosclerosis This test may also be done to help ...

  13. [A versatile phantom for hemodynamic measurements with ultrasound Doppler equipment].

    PubMed

    von Boetticher, H; Delebinski, R; Risch, U; Luska, G

    1994-10-01

    The test object described comprises a blood simulating liquid pumped through tubes embedded in tissue-mimicking material. The main components of the system can be realised in different ways. They are largely exchangeable with each other. Water, reticulated foam or silicone rubber is used as bulk background material, blood vessels are simulated using latex or silicone tubes or heat-shrink sleeving; in the artificial blood, sephadex particles or silicone emulsion were used as scatterers. The suspension of scattering particles is driven by a roller pump or a membrane dosage pump. The features of the components are described and the applications of the different phantoms discussed.

  14. A novel approach for Doppler blood flow measurement.

    PubMed

    McNamara, D M; Goli, A; Ziarani, A K

    2008-01-01

    A new approach to frequency estimation for the velocity estimation in Doppler ultrasound blood flow analysis is presented. The basis of the approach is an adaptive sinusoid-tracking algorithm which is effective in extracting nonstationary signals from within noise and estimating their time-varying parameters, such as the frequency, over time. The preliminary studies conducted using simulated signals show the potential of this approach in estimating Doppler frequency shifts under noisy conditions. A qualitative comparison with the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) is presented to show the advantages of the proposed technique over the STFT. The proposed approach offers advantages over conventional time-frequency analysis techniques in terms of high time-frequency resolution and high noise immunity.

  15. 3D dynamic model of healthy and pathologic arteries for ultrasound technique evaluation.

    PubMed

    Balocco, Simone; Basset, Olivier; Azencot, Jacques; Tortoli, Piero; Cachard, Christian

    2008-12-01

    A 3D model reproducing the biomechanical behavior of human blood vessels is presented. The model, based on a multilayer geometry composed of right generalized cylinders, enables the representation of different vessel morphologies, including bifurcations, either healthy or affected by stenoses. Using a finite element approach, blood flow is simulated by considering a dynamic displacement of the scatterers (erythrocytes), while arterial pulsation due to the hydraulic pressure is taken into account through a fluid-structure interaction based on a wall model. Each region is acoustically characterized using FIELD II software, which produces the radio frequency echo signals corresponding to echographic scans. Three acoustic physiological phantoms of carotid arteries surrounded by elastic tissue are presented to illustrate the model's capability. The first corresponds to a healthy blood vessel, the second includes a 50% stenosis, and the third represents a carotid bifurcation. Examples of M mode, B mode and color Doppler images derived from these phantoms are shown. Two examples of M-mode image segmentation and the identification of the atherosclerotic plaque boundaries on Doppler color images are reported. The model could be used as a tool for the preliminary evaluation of ultrasound signal processing and visualization techniques.

  16. Doppler Beats or Interference Fringes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Paul S.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the following: another version of Doppler beats; alternate proof of spin-1 sin-1/2 problems; some mechanisms related to Dirac's strings; Doppler redshift in oblique approach of source and observer; undergraduate experiment on noise thermometry; use of the time evolution operator; resolution of an entropy maximization controversy;…

  17. Ultrasound for fetal assessment in early pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Whitworth, Melissa; Bricker, Leanne; Neilson, James P; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-01-01

    Background Diagnostic ultrasound is a sophisticated electronic technology, which utilises pulses of high frequency sound to produce an image. Diagnostic ultrasound examination may be employed in a variety of specific circumstances during pregnancy such as after clinical complications, or where there are concerns about fetal growth. Because adverse outcomes may also occur in pregnancies without clear risk factors, assumptions have been made that routine ultrasound in all pregnancies will prove beneficial by enabling earlier detection and improved management of pregnancy complications. Routine screening may be planned for early pregnancy, late gestation, or both. The focus of this review is routine early pregnancy ultrasound. Objectives To assess whether routine early pregnancy ultrasound for fetal assessment (i.e. its use as a screening technique) influences the diagnosis of fetal malformations, multiple pregnancies, the rate of clinical interventions, and the incidence of adverse fetal outcome when compared with the selective use of early pregnancy ultrasound (for specific indications). Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (September 2009). Selection criteria Published, unpublished, and ongoing randomised controlled trials that compared outcomes in women who experienced routine versus selective early pregnancy ultrasound (i.e. less than 24 weeks’ gestation). We have included quasi-randomised trials. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data for each included study. We used the Review Manager software to enter and analyse data. Main results Routine/revealed ultrasound versus selective ultrasound/concealed: 11 trials including 37505 women. Ultrasound for fetal assessment in early pregnancy reduces the failure to detect multiple pregnancy by 24 weeks’ gestation (risk ratio (RR) 0.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03 to 0.17). Routine scan is associated with a reduction in

  18. Eye and orbit ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Echography - eye orbit; Ultrasound - eye orbit; Ocular ultrasonography; Orbital ultrasonography ... ophthalmology department of a hospital or clinic. Your eye is numbed with medicine (anesthetic drops). The ultrasound ...

  19. Transcranial Doppler: Techniques and advanced applications: Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arvind K.; Bathala, Lokesh; Batra, Amit; Mehndiratta, Man Mohan; Sharma, Vijay K.

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) is the only diagnostic tool that can provide continuous information about cerebral hemodynamics in real time and over extended periods. In the previous paper (Part 1), we have already presented the basic ultrasound physics pertaining to TCD, insonation methods, and various flow patterns. This article describes various advanced applications of TCD such as detection of right-to-left shunt, emboli monitoring, vasomotor reactivity (VMR), monitoring of vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), monitoring of intracranial pressure, its role in stoke prevention in sickle cell disease, and as a supplementary test for confirmation of brain death. PMID:27011639

  20. Bone Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mayo Clinic Staff A bone scan is a nuclear imaging test that helps diagnose and track several ... you're nursing. A bone scan is a nuclear imaging procedure. In nuclear imaging, tiny amounts of ...