Science.gov

Sample records for doppler velocity measurements

  1. Velocity precision measurements using laser Doppler anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopheide, D.; Taux, G.; Narjes, L.

    1985-07-01

    A Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) was calibrated to determine its applicability to high pressure measurements (up to 10 bars) for industrial purposes. The measurement procedure with LDA and the experimental computerized layouts are presented. The calibration procedure is based on absolute accuracy of Doppler frequency and calibration of interference strip intervals. A four-quadrant detector allows comparison of the interference strip distance measurements and computer profiles. Further development of LDA is recommended to increase accuracy (0.1% inaccuracy) and to apply the method industrially.

  2. Laser Doppler instrument measures fluid velocity without reference beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourquin, K. R.; Shigemoto, F. H.

    1971-01-01

    Fluid velocity is measured by focusing laser beam on moving fluid and measuring Doppler shift in frequency which results when radiation is scattered by particles either originally present or deliberately injected into moving fluid.

  3. Doppler radar velocity measurements for wound ballistics experiments.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, P J; Svender, J

    1994-01-01

    Bullet velocity is a basic parameter in wound ballistics studies. It is usually measured electronically by means of a variety of solid or photoelectric barriers connected to equipment measuring the time elapsing between impulses, enabling the velocity to be calculated. With the advent of Doppler radar velocity measurement of large calibre artillery shells, the use of this equipment for wound ballistics experiments was investigated. Anaesthetized pigs were shot at a range of 9-10 metres and the velocities measured by Doppler radar and photocells were compared. A very good correspondence between the measured entry and exit velocities in low and medium velocity bullets was found, i.e. an average deviation of less than 1% (range 0-2%) between the two types of equipment. In high velocity bullets measurement of entry velocities was just as good, but in both methods measurement of the exit velocity was complicated by the cluttering of signals by fragments of tissue released from the exit wound and the deflection of the bullet, Doppler radar offers important benefits - simple set up, minimal risk of damage of equipment by stray bullets and very good accuracy - and may replace photocells and similar equipment in studies involving low and medium velocity bullets. Measurement of the exit velocity of high velocity bullets is unsatisfactory in both methods, and it is necessary to improve the Doppler radar method in order to measure that as well.

  4. Exploratory Meeting on Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, G. H. (Editor); Kaufman, J. W. (Editor); Vaughan, W. W. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The scientific interests and applications of the Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurement System to severe storms and local weather are discussed. The main areas include convective phenomena, local circulation, atmospheric boundary layer, atmospheric dispersion, and industrial aerodynamics.

  5. Doppler velocity measurements from large and small arteries of mice

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Anilkumar K.; Madala, Sridhar; Entman, Mark L.; Michael, Lloyd H.; Taffet, George E.

    2011-01-01

    With the growth of genetic engineering, mice have become increasingly common as models of human diseases, and this has stimulated the development of techniques to assess the murine cardiovascular system. Our group has developed nonimaging and dedicated Doppler techniques for measuring blood velocity in the large and small peripheral arteries of anesthetized mice. We translated technology originally designed for human vessels for use in smaller mouse vessels at higher heart rates by using higher ultrasonic frequencies, smaller transducers, and higher-speed signal processing. With these methods one can measure cardiac filling and ejection velocities, velocity pulse arrival times for determining pulse wave velocity, peripheral blood velocity and vessel wall motion waveforms, jet velocities for the calculation of the pressure drop across stenoses, and left main coronary velocity for the estimation of coronary flow reserve. These noninvasive methods are convenient and easy to apply, but care must be taken in interpreting measurements due to Doppler sample volume size and angle of incidence. Doppler methods have been used to characterize and evaluate numerous cardiovascular phenotypes in mice and have been particularly useful in evaluating the cardiac and vascular remodeling that occur following transverse aortic constriction. Although duplex ultrasonic echo-Doppler instruments are being applied to mice, dedicated Doppler systems are more suitable for some applications. The magnitudes and waveforms of blood velocities from both cardiac and peripheral sites are similar in mice and humans, such that much of what is learned using Doppler technology in mice may be translated back to humans. PMID:21572013

  6. Influence of speckle effect on doppler velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zheng; Changming, Zhao; Haiyang, Zhang; Suhui, Yang; Dehua, Zhang; Xingyuan, Zheng; Hongzhi, Yang

    2016-06-01

    In a coherent Lidar system, velocity measurement of a target is achieved by measuring Doppler frequency shift between the echo and local oscillator (LO) signals. The measurement accuracy is proportional to the spectrum width of Doppler signal. Actually, the speckle effect caused by the scattering of laser from a target will broaden the Doppler signal's spectrum and bring uncertainty to the velocity measurement. In this paper, a theoretical model is proposed to predict the broadening of Doppler spectrum with respect to different target's surface and motion parameters. The velocity measurement uncertainty caused by the broadening of spectrum is analyzed. Based on the analysis, we design a coherent Lidar system to measure the velocity of the targets with different surface roughness and transverse velocities. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical analysis. It is found that the target's surface roughness and transverse velocity can significantly affect the spectrum width of Doppler signal. With the increase of surface roughness and transverse velocity, the measurement accuracy becomes worse. However, the influence of surface roughness becomes weaker when the spot size of laser beam on the target is smaller.

  7. A novel photonic Doppler velocimetry for transverse velocity measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Guanghua; Wang Detian; Liu Jun; Meng Jianhua; Liu Shouxian; Yang Qingguo

    2013-01-15

    A fiber interferometry for transverse velocity measurement has been developed. This diagnostic is similar to photonic Doppler velocimetry in the way in which laser propagates and couples. The interferometer mainly consists of a fiber coupler, an emitting probe, and two receiving probes. A pair of scattered laser beams mix in the coupler and generates fringes with frequency proportional to transverse velocity. Measurement of transverse velocity is independent of longitudinal velocity. The feasibility of the technique has been verified by rotating wheel experiment and shock loading experiment.

  8. Measurement of vertical velocity using clear-air Doppler radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzandt, T. E.; Green, J. L.; Nastrom, G. D.; Gage, K. S.; Clark, W. L.; Warnock, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    A new clear air Doppler radar was constructed, called the Flatland radar, in very flat terrain near Champaign-Urbana, Illinois. The radar wavelength is 6.02 m. The radar has been measuring vertical velocity every 153 s with a range resolution of 750 m almost continuously since March 2, 1987. The variance of vertical velocity at Flatland is usually quite small, comparable to the variance at radars located near rough terrain during periods of small background wind. The absence of orographic effects over very flat terrain suggests that clear air Doppler radars can be used to study vertical velocities due to other processes, including synoptic scale motions and propagating gravity waves. For example, near rough terrain the shape of frequency spectra changes drastically as the background wind increases. But at Flatland the shape at periods shorter than a few hours changes only slowly, consistent with the changes predicted by Doppler shifting of gravity wave spectra. Thus it appears that the short period fluctuations of vertical velocity at Flatland are alsmost entirely due to the propagating gravity waves.

  9. Doppler instrumentation for measuring blood velocity and flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, R. W.; Hottinger, C. F.; Meindl, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Doppler ultrasonic blood flowmeters are reviewed in detail. The importance of measurement accuracy for transcutaneous flowmeters and their clinical application is stressed. Doppler imaging was combined with conventional pulse echo imaging, and diagnostic information was extracted from flow signals. The range and extent of applications of Doppler instruments was also presented.

  10. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler.

    PubMed

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions. PMID:27446707

  11. Velocity measurements in whole blood using acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry promises to overcome the spatial resolution and depth penetration limitations of current blood flow measuring methods. Despite successful implementation using blood-mimicking fluids, measurements in blood have proved challenging, thus preventing in vivo application. A common explanation for this difficulty is that whole blood is insufficiently heterogeneous relative to detector frequencies of tens of MHz compatible with deep tissue photoacoustic measurements. Through rigorous experimental measurements we provide new insight that refutes this assertion. We show for the first time that, by careful choice of the detector frequency and field-of-view, and by employing novel signal processing methods, it is possible to make velocity measurements in whole blood using transducers with frequencies in the tens of MHz range. These findings have important implications for the prospects of making deep tissue measurements of blood flow relevant to the study of microcirculatory abnormalities associated with cancer, diabetes, atherosclerosis and other conditions. PMID:27446707

  12. Laser Doppler velocity measurements of swirling flows with upstream influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rloff, K. L.; Bossel, H. H.

    1973-01-01

    Swirling flow in a rotating tube is studied by flow visualization at a moderate Reynolds number, and its velocity field is measured by laser-Doppler anemometry. The tube has constant diameter, and approximately uniform initial rigid rotation of the flow is assured by passing the flow through a rotating plug of porous metal before it enters the test section. At moderate swirl values, an object mounted on the tube centerline causes a closed bubble to form upstream of the obstacle, with a clearly defined stagnation point on the axis, and recirculating flow inside the bubble. The bubble length grows upstream as the swirl is increased, until it breaks up into a Taylor column reaching all the way upstream and downstream at swirl values above a certain critical value. A vortex jump (in the sense of Benjamin) occurs downstream of the obstacle except when the Taylor column is present. Using a laser-Doppler anemometer, axial and swirl velocity profiles are obtained at several stations upstream and downstream of the bubble, and in and around the bubble.

  13. Vertical wind velocity measurements by a Doppler lidar and comparisons with a Doppler sodar.

    PubMed

    Congeduti, F; Fiocco, G; Adriani, A; Guarrella, C

    1981-06-15

    A Doppler lidar based on a single frequency Ar(+) laser and a spherical Fabry-Perot interferometer is used to study the vertical velocity field in the planetary boundary layer. The wind velocity information is obtained by spectral analysis of the aerosol backscatter. The internal consistency of the lidar measurements points to a precision of 0.1 msec(-1) obtained for scans of ~25-sec duration and a good level of the received signal at a height of a few hundred meters and a vertical resolution of 75 m. A Doppler sodar was simultaneously operated to provide independent measurements of vertical velocity. The tests were carried out during nights characterized by horizontal winds <1 msec(-1). The axes of the two systems were displaced by 53 m, and the two beams overlapped only above ~300 m. The values of the correlation coefficient function between the two outputs for 100 data sets were ~0.5. A comparison of the velocity power spectra provided by the two systems shows good agreement at small values of the frequency; at large values, because of the limited spatial resolution of the sodar, its readings were consistently lower than those of the lidar.

  14. Doppler velocity measurements using a phase-stabilized michelson spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeets, G.

    1993-10-01

    Laser Doppler systems have become classical means of nonintrusively recording velocities in all kinds of flow fields. With the system mostly used, the so-called Doppler differential velocimeter, tracer particles incorporated in the flow are illuminated by two laser beams from slightly different directions, and the velocity is derived from the beating frequency of the two scattered light waves on the cathode of a photomultiplier. As the intersecting beams form equidistant light sheets within the probe volume by their interference, it is desirable, as is the case with any technique creating light barriers in space, that particles should pass the grid individually. The particles should be of a suitable size: large enough to scatter sufficient light for a good signal-to-noise ratio but small enough for negligible velocity relaxation and true indication of the turbulent velocity fluctuations. In most applications of this technique, e.g. in wind tunnel experiments, particles of controlled size and number density are seeded into the upstream flow.

  15. Theoretical analysis of the ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter for measurements of high flow velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabin, Jozef

    1987-07-01

    A geometric approach is used to analyze the ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter for measurements of flow velocities that are high but yet much smaller than the ultrasound velocity. The approach is based on the calculation of the transit time difference between the ultrasonic waves that are reflected from a moving particle at its various positions. Beam divergence is taken into account, and each path of the ultrasonic wave propagation is approximated by two rectilinear components. It is shown that the Doppler frequency shift is influenced not only by the suspended particle velocity, but also by the mean flow velocity of the fluid. This influence is of second order in the flow velocity.

  16. Doppler shift and ambiguity velocity caused by relative motion in quantum-enhanced measurement.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanghe; Xu, Luping; Zhang, Hua; Yang, Peng

    2015-07-13

    We study the effect of relative motion on a frequency-entangled-based ranging scheme. Two major puzzles arise, i.e., Doppler shift and ambiguity velocity. During condition of rapid relative motion, Doppler shift invalidates the measurement result of this scheme; while during condition of slow relative motion, the ambiguity velocity turns into a major limitation. If relative speed between targets and measurement platform exceeds the ambiguity velocity, an accumulated profile obtained by the coincidence measurement will be distorted, which causes a lower ranging accuracy. Theoretical analysis shows a time-varying delay can be introduced to solve the two major puzzles. PMID:26191903

  17. 3D velocity measurement by a single camera using Doppler phase-shifting holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninomiya, Nao; Kubo, Yamato; Barada, Daisuke; Kiire, Tomohiro

    2016-10-01

    In order to understand the details of the flow field in micro- and nano-fluidic devices, it is necessary to measure the 3D velocities under a microscopy. Thus, there is a strong need for the development of a new measuring technique for 3D velocity by a single camera. One solution is the use of holography, but it is well known that the accuracy in the depth direction is very poor for the commonly used in-line holography. At present, the Doppler phase-shifting holography is used for the 3D measurement of an object. This method extracts the signal of a fixed frequency caused by the Doppler beat between the object light and the reference light. It can measure the 3D shape precisely. Here, the frequency of the Doppler beat is determined by the velocity difference between the object light and the reference light. This implies that the velocity of an object can be calculated by the Doppler frequency. In this study, a Japanese 5 yen coin was traversed at a constant speed and its holography has been observed by a high-speed camera. By extracting only the first order diffraction signal at the Doppler frequency, a precise measurement of the shape and the position of a 5 yen coin has been achieved. At the same time, the longitudinal velocity of a 5 yen coin can be measured by the Doppler frequency. Furthermore, the lateral velocities are obtained by particle image velocimetry (PIV) method. A 5 yen coin has been traversed at different angles and its shapes and the 3D velocities have been measured accurately. This method can be applied to the particle flows in the micro- or nano-devices, and the 3D velocities will be measured under microscopes.

  18. Filtering for unwrapping noisy Doppler optical coherence tomography images for extended microscopic fluid velocity measurement range.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Darga, Donald; Smid, Jason; Zysk, Adam M; Teh, Daniel; Boppart, Stephen A; Scott Carney, P

    2016-09-01

    In this Letter, we report the first application of two phase denoising algorithms to Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) velocity maps. When combined with unwrapping algorithms, significantly extended fluid velocity dynamic range is achieved. Instead of the physical upper bound, the fluid velocity dynamic range is now limited by noise level. We show comparisons between physical simulated ideal velocity maps and the experimental results of both algorithms. We demonstrate unwrapped DOCT velocity maps having a peak velocity nearly 10 times the theoretical measurement range. PMID:27607963

  19. Filtering for unwrapping noisy Doppler optical coherence tomography images for extended microscopic fluid velocity measurement range.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Darga, Donald; Smid, Jason; Zysk, Adam M; Teh, Daniel; Boppart, Stephen A; Scott Carney, P

    2016-09-01

    In this Letter, we report the first application of two phase denoising algorithms to Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) velocity maps. When combined with unwrapping algorithms, significantly extended fluid velocity dynamic range is achieved. Instead of the physical upper bound, the fluid velocity dynamic range is now limited by noise level. We show comparisons between physical simulated ideal velocity maps and the experimental results of both algorithms. We demonstrate unwrapped DOCT velocity maps having a peak velocity nearly 10 times the theoretical measurement range.

  20. Optimization of Doppler velocity echocardiographic measurements using an automatic contour detection method.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, E; Kadem, L; Pibarot, P; Durand, L-G

    2009-01-01

    Intra- and inter-observer variability in Doppler velocity echocardiographic measurements (DVEM) is a significant issue. Indeed, imprecisions of DVEM can lead to diagnostic errors, particularly in the quantification of the severity of heart valve dysfunction. To minimize the variability and rapidity of DVEM, we have developed an automatic method of Doppler velocity wave contour detection, based on active contour models. To validate our new method, results obtained with this method were compared to those obtained manually by an experienced echocardiographer on Doppler echocardiographic images of left ventricular outflow tract and transvalvular flow velocity signals recorded in 30 patients, 15 with aortic stenosis and 15 with mitral stenosis. We focused on three essential variables that are measured routinely by Doppler echocardiography in the clinical setting: the maximum velocity, the mean velocity and the velocity-time integral. Comparison between the two methods has shown a very good agreement (linear correlation coefficient R(2) = 0.99 between the automatically and the manually extracted variables). Moreover, the computation time was really short, about 5s. This new method applied to DVEM could, therefore, provide a useful tool to eliminate the intra- and inter-observer variabilities associated with DVEM and thereby to improve the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. This automatic method could also allow the echocardiographer to realize these measurements within a much shorter period of time compared to standard manual tracing method. From a practical point of view, the model developed can be easily implanted in a standard echocardiographic system. PMID:19965162

  1. Feasibility of using a reliable automated Doppler flow velocity measurements for research and clinical practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolgharni, Massoud; Dhutia, Niti M.; Cole, Graham D.; Willson, Keith; Francis, Darrel P.

    2014-03-01

    Echocardiographers are often unkeen to make the considerable time investment to make additional multiple measurements of Doppler velocity. Main hurdle to obtaining multiple measurements is the time required to manually trace a series of Doppler traces. To make it easier to analyse more beats, we present an automated system for Doppler envelope quantification. It analyses long Doppler strips, spanning many heartbeats, and does not require the electrocardiogram to isolate individual beats. We tested its measurement of velocity-time-integral and peak-velocity against the reference standard defined as the average of three experts who each made three separate measurements. The automated measurements of velocity-time-integral showed strong correspondence (R2 = 0.94) and good Bland-Altman agreement (SD = 6.92%) with the reference consensus expert values, and indeed performed as well as the individual experts (R2 = 0.90 to 0.96, SD = 5.66% to 7.64%). The same performance was observed for peak-velocities; (R2 = 0.98, SD = 2.95%) and (R2 = 0.93 to 0.98, SD = 2.94% to 5.12%). This automated technology allows <10 times as many beats to be acquired and analysed compared to the conventional manual approach, with each beat maintaining its accuracy.

  2. Toward a velocity-resolved microvascular blood flow measure by decomposition of the laser Doppler spectrum.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Marcus; Strömberg, Tomas

    2006-01-01

    Tissue microcirculation, as measured by laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF), comprises capillary, arterial, and venous blood flow. With the classical LDF approach, it has been impossible to differentiate between different vascular compartments. We suggest an alternative LDF algorithm that estimates at least three concentration measures of flowing red blood cells (RBCs), each associated with a predefined, physiologically relevant, absolute velocity in millimeters per second. As the RBC flow velocity depends on the dimension of the blood vessel, this approach might enable a microcirculatory flow differentiation. The LDF concentration estimates are derived by fitting predefined Monte Carlo simulated, single-velocity spectra to a measured, multiple-velocity LDF spectrum. Validation measurements, using both single- and double-tube flow phantoms perfused with a microsphere solution, show that it is possible to estimate velocity and concentration changes, and to differentiate between flows with different velocities. Our theory is also applied to RBC flow measurements. A Gegenbauer kernel phase function (alpha(gk)=1.05; g(gk)=0.93), with an anisotropy factor of 0.987 at 786 nm, is found suitable for modeling Doppler scattering by RBCs diluted in physiological saline. The method is developed for low concentrations of RBCs, but can in theory be extended to cover multiple Doppler scattering. PMID:16526901

  3. Acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer array technology.

    PubMed

    Shin, Minchul; Krause, Joshua S; DeBitetto, Paul; White, Robert D

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, modeling, and characterization of a small (1 cm(2) transducer chip) acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using microelectromechanical systems capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (cMUT) array technology. The cMUT sensor has a 185 kHz resonant frequency to achieve a 13° beam width for a 1 cm aperture. A model for the cMUT and the acoustic system which includes electrical, mechanical, and acoustic components is provided. Furthermore, this paper shows characterization of the cMUT sensor with a variety of testing procedures including Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV), beampattern measurement, reflection testing, and velocity testing. LDV measurements demonstrate that the membrane displacement at the center point is 0.4 nm/V(2) at 185 kHz. The maximum range of the sensor is 60 cm (30 cm out and 30 cm back). A velocity sled was constructed and used to demonstrate measureable Doppler shifts at velocities from 0.2 to 1.0 m/s. The Doppler shifts agree well with the expected frequency shifts over this range.

  4. Acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer array technology.

    PubMed

    Shin, Minchul; Krause, Joshua S; DeBitetto, Paul; White, Robert D

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, modeling, and characterization of a small (1 cm(2) transducer chip) acoustic Doppler velocity measurement system using microelectromechanical systems capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducer (cMUT) array technology. The cMUT sensor has a 185 kHz resonant frequency to achieve a 13° beam width for a 1 cm aperture. A model for the cMUT and the acoustic system which includes electrical, mechanical, and acoustic components is provided. Furthermore, this paper shows characterization of the cMUT sensor with a variety of testing procedures including Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV), beampattern measurement, reflection testing, and velocity testing. LDV measurements demonstrate that the membrane displacement at the center point is 0.4 nm/V(2) at 185 kHz. The maximum range of the sensor is 60 cm (30 cm out and 30 cm back). A velocity sled was constructed and used to demonstrate measureable Doppler shifts at velocities from 0.2 to 1.0 m/s. The Doppler shifts agree well with the expected frequency shifts over this range. PMID:23927100

  5. Velocity distribution measurements in a fishway like open channel by Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayeed-Bin-Asad, S. M.; Lundström, T. S.; Andersson, A. G.; Hellström, J. G. I.

    2016-03-01

    Experiments in an open channel flume with placing a vertical half cylinder barrier have been performed in order to investigate how the upstream velocity profiles are affected by a barrier. An experimental technique using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was adopted to measure these velocity distributions in the channel for four different discharge rates. Velocity profiles were measured very close to wall and at 25, 50 and 100 mm upstream of the cylinder wall. For comparing these profiles with well-known logarithmic velocity profiles, velocity profiles were also measured in smooth open channel flow for all same four discharge rates. The results indicate that regaining the logarithmic velocity profiles upstream of the half cylindrical barrier occurs at 100 mm upstream of the cylinder wall.

  6. Development of ultrasonic pulse-train Doppler method for velocity profile and flowrate measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Sanehiro; Furuichi, Noriyuki; Shimada, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    We present a novel technique for measuring the velocity profile and flowrate in a pipe. This method, named the ultrasonic pulse-train Doppler method (UPTD), has the advantages of expanding the velocity range and setting the smaller measurement volume with low calculation and instrument costs in comparison with the conventional ultrasonic pulse Doppler method. The conventional method has limited measurement of the velocity range due to the Nyquist sampling theorem. In addition, previous reports indicate that a smaller measurement volume increases the accuracy of the measurement. In consideration of the application of the conventional method to actual flow fields, such as industrial facilities and power plants, the issues of velocity range and measurement volume are important. The UPTD algorithm, which exploits two pulses of ultrasound with a short interval and envelope detection, is proposed. Velocity profiles calculated by this algorithm were examined through simulations and excellent agreement was found in all cases. The influence of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on the algorithm was also estimated. The result indicates that UPTD can measure velocity profiles with high accuracy, even under a small SNR. Experimental measurements were conducted and the results were evaluated at the national standard calibration facility of water flowrate in Japan. Every detected signal forms a set of two pulses and the enveloped line can be observed clearly. The results show that UPTD can measure the velocity profiles over the pipe diameter, even if the velocities exceed the measurable velocity range. The measured flowrates were under 0.6% and the standard deviations for all flowrate conditions were within  ±0.38%, which is the uncertainty of the flowrate measurement estimated in the previous report. In conclusion, UPTD provides superior accuracy and expansion of the velocity range.

  7. Coherent Doppler Lidar for Measuring Velocity and Altitude of Space and Arial Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Pierrottet, Diego; Hines, Glenn D.; Petway, Larry; Barnes, Bruce W.

    2016-01-01

    A coherent Doppler lidar has been developed to support future NASA missions to planetary bodies. The lidar transmits three laser beams and measures line-of-sight range and velocity along each beam using a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) technique. Accurate altitude and velocity vector data, derived from the line-of-sight measurements, enables the landing vehicle to precisely navigate from several kilometers above the ground to the designated location and execute a gentle touchdown. The same lidar sensor can also benefit terrestrial applications that cannot rely on GPS or require surface-relative altitude and velocity data.

  8. Ultrasonic position and velocity measurement for a moving object by M-sequence pulse compression using Doppler velocity estimation by spectrum-pattern analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, Yohei; Hirata, Shinnosuke; Hachiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    Pulse compression using a maximum-length sequence (M-sequence) can improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the reflected echo in the pulse-echo method. In the case of a moving object, however, the echo is modulated owing to the Doppler effect. The Doppler-shifted M-sequence-modulated signal cannot be correlated with the reference signal that corresponds to the transmitted M-sequence-modulated signal. Therefore, Doppler velocity estimation by spectrum-pattern analysis of a cyclic M-sequence-modulated signal and cross correlations with Doppler-shifted reference signals that correspond to the estimated Doppler velocities has been proposed. In this paper, measurements of the position and velocity of a moving object by the proposed method are described. First, Doppler velocities of the object are estimated using a microphone array. Secondly, the received signal from each microphone is correlated with each Doppler-shifted reference signal. Then, the position of the object is determined from the B-mode image formed from all cross-correlation functions. After that, the velocity of the object is calculated from velocity components estimated from the Doppler velocities and the position. Finally, the estimated Doppler velocities, determined positions, and calculated velocities are evaluated.

  9. Heterodyne Doppler velocity measurement of moving targets by mode-locked pulse laser.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yan; Ren, Deming; Zhao, Weijiang; Qu, Yanchen; Qian, Liming; Chen, Zhenlei

    2012-01-16

    In this study, heterodyne detection is adopted to measure the velocity of a target simulated by a rapidly rotating plate by using a mode-locked pulse laser as the resource. The coherent beat frequency of the signal light reflected by target and local oscillation light occurred on the surface of the detector. Then the waveform of beat frequency was processed by filtering to obtain the Doppler frequency shift of the signal light induced by target. With this frequency shift, the velocity of target could be obtained by calculation. Results indicate that the measurement has a high precision. The error on average is within 0.4 m/s. PMID:22274421

  10. Heterodyne Doppler velocity measurement of moving targets by mode-locked pulse laser.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yan; Ren, Deming; Zhao, Weijiang; Qu, Yanchen; Qian, Liming; Chen, Zhenlei

    2012-01-16

    In this study, heterodyne detection is adopted to measure the velocity of a target simulated by a rapidly rotating plate by using a mode-locked pulse laser as the resource. The coherent beat frequency of the signal light reflected by target and local oscillation light occurred on the surface of the detector. Then the waveform of beat frequency was processed by filtering to obtain the Doppler frequency shift of the signal light induced by target. With this frequency shift, the velocity of target could be obtained by calculation. Results indicate that the measurement has a high precision. The error on average is within 0.4 m/s.

  11. Errors in acoustic doppler profiler velocity measurements caused by flow disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; Abad, J.D.; Garcia, C.M.; Gartner, J.W.; Garcia, M.H.; Oberg, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) are commonly used to measure streamflow and water velocities in rivers and streams. This paper presents laboratory, field, and numerical model evidence of errors in ADCP measurements caused by flow disturbance. A state-of-the-art three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic model is validated with and used to complement field and laboratory observations of flow disturbance and its effect on measured velocities. Results show that near the instrument, flow velocities measured by the ADCP are neither the undisturbed stream velocity nor the velocity of the flow field around the ADCP. The velocities measured by the ADCP are biased low due to the downward flow near the upstream face of the ADCP and upward recovering flow in the path of downstream transducer, which violate the flow homogeneity assumption used to transform beam velocities into Cartesian velocity components. The magnitude of the bias is dependent on the deployment configuration, the diameter of the instrument, and the approach velocity, and was observed to range from more than 25% at 5cm from the transducers to less than 1% at about 50cm from the transducers for the scenarios simulated. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  12. Optical multi-point measurements of the acoustic particle velocity with frequency modulated Doppler global velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Andreas; König, Jörg; Haufe, Daniel; Schlüssler, Raimund; Büttner, Lars; Czarske, Jürgen

    2013-08-01

    To reduce the noise of machines such as aircraft engines, the development and propagation of sound has to be investigated. Since the applicability of microphones is limited due to their intrusiveness, contactless measurement techniques are required. For this reason, the present study describes an optical method based on the Doppler effect and its application for acoustic particle velocity (APV) measurements. While former APV measurements with Doppler techniques are point measurements, the applied system is capable of simultaneous measurements at multiple points. In its current state, the system provides linear array measurements of one component of the APV demonstrated by multi-tone experiments with tones up to 17 kHz for the first time.

  13. Optical multi-point measurements of the acoustic particle velocity with frequency modulated Doppler global velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Andreas; König, Jörg; Haufe, Daniel; Schlüssler, Raimund; Büttner, Lars; Czarske, Jürgen

    2013-08-01

    To reduce the noise of machines such as aircraft engines, the development and propagation of sound has to be investigated. Since the applicability of microphones is limited due to their intrusiveness, contactless measurement techniques are required. For this reason, the present study describes an optical method based on the Doppler effect and its application for acoustic particle velocity (APV) measurements. While former APV measurements with Doppler techniques are point measurements, the applied system is capable of simultaneous measurements at multiple points. In its current state, the system provides linear array measurements of one component of the APV demonstrated by multi-tone experiments with tones up to 17 kHz for the first time. PMID:23927110

  14. TU-A-9A-02: Analysis of Variations in Clinical Doppler Ultrasound Peak Velocity Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y; Stekel, S; Tradup, D; Hangiandreou, N

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Doppler ultrasound (US) peak velocity (Vmax) measurements show considerable variations due to intrinsic spectral broadening with different scanning techniques, machines and manufacturers. We developed a semi-automated Vmax estimation method and used this method to investigate the performance of a US system for clinical Doppler Vmax measurement. Methods: Semi-automated Vmax is defined as the velocity at which the computed mean spectral profile falls to within 1 background standard deviation of the background mean. GE LOGIQ E9 system with 9L and ML6-15 probes were studied with steady flow (5.3 – 12.5 ml/s) in a Gammex OPTIMIZER 1425A phantom. All Doppler spectra were acquired by 1 operator at the distal end of 5 mm angular tube using a modified clinical carotid artery protocol. Repeatability and variation of Vmax to scanning parameters and probes were analyzed and reported as percentage, i.e. (max-min)/mean. Results: Vmax estimation had good repeatability (3.1% over 6 days for 9L, and 3.6% for ML6-15). For 9L probe, varying gain, compression, scale, SV depth and length, and frequency had minimal impact on Vmax (all variations less than 4.0%). Beam steering had slightly higher influence (largest variations across flow rates were 4.9% for 9L and 6.9% for ML6-15). For both probes, Doppler angle had the greatest effect on Vmax. Percentage increase of Vmax was largely independent of actual flow rates. For Doppler angle varied from 30 to 60°, Vmax increased 24% for 9L, and 20% for ML6-15. Vmax measured by ML6-15 were lower than that by 9L at each Doppler angle with differences less than 5%. Conclusion: The proposed Vmax estimation method is shown to be a useful tool to evaluate clinical Doppler US system performance. For the tested system and probes, Doppler angle had largest impact in measured Vmax.

  15. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocity measurements in fluids using time-domain cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2013-03-01

    Blood flow measurements have been demonstrated using the acoustic resolution mode of photoacoustic sensing. This is unlike previous flowmetry methods using the optical resolution mode, which limits the maximum penetration depth to approximately 1mm. Here we describe a pulsed time correlation photoacoustic Doppler technique that is inherently flexible, lending itself to both resolution modes. Doppler time shifts are quantified via cross-correlation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated in moving absorbers using pairs of laser light pulses, and the photoacoustic waves detected using an ultrasound transducer. The acoustic resolution mode is employed by using the transducer focal width, rather than the large illuminated volume, to define the lateral spatial resolution. The use of short laser pulses allows depth-resolved measurements to be obtained with high spatial resolution, offering the prospect of mapping flow within microcirculation. Whilst our previous work has been limited to a non-fluid phantom, we now demonstrate measurements in more realistic blood-mimicking phantoms incorporating fluid suspensions of microspheres flowing along an optically transparent tube. Velocities up to 110 mm/s were measured with accuracies approaching 1% of the known velocities, and resolutions of a few mm/s. The velocity range and resolution are scalable with excitation pulse separation, but the maximum measurable velocity was considerably smaller than the value expected from the detector focal beam width. Measurements were also made for blood flowing at velocities up to 13.5 mm/s. This was for a sample reduced to 5% of the normal haematocrit; increasing the red blood cell concentration limited the maximum measurable velocity so that no results were obtained for concentrations greater than 20% of a physiologically realistic haematocrit. There are several possible causes for this limitation; these include the detector bandwidth and irregularities in the flow pattern. Better

  16. Relationship of spaced antenna and Doppler techniques for velocity measurements (keynote paper), part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    The Doppler, spaced-antenna and interferometric methods of measuring wind velocities all use the same basic information, the Doppler shifts imposed on backscattered radio waves, but they process it in different ways. The Doppler technique is most commonly used at VHF since the narrow radar beams are readily available. However, the spaced antenna (SA) method has been successfully used with the SOUSY and Adelaide radars. At MF/HF the spaced antenna method is widely used since the large antenna arrays (diameter 1 km) required to generate narrow beams are expensive to construct. Where such arrays of this size are available then the Doppler method has been successfully used (e.g., Adelaide and Brisbane). In principle, the factors which influence the choice of beam pointing angle, the optimum antenna spacing will be the same whether operation is at MF or VHF. Many of the parameters which govern the efficient use of wind measuring systems have been discussed at previous MST workshops. Some of the points raised by these workshops are summarized.

  17. Measurement of fast-changing low velocities by photonic Doppler velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Song Hongwei; Wu Xianqian; Huang Chenguang; Wei Yangpeng; Wang Xi

    2012-07-15

    Despite the increasing popularity of photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) in shock wave experiments, its capability of capturing low particle velocities while changing rapidly is still questionable. The paper discusses the performance of short time Fourier transform (STFT) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) in processing fringe signals of fast-changing low velocities measured by PDV. Two typical experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance. In the laser shock peening test, the CWT gives a better interpretation to the free surface velocity history, where the elastic precursor, main plastic wave, and elastic release wave can be clearly identified. The velocities of stress waves, Hugoniot elastic limit, and the amplitude of shock pressure induced by laser can be obtained from the measurement. In the Kolsky-bar based tests, both methods show validity of processing the longitudinal velocity signal of incident bar, whereas CWT improperly interprets the radial velocity of the shocked sample at the beginning period, indicating the sensitiveness of the CWT to the background noise. STFT is relatively robust in extracting waveforms of low signal-to-noise ratio. Data processing method greatly affects the temporal resolution and velocity resolution of a given fringe signal, usually CWT demonstrates a better local temporal resolution and velocity resolution, due to its adaptability to the local frequency, also due to the finer time-frequency product according to the uncertainty principle.

  18. Measurement of fast-changing low velocities by photonic Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hongwei; Wu, Xianqian; Huang, Chenguang; Wei, Yangpeng; Wang, Xi

    2012-07-01

    Despite the increasing popularity of photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) in shock wave experiments, its capability of capturing low particle velocities while changing rapidly is still questionable. The paper discusses the performance of short time Fourier transform (STFT) and continuous wavelet transform (CWT) in processing fringe signals of fast-changing low velocities measured by PDV. Two typical experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance. In the laser shock peening test, the CWT gives a better interpretation to the free surface velocity history, where the elastic precursor, main plastic wave, and elastic release wave can be clearly identified. The velocities of stress waves, Hugoniot elastic limit, and the amplitude of shock pressure induced by laser can be obtained from the measurement. In the Kolsky-bar based tests, both methods show validity of processing the longitudinal velocity signal of incident bar, whereas CWT improperly interprets the radial velocity of the shocked sample at the beginning period, indicating the sensitiveness of the CWT to the background noise. STFT is relatively robust in extracting waveforms of low signal-to-noise ratio. Data processing method greatly affects the temporal resolution and velocity resolution of a given fringe signal, usually CWT demonstrates a better local temporal resolution and velocity resolution, due to its adaptability to the local frequency, also due to the finer time-frequency product according to the uncertainty principle.

  19. Measurement of velocities in gas-liquid two-phase flow using Laser Doppler Velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Vassallo, P.F.; Trabold, T.A.; Moore, W.E.; Kirouac, G.J.

    1992-09-01

    Measurements of bubble and liquid velocities in two-phase flow have been made using a new forward/backward scattering Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) technique. This work was performed in a 6.4 by 11.1 mm vertical duct using known air/water mixtures. A standard LDV fiber optic probe was used to measure the bubble velocity, using direct backscattered light. A novel retro-reflector and lens assembly permitted the same probe to measure the liquid velocity with direct forward-scattered light. The bubble velocity was confirmed by independent measurements with a high-speed video system. The liquid velocity was confirmed by demonstrating the dominance of the liquid seed data rate in the forward-scatter measurement. Experimental data are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the technique for a wide range of flow conditions, from bubbles as small as 0.75-mm-diam to slugs as large as 10-mm wide by 30-mm long. In the slug regime, the LDV technique performed velocity measurements for both phases, for void fractions up to 50%, which was the upper limit of our experimental investigation.

  20. Fiber-Based Doppler Lidar for Vector Velocity and Altitude Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Pierrottet, Diego; Hines, Glenn; Petway, Larry; Barnes, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    A coherent Doppler lidar capable of providing accurate velocity and altitude data has been developed and demonstrated for future NASA missions to the solar system bodies requiring precision navigation and controlled soft landing.

  1. MEASUREMENTS OF ANISOTROPIC ION TEMPERATURES, NON-THERMAL VELOCITIES, AND DOPPLER SHIFTS IN A CORONAL HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W.

    2013-02-15

    We present a new diagnostic allowing one to measure the anisotropy of ion temperatures and non-thermal velocities, as well as Doppler shifts with respect to the ambient magnetic field. This method provides new results, as well as an independent test for previous measurements obtained with other techniques. Our spectral data come from observations of a low-latitude, on-disk coronal hole. A potential field source surface model was used to calculate the angle between the magnetic field lines and the line of sight for each spatial bin of the observation. A fit was performed to determine the line widths and Doppler shifts parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. For each line width component we derived ion temperatures T {sub i,} and T {sub i, Parallel-To} and non-thermal velocities v {sub nt,} and v {sub nt, Parallel-To }. T {sub i,} was cooler than off-limb polar coronal hole measurements, suggesting increasing collisional cooling with decreasing height. T {sub i, Parallel-To} is consistent with a uniform temperature of (1.8 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K for each ion. Since parallel ion heating is expected to be weak, this ion temperature should reflect the proton temperature. A comparison between our results and others implies a large proton temperature gradient around 1.02 R {sub Sun }. The non-thermal velocities are thought to be proportional to the amplitudes of various waves. Our results for v {sub nt,} agree with Alfven wave amplitudes inferred from off-limb polar coronal hole line width measurements. Our v {sub nt, Parallel-To} results are consistent with slow magnetosonic wave amplitudes inferred from Fourier analysis of time-varying intensity fluctuations. Doppler shift measurements yield outflows of Almost-Equal-To 5 km s{sup -1} for ions formed over a broad temperature range. This differs from other studies that found a strong Doppler shift dependence on formation temperature.

  2. Fully distributed absolute blood flow velocity measurement for middle cerebral arteries using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Li; Zhu, Jiang; Hancock, Aneeka M.; Dai, Cuixia; Zhang, Xuping; Frostig, Ron D.; Chen, Zhongping

    2016-01-01

    Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) is considered one of the most promising functional imaging modalities for neuro biology research and has demonstrated the ability to quantify cerebral blood flow velocity at a high accuracy. However, the measurement of total absolute blood flow velocity (BFV) of major cerebral arteries is still a difficult problem since it is related to vessel geometry. In this paper, we present a volumetric vessel reconstruction approach that is capable of measuring the absolute BFV distributed along the entire middle cerebral artery (MCA) within a large field-of-view. The Doppler angle at each point of the MCA, representing the vessel geometry, is derived analytically by localizing the artery from pure DOCT images through vessel segmentation and skeletonization. Our approach could achieve automatic quantification of the fully distributed absolute BFV across different vessel branches. Experiments on rodents using swept-source optical coherence tomography showed that our approach was able to reveal the consequences of permanent MCA occlusion with absolute BFV measurement. PMID:26977365

  3. On-chip laser Doppler vibrometer for arterial pulse wave velocity measurement.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanlu; Segers, Patrick; Dirckx, Joris; Baets, Roel

    2013-07-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an important marker for cardiovascular risk. The Laser Doppler vibrometry has been suggested as a potential technique to measure the local carotid PWV by measuring the transit time of the pulse wave between two locations along the common carotid artery (CCA) from skin surface vibrations. However, the present LDV setups are still bulky and difficult to handle. We present in this paper a more compact LDV system integrated on a CMOS-compatible silicon-on-insulator substrate. In this system, a chip with two homodyne LDVs is utilized to simultaneously measure the pulse wave at two different locations along the CCA. Measurement results show that the dual-LDV chip can successfully conduct the PWV measurement.

  4. Coherent Doppler Lidar for Measuring Altitude, Ground Velocity, and Air Velocity of Aircraft and Spaceborne Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin (Inventor); Pierrottet, Diego F. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A Doppler lidar sensor system includes a laser generator that produces a highly pure single frequency laser beam, and a frequency modulator that modulates the laser beam with a highly linear frequency waveform. A first portion of the frequency modulated laser beam is amplified, and parts thereof are transmitted through at least three separate transmit/receive lenses. A second portion of the laser beam is used as a local oscillator beam for optical heterodyne detection. Radiation from the parts of the laser beam transmitted via the transmit/receive lenses is received by the respective transmit/receive lenses that transmitted the respective part of the laser beam. The received reflected radiation is compared with the local oscillator beam to calculate the frequency difference there between to determine various navigational data.

  5. Simulating photospheric Doppler velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described for constructing artificial data that realistically simulate photospheric velocity fields. The velocity fields include rotation, differential rotation, meridional circulation, giant cell convection, supergranulation, convective limb shift, p-mode oscillations, and observer motion. Data constructed by this method can be used for testing algorithms designed to extract and analyze these velocity fields in real Doppler velocity data.

  6. Navigation Doppler Lidar Sensor for Precision Altitude and Vector Velocity Measurements Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierrottet, Diego F.; Lockhard, George; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Petway, Larry B.; Barnes, Bruce; Hines, Glenn D.

    2011-01-01

    An all fiber Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) system is under development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) for precision descent and landing applications on planetary bodies. The sensor produces high resolution line of sight range, altitude above ground, ground relative attitude, and high precision velocity vector measurements. Previous helicopter flight test results demonstrated the NDL measurement concepts, including measurement precision, accuracies, and operational range. This paper discusses the results obtained from a recent campaign to test the improved sensor hardware, and various signal processing algorithms applicable to real-time processing. The NDL was mounted in an instrumentation pod aboard an Erickson Air-Crane helicopter and flown over vegetation free terrain. The sensor was one of several sensors tested in this field test by NASA?s Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project.

  7. Laser Doppler velocity measurements in a transferred-arc plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, O.P.; Okhuysen, W.P.

    1995-12-31

    Laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) is a nonintrusive method of measuring velocity. The measurement volume formed by the intersection of the two laser beams is compact, thus the method provides excellent spatial resolution. Furthermore, aside from the requirement that the flow contain scattering particles, the method is nonintrusive. Thus, no probe disturbs the flow and measurements can be made in extremely high temperature and hostile environments. Here, the LDV technique has been used to map the velocity field in the plasma jet issuing from a transferred-arc, reverse polarity plasma torch. This gas flow field is important in understanding the physics of the plasma torch. The torch was operated with nitrogen at a fixed distance of 5 inches from the graphite billet. Velocity measurements were made for combinations of current at 125 and 175 A and pressure at 22 and 55 psig. Results are presented for the high current/high pressure condition. Since the test procedure involves reestablishing the same flow conditions after swapping graphite billets, it is instructive to see how closely the torch operating variables were reproduced. The average current varied from 175.2 to 175.8 A over the eight separate time periods. The nitrogen supply pressure varied from 52.5 to 53.9 psi. The torch voltage drop ranged from 430.6 to 436.1 V, and the nitrogen flow rate from 4.8 to 5.4 scfm.

  8. Intraoperative Doppler velocity measurements to locate patent ITA grafts at reoperation.

    PubMed

    Lotto, Attilio A; Owens, W Andrew

    2006-09-01

    We are reporting a case of a patient who underwent an aortic valve replacement with previous coronary artery bypass grafting. During the operation we used a Doppler velocity probe to locate the exact position of the bilateral internal thoracic arteries. Once the vessels were identified, a suture was passed widely around each internal thoracic artery and a snare was positioned. With the aid of the Doppler velocity probe, we achieved a gentle occlusion of the vessels, applying enough traction on the snares to abolish the flow through the internal thoracic arteries. PMID:16928554

  9. Two-dimensional Laser-Doppler measurements of fluctuations of velocity in an excited jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, P.; Sava, P. G.

    Two-component laser Doppler anemometry has been used to study velocity fluctuations in excited jets for a Strouhal number of 0.5 and a Reynolds number of 600,000. Streak lines calculated from measurements of the periodic pulsations of the jet are shown to be in good agreement with the results of stroboscopic visualization experiments and analytical calculations. Their evolution in time shows that the flow is nearly stationary in a coordinate system moving with the coherent structure for the case where the coherence is strong. In such a moving system, the trajectories provide information on the motion of fluid particles and, particularly, on the entrainment of fluid by the jet.

  10. Measurement of blood velocity using laser Doppler method for the designing module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guo-Liang; Lee, Jen-Ai; Lu, Tung-Wu; Chen, Zhao-Cheng; Chen, Chien-Ming

    2005-04-01

    We built the Dual Beam Mode of the LDA (Laser Doppler Anemometry) frame, set the photodetector at the same side with light source which collect the scattering light of blood cell. It's proper to reduce LDA optical path and convenient for our designing module. The concentration of chicken blood in this study is about 1% and we measured the relations actually between flood velocity and the angle of beams cross on particles, temperature, and the diameter of aqueduct. We found better results while the cross angle was less than 38.8 degree, diameter of aqueduct was 6 mm, and temperature of blood was set to 36 . These parameters can also provide important basis for the LDA module kit that we are designing.

  11. ALADIN: an atmosphere laser doppler wind lidar instrument for wind velocity measurements from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Rodolphe; Ghibaudo, Jean-Bernard; Labandibar, Jean-Yves; Willetts, David V.; Vaughan, M.; Pearson, G.; Harris, M. R.; Flamant, Pierre H.; Salamitou, P.; Dabas, Alain; Charasse, R.; Midavaine, Thierri; Royer, Michel; Heimel, H.

    1995-12-01

    AEROSPATIALE, leading a European team, has just conducted a successful study, under ESA contract, to demonstrate the feasibility of a spaceborne Doppler wind lidar instrument meeting the scientific requirements of wind velocity measurements from space with high spatial resolution. A first parametric investigation, based upon the initial set of mission requirements, and supported by dedicated models and detailed trade-off studies, took account of capabilities of the most promising signal processing algorithms and calibration/validation constrains: it yielded a large conically scanned instrument deemed technologically risky. A risk analysis was then carried out to propose a less challenging instrument meeting most key mission requirements. The fixed line-of-sight concept with return signal accumulation appeared as most attractive. A second set of requirements agreed upon by scientific users was therefore issued, with relaxed constraints mainly on horizontal resolution, keeping roughly the same level of wind velocity measurement accuracy. A second instrument and subsystem trade- off was then performed to eventually produce an attractive instrument concept based upon a pair of small diameter telescopes each one associated to one scanning mirror rotating stepwise around the telescope axis, which drastically reduces the detection bandwidth. Following the main contract, studies of accommodation on the International Space Station have been performed, confirming the interest of such an instrument for wind measurements from space.

  12. ALADIN: an atmospheric laser Doppler wind lidar instrument for wind velocity measurements from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Rodolphe; Ghibaudo, Jean-Bernard; Labandibar, Jean-Yves; Willetts, David V.; Vaughan, M.; Pearson, G.; Harris, M. R.; Flamant, Pierre H.; Salamitou, P.; Dabas, Alain; Lieutaud, F.; Charasse, R.; Midavaine, Thierri; Royer, Michel; Heimel, H.

    1996-10-01

    AEROSPATIALE, leading a European team, has just conducted a successful study, under ESA contract, to demonstrate the feasibility of a spaceborne Doppler wind lidar instrument meeting the scientific requirements of wind velocity measurements from space with high spatial resolution. A first parametric investigation, based upon the initial set of mission requirements, and supported by dedicated models and detailed trade-off studies, took account of capabilities of most promising signal processing algorithms and calibration/validation constraints: it yielded a large conically scanned instrument deemed technologically risky. A risk analysis was then carried out to propose a less challenging instrument meeting most key mission requirements. The fixed line-of-sight concept with return signal accumulation appeared as most attractive. A second set of requirements agreed upon by scientific users was therefore issued, with relaxed constraints mainly on horizontal resolution, keeping roughly the same level of wind velocity measurement accuracy. A second instrument and subsystem trade-off was then performed to eventually produce an attractive instrument concept based upon a pair of small diameter telescopes each one associated to one scanning mirror rotating stepwise around the telescope axis, which drastically reduces the detection bandwidth. Following the main contract, studies of accommodation on the International Space Station have been performed, confirming the interest of such an instrument for wind measurements from space.

  13. A dealiasing method for use with ultrasonic pulsed Doppler in measuring velocity profiles and flow rates in pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakawa, Hideki; Muramatsu, Ei; Sugimoto, Katsumi; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Furuichi, Noriyuki

    2015-08-01

    The ultrasonic pulsed Doppler method (UDM) is a powerful tool for measuring velocity profiles in a pipe. However, the maximum detectable velocity is limited by the Nyquist sampling theorem. Furthermore, the maximum detectable velocity (also called Nyquist velocity), vmax, and the maximum measurable length are related and cannot be increased at the same time. If the velocity is greater than vmax, velocity aliasing occurs. Hence, the higher velocity that occurs with a larger pipe diameter, i.e. under higher flow rate conditions, cannot be measured with the conventional UDM. To overcome these limitations, dual-pulse repetition frequency (dual PRF) and feedback methods were employed in this study to measure velocity profiles in a pipe. The velocity distributions obtained with the feedback method were found to be more accurate than those obtained with the dual PRF method. However, misdetection of the Nyquist folding number using the feedback method was found to increase with the flow velocity. A feedback method with a moving average is proposed to improve the measurement accuracy. The method can accurately measure the velocity distributions at a velocity five times greater than the maximum velocity that can be measured with the conventional UDM. The measurement volume was found to be among the important parameters that must be considered in assessing the traceability of the reflector during the pulse emission interval. Hence, a larger measurement volume is required to measure higher velocities using the dual PRF method. Integrating velocity distributions measured using the feedback method with a moving average makes it possible to accurately determine flow rates six times greater than those that can be determined using the conventional pulsed Doppler method.

  14. Comparison of index velocity measurements made with a horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, P. Ryan; Johnson, Kevin K.; Duncker, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The State of Illinois' annual withdrawal from Lake Michigan is limited by a U.S. Supreme Court decree, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is responsible for monitoring flows in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) near Lemont, Illinois as a part of the Lake Michigan Diversion Accounting overseen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District. Every 5 years, a technical review committee consisting of practicing engineers and academics is convened to review the U.S. Geological Survey's streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois. The sixth technical review committee raised a number of questions concerning the flows and streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont and this report provides answers to many of those questions. In addition, it is the purpose of this report to examine the index velocity meters in use at Lemont and determine whether the acoustic velocity meter (AVM), which is now the primary index velocity meter, can be replaced by the horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler (H-ADCP), which is currently the backup meter. Application of the AVM and H-ADCP to index velocity measurements in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois, has produced good ratings to date. The site is well suited to index velocity measurements in spite of the large range of velocities and highly unsteady flows at the site. Flow variability arises from a range of sources: operation of the waterway through control structures, lockage-generated disturbances, commercial and recreational traffic, industrial withdrawals and discharges, natural inflows, seiches, and storm events. The influences of these factors on the index velocity measurements at Lemont is examined in detail in this report. Results of detailed data comparisons and flow analyses show that use of bank-mounted instrumentation such as the AVM and H-ADCP appears to be the best option for index velocity measurement in the CSSC near Lemont. Comparison of the rating curves for the AVM and H-ADCP demonstrates

  15. Results from 1984 airborne Doppler lidar wind measurement program. Flight 6: Analysis of line-of-sight elevation angle errors and apparent Doppler velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry

    1987-01-01

    During the summer of 1984 the Marshall Space Flight Center's Airborne Doppler Lidar System (ADLS) made a series of wind measurements in the California Central Valley. This study quantifies the lidar beam angle errors and velocity errors through analysis of ground return signals. Line-of-sight elevation (LOSE) angle errors are under 1 deg. Apparent Doppler ground velocities, as large as 2m/s, are considerably less than in a previous flight experiment in 1981. No evidence was found of a Schuler resonance phenomenon common to inertial navigation systems (INS), however the aperiodic nature of the apparent velocities implies an error in the INS-derived ground speeds. Certain features and subtleties in the ground returns are explained in terms of atmospheric structure and characteristics of the ADLS hardware and software. Finally, least squares and low-pass filtering techniques are suggested for eliminating errors during post-processing.

  16. In vivo label-free measurement of lymph flow velocity and volumetric flow rates using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatter, Cedric; Meijer, Eelco F. J.; Nam, Ahhyun S.; Jones, Dennis; Bouma, Brett E.; Padera, Timothy P.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2016-07-01

    Direct in vivo imaging of lymph flow is key to understanding lymphatic system function in normal and disease states. Optical microscopy techniques provide the resolution required for these measurements, but existing optical techniques for measuring lymph flow require complex protocols and provide limited temporal resolution. Here, we describe a Doppler optical coherence tomography platform that allows direct, label-free quantification of lymph velocity and volumetric flow rates. We overcome the challenge of very low scattering by employing a Doppler algorithm that operates on low signal-to-noise measurements. We show that this technique can measure lymph velocity at sufficiently high temporal resolution to resolve the dynamic pulsatile flow in collecting lymphatic vessels.

  17. In vivo label-free measurement of lymph flow velocity and volumetric flow rates using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Blatter, Cedric; Meijer, Eelco F. J.; Nam, Ahhyun S.; Jones, Dennis; Bouma, Brett E.; Padera, Timothy P.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Direct in vivo imaging of lymph flow is key to understanding lymphatic system function in normal and disease states. Optical microscopy techniques provide the resolution required for these measurements, but existing optical techniques for measuring lymph flow require complex protocols and provide limited temporal resolution. Here, we describe a Doppler optical coherence tomography platform that allows direct, label-free quantification of lymph velocity and volumetric flow rates. We overcome the challenge of very low scattering by employing a Doppler algorithm that operates on low signal-to-noise measurements. We show that this technique can measure lymph velocity at sufficiently high temporal resolution to resolve the dynamic pulsatile flow in collecting lymphatic vessels. PMID:27377852

  18. In vivo label-free measurement of lymph flow velocity and volumetric flow rates using Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Blatter, Cedric; Meijer, Eelco F J; Nam, Ahhyun S; Jones, Dennis; Bouma, Brett E; Padera, Timothy P; Vakoc, Benjamin J

    2016-01-01

    Direct in vivo imaging of lymph flow is key to understanding lymphatic system function in normal and disease states. Optical microscopy techniques provide the resolution required for these measurements, but existing optical techniques for measuring lymph flow require complex protocols and provide limited temporal resolution. Here, we describe a Doppler optical coherence tomography platform that allows direct, label-free quantification of lymph velocity and volumetric flow rates. We overcome the challenge of very low scattering by employing a Doppler algorithm that operates on low signal-to-noise measurements. We show that this technique can measure lymph velocity at sufficiently high temporal resolution to resolve the dynamic pulsatile flow in collecting lymphatic vessels. PMID:27377852

  19. Remote measurement utilizing NASA's scanning laser Doppler systems. Volume 2: Laser Doppler dust devil velocity profile measurement program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howle, R. E.; Krause, M. C.; Craven, C. E.; Gorzynski, E. J.; Edwards, B. B.

    1976-01-01

    The first detailed velocity profile data on thermally induced dust vortices are presented. These dust devils will be analyzed and studied to determine their flow fields and origin in an effort to correlate this phenomena with the generation and characteristics of tornadoes. A continuing effort to increase mankind's knowledge of vortex and other meteorological phenomena will hopefully allow the prediction of tornado occurrence, their path, and perhaps eventually even lead to some technique for their destruction.

  20. [Coronary artery blood flow velocity non-invasively measured using a vessel-tracking pulsed Doppler system].

    PubMed

    Tateishi, O; Aizawa, O; Okamura, T; Yoshida, T; Furuhata, H; Seo, Y; Iinuma, K; Shiki, E

    1988-09-01

    A newly-developed noninvasive method was used to measure left coronary blood flow during phantom experiments. Two techniques were used in which: (1) the sample position can always be set in a fluctuating vessel using a wall echo-tracking method with a phase-locked-loop, and (2) the Doppler reference signal was generated separately synchronous with the wall echo signal. These techniques were combined, using a commercially available pulsed Doppler apparatus (SSH-40B: Toshiba). Basic experiments were performed using a blood vessel phantom to verify the validity of these systems. Blood flow velocity in the fluctuating tube could be measured clearly using a vessel-tracking method. The blood flow velocity of the left anterior descending artery was measured in three normal subjects and in seven patients from the third intercostal space along the left sternal border. The velocity pattern was characterized by a crescendo-decrescendo shape in diastole. The peak velocity which appeared in diastole ranged from 19 to 69 cm/sec, with no difference by disease entity. However, in all cases, the blood flow velocity signals were marred by extraneous signals, making it impossible to measure blood flow velocity during systole. Further improvement of the system is mandatory in order to use this flowmeter clinically.

  1. Accuracy of velocity and shear rate measurements using pulsed Doppler ultrasound: a comparison of signal analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Markou, C P; Ku, D N

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation was instituted to evaluate the performance of Doppler ultrasound signal processing techniques for measuring fluid velocity under well-defined flow conditions using a 10-MHz multigated pulsed ultrasound instrument. Conditions of fully developed flow in a rigid, circular tube were varied over a Reynolds number range between 500 and 8000. The velocity across the tube was determined using analog and digital zero crossing detectors and three digital spectrum estimators. Determination of the Doppler frequency from analog or digital zero crossing detectors gave accurate velocity values for laminar and moderately turbulent flow away from the wall (0.969 less than or equal to r less than or equal to 0.986). Three digital spectrum estimators, Fast Fourier Transform, Burg autoregressive method, and minimum variance method, were slightly more accurate than the zero crossing detector (0.984 less than or equal to r less than or equal to 0.994), especially at points close to the walls and with higher levels of turbulence. Steep velocity gradients and transit-time-effects from high velocities produced significantly larger errors in velocity measurement. Wall shear rate estimates were most precise when calculated using the position of the wall and two velocity points. The calculated wall shears were within 20%-30% of theoretically predicted values. PMID:1808798

  2. Laser Doppler measurement of relative blood velocity in the human optic nerve head.

    PubMed

    Riva, C E; Grunwald, J E; Sinclair, S H

    1982-02-01

    The Doppler shift frequency spectrum (DSFS) of laser light scattered from red blood cells (RBCs) moving in the microcirculation of the optic nerve head has been recorded in normal volunteers by means of a fundus camera laser Doppler velocimeter. The width of the DSFS, which varies in proportion to the speed of the RBCs, has been characterized by a parameter alpha. With the use of a model for the scattering of light by tissue and RBCs and for the RBC velocity distribution, values of alpha recorded at normal intraocular pressure (IOP) suggest that the RBCs that contribute to the Doppler signal are flowing in capillaries. The parameter alpha was found to vary markedly with the IOP and with the phase of the ocular pressure pulse at elevated IOP. The return of the speed of RBCs toward normal, which is observed after a step increase of IOP above normal and after a step decrease below normal, has been attributed to an autoregulatory response of the optic nerve circulation.

  3. Velocity surveys in a turbine stator annular-cascade facility using laser Doppler techniques. [flow measurement and flow characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, L. J.; Seasholtz, R. G.; Mclallin, K. L.

    1976-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) was used to determine the flow conditions downstream of an annular cascade of stator blades operating at an exit critical velocity ratio of 0.87. Two modes of LDV operation (continuous scan and discrete point) were investigated. Conventional pressure probe measurements were also made for comparison with the LDV results. Biasing errors that occur in the LDV measurement of velocity components were also studied. In addition, the effect of pressure probe blockage on the flow conditions was determined with the LDV. Photographs and descriptions of the test equipment used are given.

  4. Embedded Fiber Optic Probes to Measure Detonation Velocities Using the Photonic Doppler Velocimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Hare, D E; Holtkamp, D B; Strand, O T

    2010-03-02

    Detonation velocities for high explosives can be in the 7 to 8 km/s range. Previous work has shown that these velocities may be measured by inserting an optical fiber probe into the explosive assembly and recording the velocity time history using a Fabry-Perot velocimeter. The measured velocity using this method, however, is the actual velocity multiplied times the refractive index of the fiber core, which is on the order of 1.5. This means that the velocimeter diagnostic must be capable of measuring velocities as high as 12 km/s. Until recently, a velocity of 12 km/s was beyond the maximum velocity limit of a homodyne-based velocimeter. The limiting component in a homodyne system is usually the digitizer. Recently, however, digitizers have come on the market with 20 GHz bandwidth and 50 GS/s sample rate. Such a digitizer coupled with high bandwidth detectors now have the total bandwidth required to make velocity measurements in the 12 km/s range. This paper describes measurements made of detonation velocities using a high bandwidth homodyne system.

  5. Measuring Solar Doppler Velocities in the He ii 30.38 nm Emission Using the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlin, P. C.

    2016-08-01

    The EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory has provided unprecedented measurements of the solar EUV irradiance at high temporal cadence with good spectral resolution and range since May 2010. The main purpose of EVE was to connect the Sun to the Earth by providing measurements of the EUV irradiance as a driver for space weather and Living With a Star studies, but after launch the instrument has demonstrated the significance of its measurements in contributing to studies looking at the sources of solar variability for pure solar physics purposes. This paper expands upon previous findings that EVE can in fact measure wavelength shifts during solar eruptive events and therefore provide Doppler velocities for plasma at all temperatures throughout the solar atmosphere from the chromosphere to hot flaring temperatures. This process is not straightforward as EVE was not designed or optimized for these types of measurements. In this paper we describe the many detailed instrumental characterizations needed to eliminate the optical effects in order to provide an absolute baseline for the Doppler shift studies. An example is given of a solar eruption on 7 September 2011 (SOL2011-09-07), associated with an X1.2 flare, where EVE Doppler analysis shows plasma ejected from the Sun in the He ii 30.38 nm emission at a velocity of almost 120 km s^{-1} along the line-of-sight.

  6. Resonant Doppler velocimeter. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report, 1 Jul. 1974 - 31 Oct. 1979; [velocity, temperature, and pressure measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmermann, M.

    1980-01-01

    A technique is presented for visualizing and quantitatively measuring velocity, temperature, and pressure by shining a single frequency laser beam into a gaseous flow which is seeded with an atomic species. The laser is tuned through the absorption frequencies of the seeded species and the absorption profile is detected by observing fluorescence as the atoms relax back to the ground state. The flow velocity is determined by observing the Doppler shift in the absorption frequency. Spectroscopic absorption line broadening mechanisms furnish information regarding the static temperature and pressure of the moving gas. Results of experiments conducted in the free stream and in the bow shock of a conical model mounted in a hypersonic wind tunnel indicate that the experimental uncertainties in the measurement of average values for the velocity, temperature and pressure of the flow are 0.1, 5 and 10 percent respectively.

  7. Non-invasive measurement of pulse wave velocity using transputer-based analysis of Doppler flow audio signals.

    PubMed

    Stewart, W R; Ramsey, M W; Jones, C J

    1994-08-01

    A system for the measurement of arterial pulse wave velocity is described. A personal computer (PC) plug-in transputer board is used to process the audio signals from two pocket Doppler ultrasound units. The transputer is used to provide a set of bandpass digital filters on two channels. The times of excursion of power through thresholds in each filter are recorded and used to estimate the onset of systolic flow. The system does not require an additional spectrum analyser and can work in real time. The transputer architecture provides for easy integration into any wider physiological measurement system. PMID:7994208

  8. Blood flow velocity vector field reconstruction from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler OCT measurements in retinal veins

    PubMed Central

    Aschinger, Gerold C.; Schmetterer, Leopold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Gröschl, Martin; Werkmeister, René M.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility to reconstruct the actual blood flow velocity vector field in retinal microvessels from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography measurements. First, for a better understanding of measured phase patterns, several flow situations were simulated on the basis of the known dual beam measurement geometry. We were able to extract the vector field parameters that determine the measured phase pattern, allowing for the development of an algorithm to reconstruct the velocity vector field from measured phase data. In a next step, measurements were performed at a straight vessel section and at a venous convergence; the obtained phase data were evaluated by means of the new approach. For the straight vessel section, the reconstructed flow velocity vector field yielded a parabolic flow. For the venous convergence, however, the reconstructed vector field deviated from a parabolic profile, but was in very good accordance with the simulated vector field for the given vessel geometry. The proposed algorithm allows predictions of the velocity vector field. Moreover, the algorithm is also sensitive to directional changes of the flow velocity as small as <1°, thereby offering insight in the flow characteristics of the non-Newtonian fluid blood in microvessels. PMID:26137367

  9. Blood flow velocity vector field reconstruction from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler OCT measurements in retinal veins.

    PubMed

    Aschinger, Gerold C; Schmetterer, Leopold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Leitgeb, Rainer A; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Gröschl, Martin; Werkmeister, René M

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility to reconstruct the actual blood flow velocity vector field in retinal microvessels from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography measurements. First, for a better understanding of measured phase patterns, several flow situations were simulated on the basis of the known dual beam measurement geometry. We were able to extract the vector field parameters that determine the measured phase pattern, allowing for the development of an algorithm to reconstruct the velocity vector field from measured phase data. In a next step, measurements were performed at a straight vessel section and at a venous convergence; the obtained phase data were evaluated by means of the new approach. For the straight vessel section, the reconstructed flow velocity vector field yielded a parabolic flow. For the venous convergence, however, the reconstructed vector field deviated from a parabolic profile, but was in very good accordance with the simulated vector field for the given vessel geometry. The proposed algorithm allows predictions of the velocity vector field. Moreover, the algorithm is also sensitive to directional changes of the flow velocity as small as <1°, thereby offering insight in the flow characteristics of the non-Newtonian fluid blood in microvessels. PMID:26137367

  10. Blood flow velocity vector field reconstruction from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler OCT measurements in retinal veins.

    PubMed

    Aschinger, Gerold C; Schmetterer, Leopold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Leitgeb, Rainer A; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Gröschl, Martin; Werkmeister, René M

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility to reconstruct the actual blood flow velocity vector field in retinal microvessels from dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography measurements. First, for a better understanding of measured phase patterns, several flow situations were simulated on the basis of the known dual beam measurement geometry. We were able to extract the vector field parameters that determine the measured phase pattern, allowing for the development of an algorithm to reconstruct the velocity vector field from measured phase data. In a next step, measurements were performed at a straight vessel section and at a venous convergence; the obtained phase data were evaluated by means of the new approach. For the straight vessel section, the reconstructed flow velocity vector field yielded a parabolic flow. For the venous convergence, however, the reconstructed vector field deviated from a parabolic profile, but was in very good accordance with the simulated vector field for the given vessel geometry. The proposed algorithm allows predictions of the velocity vector field. Moreover, the algorithm is also sensitive to directional changes of the flow velocity as small as <1°, thereby offering insight in the flow characteristics of the non-Newtonian fluid blood in microvessels.

  11. A MAGNETIC CALIBRATION OF PHOTOSPHERIC DOPPLER VELOCITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Welsch, Brian T.; Fisher, George H.; Sun, Xudong

    2013-03-10

    The zero point of measured photospheric Doppler shifts is uncertain for at least two reasons: instrumental variations (from, e.g., thermal drifts); and the convective blueshift, a known correlation between intensity and upflows. Accurate knowledge of the zero point is, however, useful for (1) improving estimates of the Poynting flux of magnetic energy across the photosphere, and (2) constraining processes underlying flux cancellation, the mutual apparent loss of magnetic flux in closely spaced, opposite-polarity magnetogram features. We present a method to absolutely calibrate line-of-sight (LOS) velocities in solar active regions (ARs) near disk center using three successive vector magnetograms and one Dopplergram coincident with the central magnetogram. It exploits the fact that Doppler shifts measured along polarity inversion lines (PILs) of the LOS magnetic field determine one component of the velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field, and optimizes consistency between changes in LOS flux near PILs and the transport of transverse magnetic flux by LOS velocities, assuming that ideal electric fields govern the magnetic evolution. Previous calibrations fitted the center-to-limb variation of Doppler velocities, but this approach cannot, by itself, account for residual convective shifts at the limb. We apply our method to vector magnetograms of AR 11158, observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and find clear evidence of offsets in the Doppler zero point in the range of 50-550 m s{sup -1}. In addition, we note that a simpler calibration can be determined from an LOS magnetogram and Dopplergram pair from the median Doppler velocity among all near-disk-center PIL pixels. We briefly discuss shortcomings in our initial implementation, and suggest ways to address these. In addition, as a step in our data reduction, we discuss the use of temporal continuity in the transverse magnetic field direction to correct apparently

  12. Vertical velocities within a Cirrus cloud from Doppler lidar and aircraft measurements during FIRE: Implications for particle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gultepe, Ismail; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    1990-01-01

    A large and comprehensive data set taken by the NOAA CO2 Doppler lidar, the NCAR King Air, and rawinsondes on 31 October 1986 during the FIRE (First ISCCP Regional Experiment) field program which took place in Wisconsin are presented. Vertical velocities are determined from the Doppler lidar data, and are compared with velocities derived from the aircraft microphysical data. The data are used for discussion of particle growth and dynamical processes operative within the cloud.

  13. Feasibility Study of Velocity and Temperature Measurements of an Arcjet Flow using Laser Resonance Doppler Velocimetric (LRDV) Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rob, Mohammad A.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials are used in space vehicles to shield from high heating environment encountered during their atmospheric reentry. Arcjet wind tunnels are used to simulate the flowfield encountered by the spacecrafts, and are used for testing TPS materials. How well these tests simulate the actual heating environment encountered by space vehicles depends on the characteristics of the simulated flow. The flow characterization requires the determination of temperature, concentration, and velocity of the various atomic and molecular species present in the flow. However, determining these parameters requires a complex set of both analytical and experimental procedures. The ability to properly simulate the flight environment is directly related to the accuracy with which these techniques can be used to define the arcjet Laser Resonance Doppler Velocimetric (LRDV) technique can be used to accurately determine the velocity and temperature of a gaseous species. In this technique, the medium is probed with a laser beam that is in resonance with an absorbing transition of the species. The absorption lineshape is Doppler-shifted due to the flow velocity of the species, and the frequency shift is detected as the variation in intensity of the fluorescence emitted by the species. Thus a measurement of the Doppler shift and the width of a spectral line can give both the temperature and the velocity of the flowfield. This summer, our project was to make a feasibility study to set up an experimental arrangement for the laser resonance Doppler velocimetric technique using a ring dye laser. Experiments required troubleshooting, cleaning, testing, and alignment of two lasers and several diagnostics instruments. All instruments and lasers necessary for the project worked well, but the output power of the broadband fundamental dye laser was limited to about 20 mW. This was quite low as compared to that necessary to obtain second harmonic oscillation at 327.49 nm

  14. Mathematical Models for Doppler Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, William M.

    1987-01-01

    Error analysis increases precision of navigation. Report presents improved mathematical models of analysis of Doppler measurements and measurement errors of spacecraft navigation. To take advantage of potential navigational accuracy of Doppler measurements, precise equations relate measured cycle count to position and velocity. Drifts and random variations in transmitter and receiver oscillator frequencies taken into account. Mathematical models also adapted to aircraft navigation, radar, sonar, lidar, and interferometry.

  15. An experimental investigation of throughflow velocities in two-dimensional fluidized bed bubbles: Laser Doppler anemometer measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gautam, M. . Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering); Jurewicz, J.T. ); Kale, S.R. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-09-01

    Detailed nonintrusive measurements have been made to determine the throughflow velocity in isolated fluidized bed bubbles. In air-fluidized beds, the throughflow component has been rather neglected and measurements of the visible bubbleflow alone have, therefore, failed to clarify the overall distribution of gas flow between the phases. A single component fiber optic laser Doppler anemometer was used to map the fluid flow through a bubble rising in a two-dimensional bed. The bed was fluidized at a superficial velocity slightly than incipient. The conditioned sampling technique developed to characterize the periodic nature of the bubble phase flow revealed that the throughflow velocity in two-dimensional beds increases linearly with increasing distance from the distributor, thereby enhancing the convective component in the interphase mass transfer process. Bubble growth was accounted for and the end-effects were minimized. Dependence of the bubble throughflow on the elongation of the bubble was observed thus confirming the theoretical analysis of some previous investigators. However, experimental evidence presented in this paper showed that the existing models fail to accurately predict the convective component in the bubble phase of two-dimensional fluidized beds.

  16. First Scientific Working Group Meeting of Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurement Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, J. W. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the first scientific working group meeting was fourfold: (1) to identify flight test options for engineering verification of the MSFC Doppler Lidar; (2) to identify flight test options for gathering data for scientific/technology applications; (3) to identify additional support equipment needed on the CV 990 aircraft for the flight tests; and (4) to identify postflight data processing and data sets requirements. The working group identified approximately ten flight options for gathering data on atmospheric dynamics processes, including turbulence, valley breezes, and thunderstorm cloud anvil and cold air outflow dynamics. These test options will be used as a basis for planning the fiscal year 1981 tests of the Doppler Lidar system.

  17. Label-free in-vivo measurement of lymph flow velocity using Doppler optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatter, Cedric; Meijer, Eelco F. J.; Nam, Ahhyun S.; Jones, Dennis; Padera, Timothy P.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2016-03-01

    Alterations in lymphatic network function contribute to the lymphedema development, cancer progression and impairment in regional immune function. However, there are limited tools available to directly measure lymphatic vessel function and transport in vivo. Existing approaches such as fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) require injection of exogenous labels which intrinsically alter the physiology of the local lymphatic network. A label-free approach to imaging lymph flow in vivo would provide direct and unaltered measurements of lymphatic vessel transport and could catalyze research in lymphatic biology. Here, we demonstrate and validate the use of Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) to measure lymph flow in vivo at speeds as low as 50µm/s. Compared to blood, lymph is relatively acellular (under normal conditions), but contains similar soluble components to blood plasma. We demonstrate that the small but detectable scattering signal from lymph can be used to extract fluid velocity using a dedicated algorithm optimized for Doppler analysis in low signal-to-noise settings (0 to 6 dB typical). We demonstrate the accuracy of this technique by comparing DOCT to FRAP measurements, using an intralipid lymph proxy in microfluidic devices and in vivo in the mouse ear. Finally, we demonstrate the label free measurement of lymph speed in the hind-limb of mice with a temporal resolution of 0.25s that agree well with prior literature reports. We anticipate that DOCT can become a powerful new tool in preclinical lymphatic biology research—including the relationship between lymphatic function and metastasis formation—with the potential to later expand also to clinical settings.

  18. Acoustic velocity measurement by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry: Development of an Extended Kalman Filter and validation in free-field measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Duff, Alain; Plantier, Guy; Valière, Jean C.; Gazengel, Bruno

    2016-03-01

    A signal processing technique, based on the use of an Extended Kalman Filter, has been developed to measure sound fields by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry in weak flow. This method allows for the parametric estimation of both the acoustic particle and flow velocity for a forced sine-wave excitation where the acoustic frequency is known. The measurements are performed from the in-phase and the quadrature components of the Doppler downshifted signal thanks to an analog quadrature demodulation technique. Then, the estimated performance is illustrated by means of Monte-Carlo simulations obtained from synthesized signals and compared with asymptotic and analytical forms for the Cramer-Rao Bounds. Results allow the validity domain of the method to be defined and show the availability for free-field measurements in a large range. Finally, an application based on real data obtained in free field is presented.

  19. Measurements of the hole boring velocity from Doppler shifted harmonic emission from solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Zepf, M.; Castro-Colin, M.; Chambers, D.; Preston, S.G.; Wark, J.S.; Zhang, J.; Danson, C.N.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.A.; Dangor, A.E.; Dyson, A.; Lee, P.; Fews, A.P.; Gibbon, P.; Moustaizis, S.

    1996-09-01

    The fast ignitor scheme for inertial confinement fusion requires forward driving of the critical density surface by light pressure (hole boring) to allow energy deposition close to the dense fuel. The recession velocity of the critical density surface has been observed to be {ital v}/{ital c}=0.015 at an irradiance of 1.0{times}10{sup 19} Wcm{sup {minus}2} at a wavelength of 1.05 micron, in quantitative agreement with modeling. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Cause and solution for false upstream boat velocities measured with a StreamPro acoustic doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Rehmel, Mike S.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2007-01-01

    In 2003, Teledyne RD Instruments introduced the StreamPro acoustic Doppler current profiler which does not include an internal compass. During stationary moving-bed tests the StreamPro often tends to swim or kite from the end of the tether (the instrument rotates then moves laterally in the direction of the rotation). Because the StreamPro does not have an internal compass, it cannot account for the rotation. This rotation and lateral movement of the StreamPro on the end of the tether generates a false upstream velocity, which cannot be easily distinguished from a moving-bed bias velocity. A field test was completed to demonstrate that this rotation and lateral movement causes a false upstream boat velocity. The vector dot product of the boat velocity and the unit vector of the depth-averaged water velocity is shown to be an effective method to account for the effect of the rotation and lateral movement.

  1. Noninvasive Method for Measuring Local Pulse Wave Velocity by Dual Pulse Wave Doppler: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Yang, Yong; Yuan, Li-jun; Liu, Jie; Duan, Yun-you; Cao, Tie-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the validity and reproducibility of a noninvasive dual pulse wave Doppler (DPWD) method, which involves simultaneous recording of flow velocity of two independent sample volumes with a measurable distance, for measuring the local arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV) through in vitro and in vivo studies. Methods The DPWD mode of Hitachi HI Vision Preirus ultrasound system with a 5–13MHz transducer was used. An in vitro model was designed to compare the PWV of a homogeneous rubber tubing with the local PWV of its middle part measured by DPWD method. In the in vivo study, local PWV of 45 hypertensive patients (25 male, 49.8±3.1 years) and 45 matched healthy subjects (25 male, 49.3±3.0 years) were investigated at the left common carotid artery (LCCA) by DPWD method. Results In the in vitro study, the local PWV measured by DPWP method and the PWV of the homogeneous rubber tubing did not show statistical difference (5.16 ± 0.28 m/s vs 5.03 ± 0.15 m/s, p = 0.075). The coefficient of variation (CV) of the intra- and inter- measurements for local PWV were 3.46% and 4.96%, for the PWV of the homogeneous rubber tubing were 0.99% and 1.98%. In the in vivo study, a significantly higher local PWV of LCCA was found in the hypertensive patients as compared to that in healthy subjects (6.29±1.04m/s vs. 5.31±0.72m/s, P = 0.019). The CV of the intra- and inter- measurements in hypertensive patients were 2.22% and 3.94%, in healthy subjects were 2.07% and 4.14%. Conclusions This study demonstrated the feasibility of the noninvasive DPWD method to determine the local PWV, which was accurate and reproducible not only in vitro but also in vivo studies. This noninvasive echocardiographic method may be illuminating to clinical use. PMID:25786124

  2. Peak Systolic Velocity Measurements with Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound Is a Predictor of Incident Stroke among the General Population in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Bo; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Dodds, Jodi A.; Xie, Gao-Qiang; Zhang, Pu-Hong; Huang, Yi-Ning; Wang, Bo; Wu, Yang-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective It is necessary to develop an effective and low-cost screening tool for identifying Chinese people at high risk of stroke. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) is a powerful predictor of stroke in the pediatric sickle cell disease population, as demonstrated in the STOP trial. Our study was conducted to determine the prediction value of peak systolic velocities as measured by TCD on subsequent stroke risk in a prospective cohort of the general population from Beijing, China. Methods In 2002, a prospective cohort study was conducted among 1392 residents from 11 villages of the Shijingshan district of Beijing, China. The cohort was scheduled for follow up with regard to incident stroke in 2005, 2007, and 2012 by a study team comprised of epidemiologists, nurses, and physicians. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to determine the factors associated with incident stroke. Results Participants identified by TCD criteria as having intracranial stenosis had a 3.6-fold greater risk of incident stroke (hazard ratio (HR) 3.57, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.86–6.83, P<0.01) than those without TCD evidence of intracranial stenosis. The association remained significant in multivariate analysis (HR 2.53, 95% CI 1.31–4.87) after adjusting for other risk factors or confounders. Older age, cigarette smoking, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus remained statistically significant as risk factors after controlling for other factors. Conclusions The study confirmed the screening value of TCD among the general population in urban China. Increasing the availability of TCD screening may help identify subjects as higher risk for stroke. PMID:27513983

  3. Peak velocity overestimation and linear-array spectral Doppler.

    PubMed

    Eicke, B M; Kremkau, F W; Hinson, H; Tegeler, C H

    1995-04-01

    Ultrasound instruments are used to evaluate blood flow velocities in the human body. Most clinical instruments perform velocity calculations based on the Doppler principle and measure the frequency shift of a reflected ultrasound beam. Doppler-only instruments use single-frequency, single-crystal transducers. Linear- and annular-array multiple-crystal transducers are used for duplex scanning (simultaneous B-mode image and Doppler). Clinical interpretation relies primarily on determination of peak velocities or frequency shifts as identified by the Doppler spectrum. Understanding of the validity of these measurements is important for instruments in clinical use. The present study examined the accuracy with which several ultrasound instruments could estimate velocities based on the identification of the peak of the Doppler spectrum, across a range of different angles of insonation, on a Doppler string phantom. The string was running in a water tank at constant speeds of 50, 100, and 150 cm/sec and also in a sine wave pattern at 100- or 150-cm/sec amplitude. Angles of insonation were 30, 45, 60, and 70 degrees. The single-frequency, single-crystal transducers (PC Dop 842, 2-MHz pulsed-wave, 4-MHz continuous-wave) provided acceptably accurate velocity estimates at all tested velocities independent of the angle of insonation. All duplex Doppler instruments with linear-array transducers (Philips P700, 5.0-MHz; Hewlett-Packard Sonos 1000, 7.5-MHz; ATL Ultramark 9 HDI, 7.5-MHz) exhibited a consistent overestimation of the true flow velocity due to increasing intrinsic spectral broadening with increasing angle of insonation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Doppler Lidar Vertical Velocity Statistics Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, R. K.; Sivaraman, C.; Shippert, T. R.; Riihimaki, L. D.

    2015-07-01

    Accurate height-resolved measurements of higher-order statistical moments of vertical velocity fluctuations are crucial for improved understanding of turbulent mixing and diffusion, convective initiation, and cloud life cycles. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility operates coherent Doppler lidar systems at several sites around the globe. These instruments provide measurements of clear-air vertical velocity profiles in the lower troposphere with a nominal temporal resolution of 1 sec and height resolution of 30 m. The purpose of the Doppler lidar vertical velocity statistics (DLWSTATS) value-added product (VAP) is to produce height- and time-resolved estimates of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and kurtosis from these raw measurements. The VAP also produces estimates of cloud properties, including cloud-base height (CBH), cloud frequency, cloud-base vertical velocity, and cloud-base updraft fraction.

  5. Measurement of velocities with an acoustic velocity meter, one side-looking and two upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profilers in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Romeoville, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberg, Kevin A.; Duncker, James J.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, a prototype 300 kHz, side-looking Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) was deployed in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) at Romeoville, Illinois. Additionally, two upward-looking ADCP's were deployed in the same acoustic path as the side-looking ADCP and in the reach defined by the upstream and downstream acoustic velocity meter (AVM) paths. All three ADCP's were synchronized to the AVM clock at the gaging station so that data were sampled simultaneously. The three ADCP's were deployed for six weeks measuring flow velocities from 0.0 to 2.5 ft/s. Velocities measured by each ADCP were compared to AVM path velocities and to velocities measured by the other ADCP's.

  6. The effects of probe placement on measured flow velocity in transcranial Doppler ultrasound imaging in-vitro and in-vivo experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Daan L. K.; Meel-van den Abeelen, Aisha S. S.; Lagro, Joep; Claassen, Jurgen A. H. R.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2014-03-01

    The measurement of the blood flow in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) using transcranial Doppler ultrasound (US) imaging is clinically relevant for the study of cerebral autoregulation. Especially in the aging population, impairement of the autoregulation may coincide or relate to loss of perfusion and consequently loss of brain function. The cerebral autoregulation can be assessed by relating the blood pressure to the blood flow in the brain. Doppler US is a widely used, non-invasive method to measure the blood flow in the MCA. However, Doppler flow imaging is known to produce results that are dependent of the operator. The angle of the probe insonation with respect to the centerline of the blood vessel is a well known factor for output variability. In patients also the skull must be traversed and the MCA must be detected, influencing the US signal intensity. In this contribution we report two studies. We describe first an in-vitro setup to study the Doppler flow in a situation where the ground truth is known. Secondly, we report on a study with healthy volunteers where the effects of small probe displacements on the flow velocity signals are investigated. For the latter purpose, a special probe holder was designed to control the experiment.

  7. Simultaneous three-dimensional velocity and mixing measurements by use of laser Doppler velocimetry and fluorescence probes in a water tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhart, Dan H.; Wing, David J.; Henderson, Uleses C., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A water tunnel investigation was conducted to demonstrate the capabilities of a laser-based instrument that can measure velocity and fluorescence intensity simultaneously. Fluorescence intensity of an excited fluorescent dye is directly related to concentration level and is used to indicate the extent of mixing in flow. This instrument is a three-dimensional laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) in combination with a fluorometer for measuring fluorescence intensity variations. This capability allows simultaneous flow measurements of the three orthogonal velocity components and mixing within the same region. Two different flows which were generated by two models were studied: a generic nonaxisymmetric nozzle propulsion simulation model with an auxiliary internal water source that generated a jet flow and an axisymmetric forebody model with a circular sector strake that generated a vortex flow. The off-body flow fields around these models were investigated in the Langley 16- by 24-Inch Water Tunnel. The experimental results were used to calculate 17 quantities that included mean and fluctuating velocities, Reynolds stresses, mean and fluctuating dye fluorescence intensities (proportional to concentration), and fluctuating velocity and dye concentration correlations. An uncertainty analysis was performed to establish confidence levels in the experimental results. In general, uncertainties in mean velocities varied between 1 and 7 percent of free-stream velocity; uncertainties in fluctuating velocities varied between 1 and 5 percent of reference values. The results show characteristics that are unique to each type of flow.

  8. Measurements in the Turbulent Boundary Layer at Constant Pressure in Subsonic and Supersonic Flow. Part 2: Laser-Doppler Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimotakis, P. E.; Collins, D. J.; Lang, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    A description of both the mean and the fluctuating components of the flow, and of the Reynolds stress as observed using a dual forward scattering laser-Doppler velocimeter is presented. A detailed description of the instrument and of the data analysis techniques were included in order to fully document the data. A detailed comparison was made between the laser-Doppler results and those presented in Part 1, and an assessment was made of the ability of the laser-Doppler velocimeter to measure the details of the flows involved.

  9. Laser Doppler velocimeter measurements of boundary layer velocity and turbulent intensities in Mach 2.5 flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sewell, Jesse; Chew, Larry

    1994-01-01

    In recent years, the interest in developing a high-speed civil transport has increased. This has led to an increase in research activity on compressible supersonic flows, in particular the boundary layer. The structure of subsonic boundary layers has been extensively documented using conditional sampling techniques which exploit the knowledge of both u and v velocities. Researchers using these techniques have been able to explore some of the complex three-dimensional motions which are responsible for Reynolds stress production and transport in the boundary layer. As interest in turbulent structure has grown to include supersonic flows, a need for simultaneous multicomponent velocity measurements in these flows has developed. The success of conditional analysis in determining the characteristics of coherent motions and structures in the boundary layer relies on accurate, simultaneous measurement of two instantaneous velocity components.

  10. Comparison of wind velocity in thunderstorms determined from measurements by a ground-based Doppler radar and an F-106B airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usry, J. W.; Dunham, R. E., Jr.; Lee, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    As a part of the NASA Storm Hazards Program, the wind velocity in several thunderstorms was measured by an F-106B instrumented airplane and a ground-based Doppler radar. The results of five airplane penetrations of two storms in 1980 and six penetrations of one storm in 1981 are given. Comparisons were made between the radial wind velocity components measured by the radar and the airplane. The correlation coefficients for the 1980 data and part of the 1981 data were 0.88 and 0.78, respectively. It is suggested that larger values for these coefficients may be obtained by improving the experimental technique and in particular by slaving the radar to track the airplane during such tests.

  11. Some experiments in swirling flows: Detailed velocity measurements of a vortex breakdown using a laser Doppler anemometer. Ph.D. Thesis - Cornell Univ. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faler, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    The results of an experimental study of spiraling flows in a slightly diverging, circular duct are reported. Seven types of flow disturbances were observed. In addition to the spiral and axisymmetric vortex breakdowns and the double helix mode, four other forms were identified and are reported. The type and axial location of the disturbance depended on the Reynolds and circulation numbers of the flow. Detailed velocity measurements were made by using a laser Doppler anemometer. Measurements made far upstream of any disturbance showed that the introduction of swirl resulted in the formation of a high axial velocity jet centered around the vortex center. A mapping of the velocity field of a so-called axisymmetric breakdown, formed at a Reynolds number of 2560, revealed that the recirculation zone is a two-celled structure, with four stagnation points on the vortex axis marking the axial extremes of the concentric cells. The dominant feature of the flow inside the bubble was the strong, periodic velocity fluctuations. Existing theoretical models do not predict the two-celled structure and the temporal velocity fluctuations that were observed.

  12. Chaotic system for self-synchronizing Doppler measurement.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Thomas L

    2005-03-01

    In a radar system, it is necessary to measure both range and velocity of a target. The movement of the target causes a Doppler shift of the radar signal, and the size of the Doppler shift is used to measure the velocity of the target. In this work, a chaotic drive-response system is simulated that detects a Doppler shift in a chaotic signal. The response system can detect Doppler shifts in more than one signal at a time.

  13. Self-mixing detection of backscattered radiation in a single-mode erbium fibre laser for Doppler spectroscopy and velocity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, A K; Konovalov, A N; Ul'yanov, V A

    2014-04-28

    We report an experimental study of the self-mixing effect in a single-mode multifrequency erbium fibre laser when radiation backscattered from an external moving object arrives at its cavity. To eliminate resulting chaotic pulsations in the laser, we have proposed a technique for suppressing backscattered radiation through the use of multimode fibre for radiation delivery. The multifrequency operation of the laser has been shown to lead to strong fluctuations of the amplitude of the Doppler signal and a nonmonotonic variation of the amplitude with distance to the scattering object. In spite of these features, the self-mixing signal was detected with a high signal-to-noise ratio (above 10{sup 2}) when the radiation was scattered by a rotating disc, and the Doppler frequency shift, evaluated as the centroid of its spectrum, had high stability (0.15%) and linearity relative to the rotation rate. We conclude that the self-mixing effect in this type of fibre laser can be used for measuring the velocity of scattering objects and in Doppler spectroscopy for monitoring the laser evaporation of materials and biological tissues. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  14. Tangential velocity measurement using interferometric MTI radar

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.; Mileshosky, Brian P.; Bickel, Douglas L.

    2006-01-03

    Radar systems use time delay measurements between a transmitted signal and its echo to calculate range to a target. Ranges that change with time cause a Doppler offset in phase and frequency of the echo. Consequently, the closing velocity between target and radar can be measured by measuring the Doppler offset of the echo. The closing velocity is also known as radial velocity, or line-of-sight velocity. Doppler frequency is measured in a pulse-Doppler radar as a linear phase shift over a set of radar pulses during some Coherent Processing Interval (CPI). An Interferometric Moving Target Indicator (MTI) radar can be used to measure the tangential velocity component of a moving target. Multiple baselines, along with the conventional radial velocity measurement, allow estimating the true 3-D velocity of a target.

  15. Reducing Spaceborne-Doppler-Radar Rainfall-Velocity Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanelli, Simone; Im, Eastwood; Durden, Stephen L.

    2008-01-01

    A combined frequency-time (CFT) spectral moment estimation technique has been devised for calculating rainfall velocity from measurement data acquired by a nadir-looking spaceborne Doppler weather radar system. Prior spectral moment estimation techniques used for this purpose are based partly on the assumption that the radar resolution volume is uniformly filled with rainfall. The assumption is unrealistic in general but introduces negligible error in application to airborne radar systems. However, for spaceborne systems, the combination of this assumption and inhomogeneities in rainfall [denoted non-uniform beam filling (NUBF)] can result in velocity measurement errors of several meters per second. The present CFT spectral moment estimation technique includes coherent processing of a series of Doppler spectra generated in a standard manner from data over measurement volumes that are partially overlapping in the along-track direction. Performance simulation of this technique using high-resolution data from an airborne rain-mapping radar shows that a spaceborne Ku-band Doppler radar operating at signal-to-noise ratios greater than 10 dB can achieve root-mean-square accuracy between 0.5 and 0.6 m/s in vertical-velocity estimates.

  16. Ground and space based cloud-top wind velocities using CFHT/ESPaDOnS (Doppler velocimetry) and VEx/VIRTIS (cloud tracking) coordinated measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Pedro; Widemann, Thomas; Peralta, Javier; Gonçalves, Rúben; Donati, Jean-François; Luz, David

    2016-04-01

    We will present wind velocity results based in the measurements of the horizontal wind field at the cloud top level of the atmosphere of Venus, near 70 km altitude. Our aim is contribute to the characterisation of the zonal and meridional wind latitudinal profiles on hour and day-timescales. This will be done by tracking Doppler shift of solar and CO2 lines over the dayside hemisphere in coordination with ESA's Venus Express orbiter. Our observations measured winds at cloud tops at latitudes 60°S-60°N, while Vex/VIRTIS privileged southern latitudes poleward of 45°S. This coordination effort intended to provide a combined monitoring of short-term changes of wind amplitude and directions with extensive spatial coverage. We present results based on inter comparison of ground-based Doppler velocimetry of cloud-top winds and cloud tracking measurements from the Venus Express spacecraft. Doppler wind velocimetry obtained with the 3.60 m Canada-France-Hawaii telescope (CFHT) and the Visible Spectrograph ESPaDOnS in April 2014 consisted of high-resolution spectra of Fraunhofer lines in the visible range (0.37-1.05 μm) to measure the wind velocity using the Doppler shift of solar radiation scattered by cloud top particles in the observer's direction. The complete optical spectrum was collected at a phase angle Φ = (76 ± 0.3)°, at a resolution of about 80000. Both ground-based and Venus Express measurements show considerable day-to-day variability revealing wave propagation and angular momentum transport in latitude which needs to be carefully assessed. ESPaDOnS and the sequential technique of visible Doppler velocimetry has proven a reference technique to measure instantaneous winds. These measurements are necessary to help validating Global Circulation Models (GCMs), to extend the temporal coverage of available datasets. The ground-based observations in the base of this project are critical in their complementarity with Venus Express, which was recently

  17. Ground and space based cloud-top wind velocities using CFHT/ESPaDOnS (Doppler velocimetry) and VEx/VIRTIS (cloud tracking) coordinated measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Pedro; Widemann, Thomas; Peralta, Javier; Gonçalves, Rúben; Donati, Jean-François; Luz, David

    2016-04-01

    We will present wind velocity results based in the measurements of the horizontal wind field at the cloud top level of the atmosphere of Venus, near 70 km altitude. Our aim is contribute to the characterisation of the zonal and meridional wind latitudinal profiles on hour and day-timescales. This will be done by tracking Doppler shift of solar and CO2 lines over the dayside hemisphere in coordination with ESA's Venus Express orbiter. Our observations measured winds at cloud tops at latitudes 60°S-60°N, while Vex/VIRTIS privileged southern latitudes poleward of 45°S. This coordination effort intended to provide a combined monitoring of short-term changes of wind amplitude and directions with extensive spatial coverage. We present results based on inter comparison of ground-based Doppler velocimetry of cloud-top winds and cloud tracking measurements from the Venus Express spacecraft. Doppler wind velocimetry obtained with the 3.60 m Canada-France-Hawaii telescope (CFHT) and the Visible Spectrograph ESPaDOnS in April 2014 consisted of high-resolution spectra of Fraunhofer lines in the visible range (0.37-1.05 μm) to measure the wind velocity using the Doppler shift of solar radiation scattered by cloud top particles in the observer's direction. The complete optical spectrum was collected at a phase angle Φ = (76 ± 0.3)°, at a resolution of about 80000. Both ground-based and Venus Express measurements show considerable day-to-day variability revealing wave propagation and angular momentum transport in latitude which needs to be carefully assessed. ESPaDOnS and the sequential technique of visible Doppler velocimetry has proven a reference technique to measure instantaneous winds. These measurements are necessary to help validating Global Circulation Models (GCMs), to extend the temporal coverage of available datasets. The ground-based observations in the base of this project are critical in their complementarity with Venus Express, which was recently

  18. Laser Doppler dust devil measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilbro, J. W.; Jeffreys, H. B.; Kaufman, J. W.; Weaver, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning laser doppler velocimeter (SLDV) system was used to detect, track, and measure the velocity flow field of naturally occurring tornado-like flows (dust devils) in the atmosphere. A general description of the dust devil phenomenon is given along with a description of the test program, measurement system, and data processing techniques used to collect information on the dust devil flow field. The general meteorological conditions occurring during the test program are also described, and the information collected on two selected dust devils are discussed in detail to show the type of information which can be obtained with a SLDV system. The results from these measurements agree well with those of other investigators and illustrate the potential for the SLDV in future endeavors.

  19. Time-dependent flow velocity measurement using two-dimensional color Doppler flow imaging and evaluation by Hagen-Poiseuille equation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Sun, Yuqing; Xia, Lianghua; Gu, Junyi

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to develop a technique to assess velocity flow profile and wall shear stress (WSS) spatial distribution across a vessel phantom representing an artery. Upon confirming the reliability of the technique, it was then used on a set of carotid arteries from a cohort of human subjects. We implemented color Doppler flow imaging (CDFI) for measurement of velocity profile in the artery cross section. Two dimensional instantaneous and time-dependent flow velocity and WSS vector fields were measured and their waveforms of peak velocities based on the technique were compared with WSS values generated by Hagen-Poiseuille equation. Seventy-five patients with intima-media thickening were prospectively enrolled and were divided into an IMT group. At the same time, another 75 healthy volunteers were enrolled as the control group. All the subjects were scanned and the DICOM files were imported into our in-house program. Next, we determine the velocity profile of carotid arteries in a set of 150 human subjects and compared them again. The peak velocities by the CDFI and Hagen-Poiseuille equation techniques were compared and statistically evaluated. The amounts of deviation for the two measured WSS profiles were performed and we demonstrated that they are not significantly different. At two different flow settings with peak flow velocity of 0.1, 0.5 (×10(-11)) m/s, the obtained WSS were 0.021 ± 0.04, 0.038 ± 0.05 m/s, respectively. For the patient population study, the mean WSS value calculated by Hagen-Poiseuille equation was 2.98 ± 0.15 dyne/cm(2), while it was 2.31 ± 0.14 dyne/cm(2) by our CDFI analysis program. The difference was not statistically significant (t = -1.057, P = 0.259). Similar to the Hagen-Poiseuille equation, a negative linear correlation was also found between the calculated WSS and intima-media thickness (P = 0.000). Using CDFI analysis, we found that the WSS distribution at the middle of the proximal plaque shoulder was larger than the top

  20. Conduct overall test operations and evaluate two Doppler systems to detect, track and measure velocities in aircraft wake vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. J.; Krause, M. C.; Craven, C. E.; Edwards, B. B.; Coffey, E. W.; Huang, C. C.; Jetton, J. L.; Morrison, L. K.

    1974-01-01

    A program plan for system evaluation of the two-dimensional Scanning Laser Doppler System (SLDS) is presented. In order to meet system evaluation and optimization objectives the following tests were conducted: (1) noise tests; (2) wind tests; (3) blower flowfield tests; (4) single unit (1-D) flyby tests; and (5) dual unit (2-D) flyby tests. Test results are reported. The final phase of the program included logistics preparation, equipment interface checkouts, and data processing. It is concluded that the SLDS is capable of accurately tracking aircraft wake vortices from small or large aircraft, and in any type of weather.

  1. Application of acoustic-Doppler current profiler and expendable bathythermograph measurements to the study of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Dunworth, J. A.; Schubert, D. M.; Stalcup, M. C.; Barbour, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The degree to which Acoustic-Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and expendable bathythermograph (XBT) data can provide quantitative measurements of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream is addressed. An algorithm is used to generate salinity from temperature and depth using an historical Temperature/Salinity relation for the NW Atlantic. Results have been simulated using CTD data and comparing real and pseudo salinity files. Errors are typically less than 2 dynamic cm for the upper 800 m out of a total signal of 80 cm (across the Gulf Stream). When combined with ADCP data for a near-surface reference velocity, transport errors in isopycnal layers are less than about 1 Sv (10 to the 6th power cu m/s), as is the difference in total transport for the upper 800 m between real and pseudo data. The method is capable of measuring the real variability of the Gulf Stream, and when combined with altimeter data, can provide estimates of the geoid slope with oceanic errors of a few parts in 10 to the 8th power over horizontal scales of 500 km.

  2. Hydrokinetic canal measurements: inflow velocity, wake flow velocity, and turbulence

    DOE Data Explorer

    Gunawan, Budi

    2014-06-11

    The dataset consist of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) velocity measurements in the wake of a 3-meter diameter vertical-axis hydrokinetic turbine deployed in Roza Canal, Yakima, WA, USA. A normalized hub-centerline wake velocity profile and two cross-section velocity contours, 10 meters and 20 meters downstream of the turbine, are presented. Mean velocities and turbulence data, measured using acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) at 50 meters upstream of the turbine, are also presented. Canal dimensions and hydraulic properties, and turbine-related information are also included.

  3. Extraction of the velocity of walking human's body segments using ultrasonic Doppler.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Asif; Sabatier, James M; Bradley, Marshall; Ekimov, Alexander

    2010-11-01

    The focus of this paper is to experimentally extract the Doppler signatures of a walking human's individual body segments using an ultrasonic Doppler system (UDS) operating at 40 kHz. In a human's walk, the major contribution to Doppler velocities and acoustic scattering is from the foot, lower leg, thigh (upper leg) and torso. The Doppler signature of these human body segments are extracted experimentally. The measurements were made by illuminating one of these body segments at a time and blocking the remaining body segments using acoustic screens. The results obtained in our experiment were verified with the results published by Bradley using a physics-based model for Doppler sonar spectrograms.

  4. Correction of Doppler Rada Data for Aircraft Motion Using Surface Measurements and Recursive Least-Squares Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, S.; Haddad, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Observations of Doppler velocity of hydrometeors form airborne Doppler weather radars normally contains a component due to the aircraft motion. Accurate hydrometeor velocity measurements thus require correction by subtracting this velocity from the observed velocity.

  5. Radar Wind Profiler Radial Velocity: A Comparison with Doppler Lidar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Stephen A.; Goodrich, R. Kent

    2002-12-01

    The accuracy of the radial wind velocity measured with a radar wind profiler will depend on turbulent variability and instrumental noise. Radial velocity estimates of a boundary layer wind profiler are compared with those estimated by a Doppler lidar over 2.3 h. The lidar resolution volume was much narrower than the profiler volume, but the samples were well matched in range and time. The wind profiler radial velocity was computed using two common algorithms [profiler online program (POP) and National Center for Atmospheric Research improved moments algorithm (NIMA)]. The squared correlation between radial velocities measured with the two instruments was R2 = 0.99, and the standard deviation of the difference was about r = 0.20-0.23 m s1 for radial velocities of greater than 1 m s1 and r = 0.16-0.35 m s1 for radial velocities of less than 1 m s1. Small radial velocities may be treated differently in radar wind profiler processing because of ground-clutter mitigation strategies. A standard deviation of r = 0.23 m s1 implies an error in horizontal winds from turbulence and noise of less than 1 m s1 for a single cycle through the profiler beam directions and of less than 0.11-0.27 m s1 for a 30-min average measurement, depending on the beam pointing sequence. The accuracy of a wind profiler horizontal wind measurement will also depend on assumptions of spatial and temporal inhomogeneity of the atmosphere, which are not considered in this comparison. The wind profiler radial velocities from the POP and NIMA are in good agreement. However, the analysis does show the need for improvements in wind profiler processing when radial velocity is close to zero.

  6. Digital Doppler measurement with spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.; Hinedi, Sami M.; Labelle, Remi C.; Bevan, Roland P.; Del Castillo, Hector M.; Chong, Dwayne C.

    1991-01-01

    Digital and analog phase-locked loop (PLL) receivers were operated in parallel, each tracking the residual carrier from a spacecraft. The PLL tracked the downlink carrier and measured its instantaneous phase. This information, combined with a knowledge of the uplink carrier and the transponder ratio, permitted the computation of a Doppler observable. In this way, two separate Doppler measurements were obtained for one observation window. The two receivers agreed on the magnitude of the Doppler effect to within 1 mHz. There was less jitter on the data from the digital receiver. This was due to its smaller noise bandwidth. The demonstration and its results are described.

  7. Doppler effects on velocity spectra observed by MST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheffler, A. O.; Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, wind data from mesophere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars have been used to study the spectra of gravity waves in the atmosphere (Scheffler and Liu, 1985; VanZandt et al., 1985). Since MST radar measures the line-of-sight Doppler velocities, it senses the components of the wave-associated velocities along its beam directions. These components are related through the polarization relations which depend on the frequency and wave number of the wave. Therfore, the radar-observed velocity spectrum will be different from the original gravity-wave spectrum. Their relationship depends on the frequency and wave number of the wave as well as the propagation geometry. This relation can be used to interpret the observed data. It can also be used to test the assumption of gravity-wave spectrum (Scheffler and Liu, 1985). In deriving this relation, the background atmosphere has been assumed to be motionless. Obviously, the Doppler shift due to the background wind will change the shape of the gravity-wave power spectrum as well as its relation with the radar-observed spectrum. Here, researcher's investigate these changes.

  8. Doppler Measurements of the Suns Meridional Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    1996-01-01

    Doppler velocity data obtained with the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) instruments in Tucson from 1992 August through 1995 April were analyzed to determine the structure and evolution of the Sun's meridional flow. Individual measurements of the flow were derived from line-of-sight velocity images averaged over 17 minutes to remove the p-mode oscillation signal. Typical flow velocities are poleward at approximately 20 m/s, but the results suggest that episodes may occur with much stronger flows. Such variations may help to explain some of the many disparate reports on the strength and structure of the Sun's meridional flow.

  9. Blood flow velocity in monocular retinoblastoma assessed by color doppler

    PubMed Central

    Bonanomi, Maria Teresa B C; Saito, Osmar C; de Lima, Patricia Picciarelli; Bonanomi, Roberta Chizzotti; Chammas, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the flow of retrobulbar vessels in retinoblastoma by color Doppler imaging. METHODS: A prospective study of monocular retinoblastoma treated by enucleation between 2010 and 2014. The examination comprised fundoscopy, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography and color Doppler imaging. The peak blood velocities in the central retinal artery and central retinal vein of tumor-containing eyes (tuCRAv and tuCRVv, respectively) were assessed. The velocities were compared with those for normal eyes (nlCRAv and nlCRVv) and correlated with clinical and pathological findings. Tumor dimensions in the pathological sections were compared with those in magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography and were correlated with tuCRAv and tuCRVv. In tumor-containing eyes, the resistivity index in the central retinal artery and the pulse index in the central retinal vein were studied in relation to all variables. RESULTS: Eighteen patients were included. Comparisons between tuCRAv and nlCRAv and between tuCRVv and nlCRVv revealed higher velocities in tumor-containing eyes (p<0.001 for both), with a greater effect in the central retinal artery than in the central retinal vein (p=0.024). Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography measurements were as reliable as pathology assessments (p=0.675 and p=0.375, respectively). A positive relationship was found between tuCRAv and the tumor volume (p=0.027). The pulse index in the central retinal vein was lower in male patients (p=0.017) and in eyes with optic nerve invasion (p=0.0088). CONCLUSIONS: TuCRAv and tuCRVv are higher in tumor-containing eyes than in normal eyes. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography measurements are reliable. The tumor volume is correlated with a higher tuCRAv and a reduced pulse in the central retinal vein is correlated with male sex and optic nerve invasion. PMID:26735219

  10. Laser Doppler measurement techniques for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.; Gagliardi, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    Two techniques are proposed for using laser links to measure the relative radial velocity of two spacecraft. The first technique determines the relative radial velocity from a measurement of the two-way Doppler shift on a transponded radio-frequency subcarrier. The subcarrier intensity-modulates reciprocating laser beams. The second technique determines the relative radial velocity from a measurement of the two-way Doppler shift on an optical frequency carrier which is transponded between spacecraft using optical Costas loops. The first technique might be used in conjunction with noncoherent optical communications, while the second technique is compatible with coherent optical communications. The first technique simultaneously exploits the diffraction advantage of laser beams and the maturity of radio-frequency phase-locked loop technology. The second technique exploits both the diffraction advantage of laser beams and the large Doppler effect at optical frequencies. The second technique has the potential for greater accuracy; unfortunately, it is more difficult to implement since it involves optical Costas loops.

  11. Delay and Doppler spreads in underwater acoustic particle velocity channels.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huaihai; Abdi, Ali; Song, Aijun; Badiey, Mohsen

    2011-04-01

    Signal processing and communication in acoustic particle velocity channels using vector sensors are of interest in the underwater medium. Due to the presence of multiple propagation paths, a mobile receiver collects the signal with different delays and Doppler shifts. This introduces certain delay and Doppler spreads in particle velocity channels. In this paper, these channel spreads are characterized using the zero-crossing rates of channel responses in frequency and time domain. Useful expressions for delay and Doppler spreads are derived in terms of the key channel parameters mean angle of arrival and angle spread. These results are needed for design and performance prediction of systems that utilize underwater acoustic particle velocity and pressure channels.

  12. Wing tip vortex measurements with laser Doppler systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. E., III

    1973-01-01

    The vortex velocity field produced by a rectangular wing in a subsonic wind tunnel was measured using two laser Doppler velocimeter systems. One system made three dimensional mean velocity measurements and the other made one dimensional turbulence measurements. The systems and test procedures are described and comparisons of the measurements are made. The data defined a strong spiral motion in the vortex formation process.

  13. Normal Echocardiographic Measurements in a Korean Population Study: Part II. Doppler and Tissue Doppler Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-Oh; Shin, Mi-Seung; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Jung, Hae Ok; Park, Jeong Rang; Sohn, Il Suk; Kim, Hyungseop; Park, Seong-Mi; Yoo, Nam Jin; Choi, Jung Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Lee, Mi-Rae; Park, Jin-Sun; Shim, Chi Young; Kim, Dae-Hee; Shin, Dae-Hee; Shin, Gil Ja; Shin, Sung Hee; Kim, Kye Hun; Park, Jae-Hyeong; Lee, Sang Yeub; Kim, Woo-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemodynamic and functional evaluation with Doppler and tissue Doppler study as a part of comprehensive echocardiography is essential but normal reference values have never been reported from Korean normal population especially according to age and sex. Methods Using Normal echOcaRdiographic Measurements in a KoreAn popuLation study subjects, we obtained normal reference values for Doppler and tissue Doppler echocardiography including tricuspid annular velocities according to current guidelines and compared values according to gender and age groups. Results Mitral early diastolic (E) and late diastolic (A) velocity as well as E/A ratio were significantly higher in women compared to those in men. Conversely, mitral peak systolic and late diastolic annular velocity in both septal and lateral mitral annulus were significantly lower in women compared to those in men. However, there were no significant differences in both septal and lateral mitral early diastolic annular (e') velocity between men and women. In both men and women, mitral E velocity and its deceleration time as well as both E/A and E/e' ratio considerably increased with age. There were no significant differences in tricuspid inflow velocities and tricuspid lateral annular velocities between men and women except e' velocity, which was significantly higher in women compared to that in men. However, changes in both tricuspid inflow and lateral annular velocities according to age were similar to those in mitral velocities. Conclusion Since there were significant differences in Doppler and tissue Doppler echocardiographic variables between men and women and changes according to age were even more considerable in both gender groups, normal Doppler echocardiographic values should be differentially applied based on age and sex. PMID:27358707

  14. Laser Doppler anemometry measurements in an engine.

    PubMed

    Cole, J B; Swords, M D

    1979-05-15

    A simple and effective technique is reported which allows measurement of the flow field in the cylinder of a motored internal combustion engine with good temporal and spatial resolution. The experiment, a realfringe laser Doppler anemometer, uses photon counting digital autocorrelation for data capture. The experimental autocorrelation functions have been processed using curve-fitting to a Gaussian velocity profile and by direct Fourier transformation without prior assumption of the form. The ability of such a technique to tolerate poor SNRs makes it a likely choice for measurement in firing engines.

  15. Doppler Lidar for Wind Measurements on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Emmitt, George D.; Yu, Jirong; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron laser transmitter for wind sensing. With support from NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), NASA Langley Research Center has developed a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement. The transmitter portion of the transceiver employs the high-pulse-energy, Ho:Tm:LuLiF, partially conductively cooled laser technology developed at NASA Langley. The transceiver is capable of 250 mJ pulses at 10 Hz. It is very similar to the technology envisioned for coherent Doppler lidar wind measurements from Earth and Mars orbit. The transceiver is coupled to the large optics and data acquisition system in the NASA Langley VALIDAR mobile trailer. The large optics consists of a 15-cm off-axis beam expanding telescope, and a full-hemispheric scanner. Vertical and horizontal vector winds are measured, as well as relative backscatter. The data acquisition system employs frequency domain velocity estimation and pulse accumulation. It permits real-time display of the processed winds and archival of all data. This lidar system was recently deployed at Howard University facility in Beltsville, Mary-land, along with other wind lidar systems. Coherent Doppler wind lidar ground-based wind measurements and comparisons with other sensors will be presented. A simulation and data product for wind measurement at Venus will be presented.

  16. Effect of surface reflectivity on photonic Doppler velocimetry measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xianqian; Xia, Weiguang; Wang, Xi; Song, Hongwei; Huang, Chenguang

    2014-05-01

    While photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) is becoming a common diagnostic for tracking velocity in shock physical experiments, its validity on measuring surfaces with different reflectivity is not studied. This paper investigates the effects of surface reflectivity on PDV measurement for tracking back free surface velocity in laser shock processing. Credible measurement results for coarse polished surfaces with low reflectivity are obtained, whereas fine polished surfaces with relatively high reflectivity lead to heterodyne fringes with high frequency and corresponding unreasonably fast velocities. This phenomenon reported in the paper is somewhat inconsistent with the general view that PDV has remarkable robustness to large changes in surface reflectivity. The reason might be ascribed to multiple reflections of light, which cause the generation of multiple Doppler shifts. The mixing of the reference light and those Doppler-shifted lights brings out high frequency heterodyne fringes resulting in high velocity. Low surface reflectivity is better suited for PDV measurements.

  17. Evaluation of the MV (CAPON) Coherent Doppler Lidar Velocity Estimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lottman, B.; Frehlich, R.

    1997-01-01

    The performance of the CAPON velocity estimator for coherent Doppler lidar is determined for typical space-based and ground-based parameter regimes. Optimal input parameters for the algorithm were determined for each regime. For weak signals, performance is described by the standard deviation of the good estimates and the fraction of outliers. For strong signals, the fraction of outliers is zero. Numerical effort was also determined.

  18. A beamforming method for plane wave Doppler imaging of high flow velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansour, Omar; Poepping, Tamie L.; Lacefield, James C.

    2016-04-01

    Plane wave imaging is desirable for its ability to achieve high frame rates, allowing the capture of fast dynamic events, and continuous Doppler data. In most implementations of plane-wave imaging, multiple low resolution image (LRI) frames from different plane wave tilt angles are compounded to form a single high resolution image (HRI) frame, thereby reducing the frame rate. Compounding is a low-pass mean filter that causes attenuation and aliasing to signals with high Doppler shifts. On the other hand, the lateral beam profile and hence the quality of the HRI frames is improved by increasing the number of compounded frames. Therefore, a tradeoff exists between the Doppler limits and beam profile. In this paper, we present a method that eliminates this tradeoff and produces high resolution images without the use of compounding. The method suppresses the off-focus (clutter) signal by spreading its spectrum, while keeping the spectrum of the in-focus signal intact. The spreading is achieved by using a random sequence of tilt angles, as opposed to a linear sweep. Experiments performed using a carotid vessel phantom with constant flow demonstrate that the spread-spectrum method more accurately measures the parabolic flow profile of the vessel and in particular outperforms conventional plane-wave Doppler at higher flow velocities. The spread-spectrum method is expected to be valuable for Doppler applications that require measurement of high velocities at high frame rates.

  19. Modelling nonstationary Doppler noise in exoplanetary radial velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2015-08-01

    We construct a new class of analytic nonstationary noise models for exoplanetary Doppler data. The observable correlated noise is represented as a convolution of a parent activity process with a given memory function. The model honours the casuality principle, meaning that only past values of the activity may affect the observable value. This model does not approximate detailedly any real stellar activity phenomena, but it becomes mathematically simple, simultaneously satisfying the basic natural principles of physical sensibility and self-consistency.Additionally, we develop a new type of periodograms that can be used to detect periodic modulations in the Doppler noise characteristics, rather than in the observed radial velocity curve itself. We present first results of applying this technique to public Doppler time series available for a set of planet-hosting stars.This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project No. 14-02-92615 KO_a), the UK Royal Society International Exchange grant IE140055, by the President of Russia grant for young scientists (No. MK-733.2014.2), by the programme of the Presidium of Russian Academy of Sciences P21, and by the Saint Petersburg State University research grant 6.37.341.2015.

  20. Potential for coherent Doppler wind velocity lidar using neodymium lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, T. J.; Byer, R. L.; Zhou, B.

    1984-01-01

    Existing techniques for the frequency stabilization of Nd:YAG lasers operating at 1.06 micron, and the high-gain amplification of radiation at that wavelength, make possible the construction of a coherent Doppler wind velocity lidar using Nd:YAG. Velocity accuracy and range resolution are better at 1.06 micron than at 10.6 microns at the same level of the SNR. Backscatter from the atmosphere at 1.06 micron is greater than that at 10.6 microns by about 2 orders of magnitude, but the quantum-limited noise is higher by 100 also. Near-field attenuation and turbulent effects are more severe at 1.06 micron. In some configurations and environments, the 1.06-micron wavelength may be the better choice, and there may be technological advantages favoring the use of solid-state lasers in satellite systems.

  1. Remote measurement of wind speed by laser Doppler systems.

    PubMed

    Hughes, A J; Pike, E R

    1973-03-01

    Several types of laser Doppler velocimeter are considered for remote measurement of wind velocity. Particular attention is given to the range dependence of the mean power SNR when scattering is from natural aerosols. Numerical estimates for two systems are presented, indicating that CO(2) laser systems have considerably greater sensitivity than visible laser systems at ranges greater than a few meters.

  2. Visualizing flow fields using acoustic Doppler current profilers and the Velocity Mapping Toolbox

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, P. Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide examples of how the U.S. Geological Survey is using acoustic Doppler current profilers for much more than routine discharge measurements. These instruments are capable of mapping complex three-dimensional flow fields within rivers, lakes, and estuaries. Using the Velocity Mapping Toolbox to process the ADCP data allows detailed visualization of the data, providing valuable information for a range of studies and applications.

  3. Influence of Doppler-tipped guidewire position in coronary artery on blood flow velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Ivan S.; Dupouy, Patrick J.; Kvasnicka, Jan; Geschwind, Herbert J.

    1995-05-01

    A pulsatile blood flow model was used to estimate the influence of position of Doppler guide wires with 12 MHz forward looking ultrasound transducers on the average spectral peak velocity. Three 0.014-inch and three 0.018-inch Doppler guide wires were positioned in plastic tubes ranging from 1.7 mm to 8.0 mm internal diameter. Blood flow of 50, 100 and 200 ml/min was adjusted using a roller-pump. The flow velocity was lower by 54% near the wall than in the center of large tubes (diameter 8.0 mm). In tubes of 2.9 mm and 4.2 mm in diameter the maximum variations were 11% and 22.5% for the 0.014-inch guide wire and 7.5% and 20% for the 0.018-inch guide wire, respectively. No variance in velocity related to wire position was observed in small (1.7 mm) tubes. The system was not sensitive to angular displacement of the guide wire in the range of +/- 30 degree(s). These results demonstrate that intravascular Doppler ultrasound flowmeter may be accurately utilized for measurements of blood flow velocity in small coronary arteries without any need to reposition the guidewire.

  4. Method and apparatus for optical Doppler tomographic imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, John Stuart; Milner, Thomas Edward; Chen, Zhongping

    1999-01-01

    Optical Doppler tomography permits imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media. The tomography system combines Doppler velocimetry with high spatial resolution of partially coherent optical interferometry to measure fluid flow velocity at discrete spatial locations. Noninvasive in vivo imaging of blood flow dynamics and tissue structures with high spatial resolutions of the order of 2 to 10 microns is achieved in biological systems. The backscattered interference signals derived from the interferometer may be analyzed either through power spectrum determination to obtain the position and velocity of each particle in the fluid flow sample at each pixel, or the interference spectral density may be analyzed at each frequency in the spectrum to obtain the positions and velocities of the particles in a cross-section to which the interference spectral density corresponds. The realized resolutions of optical Doppler tomography allows noninvasive in vivo imaging of both blood microcirculation and tissue structure surrounding the vessel which has significance for biomedical research and clinical applications.

  5. In vitro verification of multiple-receiver Doppler ultrasound for velocity estimation improvement.

    PubMed

    Hallac, Rami R; Agarwal, Mangilal; Jones, Steven A

    2010-06-01

    The coherent scattering effect, which introduces noise in Doppler-derived velocity estimates, is caused by constructive and destructive interference of sound waves scattered from multiple particles. Because the phase relationship between signals scattered from different particles depends on the orientation of the receiver, the error in a given velocity estimate depends on the receiver location. To examine this dependence, the velocity of a steady uniform flow was measured simultaneously with a transceiver and three receivers, and the cross-correlation coefficients between velocity estimates for pairs of crystals were calculated. The velocity estimates were nearly independent, with cross-correlation coefficients of approximately 0.2. This result agrees with our previously published numerical simulation studies which demonstrated that the coherent scattering noise in receivers separated by 5 degrees or more was nearly uncorrelated. Consequently, the contribution of coherent scattering noise can be reduced by averaging out noise in signals obtained from multiple receivers.

  6. Airborne microwave Doppler measurements of ocean wave directional spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plant, W. J.; Keller, W. C.; Reeves, A. B.; Uliana, E. A.; Johnson, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    A technique is presented for measuring ocean wave directional spectra from aircraft using microwave Doppler radar. The technique involves backscattering coherent microwave radiation from a patch of sea surface which is small compared to dominant ocean wavelengths in the antenna look direction, and large compared to these lengths in the perpendicular (azimuthal) direction. The mean Doppler shift of the return signal measured over short time intervals is proportional to the mean sea surface velocity of the illuminated patch. Variable sea surface velocities induced by wave motion therefore produce time-varying Doppler shifts in the received signal. The large azimuthal dimension of the patch implies that these variations must be produced by surface waves traveling near the horizontal antenna look direction thus allowing determination of the direction of wave travel. Linear wave theory is used to convert the measured velocities into ocean wave spectral densities. Spectra measured simultaneously with this technique and two laser profilometers, and nearly simultaneous with this technique and two laser profilometers, and nearly simultaneous with a surface buoy, are presented. Applications and limitations of this airborne Doppler technique are discussed.

  7. Combined vector velocity and spectral Doppler imaging for improved imaging of complex blood flow in the carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Dahl, Torbjørn; Torp, Hans; Løvstakken, Lasse

    2014-07-01

    Color flow imaging and pulsed wave (PW) Doppler are important diagnostic tools in the examination of patients with carotid artery disease. However, measurement of the true peak systolic velocity is dependent on sample volume placement and the operator's ability to provide an educated guess of the flow direction. Using plane wave transmissions and a duplex imaging scheme, we present an all-in-one modality that provides both vector velocity and spectral Doppler imaging from one acquisition, in addition to separate B-mode images of sufficient quality. The vector Doppler information was used to provide automatically calibrated (angle-corrected) PW Doppler spectra at every image point. It was demonstrated that the combined information can be used to generate spatial maps of the peak systolic velocity, highlighting regions of high velocity and the extent of the stenotic region, which could be used to automate work flow as well as improve the accuracy of measurement of true peak systolic velocity. The modality was tested in a small group (N = 12) of patients with carotid artery disease. PW Doppler, vector velocity and B-mode images could successfully be obtained from a single recording for all patients with a body mass index ranging from 21 to 31 and a carotid depth ranging from 16 to 28 mm. PMID:24785436

  8. Velocity measurements in inhomogeneous combustion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chigier, N. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1989-10-01

    Measurements of velocity have been made in single-phase and two-phase combustion systems using laser anemometers. Argon ion lasers, Bragg cells for frequency shifting, forward and backscatter collection, signal processing, and computer analysis are used for velocity measurement. The set of vertical and horizontal fringes allows two orthogonal velocity components to be measured simultaneously and instantaneously. Radiation line filters are installed in the photomultiplier detectors to remove influence of flame radiation on velocity measurements. Instantaneous measurements of three orthogonal velocity components ({mu}, {nu}, w) are made over time periods sufficiently long for statistically valid time averaging. Conditional sampling is used on velocity-time traces to separate periodic fluctuations of flow field structure (form intermittency) from microscale fluctuations intrinsic to fluid mechanic turbulence. For two-phase flow systems with liquid fuel injection, the phase Doppler particle analyzer measures the size and velocity of single drops simultaneously. The technique is based upon the measurement of the interference fringe patterns produced by spherical drops passing through the intersection of two laser beams. Three detectors, separated at fixed spacing, are used to receive Doppler signals and to determine the phase shift due to different path lengths of the laser beam. Detailed measurements have been made in burning and nonburning air-assisted atomizer sprays revealing the detailed structural changes in the sprays as a result of drop collision and coalescence, evaporation, dispersion, and acceleration. Comparisons of mean drop sizes, number densities, and velocities under burning and nonburning conditions show the extent that the spray and flow fields are modified by combustion.

  9. Modeling and Doppler measurement of X-ray pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua; Xu, LuPing; Xie, Qiang

    2011-06-01

    Generally, the Doppler caused by the velocity of the detector leads to distortion of the integrated profile of the X-ray pulsar, on the contrary, if the distortion can be used to measure the Doppler, then the velocity of the detector is easy to be solved. In view of this, the correlation of the periodic error arise from the Doppler and the integrated profile was analyzed, then, based on the Poisson distribution model of the X-ray Pulsar, a new signal model and the concept of the profile entropy was defined. Furthermore, the directly cumulated profile of the signal was modeled with the Doppler as a parameter, and then the Doppler was solved via optimal method. Simultaneously, the performance of phase measurement based on this method was studded. The analysis shows that this method can get rid of the periodic error due to the discrete sampling, and can obtain continuous phase estimation. The experiment verification shows the consistency of the theory and the experiment.

  10. Experimental demonstration of noncontact pulse wave velocity monitoring using multiple Doppler radar sensors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li; Li, Changzhi; Lie, Donald Y C

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, two Doppler radars are used to monitor the pulse movements at the heart and the calf in order to measure the pulse wave velocity (PWV) wirelessly. Both simulation and experiment have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noncontact PWV monitoring. A three-stage calibration procedure, including DC offset calibration, circuit delay calibration and antenna radiation pattern calibration, has been developed for reliable long-term PWV monitoring. The measurement results have been verified by wired contact measurement with pulse transducers.

  11. The effect of dead elements on the accuracy of Doppler ultrasound measurements.

    PubMed

    Vachutka, Jaromir; Dolezal, Ladislav; Kollmann, Christian; Klein, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of multiple dead elements in an ultrasound probe on the accuracy of Doppler ultrasound measurements. For this work, we used a specially designed ultrasound imaging system, the Ultrasonix Sonix RP, that provides the user with the ability to disable selected elements in the probe. Using fully functional convex, linear, and phased array probes, we established a performance baseline by measuring the parameters of a laminar parabolic flow profile. These same parameters were then measured using probes with 1 to 10 disabled elements. The acquired velocity spectra from the functional probes and the probes with disabled elements were then analyzed to determine the overall Doppler power, maximum flow velocity, and average flow velocity. Color Flow Doppler images were also evaluated in a similar manner. The analysis of the Doppler spectra indicates that the overall Doppler power as well as the detected maximum and average velocities decrease with the increasing number of disabled elements. With multiple disabled elements, decreases in the detected maximum and average velocities greater than 20% were recorded. Similar results were also observed with Color Flow Doppler measurements. Our results confirmed that the degradation of the ultrasound probe through the loss of viable elements will negatively affect the quality of the Doppler-derived diagnostic information. We conclude that the results of Doppler measurements cannot be considered accurate or reliable if there are four or more contiguous dead elements in any given probe.

  12. Accuracy of velocity and power determination by the Doppler method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rottger, J.

    1984-01-01

    When designing a Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere (MST) radar antenna one has to trade between the choices to optimize the effective aperture or to optimize the sidelobe suppression. An optimization of the aperture increases the sensitivity. Suppression of side-lobes by tapering attenuates undesirable signals which spoil the estimates of reflectivity and velocity. Generally, any sidelobe effects are equivalent to a broadening of the antenna beam. The return signal is due to a product of the antenna pattern with the varying atmospheric reflectivity structures. Thus, knowing the antenna pattern, it is in principle possible to find the signal spectra, which, however, may be a tedious computational and ambiguous procedure. For vertically pointing main beams the sidelobe effects are efficiently suppressed because of the aspect sensitivity. It follows that sidelobes are a minor problem for spaced antenna methods. However, they can be crucial for Doppler methods, which need off-vertical beams. If a sidelobe is pointing towards the zenith a larger power may be received from the vertical than off-vertical directions, but quantitative estimates of this effect are not yet known. To get an error estimate of sidelobe effects with an off-vertical main beam a 1-dimensional example is considered.

  13. Acoustic Doppler discharge-measurement system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Michael R.; Oltmann, Richard N.; ,

    1990-01-01

    A discharge-measurement system that uses a vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler has been developed and tested by the U.S. Geological Survey. Discharge measurements using the system require a fraction of the time needed for conventional current-meter discharge measurements and do not require shore-based navigational aids or tag lines for positioning the vessel.

  14. Errors in radial velocity variance from Doppler wind lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Doubrawa, P.; Pryor, S. C.

    2016-08-01

    A high-fidelity lidar turbulence measurement technique relies on accurate estimates of radial velocity variance that are subject to both systematic and random errors determined by the autocorrelation function of radial velocity, the sampling rate, and the sampling duration. Using both statistically simulated and observed data, this paper quantifies the effect of the volumetric averaging in lidar radial velocity measurements on the autocorrelation function and the dependence of the systematic and random errors on the sampling duration. For current-generation scanning lidars and sampling durations of about 30 min and longer, during which the stationarity assumption is valid for atmospheric flows, the systematic error is negligible but the random error exceeds about 10 %.

  15. A comparison of a coaxial focused laser Doppler system in atmospheric measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karaki, S.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of atmospheric velocities and turbulence with the laser Doppler system were obtained, and the results compared with cup anemometer and hot-wire measurements in the same wind field. The laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) is described along with the test procedures. It was found that mean values determined from the LDV data are within 5% of other anemometer data for long time periods, and the LDV measures higher velocities.

  16. Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.G.; Davis, S.J.; Kessler, W.J.; Sonnenfroh, D.M. )

    1992-07-01

    The application of Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows is analyzed. Focussing on fluorescence of the OH molecule in typical H2-air Scramjet flows, the effects of uncharacterized variations in temperature, pressure, and collisional partner composition across the measurement plane are examined. Detailed measurements of the (1,0) band OH lineshape variations in H2-air combustions are used, along with single-pulse and time-averaged measurements of an excimer-pumped dye laser, to predict the performance of a model velocimeter with typical Scramjet flow properties. The analysis demonstrates the need for modification and control of the laser bandshape in order to permit accurate velocity measurements in the presence of multivariant flow properties. 13 refs.

  17. Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. G.; Davis, S. J.; Kessler, W. J.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    The application of Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows is analyzed. Focussing on fluorescence of the OH molecule in typical H2-air Scramjet flows, the effects of uncharacterized variations in temperature, pressure, and collisional partner composition across the measurement plane are examined. Detailed measurements of the (1,0) band OH lineshape variations in H2-air combustions are used, along with single-pulse and time-averaged measurements of an excimer-pumped dye laser, to predict the performance of a model velocimeter with typical Scramjet flow properties. The analysis demonstrates the need for modification and control of the laser bandshape in order to permit accurate velocity measurements in the presence of multivariant flow properties.

  18. Laser Doppler velocimeter aerial spray measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalay, A. D.; Eberle, W. R.; Howle, R. E.; Shrider, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental research program for measuring the location, spatial extent, and relative concentration of airborne spray clouds generated by agricultural aircraft is described. The measurements were conducted with a ground-based laser Doppler velocimeter. The remote sensing instrumentation, experimental tests, and the results of the flight tests are discussed. The cross section of the aerial spray cloud and the observed location, extent, and relative concentration of the airborne particulates are presented. It is feasible to use a mobile laser Doppler velocimeter to track and monitor the transport and dispersion of aerial spray generated by an agricultural aircraft.

  19. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Surveys of Velocity Downstream of Albeni Falls Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, William A.; Titzler, P. Scott; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Kallio, Sara E.; Bellgraph, Brian J.

    2010-09-30

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Seattle District, is studying the potential to locate fish bypass systems at Albeni Falls Dam. The USACE requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to survey velocity magnitude and direction in the dam tailrace. The empirical data collected will be used to support future numerical modeling, physical modeling, and evaluation of fish bypass system alternatives. In May 2010, PNNL conducted velocity surveys of the Albeni Falls Dam using a boat-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler. The surveys were conducted over three days (May 25 through 27). During the survey period, total river discharge at the dam varied between 30.2 and 31.0 kcfs. A small amount of spill discharge, 2 kcfs, was present on two days (May 26 and 27). This report presents data plots showing measured velocity direction and magnitude averaged over the entire depth and over 5-ft depth increments from 5 to 30 ft.

  20. Effect of velocity profile skewing on blood velocity and volume flow waveforms derived from maximum Doppler spectral velocity.

    PubMed

    Mynard, Jonathan P; Steinman, David A

    2013-05-01

    Given evidence that fully developed axisymmetric flow may be the exception rather than the rule, even in nominally straight arteries, maximum velocity (V(max)) can lie outside the Doppler sample volume (SV). The link between V(max) and derived quantities, such as volume flow (Q), may therefore be more complex than commonly thought. We performed idealized virtual Doppler ultrasound on data from image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the normal human carotid artery and investigated how velocity profile skewing and choice of sample volume affected V(max) waveforms and derived Q variables, considering common assumptions about velocity profile shape (i.e., Poiseuille or Womersley). Severe velocity profile skewing caused substantial errors in V(max) waveforms when using a small, centered SV, although peak V(max) was reliably detected; errors with a long SV covering the vessel diameter were orientation dependent but lower overall. Cycle-averaged Q calculated from V(max) was typically within ±15%, although substantial skewing and use of a small SV caused 10%-25% underestimation. Peak Q derived from Womersley's theory was generally accurate to within ±10%. V(max) pulsatility and resistance indexes differed from Q-based values, although the Q-based resistance index could be predicted reliably. Skewing introduced significant error into V(max)-derived Q waveforms, particularly during mid-to-late systole. Our findings suggest that errors in the V(max) and Q waveforms related to velocity profile skewing and use of a small SV, or orientation-dependent errors for a long SV, could limit their use in wave analysis or for constructing characteristic or patient-specific flow boundary conditions for model studies.

  1. Measurement of the Doppler power of flowing blood using ultrasound Doppler devices.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Chou, Hung-Lung; Chen, Pay-Yu

    2015-02-01

    Measurement of the Doppler power of signals backscattered from flowing blood (henceforth referred to as the Doppler power of flowing blood) and the echogenicity of flowing blood have been used widely to assess the degree of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation for more than 20 y. Many studies have used Doppler flowmeters based on an analogue circuit design to obtain the Doppler shifts in the signals backscattered from flowing blood; however, some recent studies have mentioned that the analogue Doppler flowmeter exhibits a frequency-response problem whereby the backscattered energy is lost at higher Doppler shift frequencies. Therefore, the measured Doppler power of flowing blood and evaluations of RBC aggregation obtained using an analogue Doppler device may be inaccurate. To overcome this problem, the present study implemented a field-programmable gate array-based digital pulsed-wave Doppler flowmeter to measure the Doppler power of flowing blood, in the aim of providing more accurate assessments of RBC aggregation. A clinical duplex ultrasound imaging system that can acquire pulsed-wave Doppler spectrograms is now available, but its usefulness for estimating the ultrasound scattering properties of blood is still in doubt. Therefore, the echogenicity and Doppler power of flowing blood under the same flow conditions were measured using a laboratory pulser-receiver system and a clinical ultrasound system, respectively, for comparisons. The experiments were carried out using porcine blood under steady laminar flow with both RBC suspensions and whole blood. The experimental results indicated that a clinical ultrasound system used to measure the Doppler spectrograms is not suitable for quantifying Doppler power. However, the Doppler power measured using a digital Doppler flowmeter can reveal the relationship between backscattering signals and the properties of blood cells because the effects of frequency response are eliminated. The measurements of the Doppler power and

  2. Accuracy of heart strain rate calculation derived from Doppler tissue velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Andres; Ledesma-Carbayo, Maria J.; Malpica, Norberto; Desco, Manuel; Antoranz, Jose C.; Marcos-Alberca, Pedro; Garcia-Fernandez, Miguel A.

    2001-05-01

    Strain Rate (SR) Imaging is a recent imaging technique that provides information about regional myocardial deformation by measuring local compression and expansion rates. SR can be obtained by calculating the local in-plane velocity gradients along the ultrasound beam from Doppler Tissue velocity data. However, SR calculations are very dependent on the image noise and artifacts, and different calculation algorithms may provide inconsistent results. This paper compares techniques to calculate SR. 2D Doppler Tissue Images (DTI) are acquired with an Acuson Sequoia scanner. Noise was measured with the aid of a rotating phantom. Processing is performed on polar coordinates. For each image, after removal of black spot artifacts by a selective median filter, two different SR calculation methods have been implemented. In the first one, SR is computed as the discrete velocity derivative, and noise is reduced with a variable-width gaussian filter. In the second method a smoothing cubic spine is calculated for every scan line according to the noise level and the derivative is obtained from an analytical expression. Both methods have been tested with DTI data from synthetic phantoms and normal volunteers. Results show that noise characteristics, border effects and the adequate scale are critical to obtain meaningful results.

  3. Laser Doppler visualisation of the velocity field by excluding the influence of multiparticle scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Dubnishchev, Yu N; Chugui, Yu V; Kompenhans, J

    2009-10-31

    The method of laser Doppler visualisation and measurement of the velocity field in gas and liquid flows by suppressing the influence of multiparticle scattering is discussed. The cross section of the flow under study is illuminated by a laser beam transformed by an anamorphic optical system into a laser sheet. The effect of multiparticle scattering is eliminated by obtaining differential combinations of frequency-demodulated images of the laser sheet in different regions of the angular spectrum of scattered light. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  4. Doppler velocities in the ion tail of comet Levy 1990c

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jockers, Klaus; Rauer, H.; Debi-Prasad, C.; Geyer, E. H.

    1992-01-01

    We have obtained time alternating sequences of column density maps and Doppler velocity fields in the plasma tail of comet Levy 1990c. We describe the observing technique and data analysis, and we present first results.

  5. The structure of velocity and dissipation in the top 50 cm below surface waves: Measurements in Lake Washington with a simultaneous multi-point laser Doppler velocimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Y.C.; Smith, J.F.; Atakturk, S.

    1994-12-31

    A number of studies now indicate that the marine surface boundary layer, when forced strongly by wind-stress, is not well represented by the classical wall layer as believed earlier. The energy input by wave breaking adds to the mixing, enhances the near-surface dissipation rates and promotes vigorous gas-exchange. This was most recently reported by a group of investigators including one of the present authors. The penetration of plumes has been exhaustively studied in a deterministic laboratory system also. Field measurements under realistic wave conditions have been limited to larger depths such that details of hydrodynamics in the high dissipation region have not been observed previously. Although there is some indication that shear-free conditions may establish under breaking waves within the top meter or so in a lake, a detailed study has not been possible due to a lack of suitable instrumentation. In this work, the authors describe an instrument system developed for such work and present early findings from a field experiment in Lake Washington in the Seattle region, US.

  6. Arterial compliance measurement using a noninvasive laser Doppler measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hast, Jukka T.; Myllylae, Risto A.; Sorvoja, Hannu; Nissilae, Seppo M.

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this study was to study the elasticity of the arterial wall using a non-invasive laser Doppler measurement system. The elasticity of the arterial wall is described by its compliance factor, which can be determined when both blood pressure and the radial velocity of the arterial wall are known. To measure radical velocity we used a self- mixing interferometer. The compliance factors were measured from six healthy volunteers, whose ages were varied from 21 to 32. Although a single volunteer's compliance factor is presented as an example, this paper treated the volunteers as a group. First, the elastic modulus, which is inversely proportional to the compliance factor, was determined. Then, an exponential curve was fitted into the measured data and a characteristic equation for the elastic modulus of the arterial wall was determined. The elastic modulus was calculated at different pressures and the results were compared to the static incremental modulus of a dog's femoral artery. The results indicate that there is a correlation between human elastic and canine static incremental modulus for blood pressures varying from 60 to 110 mmHg.

  7. A GIS-based Computational Tool for Multidimensional Flow Velocity by Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; Winkler, M.; Muste, M.

    2015-06-01

    Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) provide efficient and reliable flow measurements compared to other tools for characteristics of the riverine environments. In addition to originally targeted discharge measurements, ADCPs are increasingly utilized to assess river flow characteristics. The newly developed VMS (Velocity Mapping Software) aims at providing an efficient process for quality assurance, mapping velocity vectors for visualization and facilitating comparison with physical and numerical model results. VMS was designed to provide efficient and smooth work flows for processing groups of transects. The software allows the user to select group of files and subsequently to conduct statistical and graphical quality assurance on the files as a group or individually as appropriate. VMS also enables spatial averaging in horizontal and vertical plane for ADCP data in a single or multiple transects over the same or consecutive cross sections. The analysis results are displayed in numerical and graphical formats.

  8. Transcranial doppler assessment of cerebral flow velocity during perception and recognition of melodies.

    PubMed

    Matteis, M; Silvestrini, M; Troisi, E; Cupini, L M; Caltagirone, C

    1997-07-01

    The role of each cerebral hemisphere in the perception and recognition of musical information is not yet well understood. We studied cerebral blood flow changes during a melody perception task and a melody recognition task. Blood flow velocity in the two middle cerebral arteries of twenty right-handed musically naif volunteers were simultaneously measured by means of bilateral transcranial Doppler ultrasonography during two minutes of passive melody listening and two minutes of a melody recognition task. With respect to baseline values, a bilateral increase of flow velocity occurred in the middle cerebral arteries with a non-significant trend for the right artery during the melody perception task. During the melody recognition task, a significant increase in flow velocity was recorded on the right side with respect to the left side, where a slight simultaneous decrease was found. Our data suggest that melody perception requires bilateral activation of hemispheres and melody recognition mainly an activation of the right hemisphere. This study confirms the ability of transcranial Doppler ultrasonography to correlate artery flow dynamics with selective cerebral activation. PMID:9168166

  9. Evaluation of metered dose inhaler spray velocities using phase Doppler anemometry (PDA).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofei; Doub, William H; Guo, Changning

    2012-02-28

    Droplet velocity is an important parameter which can significantly influence inhalation drug delivery performance. Together with the droplet size, this parameter determines the efficiency of the deposition of MDI products at different sites within the lungs. In this study, phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) was used to investigate the instantaneous droplet velocity emitted from MDIs as well as the corresponding droplet size distribution. The nine commercial MDI products surveyed showed significantly different droplet velocities, indicating that droplet velocity could be used as a discriminating parameter for in vitro testing of MDI products. The droplet velocity for all tested MDI products decreased when the testing distance was increased from 3 cm to 6 cm from the front of mouthpiece, with CFC formulations showing a larger decrease than HFA formulations. The mean droplet diameters of the nine MDIs were also significantly different from one-another. Droplet size measurements made using PDA (a number-based technique) could not be directly compared to results obtained using laser light scattering measurements (a volume-based technique). This work demonstrates that PDA can provide unique information useful for characterizing MDI aerosol plumes and evaluating MDI drug delivery efficiency. PDA could also aid the evaluation of in vitro equivalence in support of formulation or manufacturing changes and in evaluation of abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) for MDIs. PMID:22183132

  10. Evaluation of metered dose inhaler spray velocities using phase Doppler anemometry (PDA).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofei; Doub, William H; Guo, Changning

    2012-02-28

    Droplet velocity is an important parameter which can significantly influence inhalation drug delivery performance. Together with the droplet size, this parameter determines the efficiency of the deposition of MDI products at different sites within the lungs. In this study, phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) was used to investigate the instantaneous droplet velocity emitted from MDIs as well as the corresponding droplet size distribution. The nine commercial MDI products surveyed showed significantly different droplet velocities, indicating that droplet velocity could be used as a discriminating parameter for in vitro testing of MDI products. The droplet velocity for all tested MDI products decreased when the testing distance was increased from 3 cm to 6 cm from the front of mouthpiece, with CFC formulations showing a larger decrease than HFA formulations. The mean droplet diameters of the nine MDIs were also significantly different from one-another. Droplet size measurements made using PDA (a number-based technique) could not be directly compared to results obtained using laser light scattering measurements (a volume-based technique). This work demonstrates that PDA can provide unique information useful for characterizing MDI aerosol plumes and evaluating MDI drug delivery efficiency. PDA could also aid the evaluation of in vitro equivalence in support of formulation or manufacturing changes and in evaluation of abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs) for MDIs.

  11. Continuous cardiac output measurement - Aspects of Doppler frequency analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. S.; Hechtman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    From the suprasternal notch blood flow velocity in the aorta can be measured non-invasively by a Doppler probe. Integration over systole after frequency analysis gives a measure of stroke volume if a separate diameter observation is incorporated. Frequency analysis by a zero crossing counter or by a set of parallel phaselock loops was less effective than a set of bandpass filters. Observations on dogs, baboons and humans before and after exercise or surgery suggest the indications to be useful. Application to judging heart failure by the effect of introducing a volume load is indicated. Changes in output also are measured in freely moving subjects.

  12. Measurement Capabilities of Single-Pulse Planar Doppler Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, Robert L.; Kutler, Paul F. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary investigations are described of a method that is capable of measuring instantaneous, 3-D, velocity vectors everywhere in a light sheet generated by a pulsed laser. The technique, here called Planar Doppler Velocimetry (PDV), is a variation of a new concept for velocity measurements that was called Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV) in its original disclosure. The concept relies on the use of a narrowband laser and measurements of the Doppler shift of scattered light from particles moving with a flow. The Doppler shift is recorded as a variation in transmission through a sharp-edged spectral filter provided by iodine vapor in a cell. Entire fields of velocity can be determined by using a solid-state camera to record the intensity variations throughout the field of view. However, the implementation of DGV has been centered principally on the use of high power, continuous-wave, ion lasers and measurement times that are determined by the 30-ms framing times of standard video cameras. Hence, they provide velocity fields that are averaged in time at least over that period. On the other hand, the PDV concept described in this presentation incorporates a high energy, repetitively pulsed, Nd-YAG laser that is injection-seeded to make it narrowband and then frequency-doubled to provide light at frequencies absorbed by the iodine vapor. The duration of each pulse is less than 10 nanoseconds. When used in combination with nonstandard, scientific quality, solid state cameras, a sequence of images can be obtained that provides instantaneous velocity vectors everywhere in the field of view. The investigations described in this paper include an accurate characterization of the iodine cell spectral behavior and its influence on the PDV measurements, a derivation of the PDV signal analysis requirements, and the unique aspects of the pulsed laser behavior related to this application. In addition, PDV measurements are to be demonstrated using data from a rotating wheel

  13. Droplet sizes and velocities in vaporizing sprays. [using laser Doppler anemometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yule, A. J.; Ereaut, P. R.; Ungut, A.

    1983-01-01

    A pulse height laser Doppler anemometer particle sizing technique has been refined to permit simultaneous particle size and velocity measurements in sprays. The improvements include (1) the use of a specially tailored 'top hat' light distribution, to provide unambiguous particle diameter-signal amplitude relations, (2) the use of back scattered light collection, and (3) the utilization of Mie theory to compute the relations between signal amplitude and particle diameter, in the backscatter mode. Twin-fluid atomized kerosene sprays have been investigated using the new technique. In these sprays distributions have been mapped of mean droplet diameters, droplet size distributions, and the local correlations between droplet diameters and velocities. The data show the variation of spray structure with atomizer input parameters, the preferential vaporization of smaller droplets, and the differing trajectories of the large and small droplets.

  14. Application of Spectroscopic Doppler Velocimetry for Measurement of Streamwise Vorticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, Amy; Zaman, Khairul B.; Elam, Kristie A.; Clem, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    A spectroscopic Doppler velocimetry technique has been developed for measuring two transverse components of velocity and hence streamwise vorticity in free jet flows. The nonintrusive optical measurement system uses Mie scattering from a 200 mW green continuous-wave laser interacting with dust and other tracer particulates naturally present in the air flow to measure the velocities. Scattered light is collected in two opposing directions to provide measurements of two orthogonal velocity components. An air-spaced Fabry-Perot interferometer is used for spectral analysis to determine the optical frequency shift between the incident laser light and the Mie scattered light. This frequency shift is directly proportional to the velocity component in the direction of the bisector of the incident and scattered light wave propagation vectors. Data were acquired for jet Mach numbers of 1.73 and 0.99 using a convergent 1.27-cm diameter round nozzle fitted with a single triangular "delta-tab". The velocity components and the streamwise vorticity calculated from the measurements are presented. The results demonstrate the ability of this novel optical system to obtain velocity and vorticity data without any artificial seeding and using a low power laser system.

  15. Interferometric measurement of the angular velocity of moving humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanzer, Jeffrey A.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the measurement of the angular velocity of walking humans using a millimeter-wave correlation interferometer. Measurement of the angular velocity of moving objects is a desirable function in remote sensing applications. Doppler radar sensors are able to measure the signature of moving humans based on micro-Doppler analysis; however, a person moving with little to no radial velocity produces negligible Doppler returns. Measurement of the angular movement of humans can be done with traditional radar techniques, however the process involves either continuous tracking with narrow beamwidth or angle-of-arrival estimation algorithms. A new method of measuring the angular velocity of moving objects using interferometry has recently been developed which measures the angular velocity of an object without tracking or complex processing. The frequency of the interferometer signal response is proportional to the angular velocity of the object as it passes through the interferometer beam pattern. In this paper, the theory of the interferometric measurement of angular velocity is covered and simulations of the response of a walking human are presented. Simulations are produced using a model of a walking human to show the significant features associated with the interferometer response, which may be used in classification algorithms.

  16. Estimating Discharge using Multi-level Velocity Data from Acoustic Doppler Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang Poulsen, J.; Rømer Rasmussen, K.; Bering Ovesen, N.

    2010-12-01

    In the majority of Danish streams, weed growth affects the effective stream width and bed roughness and therefore imposes temporal variations on the stage-discharge relationship. Small stream-gradients and firm ecology based restrictions prevent that hydraulic structures are made at the discharge stations and thus remove or limit such influences. Hence, estimation of the hydrograph is based on continuous stream gauging combined with monthly control measurements of discharge and assuming linear variation of bed roughness between the monthly measurements. As a result, any non-linear drift in weed density or structure which affect the frictional characteristics of the stream during both normal and peak flows are ignored. The present investigation studies if such temporal variation in the conveyance may be detected and eventually compensated for when estimating the hydrograph. Therefore acoustic Dopplers have been placed at the main discharge station in one of the largest Danish catchments (the Skjern). The instruments were set out in early February 2010 during the winter season and have been running since then. The long term average discharge at the station is near 14 m3/s and the cross sectional profile is roughly trapezoidal having width about 15 m., but slightly skew so that the stream is about 0.5 m. deeper off the right than off the left bank. During winter, the depths are typically near 2 m. while during summer they are about 1.5 m. During peak flows, when the discharge exceeds 35 m3/s, the depth increases to more than 3 m. The Doppler instruments (Nortek) are placed on a vertical pole about 2 m. off the right bank at three fixed elevations above the streambed (0.3, 0.6, and 1.3 m); the beams point horizontally towards the left bank perpendicularly to the average flow direction. At each depth, the Doppler sensor records 10 minute average stream velocities in the central 10 m. section of the stream. During summer periods with low flow, stream velocity has only

  17. Minior Actinide Doppler Coefficient Measurement Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan E. Hertel; Dwayne Blaylock

    2008-04-10

    The "Minor Actinide Doppler Coefficient Measurement Assessment" was a Department of Energy (DOE) U-NERI funded project intended to assess the viability of using either the FLATTOP or the COMET critical assembly to measure high temperature Doppler coefficients. The goal of the project was to calculate using the MCNP5 code the gram amounts of Np-237, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-241, AM-241, AM-242m, Am-243, and CM-244 needed to produce a 1E-5 in reactivity for a change in operating temperature 800C to 1000C. After determining the viability of using the assemblies and calculating the amounts of each actinide an experiment will be designed to verify the calculated results. The calculations and any doncuted experiments are designed to support the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative in conducting safety analysis of advanced fast reactor or acceoerator-driven transmutation systems with fuel containing high minor actinide content.

  18. Using embedded fibers to measure explosive detonation velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Podsednik, Jason W.; Parks, Shawn Michael; Navarro, Rudolfo J.

    2012-07-01

    Single-mode fibers were cleverly embedded into fixtures holding nitromethane, and used in conjunction with a photonic Doppler velocimeter (PDV) to measure the associated detonation velocity. These measurements have aided us in our understanding of energetic materials and enhanced our diagnostic capabilities.

  19. Estimating Radar Velocity using Direction of Arrival Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter; Horndt, Volker; Bickel, Douglas Lloyd; Naething, Richard M.

    2014-09-01

    Direction of Arrival (DOA) measurements, as with a monopulse antenna, can be compared against Doppler measurements in a Synthetic Aperture Radar ( SAR ) image to determine an aircraft's forward velocity as well as its crab angle, to assist the aircraft's navigation as well as improving high - performance SAR image formation and spatial calibration.

  20. Particle Velocity Measuring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the velocity of individual food particles within a liquid/solid food mixture that is cooked by an aseptic cooking method whereby the food mixture is heated as it flows through a flowline. At least one upstream and at least one downstream microwave transducer are provided to determine the minimum possible travel time of the fastest food particle through the flowline. In one embodiment, the upstream detector is not required. In another embodiment, a plurality of small dipole antenna markers are secured to a plurality of food particles to provide a plurality of signals as the markers pass the upstream and downstream transducers. The dipole antenna markers may also include a non-linear element to reradiate a harmonic frequency of a transmitter frequency. Upstream and downstream transducers include dipole antennas that are matched to the impedance of the food slurry and a signal transmission cable by various impedance matching means including unbalanced feed to the antennas.

  1. Quantification of ultrasound correlation-based flow velocity mapping and edge velocity gradient measurement.

    PubMed

    Park, Dae Woo; Kruger, Grant H; Rubin, Jonathan M; Hamilton, James; Gottschalk, Paul; Dodde, Robert E; Shih, Albert J; Weitzel, William F

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the use of ultrasound speckle decorrelation- and correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking methods for transverse and longitudinal blood velocity profile measurement, respectively. By studying the blood velocity gradient at the vessel wall, vascular wall shear stress, which is important in vascular physiology as well as the pathophysiologic mechanisms of vascular diseases, can be obtained. Decorrelation-based blood velocity profile measurement transverse to the flow direction is a novel approach, which provides advantages for vascular wall shear stress measurement over longitudinal blood velocity measurement methods. Blood flow velocity profiles are obtained from measurements of frame-to-frame decorrelation. In this research, both decorrelation and lateral speckle-tracking flow estimation methods were compared with Poiseuille theory over physiologic flows ranging from 50 to 1000 mm/s. The decorrelation flow velocity measurement method demonstrated more accurate prediction of the flow velocity gradient at the wall edge than the correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking method. The novelty of this study is that speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements determine the blood velocity across a vessel. In addition, speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements have higher axial spatial resolution than Doppler ultrasound measurements to enable more accurate measurement of blood velocity near a vessel wall and determine the physiologically important wall shear.

  2. Particle size and velocity measurement in flames by laser anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chigier, N. A.; Ungut, A.; Yule, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    Simultaneous droplet size and velocity measurements by a particle counting Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) in kerosene fuel sprays under burning and non-burning conditions are presented. Particle sizes are derived from pulse height analysis of the mean LDA signals and velocities are simultaneously determined by measuring Doppler shift frequencies. The measurements show that droplet velocity is a function of droplet diameter for burning and non-burning conditions, and spatially averaged size distributions are derived from velocity data. A comparison of results obtained under burning and non-burning conditions show changes in size distribution due to preferential vaporization of small droplets, acceleration due to thermal expansion of gases, and corresponding changes in droplet momentum.

  3. Estimating the instantaneous velocity of randomly moving target swarms in a stratified ocean waveguide by Doppler analysis.

    PubMed

    Bertsatos, Ioannis; Makris, Nicholas C

    2011-07-01

    Doppler analysis has been extensively used in active radar and sonar sensing to estimate the speed and direction of a single target within an imaging system resolution cell following deterministic theory. For target swarms, such as fish and plankton in the ocean, and raindrops, birds and bats in the atmosphere, multiple randomly moving targets typically occupy a single resolution cell, making single-target theory inadequate. Here, a method is developed for simultaneously estimating the instantaneous mean velocity and position of a group of randomly moving targets within a resolution cell, as well as the respective standard deviations across the group by Doppler analysis in free-space and in a stratified ocean waveguide. While the variance of the field scattered from the swarm is shown to typically dominate over the mean in the range-velocity ambiguity function, cross-spectral coherence remains and maintains high Doppler velocity and position resolution even for coherent signal processing algorithms such as the matched filter. For pseudo-random signals, the mean and variance of the swarms' velocity and position can be expressed in terms of the first two moments of the measured range-velocity ambiguity function. This is shown analytically for free-space and with Monte-Carlo simulations for an ocean waveguide.

  4. An evaluation of preliminary Doppler global velocimetry measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, L. Scott

    1991-01-01

    A review of Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV) data obtained during wind tunnel tests on a 75 degree swept delta wing was performed. High frequency variations observed in normalized data files are attributed to image alignment problems. Unfortunately, initial DGV velocity data compared poorly with baseline reference data. Nonlinear DGV system operation during the tests is the likely source of this problem. Corrected data compares much more favorably and suggests that DGV is a valid measurement technique. Future DGV investigations should include a method or means for monitoring laser frequency relative to the ALF transfer function behavior.

  5. SIRHEN : a data reduction program for photonic Doppler velocimetry measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H., III; Ao, Tommy

    2010-06-01

    SIRHEN (Sandia InfraRed HEtrodyne aNalysis) is a program for reducing data from photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) measurements. SIRHEN uses the short-time Fourier transform method to extract velocity information. The program can be run in MATLAB (2008b or later) or as a Windows executable. This report describes the new Sandia InfraRed HEtrodyne aNalysis program (SIRHEN; pronounced 'siren') that has been developed for efficient and robust analysis of PDV data. The program was designed for easy use within Sandia's dynamic compression community.

  6. Doppler Global Velocimetry Measurements for Supersonic Flow Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.

    2005-01-01

    The application of Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV) to high-speed flows has its origins in the original development of the technology by Komine et al (1991). Komine used a small shop-air driven nozzle to generate a 200 m/s flow. This flow velocity was chosen since it produced a fairly large Doppler shift in the scattered light, resulting in a significant transmission loss as the light passed through the Iodine vapor. This proof-of-concept investigation showed that the technology was capable of measuring flow velocity within a measurement plane defined by a single-frequency laser light sheet. The effort also proved that velocity measurements could be made without resolving individual seed particles as required by other techniques such as Fringe- Type Laser Velocimetry and Particle Image Velocimetry. The promise of making planar velocity measurements with the possibility of using 0.1-micron condensation particles for seeding, Dibble et al (1989), resulted in the investigation of supersonic jet flow fields, Elliott et al (1993) and Smith and Northam (1995) - Mach 2.0 and 1.9 respectively. Meyers (1993) conducted a wind tunnel investigation above an inclined flat plate at Mach 2.5 and above a delta wing at Mach 2.8 and 4.6. Although these measurements were crude from an accuracy viewpoint, they did prove that the technology could be used to study supersonic flows using condensation as the scattering medium. Since then several research groups have studied the technology and developed solutions and methodologies to overcome most of the measurement accuracy limitations:

  7. Validation of streamflow measurements made with acoustic doppler current profilers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberg, K.; Mueller, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and other international agencies have collaborated to conduct laboratory and field validations of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements of streamflow. Laboratory validations made in a large towing basin show that the mean differences between tow cart velocity and ADCP bottom-track and water-track velocities were -0.51 and -1.10%, respectively. Field validations of commercially available ADCPs were conducted by comparing streamflow measurements made with ADCPs to reference streamflow measurements obtained from concurrent mechanical current-meter measurements, stable rating curves, salt-dilution measurements, or acoustic velocity meters. Data from 1,032 transects, comprising 100 discharge measurements, were analyzed from 22 sites in the United States, Canada, Sweden, and The Netherlands. Results of these analyses show that broadband ADCP streamflow measurements are unbiased when compared to the reference discharges regardless of the water mode used for making the measurement. Measurement duration is more important than the number of transects for reducing the uncertainty of the ADCP streamflow measurement. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  8. TURBULENCE SPECTRA FROM DOPPLER-BROADENED SPECTRAL LINES: TESTS OF THE VELOCITY CHANNEL ANALYSIS AND VELOCITY COORDINATE SPECTRUM TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Chepurnov, A.; Lazarian, A.

    2009-03-10

    Turbulent motions induce Doppler shifts of observable emission and absorption lines motivating studies of turbulence using precision spectroscopy. We provide numerical testing of the two most promising techniques, velocity channel analysis and velocity coordinate spectrum (VCS). We obtain an expression for the shot noise that the discretization of the numerical data entails and successfully test it. We show that the numerical resolution required for recovering the underlying turbulent spectrum from observations depend on the spectral index of velocity fluctuations, which makes low-resolution testing misleading. We demonstrate numerically that, when dealing with absorption lines, sampling of turbulence along just a dozen directions provides a high quality spectrum with the VCS technique.

  9. Non-mechanical scanning laser Doppler velocimetry with sensitivity to direction of transverse velocity component using optical serrodyne frequency shifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maru, Koichi; Watanabe, Kento

    2014-05-01

    This paper proposes a non-mechanical axial scanning laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) with sensitivity to the direction of the transverse velocity component using optical serrodyne frequency shifting. Serrodyne modulation via the electro-optic effect of a LiNbO3 (LN) phase shifter is employed to discriminate the direction of the transverse velocity component. The measurement position is scanned without any moving mechanism in the probe by changing the wavelength of the light input to the probe. The experimental results using a sensor probe setup indicate that both the scan of the measurement position and the introduction of directional sensitivity are successfully demonstrated.

  10. Vocal fold vibration measurements using laser Doppler vibrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Alfred; Mongeau, Luc; Kost, Karen

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the velocity of the superior surface of human vocal folds during phonation using laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV). A custom-made endoscopic laser beam deflection unit was designed and fabricated. An in vivo clinical experimental procedure was developed to simultaneously collect LDV velocity and video from videolaryngoscopy. The velocity along the direction of the laser beam, i.e., the inferior-superior direction, was captured. The velocity was synchronous with electroglottograph and sound level meter data. The vibration energy of the vocal folds was determined to be significant up to a frequency of 3 kHz. Three characteristic vibrational waveforms were identified which may indicate bifurcations between vibrational modes of the mucosal wave. No relationship was found between the velocity amplitude and phonation frequency or sound pressure level. A correlation was found between the peak-to-peak displacement amplitude and phonation frequency. A sparse map of the velocity amplitudes on the vocal fold surface was obtained. PMID:23464036

  11. Vocal fold vibration measurements using laser Doppler vibrometry.

    PubMed

    Chan, Alfred; Mongeau, Luc; Kost, Karen

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the velocity of the superior surface of human vocal folds during phonation using laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV). A custom-made endoscopic laser beam deflection unit was designed and fabricated. An in vivo clinical experimental procedure was developed to simultaneously collect LDV velocity and video from videolaryngoscopy. The velocity along the direction of the laser beam, i.e., the inferior-superior direction, was captured. The velocity was synchronous with electroglottograph and sound level meter data. The vibration energy of the vocal folds was determined to be significant up to a frequency of 3 kHz. Three characteristic vibrational waveforms were identified which may indicate bifurcations between vibrational modes of the mucosal wave. No relationship was found between the velocity amplitude and phonation frequency or sound pressure level. A correlation was found between the peak-to-peak displacement amplitude and phonation frequency. A sparse map of the velocity amplitudes on the vocal fold surface was obtained.

  12. Vocal fold vibration measurements using laser Doppler vibrometry.

    PubMed

    Chan, Alfred; Mongeau, Luc; Kost, Karen

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the velocity of the superior surface of human vocal folds during phonation using laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV). A custom-made endoscopic laser beam deflection unit was designed and fabricated. An in vivo clinical experimental procedure was developed to simultaneously collect LDV velocity and video from videolaryngoscopy. The velocity along the direction of the laser beam, i.e., the inferior-superior direction, was captured. The velocity was synchronous with electroglottograph and sound level meter data. The vibration energy of the vocal folds was determined to be significant up to a frequency of 3 kHz. Three characteristic vibrational waveforms were identified which may indicate bifurcations between vibrational modes of the mucosal wave. No relationship was found between the velocity amplitude and phonation frequency or sound pressure level. A correlation was found between the peak-to-peak displacement amplitude and phonation frequency. A sparse map of the velocity amplitudes on the vocal fold surface was obtained. PMID:23464036

  13. Observation of Doppler-free electromagnetically induced transparency in atoms selected optically with specific velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hoon; Kim, Kwan Su; Kim, Jung Dong; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Jung Bog

    2011-11-15

    We observed an electromagnetically induced transparency signal in a four-level system with optically selected rubidium atoms at specific velocities in a room-temperature vaporized cell. Since the atoms behave like cold atoms in the selected atomic view, the observed signals coincide with a trapped atomic system. According to this result, we can observe Doppler-free signals, which correspond from 1.2 to 1.0 K in a Doppler-broadened medium. And the selected atoms have velocity components of {+-}(131 {+-} 3) MHz per wave number. Our experimental results can provide insight for research in cold media.

  14. Noninvasive visualization and measurement of middle cardiac vein flow by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kenji; Tamura, Masamichi; Toyono, Manatoma

    2006-01-01

    Transthoracic Doppler echocardiography offers a noninvasive approach for imaging posterior descending coronary artery (PD) running in the posterior longitudinal sulcus along the middle cardiac vein (MCV). To evaluate whether the MCV flow velocity reserve can reflect the PD flow reserve, 22 children with various heart diseases were examined using transthoracic Doppler echocardiography. Introduction of a modified transthoracic two chamber view with the transducer rotated counterclockwise and angulated posteriorly allows visualization of the MCV and PD. Peak systolic flow velocity and average peak systolic flow velocity in the MCV and peak diastolic flow velocity and average peak diastolic flow velocity in the PD were measured at rest and hyperemic conditions (intravenous administration of adenosine of 0.16 mg/kg/min). Coronary flow reserve was defined as the ratio of peak hyperemic to basal average peak flow velocity. ATP infusion induced significant increases in the peak systolic flow velocity and average peak systolic flow velocity in the MCV. The mean MCV flow velocity reserve in the patients was 1.94 +/- 0.44. Significant increases in the peak diastolic flow velocity and the average peak diastolic flow velocity in the PD were also observed during ATP infusion, and the mean PD flow velocity reserve (2.19 +/- 0.62) was significantly higher than the GCV flow velocity reserve (p < 0.0001). There was a good correlation between the MCV flow velocity reserve and PD flow velocity reserve (r = 0.86, p < 0.0001). This study demonstrated that it was possible to measure the MCV flow velocity and MCV flow velocity reserve in pediatric patients by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography. The MCV flow reserve correlated highly with the PD flow reserve. However, the degree of the MCV flow during hyperemia was less than that of the PD flow. This underestimation should be considered when the reactive hyperemic response is evaluated from the MCV flow velocity. PMID:17031721

  15. Baroreflex regulation measurement using a noninvasive laser Doppler method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hast, Jukka T.; Myllylae, Risto A.; Sorvoja, Hannu; Nissilae, Seppo M.

    2001-05-01

    In this study, a noninvasive laser Doppler measurement method based on the self-mixing effect of a diode laser was used to measure baroreflex regulation, which is manifest in the blood pressure signal as a 0.1 Hz sinusoidal variation. The laser Doppler measurement system was used to measure the movement of the right radial artery of ten volunteers. Variation in blood pressure caused by the baroreflex affects the elastic properties of the arterial wall. When diastolic blood pressure increases, the elasticity of the arterial wall decreases, causing the wall to lose some of its movability. This decreased elasticity reveals itself in the Doppler signal such that when the blood pressure increases, the Doppler frequency decreases and vice versa. The results show, that the laser Doppler method can be used to measure baroreflex regulation. Finally, baroreflex regulation in the Doppler signal is approximately in the inverse phase with respect to variation in diastolic blood pressure.

  16. Intensity and Doppler Velocity Oscillations in Pore Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, K.-S.; Bong, S.-C.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Lim, E.-K.; Park, Y.-D.; Chae, J. C.; Yang, H.-S.; Park, H.-M.; Yurchyshyn, V.

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated chromospheric traveling features running across two merged pores from their centers at speeds of about 55 km s‑1, in the active region AR 11828. The pores were observed on 2013 August 24 by using high-time, spatial, and spectral resolution data from the Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph of the 1.6 m New Solar Telescope. We infer a line-of-sight (LOS) velocity by applying the lambdameter method to the Ca ii 8542 Å band and Hα band, and investigate intensity and LOS velocity changes at different wavelengths and different positions at the pores. We find that they have three-minute oscillations, and the intensity oscillation from the line center (0.0 \\overset{\\circ}A ) is preceded by that from the core (‑0.3 \\overset{\\circ}A ) of the bands. There is no phase difference between the intensity and the LOS velocity oscillations at a given wavelength. The amplitude of LOS velocity from the near core spectra ({Δ }λ =0.10-0.21 \\overset{\\circ}A ) is greater than that from the far core spectra ({Δ }λ =0.24-0.36 \\overset{\\circ}A ). These results support the interpretation of the observed wave as a slow magnetoacoustic wave propagating along the magnetic field lines in the pores. The apparent horizontal motion and a sudden decrease of its speed beyond the pores can be explained by the projection effect caused by inclination of the magnetic field with a canopy structure. We conclude that the observed wave properties of the pores are quite similar to those from the sunspot observations.

  17. Measurement of Turbulence with Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers - Sources of Error and Laboratory Results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nystrom, E.A.; Oberg, K.A.; Rehmann, C.R.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) provide a promising method for measuring surface-water turbulence because they can provide data from a large spatial range in a relatively short time with relative ease. Some potential sources of errors in turbulence measurements made with ADCPs include inaccuracy of Doppler-shift measurements, poor temporal and spatial measurement resolution, and inaccuracy of multi-dimensional velocities resolved from one-dimensional velocities measured at separate locations. Results from laboratory measurements of mean velocity and turbulence statistics made with two pulse-coherent ADCPs in 0.87 meters of water are used to illustrate several of inherent sources of error in ADCP turbulence measurements. Results show that processing algorithms and beam configurations have important effects on turbulence measurements. ADCPs can provide reasonable estimates of many turbulence parameters; however, the accuracy of turbulence measurements made with commercially available ADCPs is often poor in comparison to standard measurement techniques.

  18. On the Positive Bias of Peak Horizontal Velocity from an Idealized Doppler Profiler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David A.; Merceret, Francis J.

    2004-01-01

    In the presence of 3-D turbulence, peak horizontal velocity estimates from an idealized Doppler profiler are found to be positively biased due to an incomplete specification of the vertical velocity field. The magnitude of the bias was estimated by assuming that the vertical and horizontal velocities can be separated into average and perturbation values and that the vertical and horizontal velocity perturbations are normally distributed. Under these assumptions, properties of the Type-I Extreme Value Distribution for maxima, known as the Gumbel distribution, can be used to obtain an analytical solution of the bias. The bias depends on geometric properties of the profiler configuration, the variance in the horizontal velocity, and the unresolved variance in the vertical velocity. When these variances are normalized by the average horizontal velocity, the bias can be mapped as a simple function of the normalized variances.

  19. Numerical performance analysis of acoustic Doppler velocity profilers in the wake of an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Harding, Samuel F.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2015-09-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) for the characterization of flow conditions in the vicinity of both experimental and full scale marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines is becoming increasingly prevalent. The computation of a three dimensional velocity measurement from divergent acoustic beams requires the assumption that the flow conditions are homogeneous between all beams at a particular axial distance from the instrument. In the near wake of MHK devices, the mean fluid motion is observed to be highly spatially dependent as a result of torque generation and energy extraction. This paper examines the performance of ADCP measurements in such scenarios through the modelling of a virtual ADCP (VADCP) instrument in the velocity field in the wake of an MHK turbine resolved using unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is achieved by sampling the CFD velocity field at equivalent locations to the sample bins of an ADCP and performing the coordinate transformation from beam coordinates to instrument coordinates and finally to global coordinates. The error in the mean velocity calculated by the VADCP relative to the reference velocity along the instrument axis is calculated for a range of instrument locations and orientations. The stream-wise velocity deficit and tangential swirl velocity caused by the rotor rotation lead to significant misrepresentation of the true flow velocity profiles by the VADCP, with the most significant errors in the transverse (cross-flow) velocity direction.

  20. Measuring with laser Doppler vibrometer on moving frame (LDVMF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Siamand; Li, Zili; Dollevoet, Rolf

    2014-05-01

    Structural dynamic gives insight into structural properties such as mass, eigenfrequencies, eigenmodes, modal damping and strain distribution and can be utilized in structural health monitoring, dynamic sub-structuring, etc. In this context structural vibration is measured and used. The measurement is done by means of conventional sensors such as accelerometers or non destructively using Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV), for instance. The non-destructive, non-contact measurement techniques preserve the integrity of the structure and don't add mass and stiffness to the structure under test. When one deals with civil structures such as rail and road ways, pipelines and catenary the importance of these techniques becomes more evident as they allow standoff measurement on a moving frame. Nevertheless when LDV is employed due to the relative in-plane motion between the LDV and the target speckle noise is generated which degrades the signal quality and makes this application not very straightforward but challenging. One of the first Laser Doppler Vibrometer on moving frame is adopted to measure and monitor the ground vibration, aiming at detection of buried land mines. The major addressed difficulty in this application is the speckle noise present in the acquired signal. In general the signal quality and the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) are a function of the laser spot size and wave length, measurement distance, relative velocity and sampling frequency. A trade-off between these factors, which are not always intuitive would help to minimize the noise floor due to the speckle noise. In this paper a test rig is presented which allows to study the speckle noise at different measurement ranges, between 1.8 and 2.8 m, and different velocities, up to 150 km/h. The results might serve as a guideline to the design process of a LDVMF.

  1. Wind Field Measurements With Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.

    1999-01-01

    In collaboration with lidar atmospheric remote sensing groups at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory, we have developed and flown the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) lidar on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. The scientific motivations for this effort are: to obtain measurements of subgrid scale (i.e. 2-200 km) processes and features which may be used to improve parameterizations in global/regional-scale models; to improve understanding and predictive capabilities on the mesoscale; and to assess the performance of Earth-orbiting Doppler lidar for global tropospheric wind measurements. MACAWS is a scanning Doppler lidar using a pulsed transmitter and coherent detection; the use of the scanner allows 3-D wind fields to be produced from the data. The instrument can also be radiometrically calibrated and used to study aerosol, cloud, and surface scattering characteristics at the lidar wavelength in the thermal infrared. MACAWS was used to study surface winds off the California coast near Point Arena, with an example depicted in the figure below. The northerly flow here is due to the Pacific subtropical high. The coastal topography interacts with the northerly flow in the marine inversion layer, and when the flow passes a cape or point that juts into the winds, structures called "hydraulic expansion fans" are observed. These are marked by strong variation along the vertical and cross-shore directions. The plots below show three horizontal slices at different heights above sea level (ASL). Bottom plots are enlargements of the area marked by dotted boxes above. The terrain contours are in 200-m increments, with the white spots being above 600-m elevation. Additional information is contained in the original.

  2. Measuring discharge with ADCPs: Inferences from synthetic velocity profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rehmann, C.R.; Mueller, D.S.; Oberg, K.A.

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic velocity profiles are used to determine guidelines for sampling discharge with acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs). The analysis allows the effects of instrument characteristics, sampling parameters, and properties of the flow to be studied systematically. For mid-section measurements, the averaging time required for a single profile measurement always exceeded the 40 s usually recommended for velocity measurements, and it increased with increasing sample interval and increasing time scale of the large eddies. Similarly, simulations of transect measurements show that discharge error decreases as the number of large eddies sampled increases. The simulations allow sampling criteria that account for the physics of the flow to be developed. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  3. Doppler cooling with coherent trains of laser pulses and a tunable velocity comb

    SciTech Connect

    Ilinova, Ekaterina; Ahmad, Mahmoud; Derevianko, Andrei

    2011-09-15

    We explore the possibility of decelerating and Doppler cooling an ensemble of two-level atoms by a coherent train of short, nonoverlapping laser pulses. We derive analytical expressions for mechanical force exerted by the train. In frequency space the force pattern reflects the underlying frequency comb structure. The pattern depends strongly on the ratio of the atomic lifetime to the repetition time between the pulses and pulse area. For example, in the limit of short lifetimes, the frequency-space peaks of the optical force wash out. We propose to tune the carrier-envelope offset frequency to follow the Doppler-shifted detuning as atoms decelerate; this leads to compression of atomic velocity distribution about comb teeth and results in a ''velocity comb''--a series of narrow equidistant peaks in the velocity space.

  4. Estimation of neutral wind velocity in the ionospheric heights by HF-Doppler technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, T.; Takefu, M.; Hiroshige, N.

    1985-01-01

    Three net stations located about 100 kilometers apart were set up around the station of the standard frequency and time signals (JJY) in central Japan and measurements of atmospheric gravity waves in the ionospheric heights (F-region, 200 to 400 km) were made by means of the HF-Doppler technique during the period of February 1983 to December 1983. The frequencies of the signals received are 5.0, 8.0 and 10.0 MHz, but only the 8.0 MHz signals are used for the present study, because no ambiguities due to the interference among other stations such as BPM, BSF, etc. exist by the use of 8.0 MHz. Two main results concerning the horizontal phase velocity of the atmospheric gravity waves with periods of 40 to 70 min may be summarized as follows: (1) the value of the phase velocity ranges from 50 m/s to 300 m/s; (2) the direction of the gravity wave propagation shows a definite seasonal variation. The prevailing direction of the gravity waves in winter is from north to south, which is consistent with the results obtained from other investigations. On the other hand, the two directions, from northeast to southwest and from southeast to northeast, dominate in summer.

  5. Coronal Outflow Velocities in a 3D Coronal Model Determined from UVCS Doppler Dimming Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, L.; Panasyuk, A. V.; Dobrzycka, D.; Gibson, S.; Biesecker, D. A.; Ko, Y.-K.; Galvin, A. B.; Romoli, M.; Kohn, J. L.

    1998-04-01

    We constrain coronal outflow velocity solutions, resolved along the line-of-sight, by using Doppler dimming models of H I Lyman alpha and O VI 1032/1037 Angstrom emissivities obtained with data from the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on SOHO. The local emissivities, from heliocentric heights of 1.5 to 3.0 radii, were determined from 3-D reconstructions of line-of-sight intensities obtained during the Whole Sun Month Campaign (10 Aug. -- 8 Sep. 1996). The models use electron densities derived from polarized brightness measurements made with the visible light coronagraphs on UVCS and LASCO, supplemented with data from Mark III at NCAR/MLSO. Electron temperature profiles are derived from `freezing-in' temperatures obtained from an analysis of charge state data from SWICS/Ulysses. The work concentrates on O5+ outflow velocities which are determined from an analysis of the the O VI line ratios. This analysis is less sensitive to the uncertainties in the electron density and independent of the ionization balance and elemental abundance than the analyses which use individual spectral lines. This work is supported in part by NASA under grant NAG-3192 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by the Italian Space Agency and by Swiss funding agencies.

  6. Velocity gradients in spatially resolved laser Doppler flowmetry and dynamic light scattering with confocal and coherence gating.

    PubMed

    Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Bouma, Brett E

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is widely used to characterize diffusive motion to obtain precise information on colloidal suspensions by calculating the autocorrelation function of the signal from a heterodyne optical system. DLS can also be used to determine the flow velocity field in systems that exhibit mass transport by incorporating the effects of the deterministic motion of scatterers on the autocorrelation function, a technique commonly known as laser Doppler flowmetry. DLS measurements can be localized with confocal and coherence gating techniques such as confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography, thereby enabling the determination of the spatially resolved velocity field in three dimensions. It has been thought that spatially resolved DLS can determine the axial velocity as well as the lateral speed in a single measurement. We demonstrate, however, that gradients in the axial velocity of scatterers exert a fundamental influence on the autocorrelation function even in well-behaved, nonturbulent flow. By obtaining the explicit functional relation between axial-velocity gradients and the autocorrelation function, we show that the velocity field and its derivatives are intimately related and their contributions cannot be separated. Therefore, a single DLS measurement cannot univocally determine the velocity field. Our extended theoretical model was found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements. PMID:27627357

  7. Velocity gradients in spatially-resolved laser Doppler flowmetry and dynamic light scattering with confocal and coherence gating

    PubMed Central

    Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is widely used to characterize diffusive motion to obtain precise information on colloidal suspensions by calculating the autocorrelation function of the signal from a heterodyne optical system. DLS can also be used to determine the flow velocity field in systems that exhibit mass transport by incorporating the effects of the deterministic motion of scatterers on the autocorrelation function, a technique commonly known as laser Doppler flowmetry. DLS measurements can be localized with confocal and coherence gating techniques such as confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography, thereby enabling the determination of the spatially-resolved velocity field in three dimensions. It has been thought that spatially-resolved DLS can determine the axial velocity as well as the lateral speed in a single measurement. We demonstrate, however, that gradients in the axial velocity of scatterers exert a fundamental influence on the autocorrelation function even in well-behaved, non-turbulent flow. By obtaining the explicit functional relation between axial-velocity gradients and the autocorrelation function, we show that the velocity field and its derivatives are intimately related and their contributions cannot be separated. Therefore, a single DLS measurement cannot univocally determine the velocity field. Our extended theoretical model was found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements. PMID:27627357

  8. Velocity gradients in spatially resolved laser Doppler flowmetry and dynamic light scattering with confocal and coherence gating.

    PubMed

    Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Bouma, Brett E

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is widely used to characterize diffusive motion to obtain precise information on colloidal suspensions by calculating the autocorrelation function of the signal from a heterodyne optical system. DLS can also be used to determine the flow velocity field in systems that exhibit mass transport by incorporating the effects of the deterministic motion of scatterers on the autocorrelation function, a technique commonly known as laser Doppler flowmetry. DLS measurements can be localized with confocal and coherence gating techniques such as confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography, thereby enabling the determination of the spatially resolved velocity field in three dimensions. It has been thought that spatially resolved DLS can determine the axial velocity as well as the lateral speed in a single measurement. We demonstrate, however, that gradients in the axial velocity of scatterers exert a fundamental influence on the autocorrelation function even in well-behaved, nonturbulent flow. By obtaining the explicit functional relation between axial-velocity gradients and the autocorrelation function, we show that the velocity field and its derivatives are intimately related and their contributions cannot be separated. Therefore, a single DLS measurement cannot univocally determine the velocity field. Our extended theoretical model was found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  9. Velocity gradients in spatially resolved laser Doppler flowmetry and dynamic light scattering with confocal and coherence gating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-08-01

    Dynamic light scattering (DLS) is widely used to characterize diffusive motion to obtain precise information on colloidal suspensions by calculating the autocorrelation function of the signal from a heterodyne optical system. DLS can also be used to determine the flow velocity field in systems that exhibit mass transport by incorporating the effects of the deterministic motion of scatterers on the autocorrelation function, a technique commonly known as laser Doppler flowmetry. DLS measurements can be localized with confocal and coherence gating techniques such as confocal microscopy and optical coherence tomography, thereby enabling the determination of the spatially resolved velocity field in three dimensions. It has been thought that spatially resolved DLS can determine the axial velocity as well as the lateral speed in a single measurement. We demonstrate, however, that gradients in the axial velocity of scatterers exert a fundamental influence on the autocorrelation function even in well-behaved, nonturbulent flow. By obtaining the explicit functional relation between axial-velocity gradients and the autocorrelation function, we show that the velocity field and its derivatives are intimately related and their contributions cannot be separated. Therefore, a single DLS measurement cannot univocally determine the velocity field. Our extended theoretical model was found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  10. Saturn's Doppler velocimetry wind measurements with VLT/UVES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Miguel; Mota Machado, Pedro; Luz, David; Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin; Hueso, Ricardo; Peralta, Javier

    2016-10-01

    We present Doppler wind velocity results of Saturn's zonal flow at ~0.4 mbar pressure level. Our aim is help to constrain the characterization of the equatorial jet at the referred altitude and the latitudinal variation of the zonal winds, to contribute to monitor the spatial and temporal variability in order to achieve a better understanding of the dynamics of Saturn's zonal winds, which Sánchez-Lavega et al. (2003, Nature, 423, 623) have found to have strongly changed in recent years, as the planet approached southern summer solstice.The UVES/VLT instrument has been used, which simultaneously achieves high spectral resolving power and high spatial resolution. The field has been derotated in order to have the aperture aligned perpendicularly to Saturn's rotation axis. In this configuration, spatial information in the East-West direction is preserved in a set of spectra in the direction perpendicular to dispersion.The technique of absolute accelerometry (AA, Connes, 1985, ApSS 110, 211) has been applied to the backscattered solar spectrum in order to determine the Doppler shift associated with the zonal circulation. Our measurements have been made in the wavelength range of 480-680 nm. Previously we successfully adapted this Doppler velocimetry technique for measuring winds at Venus cloud tops (Machado et al. 2012).The observations consisted of 4 blocks of 15 exposures of 90 sec, plus two shorter blocks of 9 exposures, totalling 7.3 hours of telescope time. In order to cover the whole disk the aperture has been offset by 1 arcsec in the North-South direction between consecutive exposures. Most of the northern hemisphere was covered by the rings. Saturn's diameter was 17.4 arcsec, and the slit aperture was 0.3x25 arcsec. The aperture offset between consecutive exposures was 1 arcsec. Two observations blocks of 9 exposures only covered the central part of the disk, and four others covered the whole disk. The sub-terrestrial point was at -26.1 degrees South. The

  11. Wind Measurements from Arc Scans with Doppler Wind Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Clifton, Andy; Pryor, S. C.

    2015-11-25

    When defining optimal scanning geometries for scanning lidars for wind energy applications, we found that it is still an active field of research. Our paper evaluates uncertainties associated with arc scan geometries and presents recommendations regarding optimal configurations in the atmospheric boundary layer. The analysis is based on arc scan data from a Doppler wind lidar with one elevation angle and seven azimuth angles spanning 30° and focuses on an estimation of 10-min mean wind speed and direction. When flow is horizontally uniform, this approach can provide accurate wind measurements required for wind resource assessments in part because of its high resampling rate. Retrieved wind velocities at a single range gate exhibit good correlation to data from a sonic anemometer on a nearby meteorological tower, and vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed, though derived from range gates located on a conical surface, match those measured by mast-mounted cup anemometers. Uncertainties in the retrieved wind velocity are related to high turbulent wind fluctuation and an inhomogeneous horizontal wind field. Moreover, the radial velocity variance is found to be a robust measure of the uncertainty of the retrieved wind speed because of its relationship to turbulence properties. It is further shown that the standard error of wind speed estimates can be minimized by increasing the azimuthal range beyond 30° and using five to seven azimuth angles.

  12. Wind Measurements from Arc Scans with Doppler Wind Lidar

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Clifton, Andy; Pryor, S. C.

    2015-11-25

    When defining optimal scanning geometries for scanning lidars for wind energy applications, we found that it is still an active field of research. Our paper evaluates uncertainties associated with arc scan geometries and presents recommendations regarding optimal configurations in the atmospheric boundary layer. The analysis is based on arc scan data from a Doppler wind lidar with one elevation angle and seven azimuth angles spanning 30° and focuses on an estimation of 10-min mean wind speed and direction. When flow is horizontally uniform, this approach can provide accurate wind measurements required for wind resource assessments in part because of itsmore » high resampling rate. Retrieved wind velocities at a single range gate exhibit good correlation to data from a sonic anemometer on a nearby meteorological tower, and vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed, though derived from range gates located on a conical surface, match those measured by mast-mounted cup anemometers. Uncertainties in the retrieved wind velocity are related to high turbulent wind fluctuation and an inhomogeneous horizontal wind field. Moreover, the radial velocity variance is found to be a robust measure of the uncertainty of the retrieved wind speed because of its relationship to turbulence properties. It is further shown that the standard error of wind speed estimates can be minimized by increasing the azimuthal range beyond 30° and using five to seven azimuth angles.« less

  13. Measurement of retinal blood velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, Leonard W., Jr.; Chou, Nee-Yin

    2006-02-01

    A fundus camera was modified to illuminate the retina of a rabbit model with low power laser light in order to obtain laser speckle images. A fast-exposure charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was used to capture laser speckle images of the retina. Image acquisition was synchronized with the arterial pulses of the rabbit to ensure that all images are obtained at the same point in the cardiac cycle. The rabbits were sedated and a speculum was inserted to prevent the eyelid from closing. Both albino (New Zealand; pigmented (Dutch belted) rabbits were used in the study. The rabbit retina is almost avascular. The measurements are obtained for choroidal tissue as well as retinal tissue. Because the retina is in a region of high metabolism, blood velocity is strongly affected by blood oxygen saturation. Measurements of blood velocity obtained over a wide range of O II saturations (58%-100%) showed that blood velocity increases with decreasing O II saturation. For most experiments, the left eye of the rabbit was used for laser measurements whereas the right eye served as a control. No observable difference between pre- and post-experimented eye was noted. Histological examinations of retinal tissue subjected to repeated laser measurements showed no indication of tissue damage.

  14. Phase noise in pulsed Doppler lidar and limitations on achievable single-shot velocity accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnicholl, P.; Alejandro, S.

    1992-01-01

    The smaller sampling volumes afforded by Doppler lidars compared to radars allows for spatial resolutions at and below some sheer and turbulence wind structure scale sizes. This has brought new emphasis on achieving the optimum product of wind velocity and range resolutions. Several recent studies have considered the effects of amplitude noise, reduction algorithms, and possible hardware related signal artifacts on obtainable velocity accuracy. We discuss here the limitation on this accuracy resulting from the incoherent nature and finite temporal extent of backscatter from aerosols. For a lidar return from a hard (or slab) target, the phase of the intermediate frequency (IF) signal is random and the total return energy fluctuates from shot to shot due to speckle; however, the offset from the transmitted frequency is determinable with an accuracy subject only to instrumental effects and the signal to noise ratio (SNR), the noise being determined by the LO power in the shot noise limited regime. This is not the case for a return from a media extending over a range on the order of or greater than the spatial extent of the transmitted pulse, such as from atmospheric aerosols. In this case, the phase of the IF signal will exhibit a temporal random walk like behavior. It will be uncorrelated over times greater than the pulse duration as the transmitted pulse samples non-overlapping volumes of scattering centers. Frequency analysis of the IF signal in a window similar to the transmitted pulse envelope will therefore show shot-to-shot frequency deviations on the order of the inverse pulse duration reflecting the random phase rate variations. Like speckle, these deviations arise from the incoherent nature of the scattering process and diminish if the IF signal is averaged over times greater than a single range resolution cell (here the pulse duration). Apart from limiting the high SNR performance of a Doppler lidar, this shot-to-shot variance in velocity estimates has a

  15. Velocity profiles inside volcanic clouds from three-dimensional scanning microwave dual-polarization Doppler radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, Mario

    2016-07-01

    In this work, velocity profiles within a volcanic tephra cloud obtained by dual-polarization Doppler radar acquisitions with three-dimensional (3-D) mechanical scanning capability are analyzed. A method for segmenting the radar volumes into three velocity regimes: vertical updraft, vertical fallout, and horizontal wind advection within a volcanic tephra cloud using dual-polarization Doppler radar moments is proposed. The horizontal and vertical velocity components within the regimes are retrieved using a novel procedure that makes assumptions concerning the characteristics of the winds inside these regimes. The vertical velocities retrieved are combined with 1-D simulations to derive additional parameters including particle fallout, mass flux, and particle sizes. The explosive event occurred on 23 November 2013 at the Mount Etna volcano (Sicily, Italy), is considered a demonstrative case in which to analyze the radar Doppler signal inside the tephra column. The X-band radar (3 cm wavelength) in the Catania, Italy, airport observed the 3-D scenes of the Etna tephra cloud ~32 km from the volcano vent every 10 min. From the radar-derived vertical velocity profiles of updraft, particle fallout, and horizontal transportation, an exit velocity of 150 m/s, mass flux rate of 1.37 • 107 kg/s, particle fallout velocity of 18 m/s, and diameters of precipitating tephra particles equal to 0.8 cm are estimated on average. These numbers are shown to be consistent with theoretical 1-D simulations of plume dynamics and local reports at the ground, respectively. A thickness of 3 ± 0.36 km for the downwind ash cloud is also inferred by differentiating the radar-derived cloud top and the height of transition between the convective and buoyancy regions, the latter being inferred by the estimated vertical updraft velocity profile. The unique nature of the case study as well as the novelty of the segmentation and retrieval methods presented potentially give new insights into the

  16. Measuring mean velocities with Pogo

    SciTech Connect

    Rossby, T.; Fontaine, J.; Hummon, J. )

    1991-10-01

    Pogo is a sample technique for measuring water transport between the surface and some preselected depth. Equipped with a 12-kHz pinger for tracking and range measurements, a xenon flasher for nighttime relocation, and a VHF beacon for daytime recovery, it has been used over 200 times in the Gulf Stream to measure volume transport and to provide a reference velocity (transport) for geostrophic calculations from pairs of hydrographic stations. This note gives a brief technical description of Pogo and how it is used. Loran C was used for navigation in this study, but with the advent of the Global Positioning System (GPS), Pogo can be used worldwide. 6 refs.

  17. Measuring mean velocities with Pogo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossby, T.; Fontaine, J.; Hummon, J.

    1991-10-01

    Pogo is a sample technique for measuring water transport between the surface and some preselected depth. Equipped with a 12-kHz pinger for tracking and range measurements, a xenon flasher for nighttime relocation, and a VHF beacon for daytime recovery, it has been used over 200 times in the Gulf Stream to measure volume transport and to provide a reference velocity (transport) for geostrophic calculations from pairs of hydrographic stations. This note gives a brief technical description of Pogo and how it is used. Loran C was used for navigation in this study, but with the advent of the Global Positioning System (GPS), Pogo can be used worldwide.

  18. Application of acoustic doppler velocimeters for streamflow measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rehmel, M.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) principally has used Price AA and Price pygmy mechanical current meters for measurement of discharge. New technologies have resulted in the introduction of alternatives to the Price meters. One alternative, the FlowTracker acoustic Doppler velocimeter, was designed by SonTek/YSI to make streamflow measurements in wadeable conditions. The device measures a point velocity and can be used with standard midsection method algorithms to compute streamflow. The USGS collected 55 quality-assurance measurements with the FlowTracker at 43 different USGS streamflow-gaging stations across the United States, with mean depths from 0.05to0.67m, mean velocities from 13 to 60 cm/s, and discharges from 0.02 to 12.4m3/s. These measurements were compared with Price mechanical current meter measurements. Analysis of the comparisons shows that the FlowTracker discharges were not statistically different from the Price meter discharges at a 95% confidence level. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  19. An acoustic doppler current profiler survey of flow velocities in St. Clair River, a connecting channel of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Koschik, John A.

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) were used to measure flow velocities in St. Clair River during a survey in May and June of 2002, as part of a study to assess the susceptibility of public water intakes to contaminants on the St. Clair-Detroit River Waterway. The survey provides 2.7 million point velocity measurements at 104 cross sections. Sections are spaced about 1,630 ft apart along the river from Port Huron to Algonac, Michigan, a distance of 28.6 miles. Two transects were obtained at each cross section, one in each direction across the river. Along each transect, velocity profiles were obtained 2-4 ft apart. At each velocity profile, average water velocity data were obtained at 1.64 ft intervals of depth. The raw position and velocity data from the ADCP field survey were adjusted for local magnetic anomalies using global positioning system (GPS) measurements at the end points of the transects. The adjusted velocity and ancillary data can be retrieved through the internet and extracted to column-oriented data files.

  20. Horizontal velocities of MSTIDs over Taiwan observed by continuous HF Doppler sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fišer, Jiří; Chum, Jaroslav

    2016-04-01

    Medium scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) are signatures of gravity waves (GWs) which propagatein the termosphere. Since GWs play an important role in the coupling between the lower atmospheric layers and the thermosphere it is important to study their properties and source mechanisms. In this contribution we present an experimental study focused on horizontal velocities of MSTIDs over Taiwan in the nearly two year long period starting in April 2014. We observe MSTIDs by multipath continuous HF Doppler sounding system. The movement of ionospheric plasma induced via collisions by gravity waves is detected as Doppler shift of the sounding radio signal. We investigate seasonal and diurnal variations of MSTIDs horizontal propagation parameters and compare them with horizontal wind model (HWM) and also compare them with results obtained in other locations in middle a low latitudes where similar HF Doppler sounding systems are installed.

  1. Constructing velocity distributions in crossed-molecular beam studies using Fourier Transform Doppler Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monge, Josue Roberto

    The goal of our scattering experiments is to derive the distribution the differential cross-section and elucidate the dynamics of a bimolecular collision via pure rotational spectroscopy. We have explored the use of a data reduction model to directly transform rotational line shapes into the differential cross section and speed distribution of a reactive bimolecular collision. This inversion technique, known as Fourier Transform Doppler Spectroscopy (FTDS), initially developed by James Kinsey, deconvolves the velocity information contained in one-dimensional Doppler Profiles to construct the non-thermal, state-selective three-dimensional velocity distribution. By employing an expansion in classical orthogonal polynomials, the integral transform in FTDS can be simplified into a set of purely algebraic expressions technique; i.e. the Taatjes method. In this investigation, we extend the Taatjes method for general use in recovering asymmetric velocity distributions. We have also constructed a hypothetical asymmetric distribution from adiabatic scattering in Argon-Argon to test the general method. The angle- and speed-components of the sample distribution were derived classically from a Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential, with collisions at 60 meV, and mapped onto Radon space to generate a set of discrete Doppler profiles. The sample distribution was reconstructed from these profiles using FTDS. Both distributions were compared along with derived total cross sections for the Argon--Argon system. This study serves as a template for constructing velocity distributions from bimolecular scattering experiments using the FTDS inversion technique.

  2. Use of High Sensitivity GNSS Receiver Doppler Measurements for Indoor Pedestrian Dead Reckoning

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhe; Renaudin, Valérie; Petovello, Mark G.; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Dead-reckoning (DR) algorithms, which use self-contained inertial sensors combined with gait analysis, have proven to be effective for pedestrian navigation purposes. In such DR systems, the primary error is often due to accumulated heading drifts. By tightly integrating global navigation satellite system (GNSS) Doppler measurements with DR, such accumulated heading errors can usually be accurately compensated. Under weak signal conditions, high sensitivity GNSS (HSGNSS) receivers with block processing techniques are often used, however, the Doppler quality of such receivers is relatively poor due to multipath, fading and signal attenuation. This often limits the benefits of integrating HSGNSS Doppler with DR. This paper investigates the benefits of using Doppler measurements from a novel direct vector HSGNSS receiver with pedestrian dead-reckoning (PDR) for indoor navigation. An indoor signal and multipath model is introduced which explains how conventional HSGNSS Doppler measurements are affected by indoor multipath. Velocity and Doppler estimated by using direct vector receivers are introduced and discussed. Real experimental data is processed and analyzed to assess the veracity of proposed method. It is shown when integrating HSGNSS Doppler with PDR algorithm, the proposed direct vector method are more helpful than conventional block processing method for the indoor environments considered herein. PMID:23539033

  3. Use of high sensitivity GNSS receiver Doppler measurements for indoor pedestrian dead reckoning.

    PubMed

    He, Zhe; Renaudin, Valérie; Petovello, Mark G; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2013-03-28

    Dead-reckoning (DR) algorithms, which use self-contained inertial sensors combined with gait analysis, have proven to be effective for pedestrian navigation purposes. In such DR systems, the primary error is often due to accumulated heading drifts. By tightly integrating global navigation satellite system (GNSS) Doppler measurements with DR, such accumulated heading errors can usually be accurately compensated. Under weak signal conditions, high sensitivity GNSS (HSGNSS) receivers with block processing techniques are often used, however, the Doppler quality of such receivers is relatively poor due to multipath, fading and signal attenuation. This often limits the benefits of integrating HSGNSS Doppler with DR. This paper investigates the benefits of using Doppler measurements from a novel direct vector HSGNSS receiver with pedestrian dead-reckoning (PDR) for indoor navigation. An indoor signal and multipath model is introduced which explains how conventional HSGNSS Doppler measurements are affected by indoor multipath. Velocity and Doppler estimated by using direct vector receivers are introduced and discussed. Real experimental data is processed and analyzed to assess the veracity of proposed method. It is shown when integrating HSGNSS Doppler with PDR algorithm, the proposed direct vector method are more helpful than conventional block processing method for the indoor environments considered herein.

  4. Use of high sensitivity GNSS receiver Doppler measurements for indoor pedestrian dead reckoning.

    PubMed

    He, Zhe; Renaudin, Valérie; Petovello, Mark G; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Dead-reckoning (DR) algorithms, which use self-contained inertial sensors combined with gait analysis, have proven to be effective for pedestrian navigation purposes. In such DR systems, the primary error is often due to accumulated heading drifts. By tightly integrating global navigation satellite system (GNSS) Doppler measurements with DR, such accumulated heading errors can usually be accurately compensated. Under weak signal conditions, high sensitivity GNSS (HSGNSS) receivers with block processing techniques are often used, however, the Doppler quality of such receivers is relatively poor due to multipath, fading and signal attenuation. This often limits the benefits of integrating HSGNSS Doppler with DR. This paper investigates the benefits of using Doppler measurements from a novel direct vector HSGNSS receiver with pedestrian dead-reckoning (PDR) for indoor navigation. An indoor signal and multipath model is introduced which explains how conventional HSGNSS Doppler measurements are affected by indoor multipath. Velocity and Doppler estimated by using direct vector receivers are introduced and discussed. Real experimental data is processed and analyzed to assess the veracity of proposed method. It is shown when integrating HSGNSS Doppler with PDR algorithm, the proposed direct vector method are more helpful than conventional block processing method for the indoor environments considered herein. PMID:23539033

  5. Advance particle and Doppler measurement methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, C.

    1985-01-01

    Particle environments, i.e., rain, ice, and snow particles are discussed. Two types of particles addressed are: (1) the natural environment in which airplanes fly and conduct test flights; and (2) simulation environments that are encountered in ground-test facilities such as wind tunnels, ranges, etc. There are characteristics of the natural environment that one wishes to measure. The liquid water content (LWC) is the one that seems to be of most importance; size distribution may be of importance in some applications. Like snow, the shape of the particle may be an important parameter to measure. As one goes on to environment in simulated tests, additional parameters may be required such as velocity distribution, the velocity lag of the particle relative to the aerodynamic flow, and the trajectory of the particle as it goes through the aerodynamic flow and impacts on the test object.

  6. Turbulence as observed by concurrent measurements made at NSSL using weather radar, Doppler radar, Doppler lidar and aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jean T.

    1987-01-01

    As air traffic increases and aircraft capability increases in range and operating altitude, the exposure to weather hazards increases. Turbulence and wind shears are two of the most important of these hazards that must be taken into account if safe flight operations are to be accomplished. Beginning in the early 1960's, Project Rough Rider began thunderstorm investigations. Past and present efforts at the National Severe Storm Laboratory (NSSL) to measure these flight safety hazards and to describe the use of Doppler radar to detect and qualify these hazards are summarized. In particular, the evolution of the Doppler-measured radial velocity spectrum width and its applicability to the problem of safe flight is presented.

  7. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-01

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  8. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  9. An acoustic doppler current profiler survey of flow velocities in Detroit River, a connecting channel of the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Koschik, John A.

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) were used to survey flow velocities in Detroit River from July 8-19, 2002, as part of a study to assess the susceptibility of public water intakes to contaminants on the St. Clair-Detroit River Waterway. More than 3.5 million point velocities were measured at 130 cross sections. Cross sections were generally spaced about 1,800 ft apart along the river from the head of Detroit River at the outlet of Lake St. Clair to the mouth of Detroit River on Lake Erie. Two transects were surveyed at each cross section, one in each direction across the river. Along each transect, velocity profiles were generally obtained 0.8-2.2 ft apart. At each velocity profile, average water velocity data were obtained at 1.64 ft intervals of depth. The raw position and velocity data from the ADCP field survey were adjusted for local magnetic anomalies using global positioning system (GPS) measurements at the end points of the transects. The adjusted velocity and ancillary data can be retrieved though the internet and extracted to column-oriented data files.

  10. Gulf stream velocity structure through combined inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Near-surface velocities from an acoustic Doppler instrument are used in conjunction with CTD/O2 data to produce estimates of the absolute flow field off Cape Hatteras. The data set consists of two transects across the Gulf Stream made by the R/V Endeavor cruise EN88 in August 1982. An inverse procedure is applied which makes use of both the acoustic Doppler data and property conservation constraints. Velocity sections at approximately 73 deg. W and 71 deg. W are presented with formal errors of 1-2 cm/s. The net Gulf Stream transports are estimated to be 116 + or - 2 Sv across the south leg and 161 + or - 4 Sv across the north. A Deep Western Boundary Current transport of 4 + or - 1 Sv is also estimated. While these values do not necessarily represent the mean, they are accurate estimates of the synoptic flow field in the region.

  11. Method for measuring Doppler shifts in arc-heated flows.

    PubMed

    Aeschliman, D P; Hill, R A

    1972-01-01

    A novel method of determining both the Doppler and Stark shifts in a single measurement of spectral lines emitted by the arc-heated flow from a plasma jet has been successfully demonstrated. The method uses a spherical mirror arranged with its optical axis coincident with the optical axis of a Fabry-Perot interferometer and with its center of curvature at the center line of the flow. The common optical axis lies at an angle to the flow. With this system, both red-and blue-shifted line profiles are recorded in the same spectral scan. If conditions are such that the red-and blue-shifted profiles are not resolvable, the blue-shifted component is chopped so that the recorded signal consists of the envelopes of both the red-shifted profile and the superimposed red-and blue-shifted profiles. The wavelength difference between the blue-and red-shifted line profiles is exactly twice the Doppler shift integrated along a line of sight through the flow and is independent of a Stark shift. The Stark shift is given by the wavelength difference between the absolute line center and the midpoint of the red-and blue-shifted lines. Abel inversion of integrated line shift data has yielded radial velocity profiles to an accuracy of +/-3% in a supersonic, arc-heated argon flow.

  12. Non-intrusive measurements of bubble size and velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassin, A. L.; Nikitopoulos, D. E.

    1995-06-01

    A non-intrusive measuring technique based on video-imaging has been developed for the measurement of bubble size, velocity and frequency. Measurements carried out with this method have been compared to those obtained by an optimized phase-Doppler system in standard configuration, for a wide range of bubble sizes produced from single injectors in a quiescent environment. The two measuring techniques have yielded velocities and frequencies that are in very good agreement while the size of spherical bubbles was consistently measured by both methods. The phase-Doppler system was also used to size oblate-spheroidal bubbles moving with their equatorial plane parallel to the scattering plane, yielding measurements reasonably close to the average radius of curvature of the bubbles in the neighborhood of the equatorial plane, as calculated from the video-imaging data. Both methods were used for detailed velocity measurements of the bubble-stream in the neighborhood of the injector tip. The observed bubble-velocity variation with the distance from the injector tip does not always display the usual increasing trend leading into the terminal velocity. When injection conditions are near the transition from discrete to jet injection mode and the bubbles are small, the latter decelerate into a terminal velocity due to direct interaction of successive bubbles at the injector tip. The measured terminal velocities of bubble-chains for a variety of bubble sizes and injection frequencies, are successfully predicted by using a far-field wake approximation to account for the drafting effect which is responsible for bubble-chain velocities higher than those of single bubbles.

  13. Shear wave transmissivity measurement by color Doppler shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Mayuko; Kasahara, Toshihiro; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Yuminaka, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Shear wave elastography is a useful method for evaluating tissue stiffness. We have proposed a novel shear wave imaging method (color Doppler shear wave imaging: CD SWI), which utilizes a signal processing unit in ultrasound color flow imaging in order to detect the shear wave wavefront in real time. Shear wave velocity is adopted to characterize tissue stiffness; however, it is difficult to measure tissue stiffness with high spatial resolution because of the artifact produced by shear wave diffraction. Spatial average processing in the image reconstruction method also degrades the spatial resolution. In this paper, we propose a novel measurement method for the shear wave transmissivity of a tissue boundary. Shear wave wavefront maps are acquired by changing the displacement amplitude of the shear wave and the transmissivity of the shear wave, which gives the difference in shear wave velocity between two mediums separated by the boundary, is measured from the ratio of two threshold voltages required to form the shear wave wavefronts in the two mediums. From this method, a high-resolution shear wave amplitude imaging method that reconstructs a tissue boundary is proposed.

  14. Rain Fallspeeds and Rates Derived from Airborne Nadir-Pointing Doppler Radar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, L.; Geerts, Bart

    1999-01-01

    The use of vertical-incidence Doppler velocity in addition to radar reflectivity may yield information on drop size distribution and therefore result in better rainrate estimates. Doppler velocity can provide useful information on the raindrop size distribution. Doppler velocities from a zenith-pointing radar represent the sum of the mean reflectivity-weighted hydrometeor fallspeed and the vertical air motion. Dual-parameter rain estimation methods using the Doppler velocity, require that the latter can be removed, or is negligible. Atlas et al. (1972) derived relations between Doppler velocity, reflectivity, and rain rate assuming an exponential size distribution for rain. Ulbrich (1994) expanded on this work by deriving the relation between the Doppler velocity and the reflectivity assuming a Gamma size distribution. This distribution provides a more realistic representation of the small rain drops. To get accurate information on raindrop size distributions with the above method, the air motions must be removed from the observed Doppler velocities

  15. Measurements of Coronal Proton Velocity Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, J. L.; Panasyuk, A.; Cranmer, S. R.; Gardner, L. D.; Raymond, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    The Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory is being used to measure precise coronal H I Ly-alpha spectral line profiles out to several Doppler half widths. Such observations can be used to reveal the proton velocity distribution along the line-of-sight. Departures from a Maxwellian distribution are believed to be needed for the acceleration of solar energetic particles (SEPs) by coronal mass ejection (CME) shocks. Our initial attempt to measure suprathermal proton velocity distributions has been described by Kohl et al. (2006). We have made considerable additional progress on such measurements since then. Improvements include the following: a much more accurate instrument spectral line profile, an increase in the wavelength range used for the observations, an increase in the statistical accuracy of the observations by increasing the observation time, and inclusion of a background measurement as part of every set of observations. We have also investigated the sensitivity to the detector high voltage, investigated the effects of diffraction in the instrument, determined the stray light effects and the Thompson scattering effects, which both turn out to be small except for scattering of Si III 120.6 nm. That scattered light is out of the primary wavelength range of interest. We believe that we have now demonstrated that UVCS has the sensitivity to distinguish between a Gaussian coronal velocity distribution and a kappa = 4 or smaller distribution. It is generally believed that the required seed particle population needed to produce SEPs of interest with a CME shock would have a velocity distribution with 0.001 to 0.01 of the particles with speeds that exceed 1000 km/s. Assuming a kappa distribution that is symmetric in the tangential plane and Maxwellian in the radial direction, this would correspond to a distribution with kappa = 3.5 or smaller. This paper will report the results of examining a fairly large body of new

  16. A Preliminary Evaluation of Near-Transducer Velocities Collected with Low-Blank Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.; Ganju, N.K.

    2002-01-01

    Many streams and rivers for which the US Geological Survey must provide discharge measurements are too shallow to apply existing acoustic Doppler current profiler techniques for flow measurements of satisfactory quality. Because the same transducer is used for both transmitting and receiving acoustic signals in most Doppler current profilers, some small time delay is required for acoustic "ringing" to be damped out of transducers before meaningful measurements can be made. The result of that time delay is that velocity measurements cannot be made close to the transducer thus limiting the usefulness of these instruments in shallow regions. Manufacturers and users are constantly striving for improvements to acoustic instruments which would permit useful discharge measurements in shallow rivers and streams that are still often measured with techniques and instruments more than a century old. One promising area of advance appeared to be reduction of time delay (blank) required between transmitting and receiving signals during acoustic velocity measurements. Development of a low- or zero-blank transducer by RD Instruments3 held promise that velocity measurements could be made much closer to the transducer and thus in much shallower water. Initial experience indicates that this is not the case; limitation of measurement quality appears to be related to the physical presence of the transducer itself within the flow field. The limitation may be the result of changes to water flow pattern close to the transducer rather than transducer ringing characteristics as a function of blanking distance. Results of field experiments are discussed that support this conclusion and some minimum measurement distances from transducer are suggested based on water current speed and ADCP sample modes.

  17. Optic-microwave mixing velocimeter for superhigh velocity measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Weng Jidong; Wang Xiang; Tao Tianjiong; Liu Cangli; Tan Hua

    2011-12-15

    The phenomenon that a light beam reflected off a moving object experiences a Doppler shift in its frequency underlies practical interferometric techniques for remote velocity measurements, such as velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR), displacement interferometer system for any reflector (DISAR), and photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV). While VISAR velocimeters are often bewildered by the fringe loss upon high-acceleration dynamic process diagnosis, the optic-fiber velocimeters such as DISAR and PDV, on the other hand, are puzzled by high velocity measurement over 10 km/s, due to the demand for the high bandwidth digitizer. Here, we describe a new optic-microwave mixing velocimeter (OMV) for super-high velocity measurements. By using currently available commercial microwave products, we have constructed a simple, compact, and reliable OMV device, and have successfully obtained, with a digitizer of bandwidth 6 GH only, the precise velocity history of an aluminum flyer plate being accelerated up to 11.2 km/s in a three stage gas-gun experiment.

  18. Direct measurement of Lorentz transformation with Doppler effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    For space science and astronomy the fundamentality of one-way velocity of light (OWVL) is selfevident. The measurement of OWVL (distance/interval) and the clock synchronization with light-signal transfer make a logical circulation. This means that OWVL could not be directly measured but only come indirectly from astronomical method (Romer's Io eclipse and Bradley's sidereal aberration), furthermore, the light-year by definitional OWVL and the trigonometry distance with AU are also un-measurable. For to solve this problem two methods of clock synchronization were proposed: The direct method is that at one end of dual-speed transmissionline with single clock measure the arriving-time difference of longitudinal wave and transverse wave or ordinary light and extraordinary light, again to calculate the collective sending-time of two wave with Yang's /shear elastic-modulus ratio (E/k) or extraordinary/ordinary light refractive-index ratio (ne/no), which work as one earthquake-station with single clock measures first-shake time and the distance to epicenter; The indirect method is that the one-way wavelength l is measured by dual-counters Ca and Cb and computer's real-time operation of reading difference (Nb - Na) of two counters, the frequency f is also simultaneously measured, then l f is just OWVL. Therefore, with classical Newtonian mechanics and ether wave optics, OWVL can be measured in the Galileo coordinate system with an isotropic length unit (1889 international meter definition). Without any hypotheses special relativity can entirely establish on the metrical results. When a certain wavelength l is defined as length unit, foregoing measurement of one-way wavelength l will become as the measurement of rod's length. Let a rigidity-rod connecting Ca and Cb moves relative to lamp-house with velocity v, rod's length L = (Nb - Na) l will change follow v by known Doppler effect, i.e., L(q) =L0 (1+ (v/c) cos q), where L0 is the proper length when v= 0, v• r = v cos q

  19. Relative velocity measurement from the spectral phase of a match-filtered linear frequency modulated pulse.

    PubMed

    Pinson, Samuel; Holland, Charles W

    2016-08-01

    Linear frequency modulated signals are commonly used to perform underwater acoustic measurements since they can achieve high signal-to-noise ratios with relatively low source levels. However, such signals present a drawback if the source or receiver or target is moving. The Doppler effect affects signal amplitude, delay, and resolution. To perform a correct match filtering that includes the Doppler shift requires prior knowledge of the relative velocity. In this paper, the relative velocity is extracted directly from the Doppler cross-power spectrum. More precisely, the quadratic coefficient of the Doppler cross-power-spectrum phase is proportional to the relative velocity. The proposed method achieves velocity estimates that compare favorably with Global Positioning System ground truth and the ambiguity method. PMID:27586779

  20. Multi-channel laser Doppler velocimetry using a two-dimensional optical fiber array for obtaining instantaneous velocity distribution characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyoden, Tomoaki; Yasue, Youichi; Ishida, Hiroki; Akiguchi, Shunsuke; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Takada, Yogo; Teranishi, Tsunenobu; Hachiga, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) has been developed that is capable of performing two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional measurements. It employs two horizontal laser light sheets that intersect at an angle of 13.3°. Since the intersection region is thin, it can be used to approximately determine the 2D flow field. An 8 × 8 array of optical fibers is used to simultaneously measure Doppler frequencies at 64 points. Experiments were conducted to assess the performance of the LDV, and it was found to be capable of obtaining spatial and temporal velocity information at multiple points in a flow field. The technique is fast, noninvasive, and accurate over long sampling periods. Furthermore, its applicability to an actual flow field was confirmed by measuring the temporal velocity distribution of a pulsatile flow in a rectangular flow channel with an obstruction. The proposed device is thus a useful, compact optical instrument for conducting simultaneous 2D cross-sectional multipoint measurements.

  1. Effects of volume averaging on the line spectra of vertical velocity from multiple-Doppler radar observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gal-Chen, T.; Wyngaard, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    Calculations of the ratio of the true one-dimensional spectrum of vertical velocity and that measured with multiple-Doppler radar beams are presented. It was assumed that the effects of pulse volume averaging and objective analysis routines is replacement of a point measurement with a volume integral. A u and v estimate was assumed to be feasible when orthogonal radars are not available. Also, the target fluid was configured as having an infinite vertical dimension, zero vertical velocity at the top and bottom, and having homogeneous and isotropic turbulence with a Kolmogorov energy spectrum. The ratio obtained indicated that equal resolutions among radars yields a monotonically decreasing, wavenumber-dependent response function. A gain of 0.95 was demonstrated in an experimental situation with 40 levels. Possible errors introduced when using unequal resolution radars were discussed. Finally, it was found that, for some flows, the extent of attenuation depends on the number of vertical levels resolvable by the radars.

  2. The pulsed Doppler ultrasound flowmeter: experimental evaluation of velocity accuracy and range resolution.

    PubMed

    Griffith, J M; McLeod, F D; Leroy, A F

    1977-01-01

    Accurate quantitation of blood flow patterns, particularly in the physiological state, is important to the successful study of several problems in biomedical research. The pulsed Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter offers promise of overcoming some of the difficulties present in other methods. This flowmeter can be either implantable or noninvasive. Although a number of papers describe important design criteria, the design or selection of a Doppler system for a given task remains a complex matter involving many compromises based on theoretical considerations and very limited data. Experimental data from well-defined flows are needed to help identify those areas in which ultrasonic flowmeters can be most useful. This paper defines and evaluates two important parameters for the pulsed Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter by comparing experimental results with those predicted theorectically. The first parameter is velocity accuracy; the second parameter is range resolution. Findings show that centerline flow velocities in circular tubes can be estimated to within a few percent of the correct value, and that a 1.5-mm range resolution can be realized with the system tested.

  3. Modifications and Moving Measurements of Mobile Doppler LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing-Yi; Liu, Zhi-Shen; Song, Xiao-Quan; Wu, Song-Hua; Bi, De-Cang; Wang, Xi-Tao; Yin, Qi-Wei; Reitebuch, Oliver

    2010-10-01

    In the last annual report of ID. 5291 LIDAR Cal/Val, a mobile Doppler lidar had been developed for 3D wind measurements by the Chinese partners from Ocean Remote Sensing Institute, Ocean University of China. In this year, in order to further improve the mobility of the mobile Doppler lidar for lidar calibration and validation, both GPS and inertial navigation system are integrated on the vehicle for performing measurements during movement. The modifications of the system and the results of the moving measurements are presented. This work simplifies the construction of the mobile Doppler system and makes the lidar more flexible for ground-based wind measurements and validation with the ADM-Aeolus spaceborne Doppler lidar.

  4. Retrieval of Hydrometeor Drop Size Distributions from TRMM Field Campaign Profiler Doppler Velocity Spectra Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Christopher R.; Gage, Kenneth S.

    2003-01-01

    Consistent with the original proposal and work plan, this project focused on estimating the raindrop size distributions (DSDs) retrieved from vertically pointing Doppler radar profilers and analyzing the relationship of the retrieved DSDs with the dynamics of the precipitation processes. The first phase of this project focused on developing the model to retrieve the DSD from the observed Doppler velocity spectra. The second phase used this model to perform DSD retrievals from the profiler observations made during the TRMM Ground Validation Field Campaigns of TEFLUN-B, TRMM-LBA, and KWAJEX. The third phase of this project established collaborations with scientists involved with each field campaign in order to validate the profiler DSD estimates and to enable the profiler retrievals to be used in their research. Through these collaborations, the retrieved DSDs were placed into context with the dynamical processes of the observed precipitating cloud systems.

  5. Supersonic-nitrogen flow-field measurements with the resonant Doppler velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, S.; Zimmermann, M.; Miles, R. B.

    1983-01-01

    The application of the resonant Doppler velocimeter (RDV) for obtaining the mean velocity, temperature, and pressure measurements and flow-field visualization in a supersonic free nitrogen jet is reported. This method utilizes laser-induced fluorescence to determine the spectral absorption of an atomic or molecular species seeded into the flow. A narrow linewidth tunable laser is directed into the flow and the total fluorescence from any point is obtained as the laser is tuned. The velocity of the flow is obtained from the Doppler shifted absorption frequency, and the temperature and pressure of the gas are determined from line broadening measurements. Results are presented for the use of this technique to determine the velocity, temperature, and pressure of the flow of sodium atoms seeded into a supersonic nitrogen jet. It is concluded that the visible signal is sufficiently intense for spatially resolved flow visualization purposes.

  6. Evaluation of mean velocity and turbulence measurements with ADCPs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nystrom, E.A.; Rehmann, C.R.; Oberg, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    To test the ability of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) to measure turbulence, profiles measured with two pulse-to-pulse coherent ADCPs in a laboratory flume were compared to profiles measured with an acoustic Doppler velocimeter, and time series measured in the acoustic beam of the ADCPs were examined. A four-beam ADCP was used at a downstream station, while a three-beam ADCP was used at a downstream station and an upstream station. At the downstream station, where the turbulence intensity was low, both ADCPs reproduced the mean velocity profile well away from the flume boundaries; errors near the boundaries were due to transducer ringing, flow disturbance, and sidelobe interference. At the upstream station, where the turbulence intensity was higher, errors in the mean velocity were large. The four-beam ADCP measured the Reynolds stress profile accurately away from the bottom boundary, and these measurements can be used to estimate shear velocity. Estimates of Reynolds stress with a three-beam ADCP and turbulent kinetic energy with both ADCPs cannot be computed without further assumptions, and they are affected by flow inhomogeneity. Neither ADCP measured integral time scales to within 60%. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  7. Field Assessment of Acoustic-Doppler Based Discharge Measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The use of equipment based on the Doppler principle for measuring water velocity and computing discharge is common within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The instruments and software have changed appreciably during the last 5 years; therefore, the USGS has begun a field validation of the instruments currently (2002) available for making discharge measurements from a moving boat in streams of various sizes. Instruments manufactured by SonTek/YSI2 and RD Instruments, Inc. were used to collect discharge data at five different sites. One or more traditional discharge measurements were made by the use of a Price AA current meter and standard USGS procedures with the acoustic instruments at each site during data collection. The discharges measured with the acoustic instruments were compared with the discharges measured with Price AA meters and the current USGS stage-discharge rating for each site. The mean discharges measured by each acoustic instrument were within 5 percent of the Price AA-based measurement and (or) discharge from the stage-discharge rating. Additional analysis of the data collected indicates that the coefficient of variation of the discharge measurements consistently was less for the RD Instruments, Inc. Rio Grandes than it was for the SonTek/YSI RiverSurveyors. The bottom-tracking referenced measurement had a lower coefficient of variation than the differentially corrected global positioning system referenced measurements. It was observed that the higher frequency RiverSurveyors measured a moving bed more often than the lower frequency Rio Grandes. The detection of a moving bed caused RiverSurveyors to be consistently biased low when referenced to bottom tracking. Differentially corrected global positioning system data may be used to remove the bias observed in the bottom-tracking referenced measurements.

  8. Use of Doppler radar to assess ice cloud particle fall velocity-size relations for remote sensing and climate studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrosov, Sergey Y.; Heymsfield, Andrew J.

    2000-09-01

    Knowledge of ice crystal terminal velocities, both for individual crystals and for size distributions, is important for an adequate representation of ice particle sedimentation in climate models. While the terminal velocities (υt) of individual crystals of simple shapes have been measured, theoretical relations of the form υt = ADB (where D is the maximum particle dimension), obtained using expressions for the aerodynamic drag force, are often more useful because they can be applied to a wide range of particle sizes and heights and temperatures in the atmosphere. For high tropospheric ice clouds the coefficient A has been found to vary over 1 order of magnitude; the exponent B is generally within the range 0.7-1.4. Aerodynamic drag force calculations show that A and B are related. A and B can also be used to characterize terminal-velocity-particle characteristic size relations for size distributions. In this study we use collocated, vertically pointing measurements of ice cloud radar reflectivity, Doppler velocity, and IR brightness temperatures to estimate the vertical profiles of cloud particle characteristic size, cloud ice water content, and vertically averaged value of the coefficient A, emphasizing cirrus clouds. We analyze variations in terminal-velocity-size relations for individual particles and corresponding variations for ensembles of particles: for example, in relations between the reflectivity-weighted terminal velocity and the median volume size and between the mass-weighted terminal velocity and the median volume size. The retrievals indicate that A ranges from ˜250 to almost 4000 (cgs units), similar to the range found from the theoretical calculations. The coefficient A tends to decrease as a characteristic particle size (e.g., median size) increases. As a simplification for climate modeling efforts, we present an empirical relation between median size and A, although there is a fair amount of variability about this relation. Using the Doppler

  9. Determinants of diastolic myocardial tissue Doppler velocities: influences of relaxation and preload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Greenberg, N. L.; Main, M. L.; Drinko, J. K.; Odabashian, J. A.; Thomas, J. D.; Garcia, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Myocardial tissue Doppler echocardiography (TDE) has been proposed as a tool for the assessment of diastolic function. Controversy exists regarding whether TDE measurements are influenced by preload. In this study, left ventricular volume and high-fidelity pressures were obtained in eight closed-chest dogs during intermittent caval occlusion. The time constant of isovolumic ventricular relaxation (tau) was altered with varying doses of dobutamine and esmolol. Peak early diastolic myocardial (E(m)) and transmitral (E) velocities were measured before and after preload reduction. The relative effects of changes in preload and relaxation were determined for E(m) and compared with their effects on E. The following results were observed: caval occlusion significantly decreased E (DeltaE = 16.4 +/- 3.3 cm/s, 36.6 +/- 13.7%, P < 0.01) and E(m) (DeltaE(m) = 1. 3 +/- 0.4 cm/s, 32.5 +/- 26.1%, P < 0.01) under baseline conditions. However, preload reduction was similar for E under all lusitropic conditions (P = not significant), but these effects on E(m) decreased with worsening relaxation. At tau < 50 ms, changes in E(m) with preload reduction were significantly greater (DeltaE(m) = 2.8 +/- 0.6 cm/s) than at tau = 50-65 ms (DeltaE(m) = 1.2 +/- 0.2 cm/s) and at tau >65 ms (DeltaE(m) = 0.5 +/- 0.1 cm/s, P < 0.05). We concluded that TDE E(m) is preload dependent. However, this effect decreases with worsening relaxation.

  10. Turbine-scale wind field measurements using dual-Doppler lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, Rob K.; Berg, Larry K.; Shaw, William J.; Fischer, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Spatially resolved measurements of micro-scale winds are retrieved using scanning dual-Doppler lidar, and validated against independent in situ wind measurements. Data for this study were obtained during a month-long field campaign conducted at a site in north-central Oklahoma in November of 2010. Observational platforms include one heavily instrumented 60-m meteorological tower and two scanning coherent Doppler lidars. The lidars were configured to perform coordinated dual-Doppler scans surrounding the 60-m tower, and the resulting radial velocity observations were processed to retrieve the 3-component velocity vector field on surfaces defined by the intersecting scan planes. Raw radial velocity measurements from the lidars were calibrated by direct comparison to a sonic anemometer located at the 60 m level on the tower. Wind retrievals were performed using both calibrated and uncalibrated measurements, and validated against the 60-m sonic anemometer observations. Retrievals using uncalibrated radial velocity data show a significant slow bias in the wind speed of about 14%; whereas the retrievals using the calibrated data show a much smaller slow bias of 1.2%. Retrievals using either the calibrated or uncalibrated data exhibit negligible bias in the wind direction (<0.2o), and excellent correlation in the wind speeds (>0.96).

  11. Orientation-independent rapid pulsatile flow measurement using dual-angle Doppler OCT

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Lindsy M; Gu, Shi; Jenkins, Michael W; Rollins, Andrew M

    2014-01-01

    Doppler OCT (DOCT) can provide blood flow velocity information which is valuable for investigation of microvascular structure and function. However, DOCT is only sensitive to motion parallel with the imaging beam, so that knowledge of flow direction is needed for absolute velocity determination. Here, absolute volumetric flow is calculated by integrating velocity components perpendicular to the B-scan plane. These components are acquired using two illumination beams with a predetermined angular separation, produced by a delay encoded technique. This technology enables rapid pulsatile flow measurement from single B-scans without the need for 3-D volumetric data or knowledge of blood vessel orientation. PMID:24575344

  12. Derivation of systolic time intervals from Doppler measurement of temporal arterial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Rothendler, J A; Schick, E C; Ryan, T J

    1981-01-01

    The carotid pulse method of recording systolic time intervals is limited by significant motion-induced artifact, making it unsuitable for studying patients during exercise. As an approach to overcoming this limitation, a new method utilizing the blood velocity profile of the superficial temporal artery measured by Doppler ultrasound has been developed. When compared with the values obtained from the conventional carotid pulse method, Doppler-derived left ventricular ejection time and preejection period showed excellent correlation (r = 0.99 for both) and the Doppler-derived measurements showed little intra- or interobserver variability. Studies performed during treadmill exercise showed that in 8 of 10 subjects, suitable tracing could be recorded through stage 3 of the Bruce protocol, confirming the enhanced stability of the technique compared with the carotid pulse method.

  13. Three component velocity measurements in an axisymmetric jet using LDA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, John M.; Gross, Robert W.

    1990-01-01

    A commercial three-component laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) has been used to acquire a detailed set of three-dimensional mean and fluctuating velocity measurements in a low-speed air jet entering a stagnant ambient, over the first 15 jet exit diameters along the jet trajectory. These data are consistent with previous measurements in axisymmetric, turbulent jets. Mean velocity and Reynolds stress data approach a self-preserving behavior by x/D equal to about 15. However, the RMS turbulence fluctuations were not self-preserving at this axial location, as expected based upon previous experimental studies. These data confirm the ability to obtain reliable three-dimensional velocity data using the present three-dimensional LDA system.

  14. Inexpensive Time-of-Flight Velocity Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett, Glen E.; Wild, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a circuit designed to measure time-of-flight velocity and shows how to use it to determine bullet velocity in connection with the ballistic pendulum demonstration of momentum conservation. (Author/GA)

  15. Measurements of velocity and discharge, Grand Canyon, Arizona, May 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberg, Kevin A.; Fisk, Gregory G.; ,

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) evaluated the feasibility of utilizing an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) to collect velocity and discharge data in the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona, in May 1994. An ADCP is an instrument that can be used to measure water velocity and discharge from a moving boat. Measurements of velocity and discharge were made with an ADCP at 54 cross sections along the Colorado River between the Little Colorado River and Diamond Creek. Concurrent measurements of discharge with an ADCP and a Price-AA current meter were made at three U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations: Colorado River above the Little Colorado River near Desert View, Colorado River near Grand Canyon, and Colorado River above Diamond Creek near Peach Springs. Discharges measured with an ADCP were within 3 percent of the rated discharge at each streamflow-gaging station. Discharges measured with the ADCP were within 4 percent of discharges measured with a Price-AA meter, except at the Colorado River above Diamond Creek. Vertical velocity profiles were measured with the ADCP from a stationary position at four cross sections along the Colorado River. Graphs of selected vertical velocity profiles collected in a cross section near National Canyon show considerable temporal variation among profile.

  16. Measurement of the rotational Doppler frequency shift of a spinning object using a radio frequency orbital angular momentum beam.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingyang; Gao, Xinlu; Xie, Mutong; Zhai, Wensheng; Xu, Wenjing; Huang, Shanguo; Gu, Wanyi

    2016-06-01

    An indirect approach based on phase measurement is proposed to measure the rotational Doppler frequency shift, which takes full advantage of the phase structure of orbital angular momentum (OAM) beams in radio domain, using a vector network analyzer (VNA) as a phase discriminator. A proof-of-concept experiment is established by an optical-controlled system with the OAM state of 1. By analyzing the experiment's results, the rotational Doppler frequency shift is measured as 24.83 Hz (max error rate 0.67%) at 50π rad/s rotational velocity, deducing the rotational velocity as 50.18π (average error rate 0.36%). PMID:27244411

  17. Velocity profiles, Reynolds stresses and bed roughness from an autonomous field deployed Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler in a mixed sediment tidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Boyle, Louise; Thorne, Peter; Cooke, Richard; Cohbed Team

    2014-05-01

    Estuaries are among some of the most important global landscapes in terms of population density, ecology and economy. Understanding the dynamics of these natural mixed sediment environments is of particular interest amid growing concerns over sea level rise, climate variations and estuarine response to these changes. Many predictors exist for bed form formation and sand transport in sandy coastal zones; however less work has been published on mixed sediments. This paper details a field study which forms part of the COHBED project aiming to increase understanding of bed forms in a biotic mixed sediment estuarine environment. The study was carried out in the Dee Estuary, in the eastern Irish Sea between England and Wales from the 21st May to 4th June 2013. A state of the art instrumentation frame, known as SEDbed, was deployed at three sites of differing sediment properties and biological makeup within the intertidal zone of the estuary. The SEDbed deployment consisted of a suite of optical and acoustic instrumentation, including an Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler (ADVP), Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and a three dimensional acoustic ripple profiler, 3D-ARP. Supplementary field samples and measurements were recorded alongside the frame during each deployment. This paper focuses on the use of new technological developments for the investigation of sediment dynamics. The hydrodynamics at each of the deployment sites are presented including centimetre resolution velocity profiles in the near bed region of the water column, obtained from the ADVP, which is presently the only autonomous field deployed coherent Doppler profiler . Based on these high resolution profiles variations in frictional velocity, bed shear stress and roughness length are calculated. Comparisons are made with theoretical models and with Reynolds stress values obtained from ADV data at a single point within the ADVP profile and from ADVP data itself. Predictions of bed roughness at each

  18. An inexpensive instrument for measuring wave exposure and water velocity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Figurski, J.D.; Malone, D.; Lacy, J.R.; Denny, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ocean waves drive a wide variety of nearshore physical processes, structuring entire ecosystems through their direct and indirect effects on the settlement, behavior, and survivorship of marine organisms. However, wave exposure remains difficult and expensive to measure. Here, we report on an inexpensive and easily constructed instrument for measuring wave-induced water velocities. The underwater relative swell kinetics instrument (URSKI) is a subsurface float tethered by a short (<1 m) line to the seafloor. Contained within the float is an accelerometer that records the tilt of the float in response to passing waves. During two field trials totaling 358 h, we confirmed the accuracy and precision of URSKI measurements through comparison to velocities measured by an in situ acoustic Doppler velocimeter and those predicted by a standard swell model, and we evaluated how the dimensions of the devices, its buoyancy, and sampling frequency can be modified for use in a variety of environments.

  19. Resting Doppler ankle brachial pressure index measurement: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Sihlangu, Dorcus; Bliss, Julie

    2012-07-01

    Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is under-diagnosed in primary and acute settings. The use of Doppler ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) is effective in diagnosing PVD , aid in determining aetiology of leg ulcers and is cost efficient in reducing the effects of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. The aim of this literature review was to review practitioners' experience in using Doppler ABPI, different skills used to measure ABPI and to examine practitioners' confidence in ABPI. The findings identified variation in method for Doppler measurement: including position of the artery, arm measurement, resting period and type of equipment for measuring blood pressure, variations in practitioners' training and experience have demonstrated variability in ABPI results. Although limited in number, the studies have demonstrated knowledge gap, and the need for training among health professionals. PMID:22875182

  20. EFFECT OF TRANSFUSION THERAPY ON TRANSCRANIAL DOPPLER ULTRASONOGRAPHY VELOCITIES IN CHILDREN WITH SICKLE CELL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowski, Janet L.; Yim, Eunsil; Miller, Scott; Adams, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Children with sickle cell disease and abnormal transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography have a high risk of stroke, but this risk is greatly reduced when chronic transfusion therapy is administered. The change in TCD velocities during chronic transfusion therapy and rate and frequency of normalization of TCD findings have not been studied extensively. Procedures Using data from children with sickle cell disease enrolled as potential subjects in the Optimizing Primary Stroke Prevention in Sickle Cell Anemia (STOP 2) trial, we characterized the change in TCD velocities on transfusion therapy and identified predictors of developing a normal TCD. Results Among 88 children with serial TCD data after starting transfusions for abnormal TCD 46 (52%) converted to normal TCD after a mean of 4.3 months (median 3.0; range 0.85-14.3 months) of transfusions. TCD studies remained abnormal in 19/88 (21.6%) after a mean of 2.4 years of transfusion. The median TCD velocity was lowered by 38 cm/s within three months of initiating transfusions, followed by a more gradual decline then stabilization of velocities, although with significant individual variation. Factors associated with conversion to normal TCD included lower initial TCD velocity, younger age, and higher pre-transfusion hemoglobin level during transfusion therapy. Conclusion Younger children with higher pre-transfusion hemoglobin levels and lower abnormal TCD velocities are most likely to have rapid normalization of TCD on transfusions. Long-term follow-up of children with persistently abnormal exams or worsening velocities on transfusion is needed to determine if these children are at higher risk of stroke. PMID:21370410

  1. Measuring retinal blood flow in rats using Doppler optical coherence tomography without knowing eyeball axial length

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenzhong; Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Jiao, Shuliang; Zhang, Hao F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) is widely used for measuring retinal blood flow. Existing Doppler OCT methods require the eyeball axial length, in which empirical values are usually used. However, variations in the axial length can create a bias unaccounted for in the retinal blood flow measurement. The authors plan to develop a Doppler OCT method that can measure the total retinal blood flow rate without requiring the eyeball axial length. Methods: The authors measured the retinal blood flow rate using a dual-ring scanning protocol. The small and large scanning rings entered the eye at different incident angles (small ring: 4°; large ring: 6°), focused on different locations on the retina, and detected the projected velocities/phase shifts along the probing beams. The authors calculated the ratio of the projected velocities between the two rings, and then used this ratio to estimate absolute flow velocity. The authors tested this method in both Intralipid phantoms and in vivo rats. Results: In the Intralipid flow phantom experiments, the preset and measured flow rates were consistent with the coefficient of determination as 0.97. Linear fitting between preset and measured flow rates determined the fitting slope as 1.07 and the intercept as −0.28. In in vivo rat experiments, the measured average total retinal blood flow was 7.02 ± 0.31μl/min among four wild-type rats. The authors’ measured flow rates were consistent with results in the literature. Conclusions: By using a dual-ring scanning protocol with carefully controlled incident angle difference between the two scanning rings in Doppler OCT, the authors demonstrated that it is feasible to measure the absolute retinal blood flow without knowing the eyeball axial length. PMID:26328984

  2. Absolute Retinal Blood Flow Measurement With a Dual-Beam Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Cuixia; Liu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Hao F.; Puliafito, Carmen A.; Jiao, Shuliang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To test the capability of a novel dual-beam Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique for simultaneous in vivo measurement of the Doppler angle and, thus, the absolute retinal blood velocity and the retinal flow rate, without the influence of motion artifacts. Methods. A novel dual-beam Doppler spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT) was developed. The two probing beams are separated with a controllable distance along an arbitrary direction, both of which are controlled by two independent 2D optical scanners. Two sets of optical Doppler tomography (ODT) images are acquired simultaneously. The Doppler angle of each blood vessel segment is calculated from the relative coordinates of the centers of the blood vessel in the two corresponding ODT images. The absolute blood flow velocity and the volumetric blood flow rate can then be calculated. To measure the total retinal blood flow, we used a circular scan pattern centered at the optic disc to obtain two sets of concentric OCT/ODT images simultaneously. Results. We imaged two normal human subjects at ages of 48 and 34 years. The total retinal blood flow rates of the two human subjects were calculated to be 47.01 μL/min (older subject) and 51.37 μL/min (younger subject), respectively. Results showed that the performance of this imaging system is immune to eye movement, since the two sets of ODT images were acquired simultaneously. Conclusions. The dual-beam OCT/ODT system is successful in measuring the absolute retinal blood velocity and the volumetric flow rate. The advantage of the technique is that the two sets of ODT images used for the calculation are acquired simultaneously, which eliminates the influence of eye motion and ensures the accuracy of the calculated hemodynamic parameters. PMID:24222303

  3. Laser Doppler visualisation of the fields of three-dimensional velocity vectors with the help of a minimal number of CCD cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Dubnishchev, Yu N

    2010-08-27

    We discuss the possibility of laser Doppler visualisation and measurement of the field of three-dimensional velocity vectors by suppressing the multiparticle scattering influence on the measurement results, when using one CCD camera. The coordinate measuring basis is formed due to switching of the directions and the frequency of spatially combined laser sheets, the frequency being synchronised with the CCD-camera operation. The field of the velocity vectors without the contribution from the multiparticle scattering is produced from the linear combinations of normalised laser sheet images detected with a CCD camera in a frequency-demodulated scattered light. The method can find applications not only in laser diagnostics of gas and condensed media but also in the Doppler spectroscopy of light fields scattered by multiparticle dynamic structures. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  4. Non-intrusive Shock Measurements Using Laser Doppler Vibrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statham, Shannon M.; Kolaini, Ali R.

    2012-01-01

    Stud mount accelerometers are widely used by the aerospace industry to measure shock environments during hardware qualification. The commonly used contact-based sensors, however, interfere with the shock waves and distort the acquired signature, which is a concern not actively discussed in the community. To alleviate these interference issues, engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are investigating the use of non-intrusive sensors, specifically Laser Doppler Vibrometers, as alternatives to the stud mounted accelerometers. This paper will describe shock simulation tests completed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, compare the measurements from stud mounted accelerometers and Laser Doppler Vibrometers, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of introducing Laser Doppler Vibrometers as alternative sensors for measuring shock environments.

  5. Simultaneous velocity and scalar measurements in premixed recirculating flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrão, P.; Heitor, M. V.

    The use of a laser-Doppler velocimeter has been extended to the analysis of turbulent heat transfer in a strongly sheared disc-stabilised propane-air flame through its combination with either laser Rayleigh scattering or digitally-compensated fine-wire thermocouples. The laser velocimeter was based on a conventional forward scattering system from the green light of a 5W Argon-Ion laser, while the Rayleigh signals used the blue line of the same laser. The procedure for the numeric compensation of the thermocouple signals included analysis of the effect of velocity and temperature on the time constant of the thermocouple and was optimised to allow combined velocity-temperature samples acquired by a purpose-built digital interference with a frequency up to 2000 Hz, without deterioration of the thermocouple by particle accretion. The maximum effective data rate for the combined Rayleigh/LDV system is shown to be around 130 Hz, which corresponds to a data rate of valid Doppler signals around 400 Hz and statistics based on more than 15000 measurements is made possible. The results obtained with the two systems agree qualitatively, although the use of thermocouples attenuates the measured velocity-temperature correlations. The results are used to assess the extent to which turbulent mixing in flames is altered by the accompanying heat release and quantify the processes of non-gradient diffusion in a strongly recirculating premixed flame.

  6. Accommodations assessment: Spaceborne Doppler lidar wind measuring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    An accommodations analysis performed by the MSFC Preliminary Design Office for a spaceborne Doppler lidar wind measuring system is summarized. A dedicated, free-flying spacecraft design concept is described. Mass and beginning-of-life power requirements are estimated at 2260 kg and 6.0 - 8.5 kW respectively, to support a pulsed, CO2, Doppler lidar having a pulse energy of 10 J, pulse rate of 8 Hz, and efficiency of approximately 5%. Under the assumptions of the analysis, such a system would provide wind measurements on a global scale, with accuracies of a few meters per second.

  7. Interpreting the CMB aberration and Doppler measurements: boost or intrinsic dipole?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldan, Omar; Notari, Alessio; Quartin, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    The aberration and Doppler coupling effects of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) were recently measured by the Planck satellite. The most straightforward interpretation leads to a direct detection of our peculiar velocity β, consistent with the measurement of the well-known dipole. In this paper we discuss the assumptions behind such interpretation. We show that Doppler-like couplings appear from two effects: our peculiar velocity and a second order large-scale effect due to the dipolar part of the gravitational potential. We find that the two effects are exactly degenerate but only if we assume second-order initial conditions from single-field Inflation. Thus, detecting a discrepancy in the value of β from the dipole and the Doppler couplings implies the presence of a primordial non-Gaussianity. We also show that aberration-like signals likewise arise from two independent effects: our peculiar velocity and lensing due to a first order large-scale dipolar gravitational potential, independently on Gaussianity of the initial conditions. In general such effects are not degenerate and so a discrepancy between the measured β from the dipole and aberration could be accounted for by a dipolar gravitational potential. Only through a fine-tuning of the radial profile of the potential it is possible to have a complete degeneracy with a boost effect. Finally we discuss that we also expect other signatures due to integrated second order terms, which may be further used to disentangle this scenario from a simple boost.

  8. Two-wave photon Doppler velocimetry measurements in direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Lewis J.; Jardine, Andrew P.

    2015-09-01

    Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently advantages are gained at a significant cost: the fact that input bar data is unavailable removes all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. Recently photon Doppler velocimetry methods have been developed, which can replace strain gauges on Hopkinson bars. In this paper we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system, with the same level of convenience. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and improving the accuracy and convenience of Doppler velocimetry on Hopkinson bars. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains.

  9. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of axial velocity, velocity shear, and parallel ion temperature profiles during the route to plasma turbulence in a linear magnetized plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty Thakur, S.; Adriany, K.; Gosselin, J. J.; McKee, J.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-11-01

    We report experimental measurements of the axial plasma flow and the parallel ion temperature in a magnetized linear plasma device. We used laser induced fluorescence to measure Doppler resolved ion velocity distribution functions in argon plasma to obtain spatially resolved axial velocities and parallel ion temperatures. We also show changes in the parallel velocity profiles during the transition from resistive drift wave dominated plasma to a state of weak turbulence driven by multiple plasma instabilities.

  10. Velocity space evolution of a minority energetic electron population undergoing the anomalous Doppler instability

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, W. N.; Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.

    2015-11-15

    The kinetic evolution in velocity space of a minority suprathermal electron population that is undergoing the anomalous Doppler instability (ADI) is investigated using the results from fully nonlinear numerical simulations that self-consistently evolve particles and fields in a plasma. Electron trajectories in phase space during different stages of the ADI are captured, and are analysed in relation to the characteristics of the excited electric fields and of the overall distribution of particles. For some electrons, trapping and mirroring effects are observed during the saturation phase. A relationship between the second order moments of the perpendicular electron distribution function and time is established, and is used to investigate the range of applicability of analytical approximations drawn from classical theory, that involve a quasilinear wave-driven diffusion operator.

  11. Velocity and Sediment Concentration Measurements over Bedforms in Sand-Bed Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holmes, R.R.; Garcia, M.H.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Bedforms often are present on the bed of alluvial sand-bed rivers. Bedforms, such as dunes, impact the flow field. In this field study, velocity and suspended-sediment concentration measurements were made longitudinally along a dune field in large (5-15 meters deep) alluvial sand-bed rivers. The velocity and suspended-sediment concentration data was collected using an acoustic Doppler current profiler, acoustic Doppler velocimeters, an optical backscatter sensor, and, two sediment intakes. This paper presents a description of these measurement devices and techniques for the collection of this data. Some preliminary results observed at the Missouri River at St. Charles, Missouri are presented.

  12. Exploitation of SAR data for measurement of ocean currents and wave velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuchman, R. A.; Lyzenga, D. R.; Klooster, A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of extracting information on ocean currents and wave orbital velocities from SAR data by an analysis of the Doppler frequency content of the data are discussed. The theory and data analysis methods are discussed, and results are presented for both aircraft and satellite (SEASAT) data sets. A method of measuring the phase velocity of a gravity wave field is also described. This method uses the shift in position of the wave crests on two images generated from the same data set using two separate Doppler bands. Results of the current measurements are pesented for 11 aircraft data sets and 4 SEASAT data sets.

  13. A study of the convective boundary-layer dynamics using single Doppler radar measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, M.; Gal-Chen, T. )

    1993-11-01

    The kinematic and dynamical properties of the convective planetary boundary layer (CBL) with shear are studied using single Doppler radar measurements. The data were collected using single K-band (0.87 cm) Doppler radar operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Wave Propagation Laboratory. An analysis technique has been developed and tested that is an extension of the velocity azimuth display (VAD). The technique and its associated error analysis are described in detail. Profiles of the mean wind, vertical velocity, associated momentum fluxes, and variances are estimated. In agreement with the classical picture of the CBL, the profile of the vertical velocity variance achieves a relative maximum magnitude in the lower part of the mixed layer. Large magnitudes of vertical flux of horizontal momentum are found at the top of the mixed layer, while countergradient momentum fluxes are found in part of the CBL. The second moment of the Doppler spectrum is utilized, so that the momentum transport by eddies smaller than radar resolution volume is included. In most cases and contrary to most large eddy simulations studies, the effects of the subresolution momentum fluxes on the mixed layer are not negligible. The longitudinal power spectrum on the horizontal velocity near the surface has also been calculated using the Fourier transform techniques. Traditional k[sup [minus]5/3] spectra at the inertial subrange are obtained from which, using standard techniques, the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate has been estimated. To test the validity of the single Doppler analysis techniques, the derived turbulence statistics are compared with the results from other measurements. 33 refs., 30 figs, 3 tabs.

  14. Feasibility assessment of Doppler radar long-term physiological measurements.

    PubMed

    Massagram, Wansuree; Lubecke, Victor M; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we examine the feasibility of applying doppler radar technique for a long-term health monitoring. Doppler radar was used to detect and eliminate periods of significant motion. This technique was verified using a human study on 17 subjects, and it was determined that for 15 out of 17 subjects there was no significant motion for over 85% of the measurement interval in supine positions. Majority of subjects exhibited significantly less motion in supine position, which is promising for sleep monitoring, and monitoring of hospitalized patients. PMID:22254615

  15. Feasibility assessment of Doppler radar long-term physiological measurements.

    PubMed

    Massagram, Wansuree; Lubecke, Victor M; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we examine the feasibility of applying doppler radar technique for a long-term health monitoring. Doppler radar was used to detect and eliminate periods of significant motion. This technique was verified using a human study on 17 subjects, and it was determined that for 15 out of 17 subjects there was no significant motion for over 85% of the measurement interval in supine positions. Majority of subjects exhibited significantly less motion in supine position, which is promising for sleep monitoring, and monitoring of hospitalized patients.

  16. Design and implementation of a smartphone-based portable ultrasound pulsed-wave Doppler device for blood flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Lee, Po-Yang; Chen, Pay-Yu; Liu, Ting-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Blood flow measurement using Doppler ultrasound has become a useful tool for diagnosing cardiovascular diseases and as a physiological monitor. Recently, pocket-sized ultrasound scanners have been introduced for portable diagnosis. The present paper reports the implementation of a portable ultrasound pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler flowmeter using a smartphone. A 10-MHz ultrasonic surface transducer was designed for the dynamic monitoring of blood flow velocity. The directional baseband Doppler shift signals were obtained using a portable analog circuit system. After hardware processing, the Doppler signals were fed directly to a smartphone for Doppler spectrogram analysis and display in real time. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of this system for medical ultrasound Doppler signal processing. A Couette flow phantom, consisting of two parallel disks with a 2-mm gap, was used to evaluate and calibrate the device. Doppler spectrograms of porcine blood flow were measured using this stand-alone portable device under the pulsatile condition. Subsequently, in vivo portable system verification was performed by measuring the arterial blood flow of a rat and comparing the results with the measurement from a commercial ultrasound duplex scanner. All of the results demonstrated the potential for using a smartphone as a novel embedded system for portable medical ultrasound applications. PMID:22293750

  17. A new method for blood velocity measurements using ultrasound FMCW signals.

    PubMed

    Kunita, Masanori; Sudo, Masamitsu; Inoue, Shinya; Akahane, Mutsuhiro

    2010-05-01

    The low peak power of frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW) radar makes it attractive for various applications, including vehicle collision warning systems and airborne radio altimeters. This paper describes a new ultrasound Doppler measurement system that measures blood flow velocity based on principles similar to those of FMCW radar. We propose a sinusoidal wave for FM modulation and introduce a new demodulation technique for obtaining Doppler information with high SNR and range resolution. Doppler signals are demodulated with a reference FMCW signal to adjust delay times so that they are equal to propagation times between the transmitter and the receiver. Analytical results suggest that Doppler signals can be obtained from a selected position, as with a sample volume in pulse wave Doppler systems, and that the resulting SNR is nearly identical to that obtained with continuous wave (CW) Doppler systems. Additionally, clutter power is less than that of CW Doppler systems. The analytical results were verified by experiments involving electronic circuits and Doppler ultrasound phantoms. PMID:20442017

  18. Design of a Non-scanning Lidar for Wind Velocity and Direction Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Peng, Zhangxian

    2016-06-01

    A Doppler lidar system for wind velocity and direction measurement is presented. The lidar use a wide field of view (FOV) objective lens as an optical antenna for both beam transmitting and signal receiving. By four fibers coupled on different position on the focal plane, the lidar can implement wind vector measurement without any scanning movement.

  19. New type of embedded laser Doppler velocimeter for measurement of rotary wings boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favier, D.; Maresca, C.; Nsi Mba, M.; Berton, E.; Agnes, A.

    1997-06-01

    An experimental method has been developed to determine the velocity profiles across the boundary layer of rotary wings. The measurement, based on laser Doppler velocimetry, has been tested on a helicopter rotor blade in hover. The main components of the prototype are embedded in an untwisted blade. The beams converging at the measurement volume, which can be moved along perpendicular to the surface, and the signals backscattered by flow particles, are collected through rotating fiber optic cables to a transmitter insuring the connection with fixed components (laser source, photomultipliers, burst spectrum analyzer, computer, etc.). Measurements, performed in a frame linked to the rotating blade for one radial distance from the rotation axis and at a chord abscissa x/c=0.25, have involved the tangential velocity component (chordwise) and the crossflow component (spanwise). The boundary layer has been explored at different rotating speeds of the blade. The accuracy of velocity components measurements has been evaluated in the region very close to the wall and far from the wall. The velocity profiles obtained in different hovering test conditions have shown the efficiency of the present embedded laser Doppler velocimeter method, which can also be applied to rotors in forward flight, wind turbines, etc. Undoubtly, the new database obtained on the rotating boundary layer will constitute an essential support for the physical models and computational works.

  20. Phase Control of Group Velocity in a Doppler-Broadened Λ-Type Three-Level System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tian-Hui; Xie, Min

    2016-06-01

    We theoretically investigate the phase control role on the group velocity of a weak probe field in a Doppler-broadened Λ-type three-level atomic system with the spontaneously generated coherence effect enhanced by an incoherence pump. We find that the absorption-dispersion of the probe field behaves phase and Doppler broadening-dependent phenomena, and testify that the quite large group index can be realized. The group velocity of the probe field can be switched from subluminal to superluminal or vice versa by modulating the relative phase of the two applied light fields. In contrast to the counterpropagating setting, the copropagating case is more suitable for the purpose considered in this paper due to the effectiveness of Doppler-free.

  1. Studying Velocity Turbulence from Doppler-broadened Absorption Lines: Statistics of Optical Depth Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarian, A.; Pogosyan, D.

    2008-10-10

    We continue our work on developing techniques for studying turbulence with spectroscopic data. We show that Doppler-broadened absorption spectral lines, in particular, saturated absorption lines, can be used within the framework of the previously introduced technique termed the velocity coordinate spectrum (VCS). The VCS relates the statistics of fluctuations along the velocity coordinate to the statistics of turbulence; thus, it does not require spatial coverage by sampling directions in the plane of the sky. We consider lines with different degree of absorption and show that for lines of optical depth less than one, our earlier treatment of the VCS developed for spectral emission lines is applicable, if the optical depth is used instead of intensity. This amounts to correlating the logarithms of absorbed intensities. For larger optical depths and saturated absorption lines, we show that only wings of the line are available for the analysis. In terms of the VCS formalism, this results in introducing an additional window, whose size decreases with the increase of the optical depth. As a result, strongly saturated absorption lines only carry the information about the small-scale turbulence. Nevertheless, the contrast of the fluctuations corresponding to the small-scale turbulence increases with the increase of the optical depth, which provides advantages for studying turbulence by combining lines with different optical depths. By combining different absorption lines one can develop a tomography of the turbulence in the interstellar gas in all its complexity.

  2. Non-contact measurement of facial surface vibration patterns during singing by scanning laser Doppler vibrometer

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Tatsuya; Ohtani, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method of measuring the vibration patterns on facial surfaces by using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). The surfaces of the face, neck, and body vibrate during phonation and, according to Titze (2001), these vibrations occur when aerodynamic energy is efficiently converted into acoustic energy at the glottis. A vocalist's vibration velocity patterns may therefore indicate his or her phonatory status or singing skills. LDVs enable laser-based non-contact measurement of the vibration velocity and displacement of a certain point on a vibrating object, and scanning LDVs permit multipoint measurements. The benefits of scanning LDVs originate from the facts that they do not affect the vibrations of measured objects and that they can rapidly measure the vibration patterns across planes. A case study is presented herein to demonstrate the method of measuring vibration velocity patterns with a scanning LDV. The objective of the experiment was to measure the vibration velocity differences between the modal and falsetto registers while three professional soprano singers sang sustained vowels at four pitch frequencies. The results suggest that there is a possibility that pitch frequency are correlated with vibration velocity. However, further investigations are necessary to clarify the relationships between vibration velocity patterns and phonation status and singing skills. PMID:26579054

  3. Non-contact measurement of facial surface vibration patterns during singing by scanning laser Doppler vibrometer.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Tatsuya; Ohtani, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method of measuring the vibration patterns on facial surfaces by using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). The surfaces of the face, neck, and body vibrate during phonation and, according to Titze (2001), these vibrations occur when aerodynamic energy is efficiently converted into acoustic energy at the glottis. A vocalist's vibration velocity patterns may therefore indicate his or her phonatory status or singing skills. LDVs enable laser-based non-contact measurement of the vibration velocity and displacement of a certain point on a vibrating object, and scanning LDVs permit multipoint measurements. The benefits of scanning LDVs originate from the facts that they do not affect the vibrations of measured objects and that they can rapidly measure the vibration patterns across planes. A case study is presented herein to demonstrate the method of measuring vibration velocity patterns with a scanning LDV. The objective of the experiment was to measure the vibration velocity differences between the modal and falsetto registers while three professional soprano singers sang sustained vowels at four pitch frequencies. The results suggest that there is a possibility that pitch frequency are correlated with vibration velocity. However, further investigations are necessary to clarify the relationships between vibration velocity patterns and phonation status and singing skills.

  4. Unsteady loads due to propulsive lift configurations. Part B: Pressure and velocity measurements in a three dimensional wall jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catalano, G. D.; Morton, J. B.; Humphris, R. R.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of increasing the velocity ratio, lambda sub j were explored. The quantities measured include the width of the mixing region, the mean velocity field, turbulent intensities and time scales. In addition, wall and static pressure velocity correlations and coherences are presented. The velocity measurements were made using a laser Doppler velocimeter with a phase locked loop processor. The fluctuating pressures were monitored using condenser type microphones.

  5. Unsteady velocity measurements in a realistic intracranial aneurysm model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugron, Ádám; Farinas, Marie-Isabelle; Kiss, László; Paál, György

    2012-01-01

    The initiation, growth and rupture of intracranial aneurysms are intensively studied by computational fluid dynamics. To gain confidence in the results of numerical simulations, validation of the results is necessary. To this end the unsteady flow was measured in a silicone phantom of a realistic intracranial aneurysm. A flow circuit was built with a novel unsteady flow rate generating method, used to model the idealised shape of the heartbeat. This allowed the measurement of the complex three-dimensional velocity distribution by means of laser-optical methods such as laser doppler anemometry (LDA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV). The PIV measurements, available with high temporal and spatial distribution, were found to have good agreement with the control LDA measurements. Furthermore, excellent agreement was found with the numerical results.

  6. Wind Measurements with High Energy 2 Micron Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Bruce W.; Koch, Grady J.; Petros, Mulugeta; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Yu, Ji-Rong; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2004-01-01

    A coherent Doppler lidar based on an injection seeded Ho:Tm:YLF pulsed laser was developed for wind measurements. A transmitted pulse energy over 75 mJ at 5 Hz repetition rate has been demonstrated. Designs are presented on the laser, injection seeding, receiver, and signal processing subsystems. Sample data of atmospheric measurements are presented including a wind profile extending from the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) to the free troposphere.

  7. Complete velocity distribution in river cross-sections measured by acoustic instruments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Gartner, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    To fully understand the hydraulic properties of natural rivers, velocity distribution in the river cross-section should be studied in detail. The measurement task is not straightforward because there is not an instrument that can measure the velocity distribution covering the entire cross-section. Particularly, the velocities in regions near the free surface and in the bottom boundary layer are difficult to measure, and yet the velocity properties in these regions play the most significant role in characterizing the hydraulic properties. To further characterize river hydraulics, two acoustic instruments, namely, an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), and a "BoogieDopp" (BD) were used on fixed platforms to measure the detailed velocity profiles across the river. Typically, 20 to 25 stations were used to represent a river cross-section. At each station, water velocity profiles were measured independently and/or concurrently by an ADCP and a BD. The measured velocity properties were compared and used in computation of river discharge. In a tow-tank evaluation of a BD, it has been confirmed that BD is capable of measuring water velocity at about 11 cm below the free-surface. Therefore, the surface velocity distribution across the river was extracted from the BD velocity measurements and used to compute the river discharge. These detailed velocity profiles and the composite velocity distribution were used to assess the validity of the classic theories of velocity distributions, conventional river discharge measurement methods, and for estimates of channel bottom roughness.

  8. [Vibrations of the human tympanic membrane measured with Laser Doppler Vibrometer].

    PubMed

    Szymański, Marcin; Rusinek, Rafał; Zadrozniak, Marek; Warmiński, Jerzy; Morshed, Kamal

    2009-01-01

    The knowledge of the physiology of the normal ear is important to understand the function of the ear. It is especially crucial in the reconstruction of the destroyed ear to apply the knowledge of the normal ear. We present results of tympanic membrane vibrations measurements using Laser Doppler Vibrometer in human temporal bone specimens. Six temporal bone specimens were harvested within 48 hours of death and stored cooled until preparation. The preparation included mastoidectomy with posterior tympanotomy and partial resection of the facial nerve to visualize the stapes with its footplate. We measured velocity and displacement of each quadrant of the tympanic membrane and the umbo with the laser Vibrometer equipped with velocity and displacement decoders. The sensor head OFV-534 produced and read the reflected laser beam directed at a measured point with a dedicated micromanipulator attached to an operating microscope. A retro-reflective tape was used to enhance the reflection of the laser beam. Vibrations were induced by a acoustic stimulation at the tympanic membrane. The results of the measurements were corrected to a sound pressure in the external ear canal. Laser Doppler Vibrometer system allows an undisturbed measurement of vibrations in the middle ear. Posterior quadrants of the tympanic membrane have greater velocity and displacement than anterior quadrants in lower frequencies up to 2 kHz.

  9. [Adaptive procedures for measuring arterial blood flow velocity in retinal vessels using indicator technique].

    PubMed

    Vilser, W; Schack, B; Bareshova, E; Senff, I; Bräuer-Burchardt, C; Münch, K; Strobel, J

    1995-10-01

    There are highly significant differences in the measuring results of arterial blood velocity between the indicator and laser-Doppler techniques (up to 800%). A new measuring procedure for the analysis of indicator dilution curves was developed based on indicator model and experimental results. The use of this new measuring procedure results in reduced mean systematic error between the indicator and laser-Doppler techniques to values around 10%. With the introduction of adaptive measuring arrays for the creation of indicator dilution curves and the application of adaptive algorithms for centering and spectral normalizing of the dilution curves, improved reproducibility can be expected.

  10. Superhilac real-time velocity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Feinberg, B.; Meaney, D.; Thatcher, R.; Timossi, C.

    1987-03-01

    Phase probes have been placed in several external beam lines at the LBL heavy ion linear accelerator (SuperHILAC) to provide non-destructive velocity measurements independent of the ion being accelerated. The existing system has been improved to provide the following features: a display refresh rate better than twice per second, a sensitive pseudo-correlation technique to pick out the signal from the noise, simultaneous measurements of up to four ion velocities when more than one beam is being accelerated, and a touch-screen operator interface. These improvements allow the system to be used as a routine tuning aid and beam velocity monitor.

  11. Reference values for pulsed Doppler signals from the blood flow velocity on both sides of the pulmonary valve.

    PubMed

    van Oort, A; de Knecht, S; van Dam, I; Heringa, A; de Boo, T; Alsters, J; Hopman, J; Fast, J; van der Werf, T; Daniels, O

    1988-04-01

    Pulsed Doppler signals were recorded from the pulmonary artery and the right ventricular outflow tract in 215 healthy subjects (120 males, 95 females; 1-65 years). Amplitude spectra from these Doppler signals were stored in digital form together with adjustment data for the instrument and the simultaneously recorded ECG. From these Doppler spectra the median of the maximal velocity (Vmax), the maximal acceleration (Amax) and the dispersion of the velocity distribution around Vmax (width) were calculated. These three median values were used to characterize the Doppler spectra and to define normal values for bloodflow velocities. Thus, calculations were made without observer interacting using a well-defined computer program. The effect of age, gender, body surface area and heart rate were studied. Reference ranges were calculated. There is a slight decrease of the median value of Vmax and Amax in the pulmonary artery during lifetime from 80 to 70 cm s-1 and from 1,200 to 800 cm s-2, respectively. On the other hand, there is no correlation between age and Vmax and Amax in the right ventricular outflow tract. The width of the spectra increases with age at both sites. No significant changes with age were seen with the other variables. PMID:3383877

  12. An improved version of the extended velocity-azimuth display analysis of single-Doppler radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matejka, Thomas; Srivastava, Ramesh C.

    1991-08-01

    Extended velocity-azimuth display (EVAD) analysis is useful for obtaining vertical profiles of horizontal divergence, vertical air velocity, vertical hydrometer velocity, and hydrometeor terminal fall speed in widespread precipitation. The technique uses a volume of velocity data collected with a single Doppler radar. Several improvements to the previously reported EVAD technique are discussed. They include the weighting of Fourier series coefficients to reflect their estimated error, a correction for heteroscedasticity (the systematic variation of residuals) in the regression analysis, and the weighting of data from different elevation angles to compensate for the finite thickness of the layers in which each analysis is performed. Vertical air velocity is obtained through a variational procedure. Procedures for dealiasing the velocity data and for rejecting outliers from the dataset are summarized. Recommendations for collecting radar data for use in EVAD analysis are made.

  13. Aircraft Wake Vortex Measurement with Coherent Doppler Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songhua; Liu, Bingyi; Liu, Jintao

    2016-06-01

    Aircraft vortices are generated by the lift-producing surfaces of the aircraft. The variability of near-surface conditions can change the drop rate and cause the cell of the wake vortex to twist and contort unpredictably. The pulsed Coherent Doppler Lidar Detection and Ranging is an indispensable access to real aircraft vortices behavior which transmitting a laser beam and detecting the radiation backscattered by atmospheric aerosol particles. Experiments for Coherent Doppler Lidar measurement of aircraft wake vortices has been successfully carried out at the Beijing Capital International Airport (BCIA). In this paper, the authors discuss the Lidar system, the observation modes carried out in the measurements at BCIA and the characteristics of vortices.

  14. The remote measurement of tornado-like flows employing a scanning laser Doppler system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffreys, H. B.; Bilbro, J. W.; Dimarzio, C.; Sonnenschein, C.; Toomey, D.

    1977-01-01

    The paper deals with a scanning laser Doppler velocimeter system employed in a test program for measuring naturally occurring tornado-like phenomena, known as dust devils. A description of the system and the test program is followed by a discussion of the data processing techniques and data analysis. The system uses a stable 15-W CO2 laser with the beam expanded and focused by a 12-inch telescope. Range resolution is obtained by focusing the optical system. The velocity of each volume of air (scanned in a horizontal plane) is determined from spectral analysis of the heterodyne signal. Results derived from the measurement program and data/system analyses are examined.

  15. Ultrasonic Doppler measurement of renal artery blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, W. R.; Meindl, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    An extensive evaluation of the practical and theoretical limitations encountered in the use of totally implantable CW Doppler flowmeters is provided. Theoretical analyses, computer models, in-vitro and in-vivo calibration studies describe the sources and magnitudes of potential errors in the measurement of blood flow through the renal artery, as well as larger vessels in the circulatory system. The evaluation of new flowmeter/transducer systems and their use in physiological investigations is reported.

  16. Effect of food intake on left and right ventricular systolic tissue Doppler measurements.

    PubMed

    Dieden, Anna; Gårdinger, Ylva; Hlebowicz, Joanna; Björgell, Ola; Dencker, Magnus

    2016-09-01

    Systolic tissue Doppler measurements (s') have been used to measure the velocity in myocardial motion and are a valuable tool for evaluating the systolic function of the left and right ventricles. Digestion of food is known to significantly alter hemodynamics and may therefore affect s'. The effect of food intake on s' parameters has not yet been studied. We assessed whether s' is affected by food intake. Nineteen healthy subjects aged 26·2 ± 4·2 years were investigated. s' was measured with pulsed tissue Doppler imaging in the right and left ventricles before the subjects ate a standardized meal and also 30 and 110 min after the meal. Three measurements were taken in each projection, and a mean value was calculated for each. s' increased significantly (P<0·05) from fasting to 30 min after food intake in every measured site except in the left inferolateral wall (P = 0·15, NS). Several, but not all, variables returned to base value 110 min after food intake. This study shows that food intake affects the tissue Doppler variables used to evaluate systolic heart function. Further studies are needed in older healthy subjects and older subjects with various cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Coherent Laser Instrument Would Measure Range and Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Daniel; Cardell, Greg; San Martin, Alejandro; Spiers, Gary

    2005-01-01

    A proposed instrument would project a narrow laser beam that would be frequency-modulated with a pseudorandom noise (PN) code for simultaneous measurement of range and velocity along the beam. The instrument performs these functions in a low mass, power, and volume package using a novel combination of established techniques. Originally intended as a low resource- footprint guidance sensor for descent and landing of small spacecraft onto Mars or small bodies (e.g., asteroids), the basic instrument concept also lends itself well to a similar application guiding aircraft (especially, small unmanned aircraft), and to such other applications as ranging of topographical features and measuring velocities of airborne light-scattering particles as wind indicators. Several key features of the instrument s design contribute to its favorable performance and resource-consumption characteristics. A laser beam is intrinsically much narrower (for the same exit aperture telescope or antenna) than a radar beam, eliminating the need to correct for the effect of sloping terrain over the beam width, as is the case with radar. Furthermore, the use of continuous-wave (CW), erbium-doped fiber lasers with excellent spectral purity (narrow line width) permits greater velocity resolution, while reducing the laser s power requirement compared to a more typical pulsed solid-state laser. The use of CW also takes proper advantage of the increased sensitivity of coherent detection, necessary in the first place for direct measurement of velocity using the Doppler effect. However, measuring range with a CW beam requires modulation to "tag" portions of it for time-of-flight determination; typically, the modulation consists of a PN code. A novel element of the instrument s design is the use of frequency modulation (FM) to accomplish both the PN-modulation and the Doppler-bias frequency shift necessary for signed velocity measurements. This permits the use of a single low-power waveguide electrooptic

  18. Spall velocity measurements from laboratory impact craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polanskey, Carol A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1986-01-01

    Spall velocities were measured for a series of impacts into San Marcos gabbro. Impact velocities ranged from 1 to 6.5 km/sec. Projectiles varied in material and size with a maximum mass of 4g for a lead bullet to a minimum of 0.04 g for an aluminum sphere. The spall velocities were calculated both from measurements taken from films of the events and from estimates based on range measurements of the spall fragments. The maximum spall velocity observed was 27 m/sec, or 0.5 percent of the impact velocity. The measured spall velocities were within the range predicted by the Melosh (1984) spallation model for the given experimental parameters. The compatability between the Melosh model for large planetary impacts and the results of these small scale experiments is considered in detail. The targets were also bisected to observe the internal fractures. A series of fractures were observed whose location coincided with the boundary of the theoretical near surface zone predicted by Melosh. Above this boundary the target material should receive reduced levels of compressive stress as compared to the more highly shocked region below.

  19. An example of scaling MST Doppler spectra using median spectra, spectral smoothing, and velocity tracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Although automatic, computer scaling methods appeared at the start of the MST (mesosphere stratosphere troposphere) radar technique, there is a continuing need for scaling algorithms that perform editing functions and increase the sensitivity of radar by post processing. The scaling method presented is an adaptation of the method of scaling MST Doppler spectra presented by Rastogi (1984). A brief overview of this method is as follows: a median spectrum is calculated from several sequential spectra; the median noise value is subtracted from this derived spectrum; the median spectrum is smoothed; the detection/nondetection decision is made by comparing the smoothed spectrum to the variance of the smoothed noise; and if a signal is detected, then the half-power points of the smoothed echo spectrum are used to place limits on the evaluation of the first two moments of the unsmoothed median spectrum. In all of the above steps, the algorithm is guided by tracing the expected velocity range upward from the lowest range as far as possible. The method is discussed in more detail.

  20. Determination of U, V, and W from single station Doppler radar radial velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, W. L.; Green, J. L.; Warnock, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The ST/MST (stratosphere troposphere/mesosphere stratosphere troposphere) clear air Doppler radar, or wind profiler, is an important tool in observational meteorology because of its capability to remote observe dynamic parameters of the atmosphere. There are difficulties in transforming the observed radial velocities into meteorological wind components. How this problem has been treated in the past is reviewed, and some of the analysis is recast to a form more suited to the high diagnostic abilities of a number of fixed beam configurations with reference to a linear wind field. The results, in conjunction with other works which treats problems such as the effects of finite sample volumes in the presence of nonhomogeneous atmospheric reflectivity, have implications important to the design of both individual MST/ST radars and MST/ST radar networks. The key parameters to uncoupling terms in the scaling equations are w sub x and w sub y. Whenever the stratiform condition, which states that these two parameters are negligible, is satisfied, a five beam ST radar may determine unbiased values of u, v, and w for sample volumes directly above the radar. The divergence and partial deformation of the flow may also be determined. Three beam systems can determine w and w sub z, but are unable to obtain u and v wind components uncontaminated by vertical sheer terms, even when the stratiform condition is satisfied.

  1. Effects of inflow velocity profile on two-dimensional hemodynamic analysis by ordinary and ultrasonic-measurement-integrated simulations.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takaumi; Sone, Shusaku; Funamoto, Kenichi; Hayase, Toshiyuki; Kadowaki, Hiroko; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional ultrasonic-measurement-integrated (2D-UMI) simulation correctly reproduces hemodynamics even with an inexact inflow velocity distribution. This study aimed to investigate which is superior, a two-dimensional ordinary (2D-O) simulation with an accurate inflow velocity distribution or a 2D-UMI simulation with an inaccurate one. 2D-O and 2D-UMI simulations were performed for blood flow in a carotid artery with four upstream velocity boundary conditions: a velocity profile with backprojected measured Doppler velocities (condition A), and velocity profiles with a measured Doppler velocity distribution, a parabolic one, and a uniform one, magnitude being obtained by inflow velocity estimation (conditions B, C, and D, respectively). The error of Doppler velocity against the measurement data was sensitive to the inflow velocity distribution in the 2D-O simulation, but not in the 2D-UMI simulation with the inflow velocity estimation. Among the results in conditions B, C, and D, the error in the worst 2D-UMI simulation with condition D was 31 % of that in the best 2D-O simulation with condition B, implying the superiority of the 2D-UMI simulation with an inaccurate inflow velocity distribution over the 2D-O simulation with an exact one. Condition A resulted in a larger error than the other conditions in both the 2D-O and 2D-UMI simulations.

  2. Automated calculation of stenosis diameters from the width of the velocity jet with the use of a multi-gate pulsed Doppler system.

    PubMed

    de Knecht, S; Hopman, J C; Alsters, J L; Daniëls, O; Hoeks, A P; Reneman, R S

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an algorithm for automated estimation of the width of a jet stream originating from a stenosis. The evaluation was performed in a pulsatile flow model. The width of the jetstream was assessed by measuring the diameter of the region with relatively high velocities (the jet) in the velocity profiles, as recorded with a multi-gate pulsed Doppler system. Measurements were performed at 3, 6, and 9 mm downstream of three different stenoses (stenosis diameter: 3, 5, or 8 mm) at different Reynolds numbers (200-1600) based on time averaged flow velocity for a tube of diameter 15 mm. The developed algorithm was used successfully for automated detection and quantification of jet flow diameters downstream to a stenosis. The algorithm can be used for calculating the stenosis diameter notwithstanding a theoretically predictable overestimation of about 1 mm, depending on the Reynolds number and the distance from the stenosis. PMID:2974211

  3. A comparison of vertical velocity in cirrus obtained from aircraft and lidar divergence measurements during FIRE. [First ISCCP Regional Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gultepe, Ismail; Heymsfield, A. J.; Lenschow, D. H.

    1990-01-01

    Techniques are presented to obtain vertical velocity in cirrus clouds from in situ aircraft lateral wind measurements and from ground-based remote Doppler lidar measurements. The approach used is to calculate w from the integral of the divergence of the horizontal velocity around a closed path. Divergence measurements from both aircraft and Doppler lidar are discussed. The principal errors in the calculation of w from aircraft lateral wind measurements are bias in the lateral wind, ground speed errors, and error due to vertical shear of the horizontal wind. For Doppler lidar measurements the principal errors are in the estimate of mean terminal velocity and the zeroth order coefficients of the Fourier series that is fitted to the data. The technique is applied to a cirrus cloud investigated during the FIRE (First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Regional Experiment) Cirrus Intensive Field Observation Program. The results indicate that the error in w is about + or - 14 cm/s from the aircraft technique; this can be reduced to about + or - 2 to 3 cm/s with technical improvements in both ground speed and lateral velocity measurements. The error in w from Doppler lidar measurements, which is about + or - 8 cm/s, can be reduced to about + or - 5 cm/s by improvements in the Doppler velocity measurements with technology that is currently available.

  4. Internal Detonation Velocity Measurements Inside High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Benterou, J; Bennett, C V; Cole, G; Hare, D E; May, C; Udd, E

    2009-01-16

    In order to fully calibrate hydrocodes and dynamic chemistry burn models, initiation models and detonation models of high explosives, the ability to continuously measure the detonation velocity within an explosive is required. Progress on an embedded velocity diagnostic using a 125 micron diameter optical fiber containing a chirped fiber Bragg grating is reported. As the chirped fiber Bragg grating is consumed by the moving detonation wave, the physical length of the unconsumed Bragg grating is monitored with a fast InGaAs photodiode. Experimental details of the associated equipment and data in the form of continuous detonation velocity records within PBX-9502 are presented. This small diameter fiber sensor has the potential to measure internal detonation velocities on the order of 10 mm/{micro}sec along path lengths tens of millimeters long.

  5. Design study for a spatial heterodyne Doppler coherence imaging system for flow measurements on NSTX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Jacob; Jaworski, M. A.; Diallo, A.; Kaita, R.; Nichols, J. H.

    2015-11-01

    Measuring the flow of impurities in the SOL of NSTX-U can lead to understanding of main ion flow and heat transport. Spatial heterodyne Doppler coherence imaging is a technique that allows a single camera frame to record both the brightness and Doppler shift of an emitted spectral line over the entire field of view. With a tangential view on NSTX-U it is possible to tomographically reconstruct 2d (r-z) profiles of emissivity and flow velocity for an imaged impurity ion by assuming axisymmetry and field-aligned flow. One can derive the main ion parallel flow velocity by making four measurements and using additional assumptions. Imaging of two spectral lines each from two ion species allows solving for ne, Te, and the density of the two ion species by using ADAS emissivity tables. Since measurements of the velocity of two impurities are planned, it is possible to derive a main ion parallel velocity by using a reconstructed ni and Ti (from other diagnostics), a 1d conduction-limited SOL model, and a 1d model of forces on impurities. With fewer than four measurements, it is possible to derive the main ion velocity if the impurities are entrained in the flow. A design study for such a spatial heterodyne Doppler coherence imaging system on NSTX-U will be presented. Supported by U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  6. Color M-mode Doppler flow propagation velocity is a preload insensitive index of left ventricular relaxation: animal and human validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, M. J.; Smedira, N. G.; Greenberg, N. L.; Main, M.; Firstenberg, M. S.; Odabashian, J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of preload in color M-mode Doppler flow propagation velocity (v(p)). BACKGROUND: The interpretation of Doppler filling patterns is limited by confounding effects of left ventricular (LV) relaxation and preload. Color M-mode v(p) has been proposed as a new index of LV relaxation. METHODS: We studied four dogs before and during inferior caval (IVC) occlusion at five different inotropic stages and 14 patients before and during partial cardiopulmonary bypass. Left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic volumes (LV-EDV), the time constant of isovolumic relaxation (tau), left atrial (LA) pre-A and LV end-diastolic pressures (LV-EDP) were measured. Peak velocity during early filling (E) and v(p) were extracted by digital analysis of color M-mode Doppler images. RESULTS: In both animals and humans, LV-EDV and LV-EDP decreased significantly from baseline to IVC occlusion (both p < 0.001). Peak early filling (E) velocity decreased in animals from 56 +/- 21 to 42 +/- 17 cm/s (p < 0.001) without change in v(p) (from 35 +/- 15 to 35 +/- 16, p = 0.99). Results were similar in humans (from 69 +/- 15 to 53 +/- 22 cm/s, p < 0.001, and 37 +/- 12 to 34 +/- 16, p = 0.30). In both species, there was a strong correlation between LV relaxation (tau) and v(p) (r = 0.78, p < 0.001, r = 0.86, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that color M-mode Doppler v(p) is not affected by preload alterations and confirms that LV relaxation is its main physiologic determinant in both animals during varying lusitropic conditions and in humans with heart disease.

  7. Incoherent Doppler lidar for measurement of atmospheric winds

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, W.R.; Hays, P.B.

    1994-12-31

    A conceptual space-based incoherent Doppler lidar wind measurement system is described. The system employs a Fabry-Perot interferometer to detect the Doppler shift of the backscattered laser line, and uses two channels, one for aerosol and one for molecular backscatter. Previous investigations have considered only the aerosol backscatter as the means to determine the Doppler shift. Several studies have demonstrated that aerosol backscatter, particularly over the oceans and in the southern hemisphere, can be extremely low in the free troposphere. The two channel configuration permits acceptable measurements regardless of the aerosol loading. The system operates in the near UV, which is eye safe and provides a large molecular backscatter. With a 20 Watt laser, 1 meter diameter collecting telescope, and 5 seconds integration time, the horizontal line of sight wind errors would be less than 1 m/s with aerosols typical of a continental loading from the surface to the stratosphere. Areas of low aerosol loading would have errors of about 3 m/s.

  8. Measurements of Shaped Charge Jet Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hongfa

    2013-06-01

    Penetration depth is an important requirement in oil/gas well perforating jobs. The depth determines how far the wellbore can directly communicate with reservoir fluids. Deep perforation charges are widely used in oilfield industry and most of those are powder metal liner charge for no carrot-like slug left as solid liner does. Comprehensive measurements for the powder metal liner shaped charge jet characteristics, namely, the jet density and velocity, are needed to predict the shaped charge performance and to plan the perforating job. This paper focuses on an experimental work of jet velocity measurements. A medium size of powder metal liner charges (27 grams HMX) is used in the tests. The powder jet shoots through a stack of limestone blocks with shorting switch set in between. Half inch air-gap between two blocks is design to provide space for jet traveling in air to record free fly velocity, meanwhile the jet penetration velocity in the limestone is measured. Aluminum foil switches are used to record the jet Time of Arrival (TOA). The charged switch shorted by the metal jet when it arrives. The shorting signal is recorded. The two velocities can be used to estimate the jet penetration effectiveness. A series of TOA tests show that jet velocity along its length linearly decreases from jet tip to tail until the stagnation points referring to which jet material moves in opposite direction.

  9. Surface wave measurements using a single continuously scanning laser Doppler vibrometer: application to elastography.

    PubMed

    Salman, Muhammad; Sabra, Karim G

    2013-03-01

    A continuous scanning laser Doppler vibrometry (CSLDV) obtained sweeping a single laser beam along a periodic scan pattern allows measuring surface vibrations at many points simultaneously by demultiplexing the CSLDV signal. This known method fundamentally differs from conventional scanning laser vibrometry techniques in which the laser beam is kept at a fixed point during each measurement and then moved to a new position prior to the next measurement. This article demonstrates the use of a CSLDV for measuring in a non-contact fashion the velocity of low-frequency surface waves (f < 100 Hz) propagating over soft materials, namely here gel surfaces-mimicking human body soft tissues-and skeletal muscles, to develop an affordable and noninvasive elastography modality. The CSLDV vibration measurements obtained with a single laser beam, linearly scanned over the test surface at 200 Hz over lengths up to 6 cm, were validated using an array of three fixed laser Doppler vibrometers distributed along the same scan line. Furthermore, this CSLDV setup was used to measure the increase in surface wave velocity over the biceps brachii muscle which was directly correlated to the actual stiffening of the biceps occurring while a subject was performing voluntary contractions at an increasing level.

  10. Surface wave measurements using a single continuously scanning laser Doppler vibrometer: application to elastography.

    PubMed

    Salman, Muhammad; Sabra, Karim G

    2013-03-01

    A continuous scanning laser Doppler vibrometry (CSLDV) obtained sweeping a single laser beam along a periodic scan pattern allows measuring surface vibrations at many points simultaneously by demultiplexing the CSLDV signal. This known method fundamentally differs from conventional scanning laser vibrometry techniques in which the laser beam is kept at a fixed point during each measurement and then moved to a new position prior to the next measurement. This article demonstrates the use of a CSLDV for measuring in a non-contact fashion the velocity of low-frequency surface waves (f < 100 Hz) propagating over soft materials, namely here gel surfaces-mimicking human body soft tissues-and skeletal muscles, to develop an affordable and noninvasive elastography modality. The CSLDV vibration measurements obtained with a single laser beam, linearly scanned over the test surface at 200 Hz over lengths up to 6 cm, were validated using an array of three fixed laser Doppler vibrometers distributed along the same scan line. Furthermore, this CSLDV setup was used to measure the increase in surface wave velocity over the biceps brachii muscle which was directly correlated to the actual stiffening of the biceps occurring while a subject was performing voluntary contractions at an increasing level. PMID:23463997

  11. Multi-wave ultrasonic Doppler method for measuring high flow-rates using staggered pulse intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Ei; Murakawa, Hideki; Sugimoto, Katsumi; Asano, Hitoshi; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Furuichi, Noriyuki

    2016-02-01

    The ultrasonic pulsed Doppler method (UDM) can obtain a velocity profile along the path of an ultrasonic beam. However, the UDM measurement volume is relatively large and it is known that the measurement volume affects the measurement accuracy. In this study, the effect of the measurement volume on velocity and flow rate measurements is analytically and experimentally evaluated. The velocities measured using UDM are considered to be ensemble-averaged values over the measurement volume in order to analyze the velocity error due to the measurement volume, while the flow rates are calculated from the integration of the velocity profile across the pipe. The analytical results show that the channel width, i.e. the spatial resolution along the ultrasonic beam axis, rather than the ultrasonic beam diameter, strongly influences the flow rate measurement. To improve the accuracy of the flow rate, a novel method using a multi-wave ultrasonic transducer consisting of two piezo-electric elements with different basic frequencies is proposed to minimize the size of the measurement volume in the near-wall region of a pipe flow. The velocity profiles in the near-wall region are measured using an 8 MHz sensor with a small diameter, while those far from the transducer are measured using a hollow 2 MHz sensor in the multi-wave transducer. The applicability of the multi-wave transducer was experimentally investigated using the water flow-rate calibration facility at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST). As a result, the errors in the flow rate were found to be below  -1%, while the multi-wave method is shown to be particularly effective for measuring higher flow rates in a large-diameter pipe.

  12. Photonic systems for high precision radial velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halverson, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    I will discuss new instrumentation and techniques designed to maximize the Doppler radial velocity (RV) measurement precision of next generation exoplanet discovery instruments. These systems include a novel wavelength calibration device based on an all-fiber fabry-perot interferometer, a compact and efficient optical fiber image scrambler based on a single high-index ball lens, and a unique optical fiber mode mixer. These systems have been developed specifically to overcome three technological hurdles that have classically hindered high precision RV measurements in both the optical and near-infrared (NIR), namely: lack of available wavelength calibration sources, inadequate decoupling of the spectrograph from variable telescope illumination, and speckle-induced noise due to mode interference in optical fibers. The instrumentation presented here will be applied to the Habitable-zone Planet Finder, a NIR RV instrument designed to detect rocky planets orbiting in the habitable zones of nearby M-dwarfs, and represents a critical technological step towards the detection of potentially habitable Earth-like planets. While primarily focused in the NIR, many of these systems will be adapted to future optical RV instruments as well, such as NASA's new Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrometer for the WIYN telescope.

  13. Laser Doppler velocimeter measurement in the tip region of a compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, K. N. S.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1984-01-01

    The axial and tangential velocity components near the tip region of a compressor rotor were measured by a laser Doppler velocimeter. The measurements were taken at 25 radial locations in the outer twenty percent of the blade span and at 10 axial locations upstream, inside and at the exit of the rotor. The results are interpreted to derive the behavior of the leakage flow, annulus wall boundary layer growth, inviscid effects and the rotor wake decay characteristics in the tip region. The inviscid and annulus wall boundary layer effects dominate up to quarter chord, beyond which the leakage phenomena has a major influence in altering the flow characteristics in the outer ten percent of the blade span. The annulus wall boundary layer undergoes drastic change through the passage. The velocity field measured near the leading edge reveals the effects of rapid acceleration near the suction surface and the stagnation point on the pressure surface.

  14. Response of Retinal Blood Flow to Systemic Hyperoxia as Measured with Dual-Beam Bidirectional Doppler Fourier-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Werkmeister, René M.; Palkovits, Stefan; Told, Reinhard; Gröschl, Martin; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2012-01-01

    Purpose There is a long-standing interest in the study of retinal blood flow in humans. In the recent years techniques have been established to measure retinal perfusion based on optical coherence tomography (OCT). In the present study we used a technique called dual-beam bidirectional Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) to characterize the effects of 100% oxygen breathing on retinal blood flow. These data were compared to data obtained with a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). Methods 10 healthy subjects were studied on 2 study days. On one study day the effect of 100% oxygen breathing on retinal blood velocities was studied using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler FD-OCT. On the second study day the effect of 100% oxygen breathing on retinal blood velocities was assessed by laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). Retinal vessel diameters were measured on both study days using a commercially available Dynamic Vessel Analyzer. Retinal blood flow was calculated based on retinal vessel diameters and red blood cell velocity. Results As expected, breathing of pure oxygen induced a pronounced reduction in retinal vessel diameters, retinal blood velocities and retinal blood flow on both study days (p<0.001). Blood velocity data correlated well between the two methods applied under both baseline as well as under hyperoxic conditions (r = 0.98 and r = 0.75, respectively). Data as obtained with OCT were, however, slightly higher. Conclusion A good correlation was found between red blood cell velocity as measured with dual-beam bidirectional Doppler FD-OCT and red blood cell velocity assessed by the laser Doppler method. Dual-beam bidirectional Doppler FD-OCT is a promising approach for studying retinal blood velocities in vivo. PMID:23029289

  15. Sources of uncertainty in Doppler sonar measurements of fish speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollefsen, Cristina D. S.; Zedel, Len

    2001-05-01

    A 250-kHz, 30-kHz bandwidth coherent Doppler sonar was evaluated to determine sources of uncertainty in fish speed measurements. Three separate tests were undertaken: (1) towtank tests using styrofoam balls to simulate fish, (2) tank tests with live free-swimming fish, and (3) field tests with wild free-swimming fish. The standard deviation in a single speed estimate was 9 cms-1 for styrofoam balls, 10-11 cms-1 for swimming fish observed from a dorsal aspect, and 19 cms-1 for swimming fish observed from a caudal aspect. The variation in precision was primarily due to the different signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in each test: a larger SNR resulted in a smaller standard deviation. Doppler speed estimates were compared with independent estimates of target speed where possible. An accuracy of +/-4 cms-1 was typical of Doppler speed estimates in all the experiments.

  16. Rough surface wavelength measurement through self mixing of Doppler microwave backscatter. [from ocean waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, D. E.; Johnson, J. W.

    1979-01-01

    A microwave backscatter technique is presented that has the ability to sense the dominant surface wavelength of a random rough surface. The purpose of this technique is to perform this measurement from an aircraft or spacecraft, wherein the horizontal velocity of the radar is an important parameter of the measurement system. Attention will be directed at water surface conditions for which a dominant wavelength can be defined, then the spatial variations of reflectivity will have a two dimensional spectrum that is sufficiently close to that of waves to be useful. The measurement concept is based on the relative motion between the water waves and a nadir looking radar, and the fact that while the instantaneous Doppler frequency at the receiver returned by any elementary group of scatterers on a water wave is monotonically changing, the difference in the Doppler frequency between any two scattering 'patches' stays approximately constant as these waves travel parallel to the major axis of an elliptical antenna footprint. The results of a theoretical analysis and a laboratory experiment with a continuous wave (CW) radar that encompasses several of the largest waves in the illuminated area show how the structure in the Doppler spectrum of the backscattered signal is related to the surface spectrum and its parameters in an especially direct and simple way when an incoherent envelope detector is the receiver.

  17. Bragg cell laser intensity modulation: effect on laser Doppler velocimetry measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mychkovsky, Alexander G.; Chang, Natasha A.; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2009-06-20

    In most laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) systems, the frequency of one of the two laser beams that intersect to create the probe volume is shifted with an acousto-optic element. It is shown here that Bragg shifting can impose a problematic fluctuation in intensity on the frequency-shifted beam, producing spurious velocity measurements. This fluctuation occurs at twice the Bragg cell frequency, and its relative amplitude to the time average intensity is a function of the ratio of the laser beam diameter to the Bragg cell acoustic wavelength. A physical model and a configuration procedure to minimize adverse effects of the intensity modulations are presented.

  18. Severe thunderstorm internal structure from dual-Doppler radar measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eagleman, J. R.; Lin, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    Dual-Doppler radar data were analyzed for three different times during the life cycle of a severe thunderstorm. The thunderstorm developed a double vortex inside as a tornado was generated beneath the cloud. The organized kinematic and precipitation internal structure of the thunderstorm support a theoretical double-vortex thunderstorm model that was developed earlier. The horizontal perturbation and relative winds, vertical winds, horizontal divergence and vorticity are compared for the three different times of measurement. The measurements and theoretical model provide new explanations of the severe thunderstorm and the relationship of associated tornadoes.

  19. Relation between three-dimensional geometry of the inflow tract to the orifice and the area, shape, and velocity of regurgitant color Doppler jets: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Nicolosi, G L; Budano, S; Grenci, G M; Mangano, S; Cervesato, E; Zanuttini, D

    1990-01-01

    The relation between three-dimensional geometry of the inflow tract to the orifice and the area, shape, and velocity of regurgitant jets was studied in a pulsatile in vitro color Doppler flow model. A 2.5 MHz transducer connected to a diagnostic ultrasound machine was placed in a water tank facing pulsatile jets (duration, 0.5 second) obtained by a calibrated injector. Flow rate from 6 to 52 ml/sec were tested through a 5 mm diameter circular orifice. Four different three-dimensional inflow tract geometries were compared: (A) sharp-edged, (B) Venturi (funnel), (C) converging conical, and (D) diverging conical. Mean velocities of jets were measured by continuous-wave Doppler echocardiography. Driving pressures were also measured by means of a fluid-filled catheter. Two observers independently digitized contours of maximal color jet areas by computer system from two separate sets of experiments. Results are given as the mean values of the four measurements for each parameter. Jet areas were correlated to flow rate, with no difference from A through D. The shape (eccentricity) of jets was different between A and B (p less than 0.05), between B and D (p less than 0.01), and between C and D (p less than 0.01). The shape of jets was correlated with flow rate, continuous-wave velocity, and pressure gradient in B, C, and D but not in A. Measured pressure gradients and estimated gradients by continuous-wave Doppler echocardiography were similarly correlated from A through D.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Antarctica: Measuring glacier velocity from satellite images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucchitta, B.K.; Ferguson, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    Many Landsat images of Antarctica show distinctive flow and crevasse features in the floating part of ice streams and outlet glaciers immediately below their grounding zones. Some of the features, which move with the glacier or ice stream, remain visible over many years and thus allow time-lapse measurements of ice velocities. Measurements taken from Landsat images of features on Byrd Glacier agree well with detailed ground and aerial observations. The satellite-image technique thus offers a rapid and cost-effective method of obtaining average velocities, to a first order of accuracy, of many ice streams and outlet glaciers near their termini.

  1. Antarctica: measuring glacier velocity from satellite images

    SciTech Connect

    Lucchitta, B.K.; Ferguson, H.M.

    1986-11-28

    Many Landsat images of Antarctica show distinctive flow and crevasse features in the floating part of ice streams and outlet glaciers immediately below their grounding zones. Some of the features, which move with the glacier or ice stream, remain visible over many years and thus allow time-lapse measurements of ice velocities. Measurements taken from Landsat images of features on Byrd Glacier agree well with detailed ground and aerial observations. The satellite-image technique thus offers a rapid and cost-effective method of obtaining average velocities, to a first order of accuracy, of many ice streams and outlet glaciers near their termini.

  2. Radar measurement of the seasonal variation in the velocity of the sunrise terminator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meehan, D. H.

    1990-03-01

    The HF phased-array radar at Bribie Island, Australia, used to measure horizontal movements of the ionosphere, has been calibrated using the known velocity of the sunrise terminator. The seasonal variation in the velocity of the terminator has been resolved, both in magnitud and direction. The technique uses single-station ionospheric sounding, and requires the angle of arrival and Doppler shift of ionospheric echoes to be measured as the terminator passes overhead. Pfister's (1971) theorem allows calculation of the velocity of the reflecting surface. The difference between theory and experiment is less than 3 percent in speed and 2 degrees in direction on average.

  3. Influence of myocardial infarction size on radionuclide and Doppler echocardiographic measurements of diastolic function

    SciTech Connect

    Johannessen, K.A.; Cerqueira, M.D.; Stratton, J.R. )

    1990-03-15

    To assess the relation between myocardial infarction size and diastolic function as measured by radionuclide ventriculography and Doppler echocardiography, 83 patients (aged 58 +/- 9 years) without significant valvular disease were studied 8 to 12 weeks after an acute myocardial infarction. Myocardial infarction size was measured by resting thallium-201 tomography. Peak early filling rate (in end-diastolic volumes/s) was measured by gated blood pool scintigraphy. Doppler measures of mitral inflow were peak early (E) and atrial (A) filling velocities, slopes of E and A, percent E and A filling, E/A ratio and diastolic filling period. In univariate analyses, there was a significant inverse correlation between infarction size and the peak early filling rate (r = -0.59, p less than 0.001), and this remained significant (r = -0.63, p less than 0.0001) in an analysis that included 2 other determinants of the filling rate, age and diastolic filling period. Infarction size was directly correlated to the peak E velocity (r = 0.37, p less than 0.01), deceleration of E (r = 0.41, p less than 0.01) and percent E filling (r = 0.31, p less than 0.01), and was inversely correlated to peak A (r = -0.27, p less than 0.05) and percent A filling (r = -0.26, p less than 0.05).

  4. Field evaluation of boat-mounted acoustic Doppler instruments used to measure streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; ,

    2003-01-01

    The use of instruments based on the Doppler principle for measuring water velocity and computing discharge is common within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The instruments and software have changed appreciably during the last 5 years; therefore, the USGS has begun field validation of the instruments used to make discharge measurements from a moving boat. Instruments manufactured by SonTek/YSI and RD Instruments, Inc. were used to collect discharge data at five different sites. One or more traditional discharge measurements were made using a Price AA current meter and standard USGS procedures concurrent with the acoustic instruments at each site. Discharges measured with the acoustic instruments were compared with discharges measured with Price AA current meters and the USGS stage-discharge rating for each site. The mean discharges measured by each acoustic instrument were within 5 percent of the Price AA-based measurement and (or) discharge from the stage-discharge rating.

  5. Feasibility of Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meters for the Production of Discharge Records from U.S. Geological Survey Streamflow-Gaging Stations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morlock, Scott E.; Nguyen, Hieu T.; Ross, Jerry H.

    2002-01-01

    It is feasible to use acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVM's) installed at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging stations to compute records of river discharge. ADVM's are small acoustic current meters that use the Doppler principle to measure water velocities in a two-dimensional plane. Records of river discharge can be computed from stage and ADVM velocity data using the 'index velocity' method. The ADVM-measured velocities are used as an estimator or 'index' of the mean velocity in the channel. In evaluations of ADVM's for the computation of records of river discharge, the USGS installed ADVM's at three streamflow-gaging stations in Indiana: Kankakee River at Davis, Fall Creek at Millersville, and Iroquois River near Foresman. The ADVM evaluation study period was from June 1999 to February 2001. Discharge records were computed, using ADVM data from each station. Discharge records also were computed using conventional stage-discharge methods of the USGS. The records produced from ADVM and conventional methods were compared with discharge record hydrographs and statistics. Overall, the records compared closely from the Kankakee River and Fall Creek stations. For the Iroquois River station, variable backwater was present and affected the comparison; because the ADVM record compensates for backwater, the ADVM record may be superior to the conventional record. For the three stations, the ADVM records were judged to be of a quality acceptable to USGS standards for publications and near realtime ADVM-computed discharges are served on USGS real-time data World Wide Web pages.

  6. Wave Measurements Using GPS Velocity Signals

    PubMed Central

    Doong, Dong-Jiing; Lee, Beng-Chun; Kao, Chia Chuen

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the idea of using GPS-output velocity signals to obtain wave measurement data. The application of the transformation from a velocity spectrum to a displacement spectrum in conjunction with the directional wave spectral theory are the core concepts in this study. Laboratory experiments were conducted to verify the accuracy of the inversed displacement of the surface of the sea. A GPS device was installed on a moored accelerometer buoy to verify the GPS-derived wave parameters. It was determined that loss or drifting of the GPS signal, as well as energy spikes occurring in the low frequency band led to erroneous measurements. Through the application of moving average skill and a process of frequency cut-off to the GPS output velocity, correlations between GPS-derived, and accelerometer buoy-measured significant wave heights and periods were both improved to 0.95. The GPS-derived one-dimensional and directional wave spectra were in agreement with the measurements. Despite the direction verification showing a 10° bias, this exercise still provided useful information with sufficient accuracy for a number of specific purposes. The results presented in this study indicate that using GPS output velocity is a reasonable alternative for the measurement of ocean waves. PMID:22346618

  7. A technique to measure the size of particles in laser Doppler velocimetry applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, C. F.

    1985-01-01

    A method to measure the size of particles in Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) applications is discussed. Since in LDV the velocity of the flow is assocated with the velocity of particles to establish how well they follow the flow, in the present method the interferometric probe volume is surrounded by a larger beam of different polarization or wavelength. The particle size is then measured from the absolute intensity scattered from the large beam by particles crossing the fringes. Experiments using polystrene particles between 1.1 and 3.3 microns and larger glass beads are reported. It is shown that the method has an excellent size resolution and its accuracy is better than 10% for the particle size studied.

  8. Mesospheric wind measurements using a medium-frequency imaging Doppler interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, G. W.; scatterers.

    1986-01-01

    Wind results from a medium-frequency radar operated as an imaging Doppler interferometer are presented. Ten independent antennas, together with mesospheric wind motions, were used to Doppler-sort and then echo-locate individual scattering points. The three-dimensional location and radial velocity of each discrete scattering point was determined. Mean winds were then determined by a least squares fit to the radial velocities of the ensemble of scatterers.

  9. Analysis of airborne Doppler lidar, Doppler radar and tall tower measurements of atmospheric flows in quiescent and stormy weather

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluestein, H. B.; Doviak, R. J.; Eilts, M. D.; Mccaul, E. W.; Rabin, R.; Sundara-Rajan, A.; Zrnic, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    The first experiment to combine airborne Doppler Lidar and ground-based dual Doppler Radar measurements of wind to detail the lower tropospheric flows in quiescent and stormy weather was conducted in central Oklahoma during four days in June-July 1981. Data from these unique remote sensing instruments, coupled with data from conventional in-situ facilities, i.e., 500-m meteorological tower, rawinsonde, and surface based sensors, were analyzed to enhance understanding of wind, waves and turbulence. The purposes of the study were to: (1) compare winds mapped by ground-based dual Doppler radars, airborne Doppler lidar, and anemometers on a tower; (2) compare measured atmospheric boundary layer flow with flows predicted by theoretical models; (3) investigate the kinematic structure of air mass boundaries that precede the development of severe storms; and (4) study the kinematic structure of thunderstorm phenomena (downdrafts, gust fronts, etc.) that produce wind shear and turbulence hazardous to aircraft operations. The report consists of three parts: Part 1, Intercomparison of Wind Data from Airborne Lidar, Ground-Based Radars and Instrumented 444 m Tower; Part 2, The Structure of the Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer as Revealed by Lidar and Doppler Radars; and Part 3, Doppler Lidar Observations in Thunderstorm Environments.

  10. Transcranial doppler sonography diagnostic value for the cerebral flow velocity changes in the interictal phase of classic migraine

    PubMed Central

    Sedighi, Behnaz; Ali Ebrahimi, Hossein; Jabbarpour, Shirin; Shafiee, Kaveh

    2011-01-01

    Background: An imbalance of the cerebrovascular response during functional activation of the brain has been postulated as a factor in the pathophysiology of migraine. The purpose of this study was to determine the transcranial doppler sonography (TDS) diagnostic value for the cerebral flow velocity changes in the interictal phase of classic migraine. Methods: This study was carried out on 46 patients (23 cases and 23 controls). We used Doppler instrument via trans-temporal window and detected middle cerebral artery, anterior cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery by 2 MHz probe. The flow velocity in the posterior cerebral artery before, during and immediately after stimulation was recorded. Stimulation was done using a flickering light in 100 seconds. Results: At the baseline, the middle cerebral artery had more peak systolic velocity in migraineurs than the control group. Although peak systolic velocity changes in the mid-photic period is not statistically significant. On the other hand, post-photic peak systolic velocity increased significantly. The diagnostic accuracy of the peak systolic volume (PSV) changes in the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) for the migraine was 72.3%. Conclusion: This stimulation we found altered cerebral vasomotor reactivity in the interictal phase in migraineurs with visual aura. This seemed to be an unavoidable hindrance for the wider implementation of functional TCD in diagnostic work up of migraine patients. PMID:24024011

  11. Measurement Capabilities of Planar Doppler Velocimetry in Large-Scale Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, Robert L.; Warmbrodt, William (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Over the past few years, Planar Doppler Velocimetry (PDT) has been shown by several laboratories to offer an attractive means for measuring three-dimensional velocity vectors everywhere in a light sheet placed in a flow. Unlike some other optical means of measuring flow velocities, PDT is particularly attractive for use in large wind tunnels where distances to the sample region may be several meters, because it does not require the spatial resolution and tracking of individual scattering particles or the alignment of crossed beams at large distances. To date, demonstrations of PDT (also called Doppler Global Velocimetry by some authors) have been made either in low speed flows without quantitative comparison to other measurements, or in supersonic flows where the Doppler shift is large and its measurement is relatively insensitive to instrumental errors. Moreover, most reported applications have relied on the use of continuous-wave lasers, which limit the measurement to time-averaged velocity fields. This work summarizes the results of two previous studies of PDT in which the use of pulsed lasers to obtain instantaneous velocity vector fields is evaluated. The objective has been to quantitatively define and demonstrate PDT capabilities for applications in large-scale wind tunnels that are intended primarily for the testing of rotorcraft and subsonic aircraft at speeds typically less than 100 m/s. For such applications, the adequate resolution of low-speed flow fields requires accurate measurements of small Doppler shifts that are obtained at distances of several meters from the sample region and with a field of view that is sufficient to encompass the entire region of interest. The use of pulsed lasers provides the unique capability to obtain not only time-averaged fields, but also their statistical fluctuation amplitudes and the spatial excursions of unsteady flow regions such as wakes, separations, and rotor-tip vortices. To accomplish the objectives of these

  12. Acoustic Measurement of Potato Cannon Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Potato cannon velocity can be measured with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle, and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. Flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato…

  13. Radionuclide Counting Technique Measures Wind Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Mall, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    Proposed technique for measuring wind velocity based on inverse-squarelaw variation of radioactive counting rates. In proposal, radioative source is deposited on bottom of light, hollow sphere and suspended by flexible wire over radiation counter, Anemometer based on this concept is self-contained, portable, yet not too fragile. Used for extended periods of time, even at remote, inhospitable and inaccessible sites.

  14. Optical fiber-based system for continuous measurement of in-bore projectile velocity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guohua; Sun, Jinglin; Li, Qiang

    2014-08-01

    This paper reports the design of an optical fiber-based velocity measurement system and its application in measuring the in-bore projectile velocity. The measurement principle of the implemented system is based on Doppler effect and heterodyne detection technique. The analysis of the velocity measurement principle deduces the relationship between the projectile velocity and the instantaneous frequency (IF) of the optical fiber-based system output signal. To extract the IF of the fast-changing signal carrying the velocity information, an IF extraction algorithm based on the continuous wavelet transforms is detailed. Besides, the performance of the algorithm is analyzed by performing corresponding simulation. At last, an in-bore projectile velocity measurement experiment with a sniper rifle having a 720 m/s muzzle velocity is performed to verify the feasibility of the optical fiber-based velocity measurement system. Experiment results show that the measured muzzle velocity is 718.61 m/s, and the relative uncertainty of the measured muzzle velocity is approximately 0.021%.

  15. Optical fiber-based system for continuous measurement of in-bore projectile velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guohua; Sun, Jinglin; Li, Qiang

    2014-08-01

    This paper reports the design of an optical fiber-based velocity measurement system and its application in measuring the in-bore projectile velocity. The measurement principle of the implemented system is based on Doppler effect and heterodyne detection technique. The analysis of the velocity measurement principle deduces the relationship between the projectile velocity and the instantaneous frequency (IF) of the optical fiber-based system output signal. To extract the IF of the fast-changing signal carrying the velocity information, an IF extraction algorithm based on the continuous wavelet transforms is detailed. Besides, the performance of the algorithm is analyzed by performing corresponding simulation. At last, an in-bore projectile velocity measurement experiment with a sniper rifle having a 720 m/s muzzle velocity is performed to verify the feasibility of the optical fiber-based velocity measurement system. Experiment results show that the measured muzzle velocity is 718.61 m/s, and the relative uncertainty of the measured muzzle velocity is approximately 0.021%.

  16. Optical fiber-based system for continuous measurement of in-bore projectile velocity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guohua; Sun, Jinglin; Li, Qiang

    2014-08-01

    This paper reports the design of an optical fiber-based velocity measurement system and its application in measuring the in-bore projectile velocity. The measurement principle of the implemented system is based on Doppler effect and heterodyne detection technique. The analysis of the velocity measurement principle deduces the relationship between the projectile velocity and the instantaneous frequency (IF) of the optical fiber-based system output signal. To extract the IF of the fast-changing signal carrying the velocity information, an IF extraction algorithm based on the continuous wavelet transforms is detailed. Besides, the performance of the algorithm is analyzed by performing corresponding simulation. At last, an in-bore projectile velocity measurement experiment with a sniper rifle having a 720 m/s muzzle velocity is performed to verify the feasibility of the optical fiber-based velocity measurement system. Experiment results show that the measured muzzle velocity is 718.61 m/s, and the relative uncertainty of the measured muzzle velocity is approximately 0.021%. PMID:25173302

  17. The Göttingen Solar Radial Velocity Project: Sub-m s-1 Doppler Precision from FTS Observations of the Sun as a Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, U.; Reiners, A.

    2016-09-01

    Radial velocity observations of stars are entering the sub-m s-1 domain revealing fundamental barriers for Doppler precision experiments. Observations of the Sun as a star can easily overcome the m s-1 photon limit but face other obstacles. We introduce the Göttingen Solar Radial Velocity Project with the goal of obtaining high-precision (cm s-1) radial velocity measurements of the Sun as a star with a Fourier Transform Spectrograph. In this first paper, we present the project and first results. The photon limit of our 2 minute observations is at the 2 cm s-1 level but is currently limited by strong instrumental systematics. A drift of a few m s-1 hr-1 is visible in all observing days, probably caused by vignetting of the solar disk in our fiber-coupled setup, and imperfections of our guiding system add further offsets in our data. Binning the data into 30 minute groups shows m s-1 stability after correcting for a daily and linear instrumental trend. Our results show the potential of Sun-as-a-star radial velocity measurements that can possibly be achieved after a substantial upgrade of our spectrograph coupling strategy. Sun-as-a-star observations can provide crucial empirical information about the radial velocity signal of convective motion and stellar activity and on the wavelength dependence of radial velocity signals caused by stellar line profile variations.

  18. The Göttingen Solar Radial Velocity Project: Sub-m s‑1 Doppler Precision from FTS Observations of the Sun as a Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, U.; Reiners, A.

    2016-09-01

    Radial velocity observations of stars are entering the sub-m s‑1 domain revealing fundamental barriers for Doppler precision experiments. Observations of the Sun as a star can easily overcome the m s‑1 photon limit but face other obstacles. We introduce the Göttingen Solar Radial Velocity Project with the goal of obtaining high-precision (cm s‑1) radial velocity measurements of the Sun as a star with a Fourier Transform Spectrograph. In this first paper, we present the project and first results. The photon limit of our 2 minute observations is at the 2 cm s‑1 level but is currently limited by strong instrumental systematics. A drift of a few m s‑1 hr‑1 is visible in all observing days, probably caused by vignetting of the solar disk in our fiber-coupled setup, and imperfections of our guiding system add further offsets in our data. Binning the data into 30 minute groups shows m s‑1 stability after correcting for a daily and linear instrumental trend. Our results show the potential of Sun-as-a-star radial velocity measurements that can possibly be achieved after a substantial upgrade of our spectrograph coupling strategy. Sun-as-a-star observations can provide crucial empirical information about the radial velocity signal of convective motion and stellar activity and on the wavelength dependence of radial velocity signals caused by stellar line profile variations.

  19. Minimally destructive, Doppler measurement of a quantized flow in a ring-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Anderson, N.; Phillips, W. D.; Eckel, S.; Campbell, G. K.; Stringari, S.

    2016-02-01

    The Doppler effect, the shift in the frequency of sound due to motion, is present in both classical gases and quantum superfluids. Here, we perform an in situ, minimally destructive measurement, of the persistent current in a ring-shaped, superfluid Bose-Einstein condensate using the Doppler effect. Phonon modes generated in this condensate have their frequencies Doppler shifted by a persistent current. This frequency shift will cause a standing-wave phonon mode to be ‘dragged’ along with the persistent current. By measuring this precession, one can extract the background flow velocity. This technique will find utility in experiments where the winding number is important, such as in emerging ‘atomtronic’ devices.

  20. Broadband measurement of translational and angular vibrations using a single continuously scanning laser Doppler vibrometer.

    PubMed

    Salman, Muhammad; Sabra, Karim G

    2012-09-01

    A continuous scanning laser Doppler velocimetry (CSLDV) technique is used to measure the low frequency broadband vibrations associated with human skeletal muscle vibrations (typically f < 100 Hz) by continuously varying the orientation of laser beam over distances that are short compared to the characteristic wavelengths of the vibrations. The high frequency scan (compared to the vibration frequency) enables the detection of broadband translational and angular velocities at a single point using amplitude demodulation of the CSDLV signal. For instance, linear scans allow measurement of the normal surface velocity and one component of angular velocity vector, while circular scans allow measurement of an additional angular velocity component. This CSLDV technique is first validated here using gel samples mimicking soft tissues and then applied to measure multiple degrees of freedom (DOF) of a subject's hand exhibiting fatigue-induced tremor. Hence this CSLDV technique potentially provides a means for measuring multiple DOF of small human body parts (e.g., fingers, tendons, small muscles) for various applications (e.g., haptic technology, remote surgery) when the use of skin-mounted sensors (e.g. accelerometers) can be problematic due to mass-loading artifacts or tethering issues.

  1. Measurement of core velocity fluctuations and the dynamo in a reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Den Hartog, D.J.; Craig, D.; Fiksel, G.; Fontana, P.W.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Chapman, J.T.

    1998-12-31

    Plasma flow velocity fluctuations have been directly measured in the high temperature magnetically confined plasma in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP). These measurements show that the flow velocity fluctuations are correlated with magnetic field fluctuations. This initial measurement is subject to limitations of spatial localization and other uncertainties, but is evidence for sustainment of the RFP magnetic field configuration by the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamo. Both the flow velocity and magnetic field fluctuations are the result of global resistive MHD modes of helicity m = 1, n = 5--10 in the core of MST. Chord-averaged flow velocity fluctuations are measured in the core of MST by recording the Doppler shift of impurity line emission with a specialized high resolution and throughput grating spectrometer. Magnetic field fluctuations are recorded with a large array of small edge pickup coils, which allows spectral decomposition into discrete modes and subsequent correlation with the velocity fluctuation data.

  2. Material properties identification using ultrasonic waves and laser Doppler vibrometer measurements: a multi-input multi-output approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, R.; Vanlanduit, S.; Guillaume, P.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper a multi-input multi-output approach able to determine the material properties of homogeneous materials is presented. To do so, an experimental set-up which combines the use of multi harmonic signals with interleaved frequencies and laser Doppler vibrometer measurements has been developed. A modeling technique, based on transmission and reflection measurements, allowed the simultaneous determination of longitudinal wave velocity, density and thickness of the materials under test with high levels of precision and accuracy.

  3. Measurements of parallel electron velocity distributions using whistler wave absorption.

    PubMed

    Thuecks, D J; Skiff, F; Kletzing, C A

    2012-08-01

    We describe a diagnostic to measure the parallel electron velocity distribution in a magnetized plasma that is overdense (ω(pe) > ω(ce)). This technique utilizes resonant absorption of whistler waves by electrons with velocities parallel to a background magnetic field. The whistler waves were launched and received by a pair of dipole antennas immersed in a cylindrical discharge plasma at two positions along an axial background magnetic field. The whistler wave frequency was swept from somewhat below and up to the electron cyclotron frequency ω(ce). As the frequency was swept, the wave was resonantly absorbed by the part of the electron phase space density which was Doppler shifted into resonance according to the relation ω - k([parallel])v([parallel]) = ω(ce). The measured absorption is directly related to the reduced parallel electron distribution function integrated along the wave trajectory. The background theory and initial results from this diagnostic are presented here. Though this diagnostic is best suited to detect tail populations of the parallel electron distribution function, these first results show that this diagnostic is also rather successful in measuring the bulk plasma density and temperature both during the plasma discharge and into the afterglow.

  4. Measurements of parallel electron velocity distributions using whistler wave absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Thuecks, D. J.; Skiff, F.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2012-08-15

    We describe a diagnostic to measure the parallel electron velocity distribution in a magnetized plasma that is overdense ({omega}{sub pe} > {omega}{sub ce}). This technique utilizes resonant absorption of whistler waves by electrons with velocities parallel to a background magnetic field. The whistler waves were launched and received by a pair of dipole antennas immersed in a cylindrical discharge plasma at two positions along an axial background magnetic field. The whistler wave frequency was swept from somewhat below and up to the electron cyclotron frequency {omega}{sub ce}. As the frequency was swept, the wave was resonantly absorbed by the part of the electron phase space density which was Doppler shifted into resonance according to the relation {omega}-k{sub ||v||} = {omega}{sub ce}. The measured absorption is directly related to the reduced parallel electron distribution function integrated along the wave trajectory. The background theory and initial results from this diagnostic are presented here. Though this diagnostic is best suited to detect tail populations of the parallel electron distribution function, these first results show that this diagnostic is also rather successful in measuring the bulk plasma density and temperature both during the plasma discharge and into the afterglow.

  5. Monochromatic heterodyne fiber-optic profile sensor for spatially resolved velocity measurements with frequency division multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Pfister, Thorsten; Buettner, Lars; Shirai, Katsuaki; Czarske, Juergen

    2005-05-01

    Investigating shear flows is important in technical applications as well as in fundamental research. Velocity measurements with high spatial resolution are necessary. Laser Doppler anemometry allows nonintrusive precise measurements, but the spatial resolution is limited by the size of the measurement volume to {approx}50 {mu}m. A new laser Doppler profile sensor is proposed, enabling determination of the velocity profile inside the measurement volume. Two fringe systems with contrary fringe spacing gradients are generated to determine the position as well as the velocity of passing tracer particles. Physically discriminating between the two measuring channels is done by a frequency-division-multiplexing technique with acousto-optic modulators. A frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and a fiber-optic measuring head were employed, resulting in a portable and flexible sensor. In the center of the measurement volume of {approx}1-mm length, a spatial resolution of {approx}5 {mu}m was obtained. Spatially resolved measurements of the Blasius velocity profile are presented. Small velocities as low as 3 cm/s are measured. The sensor is applied in a wind tunnel to determine the wall shear stress of a boundary layer flow. All measurement results show good agreement with the theoretical prediction.

  6. Evaluation of acoustic doppler velocity meters to quantify flow from Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gary, Marcus O.; Gary, Robin H.; Asquith, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs are the two largest springs in Texas, are major discharge points for the San Antonio segment of the Edwards aquifer, and provide habitat for several Federally listed endangered species that depend on adequate springflows for survival. It is therefore imperative that the Edwards Aquifer Authority have accurate and timely springflow data to guide resource management. Discharge points for Comal Springs and San Marcos Springs are submerged in Landa Lake and in Spring Lake, respectively. Flows from the springs currently (2008) are estimated by the U.S Geological Survey in real time as surface-water discharge from conventional stage-discharge ratings at sites downstream from each spring. Recent technological advances and availability of acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs) now provide tools to collect data (stream velocity) related to springflow that could increase accuracy of real-time estimates of the springflows. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Edwards Aquifer Authority, did a study during May 2006 through September 2007 to evaluate ADVMs to quantify flow from Comal and San Marcos Springs. The evaluation was based on two monitoring approaches: (1) placement of ADVMs in important spring orifices - spring run 3 and spring 7 at Comal Springs, and diversion spring at San Marcos Springs; and (2) placement of ADVMs at the nearest flowing streams - Comal River new and old channels for Comal Springs, Spring Lake west and east outflow channels and current (2008) San Marcos River streamflow-gaging site for San Marcos Springs. For Comal Springs, ADVM application at spring run 3 and spring 7 was intended to indicate whether the flows of spring run 3 and spring 7 can be related to total springflow. The findings indicate that velocity data from both discharge features, while reflecting changes in flow, do not reliably show a direct relation to measured streamflow and thus to total Comal Springs flow. ADVMs at the Comal

  7. Novel laser Doppler flowmeter for pulpal blood flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, De Yu; Millerd, James E.; Wilder-Smith, Petra B. B.; Arrastia-Jitosho, Anna-Marie A.

    1996-04-01

    We have proposed and experimentally demonstrated a new configuration of laser Doppler flowmetry for dental pulpal blood flow measurements. To date, the vitality of a tooth can be determined only by subjective thermal or electric tests, which are of questionable reliability and may induced pain in patient. Non-invasive techniques for determining pulpal vascular reactions to injury, treatment, and medication are in great demand. The laser Doppler flowmetry technique is non-invasive; however, clinical studies have shown that when used to measure pulpal blood flow the conventional back-scattering Doppler method suffers from low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and unreliable flux readings rendering it impossible to calibrate. A simplified theoretical model indicates that by using a forward scattered geometry the detected signal has a much higher SNR and can be calibrated. The forward scattered signal is readily detectable due to the fact that teeth are relatively thin organs with moderate optical loss. A preliminary experiment comparing forward scattered detection with conventional back- scattered detection was carried out using an extracted human molar. The results validated the findings of the simple theoretical model and clearly showed the utility of the forward scattering geometry. The back-scattering method had readings that fluctuated by as much as 187% in response to small changes in sensor position relative to the tooth. The forward scattered method had consistent readings (within 10%) that were independent of the sensor position, a signal-to-noise ratio that was at least 5.6 times higher than the back-scattering method, and a linear response to flow rate.

  8. Laser Doppler anemometry measurements of steady flow through two bi-leaflet prosthetic heart valves

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Ovandir; Ortiz, Jayme Pinto; Vieira Junior, Francisco Ubaldo; Vieira, Reinaldo Wilson; Antunes, Nilson; Tabacow, Fabio Bittencourt Dutra; Costa, Eduardo Tavares; Petrucci Junior, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In vitro hydrodynamic characterization of prosthetic heart valves provides important information regarding their operation, especially if performed by noninvasive techniques of anemometry. Once velocity profiles for each valve are provided, it is possible to compare them in terms of hydrodynamic performance. In this first experimental study using laser doppler anemometry with mechanical valves, the simulations were performed at a steady flow workbench. Objective To compare unidimensional velocity profiles at the central plane of two bi-leaflet aortic prosthesis from St. Jude (AGN 21 - 751 and 21 AJ - 501 models) exposed to a steady flow regime, on four distinct sections, three downstream and one upstream. Methods To provide similar conditions for the flow through each prosthesis by a steady flow workbench (water, flow rate of 17L/min. ) and, for the same sections and sweeps, to obtain the velocity profiles of each heart valve by unidimensional measurements. Results It was found that higher velocities correspond to the prosthesis with smaller inner diameter and instabilities of flow are larger as the section of interest is closer to the valve. Regions of recirculation, stagnation of flow, low pressure, and flow peak velocities were also found. Conclusions Considering the hydrodynamic aspect and for every section measured, it could be concluded that the prosthesis model AGN 21 - 751 (RegentTM) is superior to the 21 AJ - 501 model (Master Series). Based on the results, future studies can choose to focus on specific regions of the these valves. PMID:24598950

  9. Evaluation of a pulsed ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, M. K.

    1973-01-01

    The in vivo application of the pulsed ultrasound Doppler velocity meter (PUDVM) for measuring arterial velocity waveforms is reported. In particular, the performance of the PUDVM is compared with a hot film anemometer of proven accuracy.

  10. Velocity Dispersion Measurements in Cracked Quartzite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schijns, H. M.; Schmitt, D. R.; Jackson, I.

    2011-12-01

    Oscillating stress induced by seismic waves is expected to cause reversible fluid flow within low aspect ratio cracks, resulting in strongly frequency dependent seismic wave velocities. Laboratory measurements of seismic velocities typically made at MHz frequencies, well logging undertaken at kHz frequencies and in-situ exploration seismic (10-300 Hz) measurements are unlikely to be directly comparable as a result of this fluid flow effect. Experimental measurements over a broad range of frequencies are necessary to constrain theoretical velocity dispersion models. Here we present a preliminary comparison of ultrasonic (MHz) measurements on two cracked quartzite samples with measurements made in the mHz-Hz frequency band using forced oscillation. Quartzite samples from Cape Sorell, Australia and Alberta, Canada are cracked by thermally heating the samples to 1100 C and quenching them in liquid nitrogen and water, respectively. A relatively isotropic distribution of cracks, with average aperture of 1 μm and aspect ratio of <0.01, is induced in both samples for total porosities of ~2%. Measurements are made on the quartzite samples when they are dry, and after saturating with argon and water. The difference in viscosity between argon (0.025 mPa s at 10 MPa and 20 C) and water (1 mPa s) allow the investigation of different time scales of fluid flow. Further, measurements are made over effective pressures from 10-150 MPa, with progressive crack closure observed between 10-100 MPa. High frequency (0.64 MHz) measurements using piezoelectric transducers are used in conjunction with density measurements to calculate high frequency Young's and shear moduli. Low frequency (mHz-Hz) moduli are measured using a forced oscillation apparatus at Australian National University. The experimental assembly consists of a long cylindrical beam; the top of the beam is held fixed while the bottom is driven using time-varying electromagnetic drivers. The polarization of the applied force

  11. Analysis of Supergranule Sizes and Velocities Using Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) Dopplergrams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Peter E.; Pesnell, W. Dean; Beck, John G.; Lee, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    Co-temporal Doppler images from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/ Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) and Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) have been analyzed to extract quantitative information about global properties of the spatial and temporal characteristics of solar supergranulation. Preliminary comparisons show that supergranules appear to be smaller and have stronger horizontal velocity flows within HMI data than was measured with MDI. There appears to be no difference in their evolutionary timescales. Supergranule sizes and velocities were analyzed over a ten-day time period at a 15-minute cadence. While the averages of the time-series retain the aforementioned differences, fluctuations of these parameters first observed in MDI data were seen in both MDI and HMI time-series, exhibiting a strong cross-correlation. This verifies that these fluctuations are not instrumental, but are solar in origin. The observed discrepancies between the averaged values from the two sets of data are a consequence of instrument resolution. The lower spatial resolution of MDI results in larger observed structures with lower velocities than is seen in HMI. While these results offer a further constraint on the physical nature of supergranules, they also provide a level of calibration between the two instruments.

  12. Measurement of velocity deficit at the downstream of a 1:10 axial hydrokinetic turbine model

    SciTech Connect

    Gunawan, Budi; Neary, Vincent S; Hill, Craig; Chamorro, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Wake recovery constrains the downstream spacing and density of turbines that can be deployed in turbine farms and limits the amount of energy that can be produced at a hydrokinetic energy site. This study investigates the wake recovery at the downstream of a 1:10 axial flow turbine model using a pulse-to-pulse coherent Acoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP). In addition, turbine inflow and outflow velocities were measured for calculating the thrust on the turbine. The result shows that the depth-averaged longitudinal velocity recovers to 97% of the inflow velocity at 35 turbine diameter (D) downstream of the turbine.

  13. Measurement of a zonal wind profile on Titan by Doppler tracking of the Cassini entry probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, D. H.; Pollack, J. B.; Seiff, A.

    1990-01-01

    A program, called the Cassini mission, intended to study the Saturn system by utilizing a Saturn orbiter and a probe descending to the surface of Titan, is discussed. Winds are expected to cause perturbations to the probe local horizontal velocity, resulting in an anomalous drift in the probe location and a shift in the frequency of the probe telemetry, due to the Doppler effect. By using an iterative algorithm, in which the time variation of the probe telemetry frequency is monitored throughout the descent, and the probe trajectory is updated to reflect the effect of wind on the probe location, a highly accurate relative wind profile can be recovered. By adding a single wind velocity, measured by independent means, an absolute wind profile can be obtained. However, the accuracy of the zonal winds recovery is limited by errors in trajectory, and frequency.

  14. Directional-sensitive differential laser Doppler vibrometry for in-plane motion measurement of specular surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agusanto, Kusuma; Lau, Gih-Keong; Wu, Kun; Liu, Ting; Zhu, Chuangui; Yuan, Ling

    2015-03-01

    A new method for measuring in-plane vibration velocity of glossy and specular surface using differential laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is proposed in this work. A standard tangential LDV using similar differential configuration is only able to measure in-plane velocity of objects with rough surface, due to its inherent on-axis optical design that collects backscatter light along its optical axis. The proposed method adopts an off-axis detection scheme, in which the photodetector is decoupled from LDV, and placed along the dominant direction of the scattered light. For optimal placement, the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of the sample must be considered ideally, but in our measurement tests, the off-axis detection along the direction of specular reflection is sufficient to obtain good measurement results. Another advantage with this setup is that it also works with the objects with rough surface. Experimental works using the standard tangential LDV and a prototype of this method were conducted to measure the in-plane motion of four different samples representing rough, glossy and mirror-like surface. An electrodynamic shaker was used to provide the in-plane motion of the samples at three different frequencies. A single point axial vibrometer was used to validate the in-plane velocity of the measurement from both in-plane LDVs. Some preliminary results showed that the in-plane motion of the object with glossy and specular surface can be measured using the proposed method.

  15. Measurement of ciliary beat frequency using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, Bryan T.; Chen, Jason J.; Jing, Joseph; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J.F.

    2015-01-01

    1. Introduction Measuring ciliary beat frequency (CBF) is a technical challenge and difficult to perform in vivo. Doppler optical coherence tomography (D-OCT) is a mesoscopic non-contact imaging modality that provides high-resolution tomographic images and detects micromotion simultaneously in living tissues. Here we use D-OCT to measure CBF in ex vivo tissue as the first step toward translating this technology to clinical use. 2. Methods Fresh ex vivo samples of rabbit tracheal mucosa were imaged using both D-OCT and phase-contrast microscopy (n = 5). The D-OCT system was designed and built to specification in our lab (1310 nm swept source vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL), 6 μm axial resolution). The samples were placed in culture and incubated at 37°C. A fast Fourier transform was performed on the D-OCT signal recorded on the surface of the samples to gauge CBF. High-speed digital video of the epithelium recorded via phase-contrast microscopy was analyzed to confirm the CBF measurements. 3. Results The D-OCT system detected Doppler signal at the epithelial layer of ex vivo rabbit tracheal samples suggestive of ciliary motion. CBF was measured at 9.36 ± 1.22 Hz using D-OCT and 9.08 ± 0.48 Hz using phase-contrast microscopy. No significant differences were found between the two methods (p ≫ 0.05). 4. Conclusions D-OCT allows for the quantitative measurement of CBF without the need to resolve individual cilia. Furthermore, D-OCT technology can be incorporated into endoscopic platforms that allow clinicians to readily measure CBF in the office and provide a direct measurement of mucosal health. PMID:26136399

  16. Photon Doppler Velocimeter to Measure Entrained Additive Manufactured Bulk Metal Powders in Hot Subsonic and Supersonic Oxygen Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tylka, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Parts produced by additive manufacturing, particularly selective laser melting (SLM), have been shown to silt metal particulate even after undergoing stringent precision aerospace cleaning processes (Lowrey 2016). As printed parts are used in oxygen systems with increased pressures, temperatures, and gas velocity, the risk of ignition by particle impact, the most common direct ignition source of metals in oxygen, substantially increases. The White Sands Test Facility (WSTF), in collaboration with Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), desires to test the ignitability of SLM metals by particle impact in heated oxygen. The existing test systems rely on gas velocity calculations to infer particle velocity in both subsonic and supersonic particle impact systems. Until now, it was not possible to directly measure particle velocity. To increase the fidelity of planned SLM ignition studies, it is necessary to validate that the Photon Doppler Velocimetry(PDV) test system can accurately measure particle velocity.

  17. Tropospheric Wind Profile Measurements with a Direct Detection Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Li, Steven X.; Korb, C. Laurence; Chen, Huailin; Mathur, Savyasachee

    1998-01-01

    Research has established the importance of global tropospheric wind measurements for large scale improvements in numerical weather prediction. In addition, global wind measurements provide data that are fundamental to the understanding and prediction of global climate change. These tasks are closely linked with the goals of the NASA Earth Science Enterprise and Global Climate Change programs. NASA Goddard has been actively involved in the development of direct detection Doppler lidar methods and technologies to meet the wind observing needs of the atmospheric science community. In this paper we describe a recently developed prototype wind lidar system using a direct detection Doppler technique for measuring wind profiles from the surface through the troposphere. This system uses a pulsed ND:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm as the transmitter. The laser pulse is directed to the atmosphere using a 40 cm diameter scan mirror. The portion of the laser energy backscattered from aerosols and molecules is collected by a 40 cm diameter telescope and coupled via fiber optics into the Doppler receiver. Single photon counting APD's are used to detect the atmospheric backscattered signal. The principle element of the receiver is a dual bandpass tunable Fabry Perot etalon which analyzes the Doppler shift of the incoming laser signal using the double edge technique. The double edge technique uses two high resolution optical filters having bandpasses offset relative to one another such that the 'edge' of the first filter's transmission function crosses that of the second at the half power point. The outgoing laser frequency is located approximately at the crossover point. Due to the opposite going slopes of the edges, a Doppler shift in the atmospheric backscattered laser frequency produces a positive change in signal for one filter and a negative change in the second filter. Taking the ratio of the two edge channel signals yields a result which is directly proportional to the

  18. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry: practical considerations for obtaining accurate measurements of blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, J.; Beard, P.

    2014-03-01

    An assessment has been made of various experimental factors affecting the accuracy of flow velocities measured using a pulsed time correlation photoacoustic Doppler technique. In this method, Doppler time shifts are quantified via crosscorrelation of pairs of photoacoustic waveforms generated in moving absorbers using pairs of laser light pulses, and the photoacoustic waves are detected using an ultrasound transducer. The acoustic resolution mode is employed by using the transducer focal width, rather than the large illuminated volume, to define the lateral spatial resolution. This enables penetration depths of several millimetres or centimetres, unlike methods using the optical resolution mode, which limits the maximum penetration depth to approximately 1 mm. In the acoustic resolution mode, it is difficult to detect time shifts in highly concentrated suspensions of flowing absorbers, such as red blood cell suspensions and whole blood, and this challenge supposedly arises because of the lack of spatial heterogeneity. However, by assessing the effect of different absorption coefficients and tube diameters, we offer an alternative explanation relating to light attenuation and parabolic flow. We also demonstrate a new signal processing method that surmounts the previous problem of measurement under-reading. This method is a form of signal range gating and enables mapping of the flow velocity profile across the tube as well as measurement of the average flow velocity. We show that, using our signal processing scheme, it is possible to measure the flow of whole blood using a relatively low frequency detector. This important finding paves the way for application of the technique to measurements of blood flow several centimetres deep in living tissue.

  19. Direct Detection Doppler Lidar for Spaceborne Wind Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Flesia, Cristina

    1999-01-01

    The theory of double edge lidar techniques for measuring the atmospheric wind using aerosol and molecular backscatter is described. Two high spectral resolution filters with opposite slopes are located about the laser frequency for the aerosol based measurement or in the wings of the Rayleigh - Brillouin profile for the molecular measurement. This doubles the signal change per unit Doppler shift and improves the measurement accuracy by nearly a factor of 2 relative to the single edge technique. For the aerosol based measurement, the use of two high resolution edge filters reduces the effects of background, Rayleigh scattering, by as much as an order of magnitude and substantially improves the measurement accuracy. Also, we describe a method that allows the Rayleigh and aerosol components of the signal to be independently determined. A measurement accuracy of 1.2 m/s can be obtained for a signal level of 1000 detected photons which corresponds to signal levels in the boundary layer. For the molecular based measurement, we describe the use of a crossover region where the sensitivity of a molecular and aerosol-based measurement are equal. This desensitizes the molecular measurement to the effects of aerosol scattering and greatly simplifies the measurement. Simulations using a conical scanning spaceborne lidar at 355 nm give an accuracy of 2-3 m/s for altitudes of 2-15 km for a 1 km vertical resolution, a satellite altitude of 400 km, and a 200 km x 200 km spatial.

  20. Vibration measurements on rotating machinery using laser Doppler velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Rothberg, S.J.; Halliwell, N.A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-07-01

    This paper explores the use of laser vibrometry for vibration measurement directly from a rotating component. The presence of a surface velocity component due to the rotation itself is shown to create a strong measurement dependency on vibration perpendicular to the intended measurement direction. Particular ambiguity results at synchronous frequencies. A mathematical means to resolve the genuine vibration components from two simultaneous laser vibrometer measurements is presented and shown to be effective in the study of nonsynchronous rotor vibrations.

  1. An ultrasonic transducer array for velocity measurement in underwater vehicles.

    PubMed

    Boltryk, P; Hill, M; Keary, A; Phillips, B; Robinson, H; White, P

    2004-04-01

    A correlation velocity log (CVL) is an ultrasonic navigation aid for marine applications, in which velocity is estimated using an acoustic transmitter and a receiver array. CVLs offer advantages over Doppler velocity logs (DVLs) in many autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) applications, since they can achieve high accuracy at low velocities even during hover manoeuvres. DVLs require narrow beam widths, whilst ideal CVL transmitters have wide beam widths. This gives CVLs the potential to use lower frequencies thus permitting operation in deeper water, reducing power requirements for the same depth, or allowing the use of smaller transducers. Moving patterns in the wavefronts across a 2D receiver array are detected by calculating correlation coefficients between bottom reflections from consecutive transmitted pulses, across all combinations of receiver pairings. The position of the peak correlation value, on a surface representing receiver-pairing separations, is proportional to the vessel's displacement between pulses. A CVL aimed primarily for AUVs has been developed. Its acoustical and signal processing design has been optimised through sea trials and computer modelling of the sound field. This computer model is also used to predict how the distribution of the correlation coefficients varies with distance from the peak position. Current work seeks to increase the resolution of the peak estimate using surface fitting methods. Numerical simulations suggest that peak estimation methods significantly improve system precision when compared with simply identifying the position of the maximum correlation coefficient in the dataset. The peak position may be estimated by fitting a quadratic model to the measured data using least squares or maximum likelihood estimation. Alternatively, radial basis functions and Gaussian processes successfully predict the peak position despite variation between individual correlation datasets. This paper summarises the CVL's main acoustical

  2. Photoacoustic perfusion measurements: a comparison with power Doppler in phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heres, H. M.; Arabul, M. Ü.; Tchang, B. C.; van de Vosse, F. N.; Rutten, M. C.; Lopata, R. G.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-based measurements using Doppler, contrast, and more recently photoacoustics (PA), have emerged as techniques for tissue perfusion measurements. In this study, the feasibility of in vitro perfusion measurements with a fully integrated, hand-held, photoacoustic probe was investigated and compared to Power Doppler (PD). Three cylindrical polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) phantoms were made (diameter = 15 mm) containing 100, 200 and 400 parallel polysulfone tubes (diameter = 0.2 mm), resulting in a perfused cross-sectional area of 1.8, 3.6 and 7.1% respectively. Each phantom was perfused with porcine blood (15 mL/min). Cross-sectional PA images (λ = 805nm, frame rate = 10Hz) and PD images (PRF = 750Hz) were acquired with a MyLab One and MyLab 70 scanner (Esaote, NL), respectively. Data were averaged over 70 frames. The average PA signal intensity was calculated in a region-of-interest of 4 mm by 6 mm. The percentage of colored PD pixels was measured in the entire phantom region. The average signal intensity of the PA images increased linearly with perfusion density, being 0.54 (+/- 0.01), 0.56 (+/- 0.01), 0.58 (+/- 0.01) with an average background signal of 0.53 in the three phantoms, respectively. For PD, the percentage of colored pixels in the phantom area (1.5% (+/- 0.2%), 4.4% (+/- 0.2%), 13.7% (+/- 0.8%)) also increased linearly. The preliminary results suggest that PA, like PD, is capable of detecting an increase of blood volume in tissue. In the future, in vivo measurements will be explored, although validation will be more complex.

  3. Scanning Doppler Lidar Measurements for Wind Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehlich, R.; Kelley, N.

    2008-12-01

    The development of wind energy has increased rapidly along with the size and capacity of wind turbines. These larger machines require detailed wind resource measurements at higher and higher altitudes. Accurate wind speed, wind direction, and turbulence statistics are required for wind resource assessment and efficient wind farm operation. Tower measurements are limited in coverage and do not provide the three dimensional sampling of the atmospheric processes required for accurate model initialization or resource assessment. Remote sensing measurements are the most attractive option for wind energy meteorology. However, the measurement volume must be sufficiently small to resolve the important atmospheric scales and the spatial and temporal measurement domain must satisfy the requirements of the wind energy industry. High resolution profiles of mean and turbulent statistics of the wind field upstream of a wind farm can be produced using a scanning Doppler lidar. Careful corrections for the spatial filtering of the wind field by the lidar pulse produce turbulence estimates equivalent to point sensors but with the added advantage of a larger sampling volume to increase the statistical accuracy of the estimates. For a well designed lidar system, this permits accurate estimates of the mean windspeed and the turbulent statistics over various subdomains and with sufficiently short observation times to monitor rapid changes in conditions. These features may be ideally suited for optimal operation of wind farms and for improved data assimilation for local high resolution forecast models. Results from the analysis of scanning Doppler lidar data collected at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will be presented to highlight some of the fundamental atmospheric processes for wind power meteorology. The unresolved issues for future applications of this technology will be outlined.

  4. Positronium cooling in porous silica measured via Doppler spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cassidy, D. B.; Hisakado, T. H.; Meligne, V. E.; Tom, H. W. K.; Mills, A. P. Jr.; Crivelli, P.; Liszkay, L.; Perez, P.

    2010-01-15

    We have measured the kinetic energy of positronium (Ps) atoms emitted into a vacuum from a porous silica film subsequent to positron bombardment, via the Doppler spread of the linewidth of the Ps 1{sup 3}S-2{sup 3}P transition. We find that the deeper in the target film that positrons are implanted the colder is the emitted Ps, an effect we attribute to cooling via collisions in the pores as the atoms diffuse back to the film surface. We observed a lower limit to the mean Ps kinetic energy associated with motion in the direction of the laser, E{sub x}=42+-3 meV, that is consistent with conversion of the confinement energy of Ps in the 2.7-nm-diameter pores to kinetic energy in vacuum. An implication is that a porous sample would need to be composed of pores greater than around 10 nm in diameter in order to produce thermal Ps in vacuum with temperatures of less than 100 K. By performing Doppler spectroscopy on intense pulses of Ps we have experimentally demonstrated the production of many excited-state Ps atoms simultaneously, which could have numerous applications, including laser cooling and fundamental spectroscopic studies of Ps and the production of antihydrogen.

  5. Wind Measurements with a 355 nm Molecular Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Chen, Huailin; Li, Steven X.

    2000-01-01

    A Doppler lidar system based on the molecular double edge technique is described. The system is mounted in a modified van to allow deployment in field operations. The lidar operates with a tripled Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm, a 45cm aperture telescope and a matching azimuth-over-elevation scanner to allow full sky access. Validated atmospheric wind profiles have been measured from 1.8 km to 35 km with a 178 m vertical resolution. The range dependent rms deviation of the horizontal wind speed is 0.4 - 6 m/s. The results of wind speed and direction are in good agreement with balloon sonde wind measurements made simultaneously at the same location.

  6. Investigation of a laser Doppler velocimeter system to measure the flow field around a large scale V/STOL aircraft in ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalay, A. D.; Brashears, M. R.; Jordan, A. J.; Shrider, K. R.; Vought, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    The flow field measured around a hovering 70 percent scale vertical takeoff and landing (V/STOL) aircraft model is described. The velocity measurements were conducted with a ground based laser Doppler velocimeter. The remote sensing instrumentation and experimental tests of the velocity surveys are discussed. The distribution of vertical velocity in the fan jet and fountain; the radial velocity in the wall jet and the horizontal velocity along the aircraft underside are presented for different engine rpms and aircraft height above ground. Results show that it is feasible to use a mobile laser Doppler velocimeter to measure the flow field generated by a large scale V/STOL aircraft operating in ground effect.

  7. Investigation of a laser Doppler velocimeter system to measure the flow field of a large scale V/STOL aircraft in ground effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalay, A. D.; Brashears, M. R.; Jordan, A. J.; Shrider, K. R.; Vought, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental research program for measuring the flow field around a 70 percent scale V/STOL aircraft model in ground effect is described. The velocity measurements were conducted with a ground-based laser Doppler velocimeter at an outdoor test pad. The remote sensing instrumentation, experimental tests, and results of the velocity surveys are discussed. The distribution of vertical velocity in the fan jet and fountain, the radial velocity in the wall jet and the horizontal velocity along the aircraft underside are presented for different engine rpms and aircraft heights above ground. The study shows that it is feasible to use a mobile laser Doppler velocimeter to measure the flow field generated by a large scale V/STOL aircraft operating in ground effect.

  8. Spaceborne Doppler Radar Measurements of Rainfall: Correction of Errors Induced by Pointing Uncertainties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanelli, Simone; Im, Eastwood; Kobayashi, Satoru; Mascelloni, Roberto; Facheris, Luca

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a sea surface radar echo spectral analysis technique to correct for the rainfall velocity error caused by radar-pointing uncertainty is presented. The correction procedure is quite straightforward when the radar is observing a homogeneous rainfall field. When nonuniform beam filling (NUBF) occurs and attenuating frequencies are used, however, additional steps are necessary in order to correctly estimate the antenna-pointing direction. This new technique relies on the application of the combined frequency-time (CFT) algorithm to correct for uneven attenuation effects on the observed sea surface Doppler spectrum. The performance of this correction technique was evaluated by a Monte Carlo simulation of the Doppler precipitation radar backscatter from high-resolution 3D rain fields (either generated by a cloud resolving numerical model or retrieved from airborne radar measurements). The results show that the antenna-pointing-induced error can, indeed, be reduced by the proposed technique in order to achieve 1 m s(exp -1) accuracy on rainfall vertical velocity estimates.

  9. Ultrasound velocities for axial eye length measurement.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, K J

    1994-09-01

    Since 1974, I have used individual sound velocities for each eye condition encountered for axial length measurement. The calculation results in 1,555 M/sec for the average phakic eye. A slower speed of 1,549 M/sec was found for an extremely long (30 mm) eye and a higher speed of 1,561 M/sec was noted for an extremely short (20 mm) eye. This inversely proportional velocity change can best be adjusted for by measuring the phakic eye at 1,532 M/sec and correcting the result by dividing the square of the measured axial length (AL1,532)2 by the difference of the measured axial length (AL1,532) minus 0.35 mm. A velocity of 1,534 M/sec was found for all aphakic eyes regardless of their length, and correction is clinically significant. The velocity of an eye containing a poly(methyl methacrylate) intraocular lens is not different from an average phakic eye but it does magnify the effect of axial length change. I recommend measuring the pseudophakic eye at 1,532 M/sec and adding to the result (AL1,532), + 0.04 + 44% of the IOL thickness. The speed for an eye with a silicone IOL was found to be 1,476 M/sec (or AL1,532 + 0.04 - 56% of IOL thickness) and for glass, 1,549 M/sec (or AL1,532 + 0.04 + 75% of IOL thickness). A speed of 1,139 M/sec was found for a phakic eye with silicone oil filling most of the vitreous cavity and 1,052 M/sec for an aphakic eye filled with oil. For varying volumes of oil, each eye should be calculated individually. The speed was 534 M/sec for phakic eyes filled with gas. Eyes containing a silicone IOL or oil or gas will create clinically significant errors (3 to 10 diopters) if the sound velocity is not corrected. PMID:7996413

  10. Investigation of measurement sensitivities in cross-correlation Doppler global velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadel, Daniel R.; Lowe, K. Todd

    2016-11-01

    Cross-correlation Doppler global velocimetry (CC-DGV) is a flow measurement technique based on the estimation of Doppler frequency shift of scattered light by means of cross-correlating two filtered intensity signals. The signal characteristics of CC-DGV result in fundamental limits for estimation variance as well as the possibility for estimator bias. The current study assesses these aspects theoretically and via Monte Carlo signal simulations. A signal model is developed using canonical numerical functions for the iodine absorption cell and incorporating Poisson and Gaussian signal noise models. Along with consideration of the analytical form of the Cramér-Rao lower bound, best practices for system settings are discussed. The CC-DGV signal processing routine is then assessed by a series of Monte Carlo simulations studying the effect of temperature mismatch between flow signal and reference detector cells, velocity magnitude, and discretization error in the frequency modulation. A measurement bias was observed; the magnitude of the bias is a weak function of the cell temperature mismatch, but it is independent of the flow velocity magnitude. The measurement variance was found to approach the Cramér-Rao lower bound for optimized conditions. A cyclical bias error resulting from the discrete nature of the laser frequency sweep is also observed with maximum errors of ± 1.0 % of the laser frequency scan step size, corresponding to peak errors of ± 0.61 m s-1 for typical settings. Overall, the signal estimator is found to perform best for matched cell temperatures, small frequency step size, and high velocity regimes, where the relative bias errors are collectively minimized.

  11. Measurement of neutrino masses from relative velocities.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Pen, Ue-Li; Chen, Xuelei; Inman, Derek; Yu, Yu

    2014-09-26

    We present a new technique to measure neutrino masses using their flow field relative to dark matter. Present day streaming motions of neutrinos relative to dark matter and baryons are several hundred km/s, comparable with their thermal velocity dispersion. This results in a unique dipole anisotropic distortion of the matter-neutrino cross power spectrum, which is observable through the dipole distortion in the cross correlation of different galaxy populations. Such a dipole vanishes if not for this relative velocity and so it is a clean signature for neutrino mass. We estimate the size of this effect and find that current and future galaxy surveys may be sensitive to these signature distortions. PMID:25302878

  12. Doppler Lidar (DL) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, RK

    2012-02-13

    The Doppler lidar (DL) is an active remote sensing instrument that provides range- and time-resolved measurements of radial velocity and attenuated backscatter. The principle of operation is similar to radar in that pulses of energy are transmitted into the atmosphere; the energy scattered back to the transceiver is collected and measured as a time-resolved signal. From the time delay between each outgoing transmitted pulse and the backscattered signal, the distance to the scatterer is inferred. The radial or line-of-sight velocity of the scatterers is determined from the Doppler frequency shift of the backscattered radiation. The DL uses a heterodyne detection technique in which the return signal is mixed with a reference laser beam (i.e., local oscillator) of known frequency. An onboard signal processing computer then determines the Doppler frequency shift from the spectra of the heterodyne signal. The energy content of the Doppler spectra can also be used to determine attenuated backscatter.

  13. Clinical utility of laser-Doppler vibrometer measurements in live normal and pathologic human ears.

    PubMed

    Rosowski, John J; Nakajima, Hideko H; Merchant, Saumil N

    2008-01-01

    The laser-Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is a research tool that can be used to quickly measure the sound-induced velocity of the tympanic membrane near the umbo (the inferior tip of the malleus) in live human subjects and patients. In this manuscript we demonstrate the LDV to be a sensitive and selective tool for the diagnosis and differentiation of various ossicular disorders in patients with intact tympanic membranes and aerated middle ears. Patients with partial or total ossicular interruption or malleus fixation are readily separated from normal-hearing subjects with the LDV. The combination of LDV measurements and air-bone gap can distinguish patients with fixed stapes from those with normal ears. LDV measurements can also help differentiate air-bone gaps produced by ossicular pathologies from those associated with pathologies of inner-ear sound conduction such as a superior semicircular canal dehiscence.

  14. Techniques for the measurements of the line of sight velocity of high altitude Barium clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.

    1981-01-01

    It is demonstrated that for maximizing the scientific output of future ion cloud release experiments a new type of instrument is required which will measure the line of sight velocity of the ion cloud by the Doppler Technique. A simple instrument was constructed using a 5 cm diameter solid Fabry-Perot etalon coupled to a low light level integrating television camera. It was demonstrated that the system has both the sensitivity and spectral resolution for the detection of ion clouds and the measurement of their line of sight Doppler velocity. The tests consisted of (1) a field experiment using a rocket barium cloud release to check the sensitivity, (2) laboratory experiments to show the spectral resolving capabilities of the system. The instrument was found to be operational if the source was brighter than about 1 kilorayleigh and it had a wavelength resolution much better than .2A which corresponds to about 12 km/sec or an acceleration potential of 100 volts.

  15. New measurements of Venus winds with ground-based Doppler velocimetry at CFHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, P.; Widemann, T.; Luz, D.; Peralta, J.; Berry, D. L.

    2012-04-01

    Since Venus Express spacecraft operations started in 2006, an ongoing effort has been made to coordinate its operations with observations from the ground using various techniques and spectral domains (Lellouch and Witasse, 2008). We present an analysis of Venus Doppler winds at cloud tops based on observations made at the Canada France Hawaii 3.6-m telescope (CFHT) with the ESPaDOnS visible spectrograph. These observations consisted of high-resolution spectra of Fraunhofer lines in the visible range (0.37-1.05 μm) to measure the winds at cloud tops using the Doppler shift of solar radiation scattered by cloud top particles in the observer's direction (Widemann et al., 2007, 2008). The observations were made during 19-20 February 2011 and were coordinated with Visual Monitoring Camera (VMC) observations by Venus Express. The complete optical spectrum was collected over 40 spectral orders at each point with 2-5 seconds exposures, at a resolution of about 80000. The observations included various points of the dayside hemisphere at a phase angle of 67°, between +10° and -60° latitude, in steps of 10° , and from +70° to -12° longitude relative to sub-Earth meridian in steps of 12°. The Doppler shift measured in scattered solar light on Venus dayside results from two instantaneous motions: (1) a motion between the Sun and Venus upper cloud particles; (2) a motion between the observer and Venus clouds. The measured Doppler shift, which results from these two terms combined, varies with the planetocentric longitude and latitude and is minimum at meridian ΦN = ΦSun - ΦEarth where the two components subtract to each other for a pure zonal regime. Due to the need for maintaining a stable velocity reference during the course of acquisition using high resolution spectroscopy, we measure relative Doppler shifts to ΦN. The main purpose of our work is to provide variable wind measurements with respect to the background atmosphere, complementary to simultaneous

  16. Double-Edge Molecular Technique for Doppler Lidar Wind Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flesia, Cristina; Korb, C. Laurence

    1998-01-01

    The double-edge lidar technique for measuring the wind using molecular backscatter is described. Two high spectral resolution edge filters are located in the wings of the Rayleigh-Brillouin profile. This doubles the signal change per unit Doppler shift, the sensitivity, and gives nearly a factor of two improvement in measurement accuracy. The use of a crossover region is described where the sensitivity of a molecular and aerosol-based measurement are equal. This desensitizes the molecular measurement to the effects of aerosol scattering over a frequency range of +/- 100 m/s. We give methods for correcting for short-term frequency jitter and drift using a laser reference frequency measurement and methods for long-term frequency correction using a servo control system. The effects of Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering on the measurement are shown to be significant and are included in the analysis. Simulations for a conical scanning satellite-based lidar at 355 nm show an accuracy of 2-3 m/s for altitudes of 2 to 15 km for a 1 km vertical resolution, a satellite altitude of 400 km and a 200 km x 200 km spatial resolution. Results of ground based wind measurements are presented.

  17. Field evaluation of shallow-water acoustic doppler current profiler discharge measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rehmel, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Office of Surface Water staff and USGS Water Science employees began testing the StreamPro, an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) for shallow-water discharge measurements. Teledyne RD Instruments introduced the StreamPro in December of 2003. The StreamPro is designed to make a "moving boat" discharge measurement in streams with depths between 0.15 and 2 m. If the StreamPro works reliably in these conditions, it will allow for use of ADCPs in a greater number of streams than previously possible. Evaluation sites were chosen to test the StreamPro over a range of conditions. Simultaneous discharge measurements with mechanical and other acoustic meters, along with stable rating curves at established USGS streamflow-gaging stations, were used for comparisons. The StreamPro measurements ranged in mean velocity from 0.076 to 1.04 m/s and in discharge from 0.083 m 3/s to 43.4 m 3/s. Tests indicate that discharges measured with the StreamPro compare favorably to the discharges measured with the other meters when the mean channel velocity is greater than 0.25 m/s. When the mean channel velocity is less than 0.25 m/s, the StreamPro discharge measurements for individual transects have greater variability than those StreamPro measurements where the mean channel velocity is greater than 0.25 m/s. Despite this greater variation in individual transects, there is no indication that the StreamPro measured discharges (the mean discharge for all transects) are biased, provided that enough transects are used to determine the mean discharge. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  18. Discharge-measurement system using an acoustic Doppler current profiler with applications to large rivers and estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Michael R.; Oltmann, Richard N.

    1993-01-01

    Discharge measurement of large rivers and estuaries is difficult, time consuming, and sometimes dangerous. Frequently, discharge measurements cannot be made in tide-affected rivers and estuaries using conventional discharge-measurement techniques because of dynamic discharge conditions. The acoustic Doppler discharge-measurement system (ADDMS) was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey using a vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler coupled with specialized computer software to measure horizontal water velocity at 1-meter vertical intervals in the water column. The system computes discharge from water-and vessel-velocity data supplied by the ADDMS using vector-algebra algorithms included in the discharge-measurement software. With this system, a discharge measurement can be obtained by engaging the computer software and traversing a river or estuary from bank to bank; discharge in parts of the river or estuarine cross sections that cannot be measured because of ADDMS depth limitations are estimated by the system. Comparisons of ADDMS-measured discharges with ultrasonic-velocity-meter-measured discharges, along with error-analysis data, have confirmed that discharges provided by the ADDMS are at least as accurate as those produced using conventional methods. In addition, the advantage of a much shorter measurement time (2 minutes using the ADDMS compared with 1 hour or longer using conventional methods) has enabled use of the ADDMS for several applications where conventional discharge methods could not have been used with the required accuracy because of dynamic discharge conditions.

  19. Blood flow velocity measurements in rat mesentery arterioles in health and under hypertensive conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakova, Marina S.; Sokolova, Irina A.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Proskurin, Sergei G.; Savchenko, Natalia B.; Shakhnazarov, Alexander A.

    1994-07-01

    Laser Doppler measurements of blood flow velocities in the vessels of rat mesentery have been performed to study the effect of the drag-reducing agent polyethylene oxide Polyox WSR-301 on microcirculation. These agents are capable of increasing the cardiac output and decreasing the arterial pressure. Measurements performed on spontaneously hypertensive rats anesthetized by Nembutal showed that the mean blood velocities in all groups of studied vessels are higher (by nearly two to three times) as compared to those in controls. Most likely these results reflect the effects of hypertensive raising pressure drop and the `rarefaction' phenomenon.

  20. Tomographic Particle Localization and Velocity Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirner, S.; Forster, G.; Schein, J.

    2015-01-01

    Wire arc spraying is one of the most common and elementary thermal spray processes. Due to its easy handling, high deposition rate, and relative low process costs, it is a frequently used coating technology for the production of wear and corrosion resistant coatings. In order to produce reliable and reproducible coatings, it is necessary to be able to control the coating process. This can be achieved by analyzing the parameters of the particles deposited. Essential for the coating quality are, for example, the velocity, the size, and the temperature of the particles. In this work, an innovative diagnostic for particle velocity and location determination is presented. By the use of several synchronized CMOS-Cameras positioned around the particle jet, a series of images from different directions is simultaneously taken. The images contain the information that is necessary to calculate the 3D-location-vector of the particles and finally with the help of the exposure time the trajectory can be determined. In this work, the experimental setup of the tomographic diagnostic is presented, the mathematical method of the reconstruction is explained, and first measured velocity distributions are shown.

  1. Mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar for wind and temperature measurements in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiankang; Han, Yuli; Sun, Dongsong; Xia, Haiyun; Shu, Zhifeng; Zhao, Ruocan; Shangguan, Mingjia; Guo, Jie

    2014-08-25

    A mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar based on the molecular double-edge technique is developed for measuring wind velocity in the middle atmosphere up to 60 km. The lidar uses three lasers with a mean power of 17.5 W at 355 nm each and three 1 m diameter telescopes to receive the backscattered echo: one points to zenith for vertical wind component and temperature measurement; the two others pointing toward east and north are titled at 30° from the zenith for zonal and meridional wind component, respectively. The Doppler shift of the backscattered echo is measured by inter-comparing the signal detected through each of the double-edge channels of a triple Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) tuned to either side of the emitted laser line. The third channel of FPI is used for frequency locking and a locking accuracy of 1.8 MHz RMS (root-mean-square) at 355 nm over 2 hours is realized, corresponding to a systematic error of 0.32 m/s. In this paper, we present detailed technical evolutions on system calibration. To validate the performance of the lidar, comparison experiments was carried out in December 2013, which showed good agreement with radiosondes but notable biases with ECMWF (European Centre for Medium range Weather Forecasts) in the height range of overlapping data. Wind observation over one month performed in Delhi (37.371° N, 97.374° E), northwest of China, demonstrated the stability and robustness of the system.

  2. Radionuclide counting technique for measuring wind velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.J.; Khandelwal, G.S.

    1981-12-01

    A technique for measuring wind velocities of meteorological interest is described. It is based on inverse-square-law variation of the counting rates as the radioactive source-to-counter distance is changed by wind drag on the source ball. Results of a feasibility study using a weak bismuth 207 radiation source and three Geiger-Muller radiation counters are reported. The use of the technique is not restricted to Martian or Mars-like environments. A description of the apparatus, typical results, and frequency response characteristics are included. A discussion of a double-pendulum arrangement is presented. Measurements reported herein indicate that the proposed technique may be suitable for measuring wind speeds up to 100 m/sec, which are either steady or whose rates of fluctuation are less than 1 kHz.

  3. Edge technique Doppler lidar wind measurements with high vertical resolution.

    PubMed

    Korb, C L; Gentry, B M; Li, S X

    1997-08-20

    We have developed a Doppler lidar system using the edge technique and have made atmospheric lidar wind measurements. Line-of-sight wind profiles with a vertical resolution of 22 m have a standard deviation of 0.40 m /s for a ten-shot average. Day and night lidar measurements of the vector wind have been made for altitudes from 200 to 2000 m. We validated the lidar measurements by comparing them with independent rawinsonde and pilot balloon measurements of wind speed and direction. Good agreement was obtained. The instrumental noise for these data is 0.11 m /s for a 500-shot average, which is in good agreement with the observed minimum value of the standard deviation for the atmospheric measurements. The average standard deviation over 30 mins varied from 1.16 to 0.25 m /s for day and night, respectively. High spatial and temporal resolution lidar profiles of line-of-sight winds clearly show wind shear and turbulent features at the 1 -2-m /s level with a high signal-to-noise ratio and demonstrate the potential of the edge-technique lidar for studying turbulent processes and atmospheric dynamics.

  4. Brief history of vector Doppler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunmire, Barbrina; Beach, Kirk W.

    2001-05-01

    Since the development of the directional Doppler by McLeod in 1967, methods of acquiring, analyzing, and displaying blood velocity information have been under constant exploration. These efforts are motivated by a variety of interest and objectives including, to: a) simplify clinical examination, examiner training, and study interpretation, b) provide more hemodynamic information, and c) reduce examination variability and improve accuracy. The vector Doppler technique has been proposed as one potential avenue to achieve these objects. Vector Doppler systems are those that determine the true 2D or 3D blood flow velocity by combining multiple independent velocity component measurements. Most instruments can be divided into two broad categories: 1) cross-beam and 2) time-domain. This paper provides a brief synopsis of the progression of vector Doppler techniques, from its onset in 1970 to present, as well as possible avenues for future work. This is not intended to be a comprehensive review of all vector Doppler systems.

  5. Doppler Radar Measurements of Turbulence in Marine Stratiform Cloud during ASTEX.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, A. S.; Lenschow, D. H.; Fairall, C. W.; Schubert, W. H.; Gibson, J. S.

    1995-08-01

    A cloud-sensing Doppler radar is used with a vertically pointing antenna to measure the vertical air motion in clouds during the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment. The droplet fall velocity contamination was made negligible by using only measurements during the time the reflectivity was below 17 dBZ. During one day of measurements, the daytime character of the vertical velocity variance is different than that of the nighttime case. In the upper part of the cloud, the variance had a distinct maximum for both day and night; however, the nighttime maximum was about twice as large as the daytime case. Lower down in the cloud, there was a second maximum, with the daytime variance larger than the nighttime case. The skewness of the vertical velocity was negative near cloud top in both the day and night cases, changing to positive skewness in the lower part of the cloud. This behavior near cloud top indicates that the upper part of the cloud is behaving like an upside-down convective boundary layer, with the downdrafts smaller in area and more intense than the updrafts. In the lower part of the cloud, the behavior of the motion is more like a conventional convective boundary layer, with the updrafts smaller and more intense than the downdrafts. The upside-down convective forcing in the upper part of the cloud is due to radiative cooling, with the daytime forcing less because of shortwave warming.

  6. Laser Doppler vibrometer measurement on spiders in moving-coil loudspeakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiaopeng; Zeng, Xinwu; Tian, Zhangfu

    2014-12-01

    The spider is the dominate stiffness to suspend the cone for a moving-coil loudspeaker unit, and is most commonly a concentrically corrugated fabric disk. A subwoofer closed box is designed to excite the tested spiders pneumatically, and the Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) is used to measure the velocity of the moving spiders. The effective stiffness, loss factor and some viscoelastic behaviors such as level dependent stiffness have been investigated. The results find that, this pneumatic non-contact dynamic technique successfully measured the viscoelastic behaviors of spiders from extremely low frequency 5 Hz to 200 Hz, and the effective stiffness of spiders is dependent on the input voltage level, which is higher level with lower stiffness.

  7. Novel Applications of Laser Doppler Vibration Measurements to Medical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabai, Habib; Oliver, David E.; Rohrbaugh, John W.; Papadopoulos, Christopher

    2013-06-01

    Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) has been widely used in engineering applications involving non-contact vibration and sound measurements. This technique has also been used in some biomedical applications including hearing research. The detectable frequencies are in the range of near-DC to 1 GHz or higher. This paper reviews applications of LDV in biomedical engineering and proposes new medical imaging applications based on measuring surface vibrations of tissues and organs. Tests were conducted on human skin using single point and scanning laser vibrometers. These tests suggest that skin vibrations due to the forcing excitation from the heart can be used in imaging of blood flow. The results of these tests illustrate the potential of such vibration measurements in a variety of diagnostic medical imaging applications including blood flow/restrictions, real-time monitoring of blood pressure variations, wound healing, muscle movements, etc. The fact that the measurements can be conducted remotely (non-contact) is an important benefit that adds to the promise of this approach.

  8. Role of turbulence fluctuations on uncertainties of acoutic Doppler current profiler discharge measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarrab, Leticia; Garcia, Carlos M.; Cantero, Mariano I.; Oberg, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a systematic analysis quantifying the role of the presence of turbulence fluctuations on uncertainties (random errors) of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) discharge measurements from moving platforms. Data sets of three-dimensional flow velocities with high temporal and spatial resolution were generated from direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent open channel flow. Dimensionless functions relating parameters quantifying the uncertainty in discharge measurements due to flow turbulence (relative variance and relative maximum random error) to sampling configuration were developed from the DNS simulations and then validated with field-scale discharge measurements. The validated functions were used to evaluate the role of the presence of flow turbulence fluctuations on uncertainties in ADCP discharge measurements. The results of this work indicate that random errors due to the flow turbulence are significant when: (a) a low number of transects is used for a discharge measurement, and (b) measurements are made in shallow rivers using high boat velocity (short time for the boat to cross a flow turbulence structure).

  9. WIND MEASUREMENTS WITH HIGH-ENERGY DOPPLER LIDAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Petros, Mulugeta; Jirong, Yu; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Slingh, Upendra N.

    2006-01-01

    Coherent lidars at 2-micron wavelengths from holmium or thulium solid-state lasers have been in use to measure wind for applications in meteorology, aircraft wake vortex tracking, and turbulence detection [1,2,3] These field-deployed lidars, however, have generally been of a pulse energy of a few millijoules, limiting their range capability or restricting operation to regions of high aerosol concentration such as the atmospheric boundary layer. Technology improvements in the form of high-energy pulsed lasers, low noise detectors, and high optical quality telescopes are being evaluated to make wind measurements to long ranges or low aerosol concentrations. This research is aimed at developing lidar technology for satellite-based observation of wind on a global scale. The VALIDAR project was initiated to demonstrate a high pulse energy coherent Doppler lidar. VALIDAR gets its name from the concept of validation lidar, in that it can serve as a calibration and validation source for future airborne and spaceborne lidar missions. VALIDAR is housed within a mobile trailer for field measurements.

  10. Three-dimensional laser Doppler anemometer measurements of a jet in a crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, P.; Orloff, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    A three-dimensional laser Doppler anemometer (3D-LDA) was used in a wind tunnel to measure a jet in a crossflow. Measurements were made in the vicinity of a 5-cm-diam jet which issued normally into a 10.65 m/sec wind tunnel crossflow; the velocity ratio Vjet/Vinf was 8. Detailed lateral surveys were made at two elevations (z = cm and 2 cm); both elevations were within the region affected by the boundary layer on the plate. The results are believed to provide reliable velocity field information in the boundary layer of the jet in a crossflow. Turbulence information also is available and believed to be roughly correct, although it may be subject to broadening effects for the lower values of turbulence. A weak vortex pair was observed in the wake at the plate surface. This structure existed in the boundary layer and built confidence because the 3D-LDA was, indeed, able to resolve fine detail in the wake. The capabilities of the 3D-LDA not only allow the making of the velocity surveys, but can be utilized to follow mean streamlines in the flow.

  11. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Measurements in the Tailrace at John Day Dam

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Chris B.; Dibrani, Berhon; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Titzler, P. Scott; Dennis, Gary W.

    2006-01-30

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) were used to measure water velocities in the tailrace at John Day Dam over a two-week period in February 2005. Data were collected by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Hydraulic Design Section, Portland District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The objective of this project was therefore to collect field measurements of water velocities in the near-field draft tube exit zone as well as the far-field tailrace to be used for improving these models. Field data were collected during the project using five separate ADCPs. Mobile ADCP data were collected using two ADCPs mounted on two separate boats. Data were collected by either holding the boat on-station at pre-defined locations for approximately 10 minutes or in moving transect mode when the boat would move over large distances during the data collection. Results from the mobile ADCP survey indicated a complex hydrodynamic flow field in the tailrace downstream of John Day Dam. A large gyre was noted between the skeleton section of the powerhouse and non-spilling portion of the spillway. Downstream of the spillway, the spillway flow is constrained against the navigation lock guide wall, and large velocities were noted in this region. Downstream of the guide wall, velocities decreased as the spillway jet dispersed. Near the tailrace island, the flow split was measured to be approximately equal on Day 2 (25.4 kcfs spillway/123 kcfs total). However, approximately 60% of the flow passed along the south shore of the island on Day 1 (15.0 kcfs spillway/150 kcfs total). At a distance of 9000 ft downstream of the dam, flows had equalized laterally and were generally uniform over the cross section. The collection of water velocities near the draft tube exit of an operating turbine unit is not routine, and equipment capable of measuring 3D water velocities in these zones are at the forefront of hydraulic measurement technology. Although the feasibility of

  12. Assessment of tissue Doppler imaging measurements of arterial wall motion using a tissue mimicking test rig.

    PubMed

    Thrush, Abigail J; Brewin, Mark P; Birch, Malcolm J

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this in vitro study is to assess the accuracy of the tissue Doppler imaging arterial wall motion (TDI AWM) technique in measuring dilation over a range of distances and velocities. A test rig, consisting of two parallel blocks of tissue mimicking material (TMM), has been developed to generate known wall motion. One block remains stationary while the other moves in a cyclical motion. A calibrated laser range finder was used to measure the TMM motion. The TDI AWM measurements were found to underestimate the dilation by 21% +/- 4.7% when using the recommended scanner parameters. The size of the error was found to increase with a decrease in ultrasound output power. Results suggested that errors in the TDI AWM dilation measurements relate to underestimates in the velocity measured by the TDI technique. The error demonstrated in this study indicates a limitation in the value of TDI AWM result obtained in vivo. (E-mail: abigail.thrush@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk). PMID:17964065

  13. Ultrasonic Doppler measurement of renal artery blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, W. R.; Beaver, W. L.; Meindl, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Studies were made of (1) blood flow redistribution during lower body negative pressure (LBNP), (2) the profile of blood flow across the mitral annulus of the heart (both perpendicular and parallel to the commissures), (3) testing and evaluation of a number of pulsed Doppler systems, (4) acute calibration of perivascular Doppler transducers, (5) redesign of the mitral flow transducers to improve reliability and ease of construction, and (6) a frequency offset generator designed for use in distinguishing forward and reverse components of blood flow by producing frequencies above and below the offset frequency. Finally methodology was developed and initial results were obtained from a computer analysis of time-varying Doppler spectra.

  14. Photonic doppler velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, M E; Molau, N E; Sargis, P D; Strand, O T; Sweider, D

    1999-01-01

    We are developing a novel fiber-optic approach to laser Doppler velocimetry as a diagnostic for high explosives tests. Using hardware that was originally developed for the telecommunications industry, we are able to measure surface velocities ranging from centimeters per second to kilometers per second. Laboratory measurements and field trials have shown excellent agreement with other diagnostics.

  15. Intracavity Rayleigh/Mie Scattering for Multipoint, Two-Component Velocity Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivolaru, Daniel; Danehy, Paul M.; Lee, Joseph W.

    2006-01-01

    A simultaneous multi-point two-component Doppler velocimeter is described. The system uses two optical cavities: a Fabry-Perot etalon and an optical cavity for collecting and re-circulating the Rayleigh/Mie scattered light that is collected from the measurement volume in two parallel, but opposite directions. Single-pulse measurements of two orthogonal components of the velocity vector in a supersonic free jet were performed to demonstrate the technique. The re-circulation of the light rejected by the interferometer input mirror also increased the signal intensity by a factor of 3.5. 2005 Optical Society of America Interferometric Rayleigh scattering has previously been used for single-point velocity measurements in unseeded gas flow. However, this past work has generally been limited to probing with continuous-wave lasers resulting in time-averaged measurements of velocity. Multiple velocity components have been measured simultaneously by separate instruments.1,2 It has also been demonstrated that two orthogonal velocity components can be measured simultaneously at one point using one interferometer by reflecting back the probing laser beam, although this approach results in directional ambiguity of the flow velocity vector.3 This measurement ambiguity was removed by prior knowledge of the approximate magnitude and sign of the velocity components. Furthermore, it was shown that multiple points could be measured simultaneously with a Rayleigh scattering interferometric approach, but only one component of velocity was measured.4 Another method of performing multiple component velocity measurements with Rayleigh scattering uses a pair of cameras to image the flow, one of which views the flow through an iodine gas filter. This iodine-filter technique has the advantage of allowing high-resolution velocity imaging, but it generally has a lower dynamic range.

  16. Multi-channel Doppler backscattering measurements in the C-2 field reversed configuration.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, L; Ruskov, E; Deng, B H; Gota, H; Gupta, D; Tuszewski, M; Douglass, J; Peebles, W A; Binderbauer, M; Tajima, T

    2014-11-01

    A versatile heterodyne Doppler Backscattering (DBS) system is used to measure density fluctuation levels (in the wavenumber range kρs ≤ 50), and the toroidal E × B flow velocity in the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). Six tunable frequencies in three waveguide bands (26 GHz ≤ f ≤ 90 GHz) are launched using monostatic beam optics, via a quasi-optical beam combiner/polarizer and an adjustable parabolic focusing mirror (inside the vacuum enclosure) achieving Gaussian beam spot sizes of 3-5.5 cm at the X/O-mode cutoff. The DBS system covers plasma densities of 0.8 × 10(13) ≤ ne ≤ 1 × 10(14) cm(-3), and provides access to the FRC core (up to the field null) and across the FRC separatrix into the scrape-off layer plasma.

  17. Multi-channel Doppler backscattering measurements in the C-2 field reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, L. Peebles, W. A.; Ruskov, E.; Deng, B. H.; Gota, H.; Gupta, D.; Tuszewski, M.; Douglass, J.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T.

    2014-11-15

    A versatile heterodyne Doppler Backscattering (DBS) system is used to measure density fluctuation levels (in the wavenumber range kρ{sub s} ≤ 50), and the toroidal E × B flow velocity in the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). Six tunable frequencies in three waveguide bands (26 GHz ≤ f ≤ 90 GHz) are launched using monostatic beam optics, via a quasi-optical beam combiner/polarizer and an adjustable parabolic focusing mirror (inside the vacuum enclosure) achieving Gaussian beam spot sizes of 3–5.5 cm at the X/O-mode cutoff. The DBS system covers plasma densities of 0.8 × 10{sup 13} ≤ n{sub e} ≤ 1 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}, and provides access to the FRC core (up to the field null) and across the FRC separatrix into the scrape-off layer plasma.

  18. Laser Doppler anemometry measurements in the near-wake of an isolated Formula One wheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saddington, A. J.; Knowles, R. D.; Knowles, K.

    2007-05-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to identify the main structures in the near wake of an isolated Formula One wheel rotating in ground contact. A 50 percent-scale isolated wheel assembly, geometrically similar to the configuration mounted on a Formula One racing car, was tested in a closed-return three-quarter open-jet wind tunnel. The test Reynolds number, based on wheel diameter was 6.8 × 105. Using laser doppler anemometry, three velocity components were measured with a total of 1966 data points across four planes and within one diameter downstream of the wheel axis. Based on analysis of these data, the main characteristics of the near-wake of an isolated wheel rotating in ground contact are presented. A revised model of the trailing vortex system induced in the wake of such a wheel is proposed, which clarifies the contradictory ones published in the literature to date.

  19. Quantitative Measurement of the Doppler Shift at an Ultrasonic Frequency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nerbun, R. C.; Leskovec, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Discussed is a Doppler shift laboratory experiment for an introductory college physics course. Ultrasonic transducers and a digital phase detector circuit "black box" are used to overcome room noise and "standing waves" and to produce an observable frequency shift. (SL)

  20. Three-channel three-dimensional self-mixing thin-slice solid-state laser-Doppler measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtomo, Takayuki; Sudo, Seiichi; Otsuka, Kenju

    2009-01-20

    We report successful real-time three-channel self-mixing laser-Doppler measurements with extreme optical sensitivity using a laser-diode-pumped thin-slice Nd:GdVO4 laser in the carrier-frequency-division-multiplexing scheme with three pairs of acoustic optical modulators (i.e., frequency shifters) and a three-channel FM-wave demodulation circuit. We demonstrate (1) simultaneous independent measurement of three different nanometer-vibrating targets, (2) simultaneous measurements of small particles in Brownian motion from three directions, and (3) identification of the velocity vector of small particles moving in water flowing in a small-diameter glass pipe.

  1. Initial measurements of the angular velocity of walking humans using an active millimeter-wave correlation interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilevu, Kojo S.; Kammerman, Kelly L.; Nanzer, Jeffrey A.

    2013-05-01

    The design of a 29.5 GHz experimental active interferometer for the measurement of the angular velocity of moving humans is presented in this paper, as well as initial measurements of walking humans. Measurement of the angular motion of moving objects is a desirable function in remote security sensing applications. Doppler radar sensors are able to measure the signature of moving humans based on micro-Doppler analysis; however, a person moving with little to no radial velocity produces negligible Doppler returns. Measurement of the angular movement of humans can be done with traditional radar techniques however the process involves either continuous tracking with narrow beamwidth or angle-of arrival estimation algorithms. Recently, the authors presented a new method of measuring the angular velocity of moving objects using interferometry. The method measures the angular velocity of an object without tracking or complex processing. The frequency shift imparted on the signal response is proportional to the angular velocity of the object as it passes through the interferometer beam pattern. The experimental system consists of a transmitter and two separate receivers with two widely spaced antennas. The received signals in each of the two channels are downconverted and digitized, and post-processed offline. Initial results of a walking person passing through the interferometer beam pattern are presented, which verify the expected operation of the receiver derived from the initial theory.

  2. Enhanced joint spectral and time domain optical coherence tomography for quantitative flow velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, Julia; Koch, Edmund

    2011-06-01

    Recently, a new method called joint spectral and time domain optical coherence tomography (STdOCT) for flow velocity measurement in spectral domain OCT (SD OCT) was presented. This method analyzes the detected timeresolved interference fringe spectra by using a two-dimensional fast Fourier transformation (2D FFT) to determine directly the Doppler frequency shift instead of calculating the phase difference at each depth position of adjacent A-scans. There, it was found that STdOCT is more robust for measurements with low signal to noise ratio than the classic phase-resolved Doppler OCT (DOCT) making it attractive first for imaging fast flow velocities at which a strong Doppler angle dependent signal damping occurs due to interference fringe washout and second for investigating large blood vessels with a big diameter and a highly damped signal of blood with increasing depth due to strong scattering and absorption in the near-infrared wavelength range. In the present study, we would like to introduce an enhanced algorithm for STdOCT permitting a more precise flow velocity measurement in comparison to the conventional STdOCT. The new method determines the amplitude of the broadened Doppler frequency shift by calculating the center of gravity via the complex analytical signal as a result of the second FFT instead of detecting the maximum intensity signal. Furthermore, the comparison with phase-resolved DOCT was done experimentally by using a flow phantom consisting of a 1% Intralipid emulsion and a 320 μm glass capillary. As a result, the enhanced STdOCT and DOCT processed data are completely equivalent.

  3. Experimental validation of Doppler echocardiographic measurement of volume flow through the stenotic aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Otto, C M; Pearlman, A S; Gardner, C L; Enomoto, D M; Togo, T; Tsuboi, H; Ivey, T D

    1988-08-01

    In aortic stenosis, evaluation of aortic valve area by the continuity equation assumes that the volume of flow through the stenotic valve can be measured accurately in the left ventricular outflow tract. To test the accuracy of Doppler volume-flow measurement proximal to a stenotic valve, we developed an open-chest canine model in which the native leaflets were sutured together to create variable degrees of acute aortic stenosis. Left ventricular and aortic pressures were measured with micromanometer-tipped catheters. Volume flow was controlled and varied by directing systemic venous return through a calibrated roller pump and back to the right atrium. Because transaortic volume flow will not equal roller pump output when there is coexisting aortic insufficiency (present in 67% of studies), transaortic flow was measured by electromagnetic flowmeter with the flow probe placed around the proximal descending thoracic aorta, just beyond the ligated arch vessels. In 12 adult, mongrel dogs (mean weight, 25 kg), the mean transaortic pressure gradient ranged from 2 to 74 mm Hg, and transaortic volume flow ranged from 0.9 to 3.2 l/min. In four dogs, electromagnetic flow that was measured distal to the valve was accurate compared with volume flow determined by timed collection of total aortic flow into a graduated cylinder (n = 24, r = 0.97, electromagnetic flow = 0.87 Direct +0.13 l/min). In eight subsequent dogs, electromagnetic flow was compared with transaortic cardiac output measured by Doppler echocardiography in the left ventricular outflow tract as circular cross-sectional area [pi(D/2)2] x left ventricular outflow tract velocity-time integral x heart rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2969311

  4. New procedures for analyzing Doppler-shift attenuation lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, P.; Dewald, A.; Tonev, D.; Goutev, N.; Asova, G.; Dimitrov, B.; Gavrilov, G.; Mineva, M. N.; Yavahchova, M. S.

    2015-05-01

    A generalization of an earlier proposed version of the Differential decay curve method is presented for the analysis of Doppler-shift attenuation lifetime measurements. The lifetime is derived directly from the line shapes of the depopulating and feeding transitions without any assumptions about or fitting of the time dependence of the population of the corresponding levels except for unobserved feeding when relevant. Fitting of the line shapes is also not necessary. The only approximation involved is related to the continuous treatment of the nuclear scattering events in the Monte Carlo simulation needed. Tests with simulated and real data reveal good reliability of this method. We propose also a new precise procedure where the lifetime is derived by fitting the time dependence of the population of the level of interest using the line shape of the depopulating transition and the difference of the spectra of the depopulating and feeding transitions. Practical application to simulated and real data proves the applicability of the new procedure.

  5. Measurement of coronary flow using high-frequency intravascular ultrasound imaging and pulsed Doppler velocimetry: in vitro feasibility studies.

    PubMed

    Grayburn, P A; Willard, J E; Haagen, D R; Brickner, M E; Alvarez, L G; Eichhorn, E J

    1992-01-01

    The recent development of intravascular ultrasound imaging offers the potential to measure blood flow as the product of vessel cross-sectional area and mean velocity derived from pulsed Doppler velocimetry. To determine the feasibility of this approach for measuring coronary artery flow, we constructed a flow model of the coronary circulation that allowed flow to be varied by adjusting downstream resistance and aortic driving pressure. Assessment of intracoronary flow velocity was accomplished using a commercially available end-mounted pulsed Doppler catheter. Cross-sectional area of the coronary artery was measured using a 20 MHz mechanical imaging transducer mounted on a 4.8 F catheter. The product of mean velocity and cross-sectional area was compared with coronary flow measured by timed collection in a graduated cylinder by linear regression analysis. Excellent correlations were obtained between coronary flow calculated by the ultrasound method and measured coronary flow at both ostial (r = 0.99, standard error of the estimate [SEE] = 13.9 ml/min) and distal (r = 0.98, SEE = 23.0 ml/min) vessel locations under steady flow conditions. During pulsatile flow, calculated and measured coronary flow also correlated well for ostial (r = 0.98, SEE = 12.7 ml/min) and downstream (r = 0.99, SEE = 9.3 ml/min) locations. That the SEE was lower for pulsatile as compared with steady flow may be explained by the blunting of the flow profile across the vessel lumen by the acceleration phase of pulsatile flow. These data establish the feasibility of measuring coronary artery blood flow using intravascular ultrasound imaging and pulsed Doppler techniques. PMID:1531416

  6. Magnetic and velocity fluctuation measurements in the REPUTE-1 reversed-field pinch plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ejiri, A.; Ohdachi, S.; Oikawa, T.; Shinohara, S.; Yamagishi, K.; Toyama, H.; Miyamoto, K. )

    1994-05-01

    Magnetic and velocity fluctuations are studied in the REPUTE-1 [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion [bold 28], 805 (1986)] reversed-field pinch (RFP). The first measurement of velocity fluctuation in an RFP plasma has been done using a Doppler shift of the O V(O[sup 4+], 278.1 nm) line. The fluctuation level increases as the radius of the viewing chord increases. Magnetic fluctuation measurements by an insertable probe reveal that the radial cross correlation of toroidal field fluctuation changes its sign at the radius slightly inside the reversal surface. The level of magnetohydrodynamic dynamo term is estimated from magnetic fluctuations at the surface correlation changes and oxygen velocity fluctuations measured with the chord distance of 115 mm. The dynamo term and that due to resistivity are the same level. This fact is consistent with Ohm's law on which magnetohydrodynamic dynamo models are based.

  7. Evaluation and accuracy of the local velocity data measurements in an agitated vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kysela, Bohuš; Konfršt, Jiří; Chára, Zdeněk; Kotek, Michal

    2014-03-01

    Velocity measurements of the flow field in an agitated vessel are necessary for the improvement and better understanding of the mixing processes. The obtained results are used for the calculations of the impeller pumping capacity, comparison of the power consumption etc. We performed various measurements of the local velocities in an agitated vessel final results of which should be processed for several purposes so it was necessary to make an analysis of the obtained data suitability and their quality. Analysed velocity data were obtained from the LDA (Laser Doppler Anemometry) and PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) measurements performed on a standard equipment where the flat bottomed vessel with four baffles was agitated by the six-blade Rushton turbine. The results from both used methods were compared. The frequency analyses were examined as well as the dependency of the data rates, time series lengths etc. The demands for the data processed in the form of the ensemble-averaged results were also established.

  8. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882.1550 Section 882.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device...

  9. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882.1550 Section 882.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device...

  10. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882.1550 Section 882.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device...

  11. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882.1550 Section 882.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device...

  12. 21 CFR 882.1550 - Nerve conduction velocity measurement device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nerve conduction velocity measurement device. 882.1550 Section 882.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... conduction velocity measurement device. (a) Identification. A nerve conduction velocity measurement device...

  13. Comparisons of computed and measured three-dimensional velocity fields in a motored two-stroke engine

    SciTech Connect

    Amsden, A.A.; O'Rourke, P.J.; Butler, T.D. ); Meintjes, K.; Fansler, T.D. )

    1991-01-01

    Computer simulations are compared with measurements of the three-dimensional, unsteady scavenging flows of a motored two-stroke engine. Laser Doppler velocimetry measurements were made on a modified Suzuki DT-85 ported engine. Calculations were performed using KIVA-3, a computer program that efficiently solves the intake and exhaust port flows along with those in the cylinder. Measured and computed cylinder pressures and velocities are compared. Pressures agree well over the cycle as do the velocities at the intake ports. In-cylinder velocities differ in detail, but the tumbling motion in the cylinder is well replicated in vertical plane passing through the cylinder axis. 20 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Spectrographs for the Measurement of Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranne, A.

    A radial-velocity measurement derives from a shift in position of spectral features at the focus of a spectrographic instrument. We do not often think about how small these shifts are. It is not generally appreciated that the accuracy to which this shift must be measured is a tiny fraction of a pixel. Or, if we prefer to calculate in microns a surprising minuteness. What precautions should we be taking for the measurement of such small shifts? It is true that, thanks to computers, modern reduction methods allows us to correct for a wide variety of pertubations, provided that these are foreseen and understood; but such reduction procedures will give the best results if such pertubations are kept very small. We must therefore analyse these pertubations and think about how we can control them. The correlation method initiated in its modern form by Roger Griffin, and which we developed further with an optical mask in CORAVEL twenty-five years ago and more recently with a numerical mask in ELODIE, has demonstrated its power. In terms of these methods, the problem of high precision is to improve the correlation peak. Can this be done? Does the correlation method allow us to distinguish the overall radial velocity of the object from possible distortions of the lines? This is certainly a major problem which must be solved. The luminous efficiency of high-precision spectrographs is low. If the use of an optical fibre with scrambling for feeding the spectrograph seems inevitable to us today, it seems to me that the transmission of this system can be considerably improved by a better choice of the F-ratio of the image beam of the telescope which is to be matched with that of the spectrograph. This problem, common to all spectrographs, could be resolved with a specialised focal-plane instrument, giving a much greater than usual F-ratio, resulting in a simplification of the spectrograph optics, and hence an improvement in transmission and a serious decrease in size (which is

  15. Impact of assimilating airborne Doppler radar velocity data using the ARPS 3DVAR on the analysis and prediction of Hurricane Ike (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Ningzhu; Xue, Ming; Zhao, Kun; Min, Jinzhong

    2012-09-01

    The ARPS 3DVAR data assimilation system is enhanced and used for the first time to assimilate airborne Doppler radar wind observations. It is applied to Hurricane Ike (2008), where radar observations taken along four flight legs through the hurricane vortex 14 to 18 h before it made landfall are assimilated. An optimal horizontal de-correlation scale for the background error is determined through sensitivity experiments. A comparison is made between assimilating retrieved winds and assimilating radial velocity data directly. The effect of the number of assimilation cycles, each analyzing data from one flight leg, is also examined. The assimilation of retrieved wind data and of radial velocity data produces similar results. However, direct assimilation of radial velocity data is recommended for both theoretical and practical reasons. In both cases, velocity data assimilation improves the analyzed hurricane structure and intensity as well as leads to better prediction of the intensity. Improvement to the track forecasting is also found. The assimilation of radial velocity observations from all four flight legs through intermittent assimilation cycles produces the best analyses and forecasts. The first analysis in the first cycle tends to produce the largest analysis increment. It is through the mutual adjustments among model variables during the forecast periods that a balanced vortex with lowered central pressure is established. The wind speeds extracted from the assimilated model state agree very well with independent surface wind measurements by the stepped-frequency microwave radiometer onboard the aircraft, and with independent flight-level wind speeds detected by the NOAA P-3 aircraft in-flight measurements. Twenty-four hour accumulated precipitation is noticeably improved over the case without radar data assimilation.

  16. The other side of abnormal: a case series of low transcranial Doppler velocities associated with stroke in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Iris D; James-Herry, Anne; Osunkwo, Ifeyinwa

    2013-10-01

    The prevalence of cerebrovascular events in sickle cell disease (SCD) can be as low as 10% by the age of 18 for overt cerebral infarction or strokes, up to 35% for silent cerebral infarction, and as high as 43/100 patient years for acute silent cerebral ischemic events. These events typically occur during childhood with a peak incidence between the age of 4 and 7 years. The cumulative risk of central nervous system events in SCD increases with age. Transcranial Doppler (TCD) ultrasonography is an established screening tool for detecting children with SCD at highest risk for stroke by measuring the flow velocity in the large intracranial vessels. Velocities are considered abnormal with readings >200 cm/s and chronic red cell transfusions are recommended to reduce further risk or progression. Red cell transfusions have reduced the rate of cerebrovascular accidents by 90%. We describe the case of 5 children with sickle cell anemia, whose antecedent screening TCD velocities were measured to be ≤70 cm/s in the study. All patients developed some form of cerebral insults, an overt cerebral infarctions, silent stroke or transient ischemic attack, and are now receiving chronic transfusion to prevent further progression. On the basis of these cases, low TCD velocities may identify another group of children at risk for cerebrovascular disease. We suggest TCD velocities <70 cm/s in major vessels (MCA, ACA, and ICA) be considered another type of "abnormal," prompting more sensitive evaluations (such as a brain MRI and MRA) for the presence of central nervous system disease, and, if negative, decrease intervals between subsequent TCD assessments.

  17. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOEpatents

    Hall, M.S.; Brodeur, P.H.; Jackson, T.G.

    1998-07-14

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated. 20 figs.

  18. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Maclin S.; Brodeur, Pierre H.; Jackson, Theodore G.

    1998-01-01

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated.

  19. Retrieval of Raindrop Size Distribution, Vertical Air Velocity and Water Vapor Attenuation Using Dual-Wavelength Doppler Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Tian, Lin; Li, Lihua; Srivastava, C.

    2005-01-01

    Two techniques for retrieving the slope and intercept parameters of an assumed exponential raindrop size distribution (RSD), vertical air velocity, and attenuation by precipitation and water vapor in light stratiform rain using observations by airborne, nadir looking dual-wavelength (X-band, 3.2 cm and W-band, 3.2 mm) radars are presented. In both techniques, the slope parameter of the RSD and the vertical air velocity are retrieved using only the mean Doppler velocities at the two wavelengths. In the first method, the intercept of the RSD is estimated from the observed reflectivity at the longer wavelength assuming no attenuation at that wavelength. The attenuation of the shorter wavelength radiation by precipitation and water vapor are retrieved using the observed reflectivity at the shorter wavelength. In the second technique, it is assumed that the longer wavelength suffers attenuation only in the melting band. Then, assuming a distribution of water vapor, the melting band attenuation at both wavelengths and the rain attenuation at the shorter wavelength are retrieved. Results of the retrievals are discussed and several physically meaningful results are presented.

  20. The effect of maternal betamethasone administration on Doppler flow velocity parameters of the fetal branch pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Ustunyurt, O B; Ustunyurt, E; Korkmazer, E; Altug, N; Bilge, U; Danisman, N

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the effects of antenatal betamethasone on fetal pulmonary blood flow velocity waveforms. The study comprised 28 women with singleton pregnancies at high risk for preterm delivery. They were treated with two doses of 12 mg betamethasone intramuscularly 24 h apart to enhance lung maturity. Flow velocity waveforms were recorded with Doppler ultrasound from the middle segment of pulmonary artery (PA). Compared with the pretreatment mean value, a significant decrease in the pulmonary artery pulsatility (PI) and the resistance indexes (RI) was noted at 24 h and 48 h after the administration of first dose of betamethasone (p = 0.022 and p = 0.018 for PI and p = 0.001 and p = 0.004 for RI, respectively). After 7 days, the pulmonary artery velocity waveforms returned to the types of waveform observed before treatment (p = 0.216 for PI and p = 0.249 for RI). Maternal antenatal betamethasone resulted in a significant transient decrease in the pulsatility and the resistance indexes in the pulmonary artery. These findings indicate a direct effect of betamethasone on fetal pulmonary circulation.

  1. Water Velocity Measurements on a Vertical Barrier Screen at the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Yuan, Yong

    2011-11-22

    Fish screens at hydroelectric dams help to protect rearing and migrating fish by preventing them from passing through the turbines and directing them towards the bypass channels by providing a sweeping flow parallel to the screen. However, fish screens may actually be harmful to fish if they become impinged on the surface of the screen or become disoriented due to poor flow conditions near the screen. Recent modifications to the vertical barrier screens (VBS) at the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse (B2) intended to increase the guidance of juvenile salmonids into the juvenile bypass system (JBS) have resulted in high mortality and descaling rates of hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon during the 2008 juvenile salmonid passage season. To investigate the potential cause of the high mortality and descaling rates, an in situ water velocity measurement study was conducted using acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADV) in the gatewell slot at Units 12A and 14A of B2. From the measurements collected the average approach velocity, sweep velocity, and the root mean square (RMS) value of the velocity fluctuations were calculated. The approach velocities measured across the face of the VBS varied but were mostly less than 0.3 m/s. The sweep velocities also showed large variances across the face of the VBS with most measurements being less than 1.5 m/s. This study revealed that the approach velocities exceeded criteria recommended by NOAA Fisheries and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife intended to improve fish passage conditions.

  2. Real-time three-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography for characterizing the spatial velocity distribution and quantifying the peak flow rate in the left ventricular outflow tract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsujino, H.; Jones, M.; Shiota, T.; Qin, J. X.; Greenberg, N. L.; Cardon, L. A.; Morehead, A. J.; Zetts, A. D.; Travaglini, A.; Bauer, F.; Panza, J. A.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Quantification of flow with pulsed-wave Doppler assumes a "flat" velocity profile in the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT), which observation refutes. Recent development of real-time, three-dimensional (3-D) color Doppler allows one to obtain an entire cross-sectional velocity distribution of the LVOT, which is not possible using conventional 2-D echo. In an animal experiment, the cross-sectional color Doppler images of the LVOT at peak systole were derived and digitally transferred to a computer to visualize and quantify spatial velocity distributions and peak flow rates. Markedly skewed profiles, with higher velocities toward the septum, were consistently observed. Reference peak flow rates by electromagnetic flow meter correlated well with 3-D peak flow rates (r = 0.94), but with an anticipated underestimation. Real-time 3-D color Doppler echocardiography was capable of determining cross-sectional velocity distributions and peak flow rates, demonstrating the utility of this new method for better understanding and quantifying blood flow phenomena.

  3. Spectroscopic measurement of ion temperature and ion velocity distributions in the flux-coil generated FRC.

    PubMed

    Gupta, D; Bolte, N; Gota, H; Hayashi, R; Kiyashko, V; Marsili, P; Morehouse, M; Primavera, S; Roche, T; Wessel, F

    2010-10-01

    One aim of the flux-coil generated field reversed configuration at Tri Alpha Energy (TAE) is to establish the plasma where the ion rotational energy is greater than the ion thermal energy. To verify this, an optical diagnostic was developed to simultaneously measure the Doppler velocity-shift and line-broadening using a 0.75 m, 1800 groves/mm, spectrometer. The output spectrum is magnified and imaged onto a 16-channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) array. The individual PMT outputs are coupled to high-gain, high-frequency, transimpedance amplifiers, providing fast-time response. The Doppler spectroscopy measurements, along with a survey spectrometer and photodiode-light detector, form a suite of diagnostics that provide insights into the time evolution of the plasma-ion distribution and current when accelerated by an azimuthal-electric field.

  4. Holographic particle velocity measurement in the Fraunhofer plane.

    PubMed

    Ewan, B C

    1979-03-01

    Double exposure holograms of a moving particle field having a 1-D velocity distribution are produced. The Fraunhofer plane is observed on reconstruction, and it is shown that for a Gaussian velocity distribution, the fringes which modulate the diffraction pattern have spacings characteristic of the peak velocity. Known and measured peak velocities are compared, and the effect of the velocity distribution width on the fringe contrast is demonstrated.

  5. Effects of horizontal velocity variations on ultrasonic velocity measurements in open channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, E.D.

    1992-01-01

    Use of an ultrasonic velocity meter to determine discharge in open channels involves measuring the velocity in a line between transducers in the stream and relating that velocity to the average velocity in the stream. The standard method of calculating average velocity in the channel assumes that the velocity profile in the channel can be represented by the one-dimensional von Karman universal velocity profile. However, the velocity profile can be described by a two-dimensional equation that accounts for the horizontal velocity variations induced by the channel sides. An equation to calculate average velocity accounts for the two-dimensional variations in velocity within a stream. The use of this new equation to calculate average velocity was compared to the standard method in theoretical trapezoidal cross sections and in the L-31N and Snapper Creek Extension Canals near Miami, Florida. These comparisons indicate that the two-dimensional variations have the most significant effect in narrow, deep channels. Also, the two-dimensional effects may be significant in some field situations and need to be considered when determining average velocity and discharge with an ultrasonic velocity meter.

  6. A modified beam-to-earth transformation to measure short-wavelength internal waves with an acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scotti, A.; Butman, B.; Beardsley, R.C.; Alexander, P.S.; Anderson, S.

    2005-01-01

    The algorithm used to transform velocity signals from beam coordinates to earth coordinates in an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) relies on the assumption that the currents are uniform over the horizontal distance separating the beams. This condition may be violated by (nonlinear) internal waves, which can have wavelengths as small as 100-200 m. In this case, the standard algorithm combines velocities measured at different phases of a wave and produces horizontal velocities that increasingly differ from true velocities with distance from the ADCP. Observations made in Massachusetts Bay show that currents measured with a bottom-mounted upward-looking ADCP during periods when short-wavelength internal waves are present differ significantly from currents measured by point current meters, except very close to the instrument. These periods are flagged with high error velocities by the standard ADCP algorithm. In this paper measurements from the four spatially diverging beams and the backscatter intensity signal are used to calculate the propagation direction and celerity of the internal waves. Once this information is known, a modified beam-to-earth transformation that combines appropriately lagged beam measurements can be used to obtain current estimates in earth coordinates that compare well with pointwise measurements. ?? 2005 American Meteorological Society.

  7. Theory of the double-edge molecular technique for Doppler lidar wind measurement.

    PubMed

    Flesia, C; Korb, C L

    1999-01-20

    The theory of the double-edge lidar technique for measuring the wind with molecular backscatter is described. Two high-spectral-resolution edge filters are located in the wings of the Rayleigh-Brillouin profile. This doubles the signal change per unit Doppler shift, the sensitivity, and improves measurement accuracy relative to the single-edge technique by nearly a factor of 2. The use of a crossover region where the sensitivity of a molecular- and an aerosol-based measurement is equal is described. Use of this region desensitizes the molecular measurement to the effects of aerosol scattering over a velocity range of +/-100 m/s. We give methods for correcting short-term, shot-to-shot, frequency jitter and drift with a laser reference frequency measurement and methods for long-term frequency correction with a servo control system. The effects of Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering on the measurement are shown to be significant and are included in the analysis. Simulations for a conical scanning satellite-based lidar at 355 nm show an accuracy of 2-3 m/s for altitudes of 2-15 km for a 1-km vertical resolution, a satellite altitude of 400 km, and a 200 km x 200 km spatial resolution. PMID:18305631

  8. Compressional velocity measurements for a highly fractured lunar anorthosite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sondergeld, C. H.; Granryd, L. A.; Spetzler, H. A.

    1979-01-01

    The compressional wave (V sub p) velocities in three mutually perpendicular directions have been measured in lunar sample 60025,174, lunar anorthosite. V sub p measurements were made at ambient temperature and pressure and a new technique was developed to measure the velocities because of the tremendous acoustic wave attenuation of the lunar sample. The measured velocities were all less than 1 km/sec and displayed up to a 21% departure from the mean value of the three directions. The velocities agree with seismic wave velocities determined for the lunar surface at the collection site.

  9. On the measurement of wind speeds in tornadoes with a portable CW/FM-CW Doppler radar

    SciTech Connect

    Bluestein, H.B. . School of Meteorology); Unruh, W.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Both the formation mechanism and structure of tornadoes are not yet well understood. The Doppler radar is probably the best remote-sensing instrument at present for determining the wind field in tornadoes. Although much has been learned about the non-supercell tornado from relatively close range using Doppler radars at fixed sites, close-range measurements in supercell tornadoes are relatively few. Doppler radar can increase significantly the number of high-resolution, sub-cloud base measurements of both the tornado vortex and its parent vortex in supercells, with simultaneous visual documentation. The design details and operation of the CW/FM-CW Doppler radar developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and used by storm-intercept teams at the Univ. of Oklahoma are described elsewhere. The radar transmits 1 W at 3 cm, and can be switched back and forth between CW and FM-CW modes. In the FM-CW mode the sweep repetition frequency is 15.575 kHz and the sweep width 1.9 MHz; the corresponding maximum unambiguous range and velocity, and range resolution are 5 km, {plus minus} 115 m s{sup {minus}1}, and 78 m respectively. The bistatic antennas, which have half-power beamwidths of 5{degree}, are easily pointed wit the aid of a boresighted VCR. FM-CW Data are recorded on the VCR, while voice documentation is recorded on the audio tape; video is recorded on another VCR. The radar and antennas are easily mounted on a tripod, and can be set up by three people in a minute or two. The purpose of this paper is to describe the signal processing techniques used to determine the Doppler spectrum in the FM-CW mode and a method of its interpretation in real time, and to present data gathered in a tornadic storm in 1990. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Wind measurements in Saturn's atmosphere with UVES/VLT ground-based Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, Pedro; Silva, Miguel; Peralta, Javier; Luz, David; Sánchez-Lavega, Agustin; Hueso, Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    We will present preliminary Doppler wind velocity results of Saturn's zonal flow at cloud level. Our aim is help to constrain the characterization of the equatorial jet at cloud level and the latitudinal variation of the zonal winds, to measure its spatial and temporal variability, to contribute to monitor the variability in order to achieve a better understanding of the dynamics of Saturn's zonal winds, whose equatorial jet has a complex vertical structure and temporal variability (Sanchez-Lavega et al., Nature, 423, 623, 3003; Garcia-Melendo et al., Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L22204. 2010). Finally, the complementarity with Cassini, providing an independent set of observations. The UVES/VLT instrument has been used, which simultaneously achieves high spectral resolving power and high spatial resolution. The field has been derotated in order to have the aperture aligned perpendicularly to Saturn's rotation axis. In this configuration, spatial information in the East-West direction is preserved in a set of spectra in the direction perpendicular to dispersion. The technique of absolute accelerometry (AA, Connes, 1985, ApSS 110, 211) has been applied to the backscattered solar spectrum in order to determine the Doppler shift associated with the zonal circulation. Our measurements have been made in the wavelength range of 480-680 nm. Previously we successfully adapted this Doppler velocimetry technique for measuring winds at Venus cloud tops (Machado et al. 2012). In the present study we will show the adaptation of this method for Saturn's case. Since the AA technique only allows to compare spectra where the line shifts are within the line width, in fast rotating atmospheres (as is the case of Saturn) the spectra must be compared by pairs from adjacent areas of the disk (adjacent pixels in the slit). We will use coordinated observations from the Cassini's Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), in order to compare with the Doppler winds obtained from the UVES

  11. Measurements of ion temperature and flow of pulsed plasmas produced by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun device using an ion Doppler spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Y.; Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2012-10-01

    It is important to know surface damage characteristics of plasma-facing component materials during transient heat and particle loads such as type I ELMs. A magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) device has been used as transient heat and particle source in ELM simulation experiments. Characteristics of pulsed plasmas produced by the MCPG device play an important role for the plasma material interaction. In this study, ion temperature and flow velocity of pulsed He plasmas were measured by an ion Doppler spectrometer (IDS). The IDS system consists of a light collection system including optical fibers, 1m-spectrometer and a 16 channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector. The IDS system measures the width and Doppler shift of HeII (468.58 nm) emission line with the time resolution of 1 μs. The Doppler broadened and shifted spectra were measured with 45 and 135 degree angles with respect to the plasmoid traveling direction. The observed emission line profile was represented by sum of two Gaussian components to determine the temperature and flow velocity. The minor component at around the wavelength of zero-velocity was produced by the stationary plasma. As the results, the ion velocity and temperature were 68 km/s and 19 eV, respectively. Thus, the He ion flow energy is 97 eV. The observed flow velocity agrees with that measured by a time of flight technique.

  12. Mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar for wind and temperature measurements in the stratosphere and lower mesosphere.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiankang; Han, Yuli; Sun, Dongsong; Xia, Haiyun; Shu, Zhifeng; Zhao, Ruocan; Shangguan, Mingjia; Guo, Jie

    2014-08-25

    A mobile Rayleigh Doppler lidar based on the molecular double-edge technique is developed for measuring wind velocity in the middle atmosphere up to 60 km. The lidar uses three lasers with a mean power of 17.5 W at 355 nm each and three 1 m diameter telescopes to receive the backscattered echo: one points to zenith for vertical wind component and temperature measurement; the two others pointing toward east and north are titled at 30° from the zenith for zonal and meridional wind component, respectively. The Doppler shift of the backscattered echo is measured by inter-comparing the signal detected through each of the double-edge channels of a triple Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) tuned to either side of the emitted laser line. The third channel of FPI is used for frequency locking and a locking accuracy of 1.8 MHz RMS (root-mean-square) at 355 nm over 2 hours is realized, corresponding to a systematic error of 0.32 m/s. In this paper, we present detailed technical evolutions on system calibration. To validate the performance of the lidar, comparison experiments was carried out in December 2013, which showed good agreement with radiosondes but notable biases with ECMWF (European Centre for Medium range Weather Forecasts) in the height range of overlapping data. Wind observation over one month performed in Delhi (37.371° N, 97.374° E), northwest of China, demonstrated the stability and robustness of the system. PMID:25322175

  13. High-Energy 2-Micrometers Doppler Lidar for Wind Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2006-01-01

    High-energy 2-micrometer wavelength lasers have been incorporated in a prototype coherent Doppler lidar to test component technologies and explore applications for remote sensing of the atmosphere. Design of the lidar is presented including aspects in the laser transmitter, receiver, photodetector, and signal processing. Calibration tests and sample atmospheric data are presented on wind and aerosol profiling.

  14. Evaluation of coronary flow velocity reserve in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography and dual-source computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Li, Rongjuan; Ren, Hongyan; Wang, Zheng; Li, Zhian; Lin, Jie; Wang, Luya; Yu, Wei; Zhang, Zhaoqi

    2010-10-01

    Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HoFH) is a rare disorder characterized by the early onset of atherosclerosis and usually occurs at the ostia of coronary arteries. In this study, we used transthoracic Doppler echocardiography (TTDE) to evaluate the dynamic changes of coronary flow in HoFH patients and to detect aortic and coronary atherosclerosis by dual-source computed tomography (DSCT). We studied 20 HoFH patients (12 females, 8 males, mean age 13.1 ± 5.3 years, with a mean low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol of 583 ± 113 mg/dL) and 15 control patients (8 females, 7 males, mean age 15.2 ± 6.9 years, with a mean LDL cholesterol 128 ± 71 mg/dL) using TTDE and DSCT. None of the patients showed evidence of ischemia with standard exercise testing. Though the baseline coronary flow was similar between HoFH patients and normal controls, the hyperemic flow velocities and, thus, the coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) were significantly lower in those with HoFH. All HoFH patients had aortic plaques, nine of them with the coronary artery ostia simultaneously, who had significantly higher LDL-cholesterol and lower CFVR than those without ostia plaques. Our data demonstrated that TTDE together with DSCT could be a useful noninvasive method for detection of coronary flow dynamics and atherosclerosis specifically in HoFH subjects with coronary ostia. PMID:20800956

  15. Serial measurement of Doppler hepatic hemodynamic parameters for the diagnosis of acute rejection after live donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Kato, Koichi; Hirota, Masashi; Takeda, Shin; Kamei, Hideya; Nakamura, Taro; Kiuchi, Tetsuya; Nakao, Akimasa

    2009-09-01

    To elucidate the role of Doppler hepatic hemodynamic parameters as surrogate markers of acute rejection (AR) after live donor liver transplantation (LDLT), serial Doppler measurements were prospectively performed during the first 2 weeks after LDLT to compare the longitudinal hepatic hemodynamic changes between patients with histologically proven AR and patients without histologically proven AR. Forty-six patients that had undergone adult-to-adult LDLT using a right lobe graft were enrolled in this study. The portal venous maximum velocity (PVV; cm/second), portal venous flow volume, hepatic arterial peak systolic velocity, hepatic arterial pulsatility index, hepatic venous maximum velocity, hepatic venous pulsatility index, and splenic arterial pulsatility index were measured. Fourteen patients were diagnosed by biopsy to have clinically relevant AR. Markedly increased PVV was seen soon after surgery and gradually decreased in both patients with clinically relevant AR and patients without clinically relevant AR. This serial change of decreasing PVV was significantly greater in patients with clinically relevant AR (P < 0.0001). After postoperative day 6, the PVV in patients with clinically relevant AR was significantly lower than that in patients without clinically relevant AR (PVV on postoperative day 6: 35.6 +/- 21.3 versus 58.3 +/- 27.1 cm/second, respectively, P = 0.0080). A PVV cutoff value of 20.2 cm/second demonstrated the best accuracy for predicting clinically relevant AR. The sensitivity and specificity for predicting clinically relevant AR were 92.9% and 87.1%, respectively. The area under the curve was 0.94. In conclusion, serial Doppler measurement of hepatic parameters in LDLT is useful for the diagnosis of clinically relevant AR. Clinically relevant AR should therefore be suspected when a marked unexpected decrease in the PVV is observed.

  16. To assess the intimal thickness, flow velocities, and luminal diameter of carotid arteries using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound doppler imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemuru, Madhuri; Jabbar, Afzal; Chandra, Suman

    2004-04-01

    Carotid imaging is a Gold Standard test that provides useful information about the structure and functions of carotid arteries. Spectral imaging helps to evaluate the vessel and hemodynamic changes. High resolution B-mode imaging has emerged as one of the methods of choice for determining the anatomic extent of atherosclerosis and its progression and for assessing cardiovascular risks. The measurements made with Doppler correlate well with pathologic measurements. Recent prospective studies have clearly demonstrated that these measurements of carotid intimal thickness are potent predictors of Myocardial Infarction and Stroke. This method appears very attractive as it is non-invasive, extremely safe, well accepted by the patient and relatively inexpensive. It can be performed serially and has the advantage of visualizing the arterial wall in contrast to angiographic techniques which provide only an outline of the arterial lumen. Recently, there has been an interest in the clinical use of this technique in making difficult clinical decisions like deciding on preventive therapies. 30 subjects aged 21-60 years and 30 subjects aged 61-85 years of both sexes are selected after doing a baseline study to exclude Hypertension, Diabetes, Obesity and Hyperlipidemia. The carotid arteries were examined for intimal thickening, blood flow velocities and luminal diameter. With aging there is a narrowing of the carotid vessels and significant increase in intimal thickening with a consequent increase in the blood flow velocities. Inter-observer, intra-observer and instrument variations are seen and there is no significant change in the values when the distal flow pattern is considered for measurements. Aging produces major cardiovascular changes including decreased elasticity and compliance of great arteries leading to structural and functional alterations in heart and vessels. With aging there is increased intimal thickness and increased pulse wave velocity which is clearly

  17. Correction of Doppler-broadened Rayleigh backscattering effects in H2O dial measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansmann, A.; Bosenberg, J.

    1986-01-01

    A general method of solutions for treating effects of Doppler-broadened Rayleigh backscattering in H2O Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements are described and discussed. Errors in vertical DIAL measuremtns caused by this laser line broadening effect can be very large and, therfore, this effect has to be accounted for accurately. To analyze and correct effects of Doppler-broadened Rayleigh backscattering in DIAL experiments, a generalized DIAL approximation was derived starting from a lidar equation, which includes Doppler broadening. To evaluate the accuracy of H2O DIAL measurements, computer simulations were performed. It was concluded that correction of Doppler broadened Rayleigh backscattering is possible with good accuracy in most cases of tropospheric H2O DIAL measurements, but great care has to be taken when layers with steep gradients of Mie backscattering like clouds or inversion layers are present.

  18. Linear FMCW Laser Radar for Precision Range and Vector Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierrottet, Diego; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Petway, Larry; Barnes, Bruce; Lockhard, George; Rubio, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    An all fiber linear frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) coherent laser radar system is under development with a goal to aide NASA s new Space Exploration initiative for manned and robotic missions to the Moon and Mars. By employing a combination of optical heterodyne and linear frequency modulation techniques and utilizing state-of-the-art fiber optic technologies, highly efficient, compact and reliable laser radar suitable for operation in a space environment is being developed. Linear FMCW lidar has the capability of high-resolution range measurements, and when configured into a multi-channel receiver system it has the capability of obtaining high precision horizontal and vertical velocity measurements. Precision range and vector velocity data are beneficial to navigating planetary landing pods to the preselected site and achieving autonomous, safe soft-landing. The all-fiber coherent laser radar has several important advantages over more conventional pulsed laser altimeters or range finders. One of the advantages of the coherent laser radar is its ability to measure directly the platform velocity by extracting the Doppler shift generated from the motion, as opposed to time of flight range finders where terrain features such as hills, cliffs, or slopes add error to the velocity measurement. Doppler measurements are about two orders of magnitude more accurate than the velocity estimates obtained by pulsed laser altimeters. In addition, most of the components of the device are efficient and reliable commercial off-the-shelf fiber optic telecommunication components. This paper discusses the design and performance of a second-generation brassboard system under development at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance (ALHAT) project.

  19. Acceleration and Velocity Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truax, Roger

    2016-01-01

    A simple approach for computing acceleration and velocity of a structure from the strain is proposed in this study. First, deflection and slope of the structure are computed from the strain using a two-step theory. Frequencies of the structure are computed from the time histories of strain using a parameter estimation technique together with an Autoregressive Moving Average model. From deflection, slope, and frequencies of the structure, acceleration and velocity of the structure can be obtained using the proposed approach. shape sensing, fiber optic strain sensor, system equivalent reduction and expansion process.

  20. Ultrasonic colour Doppler imaging

    PubMed Central

    Evans, David H.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic colour Doppler is an imaging technique that combines anatomical information derived using ultrasonic pulse-echo techniques with velocity information derived using ultrasonic Doppler techniques to generate colour-coded maps of tissue velocity superimposed on grey-scale images of tissue anatomy. The most common use of the technique is to image the movement of blood through the heart, arteries and veins, but it may also be used to image the motion of solid tissues such as the heart walls. Colour Doppler imaging is now provided on almost all commercial ultrasound machines, and has been found to be of great value in assessing blood flow in many clinical conditions. Although the method for obtaining the velocity information is in many ways similar to the method for obtaining the anatomical information, it is technically more demanding for a number of reasons. It also has a number of weaknesses, perhaps the greatest being that in conventional systems, the velocities measured and thus displayed are the components of the flow velocity directly towards or away from the transducer, while ideally the method would give information about the magnitude and direction of the three-dimensional flow vectors. This review briefly introduces the principles behind colour Doppler imaging and describes some clinical applications. It then describes the basic components of conventional colour Doppler systems and the methods used to derive velocity information from the ultrasound signal. Next, a number of new techniques that seek to overcome the vector problem mentioned above are described. Finally, some examples of vector velocity images are presented. PMID:22866227

  1. The Galileo probe Doppler wind experiment: Measurement of the deep zonal winds on Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, David H.; Pollack, James B.; Seiff, Alvin

    1998-09-01

    During its descent into the upper atmosphere of Jupiter, the Galileo probe transmitted data to the orbiter for 57.5 min. Accurate measurements of the probe radio frequency, driven by an ultrastable oscillator, allowed an accurate time history of the probe motions to be reconstructed. Removal from the probe radio frequency profile of known Doppler contributions, including the orbiter trajectory, the probe descent velocity, and the rotation of Jupiter, left a measurable frequency residual due to Jupiter's zonal winds, and microdynamical motion of the probe from spin, swing under the parachute, atmospheric turbulence, and aerodynamic buffeting. From the assumption of the dominance of the zonal horizontal winds, the frequency residuals were inverted and resulted in the first in situ measurements of the vertical profile of Jupiter's deep zonal winds. A number of error sources with the capability of corrupting the frequency measurements or the interpretation of the frequency residuals were considered using reasonable assumptions and calibrations from prelaunch and in-flight testing. It is found that beneath the cloud tops (about 700 mbar) the winds are prograde and rise rapidly to 170 m/s at 4 bars. Beyond 4 bars to the depth at which the link with the probe was lost, nearly 21 bars, the winds remain constant and strong. Corrections for the high temperatures encountered by the probe have recently been completed and provide no evidence of diminishing or strengthening of the zonal wind profile in the deeper regions explored by the Galileo probe.

  2. Correcting acoustic Doppler current profiler discharge measurements biased by sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; Wagner, C.R.

    2007-01-01

    A negative bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) is attributed to the movement of sediment on or near the streambed, and is an issue widely acknowledged by the scientific community. The integration of a differentially corrected global positioning system (DGPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic bias associated with a moving bed. DGPS, however, cannot provide consistently accurate positions because of multipath errors and satellite signal reception problems on waterways with dense tree canopy along the banks, in deep valleys or canyons, and near bridges. An alternative method of correcting for the moving-bed bias, based on the closure error resulting from a two-way crossing of the river, is presented. The uncertainty in the mean moving-bed velocity measured by the loop method is shown to be approximately 0.6cm/s. For the 13 field measurements presented, the loop method resulted in corrected discharges that were within 5% of discharges measured utilizing DGPS to compensate for moving-bed conditions. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  3. Boundary Layer Measurements in a Supersonic Wind Tunnel Using Doppler Global Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.; Lee, Joseph W.; Cavone, Angelo A.

    2010-01-01

    A modified Doppler Global Velocimeter (DGV) was developed to measure the velocity within the boundary layer above a flat plate in a supersonic flow. Classic laser velocimetry (LV) approaches could not be used since the model surface was composed of a glass-ceramic insulator in support of heat-transfer measurements. Since surface flare limited the use of external LV techniques and windows placed in the model would change the heat transfer characteristics of the flat plate, a novel approach was developed. The input laser beam was divided into nine equal power beams and each transmitted through optical fibers to a small cavity within the model. The beams were then directed through 1.6-mm diameter orifices to form a series of orthogonal beams emitted from the model and aligned with the tunnel centerline to approximate a laser light sheet. Scattered light from 0.1-micron diameter water condensation ice crystals was collected by four 5-mm diameter lenses and transmitted by their respective optical fiber bundles to terminate at the image plane of a standard two-camera DGV receiver. Flow measurements were made over a range from 0.5-mm above the surface to the freestream at Mach 3.51 in steady state and heat pulse injected flows. This technique provides a unique option for measuring boundary layers in supersonic flows where seeding the flow is problematic or where the experimental apparatus does not provide the optical access required by other techniques.

  4. A performance study of a laser Doppler vibrometer for measuring waveforms from piezoelectric transducers.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Yo; Nishizawa, Osamu; Sato, Haruo

    2009-07-01

    The stresses at transducer contacts were estimated from accurate particle velocity measurements by using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). We then evaluated the performance of LDV for ultrasonic waveform measurements in physical model experiments that are employed for modeling seismic observations. For such experiments, the characteristics of the source and detector should be exactly known. Disc-shaped compression and shear-mode piezoelectric transducers were attached on a flat surface of a steel semicircular column, and ultrasonic waves were excited by single-shot sine waves with 0.25, 0.5, and 1 MHz frequencies. Radial and transverse components were measured by LDV at a distance of 150 mm from the source. The maximum amplitudes of waves with respect to radiation angle give a radiation pattern of a transducer. Each observed radiation pattern was fitted to the calculated radiation pattern by assuming a harmonically oscillating stress distributed uniformly on a flat circular area. The observed radiation patterns show fairly good agreement with the calculated radiation patterns for both radial and transverse components when the source frequencies are 0.25 and 0.5 MHz. Because the best-fit stress values were independently estimated from the radial and the transverse radiation patterns, the 2 stress values should be equal for each source and frequency. The discrepancy between the estimated radial and transverse stress values becomes larger as the source frequency increases. Provided that coincidence of the 2 stress values indicates the validity of waveform measurements, the results suggest that LDV is applicable for measuring the 3-D particle-velocity at frequencies up to 0.5 MHz.

  5. Application of acoustic doppler current profilers for measuring three-dimensional flow fields and as a surrogate measurement of bedload transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conaway, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) have been in use in the riverine environment for nearly 20 years. Their application primarily has been focused on the measurement of streamflow discharge. ADCPs emit high-frequency sound pulses and receive reflected sound echoes from sediment particles in the water column. The Doppler shift between transmitted and return signals is resolved into a velocity component that is measured in three dimensions by simultaneously transmitting four independent acoustical pulses. To measure the absolute velocity magnitude and direction in the water column, the velocity magnitude and direction of the instrument must also be computed. Typically this is accomplished by ensonifying the streambed with an acoustical pulse that also provides a depth measurement for each of the four acoustic beams. Sediment transport on or near the streambed will bias these measurements and requires external positioning such as a differentially corrected Global Positioning Systems (GPS). Although the influence of hydraulic structures such as spur dikes and bridge piers is typically only measured and described in one or two dimensions, the use of differentially corrected GPS with ADCPs provides a fully three-dimensional measurement of the magnitude and direction of the water column at such structures. The measurement of these flow disturbances in a field setting also captures the natural pulsations of river flow that cannot be easily quantified or modeled by numerical simulations or flumes. Several examples of measured three-dimensional flow conditions at bridge sites throughout Alaska are presented. The bias introduced to the bottom-track measurement is being investigated as a surrogate measurement of bedload transport. By fixing the position of the ADCP for a known period of time the apparent velocity of the streambed at that position can be determined. Initial results and comparison to traditionally measured bedload values are presented. These initial

  6. First Absolutely Calibrated Localized Measurements of Ion Velocity in the MST in Locked and Rotating Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltzer, M.; Craig, D.; den Hartog, D. J.; Nornberg, M. D.; Munaretto, S.

    2015-11-01

    An Ion Doppler Spectrometer (IDS) is used on MST for high time-resolution passive and active measurements of impurity ion emission. Absolutely calibrated measurements of flow are difficult because the spectrometer records data within 0.3 nm of the C+5 line of interest, and commercial calibration lamps do not produce lines in this narrow range . A novel optical system was designed to absolutely calibrate the IDS. The device uses an UV LED to produce a broad emission curve in the desired region. A Fabry-Perot etalon filters this light, cutting transmittance peaks into the pattern of the LED emission. An optical train of fused silica lenses focuses the light into the IDS with f/4. A holographic diffuser blurs the light cone to increase homogeneity. Using this light source, the absolute Doppler shift of ion emissions can be measured in MST plasmas. In combination with charge exchange recombination spectroscopy, localized ion velocities can now be measured. Previously, a time-averaged measurement along the chord bisecting the poloidal plane was used to calibrate the IDS; the quality of these central chord calibrations can be characterized with our absolute calibration. Calibration errors may also be quantified and minimized by optimizing the curve-fitting process. Preliminary measurements of toroidal velocity in locked and rotating plasmas will be shown. This work has been supported by the US DOE.

  7. Ultrasonic Doppler measurement of renal artery blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Implantable pulsed Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter development has resulted in designs for application to the aortas of dogs and humans, and to human renal and coronary arteries. A figure of merit was derived for each design, indicating the degree of its precision. An H-array design for transcutaneous observation of blood flow was developed and tested in vitro. Two other simplified designs for the same purpose obviate the need to determine vessel orientation. One of these will be developed in the next time period. Techniques for intraoperative use and for implantation have had mixed success. While satisfactory on large vessels, higher ultrasonic frequencies and alteration of transducer design are required for satisfactory operation of pulsed Doppler flowmeters with small vessels.

  8. Measuring the Velocity of a Tennis Serve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eng, John; Lietman, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    Presents an alternative to the use of a radar to determine how fast an individual can serve a tennis ball. Equipped with a tape recorder and a Macintosh computer, students determine the velocity of a tennis ball by analyzing the sounds and echoes heard on the court. (ZWH)

  9. Acceleration and Velocity Sensing from Measured Strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-Gi; Truax, Roger

    2015-01-01

    A simple approach for computing acceleration and velocity of a structure from the strain is proposed in this study. First, deflection and slope of the structure are computed from the strain using a two-step theory. Frequencies of the structure are computed from the time histories of strain using a parameter estimation technique together with an autoregressive moving average model. From deflection, slope, and frequencies of the structure, acceleration and velocity of the structure can be obtained using the proposed approach. Simple harmonic motion is assumed for the acceleration computations, and the central difference equation with a linear autoregressive model is used for the computations of velocity. A cantilevered rectangular wing model is used to validate the simple approach. Quality of the computed deflection, acceleration, and velocity values are independent of the number of fibers. The central difference equation with a linear autoregressive model proposed in this study follows the target response with reasonable accuracy. Therefore, the handicap of the backward difference equation, phase shift, is successfully overcome.

  10. Velocity Measurements Near the Empennage of a SmallScale Helicopter Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, Susan Althoff; Meyers, James F.; Berry, John D.

    1996-01-01

    A test program was conducted in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel to measure the flow near the empennage of a small-scale powered helicopter model with an operating tail fan. Three-component velocity profiles were measured with Laser Velocimetry (LV) one chord forward of the horizontal tail for four advance ratios to evaluate the effect of the rotor wake impingement on the horizontal tail angle of attack. These velocity data indicate the horizontal tail can experience unsteady downwash angle variations of over 30 degrees due to the rotor wake influence. The horizontal tail is most affected by the rotor wake above advance ratios of 0.10. Velocity measurements of the flow on the inlet side of the fan were made for a low-speed flight condition using both conventional LV techniques and a promising, non-intrusive, global, three-component velocity measurement technique called Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV). The velocity data show an accelerated flow near the fan duct, and vorticity calculations track the passage of main rotor wake vortices through the measurement plane. DGV shows promise as an evolving tool for rotor flowfield diagnostics.

  11. Accurate Sound Velocity Measurement in Ocean Near-Surface Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarralde, D.; Xu, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate sound velocity measurement is essential in oceanography because sound is the only wave that can propagate in sea water. Due to its measuring difficulties, sound velocity is often not measured directly but instead calculated from water temperature, salinity, and depth, which are much easier to obtain. This research develops a new method to directly measure the sound velocity in the ocean's near-surface layer using multi-channel seismic (MCS) hydrophones. This system consists of a device to make a sound pulse and a long cable with hundreds of hydrophones to record the sound. The distance between the source and each receiver is the offset. The time it takes the pulse to arrive to each receiver is the travel time.The errors of measuring offset and travel time will affect the accuracy of sound velocity if we calculated with just one offset and one travel time. However, by analyzing the direct arrival signal from hundreds of receivers, the velocity can be determined as the slope of a straight line in the travel time-offset graph. The errors in distance and time measurement result in only an up or down shift of the line and do not affect the slope. This research uses MCS data of survey MGL1408 obtained from the Marine Geoscience Data System and processed with Seismic Unix. The sound velocity can be directly measured to an accuracy of less than 1m/s. The included graph shows the directly measured velocity verses the calculated velocity along 100km across the Mid-Atlantic continental margin. The directly measured velocity shows a good coherence to the velocity computed from temperature and salinity. In addition, the fine variations in the sound velocity can be observed, which is hardly seen from the calculated velocity. Using this methodology, both large area acquisition and fine resolution can be achieved. This directly measured sound velocity will be a new and powerful tool in oceanography.

  12. Novel measure for the calibration of laser Doppler flowmetry devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunaev, Andrey V.; Zherebtsov, Evgeny A.; Rogatkin, Dmitrii A.; Stewart, Neil A.; Sokolovski, Sergei G.; Rafailov, Edik U.

    2014-03-01

    The metrological basis for optical non-invasive diagnostic devices is an unresolved issue. A major challenge for laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is the need to compare the outputs from individual devices and various manufacturers to identify variations useful in clinical diagnostics. The most common methods for instrument calibration are simulants or phantoms composed of colloids of light-scattering particles which simulate the motion of red blood cells based on Brownian motion. However, such systems have limited accuracy or stability and cannot calibrate for the known rhythmic components of perfusion (0.0095-1.6 Hz). To solve this problem, we propose the design of a novel technique based on the simulation of moving particles using an electromechanical transducer, in which a precision piezoelectric actuator is used (e.g., P-602.8SL with maximum movement less than 1 mm). In this system, Doppler shift is generated in the layered structure of different solid materials with different optical light diffusing properties. This comprises a fixed, light transparent upper plane-parallel plate and an oscillating fluoroplastic (PTFE) disk. Preliminary studies on this experimental setup using the LDF-channel of a "LAKK-M" system demonstrated the detection of the linear portion (0-10 Hz with a maximum signal corresponding to Doppler shift of about 20 kHz) of the LDF-signal from the oscillating frequency of the moving layer. The results suggest the possibility of applying this technique for the calibration of LDF devices.

  13. Measurements of outflow velocities in on-disk plumes from EIS/Hinode observations

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Hui; Xia, Lidong; Li, Bo; Huang, Zhenghua; Jiao, Fangran; Mou, Chaozhou

    2014-10-20

    The contribution of plumes to the solar wind has been subject to hot debate in the past decades. The EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode provides a unique means to deduce outflow velocities at coronal heights via direct Doppler shift measurements of coronal emission lines. Such direct Doppler shift measurements were not possible with previous spectrometers. We measure the outflow velocity at coronal heights in several on-disk long-duration plumes, which are located in coronal holes (CHs) and show significant blueshifts throughout the entire observational period. In one case, a plume is measured four hours apart. The deduced outflow velocities are consistent, suggesting that the flows are quasi-steady. Furthermore, we provide an outflow velocity profile along the plumes, finding that the velocity corrected for the line-of-sight effect can reach 10 km s{sup –1} at 1.02 R {sub ☉}, 15 km s{sup –1} at 1.03 R {sub ☉}, and 25 km s{sup –1} at 1.05 R {sub ☉}. This clear signature of steady acceleration, combined with the fact that there is no significant blueshift at the base of plumes, provides an important constraint on plume models. At the height of 1.03 R {sub ☉}, EIS also deduced a density of 1.3 × 10{sup 8} cm{sup –3}, resulting in a proton flux of about 4.2 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup –2} s{sup –1} scaled to 1 AU, which is an order of magnitude higher than the proton input to a typical solar wind if a radial expansion is assumed. This suggests that CH plumes may be an important source of the solar wind.

  14. Mars approach navigation using Doppler and range measurements to surface beacons and orbiting spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurman, Sam W.; Estefan, Jeffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Approximate analytical models are developed and used to construct an error covariance analysis for investigating the range of orbit determination accuracies which might be achieved for typical Mars approach trajectories. The sensitivity or orbit determination accuracy to beacon/orbiter position errors and to small spacecraft force modeling errors is also investigated. The results indicate that the orbit determination performance obtained from both Doppler and range data is a strong function of the inclination of the approach trajectory to the Martian equator, for surface beacons, and for orbiters, the inclination relative to the orbital plane. Large variations in performance were also observed for different approach velocity magnitudes; Doppler data in particular were found to perform poorly in determining the downtrack (along the direction of flight) component of spacecraft position. In addition, it was found that small spacecraft acceleration modeling errors can induce large errors in the Doppler-derived downtrack position estimate.

  15. Multi-frequency, 3D ODS measurement by continuous scan laser Doppler vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekes, Ben; Ewins, David

    2015-06-01

    Continuous scan laser Doppler vibrometry (CSLDV) is a technique which has been described and explored in the literature for over two decades, but remains niche compared to SLDV inspection by a series of discrete-point measurements. This is in part because of the unavoidable phenomenon of laser speckle, which deteriorates signal quality when velocity data is captured from a moving spot measurement. Further, applicability of CSLDV has typically been limited to line scans and rectangular areas by the application of sine, step, or ramp functions to the scanning mirrors which control the location of the measurement laser spot. In this paper it is shown that arbitrary functions to scan any area can easily be derived from a basic calibration routine, equivalent to the calibration performed in conventional discrete-point laser vibrometry. This is extended by performing the same scan path upon a test surface from three independent locations of the laser head, and decomposing the three sets of one-dimensional deflection shapes into a single set of three-dimensional deflection shapes. The test was performed with multi-sine excitation, yielding 34 operating deflection shapes from each scan.

  16. Planar near-nozzle velocity measurements during a single high-pressure fuel injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlüßler, Raimund; Gürtler, Johannes; Czarske, Jürgen; Fischer, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    In order to reduce the fuel consumption and exhaust emissions of modern Diesel engines, the high-pressure fuel injections have to be optimized. This requires continuous, time-resolved measurements of the fuel velocity distribution during multiple complete injection cycles, which can provide a deeper understanding of the injection process. However, fuel velocity measurements at high-pressure injection nozzles are a challenging task due to the high velocities of up to 300 m/s, the short injection durations in the range and the high fuel droplet density especially near the nozzle exit. In order to solve these challenges, a fast imaging Doppler global velocimeter with laser frequency modulation (2D-FM-DGV) incorporating a high-speed camera is presented. As a result, continuous planar velocity field measurements are performed with a measurement rate of 200 kHz in the near-nozzle region of a high-pressure Diesel injection. The injection system is operated under atmospheric surrounding conditions with injection pressures up to 1400 bar thereby reaching fuel velocities up to 380 m/s. The measurements over multiple entire injection cycles resolved the spatio-temporal fluctuations of the fuel velocity, which occur especially for low injection pressures. Furthermore, a sudden setback of the velocity at the beginning of the injection is identified for various injection pressures. In conclusion, the fast measurement system enables the investigation of the complete temporal behavior of single injection cycles or a series of it. Since this eliminates the necessity of phase-locked measurements, the proposed measurement approach provides new insights for the analysis of high-pressure injections regarding unsteady phenomena.

  17. Sampling artifact in volume weighted velocity measurement. I. Theoretical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengjie; Zheng, Yi; Jing, Yipeng

    2015-02-01

    Cosmology based on large scale peculiar velocity prefers volume weighted velocity statistics. However, measuring the volume weighted velocity statistics from inhomogeneously distributed galaxies (simulation particles/halos) suffers from an inevitable and significant sampling artifact. We study this sampling artifact in the velocity power spectrum measured by the nearest particle velocity assignment method by Zheng et al., [Phys. Rev. D 88, 103510 (2013).]. We derive the analytical expression of leading and higher order terms. We find that the sampling artifact suppresses the z =0 E -mode velocity power spectrum by ˜10 % at k =0.1 h /Mpc , for samples with number density 10-3 (Mpc /h )-3 . This suppression becomes larger for larger k and for sparser samples. We argue that this source of systematic errors in peculiar velocity cosmology, albeit severe, can be self-calibrated in the framework of our theoretical modelling. We also work out the sampling artifact in the density-velocity cross power spectrum measurement. A more robust evaluation of related statistics through simulations will be presented in a companion paper by Zheng et al., [Sampling artifact in volume weighted velocity measurement. II. Detection in simulations and comparison with theoretical modelling, arXiv:1409.6809.]. We also argue that similar sampling artifact exists in other velocity assignment methods and hence must be carefully corrected to avoid systematic bias in peculiar velocity cosmology.

  18. Staggered Multiple-PRF Ultrafast Color Doppler.

    PubMed

    Posada, Daniel; Poree, Jonathan; Pellissier, Arnaud; Chayer, Boris; Tournoux, Francois; Cloutier, Guy; Garcia, Damien

    2016-06-01

    Color Doppler imaging is an established pulsed ultrasound technique to visualize blood flow non-invasively. High-frame-rate (ultrafast) color Doppler, by emissions of plane or circular wavefronts, allows severalfold increase in frame rates. Conventional and ultrafast color Doppler are both limited by the range-velocity dilemma, which may result in velocity folding (aliasing) for large depths and/or large velocities. We investigated multiple pulse-repetition-frequency (PRF) emissions arranged in a series of staggered intervals to remove aliasing in ultrafast color Doppler. Staggered PRF is an emission process where time delays between successive pulse transmissions change in an alternating way. We tested staggered dual- and triple-PRF ultrafast color Doppler, 1) in vitro in a spinning disc and a free jet flow, and 2) in vivo in a human left ventricle. The in vitro results showed that the Nyquist velocity could be extended to up to 6 times the conventional limit. We found coefficients of determination r(2) ≥ 0.98 between the de-aliased and ground-truth velocities. Consistent de-aliased Doppler images were also obtained in the human left heart. Our results demonstrate that staggered multiple-PRF ultrafast color Doppler is efficient for high-velocity high-frame-rate blood flow imaging. This is particularly relevant for new developments in ultrasound imaging relying on accurate velocity measurements.

  19. Birefringent dual-frequency laser Doppler velocimeter using a low-frequency lock-in amplifier technique for high-resolution measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongbin; Chen, Junbao; Guo, Dongmei; Xia, Wei; Hao, Hui; Wang, Ming

    2016-06-01

    A birefringent dual-frequency laser with a half-intracavity has been used to develop a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). The developed LDV utilizes a new signal-processing method based on a lock-in amplifier to achieve high-resolution velocity measurements and the discrimination of positive and negative velocities. Theoretical analysis and simulation results are presented. The velocity measurement experiments by using a high-precision linear stage are performed to verify the performance of the LDV. Compared with the previous dual-frequency LDVs, the average velocity resolution of the developed LDV is improved from 0.31 mm/s to 0.028 mm/s for a target without the rotational velocity. The measurement results show that our new technique can offer a powerful instrument for metrology sciences. PMID:27411198

  20. Quantifying error of lidar and sodar Doppler beam swinging measurements of wind turbine wakes using computational fluid dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Lundquist, J. K.; Churchfield, M. J.; Lee, S.; Clifton, A.

    2015-02-23

    Wind-profiling lidars are now regularly used in boundary-layer meteorology and in applications such as wind energy and air quality. Lidar wind profilers exploit the Doppler shift of laser light backscattered from particulates carried by the wind to measure a line-of-sight (LOS) velocity. The Doppler beam swinging (DBS) technique, used by many commercial systems, considers measurements of this LOS velocity in multiple radial directions in order to estimate horizontal and vertical winds. The method relies on the assumption of homogeneous flow across the region sampled by the beams. Using such a system in inhomogeneous flow, such as wind turbine wakes ormore » complex terrain, will result in errors. To quantify the errors expected from such violation of the assumption of horizontal homogeneity, we simulate inhomogeneous flow in the atmospheric boundary layer, notably stably stratified flow past a wind turbine, with a mean wind speed of 6.5 m s-1 at the turbine hub-height of 80 m. This slightly stable case results in 15° of wind direction change across the turbine rotor disk. The resulting flow field is sampled in the same fashion that a lidar samples the atmosphere with the DBS approach, including the lidar range weighting function, enabling quantification of the error in the DBS observations. The observations from the instruments located upwind have small errors, which are ameliorated with time averaging. However, the downwind observations, particularly within the first two rotor diameters downwind from the wind turbine, suffer from errors due to the heterogeneity of the wind turbine wake. Errors in the stream-wise component of the flow approach 30% of the hub-height inflow wind speed close to the rotor disk. Errors in the cross-stream and vertical velocity components are also significant: cross-stream component errors are on the order of 15% of the hub-height inflow wind speed (1.0 m s−1) and errors in the vertical velocity measurement exceed the actual

  1. Quantifying error of lidar and sodar Doppler beam swinging measurements of wind turbine wakes using computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lundquist, J. K.; Churchfield, M. J.; Lee, S.; Clifton, A.

    2015-02-23

    Wind-profiling lidars are now regularly used in boundary-layer meteorology and in applications such as wind energy and air quality. Lidar wind profilers exploit the Doppler shift of laser light backscattered from particulates carried by the wind to measure a line-of-sight (LOS) velocity. The Doppler beam swinging (DBS) technique, used by many commercial systems, considers measurements of this LOS velocity in multiple radial directions in order to estimate horizontal and vertical winds. The method relies on the assumption of homogeneous flow across the region sampled by the beams. Using such a system in inhomogeneous flow, such as wind turbine wakes or complex terrain, will result in errors.

    To quantify the errors expected from such violation of the assumption of horizontal homogeneity, we simulate inhomogeneous flow in the atmospheric boundary layer, notably stably stratified flow past a wind turbine, with a mean wind speed of 6.5 m s-1 at the turbine hub-height of 80 m. This slightly stable case results in 15° of wind direction change across the turbine rotor disk. The resulting flow field is sampled in the same fashion that a lidar samples the atmosphere with the DBS approach, including the lidar range weighting function, enabling quantification of the error in the DBS observations. The observations from the instruments located upwind have small errors, which are ameliorated with time averaging. However, the downwind observations, particularly within the first two rotor diameters downwind from the wind turbine, suffer from errors due to the heterogeneity of the wind turbine wake. Errors in the stream-wise component of the flow approach 30% of the hub-height inflow wind speed close to the rotor disk. Errors in the cross-stream and vertical velocity components are also significant: cross-stream component errors are on the order of 15% of the hub-height inflow wind speed (1.0 m s−1) and errors in the vertical velocity measurement

  2. A simple apparatus for measuring cell settling velocity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaowei; Belovich, Joanne M

    2010-01-01

    Accurate cell settling velocity determination is critical for perfusion culture using a gravity settler for cell retention. We have developed a simple apparatus (a "settling column") for measuring settling velocity and have validated the procedure with 15-μm polystyrene particles with known physical properties. The measured settling velocity of the polystyrene particles is within 4% of the value obtained using the traditional Stokes' law approach. The settling velocities of three hybridoma cell lines were measured, resulting in up to twofold variation among cell lines, and the values decreased as the cell culture aged. The settling velocities of the nonviable cells were 33-50% less than the corresponding viable cells. The significant variation of settling velocities among cell populations and growth phases confirms the necessity of routine measurement of this property during long-term perfusion culture.

  3. Laser Doppler Vibrometry measurement of the mechanical myogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrbaugh, John W.; Sirevaag, Erik J.; Richter, Edward J.

    2012-06-01

    Contracting muscles show complex dimensional changes that include lateral expansion. Because this expansion process is intrinsically vibrational, driven by repetitive actions of multiple motor units, it can be sensed and quantified using the method of Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV). LDV has a number of advantages over more traditional mechanical methods based on microphones and accelerometers. The LDV mechanical myogram from a small hand muscle was shown under conditions of elastic loading to be related systematically to the level of force production, and to compare favorably with conventional methods for sensing the mechanical and electrical aspects of muscle contraction.

  4. Aerosol/Cloud Measurements Using Coherent Wind Doppler Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Philippe; Boquet, Matthieu; Cariou, Jean-Pierre; Sauvage, Laurent; Parmentier, Rémy

    2016-06-01

    The accurate localization and characterization of aerosol and cloud layers is crucial for climate studies (aerosol indirect effect), meteorology (Planetary Boundary Layer PBL height), site monitoring (industrial emissions, mining,…) and natural hazards (thunderstorms, volcanic eruptions). LEOSPHERE has recently developed aerosol/cloud detection and characterization on WINDCUBE long range Coherent Wind Doppler Lidars (CWDL). These new features combine wind and backscatter intensity informations (Carrier-to-Noise Ratio CNR) in order to detect (aerosol/cloud base and top, PBL height) and to characterize atmospheric structures (attenuated backscatter, depolarization ratio). For each aerosol/cloud functionality the method is described, limitations are discussed and examples are given to illustrate the performances.

  5. Rapid and stable measurement of respiratory rate from Doppler radar signals using time domain autocorrelation model.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guanghao; Matsui, Takemi

    2015-01-01

    Noncontact measurement of respiratory rate using Doppler radar will play a vital role in future clinical practice. Doppler radar remotely monitors the tiny chest wall movements induced by respiration activity. The most competitive advantage of this technique is to allow users fully unconstrained with no biological electrode attachments. However, the Doppler radar, unlike other contact-type sensors, is easily affected by the random body movements. In this paper, we proposed a time domain autocorrelation model to process the radar signals for rapid and stable estimation of the respiratory rate. We tested the autocorrelation model on 8 subjects in laboratory, and compared the respiratory rates detected by noncontact radar with reference contact-type respiratory effort belt. Autocorrelation model showed the effects of reducing the random body movement noise added to Doppler radar's respiration signals. Moreover, the respiratory rate can be rapidly calculated from the first main peak in the autocorrelation waveform within 10 s.

  6. Rapid and stable measurement of respiratory rate from Doppler radar signals using time domain autocorrelation model.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guanghao; Matsui, Takemi

    2015-01-01

    Noncontact measurement of respiratory rate using Doppler radar will play a vital role in future clinical practice. Doppler radar remotely monitors the tiny chest wall movements induced by respiration activity. The most competitive advantage of this technique is to allow users fully unconstrained with no biological electrode attachments. However, the Doppler radar, unlike other contact-type sensors, is easily affected by the random body movements. In this paper, we proposed a time domain autocorrelation model to process the radar signals for rapid and stable estimation of the respiratory rate. We tested the autocorrelation model on 8 subjects in laboratory, and compared the respiratory rates detected by noncontact radar with reference contact-type respiratory effort belt. Autocorrelation model showed the effects of reducing the random body movement noise added to Doppler radar's respiration signals. Moreover, the respiratory rate can be rapidly calculated from the first main peak in the autocorrelation waveform within 10 s. PMID:26737655

  7. Evaluation of the Acoustic Doppler Velocity Meter for Computation of Discharge Records at Three Sites in Colorado, 2004-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Michael R.; Diaz, Paul; Smits, Dennis E.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Colorado Water Conservation Board, conducted a study in 2004-2005 at three sites in Colorado: Bear Creek at Morrison, Clear Creek near Empire, and Redlands Canal near Grand Junction. The study was done to evaluate acoustic Doppler velocity meter (ADVM) technology in different hydrologic settings that are characteristic of many Colorado streamflow-gaging sites. ADVMs have been tested and used extensively in many parts of the United States by USGS but not in Colorado where relatively small, shallow, clear, coarse-bed streams that ice up in the winter may affect the ADVM suitability. In this study, ADVM instrumentation was successfully used and discharge computations compared favorably, generally within 5 to 10 percent, with conventional USGS stage/discharge methods at the three Colorado sites. However, two factors, encountered in this study, may adversely affect the use of ADVM technology in Colorado. First, for some streams, the depth required (about 1.5 feet for a side-looking instrument) cannot be met during low-flow periods of the year. Second, cold temperatures and freezing-thawing cycles can produce ice effects that could prevent collection of usable ADVM (and stage) data.

  8. Estimating suspended solids concentrations from backscatter intensity measured by acoustic Doppler current profiler in San Francisco Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    The estimation of mass concentration of suspended solids is one of the properties needed to understand the characteristics of sediment transport in bays and estuaries. However, useful measurements or estimates of this property are often problematic when employing the usual methods of determination from collected water samples or optical sensors. Analysis of water samples tends to undersample the highly variable character of suspended solids, and optical sensors often become useless from biological fouling in highly productive regions. Acoustic sensors, such as acoustic Doppler current profilers that are now routinely used to measure water velocity, have been shown to hold promise as a means of quantitatively estimating suspended solids from acoustic backscatter intensity, a parameter used in velocity measurement. To further evaluate application of this technique using commercially available instruments, profiles of suspended solids concentrations are estimated from acoustic backscatter intensity recorded by 1200- and 2400-kHz broadband acoustic Doppler current profilers located at two sites in San Francisco Bay, California. ADCP backscatter intensity is calibrated using optical backscatterance data from an instrument located at a depth close to the ADCP transducers. In addition to losses from spherical spreading and water absorption, calculations of acoustic transmission losses account for attenuation from suspended sediment and correction for nonspherical spreading in the near field of the acoustic transducer. Acoustic estimates of suspended solids consisting of cohesive and noncohesive sediments are found to agree within about 8-10% (of the total range of concentration) to those values estimated by a second optical backscatterance sensor located at a depth further from the ADCP transducers. The success of this approach using commercially available Doppler profilers provides promise that this technique might be appropriate and useful under certain conditions in

  9. The Martian rotation from Doppler measurements: Simulations of future radioscience experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Péters, Marie-Julie; Yseboodt, Marie; Dehant, Véronique; Le Maistre, Sebastien; Marty, Jean-Charles

    2016-10-01

    The radioscience experiment onboard the future InSight and ExoMars missions consists in two-way Doppler shift measurement from a X-band radio link between a lander on Mars and the ground stations on Earth. The Doppler effect on the radio signal is related to the revolution of the planets around the Sun and to the variations of the orientation and the rotation of Mars. The variations of the orientation of the rotation axis are the precession and nutations, related to the deep interior of Mars and the variations of the rotation rate are the length-of-day variation, related to the dynamic of the atmosphere.We perform numerical simulations of the Doppler measurements in order to quantify the precision that can be achieved on the determination of the Mars rotation and orientation parameters (MOP). For this purpose, we use the GINS (Géodésie par Intégrations Numériques Simultanées) software developed by the CNES and further adapted at the Royal Observatory of Belgium for planetary geodesy applications. This software enables to simulate the relative motion of the lander at the surface of Mars relative to the ground stations and to compute the MOP signature on the Doppler shift. The signature is the difference between the Doppler observable estimated taking into account a MOP and the Doppler estimated without this parameter.The objective is to build a strategy to be applied to future data processing in order to improve our estimation of the MOP. We study the effect of the elevation of the Earth in the sky of the lander, of the tracking duration and number of pass per week, of the tracking time, of the lander position and of Doppler geometry on the signatures. Indeed, due to the geometry, the Doppler data are highly sensitive to the position variations along the line of sight.

  10. Surface Charge Measurement of SonoVue, Definity and Optison: A Comparison of Laser Doppler Electrophoresis and Micro-Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ja'afar, Fairuzeta; Leow, Chee Hau; Garbin, Valeria; Sennoga, Charles A; Tang, Meng-Xing; Seddon, John M

    2015-11-01

    Microbubble (MB) contrast-enhanced ultrasonography is a promising tool for targeted molecular imaging. It is important to determine the MB surface charge accurately as it affects the MB interactions with cell membranes. In this article, we report the surface charge measurement of SonoVue, Definity and Optison. We compare the performance of the widely used laser Doppler electrophoresis with an in-house micro-electrophoresis system. By optically tracking MB electrophoretic velocity in a microchannel, we determined the zeta potentials of MB samples. Using micro-electrophoresis, we obtained zeta potential values for SonoVue, Definity and Optison of -28.3, -4.2 and -9.5 mV, with relative standard deviations of 5%, 48% and 8%, respectively. In comparison, laser Doppler electrophoresis gave -8.7, +0.7 and +15.8 mV with relative standard deviations of 330%, 29,000% and 130%, respectively. We found that the reliability of laser Doppler electrophoresis is compromised by MB buoyancy. Micro-electrophoresis determined zeta potential values with a 10-fold improvement in relative standard deviation.

  11. A proposed experimental method for interpreting Doppler effect measurements and determining their precision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klann, P. G.

    1973-01-01

    The principal problem in the measurement of the Doppler reactivity effect is separating it from the thermal reactivity effects of the expansion of the heated sample. It is shown in this proposal that the thermal effects of sample expansion can be experimentally determined by making additional measurements with porous samples having the same mass and/or volume as the primary sample. By combining these results with independent measurements of the linear temperature coefficient and the computed temperature dependence of the Doppler coefficient the magnitude of the Doppler coefficient may be extracted from the data. These addiational measurements are also useful to experimentally determine the precision of the reactivity oscillator technique used to measure the reactivity effects of the heated sample.

  12. Extremely high-frequency micro-Doppler measurements of humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedden, Abigail S.; Silvious, Jerry L.; Dietlein, Charles R.; Green, Jeremy A.; Wikner, David A.

    2014-05-01

    The development of sensors that are capable of penetrating smoke, dust, fog, clouds, and rain is critical for maintaining situational awareness in degraded visual environments and for providing support to the Warfighter. Atmospheric penetration properties, the ability to form high-resolution imagery with modest apertures, and available source power make the extremely high-frequency (EHF) portion of the spectrum promising for the development of radio frequency (RF) sensors capable of penetrating visual obscurants. Comprehensive phenomenology studies including polarization and backscatter properties of relevant targets are lacking at these frequencies. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is developing a fully-polarimetric frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) instrumentation radar to explore polarization and backscatter properties of in-situ rain, scattering from natural and man-made surfaces, and the radar cross section and micro-Doppler signatures of humans at EHF frequencies, specifically, around the 220 GHz atmospheric window. This work presents an overview of the design and construction of the radar system, hardware performance, data acquisition software, and initial results including an analysis of human micro-Doppler signatures.

  13. SELENE mission: mathematical model for SST Doppler measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, J.; Kono, Y.; Kawano, N.; Hanada, H.; Matsumoto, K.

    2001-09-01

    Japanese lunar exploration mission, SELENE, has been planned to be launched into space by using H II-a rocket in the Summer of 2004. This mission is composed of 3 subsatellites, a main lunar orbiter, a relay satellite and a free flying VLBI radio source. One of its main scientific objectives is the estimation of high order and degree spherical harmonic coefficients for the lunar gravity field. Different tracking methods will be employed in SELENE. The key tracking method is 4 way Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST) technique. By this way, the tracking data can be obtained through the relay when the low altitude main orbiter is flying at the far-side of the Moon and can not be "seen" from the Earth. To success the historical tracking data, a complete coverage of Doppler tracking from an orbiter at sufficiently low altitude with high tracking accuracy can be obtained. The 4 way SST has various configurations. For SELENE, the SST tracking mode is introduced here, the mathematical relation between range rate and 4 way Doppler count number is established, and a data processing stream frame by using GEODYN II is suggested.

  14. Magneto-optic Doppler analyzer: a new instrument to measure mesopause winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Bifford P.; Tomczyk, Steven

    1996-11-01

    The magneto-optic Doppler analyzer (MODA) is a new type of passive optical instrument that one can use to measure the Doppler shift of the sodium nightglow emitted at approximately 91 km near the mesopause. From this measurement, horizontal wind signatures are inferred. The MODA is based on a sodium vapor magneto-optic filter that provides inherent wavelength stability at a low cost. The instrument has been used to take nightly zonal and meridional wind measurements since October 1994 at Niwot Ridge, Colorado (40 N, 105 W). We obtained an internally consistent wind signal and measured the semidiurnal tide for several seasons.

  15. Characterization of sub-cloud vertical velocity distributions and precipitation-driven outflow dynamics using a ship-based, scanning Doppler lidar during VOCALS-Rex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, A.; Feingold, G.; Tucker, S. C.; Covert, D. S.; Hardesty, R.

    2010-12-01

    During the VOCALS Regional Experiment NOAA's High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL) operated from the RV Ronald H. Brown and made continuous measurements of sub-cloud horizontal and vertical wind speed and aerosol backscatter signal strength. We will present averaged profiles of vertical velocity distributions and turbulence parameters, stratified by a range of conditions including diurnal variation, precipitation, and distance from shore. The results point to a strong diurnal dependence in the strength of turbulence with nighttime conditions exhibiting stronger subcloud variance. Skewness shows less diurnal sensitivity with a trend towards more negative skewness near cloud base. Combining HRDL’s scanning horizontal wind speed measurements with other ship based in-situ and remote sensing measurements, we investigate the dynamics of precipitation-driven outflows and their impact on surface thermodynamic and aerosol properties. Using a sample of over 150 airmass transitions over the course of the 5 week deployment, we observed that warmer outflow air is typically drier, has less aerosol scattering and tends to have higher ozone concentrations (indicating the transport of air from above the boundary layer top). Transitions to cooler air are generally moister, have more aerosol scattering and show no significant change in ozone concentration. We will present animations of combined lidar/radar/GOES imagery that were used to facilitate visualization and interpretation of the dynamics of the outflows.

  16. On the measurement of vertical velocity by MST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gage, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    An overview is presented of the measurement of atmospheric vertical motion utilizing the MST radar technique. Vertical motion in the atmosphere is briefly discussed as a function of scale. Vertical velocity measurement by MST radars is then considered from within the context of the expected magnitudes to be observed. Examples are drawn from published vertical velocity observations.

  17. In vitro and in vivo validation of time domain velocity and flow measurement technique.

    PubMed

    Maulik, D; Kadado, T; Downing, G; Phillips, C

    1995-12-01

    This study was undertaken to validate the time domain processing method for measuring (1) the peak velocity in comparison to pulsed-wave spectral Doppler findings in an in vitro system; (2) the volumetric flow in comparison to the actual flow measured by a graduated cylinder in an in vitro circulation; and (3) the volumetric flow in comparison to a transit time flowmeter in a permanently instrumented neonatal lamb model. A prototype implementation of time domain processing in a commercial ultrasound device was used. For velocimetry, both time domain processing and Doppler methods showed low variance, low intrarater variability (0.03 and 0.09%, respectively), high reliability coefficients (97% and 96%, respectively), and a significant correlation (r = 0.96; P < 0.001). For in vitro flow quantification, time domain processing and graduated cylinder methods showed low variance, low intrarater variability (0.09 and 0.01%, respectively), high reliability coefficients (99.60% and 99.96%, respectively), and a significant correlation (r = 0.98, P < 0.001). For in vivo flow quantification, time domain processing and transit time flowmeter showed a significant correlation (r = 0.96; P < 0.001). Within the limits of the in vitro and in vivo experimental conditions, this study proves the validity of the time domain processing sonographic technique for measuring peak flow velocity and volumetric flow. PMID:8583530

  18. Phase-resolved optical coherence tomography and optical Doppler tomography for imaging blood flow in human skin with fast scanning speed and high velocity sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yonghua; Chen, Zhongping; Saxer, Christopher; Xiang, Shaohua; Boer, Johannes F. de; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2000-01-15

    We have developed a novel phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical Doppler tomography (ODT) system that uses phase information derived from a Hilbert transformation to image blood flow in human skin with fast scanning speed and high velocity sensitivity. Using the phase change between sequential scans to construct flow-velocity imaging, this technique decouples spatial resolution and velocity sensitivity in flow images and increases imaging speed by more than 2 orders of magnitude without compromising spatial resolution or velocity sensitivity. The minimum flow velocity that can be detected with an axial-line scanning speed of 400 Hz and an average phase change over eight sequential scans is as low as 10 {mu}m/s , while a spatial resolution of 10 {mu}m is maintained. Using this technique, we present what are to our knowledge the first phase-resolved OCT/ODT images of blood flow in human skin. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  19. A new instrumentation for particle velocity and velocity related measurements under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weijia

    This dissertation investigates the capability of a new instrument for small particle velocity measurement and velocity related signal analysis in an underwater environment. This research started from the laser beam quality test, which was performed in air. It was conducted mainly by means of an optical fiber sensor combined with a computer controlled stepping motor as well as two other methods, edge detection and needle-tip scattering. The stepping motor offers a constant velocity to the fiber sensor, so that the beam separation can be accurately measured by using the constant velocity value and the transit time determined by the cross correlation function of two digital signals. Meanwhile, information of the beam intensity profile, the parallelism of the two beams and the in-air beam widths can also be obtained in the test. By using the calibrated beam separation of the ribbon pair in the beam quality test, particle velocity measurements are carried out based on the relation between velocity, displacement and time in a 500-liter open water tank. The time delay for a particle crossing over the two ribbons in sequence is obtained by computing the cross correlation of the two signals. In fact, the time delay is actually a statistical mean value of many particles that cross over the ribbons in a short time. So is the measured velocity. The third part of this research is the practical study on pulse shape analysis based on the data sets of the velocity measurement. Several computer programs are developed to explore the pulse height distribution in a data set, to study the pulse degeneration, the relationship between the pulse width and the velocity, and the in-water beam width information. Some important reference materials are displayed in the appendices such as the fundamentals of the cross correlation and auto correlation, three main MATLAB programs developed for this research, the theoretical analysis of particle diffraction.

  20. Expected Characteristics of Global Wind Profile Measurements with a Scanning, Hybrid, Doppler Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Over 20 years of investigation by NASA and NOAA scientists and Doppler lidar technologists into a global wind profiling mission from earth orbit have led to the current favored concept of an instrument with both coherent- and direct-detection pulsed Doppler lidars (i.e., a hybrid Doppler lidar) and a stepstare beam scanning approach covering several azimuth angles with a fixed nadir angle. The nominal lidar wavelengths are 2 microns for coherent detection, and 0.355 microns for direct detection. The two agencies have also generated two sets of sophisticated wind measurement requirements for a space mission: science demonstration requirements and operational requirements. The requirements contain the necessary details to permit mission design and optimization by lidar technologists. Simulations have been developed that connect the science requirements to the wind measurement requirements, and that connect the wind measurement requirements to the Doppler lidar parameters. The simulations also permit trade studies within the multi-parameter space. These tools, combined with knowledge of the state of the Doppler lidar technology, have been used to conduct space instrument and mission design activities to validate the feasibility of the chosen mission and lidar parameters. Recently, the NRC Earth Science Decadal Survey recommended the wind mission to NASA as one of 15 recommended missions. A full description of the wind measurement product from these notional missions and the possible trades available are presented in this paper.

  1. Synoptic Gulf Stream velocity profiles through simultaneous inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Wunsch, C.; Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Data from a shipborne acoustic profiling device have been combined with conductivity, temperature, depth/O2 sections across the Gulf Stream to form estimates of the absolute flow fields. The procedure for the combination was a form of inverse method. The results suggest that at the time of the observations (June 1982) the net Gulf Stream transport off Hatteras was 107 + or - 11 Sv and that across a section near 72.5 W it had increased to 125 + or - 6 Sv. The transport of the deep western boundary current was 9 + or - 3 Sv. For comparison purposes an inversion was done using the hydrographic/O2 data alone as in previously published results and obtained qualitative agreement with the combined inversion. Inversion of the acoustic measurements alone, when corrected for instrument biases, leaves unacceptably large mass transport residuals in the deep water.

  2. Laser Doppler vibrometry measurement of the mechanical myogram.

    PubMed

    Rohrbaugh, John W; Sirevaag, Erik J; Richter, Edward J

    2013-12-01

    Contracting muscles show complex dimensional changes that include lateral expansion. Because this expansion process is intrinsically vibrational, driven by repetitive actions of multiple motor units, it can be sensed and quantified using the method of Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV). LDV has a number of advantages over more traditional mechanical methods based on microphones and accelerometers. The LDV mechanical myogram from a small hand muscle (the first dorsal interosseous) was studied under conditions of elastic loading applied to the tip of the abducted index finger. The LDV signal was shown to be related systematically to the level of force production, and to compare favorably with conventional methods for sensing the mechanical and electrical aspects of muscle contraction.

  3. Laser Doppler vibrometry measurement of the mechanical myogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrbaugh, John W.; Sirevaag, Erik J.; Richter, Edward J.

    2013-12-01

    Contracting muscles show complex dimensional changes that include lateral expansion. Because this expansion process is intrinsically vibrational, driven by repetitive actions of multiple motor units, it can be sensed and quantified using the method of Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV). LDV has a number of advantages over more traditional mechanical methods based on microphones and accelerometers. The LDV mechanical myogram from a small hand muscle (the first dorsal interosseous) was studied under conditions of elastic loading applied to the tip of the abducted index finger. The LDV signal was shown to be related systematically to the level of force production, and to compare favorably with conventional methods for sensing the mechanical and electrical aspects of muscle contraction.

  4. A comparison of Doppler lidar wind sensors for Earth-orbit global measurement applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.

    1985-01-01

    Now, there are four Doppler lidar configurations which are being promoted for the measurement of tropospheric winds: (1) the coherent CO2 Lidar, operating in the 9 micrometer region using a pulsed, atmospheric pressure CO2 gas discharge laser transmitter, and heterodyne detection; (2) the coherent Neodymium doped YAG or Glass Lidar, operating at 1.06 micrometers, using flashlamp or diode laser optical pumping of the solid state laser medium, and heterodyne detection; (3) the Neodymium doped YAG/Glass Lidar, operating at the doubled frequency (at 530 nm wavelength), again using flashlamp or diode laser pumping of the laser transmitter, and using a high resolution tandem Fabry-Perot filter and direct detection; and (4) the Raman shifted Xenon Chloride Lidar, operating at 350 nm wavelength, using a pulsed, atmospheric pressure XeCl gas discharge laser transmitter at 308 nm, Raman shifted in a high pressure hydrogen cell to 350 nm in order to avoid strong stratospheric ozone absorption, also using a high resolution tandem Fabry-Perot filter and direct detection. Comparisons of these four systems can include many factors and tradeoffs. The major portion of this comparison is devoted to efficiency. Efficiency comparisons are made by estimating the number of transmitted photons required for a single pulse wind velocity estimate of + or - 1 m/s accuracy in the middle troposphere, from an altitude of 800 km, which is assured to be reasonable for a polar orbiting platform.

  5. All-Fiber Airborne Coherent Doppler Lidar to Measure Wind Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiqiao; Zhu, Xiaopeng; Diao, Weifeng; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Yuan; Bi, Decang; Jiang, Liyuan; Shi, Wei; Zhu, Xiaolei; Chen, Weibiao

    2016-06-01

    An all-fiber airborne pulsed coherent Doppler lidar (CDL) prototype at 1.54μm is developed to measure wind profiles in the lower troposphere layer. The all-fiber single frequency pulsed laser is operated with pulse energy of 300μJ, pulse width of 400ns and pulse repetition rate of 10kHz. To the best of our knowledge, it is the highest pulse energy of all-fiber eye-safe single frequency laser that is used in airborne coherent wind lidar. The telescope optical diameter of monostatic lidar is 100 mm. Velocity-Azimuth-Display (VAD) scanning is implemented with 20 degrees elevation angle in 8 different azimuths. Real-time signal processing board is developed to acquire and process the heterodyne mixing signal with 10000 pulses spectra accumulated every second. Wind profiles are obtained every 20 seconds. Several experiments are implemented to evaluate the performance of the lidar. We have carried out airborne wind lidar experiments successfully, and the wind profiles are compared with aerological theodolite and ground based wind lidar. Wind speed standard error of less than 0.4m/s is shown between airborne wind lidar and balloon aerological theodolite.

  6. Unseeded Scalar Velocity Measurements for Propulsion Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitz, Robert W.; Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.; Seasholtz, Richard G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Unseeded molecular tagging methods based on single-photon processes that produce long tag lines (>50 mm) have been recently developed and demonstrated by the Combustion Laser Diagnostics Group (Mechanical Engineering Department) at Vanderbilt University [1,2]. In Ozone Tagging Velocimetry (OTV) a line of ozone (O3) is produced by a single photon from a pulsed narrowband argon fluoride (ArF) excimer laser operating at - 193 nm. After a known time delay, t, the position of the displaced (convected in the flow field) O3 tag line is revealed by photodissociation of O3 and subsequent fluorescence of O2, caused by a pulsed laser sheet from a krypton fluoride (KrF) excimer laser operating at - 248 nm. Intensified CCD camera images of the fluorescence are taken from the initial and final tag line locations thus providing unobtrusive means of establishing a velocity profile in the interrogated flow field. The O3 lines are "written" and subsequently "read" by the following reactions:

  7. An Economical High Resolution Spectrograph Optimized for Radial Velocity Measurements at 5000 Angstroms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, D.; Arion, D. N.

    2004-12-01

    A high resolution spectrometer was built and calibrated on an optical bench. The target resolution of the instrument was designed to allow accurate measurement of the Doppler shifts of the 5007 Angstrom O III line in planetary nebulae due to their expansion. The optical components of the instrument include two Meade ETX 90 Maksutov-Cassegrain telescopes, a Richardson Grating Laboratory reflection diffraction grating, nickel-plated glass slides used as slit apertures, and an SBIG ST-8E CCD imaging camera. The mounts for each of the optical components were machined out of aluminum bar and plate stock. The instrument was calibrated using He and Hg gas discharge tubes generating spectra of known wavelengths. A total of four sets of lines were imaged and analyzed to calibrate the instrument. The line shapes in the images were manually fit with functions approximating the pressure and Doppler broadening of the lines, as expected for the behavior of the lines emitted by the spectrum tubes. These fits were used to identify the line peak positions, which were then compared to standard line wavelengths to determine the instrument calibration. The He I line at 5015.678 Angstrom line was carefully analyzed to determine the system wavelength uncertainty, which determines the smallest resolvable difference in wavelength that the instrument can determine. The resulting operating resolution at 5007 Angstroms was found to be 206474, making the instrument capable of resolving Doppler shifts at 5007 Angstroms corresponding to +/- 1.4 kilometers per second. The program was thus successful in developing an instrument suitable for a variety of relatively low velocity Doppler measurements, especially those associated with planetary nebula expansions. Future work entails developing a mounting system to rigidly hold the instrument on a suitable telescope, while maintaining the necessary precision to retain the instrumental resolution. This work was supported in part by Carthage College

  8. Uncertainty in Cloud Aerosol Transport System (CATS) Doppler Lidar Products and Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selmer, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Cloud Aerosol Transport System (CATS) is both a high spectral resolution lidar and Doppler lidar currently being developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for use as a demonstrator instrument for NASA’s Aerosol Cloud Ecosystem (ACE) Mission. CATS is intended to fly on NASA’s high-altitude ER-2 aircraft. CATS will be capable of measuring both aerosol properties and horizontal wind velocity as a function of altitude. The accuracy of these measurements is important to the success of the instrument and the ACE mission. Uncertainty equations for both the aerosol and wind products are derived. Initially the only sources of error are assumed to be instrument error in the spectral measurements. Using simulated CATS spectral measurements from simulated atmospheric profiles (an atmosphere with only a cirrus layer, an atmosphere with only a cumulus layer, an atmosphere with only an aerosol layer, and an atmosphere with no clouds or aerosols), the uncertainty in the aerosol and wind products are calculated. These calculated uncertainties are found to be within reason. Also worthy of consideration is the effect of aircraft motion on CATS’ wind measurements and products. An equation for the the nadir angle (assumed to be about 45 degrees for CATS), as well as the uncertainty in this angle, in terms of aircraft pitch and roll is derived. The effect of uncertainty in this angle on the uncertainty in CATS aerosol and wind products is calculated using the same simulated data previously mentioned, which is found to be insignificant for normal, steady flight.

  9. Measurement of the line-of-sight velocity of high-altitude barium clouds A technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, S. B.; Harris, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    It is demonstrated that for maximizing the scientific output of future ionospheric and magnetospheric ion cloud release experiments a new type of instrument is required which will measure the line-of-sight velocity of the ion cloud by the Doppler technique. A simple instrument was constructed using a 5-cm diam solid Fabry-Perot etalon coupled to a low-light-level integrating TV camera. It was demonstrated that the system has both the sensitivity and spectral resolution for detection of ion clouds and measurement of their line-of-sight Doppler velocity. The tests consisted of (1) a field experiment using a rocket barium cloud release to check sensitivity, and (2) laboratory experiments to show the spectral resolving capabilities of the system. The instrument was found to be operational if the source was brighter than approximately 1 kR, and it had a wavelength resolution much better than 0.2 A, which corresponds to approximately 12 km/sec or in the case of barium ion an acceleration potential of 100 V. The instrument is rugged and, therefore, simple to use in field experiments or on flight instruments. The sensitivity limit of the instrument can be increased by increasing the size of the etalon.

  10. Measurement of the line-of-sight velocity of high-altitude barium clouds: a technique.

    PubMed

    Mende, S B; Harris, S E

    1982-09-15

    It is demonstrated that for maximizing the scientific output of future ionospheric and magnetospheric ion cloud release experiments a new type of instrument is required which will measure the line-of-sight velocity of the ion cloud by the Doppler technique. A simple instrument was constructed using a 5-cm diam solid Fabry-Perot etalon coupled to a low-light-level integrating TV camera. It was demonstrated that the system has both the sensitivity and spectral resolution for detection of ion clouds and measurement of their line-of-sight Doppler velocity. The tests consisted of (1) a field experiment using a rocket barium cloud release to check sensitivity, and (2) laboratory experiments to show the spectral resolving capabilities of the system. The instrument was found to be operational if the source was brighter than approximately 1 kR, and it had a wavelength resolution much better than 0.2 A, which corresponds to approximately 12 km/sec or in the case of barium ion an acceleration potential of 100 V. The instrument is rugged and, therefore, simple to use in field experiments or on flight instruments. The sensitivity limit of the instrument can be increased by increasing the size of the etalon.

  11. Synchrotron microimaging technique for measuring the velocity fields of real blood flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Joon; Kim, Guk Bae

    2005-03-15

    Angiography and Doppler methods used for diagnosing vascular diseases give information on the shape of blood vessels and pointwise blood speed but do not provide detailed information on the flow fields inside the blood vessels. In this study, we developed a method for visualizing blood flow by using coherent synchrotron x rays. This method, which does not require the addition of any contrast agent or tracer particles, visualizes the flow pattern of blood by enhancing the diffraction and interference characteristics of the blood cells. This was achieved by optimizing the sample- (blood) to-detector (charge-coupled device camera) distance and the sample thickness. The proposed method was used to extract quantitative velocity field information from blood flowing inside an opaque microchannel by applying a two-frame particle image velocimetry algorithm to enhanced x-ray images of the blood flow. The measured velocity field data showed a flow structure typical of flow in a macrochannel.

  12. Characterization of guided wave velocity and attenuation in anisotropic materials from wavefield measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Westin B.; Michaels, Thomas E.; Michaels, Jennifer E.

    2016-02-01

    The behavior of guided waves propagating in anisotropic composite panels can be substantially more complicated than for isotropic, metallic plates. The angular dependency of wave propagation characteristics need to be understood and quantified before applying methods for damage detection and characterization. This study experimentally investigates the anisotropy of wave speed and attenuation for the fundamental A0-like guided wave mode propagating in a solid laminate composite panel. A piezoelectric transducer is the wave source and a laser Doppler vibrometer is used to measure the outward propagating waves along radial lines originating at the source transducer. Group velocity, phase velocity and attenuation are characterized as a function of angle for a single center frequency. The methods shown in this paper serve as a framework for future adaptation to damage imaging methods using guided waves for structural health monitoring.

  13. Laser Doppler flowmetry for measurement of laminar capillary blood flow in the horse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adair, Henry S., III

    1998-07-01

    Current methods for in vivo evaluation of digital hemodynamics in the horse include angiography, scintigraphy, Doppler ultrasound, electromagnetic flow and isolated extracorporeal pump perfused digit preparations. These techniques are either non-quantifiable, do not allow for continuous measurement, require destruction of the horse orare invasive, inducing non- physiologic variables. In vitro techniques have also been reported for the evaluation of the effects of vasoactive agents on the digital vessels. The in vitro techniques are non-physiologic and have evaluated the vasculature proximal to the coronary band. Lastly, many of these techniques require general anesthesia or euthanasia of the animal. Laser Doppler flowmetry is a non-invasive, continuous measure of capillary blood flow. Laser Doppler flowmetry has been used to measure capillary blood flow in many tissues. The principle of this method is to measure the Doppler shift, that is, the frequency change that light undergoes when reflected by moving objects, such as red blood cells. Laser Doppler flowmetry records a continuous measurement of the red cell motion in the outer layer of the tissue under study, with little or no influence on physiologic blood flow. This output value constitutes the flux of red cells and is reported as capillary perfusion units. No direct information concerning oxygen, nutrient or waste metabolite exchange in the surrounding tissue is obtained. The relationship between the flowmeter output signal and the flux of red blood cells is linear. The principles of laser Doppler flowmetry will be discussed and the technique for laminar capillary blood flow measurements will be presented.

  14. Measurement of Thermal Effects of Doppler Ultrasound: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Helmy, Samir; Bader, Yvonne; Koch, Marianne; Tiringer, Denise; Kollmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Objective Ultrasound is considered a safe imaging modality and is routinely applied during early pregnancy. However, reservations are expressed concerning the application of Doppler ultrasound in early pregnancy due to energy emission of the ultrasound probe and its conversion to heat. The objective of this study was to evaluate the thermal effects of emitted Doppler ultrasound of different ultrasound machines and probes by means of temperature increase of in-vitro test-media. Methods We investigated the energy-output of 5 vaginal and abdominal probes of 3 ultrasound machines (GE Healthcare, Siemens, Aloka). Two in-vitro test objects were developed at the Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University Vienna (water bath and hydrogel bath). Temperature increase during Doppler ultrasound emission was measured via thermal sensors, which were placed inside the test objects or on the probes’ surface. Each probe was emitting for 5 minutes into the absorbing test object with 3 different TI/MI settings in Spectral Doppler mode. Results During water bath test, temperature increase varied between 0.1 and 1.0°C, depending on probe, setting and focus, and was found highest for spectral Doppler mode alone. Maximum temperature increase was found during the surface heating test, where values up to 2.4°C could be measured within 5 minutes of emission. Conclusions Activation of Doppler ultrasound in the waterbath model causes a significant increase of temperature within one minute. Thermally induced effects on the embryo cannot be excluded when using Doppler ultrasound in early pregnancy. PMID:26302465

  15. Validation of a radar doppler spectra simulator using measurements from the ARM cloud radars

    SciTech Connect

    Remillard, J.; Luke, E.; Kollias, P.

    2010-03-15

    The use of forward models as an alternative approach to compare models with observations contains advantages and challenges. Radar Doppler spectra simulators are not new; their application in high- resolution models with bin microphysics schemes could help to compare model output with the Doppler spectra recorded from the vertically pointing cloud radars at the ARM Climate Research Facility sites. The input parameters to a Doppler spectra simulator are both microphysical (e.g., particle size, shape, phase, and number concentration) and dynamical (e.g., resolved wind components and sub-grid turbulent kinetic energy). Libraries for spherical and non-spherical particles are then used to compute the backscattering cross-section and fall velocities, while the turbulence is parameterized as a Gaussian function with a prescribed width. The Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) is used to determine the amount of noise added throughout the spectrum, and the spectral smoothing due to spectral averages is included to reproduce the averaging realized by cloud radars on successive returns. Thus, realistic Doppler spectra are obtained, and several parameters that relate to the morphological characteristics of the synthetically generated spectra are computed. Here, the results are compared to the new ARM microARSCL data products in an attempt to validate the simulator. Drizzling data obtained at the SGP site by the MMCR and the AMF site at Azores using the WACR are used to ensure the liquid part and the turbulence representation part of the simulator are properly accounted in the forward model.

  16. Experimental Acoustic Velocity Measurements in a Tidally Affected Stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Storm, J.B.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) constructed a continuous steamgaging station on the tidally affected Escatawpa River at Interstate 10 near Orange Grove, Mississippi, in August 2001. The gage collects water quantity parameters of stage and stream velocity, and water quality parameters of water temperature, specific conductance, and salinity. Data are transmitted to the local USGS office via the GOES satellite and are presented on a near real-time web page. Due to tidal effects, the stream has multiple flow regimes which include downstream, bi-directional, and reverse flows. Advances in acoustic technology have made it possible to gage streams of this nature where conventional methods have been unsuccessful. An experimental mount was designed in an attempt to recognize, describe, and quantify these flow regimes by using acoustic Doppler equipment.

  17. Measurement of retinal blood flow in the rat by combining Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography with fundus imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Vietauer, Martin; Knopf, Corinna; Fürnsinn, Clemens; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Reitsamer, Herbert; Gröschl, Martin; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Vilser, Walthard; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-10-01

    A wide variety of ocular diseases are associated with abnormalities in ocular circulation. As such, there is considerable interest in techniques for quantifying retinal blood flow, among which Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) may be the most promising. We present an approach to measure retinal blood flow in the rat using a new optical system that combines the measurement of blood flow velocities via Doppler Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography and the measurement of vessel diameters using a fundus camera-based technique. Relying on fundus images for extraction of retinal vessel diameters instead of OCT images improves the reliability of the technique. The system was operated with an 841-nm superluminescent diode and a charge-coupled device camera that could be operated at a line rate of 20 kHz. We show that the system is capable of quantifying the response of 100% oxygen breathing on the retinal blood flow. In six rats, we observed a decrease in retinal vessel diameters of 13.2% and a decrease in retinal blood velocity of 42.6%, leading to a decrease in retinal blood flow of 56.7%. Furthermore, in four rats, the response of retinal blood flow during stimulation with diffuse flicker light was assessed. Retinal vessel diameter and blood velocity increased by 3.4% and 28.1%, respectively, leading to a relative increase in blood flow of 36.2%;. The presented technique shows much promise to quantify early changes in retinal blood flow during provocation with various stimuli in rodent models of ocular diseases in rats.

  18. The sound velocity measurement in diacylglycerol oil under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostocki, A. J.; Malanowski, A.; Tarakowski, R.; Szlachta, K.; Kiełczyński, P.; Szalewski, M.; Balcerzak, A.; Ptasznik, S.

    2013-03-01

    In this article, the influence of high pressure on sound velocity at 293 K has been presented. The investigated diacylglycerol oil (DAG - [D82T18]AG) was composed of 82% DAGs and 18% triacylglycerols. The variation of sound velocity with hydrostatic pressure for DAG was evaluated up to 400 MPa. The phase transformation in DAG has been observed as a discontinuity of the dependence of sound velocity on pressure. The sound velocity during the phase transition has shown distinct increment. Also the volume changes have been measured. It has shown the rapid drop of the volume at the phase transformation pressure due to the possible crystallization of DAG oil.

  19. Measurement of gas temperature and convection velocity profiles in a dc atmospheric glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Stepaniuk, Vadim P.; Ioppolo, Tindaro; Oetuegen, M. Volkan; Sheverev, Valery A.

    2007-12-15

    Gas temperature and convective velocity distributions are presented for an unconfined glow discharge in air at atmospheric pressure, with electric currents ranging between 30 and 92 mA. The vertically oriented discharge was formed between a pin anode (top) and an extended cathode. The temperature and velocity profiles were measured using laser-induced Rayleigh scattering and laser Doppler anemometry techniques, respectively. The temperature field exhibited a conical shape with the radius of hot temperature zone increasing toward the anode. A maximum temperature of 2470 K was observed on the discharge axis with the discharge current of 92 mA. Air velocity measurements around the discharge demonstrated that the shape and magnitude of the temperature field are strongly affected by natural convection. Estimates indicate that convective losses may account for more than 50% of the power input into the positive column of the discharge. The measured temperature fields and convective velocity profiles provide a set of data that is important for the evaluation of dc atmospheric glow discharges in various applications such as sound manipulation and acoustic noise mitigation.

  20. Measurement of sound velocity profiles in fluids for process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, M.; Kühnicke, E.; Lenz, M.; Bock, M.

    2012-12-01

    In ultrasonic measurements, the time of flight to the object interface is often the only information that is analysed. Conventionally it is only possible to determine distances or sound velocities if the other value is known. The current paper deals with a novel method to measure the sound propagation path length and the sound velocity in media with moving scattering particles simultaneously. Since the focal position also depends on sound velocity, it can be used as a second parameter. Via calibration curves it is possible to determine the focal position and sound velocity from the measured time of flight to the focus, which is correlated to the maximum of averaged echo signal amplitude. To move focal position along the acoustic axis, an annular array is used. This allows measuring sound velocity locally resolved without any previous knowledge of the acoustic media and without a reference reflector. In previous publications the functional efficiency of this method was shown for media with constant velocities. In this work the accuracy of these measurements is improved. Furthermore first measurements and simulations are introduced for non-homogeneous media. Therefore an experimental set-up was created to generate a linear temperature gradient, which also causes a gradient of sound velocity.

  1. Three Component Velocity and Acceleration Measurement Using FLEET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Calvert, Nathan; Dogariu, Arthur; Miles, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    The femtosecond laser electronic excitation and tagging (FLEET) method has been used to measure three components of velocity and acceleration for the first time. A jet of pure N2 issuing into atmospheric pressure air was probed by the FLEET system. The femtosecond laser was focused down to a point to create a small measurement volume in the flow. The long-lived lifetime of this fluorescence was used to measure the location of the tagged particles at different times. Simultaneous images of the flow were taken from two orthogonal views using a mirror assembly and a single intensified CCD camera, allowing two components of velocity to be measured in each view. These different velocity components were combined to determine three orthogonal velocity components. The differences between subsequent velocity components could be used to measure the acceleration. Velocity accuracy and precision were roughly estimated to be +/-4 m/s and +/-10 m/s respectively. These errors were small compared to the approx. 100 m/s velocity of the subsonic jet studied.

  2. Measuring the Stellar Halo Velocity Anisotropy With 3D Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Emily C.; Deason, Alis J.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Rockosi, Constance M.; van der Marel, Roeland P.; Sohn, S. Tony

    2016-08-01

    We present the first measurement of the anisotropy parameter β using 3D kinematic information outside of the solar neighborhood. Our sample consists of 13 Milky Way halo stars with measured proper motions and radial velocities in the line of sight of M31. Proper motions were measured using deep, multi-epoch HST imaging, and radial velocities were measured from Keck II/DEIMOS spectra. We measure β = -0.3-0.9 +0.4, which is consistent with isotropy, and inconsistent with measurements in the solar neighborhood. We suggest that this may be the kinematic signature of a relatively early, massive accretion event, or perhaps several such events.

  3. A new three-component signal model to objectively select power Doppler wall filter cut-off velocity for quantitative microvascular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfarnawany, Mai; Lacefield, James C.

    2013-03-01

    The wall-filter selection curve (WFSC) method was developed to automatically select cut-off velocities for high-frequency power Doppler imaging. Selection curves are constructed by plotting color pixel density (CPD) as a function of wall filter cut-off velocity. A new three-component mathematical model is developed to guide the design of an online implementation of the method for in vivo imaging. The model treats Doppler imaging as a signal detection task in which the scanner must distinguish intravascular pixels from perivascular and extravascular pixels and includes a cost function to identify the optimum cut-off velocity that provides accurate vascular quantification and minimizes the effect of color pixel artifacts on visualization of vascular structures. The goodness of fit of the three-component model to flow-phantom data is significantly improved compared to a previous two-component model (F test, p < 0:005). Simulations using the new model indicate that selection curves should be sampled using at least 100 cut-off velocities to ensure robust performance of the automated WFSC method and determine an upper bound on CPD variability that ensures reliable vascular quantification accuracy, defined as CPD within 5% of the reference vascular volume fraction. Results of the simulations also provide evidence that limiting the selection of the cut-off velocity to a binary choice between the middle and right end of the characteristic interval is sufficient to meet the quantification accuracy goal. The model provides an intuitive, empirical description of the relationship between system settings and blood-flow detection performance in power Doppler imaging.

  4. Half-year-long measurements with a buoy-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler in the Somali Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, Friedrich; Johns, William

    1987-05-01

    A self-contained, upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), mounted in the top float of a subsurface mooring was deployed in the Somali Current at 2°14'N, 45°55'E from September 17, 1985, to April 25, 1986. The instrument operated at a frequency of 150 kHz, with a vertical beam angle of 20°. Vector-averaged profiles of horizontal and vertical velocity were recorded every 4 hours, using 200 pings per ensemble at a vertical bin length of 8.7 m. The mooring was deployed in very rough topography, settling in a trough at 337 m depth with the ADCP located at 267 m depth. Data retrieval over the entire recording period was complete, with Doppler biasing from side lobe reception of vertically traveling rays affecting only the top 20 m below the surface. Over the 7-month deployment the instrument recorded current profiles encompassing the end of the 1985 summer monsoon and entire winter monsoon and also through the spring transition into the early onset phase of the 1986 summer monsoon. Significant echo amplitude variations of week-to-month-long duration were observed, which were only partially related to horizontal flow variations associated with the monsoons. Projection of the strong horizontal currents (exceeding 150 cm/s at times) into the vertical component was not observed, attesting to fairly exact orientation of the four beams and tilt meters. This indicates that the vertical current measurement from ADCPs can be potentially useful for phenomena with vertical velocities exceeding a few millimeters per second. However, an analysis of echo amplitude and vertical current variations at the diurnal period suggests that the measured vertical velocity is, at least at that period, probably dominated by active vertical migration of biological scatterers through the water column.

  5. 33. BENTZEL TUBE. A CURRENT VELOCITY MEASURING DEVICE DEVELOPED AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. BENTZEL TUBE. A CURRENT VELOCITY MEASURING DEVICE DEVELOPED AT WES IN 1932 BY CARL E. BENTZEL. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  6. Measurements of groundwater velocity in discrete rock fractures.

    PubMed

    Novakowski, Kent; Bickerton, Greg; Lapcevic, Pat; Voralek, John; Ross, Nathalie

    2006-01-01

    Estimating groundwater velocity in fracture networks using a Darcy or cubic law calculation is complicated by the wide distribution of fracture aperture often found in these systems and by the difficulty in measuring hydraulic head in discrete fracture features. Although difficult to conduct in a fractured rock setting, the point dilution method can be utilized to collect direct measurements of groundwater velocity in individual fractures. To compare measured against calculated velocities, more than 100 point dilution experiments were conducted within a 35 x 35 m area of a single fracture and in discrete fracture features within a fracture network at a larger scale. The dilution experiments were conducted by isolating a fracture feature in a borehole, measuring the hydraulic aperture, and measuring the decay of an injected tracer due to the advective groundwater flux across the fracture. Groundwater velocity was estimated using the hydraulic aperture and the rate of decay of the injected tracer. Estimates of the local hydraulic gradient were calculated via the cubic law using the velocity estimate and the hydraulic aperture. The results of the tests conducted in the single fracture show variable (1 to 33 m/day) but on average higher velocities in comparison to that measured during a natural gradient tracer experiment conducted previously (in which the effects of matrix diffusion were accounted for) and to that which would be calculated using the cubic law. Based on these results, it was determined that the best estimate of the average groundwater velocity, at the scale of the measurement area used for the cubic law calculations, could only be obtained using the largest apertures in the aperture distribution. Variability of the velocity measurements was also observed over time. Increases in velocity were attributed to the effect of rainfall although concurrent increases in hydraulic gradient were not detected (likely within the tolerance of the measuring devices

  7. Coherent Doppler Lidar for Wind and Cloud Measurements on Venus from an Orbiting or Floating/Flying Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra; Limaye, Sanjay; Emmitt, George; Kavaya, Michael; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta

    Abstract Given the presence of clouds and haze in the upper portion of the Venus atmosphere, it is reasonable to consider a Doppler wind lidar (DWL) for making remote measurements of the 3D winds within the tops of clouds and the overlying haze layer. Assuming an orbit altitude of 250 km and cloud tops at 60km (within the “upper cloud layer”), an initial performance assessment of an orbiting DWL was made using a numerical instrument and atmospheres model developed for both Earth and Mars. The threshold aerosol backscatter for 2-micron was taken to be 1.0*10-6 msr-1. This backscatter value is between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude lower than that expected for clouds with optical depths greater than 2.0. Cloud composition was assumed to be mixture of dust, frozen CO2 and sulfuric acid. Based on the DWL assessment and simulation, it is reasonable to expect vertical profiles of the 3D wind speed with 1 km vertical resolution and horizontal spacing of 25 km to several 100 kms depending upon the desired integration times. These profiles would begin somewhere just below the tops of the highest clouds and extend into the overlying haze layer to some TBD height. Getting multiple layers of cloud returns is also possible with no negative impact on velocity measurement accuracy. With support from the NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), NASA Langley Research Center has developed a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed 2-micron coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement in the Earth’s atmosphere [1-3]. The knowledge and expertise for developing coherent Doppler wind lidar technologies and techniques for Earth related mission at NASA LaRC is being leveraged to develop an appropriate system suitable for wind measurement around Venus. We are considering a fiber laser based lidar system of high efficiency and smaller size and advancing the technology level to meet the requirements for DWL system for Venus from

  8. Measurement of wind profiles by motion-stabilised ship-borne Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achtert, P.; Brooks, I. M.; Brooks, B. J.; Moat, B. I.; Prytherch, J.; Persson, P. O. G.; Tjernström, M.

    2015-11-01

    Three months of Doppler lidar wind measurements were obtained during the Arctic Cloud Summer Experiment on the icebreaker Oden during the summer of 2014. Such ship-borne Doppler measurements require active stabilisation to remove the effects of ship motion. We demonstrate that the combination of a commercial Doppler lidar with a custom-made motion-stabilisation platform enables the retrieval of wind profiles in the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer during both cruising and ice-breaking with statistical uncertainties comparable to land-based measurements. This held true particularly within the atmospheric boundary layer even though the overall aerosol load was very low. Motion stabilisation was successful for high wind speeds in open water and the resulting wave conditions. It allows for the retrieval of vertical winds with a random error below 0.2 m s-1. The comparison of lidar-measured wind and radio soundings gives a mean bias of 0.3 m s-1 (2°) and a mean standard deviation of 1.1 m s-1 (12°) for wind speed (wind direction). The agreement for wind direction degrades with height. The combination of a motion-stabilised platform with a low-maintenance autonomous Doppler lidar has the potential to enable continuous long-term high-resolution ship-based wind profile measurements over the oceans.

  9. Measuring cerebral hemodynamic changes during action observation with functional transcranial doppler

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Sik; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of action observation training (AOT) on cerebral hemodynamic changes including cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) and cerebral blood flow volume (CBFvol) in healthy subjects. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy subjects participated in this study. [Methods] All subjects were educated regarding AOT, and systolic peak velocity (Vs) as well as mean flow velocity (Vm) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA), anterior cerebral artery (ACA), and posterior cerebral artery (PCA) were evaluated using functional transcranial doppler with a 2-MHz probe, before and after performing AOT. [Results] Healthy subjects showed significant differences in Vs and Vm in the MCA, ACA, and PCA after AOT compared with those before AOT. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that AOT has a positive effect in terms of an increase in CBFV and CBFvol in healthy subjects, since the brain requires more blood to meet the metabolic demand during AOT. PMID:26157224

  10. Measurement of Poloidal Velocity on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald E. Bell and Russell Feder

    2010-06-04

    A diagnostic suite has been developed to measure impurity poloidal flow using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Toroidal and poloidal viewing systems measure all quantities required to determine the radial electric field. Two sets of up/down symmetric poloidal views are used to measure both active emission in the plane of the neutral heating beams and background emission in a radial plane away from the neutral beams. Differential velocity measurements isolate the line-integrated poloidal velocity from apparent flows due to the energy-dependent chargeexchange cross section. Six f/1.8 spectrometers measure 276 spectra to obtain 75 active and 63 background channels every 10 ms. Local measurements from a similar midplane toroidal viewing system are mapped into two dimensions to allow the inversion of poloidal line-integrated measurements to obtain local poloidal velocity profiles. Radial resolution after inversion is 0.6-1.8 cm from the plasma edge to the center.

  11. Doppler lidar results from the San Gorgonio Pass experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.; Skarda, J. R.; Renne, D. S.

    1984-01-01

    During FY-84, the Doppler Lidar data from the San Gorgonio Pass experiments were analyzed, evaluated, and interpreted with regard to signal strength, signal width, magnitude and direction of velocity component and a goodness parameter associated with the expected noise level of the signal. From these parameters, a screening criteria was developed to eliminate questionable data. For the most part analysis supports the validity of Doppler Lidar data obtained at San Gorgonio Pass with respect to the mean velocity magnitude and direction. The question as to whether the Doppler width could be interpreted as a measure of the variance of the turbulence within the Doppler Lidar System (DLS) focal volume was not resolved. The stochastic nature of the Doppler broadening from finite residence time of the particles in the beam as well as other Doppler broadening phenomenon tend to mask the Doppler spread associated with small scale turbulence. Future tests with longer pulses may assist in better understanding.

  12. Use of a tethersonde measurement system to conduct a Doppler SODAR performance audit

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkerson, G.W.; Catizone, P.A.; Coble, T.D.

    1994-12-31

    With the increased usage of dispersion models that require stack top wind information, such as the Complex Terrain Dispersion Model (CTDM), the need for a reliable method to collect elevated wind data has also increased. Doppler Sound Detection and Ranging (SODAR) instruments have gained recognition as a viable means of collecting such data. SODAR technology has improved greatly over the last decade and is now a cost effective alternative to tall meteorological towers. SODARs are remote sensing devices that sample the atmosphere and calculate wind speed and wind direction data at different altitudes. This is accomplished by measuring the doppler shift of an acoustic pulse emitted by a ground level antenna.

  13. Application of the loop method for correcting acoustic doppler current profiler discharge measurements biased by sediment transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2006-01-01

    A systematic bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) is attributed to the movement of sediment near the streambed-an issue widely acknowledged by the scientific community. This systematic bias leads to an underestimation of measured velocity and discharge. The integration of a differentially corrected Global Positioning System (DGPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic bias associated with a moving bed. DGPS systems, however, cannot provide consistently accurate positions because of multipath errors and satellite signal reception problems on waterways with dense tree canopy along the banks, in deep valleys or canyons, and near bridges. An alternative method of correcting for the moving-bed bias was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey.

  14. The Methodology of Doppler-Derived Central Blood Flow Measurements in Newborn Infants

    PubMed Central

    de Waal, Koert A.

    2012-01-01

    Central blood flow (CBF) measurements are measurements in and around the heart. It incorporates cardiac output, but also measurements of cardiac input and assessment of intra- and extracardiac shunts. CBF can be measured in the central circulation as right or left ventricular output (RVO or LVO) and/or as cardiac input measured at the superior vena cava (SVC flow). Assessment of shunts incorporates evaluation of the ductus arteriosus and the foramen ovale. This paper describes the methodology of CBF measurements in newborn infants. It provides a brief overview of the evolution of Doppler ultrasound blood flow measurements, basic principles of Doppler ultrasound, and an overview of all used methodology in the literature. A general guide for interpretation and normal values with suggested cutoffs of CBFs are provided for clinical use. PMID:22291718

  15. Doppler Lidar Measurements of Tropospheric Wind Profiles Using the Aerosol Double Edge Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Li, Steven X.; Mathur, Savyasachee; Korb, C. Laurence; Chen, Huailin

    2000-01-01

    The development of a ground based direct detection Doppler lidar based on the recently described aerosol double edge technique is reported. A pulsed, injection seeded Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm is used to make range resolved measurements of atmospheric winds in the free troposphere. The wind measurements are determined by measuring the Doppler shift of the laser signal backscattered from atmospheric aerosols. The lidar instrument and double edge method are described and initial tropospheric wind profile measurements are presented. Wind profiles are reported for both day and night operation. The measurements extend to altitudes as high as 14 km and are compared to rawinsonde wind profile data from Dulles airport in Virginia. Vertical resolution of the lidar measurements is 330 m and the rms precision of the measurements is a low as 0.6 m/s.

  16. Three-component laser Doppler velocimetry measurements in the vicinity of mechanical heart valves in a mock-circulatory loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Richard Scott

    Streakline flow visualization and three-component laser Doppler velocimetry were conducted in a mock-circulatory loop on four mechanical heart valve types in the mitral position. Measurements were conducted in the regurgitant flow region proximal to the valve. Results for the Bjork-Shiley Monostrutsp{TM} valve showed a highly non-uniform flow at valve closure, with very large velocities in the minor orifice region. These velocities were on the order of 15-20 mps and lasted less than one millisecond. Following closure, an interval of sustained regurgitant flow persisted for the duration of systole. Reynolds stresses were calculated from three-dimensional data, and yielded a maximum of 8,100 dyne/cmsp2. Values as high as 80,000 dyne/cmsp2 were calculated during the initial spike, but due to the intermittency of the spike, they are artificially high. Similar measurements were conducted in the minor orifice of the Medtronic-Hall valve, and maximum velocities of about 4 mps were measured during the sustained regurgitant flow. Maximum Reynolds shear stresses were about 7,000 dyne/cmsp2. The velocity spike at closing was noted with this valve also. Two-component measurements around the center hole in the occluder showed a sustained jet with maximum velocities of about 1 mps, and maximum Reynolds shear stresses of about 2,000 dyne/cmsp2. Measurements in the St. Jude Medical valve showed velocities and stresses to be very low. No closing spike was measured, and sustained velocities were observed in the hinge region of about 0.2 mps with maximum stresses of about 1,000 dyne/cmsp2. The CarboMedicssp{TM} valve showed a regurgitant jets emanating from the gap between the leaflet and valve housing ring, with velocities of 3.3 mps for the duration of systole, and calculated stresses of 8,100 dyne/cmsp2. No closing spike was noted. Differences between two and three-dimensional Reynolds shear stresses were significant only at locations where two-dimensional calculated values were

  17. Velocity field measurement of a round jet using quantitative schlieren.

    PubMed

    Iffa, Emishaw D; Aziz, A Rashid A; Malik, Aamir S

    2011-02-10

    This paper utilizes the background oriented schlieren (BOS) technique to measure the velocity field of a variable density round jet. The density field of the jet is computed based on the light deflection created during the passage of light through the understudy jet. The deflection vector estimation was carried out using phase-based optical flow algorithms. The density field is further exploited to extract the axial and radial velocity vectors with the aid of continuity and energy equations. The experiment is conducted at six different jet-exit temperature values. Additional turbulence parameters, such as velocity variance and power spectral density of the vector field, are also computed. Finally, the measured velocity parameters are compared with the hot wire anemometer measurements and their correlation is displayed.

  18. Velocity field measurement of a round jet using quantitative schlieren

    SciTech Connect

    Iffa, Emishaw D.; Aziz, A. Rashid A.; Malik, Aamir S.

    2011-02-10

    This paper utilizes the background oriented schlieren (BOS) technique to measure the velocity field of a variable density round jet. The density field of the jet is computed based on the light deflection created during the passage of light through the understudy jet. The deflection vector estimation was carried out using phase-based optical flow algorithms. The density field is further exploited to extract the axial and radial velocity vectors with the aid of continuity and energy equations. The experiment is conducted at six different jet-exit temperature values. Additional turbulence parameters, such as velocity variance and power spectral density of the vector field, are also computed. Finally, the measured velocity parameters are compared with the hot wire anemometer measurements and their correlation is displayed.

  19. Cerenkov detector for heavy-ion velocity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.L.; Baumgartner, M.; Dufour, J.P.; Girard, J.G.; Greiner, D.E.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Symons, T.J.M.; Crawford, H.J.

    1984-08-01

    We have developed a highly sensitive velocity measuring detector using total-internal-reflection Cerenkov counters of a type mentioned by Jelly in 1958. If the velocity of the particle is above the threshold for total-internal-reflection these counters have a charge resolution of sigma = 0.18e for a 3mm thick glass radiator. For the velocity measurement we use a fused silica radiator so that the velocity of the particles are near the threshold for total-internal reflection. For momentum-analyzed projectile fragments of 1.6 GeV/nucleon /sup 40/Ar, we have measured a mass resolution of sigma = 0.1u for isotope identification.

  20. The leicester Doppler phantom--a digital electronic phantom for ultrasound pulsed Doppler system testing.

    PubMed

    Gittins, John; Martin, Kevin

    2010-04-01

    Doppler flow and string phantoms have been used to assess the performance of ultrasound Doppler systems in terms of parameters such as sensitivity, velocity accuracy and sample volume registration. However, because of the nature of their construction, they cannot challenge the accuracy and repeatability of modern digital ultrasound systems or give objective measures of system performance. Electronic Doppler phantoms are able to make use of electronically generated test signals, which may be controlled precisely in terms of frequency, amplitude and timing. The Leicester Electronic Doppler Phantom uses modern digital signal processing methods and field programmable gate array technology to overcome some of the limitations of previously described electronic phantoms. In its present form, it is able to give quantitative graphical assessments of frequency response and range gate characteristics, as well as measures of dynamic range and velocity measurement accuracy. The use of direct acoustic coupling eliminates uncertainties caused by Doppler beam effects, such as intrinsic spectral broadening, but prevents their evaluation.