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Sample records for dorsal hippocampus impairs

  1. Preferential loss of dorsal-hippocampus synapses underlies memory impairments provoked by short, multimodal stress

    PubMed Central

    Maras, P M; Molet, J; Chen, Y; Rice, C; Ji, S G; Solodkin, A; Baram, T Z

    2014-01-01

    The cognitive effects of stress are profound, yet it is unknown if the consequences of concurrent multiple stresses on learning and memory differ from those of a single stress of equal intensity and duration. We compared the effects on hippocampus-dependent memory of concurrent, hours-long light, loud noise, jostling and restraint (multimodal stress) with those of restraint or of loud noise alone. We then examined if differences in memory impairment following these two stress types might derive from their differential impact on hippocampal synapses, distinguishing dorsal and ventral hippocampus. Mice exposed to hours-long restraint or loud noise were modestly or minimally impaired in novel object recognition, whereas similar-duration multimodal stress provoked severe deficits. Differences in memory were not explained by differences in plasma corticosterone levels or numbers of Fos-labeled neurons in stress-sensitive hypothalamic neurons. However, although synapses in hippocampal CA3 were impacted by both restraint and multimodal stress, multimodal stress alone reduced synapse numbers severely in dorsal CA1, a region crucial for hippocampus-dependent memory. Ventral CA1 synapses were not significantly affected by either stress modality. Probing the basis of the preferential loss of dorsal synapses after multimodal stress, we found differential patterns of neuronal activation by the two stress types. Cross-correlation matrices, reflecting functional connectivity among activated regions, demonstrated that multimodal stress reduced hippocampal correlations with septum and thalamus and increased correlations with amygdala and BST. Thus, despite similar effects on plasma corticosterone and on hypothalamic stress-sensitive cells, multimodal and restraint stress differ in their activation of brain networks and in their impact on hippocampal synapses. Both of these processes might contribute to amplified memory impairments following short, multimodal stress. PMID:24589888

  2. Select Overexpression of Homer1a in Dorsal Hippocampus Impairs Spatial Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Celikel, Tansu; Zivkovic, Aleksandar; Resnik, Evgeny; Hasan, Mazahir T.; Licznerski, Pawel; Osten, Pavel; Rozov, Andrej; Seeburg, Peter H.; Schwarz, Martin K.

    2007-01-01

    Long Homer proteins forge assemblies of signaling components involved in glutamate receptor signaling in postsynaptic excitatory neurons, including those underlying synaptic transmission and plasticity. The short immediate-early gene (IEG) Homer1a can dynamically uncouple these physical associations by functional competition with long Homer isoforms. To examine the consequences of Homer1a-mediated “uncoupling” for synaptic plasticity and behavior, we generated forebrain-specific tetracycline (tet) controlled expression of Venus-tagged Homer1a (H1aV) in mice. We report that sustained overexpression of H1aV impaired spatial working but not reference memory. Most notably, a similar impairment was observed when H1aV expression was restricted to the dorsal hippocampus (HP), which identifies this structure as the principal cortical area for spatial working memory. Interestingly, H1aV overexpression also abolished maintenance of CA3-CA1 long-term potentiation (LTP). These impairments, generated by sustained high Homer1a levels, identify a requirement for long Homer forms in synaptic plasticity and temporal encoding of spatial memory. PMID:18982121

  3. COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT AND MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN THE DORSAL HIPPOCAMPUS OF VERY OLD FEMALE RATS

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Gustavo R.; Andersen, Tomás; Pardo, Joaquín; Zuccolilli, Gustavo O.; Cambiaggi, Vanina L.; Hereñú, Claudia B.; Goya, Rodolfo G.

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampus, a medial temporal lobe structure necessary for the formation of spatial memory, is particularly affected by both normal and pathologic aging. In previous studies, we observed a significant age-related increase in dopaminergic neuron loss in the hypothalamus and the substantia nigra of female rats, which becomes more conspicuous at extreme ages. Here, we extend our studies by assessing spatial memory 4–6 months old (young), 26 months old (old) and 29–32 months old (senile) Sprague–Dawley female rats as well as the age-related histopathological changes in their dorsal hippocampus. Age changes in spatial memory performance were assessed with a modified version of the Barnes maze test. We employed two probe trials (PT), one and five days after training, respectively, in order to evaluate learning ability as well as short-term and longer-term spatial memory retention. A set of relevant hippocampal cell markers was also quantitated in the animals by means of an unbiased stereological approach. The results revealed that old rats perform better than senile rats in acquisition trials and young rats perform better than both aging groups. However, during short-term PT both aging groups showed a preserved spatial memory while in longer-term PT, spatial memory showed deterioration in both aged groups. Morphological analysis showed a marked decrease (94–97%) in doublecortin neuron number in the dentate gyrus in both aged groups and a reduction in glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cell number in the stratum radiatum of aging rats. Astroglial process length and branching complexity decreased in the aged rats. We conclude that while target-seeking activity and learning ability decrease in aged females, spatial memory only declines in the longer-term tests. The reduction in neuroblast number and astroglial arborescence complexity in the dorsal hippocampus are likely to play a role in the cognitive deficits of aging rats. PMID:26141841

  4. Cognitive impairment and morphological changes in the dorsal hippocampus of very old female rats.

    PubMed

    Morel, G R; Andersen, T; Pardo, J; Zuccolilli, G O; Cambiaggi, V L; Hereñú, C B; Goya, R G

    2015-09-10

    The hippocampus, a medial temporal lobe structure necessary for the formation of spatial memory, is particularly affected by both normal and pathologic aging. In previous studies, we observed a significant age-related increase in dopaminergic neuron loss in the hypothalamus and the substantia nigra of female rats, which becomes more conspicuous at extreme ages. Here, we extend our studies by assessing spatial memory in 4-6 month-old (young), 26-month-old (old) and 29-32-month-old (senile) Sprague-Dawley female rats as well as the age-related histopathological changes in their dorsal hippocampus. Age changes in spatial memory performance were assessed with a modified version of the Barnes maze test. We employed two probe trials (PTs), one and five days after training, respectively, in order to evaluate learning ability as well as short-term and longer-term spatial memory retention. A set of relevant hippocampal cell markers was also quantitated in the animals by means of an unbiased stereological approach. The results revealed that old rats perform better than senile rats in acquisition trials and young rats perform better than both aging groups. However, during short-term PT both aging groups showed a preserved spatial memory while in longer-term PT, spatial memory showed deterioration in both aged groups. Morphological analysis showed a marked decrease (94-97%) in doublecortin neuron number in the dentate gyrus in both aged groups and a reduction in glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cell number in the stratum radiatum of aging rats. Astroglial process length and branching complexity decreased in aged rats. We conclude that while target-seeking activity and learning ability decrease in aged females, spatial memory only declines in the longer-term tests. The reduction in neuroblast number and astroglial arborescence complexity in the dorsal hippocampus are likely to play a role in the cognitive deficits of aging rats.

  5. Dopamine in the Dorsal Hippocampus Impairs the Late Consolidation of Cocaine-Associated Memory

    PubMed Central

    Kramar, Cecilia P; Chefer, Vladimir I; Wise, Roy A; Medina, Jorge H; Barbano, M Flavia

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine is thought to be addictive because it elevates dopamine levels in the striatum, reinforcing drug-seeking habits. Cocaine also elevates dopamine levels in the hippocampus, a structure involved in contextual conditioning as well as in reward function. Hippocampal dopamine promotes the late phase of consolidation of an aversive step-down avoidance memory. Here, we examined the role of hippocampal dopamine function in the persistence of the conditioned increase in preference for a cocaine-associated compartment. Blocking dorsal hippocampal D1-type receptors (D1Rs) but not D2-type receptors (D2Rs) 12 h after a single training trial extended persistence of the normally short-lived memory; conversely, a general and a specific phospholipase C-coupled D1R agonist (but not a D2R or adenylyl cyclase-coupled D1R agonist) decreased the persistence of the normally long-lived memory established by three-trial training. These effects of D1 agents were opposite to those previously established in a step-down avoidance task, and were here also found to be opposite to those in a lithium chloride-conditioned avoidance task. After returning to normal following cocaine injection, dopamine levels in the dorsal hippocampus were found elevated again at the time when dopamine antagonists and agonists were effective: between 13 and 17 h after cocaine injection. These findings confirm that, long after the making of a cocaine–place association, hippocampal activity modulates memory consolidation for that association via a dopamine-dependent mechanism. They suggest a dynamic role for dorsal hippocampal dopamine in this late-phase memory consolidation and, unexpectedly, differential roles for late consolidation of memories for places that induce approach or withdrawal because of a drug association. PMID:24442095

  6. A high-fat diet impairs learning that is dependent on the dorsal hippocampus but spares other forms of learning.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, Eric M; Warninger, Elizabeth E; Michener, Paige N

    2015-12-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of a high-fat diet (HFD) on two tasks that were either dependent on the dorsal hippocampus (DH) or independent of the DH. A total of 80 adult male Sprague Dawley rats were administered either a lard-based HFD (60% of calories from fat) or a control diet (10% of calories from fat) for 8 weeks, and then were trained and tested on either the latent cue preference (LCP) task or the conditioned cue preference (CCP) task in a 3-compartment box apparatus (2 end-compartments and 1 middle-compartment). The end compartments of the box apparatus contained either a single environmental cue (DH-independent) or multiple environmental cues (DH-dependent). During training trials for the LCP and CCP tasks, on alternating days, rats were given access to water in 1 of the 2 end compartments and no water in the opposite end compartment. Rats were water-replete during LCP training and were water-deprived during CCP training. During testing for both tasks, all rats were water-deprived and given free access to all compartments while the amounts of time spent in each compartment were recorded. Results showed that rats given the HFD demonstrated no compartment preferences during both LCP and CCP testing when the compartments contained multiple cues, while rats fed the control diet demonstrated normal compartment preference behavior. However, when the compartments contained a single environmental cue, rats given either the HFD and control diet demonstrated normal LCP and CCP learning. These results demonstrate that consumption of a HFD disrupted both LCP and CCP learning in a multiple-cue (DH-dependent) environment, but did not impair either type of learning in a single-cue (DH-independent) environment. This may be due to selective impairment of the DH caused by increased oxidative stress, inflammation, and/or disrupted neurotransmission produced by consumption of the HFD.

  7. Inactivation of the dorsal hippocampus or the medial prefrontal cortex impairs retrieval but has differential effect on spatial memory reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Rossato, Janine I; Köhler, Cristiano A; Radiske, Andressa; Bevilaqua, Lia R M; Cammarota, Martín

    2015-11-01

    Active memories can incorporate new information through reconsolidation. However, the notion that memory retrieval is necessary for reconsolidation has been recently challenged. Non-reinforced retrieval induces hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC)-dependent reconsolidation of spatial memory in the Morris water maze (MWM). We found that the effect of protein synthesis inhibition on this process is abolished when retrieval of the learned spatial preference is hindered through mPFC inactivation but not when it is blocked by deactivation of dorsal CA1. Our results do not fully agree with the hypothesis that retrieval is unneeded for reconsolidation. Instead, they support the idea that a hierarchic interaction between the hippocampus and the mPFC controls spatial memory in the MWM, and indicate that this cortex is sufficient to retrieve the information essential to reconsolidate the spatial memory trace, even when the hippocampus is inactivated.

  8. GABA(A) receptor activation in the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus impairs consolidation of conditioned contextual fear in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Misane, Ilga; Kruis, Ayla; Pieneman, Anton W; Ögren, Sven Ove; Stiedl, Oliver

    2013-02-01

    Local infusion of the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol is used for reversible inactivation of septohippocampal brain structures associated with cognitive functions. However, information on the effective duration, affected processes and site(s) of action of muscimol in the hippocampus is lacking. Therefore, the dose- and time-dependent effects of bilateral dorsohippocampal infusion of muscimol (0.01-2.0 μg/mouse) below the CA1 area were examined on processing of fear memory in male C57BL/6J mice. Infusion of muscimol 15 min-6 h but not 9 h or 24 h before training impaired conditioned context-dependent fear tested 24 h or 48 h after training. Post-training infusion of muscimol also impaired context-dependent fear when applied either 4 h or 6 h after training, although with lower efficacy. Muscimol was ineffective when administered immediately, 1 h or 24 h after training. Infusion of muscimol 15 min before training impaired context-dependent fear 4-6 h after training indicating preserved short-term but impaired long-term memory. Regardless of infusion time and dose, muscimol had no effect on tone-dependent (cued) fear memory. The impairment by the fluorescently-labeled muscimol-bodipy (5.3 μg/mouse) were similar to those of an equimolar dose of muscimol (1 μg/mouse). The distribution profile after local infusion indicated that muscimol-bodipy (5.3 μg/mouse) was confined to the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus. These results demonstrated that GABA(A) receptor activation in the CA1 area of the dorsal hippocampus causes a long-term memory impairment of conditioned context-dependent fear mediated by a long-lasting (≥6 h) muscimol action most likely affecting consolidation processes.

  9. Binge ethanol exposure during adolescence leads to a persistent loss of neurogenesis in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus that is associated with impaired adult cognitive functioning

    PubMed Central

    Vetreno, Ryan P.; Crews, Fulton T.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is a developmental period that coincides with the maturation of adult cognitive faculties. Binge drinking is common during adolescence and can impact brain maturation. Using a rodent model of adolescent intermittent ethanol (AIE; 5.0 g/kg, i.g., 20% EtOH w/v; 2 days on/2 days off from postnatal day [P]25 to P55), we discovered that AIE treatment reduced neurogenesis (i.e., doublecortin-immunoreactive [DCX + IR] cells) in both the dorsal and ventral hippocampal dentate gyrus of late adolescent (P56) male Wistar rats that persisted during abstinence into adulthood (P220). This reduction in neurogenesis was accompanied by a concomitant reduction in proliferating cells (Ki-67) and an increase in cell death (cleaved caspase-3). In the hippocampus, AIE treatment induced a long-term upregulation of neuroimmune genes, including Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and its endogenous agonist high-mobility group box 1 as well as several proinflammatory signaling molecules. Administration of lipopolysaccharide, a gram-negative endotoxin agonist at TLR4, to young adult rats (P70) produced a similar reduction of DCX + IR cells that was observed in AIE-treated animals. Behaviorally, AIE treatment impaired object recognition on the novel object recognition task when assessed from P163 to P165. Interestingly, object recognition memory was positively correlated with DCX + IR in both the dorsal and ventral hippocampal dentate gyrus while latency to enter the center of the apparatus was negatively correlated with DCX + IR in the ventral dentate gyrus. Together, these data reveal that adolescent binge ethanol exposure persistently inhibits neurogenesis throughout the hippocampus, possibly through neuroimmune mechanisms, which might contribute to altered adult cognitive and emotive function. PMID:25729346

  10. Posttraining activation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus impairs object recognition long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Julia R; Rossato, Janine I; Monteiro, Siomara; Bevilaqua, Lia R M; Izquierdo, Iván; Cammarota, Martín

    2008-09-01

    Evidence indicates that brain endocannabinoids are involved in memory processing. However, the participation of CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors in recognition memory has not been yet conclusively determined. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of the posttraining activation of hippocampal cannabinoid receptors on the consolidation of object recognition memory. Rats with infusion cannulae stereotaxically aimed to the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus were trained in an object recognition learning task involving exposure to two different stimulus objects. Memory retention was assessed at different times after training. In the test sessions, one of the objects presented during training was replaced by a novel one. When infused in the CA1 region immediately after training, the non-selective cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN-55,212-2 and the endocannabinoid membrane transporter inhibitor VDM-11 blocked long-term memory retention in a dose-dependent manner without affecting short-term memory, exploratory behavior, anxiety state or the functionality of the hippocampus. The amnesic effect of WIN-55,212-2 and VDM-11 was not due to state-dependency and was completely reversed by co-infusion of the CB1 receptor antagonist AM-251 and mimicked by the CB1 receptor agonist ACEA but not by the CB2 receptor agonists JWH-015 and palmitoylethanolamide. Our data indicate that activation of hippocampal CB1 receptors early after training hampers consolidation of object recognition memory.

  11. Role of the Dorsal Hippocampus in Object Memory Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sannino, Sara; Russo, Fabio; Torromino, Giulia; Pendolino, Valentina; Calabresi, Paolo; De Leonibus, Elvira

    2012-01-01

    The dorsal hippocampus is crucial for mammalian spatial memory, but its exact role in item memory is still hotly debated. Recent evidence in humans suggested that the hippocampus might be selectively involved in item short-term memory to deal with an increasing memory load. In this study, we sought to test this hypothesis. To this aim we developed…

  12. A role for dorsal and ventral hippocampus in response learning.

    PubMed

    Fidalgo, C; Conejo, N M; González-Pardo, H; Lazo, P S; Arias, J L

    2012-07-01

    The hippocampus and the striatum have been traditionally considered as part of different and independent memory systems despite growing evidence supporting that both brain regions may even compete for behavioral control in particular learning tasks. In this regard, it has been reported that the hippocampus could be necessary for the use of idiothetic cues in several types of spatial learning tasks. Accordingly, the ventral striatum receives strong anatomical projections from the hippocampus, suggesting a participation of both regions in goal-directed behavior. Our work examined the role of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus on a response learning task. Cytochrome c oxidase (C.O.) quantitative histochemistry was used as an index of brain oxidative metabolism. In addition, determination of C.O. subunit I levels in the hippocampus by western blot analysis was performed to assess the contribution of this subunit to overall C.O. activity. Increased brain oxidative metabolism was found in most of the studied hippocampal subregions when experimental group was compared with a swim control group. However, no differences were found in the amount of C.O. subunit I expressed in the hippocampus by western blot analysis. Our results support that both the dorsal and ventral hippocampus are associated with the use of response strategies during response learning. PMID:22507525

  13. Homer1 mediates acute stress-induced cognitive deficits in the dorsal hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Klaus V; Hartmann, Jakob; Mangold, Katharina; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Labermaier, Christiana; Liebl, Claudia; Wolf, Miriam; Gassen, Nils C; Holsboer, Florian; Rein, Theo; Müller, Marianne B; Schmidt, Mathias V

    2013-02-27

    In recent years, the glutamatergic system has been implicated in the development and treatment of psychiatric disorders. Glutamate signaling is processed by different receptors, including metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), which in turn interact with the scaffolding protein Homer1 to modulate downstream Ca(2+) signaling. Stress is a major risk factor for the incidence of psychiatric diseases, yet acute stress episodes may have diverging effects on individuals. Cognitive impairments have often been shown to occur after episodes of stress, however the specific role of mGluR5/Homer1 signaling in the interaction of stress and cognition has not yet been elucidated. In this study we show that a single episode of social defeat stress is sufficient to specifically induce cognitive impairments in mice 8 h after the stressor without affecting the animals' locomotion or anxiety levels. We also demonstrate that Homer1b/c levels as well as mGluR5/Homer1b/c interactions in the dorsal hippocampus are reduced up to 8 h after stress. Blockade of mGluR5 during the occurrence of social stress was able to rescue the cognitive impairments. In addition, a specific overexpression of Homer1b/c in the dorsal hippocampus also reversed the behavioral phenotype, indicating that both mGluR5 and Homer1b/c play a crucial role in the mediation of the stress effects. In summary, we could demonstrate that stress induces a cognitive deficit that is likely mediated by mGluR5/Homer1 signaling in the hippocampus. These findings help to reveal the underlying effects of cognitive impairments in patients suffering from stress-related psychiatric disorders.

  14. Spatial Learning Requires mGlu5 Signalling in the Dorsal Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shawn Zheng Kai; Ganella, Despina E; Dick, Alec Lindsay Ward; Duncan, Jhodie R; Ong-Palsson, Emma; Bathgate, Ross A D; Kim, Jee Hyun; Lawrence, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    We examined the role of hippocampal metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) in spatial learning and memory. Although it has been shown that mGlu5 signalling is required for certain forms of learning and memory, its role in spatial learning is unclear since studies using pharmacological or knockout mice models provide inconsistent findings. Additionally, the location in the brain where mGlu5 signalling may modulate such learning is yet to be precisely delineated. We stereotaxically injected rAAV-Cre into the dorsal hippocampus of mGlu5(loxP/loxP) mice to knockdown mGlu5 in that region. We show for the first time that knockdown of mGlu5 in the dorsal hippocampus is sufficient to impair spatial learning in Morris Water Maze. Locomotor activity and memory retrieval were unaffected by the mGlu5 knockdown. Taken together, these findings support a key role for dorsal hippocampal mGlu5 signalling in spatial learning.

  15. Electrolytic Lesions of the Dorsal Hippocampus Disrupt Renewal of Conditional Fear after Extinction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ji, Jinzhao; Maren, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that the hippocampus is critical for context-dependent memory retrieval. In the present study, we used Pavlovian fear conditioning in rats to examine the role of the dorsal hippocampus (DH) in the context-specific expression of fear memory after extinction (i.e., renewal). Pre-training electrolytic lesions of…

  16. Functional interaction between the dorsal hippocampus and the striatum in visual discrimination learning.

    PubMed

    Fidalgo, C; Conejo, N M; González-Pardo, H; Arias, J L

    2012-03-01

    The hippocampus and the striatum have traditionally been considered as part of different and independent memory systems. However, there is evidence that supports a functional interaction between the hippocampus and the dorsal striatum at least in particular learning tasks. Here, we evaluated the functional contribution of both brain regions in a visual discrimination learning task using cytochrome c oxidase (CO) quantitative histochemistry. Compared with other brain metabolic mapping techniques, CO activity reflects steady-state neuronal energy demand. Rats were trained for 6 days in a water T-maze to find a hidden escape platform associated with an intramaze visual cue. A control group of animals swam for an equivalent amount of time compared as the trained group but without any escape platform available. After finishing the behavioral task, CO activity was measured in subdivisions of the dorsal hippocampus and the dorsal striatum in both groups. Results show significantly higher CO activity in the CA1 area and the dentate gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus in the trained rats compared with the control group. In addition, a significant negative functional cross-correlation between area CA1 of the dorsal hippocampus and the anterodorsal striatum was found. Our results support current theories on competitive interaction of different memory systems during visual discrimination learning. PMID:22012685

  17. Spatial learning deficits in rats after injection of vincristine into the dorsal hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Eijkenboom, M; Van Der Staay, F J

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, performance in the Morris water escape task after bilateral lesioning of the dorsal hippocampus induced by the microtubule poison vincristine is discussed as a cognitive deficit model in rats. As we are especially interested in spontaneous or pharmacologically induced recovery processes after experimentally induced cognitive dysfunctions, the model should fulfil a number of criteria. Firstly, a clear dose-effect relationship between the dose of vincristine and the amount of spatial learning impairments should be present. Secondly, lesions must remain within the target area. Thirdly, there should be an observable behavioural recovery or compensation of the induced deficit. Two experiments evaluated the influence of the application volume (experiment 1) and the concentration of vincristine (experiment 2) on lesion location and size, and on spatial learning. The results of both experiments demonstrated that the effect of vincristine on the performance in the Morris water escape task seems to be characterized by an "all-or-none" relationship. Concentrations above a "threshold" value induced severe damage in the hippocampus and adjacent brain structures, whereas concentrations below the "threshold" value had marginal or no effects. The non-selective and highly toxic properties of vincristine make this neurotoxin an unsuitable tool for the establishment of a learning and memory deficit model.

  18. The effects of intra-dorsal hippocampus infusion of pregnenolone sulfate on memory function and hippocampal BDNF mRNA expression of biliary cirrhosis-induced memory impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Dastgheib, M; Dehpour, A R; Heidari, M; Moezi, L

    2015-10-15

    Learning and memory impairment is one of the most challenging complications of cirrhosis and present treatments are unsatisfactory. The exact mechanism of cirrhosis cognitive dysfunction is unknown. Pregnenolone sulfate (PREGS) is an excitatory neurosteroid that acts as a N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor agonist and GABAA receptor antagonist. In this study we evaluated the effect of intra CA1 infusion of PREGS on cirrhotic rats' memory function using the Y-maze test. Hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression was also evaluated. Three weeks after bile duct ligation (BDL) surgery, rats were under stereotaxic surgery for insertion of two guide cannulas in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. After 1-week of recovery, PREGS was administered through CA1 cannulas in cirrhotic rats, while control or sham groups received vehicle. For evaluation of NMDA receptor role in memory-enhancing effects of PREGS, DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5) which is a potent and competitive antagonist of NMDA receptor, co-administered with PREGS and for assessment of hippocampal BDNF mRNA expression, quantitative Real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) was used. Results showed that 28 days after BDL, cirrhotic animals' memory significantly decreased in comparison with control and sham groups, while PREGS infusion could restore memory impairment (P<0.05). PREGS effects on memory of cirrhotic rats were antagonized by DAP5. RT-PCR findings have shown that hippocampal relative BDNF mRNA expression was up-regulated in PREGS-treated groups in comparison with the BDL group (P<0.001). Our findings suggest that PREGS has a memory-enhancing effect in cirrhosis memory deficit in acute therapy and this effect may be through NMDA (glutamate) receptor involvement and BDNF mRNA expression.

  19. Proteomic analysis of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus of rats maintained on a high fat and refined sugar diet.

    PubMed

    Francis, Heather M; Mirzaei, Mehdi; Pardey, Margery C; Haynes, Paul A; Cornish, Jennifer L

    2013-10-01

    The typical Western diet, rich in high saturated fat and refined sugar (HFS), has been shown to increase cognitive decline with aging and Alzheimer's disease, and to affect cognitive functions that are dependent on the hippocampus, including memory processes and reversal learning. To investigate neurophysiological changes underlying these impairments, we employed a proteomic approach to identify differentially expressed proteins in the rat dorsal and ventral hippocampus following maintenance on an HFS diet. Rats maintained on the HFS diet for 8 weeks were impaired on a novel object recognition task that assesses memory and on a Morris Water Maze task assessing reversal learning. Quantitative label-free shotgun proteomic analysis was conducted on biological triplicates for each group. For the dorsal hippocampus, 59 proteins were upregulated and 36 downregulated in the HFS group compared to controls. Pathway ana-lysis revealed changes to proteins involved in molecular transport and cellular and molecular signaling, and changes to signaling pathways including calcium signaling, citrate cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation. For the ventral hippocampus, 25 proteins were upregulated and 27 downregulated in HFS fed rats. Differentially expressed proteins were involved in cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, and cellular and molecular function. Changes to signaling pathways included protein ubiquitination, ubiquinone biosynthesis, oxidative phosphorylation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. This is the first shotgun proteomics study to examine protein changes in the hippocampus following long-term consumption of a HFS diet, identifying changes to a large number of proteins including those involved in synaptic plasticity and energy metabolism. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000028.

  20. [The participation of the dorsal hippocampus in the antianxiety action of melatonin and diazepam].

    PubMed

    Arushanian, E B; Beĭer, E V

    1998-01-01

    The pineal hormone melatonin and the tranquilizer diazepam given in an equal dose (0.1 mg/kg) demonstrated an anxiolytic effect on a model of a conflict situation in rats. Damage to the dorsal hippocampus produced a similar effect and the anxiolytic activity of the drugs under study was removed against this background.

  1. Neurogenesis and precursor cell differences in the dorsal and ventral adult canine hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Aileen; Dalton, Marshall; Sidhu, Kuldip; Sachdev, Perminder; Reynolds, Brent; Valenzuela, Michael

    2015-04-23

    During evolution a unique anterior-posterior flexure posited the canine dentate gyrus in two distinct dorsal and ventral positions. We therefore sought to explore neurogenesis and neurogenic cell-related difference along the canine hippocampal dorsal-ventral axis. Post mortem histological analysis revealed 49.1% greater doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells and a 158.5% greater percentage of double labeled DCX-positive/neuronal nuclei (NeuN) positive cells in the dorsal subgranular zone compared to the ventral. We then show neural precursor cells isolated from fresh hippocampal tissue are capable of proliferating long term, and after differentiation, express neuronal and glial markers. Dorsal hippocampal isolates produced a 120.0% higher frequency of sphere-forming neural precursor cells compared to ventral hippocampal tissue. Histological DCX and neurosphere assay results were highly correlated. Overall, we provide the first evidence that the dorsal canine hippocampus has a markedly higher rate of adult neurogenesis than the ventral hippocampus, possibly related to a greater frequency of contributory neural precursor cells.

  2. Differential roles of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus in predator odor contextual fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Melissa E; Fraize, Nicolas P; Yin, Linda; Yuan, Robin K; Petsagourakis, Despina; Wann, Ellen G; Muzzio, Isabel A

    2013-06-01

    The study of fear memory is important for understanding various anxiety disorders in which patients experience persistent recollections of traumatic events. These memories often involve associations of contextual cues with aversive events; consequently, Pavlovian classical conditioning is commonly used to study contextual fear learning. The use of predator odor as a fearful stimulus in contextual fear conditioning has become increasingly important as an animal model of anxiety disorders. Innate fear responses to predator odors are well characterized and reliable; however, attempts to use these odors as unconditioned stimuli in fear conditioning paradigms have proven inconsistent. Here we characterize a contextual fear conditioning paradigm using coyote urine as the unconditioned stimulus. We found that contextual conditioning induced by exposure to coyote urine produces long-term freezing, a stereotypic response to fear observed in mice. This paradigm is context-specific and parallels shock-induced contextual conditioning in that it is responsive to extinction training and manipulations of predator odor intensity. Region-specific lesions of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus indicate that both areas are independently required for the long-term expression of learned fear. These results in conjunction with c-fos immunostaining data suggest that while both the dorsal and ventral hippocampus are required for forming a contextual representation, the ventral region also modulates defensive behaviors associated with predators. This study provides information about the individual contributions of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus to ethologically relevant fear learning.

  3. The role of NMDA receptors of the medial septum and dorsal hippocampus on memory acquisition.

    PubMed

    Khakpai, Fatemeh; Nasehi, Mohammad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-04-01

    The glutamatergic neurons in the medial septal/diagonal band of broca (MS/DB) affect the hippocampal functions by modulating the septo-hippocampal neurons. Our study investigated the possible role of NMDA receptors of the medial septum nucleus (MS) and dorsal hippocampus (CA1) on memory acquisition in male Wistar rats. Animals were bilaterally implanted with chronic cannulae in the MS and CA1. Rats were trained in a step-through type inhibitory avoidance task, and tested 24h after training to measure step-through latency as memory retrieval. Our results indicated that pre-training intra-MS or intra-CA1 infusions of NMDA (0.125 μg/rat) and D-AP7 (0.012 μg/rat) increased and decreased memory acquisition, respectively when compared to saline control group. Also, pre-training intra-CA1 and intra-MS injection of an effect dose of D-AP7 (0.012 μg/rat) along with an effect dose of NMDA (0.125 μg/rat) impaired memory acquisition. Interestingly, pre-training intra-CA1/MS infusion of D-AP7 (0.012 μg/rat) diminished memory response produced by pre-training injection of NMDA (0.125 μg/rat) in the MS/CA1, respectively (cross injection or bilateral injection). Also, all above doses of drugs did not alter locomotor activity. These results suggest that the glutamatergic pathway between the MS and CA1 regions is involved in memory acquisition process. PMID:26780596

  4. Major neurotransmitter systems in dorsal hippocampus and basolateral amygdala control social recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Garrido Zinn, Carolina; Clairis, Nicolas; Silva Cavalcante, Lorena Evelyn; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2016-08-16

    Social recognition memory (SRM) is crucial for reproduction, forming social groups, and species survival. Despite its importance, SRM is still relatively little studied. Here we examine the participation of the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus (CA1) and the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and that of dopaminergic, noradrenergic, and histaminergic systems in both structures in the consolidation of SRM. Male Wistar rats received intra-CA1 or intra-BLA infusions of different drugs immediately after the sample phase of a social discrimination task and 24-h later were subjected to a 5-min retention test. Animals treated with the protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin, into either the CA1 or BLA were unable to recognize the previously exposed juvenile (familiar) during the retention test. When infused into the CA1, the β-adrenoreceptor agonist, isoproterenol, the D1/D5 dopaminergic receptor antagonist, SCH23390, and the H2 histaminergic receptor antagonist, ranitidine, also hindered the recognition of the familiar juvenile 24-h later. The latter drug effects were more intense in the CA1 than in the BLA. When infused into the BLA, the β-adrenoreceptor antagonist, timolol, the D1/D5 dopamine receptor agonist, SKF38393, and the H2 histaminergic receptor agonist, ranitidine, also hindered recognition of the familiar juvenile 24-h later. In all cases, the impairment to recognize the familiar juvenile was abolished by the coinfusion of agonist plus antagonist. Clearly, both the CA1 and BLA, probably in that order, play major roles in the consolidation of SRM, but these roles are different in each structure vis-à-vis the involvement of the β-noradrenergic, D1/D5-dopaminergic, and H2-histaminergic receptors therein. PMID:27482097

  5. Distinct effect of stress on 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 and corticosteroid receptors in dorsal and ventral hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ergang, P; Kuželová, A; Soták, M; Klusoňová, P; Makal, J; Pácha, J

    2014-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest the participation of the hippocampus in the feedback inhibition of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis during stress response. This inhibition is mediated by glucocorticoid feedback due to the sensitivity of the hippocampus to these hormones. The sensitivity is determined by the expression of glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid (MR) receptors and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11HSD1), an enzyme that regulates the conversion of glucocorticoids from inactive to active form. The goal of our study was to assess the effect of stress on the expression of 11HSD1, GR and MR in the ventral and dorsal region of the CA1 hippocampus in three different rat strains with diverse responses to stress: Fisher 344, Lewis and Wistar. Stress stimulated 11HSD1 in the ventral but not dorsal CA1 hippocampus of Fisher 344 but not Lewis or Wistar rats. In contrast, GR expression following stress was decreased in the dorsal but not ventral CA1 hippocampus of all three strains. MR expression was not changed in either the dorsal or ventral CA1 region. These results indicate that (1) depending on the strain, stress stimulates 11HSD1 in the ventral hippocampus, which is known to be involved in stress and emotion reactions whereas (2) independent of strain, stress inhibits GR in the dorsal hippocampus, which is predominantly involved in cognitive functions.

  6. Glutamate receptors in the dorsal hippocampus mediate the acquisition, but not the expression, of conditioned place aversion induced by acute morphine withdrawal in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yuan-yuan; Liu, Yao; Kang, Shuo; Yu, Chuan; Chi, Zhi-qiang; Liu, Jing-gen

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the role of glutamate receptors in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) in the motivational component of morphine withdrawal. Methods: NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5 (5 μg/0.5 μL per side) or AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (2 μg/0.5 μL per side) was microinjected into DH of rats. Conditioned place aversion (CPA) induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal were assessed. Results: Preconditioning microinjection of D-AP5 or NBQX into the DH impaired the acquisition of CPA in acute morphine-dependent rats. However, intra-DH microinjection of D-AP5 or NBQX after conditioning but before the testing session had no effect on the expression of CPA. Conclusion: Our results suggest that NMDA and AMPA receptors in the dorsal hippocampus are involved in the acquisition, but not in the expression, of the negative motivational components of acute morphine withdrawal in rats. PMID:19767765

  7. Age-related differences in oligodendrogenesis across the dorsal-ventral axis of the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Jun; Jinno, Shozo

    2014-08-01

    Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) continue to divide and generate new oligodendrocytes (OLs) in the healthy adult brain. Although recent studies have indicated that adult oligodendrogenesis may be vital for the maintenance of normal brain function, the significance of adult oligodendrogenesis in brain aging remains unclear. In this study, we report a stereological estimation of age-related oligodendrogenesis changes in the mouse hippocampus: the dorsal subdivision is related to learning and memory, while the ventral subdivision is involved in emotional behaviors. To identify OPCs and OLs, we used a set of molecular markers, OL lineage transcription factor (Olig2) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha (PDGFαR). Intracellular dye injection shows that PDGFαR+/Olig2+ cells and PDGFαR-/Olig2+ cells can be defined as OPCs and OLs, respectively. In the dorsal Ammon's horn, the numbers of OPCs decreased with age, while those of OLs remained unchanged during aging. In the ventral Ammon's horn, the numbers of OPCs and OLs generally decreased with age. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) fate-tracing analysis revealed that the numbers of BrdU+ mitotic OPCs in the Ammon's horn remained unchanged during aging in both the dorsal and ventral subdivisions. Unexpectedly, the numbers of BrdU+ newly generated OLs increased with age in the dorsal Ammon's horn, but remained unchanged in the ventral Ammon's horn. Together, the numbers of OLs in the dorsal Ammon's horn may be maintained during aging by increased survival of adult born OLs, while the numbers of OLs in the ventral Ammon's horn may be reduced with age due to the lack of such compensatory mechanisms. These observations provide new insight into the involvement of adult oligodendrogenesis in age-related changes in the structure and function of the hippocampus.

  8. Hippocampus and subregions of the dorsal striatum respond differently to a behavioral strategy change on a spatial navigation task

    PubMed Central

    Regier, Paul S.; Amemiya, Seiichiro

    2015-01-01

    Goal-directed and habit-based behaviors are driven by multiple but dissociable decision making systems involving several different brain areas, including the hippocampus and dorsal striatum. On repetitive tasks, behavior transitions from goal directed to habit based with experience. Hippocampus has been implicated in initial learning and dorsal striatum in automating behavior, but recent studies suggest that subregions within the dorsal striatum have distinct roles in mediating habit-based and goal-directed behavior. We compared neural activity in the CA1 region of hippocampus with anterior dorsolateral and posterior dorsomedial striatum in rats on a spatial choice task, in which subjects experienced reward delivery changes that forced them to adjust their behavioral strategy. Our results confirm the importance of the hippocampus in evaluating predictive steps during goal-directed behavior, while separate circuits in the basal ganglia integrated relevant information during automation of actions and recognized when new behaviors were needed to continue obtaining rewards. PMID:26084902

  9. Lasting Differential Effects on Plasticity Induced by Prenatal Stress in Dorsal and Ventral Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryan, Gayane; Segal, Menahem

    2016-01-01

    Early life adversaries have a profound impact on the developing brain structure and functions that persist long after the original traumatic experience has vanished. One of the extensively studied brain structures in relation to early life stress has been the hippocampus because of its unique association with cognitive processes of the brain. While the entire hippocampus shares the same intrinsic organization, it assumes different functions in its dorsal and ventral sectors (DH and VH, resp.), based on different connectivity with other brain structures. In the present review, we summarize the differences between DH and VH and discuss functional and structural effects of prenatal stress in the two sectors, with the realization that much is yet to be explored in understanding the opposite reactivity of the DH and VH to stressful stimulation. PMID:26881096

  10. Hypothalamic and Other Connections with the Dorsal CA2 Area of the Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhenzhong; Gerfen, Charles R.; Young, W. Scott

    2013-01-01

    The CA2 area is an important, although relatively unexplored, component of the hippocampus. We used various tracers to provide a comprehensive analysis of CA2 connections in C57BL/6J mice. Using various adeno-associated viruses that express fluorescent proteins, we found a vasopressinergic projection from the paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus (PVN) to the CA2, as well as a projection from pyramidal neurons of the CA2 to the supramammillary nuclei. These projections were confirmed by retrograde tracing. As expected, we observed CA2 afferent projections from neurons in ipsilateral entorhinal cortical layer II as well as from bilateral dorsal CA2 and CA3 using retrograde tracers. Additionally, we saw CA2 neuronal input from bilateral medial septal nuclei, vertical and horizontal limbs of the nucleus of diagonal band of Broca, supramammillary nuclei (SUM) and median raphe nucleus. Dorsal CA2 injections of adeno-associated virus expressing green fluorescent protein revealed axonal projections primarily to dorsal CA1, CA2 and CA3 bilaterally. No projection was detected to the entorhinal cortex from the dorsal CA2. These results are consistent with recent observations that the dorsal CA2 forms disynaptic connections with the entorhinal cortex to influence dynamic memory processing. Mouse dorsal CA2 neurons send bilateral projections to the medial and lateral septal nuclei, vertical and horizontal limbs of the diagonal band of Broca and the SUM. Novel connections from the PVN and to the SUM suggest important regulatory roles for CA2 in mediating social and emotional input for memory processing. PMID:23172108

  11. Endothelin-1-induced mini-stroke in the dorsal hippocampus or lateral amygdala results in deficits in learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Tao; Zhang, Xueting; Wang, Shaoli; Zhang, Jingyun; Lu, Wei; Dai, Yifan

    2015-09-01

    Functional and structural alterations in brain connectivity associated with brain ischemia have been extensively studied. However, the mechanism whereby local ischemia in deep brain region affect brain functions is still unknown. Here, we first established a mini-stroke model by infusion of endothelin-1 (ET-1) into the dorsal hippocampus or the lateral amygdala, and then investigated how these mini-infarcts affected brain functions associated with these regions. We found that rats with ET-1 infusion showed deficit in recall of contextual fear memory, but not in learning process and recall of tone fear memory. In novel object task, ET-1 in the hippocampus also eliminated object identity memory. ET-1 in the lateral amygdale affected acquisition of fear conditioning and disrupted retention of tone-conditioned fear, but did not impair retention of contextual fear. These findings suggest that ET-1-induced mini-infarct in deep brain area leads to functional deficits in learning and memory associated with these regions. PMID:26445569

  12. Dissociation of function between the dorsal and the ventral hippocampus in spatial learning abilities of the rat: a within-subject, within-task comparison of reference and working spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Pothuizen, Helen H J; Zhang, Wei-Ning; Jongen-Rêlo, Ana L; Feldon, Joram; Yee, Benjamin K

    2004-02-01

    Lesions restricted to the dorsal, but not the ventral, hippocampus severely impair the formation of spatial memory. This dissociation was first demonstrated using the water maze task. The present study investigated whether the dorsal and the ventral hippocampus are involved differentially in spatial reference and spatial working memory using a four-baited/four-unbaited version of the eight-arm radial maze task. This test allows the concurrent evaluation of reference and working memory with respect to the same set of spatial cues, and thereby enables a within-subjects within-task comparison between the two forms of memory functions. Rats with N-methyl-d-aspartic acid-induced excitotoxic lesions of the dorsal hippocampus, ventral hippocampus or both were compared with sham and unoperated controls. We showed that dorsal lesions were as effective as complete lesions in severely disrupting both reference and working spatial memory, whereas rats with ventral lesions performed at a level comparable with controls. These results lend further support to the existence of a functional dissociation between the dorsal and the ventral hippocampus, with the former being preferentially involved in spatial learning.

  13. Protein kinases paralleling late-phase LTP formation in dorsal hippocampus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Wan, Jia; Sase, Sunetra; Gröger, Marion; Pollak, Arnold; Korz, Volker; Lubec, Gert

    2014-10-01

    Hippocampal long term potentiation (LTP), representing a cellular model for learning and memory formation, can be dissociated into at least two phases: a protein-synthesis-independent early phase, lasting about 4h and a protein-synthesis-dependent late phase LTP lasting 6h or longer, or even days. A large series of protein kinases have been shown to be involved and herein, a distinct set of protein kinases proposed to be involved in memory retrieval in previous work was tested in dorsal hippocampus of the rat following induction of late-phase LTP. A bipolar stimulation electrode was chronically implanted into the perforant path, while two monopolar recording electrodes were implanted into the dentate gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus. The recording electrode was measuring extracellular excitatory postsynaptic potentials, while the other one measured population spikes. Protein kinases were determined by immunoblotting and immunoflourescence on hippocampal areas showed the distribution pattern of protein kinases PKN1 and NEK7. Induction of LTP was proven, elevated levels for protein kinases PKN1, RPS6KB1, STK4, CDC42BPB, PRKG, TLK, BMX and decreased levels for NEK7, MAK14 and PLK1 were observed. A remarkable overlap of protein kinases observed in spatial memory processes with those proposed in LTP formation was demonstrated. The findings may be relevant for design of future studies on protein kinases and for the interpretation of previous work. PMID:24911953

  14. Bimodal modulation by nicotine of anxiety in the social interaction test: role of the dorsal hippocampus.

    PubMed

    File, S E; Kenny, P J; Ouagazzal, A M

    1998-12-01

    In conditions generating moderate levels of anxiety in the social interaction test (low light, unfamiliar arena or high light, familiar arena), parenteral administration of nicotine had bimodal actions, low doses (0.01 and 0.1 mg/kg i.p.) had anxiolytic effects and high doses (0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg i.p.) had anxiogenic effects. In test conditions where anxiety was lowest (low light, familiar arena) and highest (high light, unfamiliar arena), nicotine was without effect after intraperitoneal or hippocampal administration. Thus, nicotine plays a modulatory role in which the activity of other neurotransmitters is crucial to its expression. After bilateral administration to the dorsal hippocampus, nicotine (0.1-8.0 microg) had anxiogenic effects in conditions of moderate anxiety; mecamylamine (30 ng) was silent in these conditions, indicating no intrinsic tone. Our results show that the dorsal hippocampus is one area that can mediate anxiogenic effects in the social interaction test, but the brain region mediating anxiolytic effects remains to be identified.

  15. The bite-raised condition in aged SAMP8 mice reduces the expression of glucocorticoid receptors in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ichihashi, Yukiko; Saito, Naonori; Arakawa, Yoko; Kurata, Chika; Iinuma, Mitsuo; Tamura, Yasuo; Iwaku, Fumihiko; Kubo, Kin-Ya

    2008-02-01

    In the present study, we examined whether the effects induced by the bite-raised condition on glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression differ between the dorsal and ventral hippocampus in SAMP8 mice. In the bite-raised condition, the number of GR-immunoreactive cells was significantly decreased in both the dorsal and ventral CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) subfields of the hippocampus compared to control mice, as revealed by immunohistochemical analysis. The decrease in the number of GR-immunoreactive cells tended to be greater in the dorsal hippocampus than in the ventral hippocampus. Only in the DG subfield was there a significant difference in the number of GR-immunoreactive cells between the dorsal and ventral hippocampus. These findings suggest that in aged SAMP8 mice, the bite-raised condition decreases the number of GR-immunoreactive cells in both the dorsal and ventral hippocampus.

  16. Distinct behavioral consequences of short-term and prolonged GABAergic depletion in prefrontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Reichel, Judith M.; Nissel, Sabine; Rogel-Salazar, Gabriela; Mederer, Anna; Käfer, Karola; Bedenk, Benedikt T.; Martens, Henrik; Anders, Rebecca; Grosche, Jens; Michalski, Dominik; Härtig, Wolfgang; Wotjak, Carsten T.

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons are essential for a functional equilibrium between excitatory and inhibitory impulses throughout the CNS. Disruption of this equilibrium can lead to various neurological or neuropsychiatric disorders such as epilepsy or schizophrenia. Schizophrenia itself is clinically defined by negative (e.g., depression) and positive (e.g., hallucinations) symptoms as well as cognitive dysfunction. GABAergic interneurons are proposed to play a central role in the etiology and progression of schizophrenia; however, the specific mechanisms and the time-line of symptom development as well as the distinct involvement of cortical and hippocampal GABAergic interneurons in the etiology of schizophrenia-related symptoms are still not conclusively resolved. Previous work demonstrated that GABAergic interneurons can be selectively depleted in adult mice by means of saporin-conjugated anti-vesicular GABA transporter antibodies (SAVAs) in vitro and in vivo. Given their involvement in schizophrenia-related disease etiology, we ablated GABAergic interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and dorsal hippocampus (dHPC) in adult male C57BL/6N mice. Subsequently we assessed alterations in anxiety, sensory processing, hyperactivity and cognition after long-term (>14 days) and short-term (<14 days) GABAergic depletion. Long-term GABAergic depletion in the mPFC resulted in a decrease in sensorimotor-gating and impairments in cognitive flexibility. Notably, the same treatment at the level of the dHPC completely abolished spatial learning capabilities. Short-term GABAergic depletion in the dHPC revealed a transient hyperactive phenotype as well as marked impairments regarding the acquisition of a spatial memory. In contrast, recall of a spatial memory was not affected by the same intervention. These findings emphasize the importance of functional local GABAergic networks for the encoding but not the recall of hippocampus-dependent spatial memories. PMID:25628548

  17. Differential role of the dorsal hippocampus, ventro-intermediate hippocampus, and medial prefrontal cortex in updating the value of a spatial goal.

    PubMed

    De Saint Blanquat, Paul; Hok, Vincent; Save, Etienne; Poucet, Bruno; Chaillan, Franck A

    2013-05-01

    Encoding of a goal with a specific value while performing a place navigation task involves the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the dorsal hippocampus (dHPC), and depends on the coordination between mPFC and the ventro-intermediate hippocampus (vHPC).The present work investigates the contribution of mPFC, dHPC, and vHPC when the rat has to update the value of a goal. Rats were trained to navigate to an uncued goal in order to release a food pellet in a continuous place navigation task. When they had reached criterion performance level in the task, they were subjected to a single "flash session" in which they were exposed to an aversive strobe light during goal visits instead of receiving a food reward. Just before the flash session, the GABA(A) agonist muscimol was injected to temporarily inactivate mPFC, dHPC, or vHPC. The ability to recall the changed value of the goal was tested on the next day. We first demonstrate the aversive effect of the strobe light by showing that rats learn to avoid the goal much more rapidly in the flash session than during a simple extinction session in which goal visits are not rewarded. Furthermore, while dHPC inactivation had no effect on learning and recalling the new goal value, vHPC muscimol injections considerably delayed goal value updating during the flash session, which resulted in a slight deficit during recall. In contrast, mPFC muscimol injections induced faster goal value updating but the rats were markedly impaired on recalling the new goal value on the next day. These results suggest that, contrary to mPFC and dHPC, vHPC is required for updating the value of a goal. In contrast, mPFC is necessary for long-term retention of this updating.

  18. Differential role of the dorsal hippocampus, ventro-intermediate hippocampus, and medial prefrontal cortex in updating the value of a spatial goal.

    PubMed

    De Saint Blanquat, Paul; Hok, Vincent; Save, Etienne; Poucet, Bruno; Chaillan, Franck A

    2013-05-01

    Encoding of a goal with a specific value while performing a place navigation task involves the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the dorsal hippocampus (dHPC), and depends on the coordination between mPFC and the ventro-intermediate hippocampus (vHPC).The present work investigates the contribution of mPFC, dHPC, and vHPC when the rat has to update the value of a goal. Rats were trained to navigate to an uncued goal in order to release a food pellet in a continuous place navigation task. When they had reached criterion performance level in the task, they were subjected to a single "flash session" in which they were exposed to an aversive strobe light during goal visits instead of receiving a food reward. Just before the flash session, the GABA(A) agonist muscimol was injected to temporarily inactivate mPFC, dHPC, or vHPC. The ability to recall the changed value of the goal was tested on the next day. We first demonstrate the aversive effect of the strobe light by showing that rats learn to avoid the goal much more rapidly in the flash session than during a simple extinction session in which goal visits are not rewarded. Furthermore, while dHPC inactivation had no effect on learning and recalling the new goal value, vHPC muscimol injections considerably delayed goal value updating during the flash session, which resulted in a slight deficit during recall. In contrast, mPFC muscimol injections induced faster goal value updating but the rats were markedly impaired on recalling the new goal value on the next day. These results suggest that, contrary to mPFC and dHPC, vHPC is required for updating the value of a goal. In contrast, mPFC is necessary for long-term retention of this updating. PMID:23460312

  19. Dorsal hippocampus infusions of CNQX into the dentate gyrus disrupt expression of trace fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Jamie L; Pullins, Shane E; Quinn, Jennifer J

    2015-07-01

    The hippocampus is essential for the consolidation of some explicit long-term memories, including trace conditioning. Lesions and pharmacological manipulations of the dorsal hippocampus (DH) have provided strong evidence for its involvement in the acquisition and expression of trace fear memories. However, no studies have specifically targeted DH subregions [CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG)] to determine their involvement in trace fear conditioning. In the present study, rats received bilateral cannulation targeting either the DG or CA1 of the DH. Following surgery, animals were trace fear conditioned. Forty-eight hours following training, rats received bilateral infusions of the AMPA/kainate glutamate receptor antagonist, CNQX, or vehicle. Following the infusion, rats were placed in a novel context for the tone test. Rats that received CNQX into the DG froze significantly less during the tone and trace interval as compared to controls. Rats that received CNQX into the DH CA1 showed no difference in freezing during the tone or trace interval as compared to controls. These data support a role for the DG in the expression of trace tone fear conditioning.

  20. Dopamine D1/D5 receptors in the dorsal hippocampus are required for the acquisition and expression of a single trial cocaine-associated memory.

    PubMed

    Kramar, Cecilia P; Barbano, M Flavia; Medina, Jorge H

    2014-12-01

    The role of the hippocampus in memory supporting associative learning between contexts and unconditioned stimuli is well documented. Hippocampal dopamine neurotransmission modulates synaptic plasticity and memory processing of fear-motivated and spatial learning tasks. Much less is known about the involvement of the hippocampus and its D1/D5 dopamine receptors in the acquisition, consolidation and expression of memories for drug-associated experiences, more particularly, in the processing of single pairing cocaine conditioned place preference (CPP) training. To determine the temporal dynamics of cocaine CPP memory formation, we trained rats in a one-pairing CPP paradigm and tested them at different time intervals after conditioning. The cocaine-associated memory lasted 24 h but not 72 h. Then, we bilaterally infused the dorsal hippocampus with the GABA A receptor agonist muscimol or the D1/D5 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH 23390 at different stages to evaluate the mechanisms involved in the acquisition, consolidation or expression of cocaine CPP memory. Blockade of D1/D5 dopamine receptors at the moment of training impaired the acquisition of cocaine CPP memories, without having any effect when administered immediately or 12 h after training. The expression of cocaine CPP memory was also affected by the administration of SCH 23390 at the moment of the test. Conversely, muscimol impaired the consolidation of cocaine CPP memory only when administered 12 h post conditioning. These findings suggests that dopaminergic inputs to the dorsal hippocampus are required for the acquisition and expression of one trial cocaine-associated memory while neural activity of this structure is required for the late consolidation of these types of memories. PMID:25452086

  1. Dexamethasone induces different morphological changes in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Silva-Gómez, Adriana Berenice; Aguilar-Salgado, Yuritze; Reyes-Hernández, Diego Octavio; Flores, Gonzalo

    2013-01-01

    Dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid widely used in neurological illnesses because of its antiinflammatory properties, has many serious side effects, including severe psychiatric symptoms such as psychoses. The hippocampus is divided in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) and ventral hippocampus (VH) with each region having a subfield of CA1 and CA3 pyramidal layers. Great interest has recently emerged showing that the DH and VH are functionally different. In our work we determined whether, and what, changes occurred, after five days of DEX (0.2mg/kg) treatment, on the dendritic morphology of the CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons of the DH and VH of adult Sprague-Dawley rats. The dendritic morphology and characteristics were measured by using the Golgi-Cox procedure followed by a Sholl analysis. DEX decreased the number of dendritic spines of both apical and basolateral dendrites. Interestingly, this decrease was more pronounced in the VH. Only the VH neurons were affected by DEX with a decrease in their total dendritic length (TDL). An interesting point is that the VH neurons are longer that the DH neurons among the groups injected with saline only as the control. The length per branch order was only altered in the apical dendritic tree of the CA1 neurons. These data taken together show that the VH is more susceptible to DEX and its neurons are larger than the DH neurons. These results support previous observations related to differences between the DH and VH and suggest differences in the expression of the glucocorticoid receptors in connectivity and the space to elongate their dendritic arbor.

  2. Intracellular mechanisms of cocaine-memory reconsolidation in the basolateral amygdala and dorsal hippocampus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Audrey Marie

    The ability of cocaine-associated environmental contexts to promote relapse in abstinent humans and reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior in laboratory animals depends on the formation and maintenance of maladaptive context-response-cocaine associative memories, the latter of which can be disrupted by manipulations that interfere with memory reconsolidation. Memory reconsolidation refers to a protein synthesis-dependent phenomenon whereby memory traces are reincorporated back into long-term memory storage following their retrieval and subsequent destabilization. To elucidate the distinctive roles of the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and dorsal hippocampus (DH) in the reconsolidation of context-response-cocaine memories, Experiments 1-3 evaluated novel molecular mechanisms within each structure that control this phenomenon. Experiment 1 tested the hypothesis that activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the BLA and nucleus accumbens core (NACc - a substrate for Pavlovian cocaine-memory reconsolidation) would critically control instrumental cocaine-memory reconsolidation. To determine this, rats were re-exposed to a context that had previously been used for cocaine self-administration (i.e., cocaine memory-reactivation) and immediately thereafter received bilateral intra-BLA or intra-NACc microinfusions of the ERK inhibitor U0126 or vehicle (VEH) and were subsequently tested for drug context-induced cocaine-seeking behavior (non-reinforced lever responding) ~72 h later. Re-exposure to the cocaine-paired context at test fully reinstated cocaine-seeking behavior, relative to responding in an alternate, extinction context, and post-reactivation U0126 treatment in the BLA, but not the NACc, impaired cocaine-seeking behavior, relative to VEH. This effect was associated with a temporary increase in ERK2, but not ERK1, phosphorylation in the BLA and required explicit reactivation of the target memory trace (i.e., did not similarly manifest when U

  3. Dorsal hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex each contribute to the retrieval of a recent spatial memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Cholvin, Thibault; Loureiro, Michaël; Cassel, Raphaelle; Cosquer, Brigitte; Herbeaux, Karin; de Vasconcelos, Anne Pereira; Cassel, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Systems-level consolidation models propose that recent memories are initially hippocampus-dependent. When remote, they are partially or completely dependent upon the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). An implication of the mPFC in recent memory, however, is still debated. Different amounts of muscimol (MSCI 0, 30, 50, 80 and 250 ng in 1 µL PBS) were used to assess the impact of inactivation of the dorsal hippocampus (dHip) or the mPFC (targeting the prelimbic cortex) on a 24-h delayed retrieval of a platform location that rats had learned drug-free in a water maze. The two smallest amounts of MSCI (30 and 50 ng) did not affect recall, whatever the region. 80 ng MSCI infused into the dHip disrupted spatial memory retrieval, as did the larger amount. Infusion of MSCI into the mPFC did not alter performance in the 0-80 ng range. At 250 ng, it induced an as dramatic memory impairment as after efficient dHip inactivation. Stereological quantifications showed that 80 ng MSCI in the dHip and 250 ng MSCI in the mPFC induced a more than 80% reduction of c-Fos expression, suggesting that, beyond the amounts infused, it is the magnitude of the neuronal activity decrease which is determinant as to the functional outcome of the inactivation. Because, based on the literature, even 250 ng MSCI is a small amount, our results point to a contribution of the mPFC to the recall of a recently acquired spatial memory and thereby extend our knowledge about the functions of this major actor of cognition.

  4. Higher susceptibility of the ventral versus the dorsal hippocampus and the posteroventral versus anterodorsal amygdala to soman-induced neuropathology

    PubMed Central

    Apland, James P.; Figueiredo, Taiza H.; Qashu, Felicia; Aroniadou-Anderjaska, Vassiliki; Souza, Adriana P.; Braga, Maria F. M.

    2010-01-01

    Nerve agents are acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, exposure to which causes brain damage, primarily by inducing intense seizure activity. Knowledge of the brain regions that are most vulnerable to nerve agent-induced brain damage can facilitate the development of drugs targeting the protection of these regions. Both the amygdala and the hippocampus have been shown to suffer significant damage after nerve agent exposure, but the amygdala appears to be the more severely affected structure. However, damage in the amygdala has generally been compared with damage in the dorsal hippocampus, whereas there is evidence that the ventral hippocampus is significantly more susceptible to seizures than the dorsal region, and, therefore, it may also be more susceptible to nerve agent-induced neuropathology. Here, we report that after status epilepticus induced by soman administration to rats, neuronal degeneration as assessed by Fluoro-Jade C staining was more extensive in the ventral than the dorsal hippocampal subfields, 1 day after soman exposure. Seven days later, the difference between dorsal and ventral regions was not statistically significant. In the amygdala, soman-induced neurodegeneration was more severe in the posteroventral regions of the lateral, basolateral, and medial nuclei compared to the anterodorsal regions of these nuclei. The basomedial nucleus was more severely affected in the anterodorsal region, while the central nucleus was less affected than the other amygdalar nuclei. The extent of neurodegeneration in the amygdala was not significantly different from that in the ventral hippocampus. However, when compared with the whole hippocampus, the amygdala displayed more severe neurodegeneration, on both day 1 and day 7 after soman exposure. Testing the protective efficacy of drugs against nerve agent-induced brain damage should include examination of the ventral hippocampus and the posteroventral regions of the amygdala, as these areas are most vulnerable to

  5. Decoupling Actions from Consequences: Dorsal Hippocampal Lesions Facilitate Instrumental Performance, but Impair Behavioral Flexibility in Rats.

    PubMed

    Busse, Sebastian; Schwarting, Rainer K W

    2016-01-01

    The present study is part of a series of experiments, where we analyze why and how damage of the rat's dorsal hippocampus (dHC) can enhance performance in a sequential reaction time task (SRTT). In this task, sequences of distinct visual stimulus presentations are food-rewarded in a fixed-ratio-13-schedule. Our previous study (Busse and Schwarting, 2016) had shown that rats with lesions of the dHC show substantially shorter session times and post-reinforcement pauses (PRPs) than controls, which allows for more practice when daily training is kept constant. Since sequential behavior is based on instrumental performance, a sequential benefit might be secondary to that. In order to test this hypothesis in the present study, we performed two experiments, where pseudorandom rather than sequential stimulus presentation was used in rats with excitotoxic dorsal hippocampal lesions. Again, we found enhanced performance in the lesion-group in terms of shorter session times and PRPs. During the sessions we found that the lesion-group spent less time with non-instrumental behavior (i.e., grooming, sniffing, and rearing) after prolonged instrumental training. Also, such rats showed moderate evidence for an extinction impairment under devalued food reward conditions and significant deficits in a response-outcome (R-O)-discrimination task in comparison to a control-group. These findings suggest that facilitatory effects on instrumental performance after dorsal hippocampal lesions may be primarily a result of complex behavioral changes, i.e., reductions of behavioral flexibility and/or alterations in motivation, which then result in enhanced instrumental learning. PMID:27375453

  6. Decoupling Actions from Consequences: Dorsal Hippocampal Lesions Facilitate Instrumental Performance, but Impair Behavioral Flexibility in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Busse, Sebastian; Schwarting, Rainer K. W.

    2016-01-01

    The present study is part of a series of experiments, where we analyze why and how damage of the rat’s dorsal hippocampus (dHC) can enhance performance in a sequential reaction time task (SRTT). In this task, sequences of distinct visual stimulus presentations are food-rewarded in a fixed-ratio-13-schedule. Our previous study (Busse and Schwarting, 2016) had shown that rats with lesions of the dHC show substantially shorter session times and post-reinforcement pauses (PRPs) than controls, which allows for more practice when daily training is kept constant. Since sequential behavior is based on instrumental performance, a sequential benefit might be secondary to that. In order to test this hypothesis in the present study, we performed two experiments, where pseudorandom rather than sequential stimulus presentation was used in rats with excitotoxic dorsal hippocampal lesions. Again, we found enhanced performance in the lesion-group in terms of shorter session times and PRPs. During the sessions we found that the lesion-group spent less time with non-instrumental behavior (i.e., grooming, sniffing, and rearing) after prolonged instrumental training. Also, such rats showed moderate evidence for an extinction impairment under devalued food reward conditions and significant deficits in a response-outcome (R-O)-discrimination task in comparison to a control-group. These findings suggest that facilitatory effects on instrumental performance after dorsal hippocampal lesions may be primarily a result of complex behavioral changes, i.e., reductions of behavioral flexibility and/or alterations in motivation, which then result in enhanced instrumental learning. PMID:27375453

  7. HDAC I inhibition in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus differentially modulates predator-odor fear learning and generalization

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Robin K.; Hebert, Jenna C.; Thomas, Arthur S.; Wann, Ellen G.; Muzzio, Isabel A.

    2015-01-01

    Although predator odors are ethologically relevant stimuli for rodents, the molecular pathways and contribution of some brain regions involved in predator odor conditioning remain elusive. Inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in the dorsal hippocampus has been shown to enhance shock-induced contextual fear learning, but it is unknown if HDACs have differential effects along the dorso-ventral hippocampal axis during predator odor fear learning. We injected MS-275, a class I HDAC inhibitor, bilaterally in the dorsal or ventral hippocampus of mice and found that it had no effects on innate anxiety in either region. We then assessed the effects of MS-275 at different stages of fear learning along the longitudinal hippocampal axis. Animals were injected with MS-275 or vehicle after context pre-exposure (pre-conditioning injections), when a representation of the context is first formed, or after exposure to coyote urine (post-conditioning injections), when the context becomes associated with predator odor. When MS-275 was administered after context pre-exposure, dorsally injected animals showed enhanced fear in the training context but were able to discriminate it from a neutral environment. Conversely, ventrally injected animals did not display enhanced learning in the training context but generalized the fear response to a neutral context. However, when MS-275 was administered after conditioning, there were no differences between the MS-275 and vehicle control groups in either the dorsal or ventral hippocampus. Surprisingly, all groups displayed generalization to a neutral context, suggesting that predator odor exposure followed by a mild stressor such as restraint leads to fear generalization. These results may elucidate distinct functions of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus in predator odor-induced fear conditioning as well as some of the molecular mechanisms underlying fear generalization. PMID:26441495

  8. HDAC I inhibition in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus differentially modulates predator-odor fear learning and generalization.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Robin K; Hebert, Jenna C; Thomas, Arthur S; Wann, Ellen G; Muzzio, Isabel A

    2015-01-01

    Although predator odors are ethologically relevant stimuli for rodents, the molecular pathways and contribution of some brain regions involved in predator odor conditioning remain elusive. Inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in the dorsal hippocampus has been shown to enhance shock-induced contextual fear learning, but it is unknown if HDACs have differential effects along the dorso-ventral hippocampal axis during predator odor fear learning. We injected MS-275, a class I HDAC inhibitor, bilaterally in the dorsal or ventral hippocampus of mice and found that it had no effects on innate anxiety in either region. We then assessed the effects of MS-275 at different stages of fear learning along the longitudinal hippocampal axis. Animals were injected with MS-275 or vehicle after context pre-exposure (pre-conditioning injections), when a representation of the context is first formed, or after exposure to coyote urine (post-conditioning injections), when the context becomes associated with predator odor. When MS-275 was administered after context pre-exposure, dorsally injected animals showed enhanced fear in the training context but were able to discriminate it from a neutral environment. Conversely, ventrally injected animals did not display enhanced learning in the training context but generalized the fear response to a neutral context. However, when MS-275 was administered after conditioning, there were no differences between the MS-275 and vehicle control groups in either the dorsal or ventral hippocampus. Surprisingly, all groups displayed generalization to a neutral context, suggesting that predator odor exposure followed by a mild stressor such as restraint leads to fear generalization. These results may elucidate distinct functions of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus in predator odor-induced fear conditioning as well as some of the molecular mechanisms underlying fear generalization. PMID:26441495

  9. Induction of c-Fos expression in the mammillary bodies, anterior thalamus and dorsal hippocampus after fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Conejo, Nélida M; González-Pardo, Héctor; López, Matías; Cantora, Raúl; Arias, Jorge L

    2007-09-14

    The aim of the present study was to provide further evidence on the role of particular subdivisions of the mammillary bodies, anterior thalamus and dorsal hippocampus to contextual and auditory fear conditioning. We used c-Fos expression as a marker of neuronal activation to compare rats that received tone-footshock pairings in a distinctive context (conditioned group) to rats being exposed to both the context and the auditory CS without receiving footshocks (unconditioned group), and naïve rats that were only handled. Fos immunoreactivity was significantly increased only in the anterodorsal thalamic nucleus and the lateral mammillary nucleus of the conditioned group. However, the dorsal hippocampus showed the highest density of c-Fos positive nuclei in the naïve group as compared to the other groups. Together, our data support previous studies indicating a particular involvement of the mammillary bodies and anterior thalamus in fear conditioning. PMID:17683804

  10. Retroactive interference of object-in-context long-term memory: role of dorsal hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Martínez, María Cecilia; Villar, María Eugenia; Ballarini, Fabricio; Viola, Haydée

    2014-12-01

    Retroactive interference (RI) is a type of amnesia in which a new learning experience can impair the expression of a previous one. It has been studied in several types of memories for over a century. Here, we aimed to study in the long-term memory (LTM) formation of an object-in-context task, defined as the recognition of a familiar object in a context different to that in which it was previously encountered. We trained rats with two sample trials, each taking place in a different context in association with different objects. Test sessions were performed 24 h later, to evaluate LTM for both object-context pairs using separate groups of trained rats. Furthermore, given the involvement of hippocampus (Hp) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in several recognition memories, we also analyzed the participation of these structures in the LTM formation of this task by the local infusion of muscimol. Our results show that object-in-context LTM formation is sensitive to RI by a different either familiar or novel object-context pair trial, experienced 1 h later. This interference occurs in a restricted temporal window and works on the LTM consolidation phase, leaving intact short-term memory expression. The second sample trial did not affect the object recognition part of the memory. Besides, muscimol treatment before the second sample trial blocks its object-in-context LTM and restores the first sample trial memory. We hypothesized that LTM-RI amnesia is probably caused by resources or cellular machinery competition in these brain regions when they are engaged in memory formation of the traces. In sum, when two different object-in-context memory traces are being processed, the second trace interferes with the consolidation of the first one requiring mPFC and CA1 dorsal Hp activation.

  11. Delayed effects of spiperone on serotonin1A receptors in the dorsal hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, T; Blier, P; de Montigny, C

    1993-01-01

    The effects of 5-HT1A antagonists spiperone, methiothepin and BMY 7378 on [3H]-8-OH-DPAT binding were determined in vitro and ex vivo in rat hippocampus CA3 membrane preparations, and ex vivo in tissue sections of CA1 and CA3 subfields using quantitative autoradiography. In CA3 membranes from rats sacrificed 1 h or 24 h after administration of 5 mg/kg i.p. spiperone or methiothepin, no decrease in [3H]-8-OH-DPAT Bmax values approached statistical significance. Autoradiograms from identically treated rats showed significant increases in Kd values in both CA1 and CA3 hippocampal subfields 24 h but not 1 h after administration of the drugs, while no changes were observed in the dorsal raphe at either time. In vitro co-incubation of membranes with spiperone (200 or 500 nM) or methiothepin (500 nM) resulted in significant decreases in both affinity and Bmax values. In contrast, co-incubation with BMY 7378 (5 nM) increased only Kd values. GTP gamma S produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of specific [3H]8-OH-DPAT binding. At 0.1 mM of GTP gamma S, Kd values were increased three-fold and Bmax values were significantly decreased. When membranes were co-incubated with GTP gamma S and spiperone or BMY 7378, Kd values increased further. Moreover, the effects of spiperone and GTP gamma S on Bmax values were additive. It is concluded that BMY 7378 acts as a competitive antagonist at hippocampal post-synaptic 5-HT1A receptors, whereas spiperone and methiothepin exert their delayed antagonistic effects at these receptors through a non-competitive mechanism of action, possibly affecting the coupling of the receptors to their Gi/o proteins. PMID:8297925

  12. Glucose Injections into the Dorsal Hippocampus or Dorsolateral Striatum of Rats Prior to T-Maze Training: Modulation of Learning Rates and Strategy Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canal, Clinton E.; Stutz, Sonja J.; Gold, Paul E.

    2005-01-01

    The present experiments examined the effects of injecting glucose into the dorsal hippocampus or dorsolateral striatum on learning rates and on strategy selection in rats trained on a T-maze that can be solved by using either a hippocampus-sensitive place or striatum-sensitive response strategy. Percentage strategy selection on a probe trial…

  13. Temporary inactivation reveals that the CA1 region of the mouse dorsal hippocampus plays an equivalent role in the retrieval of long-term object memory and spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Stackman, Robert W; Cohen, Sarah J; Lora, Joan C; Rios, Lisa M

    2016-09-01

    Recognition of a previously experienced item or object depends upon the successful retrieval of memory for the object. The neural mechanisms that support object recognition memory in the mammalian brain are not well understood. The rodent hippocampus plays a well-established role in spatial memory, and we previously demonstrated that temporary inactivation of the mouse hippocampus impairs object memory, as assessed with a novel object preference (NOP) test. The present studies were designed to test some remaining issues regarding the contribution of the CA1 sub-region of the mouse dorsal hippocampus to long-term object memory. Specifically, we examined whether the retrieval of spatial memory (as assessed by the Morris water maze; MWM) and object recognition memory are differentially sensitive to inactivation of the CA1 region. The current study used pre-test local microinfusion of muscimol directly into the CA1 region of dorsal hippocampus to temporarily interrupt its function during the respective retrieval phases of both behavioral tasks, in order to compare the contribution of the CA1 to object memory and spatial memory. Histological analyses revealed that local intra-CA1 injection of muscimol diffused within, and not beyond, the CA1 region of dorsal hippocampus. The degree of memory retrieval impairment induced by muscimol was comparable in the two tasks, supporting the view that object memory and spatial memory depend similarly on the CA1 region of rodent hippocampus. Further, we confirmed that the muscimol-induced impairment of CA1 function is temporary. First, mice that exhibited impaired object memory retrieval immediately after intra-CA1 muscimol, subsequently exhibited unimpaired retrieval of object memory when tested 24h later. Secondly, a cohort of mice that exhibited impaired object memory retrieval after intra-CA1 muscimol later acquired spatial memory in the MWM comparable to that of control mice. Together, these results offer further support for the

  14. Temporary inactivation reveals that the CA1 region of the mouse dorsal hippocampus plays an equivalent role in the retrieval of long-term object memory and spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Stackman, Robert W; Cohen, Sarah J; Lora, Joan C; Rios, Lisa M

    2016-09-01

    Recognition of a previously experienced item or object depends upon the successful retrieval of memory for the object. The neural mechanisms that support object recognition memory in the mammalian brain are not well understood. The rodent hippocampus plays a well-established role in spatial memory, and we previously demonstrated that temporary inactivation of the mouse hippocampus impairs object memory, as assessed with a novel object preference (NOP) test. The present studies were designed to test some remaining issues regarding the contribution of the CA1 sub-region of the mouse dorsal hippocampus to long-term object memory. Specifically, we examined whether the retrieval of spatial memory (as assessed by the Morris water maze; MWM) and object recognition memory are differentially sensitive to inactivation of the CA1 region. The current study used pre-test local microinfusion of muscimol directly into the CA1 region of dorsal hippocampus to temporarily interrupt its function during the respective retrieval phases of both behavioral tasks, in order to compare the contribution of the CA1 to object memory and spatial memory. Histological analyses revealed that local intra-CA1 injection of muscimol diffused within, and not beyond, the CA1 region of dorsal hippocampus. The degree of memory retrieval impairment induced by muscimol was comparable in the two tasks, supporting the view that object memory and spatial memory depend similarly on the CA1 region of rodent hippocampus. Further, we confirmed that the muscimol-induced impairment of CA1 function is temporary. First, mice that exhibited impaired object memory retrieval immediately after intra-CA1 muscimol, subsequently exhibited unimpaired retrieval of object memory when tested 24h later. Secondly, a cohort of mice that exhibited impaired object memory retrieval after intra-CA1 muscimol later acquired spatial memory in the MWM comparable to that of control mice. Together, these results offer further support for the

  15. Glucose injections into the dorsal hippocampus or dorsolateral striatum of rats prior to T-maze training: Modulation of learning rates and strategy selection

    PubMed Central

    Canal, Clinton E.; Stutz, Sonja J.; Gold, Paul E.

    2005-01-01

    The present experiments examined the effects of injecting glucose into the dorsal hippocampus or dorsolateral striatum on learning rates and on strategy selection in rats trained on a T-maze that can be solved by using either a hippocampus-sensitive place or striatum-sensitive response strategy. Percentage strategy selection on a probe trial (Pcrit) administered after rats achieved criterion (nine of 10 correct choices) varied by group. All groups predominately exhibited a response strategy on a probe trial administered after overtraining, i.e., after 90 trials. In experiment 1, rats that received intrahippocampal glucose injections showed enhanced acquisition of the T-maze and showed increased use of response solutions at Pcrit compared with that of unimplanted and artificial cerebral spinal fluid (aCSF)-treated groups. These findings suggest that glucose enhanced hippocampal functions to accelerate the rate of learning and the early adoption of a response strategy. In experiment 2, rats that received intrastriatal glucose injections exhibited place solutions early in training and reached criterion more slowly than did aCSF controls, with learning rates comparable to those of unoperated and operated-uninjected controls. Relative to unoperated, operated-uninjected and glucose-injected rats, rats that received intrastriatal aCSF injections showed enhanced acquisition of the T-maze and increased use of response solutions at Pcrit. The unexpected enhanced acquisition seen after striatal aCSF injections suggests at least two possible interpretations: (1) aCSF impaired striatal function, thereby releasing competition with the hippocampus and ceding control over learning to the hippocampus during early training trials; and (2) aCSF enhanced striatal functioning to facilitate striatal-sensitive learning. With either interpretation, the results indicate that intrastriatal glucose injections compensated for the aCSF-induced effect. Finally, enhanced acquisition regardless

  16. Blockade of corticosterone synthesis reduces serotonin turnover in the dorsal hippocampus of the rat as measured by microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Korte-Bouws, G A; Korte, S M; De Kloet, E R; Bohus, B

    1996-11-01

    The influence of plasma corticosterone concentration on serotonin (5-HT) turnover in the dorsal hippocampus was investigated. The experiments were performed in freely moving male Wistar rats in their home cage. Blood samples were taken via a permanent jugular vein catheter to determine plasma corticosterone levels. Extracellular levels of 5-HT and its metabolite 5-hydroxy-indole acetic acid (5-HIAA) were measured using in vivo microdialysis. The rats received an intravenous (i.v.) infusion of the steroid synthesis-inhibitor metyrapone (150 mg/kg/ml) in order to manipulate circulating corticosterone levels. Three hours later, the monoamine oxidase inhibitor pargyline (15 mg/kg/2 ml i.v.) was administered to produce an accumulation of extracellular 5-HT. Pargyline administration led to a four fold increase in 5-HT levels, while reducing 5-HIAA by 45%. Metyrapone pretreatment blocked the pargyline-induced rise in plasma corticosterone to baseline levels and diminished the pargyline-induced increase in 5-HT, without affecting 5-HIAA levels. Thus, the data suggest that a decrease in availability of corticosterone for its receptors by metyrapone diminished the 5-HT synthesis rate. Since plasma corticosterone levels during this blockade are still low, it is assumed that brain glucocorticoid receptor occupation is reduced, while mineralocorticoid receptors are still substantially occupied. Therefore the present results support the hypothesis that corticosterone through glucocorticoid receptor activation enhances 5-HT synthesis rate and release in the dorsal hippocampus. PMID:8933365

  17. Temporary inhibition of dorsal or ventral hippocampus by muscimol: distinct effects on measures of innate anxiety on the elevated plus maze, but similar disruption of contextual fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Ning; Bast, Tobias; Xu, Yan; Feldon, Joram

    2014-04-01

    Studies in rats, involving hippocampal lesions and hippocampal drug infusions, have implicated the hippocampus in the modulation of anxiety-related behaviors and conditioned fear. The ventral hippocampus is considered to be more important for anxiety- and fear-related behaviors than the dorsal hippocampus. In the present study, we compared the role of dorsal and ventral hippocampus in innate anxiety and classical fear conditioning in Wistar rats, examining the effects of temporary pharmacological inhibition by the GABA-A agonist muscimol (0.5 ug/0.5 ul/side) in the elevated plus maze and on fear conditioning to a tone and the conditioning context. In the elevated plus maze, dorsal and ventral hippocampal muscimol caused distinct behavioral changes. The effects of ventral hippocampal muscimol were consistent with suppression of locomotion, possibly accompanied by anxiolytic effects, whereas the pattern of changes caused by dorsal hippocampal muscimol was consistent with anxiogenic effects. In contrast, dorsal and ventral hippocampal muscimol caused similar effects in the fear conditioning experiments, disrupting contextual, but not tone, fear conditioning.

  18. Encoding and retrieval along the long axis of the hippocampus and their relationships with dorsal attention and default mode networks: The HERNET model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hongkeun

    2015-04-01

    The encoding of sensory input is intertwined with external attention, whereas retrieval is intrinsically related to internal attention. This study proposes a model in which the encoding of sensory input involves mainly the anterior hippocampus and the external attention network, whereas retrieval, the posterior hippocampus and the internal attention network. This model is referred to as the HERNET (hippocampal encoding/retrieval and network) model. Functional neuroimaging studies have identified two intrinsic large-scale networks closely associated with external and internal attention, respectively. The dorsal attention network activates during any externally oriented mental activity, whereas the default mode network shows increased activity during internally oriented mental activity. Therefore, the HERNET model may predict the activation of the anterior hippocampus and the dorsal attention network during the encoding and activation of the posterior hippocampus and the default mode network during retrieval. To test this prediction, this study provides a meta-analysis of three memory-imaging paradigms: subsequent memory, laboratory-based recollection, and autobiographical memory retrieval. The meta-analysis included 167 individual studies and 2,856 participants. The results provide support for the HERNET model and suggest that the anterior-posterior gradient of encoding and retrieval includes amygdala regions. More broadly, humans continuously oscillate between external and internal attention and thus between encoding and retrieval processes. These oscillations may involve repetitive and spontaneous activity switching between the anterior hippocampus/dorsal attention network and the posterior hippocampus/default mode network.

  19. Conditional loss of GluN2B in cortex and hippocampus impairs attentional set formation

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Shannon M.; Josey, Megan; Holmes, Andrew; Brigman, Jonathan L.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to attend to appropriate stimuli, to plan actions and then alter those actions when environmental conditions change, is essential for an organism to thrive. There is increasing evidence that these executive control processes are mediated in part by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR). NMDAR subunits confer different physiological properties to the receptor, interact with distinct intracellular postsynaptic scaffolding and signaling molecules and are differentially expressed during development. Recent findings have suggested that the GluN2B subunit may play a unique role in both the acquisition of adaptive choice and the behavioral flexibility required to shift between choices. Here we investigated the role of GluN2B containing NMDARs in the ability to learn, reverse and shift between stimulus dimensions. Mutant mice (floxed-GluN2B x CaMKII-Cre) lacking GluN2B in the dorsal CA1 of the hippocampus and throughout the cortex were tested on an attentional set-shifting task. To explore the role that alterations in motor behavior may have on these behaviors, gross and fine motor behaviors were analyzed in mutant and floxed-control mice. Results show that corticohippocampal loss of GluN2B selectively impaired an initial reversal in a stimulus specific manner and impaired the ability of mutant mice to form an attentional set. Further, GluN2B mice showed normal motor behavior in both overall movement and individual limb behaviors. Together, these results further support the role of NMDAR, and GluN2B in particular, in aspects of executive control including behavioral flexibility and attentional processes. PMID:25798630

  20. Inhibition of mRNA synthesis in the hippocampus impairs consolidation and reconsolidation of spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Weber C; Bonini, Juliana S; Bevilaqua, Lia R M; Medina, Jorge H; Izquierdo, Iván; Cammarota, Martín

    2008-01-01

    Using two different mRNA synthesis inhibitors, we show that blockade of hippocampal gene expression during restricted posttraining or postretrieval time windows hinders retention of long-term spatial memory for the Morris water maze task, without affecting short-term memory, nonspatial learning, or the functionality of the hippocampus. Our results indicate that spatial memory consolidation induces the activation of the hippocampal transcriptional machinery and suggest the existence of a gene expression-dependent reconsolidation process that operates in the dorsal hippocampus at the moment of retrieval to stabilize the reactivated mnemonic trace.

  1. Unilateral lesion of dorsal hippocampus enhances reinforcing lateral hypothalamic stimulation in the contralateral hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, P K; Wagner, U; Krauth, J; Huston, J P

    1997-01-01

    Whereas convincing evidence exists for an important role of the hippocampus in mechanisms underlying memory and encoding of location in space, the contribution of the hippocampus to the system underlying central processes of reinforcement is less well established. Scattered data suggesting that hippocampal ablation increases the effectiveness of positive reinforcers have alternatively been interpretated in terms of general and unspecific behavioral disinhibition, which results in higher levels of activity and rates of responding. In the present experiment, 22 Wistar rats were either given a neurotoxic or a sham lesion in the CA1 region of the hippocampus, and the effect on lateral hypothalamic self-stimulation behavior was assessed. To control for nonspecific performance effects rates of lever pressing were assessed ipsi- and contralateral to the lesioned hemisphere as well as under condition of extinction (current set to zero). Following the neurotoxic lesion the animals displayed significant higher rates of self-stimulation at the electrode sites in the hypothalamus situated contralateral but not ipsilateral to the hemisphere with the lesion compared with controls. The increase in self-stimulation commenced on the third day postlesion and was maintained over the 8 days of testing. The lesion did not change the animals' behavior under extinction. Thus, the hippocampal lesion led to an amplification of rewarding lateral hypothalamic self-stimulation behavior, indicative of a lesion induced disinhibition of the brain's reinforcement system.

  2. Interaction between the Basolateral Amygdala and Dorsal Hippocampus Is Critical for Cocaine Memory Reconsolidation and Subsequent Drug Context-Induced Cocaine-Seeking Behaviorin Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Audrey M.; Lasseter, Heather C.; Xie, Xiaohu; Cowhey, Kate E.; Reittinger, Andrew M.; Fuchs, Rita A.

    2011-01-01

    Contextual stimulus control over instrumental drug-seeking behavior relies on the reconsolidation of context-response-drug associative memories into long-term memory storage following retrieval-induced destabilization. According to previous studies, the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and dorsal hippocampus (DH) regulate cocaine-related memory…

  3. STRESS-INDUCED CHANGES IN EXTRACELLULAR DOPAMINE AND SEROTONIN IN THE MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX AND DORSAL HIPPOCAMPUS OF PRENATALLY MALNOURISHED RATS

    PubMed Central

    Mokler, David J.; Torres, Olga I.; Galler, Janina R.; Morgane, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Prenatal protein malnutrition continues to be a significant problem in the world today. Exposure to prenatal protein malnutrition increases the risk of a number of neuropsychiatric disorders in adulthood including depression, schizophrenia and attentional deficit disorder. In the present experiment we have examined the effects of stress on extracellular serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine in the medial prefrontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus of rats exposed in utero to protein malnutrition. The medial prefrontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus were chosen as two limbic forebrain regions involved in learning and memory, attention and the stress response. Extracellular 5-HT and dopamine were determined in the medial prefrontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats using dual probe in vivo microdialysis. Basal extracellular 5-HT did not differ between malnourished and well-nourished controls in either the medial prefrontal cortex or the dorsal hippocampus. Basal extracellular dopamine was significantly decreased in the medial prefrontal cortex of malnourished animals. Restraint stress (20 m) produced a significant rise in extracellular dopamine in the medial prefrontal cortex of well-nourished rats but did not alter release in malnourished rats. In malnourished rats, stress produced an increase in 5-HT in the hippocampus, whereas stress produced a decrease in 5-HT in the hippocampus of well-nourished rats. These data demonstrate that prenatal protein malnutrition alters dopaminergic neurotransmission in the medial prefrontal cortex as well as altering the dopaminergic and serotonergic response to stress. These changes may provide part of the bases for alterations in malnourished animals’ response to stress. PMID:17368432

  4. Influence of N-methyl D-aspartate receptor mechanism on WIN55,212-2-induced amnesia in rat dorsal hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Jamali-Raeufy, Nida; Nasehi, Mohammad; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of both N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) and MK-801 on WIN55,212-2(WIN)-induced amnesia in rats. Step-through inhibitory avoidance of memory was used to examine the retrieval of memory, 24 h after training. All drugs were injected bilaterally into the dorsal hippocampus (intra-CA1) of rats. Pretraining and posttraining or pretesting administration of the nonselective CB1/CB2 receptor agonist, WIN (0.5 µg/rat), decreased the step-through latency. However, amnesia induced by pretraining or posttraining injections of WIN was reversed by a pretest administration of WIN (0.25 and 0.5 µg/rat). Pretest microinjections of different doses of NMDA (0.1, 0.5, and 1 µg/rat) elicited no response, but NMDA (0.5 and 1 µg/rat) did induce full recovery from amnesia induced by WIN (0.5 µg/rat). The posttraining and pretest injection of a higher dose of the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK801 (MK; 4 µg/rat), caused an impairment in the memory retrieval. However, amnesia induced by posttraining injections of MK (4 µg/rat) was reversed by a pretest administration of MK (4 µg/rat). In addition, pretest administration of different doses of the antagonist (2 and 4 µg/rat) induced full recovery of WIN-induced amnesia, but did not influence memory recovery in the subjects, which had received posttraining (0.5 µg/rat) and pretest WIN (0.25 and 0.5 µg/rat). Pretesting coadministration of ineffective doses of WIN (0.1 µg/rat) with NMDA (0.1 µg/rat), but not with MK (1 µg/rat), restored WIN-induced (0.5 µg/rat) amnesia. It can be concluded that the NMDA receptor mechanism located in the dorsal hippocampus may be involved in WIN-induced amnesia.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Du A, T; Schuff, N; Amend, D; Laakso, M; Hsu, Y; Jagust, W; Yaffe, K; Kramer, J; Reed, B; Norman, D; Chui, H; Weiner, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To explore volume changes of the entorhinal cortex (ERC) and hippocampus in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared with normal cognition (NC); to determine the powers of the ERC and the hippocampus for discrimination between these groups.
METHODS—This study included 40 subjects with NC, 36 patients with MCI, and 29 patients with AD. Volumes of the ERC and hippocampus were manually measured based on coronal T1 weighted MR images. Global cerebral changes were assessed using semiautomatic image segmentation.
RESULTS—Both ERC and hippocampal volumes were reduced in MCI (ERC 13%, hippocampus 11%, p<0.05) and AD (ERC 39%, hippocampus 27%, p<0.01) compared with NC. Furthermore, AD showed greater volume losses in the ERC than in the hippocampus (p<0.01). In addition, AD and MCI also had cortical grey matter loss (p< 0.01) and ventricular enlargement (p<0.01) when compared with NC. There was a significant correlation between ERC and hippocampal volumes in MCI and AD (both p<0.001), but not in NC. Using ERC and hippocampus together improved discrimination between AD and CN but did not improve discrimination between MCI and NC. The ERC was better than the hippocampus for distinguishing MCI from AD. In addition, loss of cortical grey matter significantly contributed to the hippocampus for discriminating MCI and AD from NC.
CONCLUSIONS—Volume reductions in the ERC and hippocampus may be early signs of AD pathology that can be measured using MRI.

 PMID:11561025

  6. Dorsal hippocampal microinjection of chlorpheniramine reverses the anxiolytic-like effects of l-histidine and impairs emotional memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Canto-de-Souza, L; Garção, D C; Romaguera, F; Mattioli, R

    2015-02-01

    Several findings have pointed to the role of histaminergic neurotransmission in the modulation of anxiety-like behaviors and emotional memory. The elevated plus-maze (EPM) test has been widely used to investigate the process of anxiety and also has been used to investigate the process of learning and memory. Visual cues are relevant to the formation of spatial maps, and as the hippocampus is involved in this task, experiment 1 explored this issue. Experiment 2 investigated the effects of intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of l-histidine (LH, a precursor of histamine) and of intra-dorsal hippocampus (intra-DH) injections of chlorpheniramine (CPA, an H1 receptor antagonist) on anxiety and emotional memory in mice re-exposed to the EPM. Mice received saline (SAL) or LH i.p. and SAL or CPA (0.016, 0.052, and 0.16 nmol/0.1 μl) intra-DH prior to Trial 1 (T1) and Trial 2 (T2). No significant changes were observed in the number of enclosed-arm entries (EAE) in T1, an EPM index of general exploratory activity. LH had an anxiolytic-like effect that was reversed by intra-DH injections of CPA. T2 versus T1 analysis revealed that only the lower dose of CPA resulted in impaired emotional memory. Combined injections of LH and CPA revealed that higher doses of CPA impair emotional memory. Taken together, these results suggest that LH and H1 receptors present in the dorsal hippocampus are involved in anxiety-related behaviors and emotional memory in mice submitted to EPM.

  7. Parallel memory processing by the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus and the basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Cammarota, Martín; Bevilaqua, Lia R; Rossato, Janine I; Lima, Ramón H; Medina, Jorge H; Izquierdo, Iván

    2008-07-29

    There is abundant literature on the role of the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and the CA1 region of the hippocampus in memory formation of inhibitory avoidance (IA) and other behaviorally arousing tasks. Here, we investigate molecular correlates of IA consolidation in the two structures and their relation to NMDA receptors (NMDArs) and beta-adrenergic receptors (beta-ADrs). The separate posttraining administration of antagonists of NMDAr and beta-ADr to BLA and CA1 is amnesic. IA training is followed by an increase of the phosphorylation of calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and ERK2 in CA1 but only an increase of the phosphorylation of ERK2 in BLA. The changes are blocked by NMDAr antagonists but not beta-ADr antagonists in CA1, and they are blocked by beta-ADr but not NMDAr antagonists in BLA. In addition, the changes are accompanied by increased phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase in BLA but not in CA1, suggesting that beta-AD modulation results from local catecholamine synthesis in the former but not in the latter structure. NMDAr blockers in CA1 do not alter the learning-induced neurochemical changes in BLA, and beta-ADr blockade in BLA does not hinder those in CA1. When put together with other data from the literature, the present findings suggest that CA1 and BLA play a role in consolidation, but they operate to an extent in parallel, suggesting that each is probably involved with different aspects of the task studied.

  8. Genetic disruption of the core circadian clock impairs hippocampus-dependent memory

    PubMed Central

    Wardlaw, Sarah M.; Phan, Trongha X.; Saraf, Amit; Chen, Xuanmao

    2014-01-01

    Perturbing the circadian system by electrolytically lesioning the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) or varying the environmental light:dark schedule impairs memory, suggesting that memory depends on the circadian system. We used a genetic approach to evaluate the role of the molecular clock in memory. Bmal1−/− mice, which are arrhythmic under constant conditions, were examined for hippocampus-dependent memory, LTP at the Schaffer-collateral synapse, and signal transduction activity in the hippocampus. Bmal1−/− mice exhibit impaired contextual fear and spatial memory. Furthermore, LTP in hippocampal slices from Bmal1−/− mice is also significantly decreased relative to that from wild-type mice. Activation of Erk1,2 MAP kinase (MAPK) during training for contextual fear memory and diurnal oscillation of MAPK activity and cAMP in the hippocampus is also lost in Bmal1−/− mice, suggesting that the memory defects are due to reduction of the memory consolidation pathway in the hippocampus. We conclude that critical signaling events in the hippocampus required for memory depend on BMAL1. PMID:25034823

  9. Allopregnanolone microinjected into the lateral septum or dorsal hippocampus reduces immobility in the forced swim test: participation of the GABAA receptor.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Landa, Juan Francisco; Contreras, Carlos M; García-Ríos, Rosa Isela

    2009-10-01

    Allopregnanolone is a 5α-reduced metabolite of progesterone with actions on γ-aminobutyric acid-A (GABAA) receptors that produce antidepressant-like effects. However, little is known about the target brain regions that mediate its antidepressant-like effects. In this study, allopregnanolone (2.0 μg/0.3 μl/rat) or its vehicle (35% cyclodextrin solution) were microinjected into the lateral septum, septofimbrial, or dorsal hippocampus of male Wistar rats that had previously received intraperitoneal injections of either saline or the GABAA antagonist bicuculline (1.0 mg/kg), and its effects were evaluated in the open field and forced swim tests. Allopregnanolone microinjected into the lateral septum or dorsal hippocampus, but not septofimbrial nucleus, induced a longer latency to the first immobility and a shorter total immobility time in the forced swim test compared with vehicle. Bicuculline pretreatment reversed the effect of allopregnanolone. None of the treatments produced significant changes in crossings in the open field test. In conclusion, allopregnanolone produces an antidepressant-like effect in rats submitted to the forced swim test through actions on GABAA receptors located in the lateral septum and dorsal hippocampus, which is consistent with the antistress effect of GABAA agonists in these particular brain structures.

  10. Transient Inactivation of the Neonatal Ventral Hippocampus Impairs Attentional Set-Shifting Behavior: Reversal with an α7 Nicotinic Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Julie M; Pershing, Michelle L; Thomsen, Morten S; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Sarter, Martin; Bruno, John P

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive deficits represent a core symptom cluster in schizophrenia that are thought to reflect developmental dysregulations within a neural system involving the ventral hippocampus (VH), nucleus accumbens (NAC), and prefrontal cortex (PFC). The present experiments determined the cognitive effects of transiently inactivating VH in rats during a sensitive period of development. Neonatal (postnatal day 7, PD7) and adolescent (PD32) male rats received a single bilateral infusion of saline or tetrodotoxin (TTX) within the VH to transiently inactivate local circuitry and efferent outflow. Rats were tested as adults on an attentional set-shifting task. Performance in this task depends upon the integrity of the PFC and NAC. TTX infusions did not affect the initial acquisition or ability to learn an intra-dimensional shift. However, TTX rats required a greater number of trials than did controls to acquire the first reversal and extra-dimensional shift (ED) stages. These impairments were age and region-specific as rats infused with TTX into the VH at PD32, or into the dorsal hippocampus at PD7, exhibited performance in the task similar to that of controls. Finally, acute systemic administration of the partial α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonist SSR 180711 (3.0 mg/kg) eliminated the TTX-induced performance deficits. Given that patients with schizophrenia exhibit hippocampal pathophysiology and deficits in the ED stages of set-shifting tasks, our results support the significance of transient hippocampal inactivation as an animal model for studying the cognitive impairments in schizophrenia as well as the pro-cognitive therapeutic potential of α7 nAChR agonists. PMID:22781844

  11. Serotonin₆ receptors in the dorsal hippocampus regulate depressive-like behaviors in unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned Parkinson's rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun-Cheng; Li, Jun-Yi; Tan, Hui-Hui; Du, Cheng-Xue; Xie, Wen; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Ma, Wei-Lin; Zhang, Li

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical studies indicate both activation and blockade of serotonin6 (5-HT6) receptors may produce antidepressant-like effects. Depression is a common symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD); however, its pathophysiology is unclear. Here we examined whether 5-HT6 receptors in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) involve in the regulation of PD-associated depression. Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle in rats induced depressive-like responses as measured by the sucrose preference and forced swim tests when compared to sham-operated rats. In sham-operated rats, intra-DH injection of 5HT6 receptor agonist WAY208466 or antagonist SB258585 increased sucrose consumption and decreased immobility time, indicating the induction of antidepressant effects. In the lesioned rats, WAY208466 also produced antidepressant effects, whereas SB258585 decreased sucrose consumption and increased immobility time, indicating the induction of depressive-like behaviors. Neurochemical results showed that WAY208466 did not change dopamine (DA) levels in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), DH and habenula, and noradrenaline (NA) levels in the DH and habenula in sham-operated rats, and SB258585 increased DA and NA levels in these structures. Further, WAY208466 increased DA levels in the mPFC, DH and habenula, and NA level in the habenula in the lesioned rats, and SB258585 decreased DA levels in the mPFC and habenula. Additionally, the lesion did not change the density of neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1/5-HT6 receptor co-expressing neurons in the DH. Compared to sham-operated rats, these findings suggest that the effects of 5-HT6 receptors in PD-associated depression may be mediated through different neurochemical mechanisms, and the DH is an important site involved in these effects.

  12. Involvement of dorsal hippocampus glutamatergic and nitrergic neurotransmission in autonomic responses evoked by acute restraint stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Moraes-Neto, T B; Scopinho, A A; Biojone, C; Corrêa, F M A; Resstel, L B M

    2014-01-31

    The dorsal hippocampus (DH) is a structure of the limbic system that is involved in emotional, learning and memory processes. There is evidence indicating that the DH modulates cardiovascular correlates of behavioral responses to stressful stimuli. Acute restraint stress (RS) is an unavoidable stress situation that evokes marked and sustained autonomic changes, which are characterized by elevated blood pressure (BP), intense heart rate (HR) increase and a decrease in cutaneous temperature. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor/nitric oxide (NO) pathway of the DH in the modulation of autonomic (arterial BP, HR and tail skin temperature) responses evoked by RS in rats. Bilateral microinjection of the NMDA receptor antagonist AP-7 (10 nmol/500 nL) into the DH attenuated RS-evoked autonomic responses. Moreover, RS evoked an increase in the content of NO₂/NO₃ in the DH, which are products of the spontaneous oxidation of NO under physiological conditions that can provide an indirect measurement of NO production. Bilateral microinjection of N-propyl-L-arginine (0.1 nmol/500 nL; N-propyl, a neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) inhibitor) or carboxy-PTIO (2 nmol/500 nL; c-PTIO, an NO scavenger) into the DH also attenuated autonomic responses evoked by RS. Therefore, our findings suggest that a glutamatergic system present in the DH is involved in the autonomic modulation during RS, acting via NMDA receptors and nNOS activation. Furthermore, the present results suggest that NMDA receptor/nNO activation has a facilitatory influence on RS-evoked autonomic responses. PMID:24269610

  13. Serotonin₆ receptors in the dorsal hippocampus regulate depressive-like behaviors in unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned Parkinson's rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun-Cheng; Li, Jun-Yi; Tan, Hui-Hui; Du, Cheng-Xue; Xie, Wen; Zhang, Yu-Ming; Ma, Wei-Lin; Zhang, Li

    2015-08-01

    Preclinical studies indicate both activation and blockade of serotonin6 (5-HT6) receptors may produce antidepressant-like effects. Depression is a common symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD); however, its pathophysiology is unclear. Here we examined whether 5-HT6 receptors in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) involve in the regulation of PD-associated depression. Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the medial forebrain bundle in rats induced depressive-like responses as measured by the sucrose preference and forced swim tests when compared to sham-operated rats. In sham-operated rats, intra-DH injection of 5HT6 receptor agonist WAY208466 or antagonist SB258585 increased sucrose consumption and decreased immobility time, indicating the induction of antidepressant effects. In the lesioned rats, WAY208466 also produced antidepressant effects, whereas SB258585 decreased sucrose consumption and increased immobility time, indicating the induction of depressive-like behaviors. Neurochemical results showed that WAY208466 did not change dopamine (DA) levels in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), DH and habenula, and noradrenaline (NA) levels in the DH and habenula in sham-operated rats, and SB258585 increased DA and NA levels in these structures. Further, WAY208466 increased DA levels in the mPFC, DH and habenula, and NA level in the habenula in the lesioned rats, and SB258585 decreased DA levels in the mPFC and habenula. Additionally, the lesion did not change the density of neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1/5-HT6 receptor co-expressing neurons in the DH. Compared to sham-operated rats, these findings suggest that the effects of 5-HT6 receptors in PD-associated depression may be mediated through different neurochemical mechanisms, and the DH is an important site involved in these effects. PMID:25863121

  14. Either the dorsal hippocampus or the dorsolateral striatum is selectively involved in consolidation of forced swim-induced immobility depending on genetic background.

    PubMed

    Colelli, V; Campus, P; Conversi, D; Orsini, C; Cabib, S

    2014-05-01

    Healthy subjects differ in the memory system they engage to learn dual-solution tasks. Both genotype and stress experience could contribute to this phenotypic variability. The present experiments tested whether the hippocampus and the dorsal striatum, the core nodes of two different memory systems, are differently involved in 24 h retention of a stress-associated memory in two genetically unrelated inbred strains of mice. Mice from both the C57BL/6J and the DBA/2J inbred strains showed progressive increase of immobility during 10 min exposure to forced swim (FS) and retrieved the acquired levels of immobility when tested 24h later. The pattern of c-fos immunostaining promoted by FS revealed activation of a large number of brain areas in both strains, including CA1 and CA3 fields of the hippocampus. However, only DBA/2J mice showed activation of the dorsolateral striatum (DLS). In addition, FS induced a positive correlation between c-fos expression in the amygdala and CA1 and CA3 in C57BL/6J mice whereas it induced a positive correlation between c-fos expression in the amygdala and DLS in DBA/2J mice. Finally, temporary post-training inactivation of the dorsal hippocampus, by local infusion of lidocaine, prevented 24h retention of immobility in C57BL/6J mice only, whereas inactivation of the DLS prevented retention in DBA/2J mice only. These findings support the view that genetic factors can determine whether the dorsal hippocampus or the DLS are selectively engaged to consolidate stress-related memory.

  15. The hippocampus mediates glucocorticoid-induced impairment of spatial memory retrieval: Dependence on the basolateral amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Roozendaal, Benno; Griffith, Qyana K.; Buranday, Jason; de Quervain, Dominique J.-F.; McGaugh, James L.

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that stress-activated glucocorticoid hormones induce temporary memory retrieval impairment. The present study examined whether adrenal steroid receptors in the hippocampus mediate such glucocorticoid effects on spatial memory retrieval. The specific glucocorticoid receptor (GR) agonist 11β, 17β-dihydroxy-6,21-dimethyl-17α-pregna-4,6-trien-20yn-3-one (RU 28362; 5 or 15 ng) infused into the hippocampus of male Sprague–Dawley rats 60 min before water-maze retention testing, 24 h after training, dose-dependently impaired probe-trial retention performance, as assessed both by time spent in the training quadrant and initial latency to cross the platform location. The GR agonist did not affect circulating corticosterone levels immediately after the probe trial, indicating that RU 28362 infusions did not influence retention by altering glucocorticoid feedback mechanisms. As infusions of the GR agonist into the hippocampus 60 min before training did not influence water-maze acquisition or immediate recall, the findings indicated that the GR agonist-induced retention impairment was induced selectively by an influence on information retrieval. In contrast, pretest infusions of the GR agonist administered into the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA; 2 or 6 ng) did not alter retention performance in the water maze. However, N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced lesions of the BLA, made 1 week before training, blocked the memory retrieval impairment induced by intrahippocampal infusions of RU 28362 given 60 min before the retention test. These findings indicate that the effects of glucocorticoids on retrieval of long-term spatial memory depend on the hippocampus and, additionally, that neuronal input from the BLA is critical in enabling hippocampal glucocorticoid effects on memory retrieval. PMID:12538851

  16. Ectomesenchymal Chondromyxoid Tumour of the Dorsal Tongue Presenting with Impaired Speech

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, S. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Ectomesenchymal chondromyxoid tumours (ECTs) are rare mesenchymal soft tissue neoplasms that typically present as a slow-growing asymptomatic mass on the anterior dorsum of the tongue. Our patient presented with impaired speech articulation and pain associated with upper respiratory tract infections when the lesion on his dorsal tongue would swell, and he would accidentally bite down on it. Microscopically, ECTs appear as unencapsulated, well-circumscribed proliferations of uniform round to fusiform cells embedded within chondromyxoid matrices. Most cases of ECT have been detected in the third to the sixth decades of life, with no sex preference. ECT may cause a range of symptoms that negatively impact patients' quality of life, including pain, dysphagia, odynophagia, bleeding, and, in the case of our patient, impairment of speech. We provide a unique preoperative clinical photograph and case description that should help readers in recognizing this neoplasm. Considering the rarity of ECT presenting clinically as well as in the literature, we believe this report will add to our growing understanding of ECT and its management. We report a case of ECT presenting on the anterior dorsal tongue that was successfully surgically resected under local anesthesia with clear margins, accompanied by a review of the pertinent literature. PMID:27239359

  17. Activation of dopamine D1 receptors in the medial septum improves scopolamine-induced amnesia in the dorsal hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza; Ardjmand, Abolfazl; Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, we investigated the influence of intra-medial septum (intra-MS) injections of dopamine D1 receptor agents on amnesia induced by intra-CA1 injections of a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, scopolamine. This study used a step-through inhibitory (passive) avoidance task to assess memory in adult male Wistar rats. The results showed that in the animals that received post-training intra-MS injections of saline, intra-CA1 administrations of scopolamine (0.75, 1, and 2 μg/rat) decreased inhibitory avoidance (IA) memory consolidation as evidenced by a decrease in step-through latency on the test day, which was suggestive of drug-induced amnesia. Post-training intra-MS injections of a dopamine D1 receptor agonist, SKF38393 at doses of 0.1, 0.15, and 0.3 μg/rat had no effect, but at dose of 0.5 μg/rat impaired IA memory consolidation. Interestingly, intra-MS injections of SKF38393 (0.15, 0.3 and 0.5 μg/rat) significantly prevented amnesia induced by intra-CA1 injections of scopolamine (1 μg/rat). Intra-MS injections of a dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390 (0.5 and 0.75 μg/rat) by itself impaired IA memory consolidation, and also at dose of 0.75 μg/rat increased amnesia induced by intra-CA1 administrations of an ineffective dose of scopolamine (0.5 μg/rat). Post-training intra-MS injections of ineffective doses of SCH23390 (0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 μg/rat) prevented an effective dose of SKF38393 response to the impaired effect of scopolamine. These results suggest that dopamine D1 receptors in the MS via projection neurons to the hippocampus affect impairment of memory consolidation induced by intra-CA injections of scopolamine.

  18. Lanthanum chloride impairs spatial memory through ERK/MSK1 signaling pathway of hippocampus in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiying; Yang, Jinghua; Liu, Qiufang; Jin, Cuihong; Wu, Shengwen; Lu, Xiaobo; Zheng, Linlin; Xi, Qi; Cai, Yuan

    2014-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are used in many fields for their diverse physical and chemical properties. Surveys have shown that REEs can impair learning and memory in children and cause neurobehavioral defects in animals. However, the mechanism underlying these impairments has not yet been completely elucidated. Lanthanum (La) is often selected to study the effects of REEs. The aim of this study was to investigate the spatial memory impairments induced by lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) and the probable underlying mechanism. Wistar rats were exposed to LaCl3 in drinking water at 0 % (control, 0 mM), 0.25 % (18 mM), 0.50 % (36 mM), and 1.00 % (72 mM) from birth to 2 months after weaning. LaCl3 considerably impaired the spatial learning and memory of rats in the Morris water maze test, damaged the synaptic ultrastructure and downregulated the expression of p-MEK1/2, p-ERK1/2, p-MSK1, p-CREB, c-FOS and BDNF in the hippocampus. These results indicate that LaCl3 exposure impairs the spatial learning and memory of rats, which may be attributed to disruption of the synaptic ultrastructure and inhibition of the ERK/MSK1 signaling pathway in the hippocampus.

  19. Contribution of an SFK-Mediated Signaling Pathway in the Dorsal Hippocampus to Cocaine-Memory Reconsolidation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wells, Audrey M; Xie, Xiaohu; Higginbotham, Jessica A; Arguello, Amy A; Healey, Kati L; Blanton, Megan; Fuchs, Rita A

    2016-02-01

    Environmentally induced relapse to cocaine seeking requires the retrieval of context-response-cocaine associative memories. These memories become labile when retrieved and must undergo reconsolidation into long-term memory storage to be maintained. Identification of the molecular underpinnings of cocaine-memory reconsolidation will likely facilitate the development of treatments that mitigate the impact of cocaine memories on relapse vulnerability. Here, we used the rat extinction-reinstatement procedure to test the hypothesis that the Src family of tyrosine kinases (SFK) in the dorsal hippocampus (DH) critically controls contextual cocaine-memory reconsolidation. To this end, we evaluated the effects of bilateral intra-DH microinfusions of the SFK inhibitor, PP2 (62.5 ng per 0.5 μl per hemisphere), following re-exposure to a cocaine-associated (cocaine-memory reactivation) or an unpaired context (no memory reactivation) on subsequent drug context-induced instrumental cocaine-seeking behavior. We also assessed alterations in the phosphorylation state of SFK targets, including GluN2A and GluN2B N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and GluA2 α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor subunits at the putative time of memory restabilization and following PP2 treatment. Finally, we evaluated the effects of intra-DH PEAQX (2.5 μg per 0.5 μl per hemisphere), a GluN2A-subunit-selective NMDAR antagonist, following, or in the absence of, cocaine-memory reactivation on subsequent drug context-induced cocaine-seeking behavior. GluN2A phosphorylation increased in the DH during putative memory restabilization, and intra-DH PP2 treatment inhibited this effect. Furthermore, PP2-as well as PEAQX-attenuated subsequent drug context-induced cocaine-seeking behavior, in a memory reactivation-dependent manner, relative to VEH. These findings suggest that hippocampal SFKs contribute to the long-term stability of cocaine-related memories that underlie contextual

  20. Luteolin protects the hippocampus against neuron impairments induced by kainic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Wang, Su Jane

    2016-07-01

    Glutamatergic excitotoxicity is crucial in the pathogenesis of numerous brain disorders. Luteolin, a flavonoid compound, inhibits glutamate release, however, its ability to affect glutamate-induced brain injury is unknown. Therefore, this study evaluated the protective effect of luteolin against brain damage induced by kainic acid (KA), a glutamate analog. Rats were treated with luteolin (10 or 50mg/kg, intraperitoneally) 30min before an intraperitoneal injection of KA (15mg/kg). Luteolin treatment reduced the KA-induced seizure score and elevations of glutamate levels in the hippocampus. A histopathological analysis showed that luteolin attenuated KA-induced neuronal death and microglial activation in the hippocampus. An immunoblotting analysis showed that luteolin restored the KA-induced reduction in Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus. Furthermore, a Morris water maze test revealed that luteolin effectively prevented KA-induced learning and memory impairments. The results suggest that luteolin protected rat brains from KA-induced excitotoxic damage by reducing glutamate levels, mitigating inflammation, and enhancing Akt activation in the hippocampus. Therefore, luteolin may be beneficial for preventing or treating brain disorders associated with excitotoxic neuronal damage. PMID:27185356

  1. Structural impairments of hippocampus in coal mine gas explosion-related posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan; Zhuo, Chuanjun; Lang, Xu; Li, Huabing; Qin, Wen; Yu, Chunshui

    2014-01-01

    Investigations on hippocampal and amygdalar volume have revealed inconsistent results in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Little is known about the structural covariance alterations between the hippocampus and amygdala in PTSD. In this study, we evaluated the alteration in the hippocampal and amygdalar volume and their structural covariance in the coal mine gas explosion related PTSD. High resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on coal mine gas explosion related PTSD male patients (n = 14) and non-traumatized coalminers without PTSD (n = 25). The voxel-based morphometry (VBM) method was used to test the inter-group differences in hippocampal and amygdalar volume as well as the inter-group differences in structural covariance between the ipsilateral hippocampus and amygdala. PTSD patients exhibited decreased gray matter volume (GMV) in the bilateral hippocampi compared to controls (p<0.05, FDR corrected). GMV covariances between the ipsilateral hippocampus and amygdala were significantly reduced in PTSD patients compared with controls (p<0.05, FDR corrected). The coalminers with gas explosion related PTSD had decreased hippocampal volume and structural covariance with the ipsilateral amygdala, suggesting that the structural impairment of the hippocampus may implicate in the pathophysiology of PTSD.

  2. Structural Impairments of Hippocampus in Coal Mine Gas Explosion-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Xu; Li, Huabing; Qin, Wen; Yu, Chunshui

    2014-01-01

    Investigations on hippocampal and amygdalar volume have revealed inconsistent results in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Little is known about the structural covariance alterations between the hippocampus and amygdala in PTSD. In this study, we evaluated the alteration in the hippocampal and amygdalar volume and their structural covariance in the coal mine gas explosion related PTSD. High resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed on coal mine gas explosion related PTSD male patients (n = 14) and non-traumatized coalminers without PTSD (n = 25). The voxel-based morphometry (VBM) method was used to test the inter-group differences in hippocampal and amygdalar volume as well as the inter-group differences in structural covariance between the ipsilateral hippocampus and amygdala. PTSD patients exhibited decreased gray matter volume (GMV) in the bilateral hippocampi compared to controls (p<0.05, FDR corrected). GMV covariances between the ipsilateral hippocampus and amygdala were significantly reduced in PTSD patients compared with controls (p<0.05, FDR corrected). The coalminers with gas explosion related PTSD had decreased hippocampal volume and structural covariance with the ipsilateral amygdala, suggesting that the structural impairment of the hippocampus may implicate in the pathophysiology of PTSD. PMID:25000505

  3. Ablation of BRaf impairs neuronal differentiation in the postnatal hippocampus and cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Verena; Götz, Rudolf; Xiang, Chaomei; Camarero, Guadelupe; Braun, Attila; Zhang, Yina; Blum, Robert; Heinsen, Helmut; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Rapp, Ulf R

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the role of the kinase BRaf in postnatal brain development. Mice expressing truncated, non-functional BRaf in neural stem cell-derived brain tissue demonstrate alterations in the cerebellum, with decreased sizes and fuzzy borders of the glomeruli in the granule cell layer. In addition we observed reduced numbers and misplaced ectopic Purkinje cells that showed an altered structure of their dendritic arborizations in the hippocampus, while the overall cornus ammonis architecture appeared to be unchanged. In male mice lacking BRaf in the hippocampus the size of the granule cell layer was normal at postnatal day 12 (P12) but diminished at P21, as compared to control littermates. This defect was caused by a reduced ability of dentate gyrus progenitor cells to differentiate into NeuN positive granule cell neurons. In vitro cell culture of P0/P1 hippocampal cells revealed that BRaf deficient cells were impaired in their ability to form microtubule-associated protein 2 positive neurons. Together with the alterations in behaviour, such as autoaggression and loss of balance fitness, these observations indicate that in the absence of BRaf all neuronal cellular structures develop, but neuronal circuits in the cerebellum and hippocampus are partially disturbed besides impaired neuronal generation in both structures. PMID:23505473

  4. Dorsal versus ventral hippocampal contributions to trace and contextual conditioning: differential effects of regionally selective NMDA receptor antagonism on acquisition and expression.

    PubMed

    Czerniawski, Jennifer; Ree, Fredrick; Chia, Chester; Otto, Tim

    2012-07-01

    The dorsal and ventral subregions of the hippocampus likely play dissociable roles in some forms of learning. For example, we have previously demonstrated that temporary inactivation of ventral, but not dorsal, hippocampus dramatically impaired the acquisition of trace fear conditioning, while temporary inactivation of dorsal, but not ventral, hippocampus impaired spatially guided reinforced alternation (Czerniawski et al. (2009) Hippocampus 19:20-32). Importantly, emerging data suggest that lesions, temporary inactivation, and NMDA receptor antagonism within these subregions can produce quite different patterns of behavioral effects when administered into the same region. Specifically, while neither lesions nor temporary inactivation of dorsal hippocampus impair the acquisition of trace fear conditioning, learning in this paradigm is severely impaired by pre-training administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist dl-2-phosphonovaleric acid (APV) in dorsal hippocampus; the effect of NMDA receptor antagonism within ventral hippocampus on the acquisition and expression of trace conditioning, or on learning in general, has not yet been systematically explored. The present study extends our previous work examining the differential effect of lesions or inactivation of the dorsal and ventral hippocampal subregions by systematically examining the effect of regionally selective pre-training or pre-testing administration of APV on the acquisition and expression of trace and contextual fear conditioning. The results of these studies demonstrate that while pre-training NMDA receptor antagonism within either the dorsal or ventral subregion of the hippocampus impaired the acquisition of both trace and contextual conditioning, pre-testing NMDA receptor antagonism within ventral, but not dorsal, hippocampus impaired the expression of previously-acquired trace and contextual fear conditioning. These data suggest that selectively manipulating the integrity of individual subregions

  5. Lesions to the CA2 region of the hippocampus impair social memory in mice

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Erica L.; Caldwell, Heather K.

    2014-01-01

    The function of the CA2 region of the hippocampus is poorly understood. While the CA1 and CA3 regions have been extensively studied, for years the CA2 region has primarily been viewed as a linking area between the two. However, the CA2 region is known to have distinct neurochemical and structural features that are different from the other parts of hippocampus and in recent years it has been suggested that the CA2 region may play a role in the formation and or recall of olfactory-based memories needed for normal social behavior. While this hypothesis has been supported by hippocampal lesion studies that have included the CA2 region, no studies have attempted to specifically lesion the CA2 region of the hippocampus in mice to determine the effects on social recognition memory and olfaction. To fill this knowledge gap, we sought to perform excitotoxic N-methyl-D aspartate (NMDA) lesions of the CA2 region in mice and determine the effects on social recognition memory. We predicted that lesions of the CA2 region would impair social recognition memory. We then went on to test olfaction in CA2 lesioned mice since social memory requires a functional olfactory system. Consistent with our prediction, we found that CA2 lesioned animals have impaired social recognition. These findings are significant because they confirm that the CA2 region of the hippocampus is a part of the neural circuitry that regulates social recognition memory, which may have implications for our understanding of the neural regulation of social behavior across species. PMID:25131412

  6. Impairment of synaptic development in the hippocampus of diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Yuki; Negishi, Takayuki; Hatakeyama, Akinori; Kawagoe, Yuta; Sawano, Erika; Tashiro, Tomoko

    2016-10-01

    Insulin receptor signaling has been shown to regulate essential aspects of CNS function such as synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival. To elucidate its roles during CNS development in vivo, we examined the synaptic and cognitive development of the spontaneously diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats in the present study. GK rats are non-obese models of type 2 diabetes established by selective inbreeding of Wistar rats based on impaired glucose tolerance. Though they start exhibiting only moderate hyperglycemia without changes in plasma insulin levels from 3 weeks postnatally, behavioral alterations in the open-field as well as significant impairments in memory retention compared with Wistar rats were observed at 10 weeks and were worsened at 20 weeks. Alterations in insulin receptor signaling and signs of insulin resistance were detected in the GK rat hippocampus at 3 weeks, as early as in other insulin-responsive peripheral tissues. Significant reduction of an excitatory postsynaptic scaffold protein, PSD95, was found at 5w and later in the hippocampus of GK rats due to the absence of a two-fold developmental increase of this protein observed in Wistar control rats between 3 and 20w. In the GK rat hippocampus, NR2A which is a NMDA receptor subunit selectively anchored to PSD95 was also reduced. In contrast, both NR2B and its anchoring protein, SAP102, showed similar developmental profiles in Wistar and GK rats with expression peaks at 2 and 3w. The results suggest that early alterations in insulin receptor signaling in the GK rat hippocampus may affect cognitive performance by suppressing synaptic maturation. PMID:27444810

  7. Lesions to the CA2 region of the hippocampus impair social memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Erica L; Caldwell, Heather K

    2014-11-01

    The function of the CA2 region of the hippocampus is poorly understood. Although the CA1 and CA3 regions have been extensively studied, for years the CA2 region has primarily been viewed as a linking area between the two. However, the CA2 region is known to have distinct neurochemical and structural features that are different from the other parts of the hippocampus and in recent years it has been suggested that the CA2 region may play a role in the formation and/or recall of olfactory-based memories needed for normal social behavior. Although this hypothesis has been supported by hippocampal lesion studies that have included the CA2 region, no studies have attempted to specifically lesion the CA2 region of the hippocampus in mice to determine the effects on social recognition memory and olfaction. To fill this knowledge gap, we sought to perform excitotoxic N-methyl-D-aspartate lesions of the CA2 region and determine the effects on social recognition memory. We predicted that lesions of the CA2 region would impair social recognition memory. We then went on to test olfaction in CA2-lesioned mice, as social memory requires a functional olfactory system. Consistent with our prediction, we found that CA2-lesioned animals had impaired social recognition. These findings are significant because they confirmed that the CA2 region of the hippocampus is a part of the neural circuitry that regulates social recognition memory, which may have implications for our understanding of the neural regulation of social behavior across species. PMID:25131412

  8. Impairment of synaptic development in the hippocampus of diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Yuki; Negishi, Takayuki; Hatakeyama, Akinori; Kawagoe, Yuta; Sawano, Erika; Tashiro, Tomoko

    2016-10-01

    Insulin receptor signaling has been shown to regulate essential aspects of CNS function such as synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival. To elucidate its roles during CNS development in vivo, we examined the synaptic and cognitive development of the spontaneously diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats in the present study. GK rats are non-obese models of type 2 diabetes established by selective inbreeding of Wistar rats based on impaired glucose tolerance. Though they start exhibiting only moderate hyperglycemia without changes in plasma insulin levels from 3 weeks postnatally, behavioral alterations in the open-field as well as significant impairments in memory retention compared with Wistar rats were observed at 10 weeks and were worsened at 20 weeks. Alterations in insulin receptor signaling and signs of insulin resistance were detected in the GK rat hippocampus at 3 weeks, as early as in other insulin-responsive peripheral tissues. Significant reduction of an excitatory postsynaptic scaffold protein, PSD95, was found at 5w and later in the hippocampus of GK rats due to the absence of a two-fold developmental increase of this protein observed in Wistar control rats between 3 and 20w. In the GK rat hippocampus, NR2A which is a NMDA receptor subunit selectively anchored to PSD95 was also reduced. In contrast, both NR2B and its anchoring protein, SAP102, showed similar developmental profiles in Wistar and GK rats with expression peaks at 2 and 3w. The results suggest that early alterations in insulin receptor signaling in the GK rat hippocampus may affect cognitive performance by suppressing synaptic maturation.

  9. Impaired Communication Between the Dorsal and Ventral Stream: Indications from Apraxia.

    PubMed

    Evans, Carys; Edwards, Martin G; Taylor, Lawrence J; Ietswaart, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Patients with apraxia perform poorly when demonstrating how an object is used, particularly when pantomiming the action. However, these patients are able to accurately identify, and to pick up and move objects, demonstrating intact ventral and dorsal stream visuomotor processing. Appropriate object manipulation for skilled use is thought to rely on integration of known and visible object properties associated with "ventro-dorsal" stream neural processes. In apraxia, it has been suggested that stored object knowledge from the ventral stream may be less readily available to incorporate into the action plan, leading to an over-reliance on the objects' visual affordances in object-directed motor behavior. The current study examined grasping performance in left hemisphere stroke patients with (N = 3) and without (N = 9) apraxia, and in age-matched healthy control participants (N = 14), where participants repeatedly grasped novel cylindrical objects of varying weight distribution. Across two conditions, object weight distribution was indicated by either a memory-associated cue (object color) or visual-spatial cue (visible dot over the weighted end). Participants were required to incorporate object-weight associations to effectively grasp and balance each object. Control groups appropriately adjusted their grasp according to each object's weight distribution across each condition, whereas throughout the task two of the three apraxic patients performed poorly on both the memory-associated and visual-spatial cue conditions. A third apraxic patient seemed to compensate for these difficulties but still performed differently to control groups. Patients with apraxia performed normally on the neutral control condition when grasping the evenly weighted version. The pattern of behavior in apraxic patients suggests impaired integration of visible and known object properties attributed to the ventro-dorsal stream: in learning to grasp the weighted object accurately, apraxic patients

  10. Region-specific roles of the prelimbic cortex, the dorsal CA1, the ventral DG and ventral CA1 of the hippocampus in the fear return evoked by a sub-conditioning procedure in rats.

    PubMed

    Fu, Juan; Xing, Xiaoli; Han, Mengfi; Xu, Na; Piao, Chengji; Zhang, Yue; Zheng, Xigeng

    2016-02-01

    The return of learned fear is an important issue in anxiety disorder research since an analogous process may contribute to long-term fear maintenance or clinical relapse. A number of studies demonstrate that mPFC and hippocampus are important in the modulation of post-extinction re-expression of fear memory. However, the region-specific role of these structures in the fear return evoked by a sub-threshold conditioning (SC) is not known. In the present experiments, we first examined specific roles of the prelimbic cortex (PL), the dorsal hippocampus (DH, the dorsal CA1 area in particular), the ventral hippocampus (the ventral dentate gyrus (vDG) and the ventral CA1 area in particular) in this fear return process. Then we examined the role of connections between PL and vCA1 with this behavioral approach. Rats were subjected to five tone-shock pairings (1.0-mA shock) to induce conditioned fear (freezing), followed by three fear extinction sessions (25 tone-alone trials each session). After a post-test for extinction memory, some rats were retrained with the SC procedure to reinstate tone-evoked freezing. Rat groups were injected with low doses of the GABAA agonist muscimol to selectively inactivate PL, DH, vDG, or vCA1 120 min before the fear return test. A disconnection paradigm with ipsilateral or contralateral muscimol injection of the PL and the vCA1 was used to examine the role of this pathway in the fear return. We found that transient inactivation of these areas significantly impaired fear return (freezing): inactivation of the prelimbic cortex blocked SC-evoked fear return in particular but did not influence fear expression in general; inactivation of the DH area impaired fear return, but had no effect on the extinction retrieval process; both ventral DG and ventral CA1 are required for the return of extinguished fear whereas only ventral DG is required for the extinction retrieval. These findings suggest that PL, DH, vDG, and vCA1 all contribute to the fear

  11. Brain iron deficiency and excess; cognitive impairment and neurodegeneration with involvement of striatum and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Youdim, M B H

    2008-08-01

    While iron deficiency is not perceived as a life threatening disorder, it is the most prevalent nutritional abnormality in the world, and a better understanding of modes and sites of action, can help devise better treatment programs for those who suffer from it. Nowhere is this more important than in infants and children that make up the bulk of iron deficiency in society. Although the effects of iron deficiency have been extensively studied in systemic organs, until very recently little attention was paid to its effects on brain function. The studies of Oski at Johns Hopkin Medical School in 1974, demonstrating the impairment of learning in young school children with iron deficiency, prompted us to study its relevance to brain biochemistry and function in an animal model of iron deficiency. Indeed, rats made iron deficient have lowered brain iron and impaired behaviours including learning. This can become irreversible especially in newborns, even after long-term iron supplementation. We have shown that in this condition it is the brain striatal dopaminergic-opiate system which becomes defective, resulting in alterations in circadian behaviours, cognitive impairment and neurochemical changes closely associated with them. More recently we have extended these studies and have established that cognitive impairment may be closely associated with neuroanatomical damage and zinc metabolism in the hippocampus due to iron deficiency, and which may result from abnormal cholinergic function. The hippocampus is the focus of many studies today, since this brain structure has high zinc concentration and is highly involved in many forms of cognitive deficits as a consequence of cholinergic deficiency and has achieved prominence because of dementia in ageing and Alzheimer's disease. Thus, it is now apparent that cognitive impairment may not be attributed to a single neurotransmitter, but rather, alterations and interactions of several systems in different brain regions. In animal

  12. Inhibition of Rac1 activity in the hippocampus impaired extinction of contextual fear.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lizhu; Mao, Rongrong; Tong, Jianbin; Li, Jinnan; Chai, Anping; Zhou, Qixin; Yang, Yuexiong; Wang, Liping; Li, Lingjiang; Xu, Lin

    2016-10-01

    Promoting extinction of fear memory is the main treatment of fear disorders, especially post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, fear extinction is often incomplete in these patients. Our previous study had shown that Rac1 activity in hippocampus plays a crucial role in the learning of contextual fear memory in rats. Here, we further investigated whether Rac1 activity also modulated the extinction of contextual fear memory. We found that massed extinction obviously upregulated hippocampal Rac1 activity and induced long-term extinction of contextual fear in rats. Intrahippocampal injection of the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 prevents extinction of contextual fear in massed extinction training rats. In contrast, long-spaced extinction downregulated Rac1 activity and caused less extinction. And Rac1 activator CN04-A promotes extinction of contextual fear in long-spaced extinction rats. Our study demonstrates that inhibition of Rac1 activity in the hippocampus impaired extinction of contextual fear, suggesting that modulating Rac1 activity of the hippocampus may be promising therapy of fear disorders.

  13. Inhibition of Rac1 activity in the hippocampus impaired extinction of contextual fear.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lizhu; Mao, Rongrong; Tong, Jianbin; Li, Jinnan; Chai, Anping; Zhou, Qixin; Yang, Yuexiong; Wang, Liping; Li, Lingjiang; Xu, Lin

    2016-10-01

    Promoting extinction of fear memory is the main treatment of fear disorders, especially post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, fear extinction is often incomplete in these patients. Our previous study had shown that Rac1 activity in hippocampus plays a crucial role in the learning of contextual fear memory in rats. Here, we further investigated whether Rac1 activity also modulated the extinction of contextual fear memory. We found that massed extinction obviously upregulated hippocampal Rac1 activity and induced long-term extinction of contextual fear in rats. Intrahippocampal injection of the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 prevents extinction of contextual fear in massed extinction training rats. In contrast, long-spaced extinction downregulated Rac1 activity and caused less extinction. And Rac1 activator CN04-A promotes extinction of contextual fear in long-spaced extinction rats. Our study demonstrates that inhibition of Rac1 activity in the hippocampus impaired extinction of contextual fear, suggesting that modulating Rac1 activity of the hippocampus may be promising therapy of fear disorders. PMID:27329554

  14. Activation of matrix metalloproteinase in dorsal hippocampus drives improvement in spatial working memory after intra-VTA nicotine infusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Shu, Hui; Zheng, Guo-qing; Wang, Xiaona; Sun, Yanyun; Liu, Yushan; Weaver, John Michael; Shen, Xianzhi; Liu, Wenlan; Jin, Xinchun

    2015-10-01

    The hippocampus receives dopaminergic projections from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra. These inputs appear to provide a modulatory signal that influences hippocampus-dependent behaviors. Enhancements in working memory performance have been previously reported following acute smoking/nicotine exposure. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated the effects of nicotine on spatial working memory (SWM) and the mechanisms involved. Delayed alternation T-maze task was used to assess SWM. In situ and gel gelatin zymography were used to detect matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in SWM. Systemic or local (intra-VTA) administration of nicotine significantly improves SWM, which was accompanied by increased MMP-9 activity in dorsal hippocampus (dHPC). Intra-dHPC administration of MMP inhibitor FN-439 abolished the memory enhancement induced by intra-VTA nicotine infusion. FN-439 had no effect on locomotor behavior. Our data suggest that intra-VTA nicotine infusion activates MMP-9 in dHPC to improve SWM in rats.

  15. Impaired Communication Between the Dorsal and Ventral Stream: Indications from Apraxia

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Carys; Edwards, Martin G.; Taylor, Lawrence J.; Ietswaart, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Patients with apraxia perform poorly when demonstrating how an object is used, particularly when pantomiming the action. However, these patients are able to accurately identify, and to pick up and move objects, demonstrating intact ventral and dorsal stream visuomotor processing. Appropriate object manipulation for skilled use is thought to rely on integration of known and visible object properties associated with “ventro-dorsal” stream neural processes. In apraxia, it has been suggested that stored object knowledge from the ventral stream may be less readily available to incorporate into the action plan, leading to an over-reliance on the objects’ visual affordances in object-directed motor behavior. The current study examined grasping performance in left hemisphere stroke patients with (N = 3) and without (N = 9) apraxia, and in age-matched healthy control participants (N = 14), where participants repeatedly grasped novel cylindrical objects of varying weight distribution. Across two conditions, object weight distribution was indicated by either a memory-associated cue (object color) or visual-spatial cue (visible dot over the weighted end). Participants were required to incorporate object-weight associations to effectively grasp and balance each object. Control groups appropriately adjusted their grasp according to each object’s weight distribution across each condition, whereas throughout the task two of the three apraxic patients performed poorly on both the memory-associated and visual-spatial cue conditions. A third apraxic patient seemed to compensate for these difficulties but still performed differently to control groups. Patients with apraxia performed normally on the neutral control condition when grasping the evenly weighted version. The pattern of behavior in apraxic patients suggests impaired integration of visible and known object properties attributed to the ventro-dorsal stream: in learning to grasp the weighted object accurately, apraxic

  16. Modulation of axonal sprouting along rostro-caudal axis of dorsal hippocampus and no neuronal survival in parahippocampal cortices by long-term post-lesion melatonin administration in lithium-pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Ganjkhani, Mahin; Ali, Rostami; Iraj, Jafari Anarkooli

    2016-01-01

    Feature outcome of hippocampus and extra-hippocampal cortices was evaluated in melatonin treated lithium-pilocarpine epileptic rats during early and chronic phases of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). After status epilepticus (SE) induction, 5 and 20 mg/kg melatonin were administered for 14 days or 60 days. All animals were killed 60 days post SE induction and the histological features of the rosrto-caudal axis of the dorsal hippocampus, piriform and entorhinal cortices were evaluated utilizing Nissl, Timm, and synapsin I immunoflorescent staining. Melatonin (20 mg/kg) effect on CA1 and CA3 neurons showed a region-specific pattern along the rostro-caudal axis of the dorsal hippocampus. The number of counted granular cells by melatonin (20 mg/kg) treatment increased along the rostro-caudal axis of the dorsal hippocampus in comparison to the untreated epileptic group. The density of Timm granules in the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus decreased significantly in all melatonin treated groups in comparison to the untreated epileptic animals. The increased density of synapsin I immunoreactivity in the outer molecular layer of the dentate gyrus of untreated epileptic rats showed a profound decrease following melatonin treatment. There was no neuronal protection in the piriform and entorhinal cortices whatever the melatonin treatment. Long-term melatonin administration as a co-adjuvant probably could reduce the post-lesion histological consequences of TLE in a region-specific pattern along the rostro-caudal axis of the dorsal hippocampus. PMID:27051565

  17. Activation of dopaminergic D2/D3 receptors modulates dorsoventral connectivity in the hippocampus and reverses the impairment of working memory after nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Cardoso-Cruz, Helder; Dourado, Margarida; Monteiro, Clara; Matos, Mariana R; Galhardo, Vasco

    2014-04-23

    Dopamine plays an important role in several forms of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus, a crucial brain structure for working memory (WM) functioning. In this study, we evaluated whether the working-memory impairment characteristic of animal models of chronic pain is dependent on hippocampal dopaminergic signaling. To address this issue, we implanted multichannel arrays of electrodes in the dorsal and ventral hippocampal CA1 region of rats and recorded the neuronal activity during a food-reinforced spatial WM task of trajectory alternation. Within-subject behavioral performance and patterns of dorsoventral neuronal activity were assessed before and after the onset of persistent neuropathic pain using the Spared Nerve Injury (SNI) model of neuropathic pain. Our results show that the peripheral nerve lesion caused a disruption in WM and in hippocampus spike activity and that this disruption was reversed by the systemic administration of the dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist quinpirole (0.05 mg/kg). In SNI animals, the administration of quinpirole restored both the performance-related and the task-related spike activity to the normal range characteristic of naive animals, whereas quinpirole in sham animals caused the opposite effect. Quinpirole also reversed the abnormally low levels of hippocampus dorsoventral connectivity and phase coherence. Together with our finding of changes in gene expression of dopamine receptors and modulators after the onset of the nerve injury model, these results suggest that disruption of the dopaminergic balance in the hippocampus may be crucial for the clinical neurological and cognitive deficits observed in patients with painful syndromes.

  18. Bisphenol-A impairs myelination potential during development in the hippocampus of the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Shashi Kant; Agarwal, Swati; Chauhan, Lalit Kumar Singh; Mishra, Vijay Nath; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Myelin is the functional implication of oligodendrocytes (OLs), which is involved in insulation of axons and promoting rapid propagation of action potential in the brain. OLs are derived from oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), which proliferate, differentiate, and migrate throughout the central nervous system. Defects in myelination process lead to the onset of several neurological and neurodegenerative disorders. Exposure to synthetic xenoestrogen bisphenol-A (BPA) causes cognitive dysfunction, impairs hippocampal neurogenesis, and causes onset of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the effects of BPA on OPC proliferation, differentiation and myelination, and associated cellular and molecular mechanism(s) in the hippocampus of the rat brain are still largely unknown. We found that BPA significantly decreased bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cell proliferation and number and size of oligospheres. We observed reduced co-localization of BrdU with myelination markers CNPase and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFR-α), suggesting impaired proliferation and differentiation of OPCs by BPA in culture. We studied the effects of BPA exposure during prenatal and postnatal periods on cellular and molecular alteration(s) in the myelination process in the hippocampus region of the rat brain at postnatal day 21 and 90. BPA exposure both in vitro and in vivo altered proliferation and differentiation potential of OPCs and decreased the expression of genes and levels of proteins that are involved in myelination. Ultrastructural electron microscopy analysis revealed that BPA exposure caused decompaction of myelinated axons and altered g-ratio at both the developmental periods as compared to control. These results suggest that BPA exposure both during prenatal and postnatal periods alters myelination in the hippocampus of the rat brain leading to cognitive deficits.

  19. Antidepressant suppression of non-REM sleep spindles and REM sleep impairs hippocampus-dependent learning while augmenting striatum-dependent learning.

    PubMed

    Watts, Alain; Gritton, Howard J; Sweigart, Jamie; Poe, Gina R

    2012-09-26

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep enhances hippocampus-dependent associative memory, but REM deprivation has little impact on striatum-dependent procedural learning. Antidepressant medications are known to inhibit REM sleep, but it is not well understood if antidepressant treatments impact learning and memory. We explored antidepressant REM suppression effects on learning by training animals daily on a spatial task under familiar and novel conditions, followed by training on a procedural memory task. Daily treatment with the antidepressant and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor desipramine (DMI) strongly suppressed REM sleep in rats for several hours, as has been described in humans. We also found that DMI treatment reduced the spindle-rich transition-to-REM sleep state (TR), which has not been previously reported. DMI REM suppression gradually weakened performance on a once familiar hippocampus-dependent maze (reconsolidation error). DMI also impaired learning of the novel maze (consolidation error). Unexpectedly, learning of novel reward positions and memory of familiar positions were equally and oppositely correlated with amounts of TR sleep. Conversely, DMI treatment enhanced performance on a separate striatum-dependent, procedural T-maze task that was positively correlated with the amounts of slow-wave sleep (SWS). Our results suggest that learning strategy switches in patients taking REM sleep-suppressing antidepressants might serve to offset sleep-dependent hippocampal impairments to partially preserve performance. State-performance correlations support a model wherein reconsolidation of hippocampus-dependent familiar memories occurs during REM sleep, novel information is incorporated and consolidated during TR, and dorsal striatum-dependent procedural learning is augmented during SWS.

  20. Estradiol-Induced Object Recognition Memory Consolidation Is Dependent on Activation of mTOR Signaling in the Dorsal Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortress, Ashley M.; Fan, Lu; Orr, Patrick T.; Zhao, Zaorui; Frick, Karyn M.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is an important regulator of protein synthesis and is essential for various forms of hippocampal memory. Here, we asked whether the enhancement of object recognition memory consolidation produced by dorsal hippocampal infusion of 17[Beta]-estradiol (E[subscript 2]) is dependent on mTOR…

  1. Preictal Activity of Subicular, CA1, and Dentate Gyrus Principal Neurons in the Dorsal Hippocampus before Spontaneous Seizures in a Rat Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Satoshi; Toyoda, Izumi; Thamattoor, Ajoy K.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that spontaneous seizures in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy might be preceded by increased action potential firing of hippocampal neurons. Preictal activity is potentially important because it might provide new opportunities for predicting when a seizure is about to occur and insight into how spontaneous seizures are generated. We evaluated local field potentials and unit activity of single, putative excitatory neurons in the subiculum, CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus in epileptic pilocarpine-treated rats as they experienced spontaneous seizures. Average action potential firing rates of neurons in the subiculum, CA1, and dentate gyrus, but not CA3, increased significantly and progressively beginning 2–4 min before locally recorded spontaneous seizures. In the subiculum, CA1, and dentate gyrus, but not CA3, 41–57% of neurons displayed increased preictal activity with significant consistency across multiple seizures. Much of the increased preictal firing of neurons in the subiculum and CA1 correlated with preictal theta activity, whereas preictal firing of neurons in the dentate gyrus was independent of theta. In addition, some CA1 and dentate gyrus neurons displayed reduced firing rates preictally. These results reveal that different hippocampal subregions exhibit differences in the extent and potential underlying mechanisms of preictal activity. The finding of robust and significantly consistent preictal activity of subicular, CA1, and dentate neurons in the dorsal hippocampus, despite the likelihood that many seizures initiated in other brain regions, suggests the existence of a broader neuronal network whose activity changes minutes before spontaneous seizures initiate. PMID:25505320

  2. Impaired up-regulation of type II corticosteroid receptors in hippocampus of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, J C; Fleenor, D G; Kerr, D S; Landfield, P W

    1989-01-30

    Several recent investigations have reported a decline of rat hippocampal corticosteroid-binding receptors (CSRs) with aging. This decline has been proposed to be an initial cause (through disinhibition) of the elevated adrenal steroid secretion that apparently occurs with aging; however, it could instead be an effect of corticoid elevation (through down-regulation). In order to assess the effects of age on CSR biosynthetic capacity in the absence of down-regulatory influences of endogenous corticoids, as well as to study aging changes in CSR plasticity, we examined the up-regulation of hippocampal CSR that follows adrenalectomy (ADX). The rat hippocampus contains at least two types of CSR binding and differential analysis of types I and II CSR was accomplished by selective displacement of [3H]corticosterone with RU-28362, a specific type II agonist. In young (3 months old) Fischer-344 rat hippocampus, up-regulation of type II binding above 2-day ADX baseline was present by 3-7 days and increased still further by 8-10 days post-ADX; type I CSR density did not change significantly between 1 and 10 days post-ADX. However, in aged (24-26 months old) rats, type II CSR up-regulation did not occur over the 10 day post-ADX period. Thus, the age-related impairment of type II up-regulation may reflect an intrinsic deficit in CSR biosynthesis or lability that is independent of the acute endogenous adrenal steroid environment.

  3. Depletion of primary cilia from mature dentate granule cells impairs hippocampus-dependent contextual memory

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Soyoung; Kirschen, Gregory W.; Gu, Yan; Ge, Shaoyu

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilium, a sensory organelle, regulates cell proliferation and neuronal development of dentate granule cells in the hippocampus. However, its role in the function of mature dentate granule cells remains unknown. Here we specifically depleted and disrupted ciliary proteins IFT20 and Kif3A (respectively) in mature dentate granule cells and investigated hippocampus-dependent contextual memory and long-term plasticity at mossy fiber synapses. We found that depletion of IFT20 in these cells significantly impaired context-dependent fear-related memory. Furthermore, we tested synaptic plasticity of mossy fiber synapses in area CA3 and found increased long-term potentiation upon depletion of IFT20 or disruption of Kif3A. Our findings suggest a role of primary cilia in the memory function of mature dentate granule cells, which may result from abnormal mossy fiber synaptic plasticity. A direct link between the primary cilia of mature dentate granule cells and behavior will require further investigation using independent approaches to manipulate primary cilia. PMID:27678193

  4. Dysregulation of memory-related proteins in the hippocampus of aged rats and their relation with cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Monti, Barbara; Berteotti, Chiara; Contestabile, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    In the present experiments, we used conditioned fear to study whether changes in expression or functional state of proteins known to be involved in hippocampal learning could suggest correlation with age-related memory deficits. We focused on both alterations constitutively present in the hippocampus of aged rats and alterations related to different learning responses. Our results point at the dysregulation of the phosphorylation state of CREB in the hippocampus of aged rats as a primary biochemical correlate of their impaired memory. Other proteins, known to be important for various steps of memory formation and consolidation and linked to CREB, are to some extent altered in their constitutive expression or in the response to learning in the aged hippocampus. In particular, phosphorylated CREB and Arc, a protein functionally related to CREB in memory consolidation, are both present at constitutively higher levels in the hippocampus of aged rats, but they are not susceptible to the learning-related up-regulation occurring in young adults. Two other CREB-regulated proteins involved in memory consolidation, the neurotrophin BDNF and the transcription factor C/EBPbeta, are expressed at similar levels in the hippocampus of young-adult and aged rats, but their response to conditioned fear learning appears dysregulated by aging. Calcineurin, a protein phosphatase having CREB among its substrates and whose expression negatively correlates with learning, is more expressed in the hippocampus of aged rats. However, while calcineurin expression decreases in the hippocampus of young adults after learning, no changes are observed in the hippocampus of aged, learning-impaired rats. PMID:16086428

  5. CREB Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotide Administration into the Dorsal Hippocampal CA3 Region Impairs Long- but Not Short-Term Spatial Memory in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florian, Cedrick; Mons, Nicole; Roullet, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    The transcription factor cAMP response-element binding protein (CREB) has a pivotal role in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent long-term memory. We recently demonstrated that the dorsal hippocampal CA3 region is involved in memory consolidation of spatial information tested on a Morris water maze in mice. To test whether…

  6. Buspirone impaired acquisition and retention in avoidance tasks: involvement of the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Liang, K C; Tsui, K Y; Tyan, Y M; Chiang, T C

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of buspirone on acquisition as well as formation and expression of memory in three different types of avoidance tasks. Rats were trained and tested on a one-trial inhibitory avoidance task, an 8-trial active avoidance task or the Morris water maze. Buspirone (5.0 mg/kg) was administered subcutaneously 30 min before training, immediately after training or 30 min before testing. Retention was tested at various times after training. In the inhibitory avoidance task, pretraining injections of buspirone produced a marked impairing effect on retention, posttraining injections of buspirone produced a moderate but time-dependent memory deficit. Pretest injections of buspirone suppressed retention performance. Such an effect was more pronounced in the 1-day test than in the 21-day test. Intra-hippocampal infusion of buspirone (5.0 micrograms) before testing suppressed expression of the 1-day, but not the 21-day, memory. In the active avoidance task and the Morris water maze, an injection of buspirone before training or testing also impaired acquisition or suppressed retention performance. These findings suggest that buspirone given at various times could compromise acquisition, consolidation and retrieval of affective memory and the hippocampus was involved in the retrieval effect.

  7. Effects of dihydrotestosterone on synaptic plasticity of the hippocampus in mild cognitive impairment male SAMP8 mice

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wensen; Han, Shuo; Kang, Lin; Li, Sha; Du, Juan; Cui, Huixian

    2016-01-01

    The current study focused on how dihydrotestosterone (DHT) regulates synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of mild cognitive impairment male senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice. Five-month-old SAMP8 mice were divided into the control, castrated and castrated-DHT groups, in which the mice were castrated and treated with physiological doses of DHT for a period of 2 months. To determine the regulatory mechanisms of DHT in the cognitive capacity, the effects of DHT on the morphology of the synapse and the expression of synaptic marker proteins in the hippocampus were investigated using immunohistochemistry, qPCR and western blot analysis. The results showed that the expression of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), synaptophysin (SYN) and developmentally regulated brain protein (Drebrin) was reduced in the castrated group compared to the control group. However, DHT promoted the expression of CREB, PSD95, SYN and Drebrin in the hippocampus of the castrated-DHT group. Thus, androgen depletion impaired the synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of SAMP8 and accelerated the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like neuropathology, suggesting that a similar mechanism may underlie the increased risk for AD in men with low testosterone. In addition, DHT regulated synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) SAMP8 mice and delayed the progression of disease to Alzheimer's dementia. In conclusion, androgen-based hormone therapy is a potentially useful strategy for preventing the progression of MCI in aging men. Androgens enhance synaptic markers (SYN, PSD95, and Drebrin), activate CREB, modulate the fundamental biology of synaptic structure, and lead to the structural changes of plasticity in the hippocampus, all of which result in improved cognitive function. PMID:27588067

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum stress impairment in the spinal dorsal horn of a neuropathic pain model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Enji; Yi, Min-Hee; Shin, Nara; Baek, Hyunjung; Kim, Sena; Kim, Eunjee; Kwon, Kisang; Lee, Sunyeul; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Chul Bae, Yong; Kim, Yonghyun; Kwon, O-Yu; Lee, Won Hyung; Kim, Dong Woon

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, but its role in neuropathic pain remains unclear. In this study, we examined the ER stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) activation in a L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-induced rat neuropathic pain model. SNL-induced neuropathic pain was assessed behaviorally using the CatWalk system, and histologically with microglial activation in the dorsal spinal horn. L5 SNL induced BIP upregulation in the neuron of superficial laminae of dorsal spinal horn. It also increased the level of ATF6 and intracellular localization into the nuclei in the neurons. Moreover, spliced XBP1 was also markedly elevated in the ipsilateral spinal dorsal horn. The PERK-elF2 pathway was activated in astrocytes of the spinal dorsal horn in the SNL model. In addition, electron microscopy revealed the presence of swollen cisternae in the dorsal spinal cord after SNL. Additionally, inhibition of the ATF6 pathway by intrathecal treatment with ATF6 siRNA reduced pain behaviors and BIP expression in the dorsal horn. The results suggest that ER stress might be involved in the induction and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, a disturbance in UPR signaling may render the spinal neurons vulnerable to peripheral nerve injury or neuropathic pain stimuli. PMID:26109318

  9. Functional-structural degeneration in dorsal and ventral attention systems for Alzheimer's disease, amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Qian, Shaowen; Zhang, Zhaoyan; Li, Bo; Sun, Gang

    2015-12-01

    Growing evidence of attention related failures in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) has already been proposed by previous studies. However, previous studies lacked of systematic investigation on the functional and structural substrates for attention function for patients with AD and aMCI. In this work, we investigated the functional connectivity and gray matter density in dorsal and ventral attention networks (DAN, VAN) of normal participants (n = 15) and patients with aMCI (n = 12) and AD (n = 16) by applying group independent component analysis (ICA) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis. Using ICA, we extracted the functional patterns of DAN and VAN which are respectively responsible for the "top-down" attention process and "bottom-up" process. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed significant group-differed functional connectivity in bilateral frontal eye fields (FEF) area and intraparietal sulcus (IPS) area, as well as posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus in the dorsal system. With regard to the ventral system, group-effects were significantly focused in right orbital superior/middle frontal gyrus, right inferior parietal lobule, angular gyrus, and supramarginal gyrus around the temporal-parietal junction area. Post hoc cluster-level comparisons revealed totally impaired functional substrates for both attentional networks for patients with AD, whereas selectively impaired attention systems for patients with aMCI with impaired functional patent of DAN but preserved functional pattern of VAN. Correspondingly, VBM analysis revealed gray matter loss in right ventral and dorsal frontal cortex was in the AD group, whereas preserved gray matter density was in aMCI, even a little extent of expansion of gray matter density in several participants. Using multivariate regression analysis we found discrepant couplings of functional-structural degenerations between both patient groups

  10. OBESITY/HYPERLEPTINEMIC PHENOTYPE IMPAIRS STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL PLASTICITY IN THE RAT HIPPOCAMPUS

    PubMed Central

    Grillo, Claudia A.; Piroli, Gerardo G.; Junor, Lorain; Wilson, Steven P.; Mott, David D.; Wilson, Marlene A.; Reagan, Lawrence P.

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological studies estimate that greater than 60% of the adult US population may be categorized as either overweight or obese and there is a growing appreciation that the complications of obesity extend to the central nervous system (CNS). While the vast majority of these studies have focused upon the hypothalamus, more recent studies suggest that the complications of obesity may also affect the structural and functional integrity of the hippocampus. A potential contributor to obesity-related CNS abnormalities is the adipocyte-derived hormone leptin. In this regard, decreases in CNS leptin activity may contribute to deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and suggest that leptin resistance, a well described phenomenon in the hypothalamus, may also be observed in the hippocampus. Unfortunately, the myriad of metabolic and endocrine abnormalities in diabetes/obesity phenotypes makes it challenging to assess the role of leptin in hippocampal neuroplasticity deficits associated with obesity models. To address this question, we examined hippocampal morphological and behavioral plasticity following lentivirus-mediated downregulation of hypothalamic insulin receptors (hypo-IRAS). Hypo-IRAS rats exhibit increases in body weight, adiposity, plasma leptin and triglyceride levels. As such, hypo-IRAS rats develop a phenotype that is consistent with features of the metabolic syndrome. In addition, hippocampal morphological plasticity and performance of hippocampal-dependent tasks are adversely affected in hypo-IRAS rats. Leptin-mediated signaling is also decreased in hypo-IRAS rats. We will discuss these findings in the context of how hyperleptinemia and hypertriglyceridemia may represent mechanistic mediators of the neurological consequences of impaired hippocampal synaptic plasticity in obesity. PMID:21354191

  11. Grey matter atrophy of basal forebrain and hippocampus in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haobo; Trollor, Julian N; Wen, Wei; Zhu, Wanlin; Crawford, John D; Kochan, Nicole A; Slavin, Melissa J; Brodaty, Henry; Reppermund, Simone; Kang, Kristan; Mather, Karen A; Sachdev, Perminder S

    2011-05-01

    The basal forebrain area (BFA) is closely connected to the hippocampus by virtue of cholinergic neuronal projections. Structural neuroimaging studies have shown reduced volumes of both structures in Alzheimer's disease and its prodromal stage mild cognitive impairment (MCI), but generally not in the same investigation. By combining voxel based morphometry and region of interest methods, we measured the grey matter (GM) volumes of the two brain regions with the goal of elucidating their contributions to MCI and its two subtypes (amnestic MCI and non-amnestic MCI) in an elderly epidemiological sample. The results replicated previous findings that the atrophies of both brain regions were associated with an increased likelihood of MCI and its two subtypes. However, in a regression model for the prediction of MCI with GM volumes for both regions used as predictors, only hippocampal atrophy remained significant. Two possible interpretations for this pattern of results were discussed. One is that the observed correlation between BFA atrophy and MCI is spurious and due to the hippocampal atrophy correlated with both. Alternatively, our observation is consistent with the possibility that BFA atrophy has a causal effect on MCI, which is mediated via its influence on hippocampal atrophy. Furthermore, we found that the left hippocampal atrophy had a stronger effect than the right hippocampus and bilateral BFA in the prediction of amnestic MCI occurrence when the four unilateral areas were entered into one regression model. In addition, a slight but statistically significant difference was found in the left hippocampal volume between APOE ε4 allele carriers and non-carriers, consistent with prior studies.

  12. NMDA-NO signaling in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus time-dependently modulates the behavioral responses to forced swimming stress.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Cassiano R A F; Casarotto, Plínio C; Joca, Sâmia R L

    2016-07-01

    Hodological and genetic differences between dorsal (DH) and ventral (VH) hippocampus may convey distinct behavioral roles. DH is responsible for mediating cognitive process, such as learning and memory, while VH modulates neuroendocrine and emotional-motivational responses to stress. Manipulating glutamatergic NMDA receptors and nitric oxide (NO) systems of the hippocampus induces important changes in behavioral responses to stress. Nevertheless, there is no study concerning functional differences between DH and VH in the modulation of behavioral responses induced by stress models predictive of antidepressant effects. Thus, this study showed that reversible blockade of the DH or VH of animals submitted to the forced swimming test (FST), by using cobalt chloride (calcium-dependent synaptic neurotransmission blocker), was not able to change immobility time. Afterwards, the NMDA-NO system was evaluated in the FST by means of intra-DH or intra-VH administration of NMDA receptor antagonist (AP7), NOS1 and sGC inhibitors (N-PLA and ODQ, respectively). Bilateral intra-DH injections after pretest or before test were able to induce antidepressant-like effects in the FST. On the other hand, bilateral VH administration of AP-7, N-PLA and ODQ induced antidepressant-like effects only when injected before the test. Administration of NO scavenger (C-PTIO) intra-DH, after pretest and before test, or intra-VH before test induced similar results. Increased NOS1 levels was associated to stress exposure in the DH. These results suggest that the glutamatergic-NO system of the DH and VH are both able to modulate behavioral responses in the FST, albeit with differential participation along time after stress exposure.

  13. Myelin injury induces axonal transport impairment but not AD-like pathology in the hippocampus of cuprizone-fed mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Junjun; Zhou, Hong; Bai, Feng; Ren, Qingguo; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    Both multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are progressive neurological disorders with myelin injury and memory impairment. However, whether myelin impairment could cause AD-like neurological pathology remains unclear. To explore neurological pathology following myelin injury, we assessed cognitive function, the expression of myelin proteins, axonal transport-associated proteins, axonal structural proteins, synapse-associated proteins, tau and beta amyloid and the status of neurons, using the cuprizone mouse model of demyelination. We found the mild impairment of learning ability in cuprizone-fed mice and the decreased expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) in the hippocampus. And anti-LINGO-1 improved learning ability and partly restored MBP level. Furthermore, we also found kinesin light chain (KLC), neurofilament light chain (NFL) and neurofilament heavy chain (NF200) were declined in demyelinated hippocampus, which could be partly improved by treatment with anti-LINGO-1. However, we did not observe the increased expression of beta amyloid, hyperphosphorylation of tau and loss of neurons in demyelinated hippocampus. Our results suggest that demyelination might lead to the impairment of neuronal transport, but not cause increased level of hyperphosphorylated tau and beta amyloid. Our research demonstrates remyelination might be an effective pathway to recover the function of neuronal axons and cognition in MS. PMID:27129150

  14. Myelin injury induces axonal transport impairment but not AD-like pathology in the hippocampus of cuprizone-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Junjun; Zhou, Hong; Bai, Feng; Ren, Qingguo; Zhang, Zhijun

    2016-05-24

    Both multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are progressive neurological disorders with myelin injury and memory impairment. However, whether myelin impairment could cause AD-like neurological pathology remains unclear. To explore neurological pathology following myelin injury, we assessed cognitive function, the expression of myelin proteins, axonal transport-associated proteins, axonal structural proteins, synapse-associated proteins, tau and beta amyloid and the status of neurons, using the cuprizone mouse model of demyelination. We found the mild impairment of learning ability in cuprizone-fed mice and the decreased expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) in the hippocampus. And anti-LINGO-1 improved learning ability and partly restored MBP level. Furthermore, we also found kinesin light chain (KLC), neurofilament light chain (NFL) and neurofilament heavy chain (NF200) were declined in demyelinated hippocampus, which could be partly improved by treatment with anti-LINGO-1. However, we did not observe the increased expression of beta amyloid, hyperphosphorylation of tau and loss of neurons in demyelinated hippocampus. Our results suggest that demyelination might lead to the impairment of neuronal transport, but not cause increased level of hyperphosphorylated tau and beta amyloid. Our research demonstrates remyelination might be an effective pathway to recover the function of neuronal axons and cognition in MS. PMID:27129150

  15. Electromagnetic radiation (Wi-Fi) and epilepsy induce calcium entry and apoptosis through activation of TRPV1 channel in hippocampus and dorsal root ganglion of rats.

    PubMed

    Ghazizadeh, Vahid; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2014-09-01

    Incidence rates of epilepsy and use of Wi-Fi worldwide have been increasing. TRPV1 is a Ca(2+) permeable and non-selective channel, gated by noxious heat, oxidative stress and capsaicin (CAP). The hyperthermia and oxidant effects of Wi-Fi may induce apoptosis and Ca(2+) entry through activation of TRPV1 channel in epilepsy. Therefore, we tested the effects of Wi-Fi (2.45 GHz) exposure on Ca(2+) influx, oxidative stress and apoptosis through TRPV1 channel in the murine dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and hippocampus of pentylentetrazol (PTZ)-induced epileptic rats. Rats in the present study were divided into two groups as controls and PTZ. The PTZ groups were divided into two subgroups namely PTZ + Wi-Fi and PTZ + Wi-Fi + capsazepine (CPZ). The hippocampal and DRG neurons were freshly isolated from the rats. The DRG and hippocampus in PTZ + Wi-Fi and PTZ + Wi-Fi + CPZ groups were exposed to Wi-Fi for 1 hour before CAP stimulation. The cytosolic free Ca(2+), reactive oxygen species production, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, caspase-3 and -9 values in hippocampus were higher in the PTZ group than in the control although cell viability values decreased. The Wi-Fi exposure induced additional effects on the cytosolic Ca(2+) increase. However, pretreatment of the neurons with CPZ, results in a protection against epilepsy-induced Ca(2+) influx, apoptosis and oxidative damages. In results of whole cell patch-clamp experiments, treatment of DRG with Ca(2+) channel antagonists [thapsigargin, verapamil + diltiazem, 2-APB, MK-801] indicated that Wi-Fi exposure induced Ca(2+) influx via the TRPV1 channels. In conclusion, epilepsy and Wi-Fi in our experimental model is involved in Ca(2+) influx and oxidative stress-induced hippocampal and DRG death through activation of TRPV1 channels, and negative modulation of this channel activity by CPZ pretreatment may account for the neuroprotective activity against oxidative stress.

  16. Trajectories of peripheral interleukin-6, structure of the hippocampus, and cognitive impairment over 14 years in older adults.

    PubMed

    Metti, Andrea L; Aizenstein, Howard; Yaffe, Kristine; Boudreau, Robert M; Newman, Anne; Launer, Lenore; Gianaros, Peter J; Lopez, Oscar L; Saxton, Judith; Ives, Diane G; Kritchevsky, Stephen; Vallejo, Abbe N; Rosano, Caterina

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to investigate if trajectory components (baseline level, slope, and variability) of peripheral interleukin-6 (IL-6) over time were related to cognitive impairment and smaller hippocampal volume and if hippocampal volume explained the associations between IL-6 and cognitive impairment. Multivariable regression models were used to test the association between IL-6 trajectory components with change in neuroimaging measures of the hippocampus and with cognitive impairment among 135 older adults (70-79 years at baseline) from the Healthy Brain Project over 14 years. IL-6 variability was positively associated with cognitive impairment (odds ratio [OR] = 5.86, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24, 27.61) and with greater decrease per year of gray matter volume of the hippocampus (β = -0.008, standard error = 0.004, p = 0.03). After adjustment for hippocampal volume, the OR of cognitive impairment decreased for each unit of IL-6 variability and CIs widened (OR = 4.36, 95% CI: 0.67, 28.29). Neither baseline levels nor slopes of IL-6 were related to cognitive impairment or hippocampal volume. We believe this has potential clinical and public health implications by suggesting adults with stable levels of peripheral IL-6 may be better targets for intervention studies for slowing or preventing cognitive decline.

  17. Myocardial infarction induces cognitive impairment by increasing the production of hydrogen peroxide in adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunhua; Liu, Ye; Yang, Zhuo

    2014-02-01

    Accumulating clinical evidence has shown a causal relationship between heart diseases and cognitive impairment in clinical, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, rats with myocardial infarction (MI) were used to investigate cognition-related synaptic function and proteins. Adult male Wistar rats were subjected to MI by ligating of left anterior descending artery (LAD) and the infarct size of rat heart was measured by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazoium chloride (TTC) staining. In this study, results showed that compared with control group, long-term potentiation was suppressed in dentate gyrus area, the contents of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde were significantly increased, whereas the Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase activity and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 2B were attenuated in hippocampus of MI rats. Interestingly, it was observed that the PI3K/Akt pathway was activated in MI rats. Therefore, this study suggests that H2O2 plays an important role in cognitive dysfunction induced by MI.

  18. Further evidence for involvement of the dorsal hippocampus serotonergic and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic pathways in the expression of contextual fear conditioning in rats.

    PubMed

    Almada, Rafael C; Albrechet-Souza, Lucas; Brandão, Marcus L

    2013-12-01

    Intra-dorsal hippocampus (DH) injections of 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), a serotonin-1A (5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-1A) receptor agonist, were previously shown to inhibit the expression of contextual fear when administered six hours after conditioning. However, further understanding of the consolidation and expression of aversive memories requires investigations of these and other mechanisms at distinct time points and the regions of the brain to which they are transferred. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of DH serotonergic and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic mechanisms in the expression of contextual fear 24 h after conditioning, reflected by fear-potentiated startle (FPS) and freezing behavior. The recruitment of the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in these processes was also evaluated by measuring Fos protein immunoreactivity. Although intra-DH injections of 8-OH-DPAT did not produce behavioral changes, muscimol reduced both FPS and the freezing response. Fos protein immunoreactivity revealed that contextual fear promoted wide activation of the mPFC, which was significantly reduced after intra-DH infusions of muscimol. The present findings, together with previous data, indicate that in contrast to 5-HT, which appears to play a role during the early phases of contextual aversive memory consolidation, longer-lasting GABA-mediated mechanisms are recruited during the expression of contextual fear memories.

  19. Identification of a Sustained Neurogenic Zone at the Dorsal Surface of the Adult Mouse Hippocampus and Its Regulation by the Chemokine SDF-1

    PubMed Central

    Belmadani, Abdelhak; Ren, Dongjun; Bhattacharyya, Bula J.; Rothwangl, Katharina B.; Hope, Thomas J.; Perlman, Harris; Miller, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    We identified a previously unknown neurogenic region at the dorsal surface of the hippocampus; (the “subhippocampal zone,” SHZ) in the adult brain. Using a reporter mouse in which SHZ cells and their progeny could be traced through the expression of EGFP under the control of the CXCR4 chemokine receptor promoter we observed the presence of a pool of EGFP expressing cells migrating in direction of the dentate gyrus (DG), which is maintained throughout adulthood. This population appeared to originate from the SHZ where cells entered a caudal migratory stream (aCMS) that included the fimbria, the meninges and the DG. Deletion of CXCR4 from neural stem cells (NSCs) or neuroinflammation resulted in the appearance of neurons in the DG, which were the result of migration of NSCs from the SHZ. Some of these neurons were ectopically placed. Our observations indicate that the SHZ is a neurogenic zone in the adult brain through migration of NSCs in the aCMS. Regulation of CXCR4 signaling in these cells may be involved in repair of the DG and may also give rise to ectopic granule cells in the DG in the context of neuropathology. PMID:25656357

  20. Identification of a sustained neurogenic zone at the dorsal surface of the adult mouse hippocampus and its regulation by the chemokine SDF-1.

    PubMed

    Belmadani, Abdelhak; Ren, Dongjun; Bhattacharyya, Bula J; Rothwangl, Katharina B; Hope, Thomas J; Perlman, Harris; Miller, Richard J

    2015-11-01

    We identified a previously unknown neurogenic region at the dorsal surface of the hippocampus; (the "subhippocampal zone," SHZ) in the adult brain. Using a reporter mouse in which SHZ cells and their progeny could be traced through the expression of EGFP under the control of the CXCR4 chemokine receptor promoter we observed the presence of a pool of EGFP expressing cells migrating in direction of the dentate gyrus (DG), which is maintained throughout adulthood. This population appeared to originate from the SHZ where cells entered a caudal migratory stream (aCMS) that included the fimbria, the meninges and the DG. Deletion of CXCR4 from neural stem cells (NSCs) or neuroinflammation resulted in the appearance of neurons in the DG, which were the result of migration of NSCs from the SHZ. Some of these neurons were ectopically placed. Our observations indicate that the SHZ is a neurogenic zone in the adult brain through migration of NSCs in the aCMS. Regulation of CXCR4 signaling in these cells may be involved in repair of the DG and may also give rise to ectopic granule cells in the DG in the context of neuropathology.

  1. Postnatal Isoflurane Exposure Induces Cognitive Impairment and Abnormal Histone Acetylation of Glutamatergic Systems in the Hippocampus of Adolescent Rats.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bing; Fang, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Isoflurane can elicit cognitive impairment. However, the pathogenesis in the brain remains inconclusive. The present study investigated the mechanism of glutamate neurotoxicity in adolescent male rats that underwent postnatal isoflurane exposure and the role of sodium butyrate (NaB) in cognitive impairment induced by isoflurane exposure. Seven-day-old rats were exposed to 1.7 % isoflurane for 35 min every day for four consecutive days, and then glutamate neurotoxicity was examined in the hippocampus. Morris water maze analysis showed cognitive impairments in isoflurane-exposed rats. High-performance liquid chromatography found higher hippocampal glutamate concentrations following in vitro and in vivo isoflurane exposure. The percentage of early apoptotic hippocampal neurons was markedly increased after isoflurane exposure. Decreased acetylation and increased HDAC2 activity were observed in the hippocampus of isoflurane-exposed rats and hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, postnatal isoflurane exposure decreased histone acetylation of hippocampal neurons in the promoter regions of GLT-1 and mGLuR1/5, but not mGLuR2/3. Treatment with NaB not only restored the histone acetylation of the GLT-1 and mGLuR1/5 promoter regions and glutamate excitatory neurotoxicity in hippocampal neurons, but also improved cognitive impairment in vivo. Moreover, NaB may be a potential therapeutic drug for cognitive impairment caused by isoflurane exposure. These results suggest that postnatal isoflurane exposure contributes to cognitive impairment via decreasing histone acetylation of glutamatergic systems in the hippocampus of adolescent rats. PMID:27307148

  2. Activation of the dorsal hippocampal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors improves tamoxifen-induced memory retrieval impairment in adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Tajik, Azam; Rezayof, Ameneh; Ghasemzadeh, Zahra; Sardari, Maryam

    2016-07-01

    Tamoxifen (TAM), a selective estrogen receptor modulator, has frequently been used in the treatment of breast cancer. In view of the fact that cognitive deficits in women who receive adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer is a common health problem, using female animal models for investigating the cognitive effects of TAM administration may improve our knowledge of TAM therapy. Therefore, the present study assessed the role of dorsal hippocampal cholinergic nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) in the effect of TAM administration on memory retrieval in ovariectomized (OVX) and non-OVX female rats using a passive avoidance learning task. Our results showed that pre-test administration of TAM (2-6mg/kg) impaired memory retrieval. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of nicotine (0.3-0.5μg/rat) reversed TAM-induced memory impairment. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of mecamylamine (0.1-0.3μg/rat) plus 2mg/kg (an ineffective dose) of TAM impaired memory retrieval. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of the same doses of nicotine and mecamylamine by themselves had no effect on memory retrieval. In OVX rats, the administration of TAM (6mg/kg) produced memory impairment but pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of nicotine (0.5μg/rat) had no effect on TAM response. Moreover, the administration of an ineffective dose of TAM (2mg/kg) had no effect on memory retrieval in OVX rats, while pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of mecamylamine (0.3μg/rat) impaired memory retrieval. Taken together, it can be concluded that the impairing effect of TAM on memory formation may be modulated by nAChRs of the CA1 regions. It seems that memory impairment may be considered as an important side effect of TAM. PMID:27072849

  3. Differences in the Flexibility of Switching Learning Strategies and CREB Phosphorylation Levels in Prefrontal Cortex, Dorsal Striatum and Hippocampus in Two Inbred Strains of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Woo-Hyun; Han, Jung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Flexibility in using different learning strategies was assessed in two different inbred strains of mice, the C57BL/6 and DBA/2 strains. Mice were trained sequentially in two different Morris water maze protocols that tested their ability to switch their learning strategy to complete a new task after first being trained in a different task. Training consisted either of visible platform trials (cued training) followed by subsequent hidden platform trials (place training) or the reverse sequence (place training followed by cued training). Both strains of mice showed equivalent performance in the type of training (cued or place) that they received first. However, C57BL/6 mice showed significantly better performances than DBA/2 mice following the switch in training protocols, irrespective of the order of training. After completion of the switched training session, levels of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) were measured in the hippocampus, striatum and prefrontal cortex of the mice. Prefrontal cortical and hippocampal pCREB levels differed by strain, with higher levels found in C57BL/6 mice than in DBA/2 mice. No strain differences were observed in the medial or lateral region of the dorsal striatum. These findings indicate that the engagement (i.e., CREB signaling) of relevant neural structures may vary by the specific demands of the learning strategy, and this is closely tied to differences in the flexibility of C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice to switch their learning strategies when given a new task.

  4. Anxiety-like behavior induced by histaminergic agents can be prevented by cannabinoidergic WIN55,212-2 injected into the dorsal hippocampus in mice.

    PubMed

    Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza; Nasehi, Mohammad; Piri, Morteza; Bina, Payvand

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we investigate the effects of the histaminergic system and cannabinoid receptor agents on anxiety-related behaviors and their interactions using the hole-board test on mice. Bilateral intra-CA1 administration of the CB1/CB2 receptor agonist, WIN55, 212-2 (0.1-0.5microg/mouse) did not modify exploratory behaviors in mice. On the other hand, intra-CA1 administration of CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251 (25 and 50ng/mouse) or histamine, pyrilamine and ranitidine (5-10microg/mouse) decreased the amount of head-dipping and increased the first head-dip, suggesting an anxiogenic-like response. Furthermore, our present data indicated that the co-administration of WIN55, 212-2 (0.25microg/mouse) with histaminergic agents, decreased the anxiogenic-like response of an effective dose (5microg/mouse) of histamine and pyrilamine, but not that of ranitidine. In addition, the results demonstrated that co-administration of an ineffective dose of AM251 (15ng/mouse) with histaminergic drugs did not alter the response induced by an ineffective dose (3.75microg/mouse) of either histamine or pyrilamine and ranitidine. In all experiments and doses, locomotor activity and other exploratory behaviors were not significantly changed. In conclusion, our results showed that there is a chance of partial interaction between the cannabinoidergic and the histaminergic systems of the dorsal hippocampus on anxiogenic/anxiolytic-like behaviors in hole-board test.

  5. Oxytocin via its receptor affects restraint stress-induced methamphetamine CPP reinstatement in mice: Involvement of the medial prefrontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus glutamatergic system.

    PubMed

    Han, Wen-Yan; Du, Ping; Fu, Shi-Yuan; Wang, Fang; Song, Ming; Wu, Chun-Fu; Yang, Jing-Yu

    2014-04-01

    Our previous study revealed that intracerebroventricular oxytocin (OT) markedly inhibited the restraint stress-priming conditioned place preference (CPP) reinstatement induced by methamphetamine (MAP) via the glutamatergic system. In this study, the effect of microinjection with OT into mesocorticolimbic regions, the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the dorsal hippocampus (DHC), on the restraint stress-priming CPP reinstatement were further studied. The results showed that a 15-min restraint stress significantly reinstated MAP-induced CPP, which was inhibited by the microinjection of OT (0.5 and 2.5μg/μl/mouse) into the mPFC. Atosiban (Ato), a selective inhibitor of OT receptor, could absolutely block the effect of OT (2.5μg/μl/mouse). The reinstatement was inhibited by microinjecting with OT (2.5 but not 0.5μg/μl/mouse) into the DHC, which could not be reversed by Ato. Western blotting results showed that the levels of GLT1, VGLUT2, NR2B, p-ERK1/2 and p-CREB expressions in the mPFC were increased and CaMKII was decreased markedly after the stress-priming MAP-induced CPP reinstatement test. OT blocked the changing levels of GLT1, VGLUT2, NR2B, p-CREB and CaMK II, which were reversed by Ato, but failed to affect the elevated expression of p-ERK1/2. In DHC, the levels of VGLUT2, p-ERK1/2 and CREB expressions were reduced during the stress-induced reinstatement, which could be reversed by OT and further abolished by Ato. The present results suggest that mPFC and DHC play differential roles in restraint stress-priming CPP reinstatement induced by MAP and OT via OT receptor affects the reinstatement in which the glutamatergic system is involved.

  6. Protective effects of chronic treatment with a standardized extract of Ginkgo biloba L. in the prefrontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus of middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Marcelo L; Moreira, Luciana M; Arçari, Demetrius P; Dos Santos, Letícia França; Marques, Antônio Cezar; Pedrazzoli, José; Cerutti, Suzete M

    2016-10-15

    This study assessed the effects of chronic treatment with a standardized extract of Ginkgo biloba L. (EGb) on short-term and long-term memory as well as on anxiety-like and locomotor activity using the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (PM-DAT). Additionally, we evaluated the antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of EGb on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and dorsal hippocampus (DH) of middle-aged rats using the comet assay. Twelve-month-old male Wistar rats were administered vehicle or EGb (0.5mgkg(-1) or 1.0gkg(-1)) for 30days. Behavioural data showed that EGb treatment improved short-term memory. Neither an anti-anxiety effect nor a change in locomotor activity was observed. Twenty-four hours after the behavioural tests, the rats were decapitated, and the PFC and DH were quickly dissected out and prepared for the comet assay. The levels of DNA damage in the PFC were significantly lower in rats that were treated with 1.0gkg(-1) EGb. Both doses of EGb decreased H2O2-induced DNA breakage in cortical cells, whereas the levels of DNA damage in the EGb-treated animals were significantly lower than those in the control animals. No significant differences in the level of DNA damage in hippocampal cells were observed among the experimental groups. EGb treatment was not able to reduce H2O2-induced DNA damage in hippocampal cells. Altogether, our data provide the first demonstration that chronic EGb treatment improved the short-term memory of middle-aged rats, an effect that could be associated with a reduction in free radical production in the PFC. These data suggest that EGb treatment might increase the survival of cortical neurons and corroborate and extend the view that EGb has protective and therapeutic properties. PMID:27424157

  7. Differences in the Flexibility of Switching Learning Strategies and CREB Phosphorylation Levels in Prefrontal Cortex, Dorsal Striatum and Hippocampus in Two Inbred Strains of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Woo-Hyun; Han, Jung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Flexibility in using different learning strategies was assessed in two different inbred strains of mice, the C57BL/6 and DBA/2 strains. Mice were trained sequentially in two different Morris water maze protocols that tested their ability to switch their learning strategy to complete a new task after first being trained in a different task. Training consisted either of visible platform trials (cued training) followed by subsequent hidden platform trials (place training) or the reverse sequence (place training followed by cued training). Both strains of mice showed equivalent performance in the type of training (cued or place) that they received first. However, C57BL/6 mice showed significantly better performances than DBA/2 mice following the switch in training protocols, irrespective of the order of training. After completion of the switched training session, levels of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) were measured in the hippocampus, striatum and prefrontal cortex of the mice. Prefrontal cortical and hippocampal pCREB levels differed by strain, with higher levels found in C57BL/6 mice than in DBA/2 mice. No strain differences were observed in the medial or lateral region of the dorsal striatum. These findings indicate that the engagement (i.e., CREB signaling) of relevant neural structures may vary by the specific demands of the learning strategy, and this is closely tied to differences in the flexibility of C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mice to switch their learning strategies when given a new task. PMID:27695401

  8. Protective effects of chronic treatment with a standardized extract of Ginkgo biloba L. in the prefrontal cortex and dorsal hippocampus of middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Marcelo L; Moreira, Luciana M; Arçari, Demetrius P; Dos Santos, Letícia França; Marques, Antônio Cezar; Pedrazzoli, José; Cerutti, Suzete M

    2016-10-15

    This study assessed the effects of chronic treatment with a standardized extract of Ginkgo biloba L. (EGb) on short-term and long-term memory as well as on anxiety-like and locomotor activity using the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (PM-DAT). Additionally, we evaluated the antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of EGb on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and dorsal hippocampus (DH) of middle-aged rats using the comet assay. Twelve-month-old male Wistar rats were administered vehicle or EGb (0.5mgkg(-1) or 1.0gkg(-1)) for 30days. Behavioural data showed that EGb treatment improved short-term memory. Neither an anti-anxiety effect nor a change in locomotor activity was observed. Twenty-four hours after the behavioural tests, the rats were decapitated, and the PFC and DH were quickly dissected out and prepared for the comet assay. The levels of DNA damage in the PFC were significantly lower in rats that were treated with 1.0gkg(-1) EGb. Both doses of EGb decreased H2O2-induced DNA breakage in cortical cells, whereas the levels of DNA damage in the EGb-treated animals were significantly lower than those in the control animals. No significant differences in the level of DNA damage in hippocampal cells were observed among the experimental groups. EGb treatment was not able to reduce H2O2-induced DNA damage in hippocampal cells. Altogether, our data provide the first demonstration that chronic EGb treatment improved the short-term memory of middle-aged rats, an effect that could be associated with a reduction in free radical production in the PFC. These data suggest that EGb treatment might increase the survival of cortical neurons and corroborate and extend the view that EGb has protective and therapeutic properties.

  9. Increased stress-induced intra-hippocampus corticosterone rise associated with memory impairments in middle-aged mice.

    PubMed

    Tronche, C; Piérard, C; Coutan, M; Chauveau, F; Liscia, P; Béracochéa, D

    2010-03-01

    The present study investigates the relationships between hippocampal corticosterone concentrations and memory retrieval performance in stress and non-stress conditions, in both young (6 month-old) and middle-aged (16 month-old) mice. For this purpose, the time-course evolution of stress-induced corticosterone rise in the dorsal hippocampus (dHPC) was investigated in both young and middle-aged mice. In parallel, the evolution of memory retrieval patterns was assessed using a contextual serial discrimination task (CSD). Finally, metyrapone (corticosterone synthesis inhibitor) was administered in order to evaluate the stress-induced impact of corticosterone rise on contextual memory retrieval in middle-aged animals. Results showed that: (i) non-stressed middle-aged mice exhibited a memory retrieval pattern opposite to that of non-stressed young animals, but similar to that of stressed young mice; (ii) the impact of stress on memory performance was transient (90 min) in young, as compared to middle-aged mice (120 min); (iii) dHPC basal (non-stress) corticosterone level was significantly increased by ageing; (iv) acute stress induced a rapid (15 min) and transient (90 min) dHPC corticosterone rise in young mice, while exhibiting greater magnitude and duration (120 min) in middle-aged animals; and (v) both the stress-induced endocrinal and memory effects were blocked by metyrapone in young and middle-aged mice. Finally, to our knowledge, the present work is the first study to directly measure the corticosterone rise in the hippocampus following exposure to stress and to directly correlate the corticosterone changes in the hippocampus with memory performance in both young and middle-aged mice.

  10. Patients with type 2 diabetes exhibit cognitive impairment with changes of metabolite concentration in the left hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Xu, Xiao-Yun; Feng, Chun-Hua; Li, Yuan-Ling; Ge, Xia; Zong, Gen-Lin; Wang, Yi-Bin; Feng, Bo; Zhang, Peng

    2015-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with cognitive dysfunction. Previous studies have reported the relationship between cerebral metabolite changes and glucose levels. However, the specific aspects of cognition that are affected by metabolic changes in T2DM- related cognitive impairment remain undetermined. In this study, 188 T2DM patients and 266 controls were recruited. Proton magnetic resonance spectra with a single voxel stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) were acquired from the left hippocampus and the frontal lobe. Presence of T2DM negatively affected the scores of Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), sub-tests (i.e., attention and language) of MMSE, Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) according to the Beijing version, and sub-tests (i.e., visuospatial/executive reasoning, attention, and language) of MoCA, rather than the Wechsler Memory Scale - Revised in China (WMS-RC), and all memory sub-tests contained with the MMSE and MoCA frameworks. T2DM positively affected creatine and myoinositol peak areas from the left hippocampus, rather than metabolites in the left frontal lobe. Negative correlations were shown between the left hippocampal myoinositol levels and language scores, and between the left hippocampal creatine levels and visuospatial/executive scores in T2DM. These findings suggest that T2DM may be an independent risk factor for cognitive impairment. Further, the cognitive domains of visuospatial /executive reasoning, attention and language may be predominantly impaired in the early phases of T2DM-related cognitive impairment. In addition, left hippocampal myoinositol and creatine concentrations were associated with cognitive impairment in patients with T2DM.

  11. Improvements in impaired GABA and GAD65/67 production in the spinal dorsal horn contribute to exercise-induced hypoalgesia in a mouse model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, MS, Satoru; Tajima, Fumihiro; Senba, Emiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical exercise effectively attenuates neuropathic pain, and multiple events including the inhibition of activated glial cells in the spinal dorsal horn, activation of the descending pain inhibitory system, and reductions in pro-inflammatory cytokines in injured peripheral nerves may contribute to exercise-induced hypoalgesia. Since fewer GABAergic hypoalgesic interneurons exist in the dorsal horn in neuropathic pain model animals, the recovery of impaired GABAergic inhibition in the dorsal horn may improve pain behavior. We herein determined whether the production of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in the dorsal horn is restored by treadmill running and contributes to exercise-induced hypoalgesia in neuropathic pain model mice. C57BL/6 J mice underwent partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSL). PSL-Runner mice ran on a treadmill at 7 m/min for 60 min/day, 5 days/week, from two days after PSL. Results Mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia developed in PSL-Sedentary mice but were significantly attenuated in PSL-Runner mice. PSL markedly decreased GABA and GAD65/67 levels in neuropils in the ipsilateral dorsal horn, while treadmill running inhibited these reductions. GABA+ neuronal nuclei+ interneuron numbers in the ipsilateral dorsal horn were significantly decreased in PSL-Sedentary mice but not in PSL-Runner mice. Pain behavior thresholds positively correlated with GABA and GAD65/67 levels and GABAergic interneuron numbers in the ipsilateral dorsal horns of PSL-Sedentary and -Runner mice. Conclusions Treadmill running prevented PSL-induced reductions in GAD65/67 production, and, thus, GABA levels may be retained in interneurons and neuropils in the superficial dorsal horn. Therefore, improvements in impaired GABAergic inhibition may be involved in exercise-induced hypoalgesia. PMID:27030712

  12. Cognition Enhancing and Neuromodulatory Propensity of Bacopa monniera Extract Against Scopolamine Induced Cognitive Impairments in Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Pandareesh, M D; Anand, T; Khanum, Farhath

    2016-05-01

    Cognition-enhancing activity of Bacopa monniera extract (BME) was evaluated against scopolamine-induced amnesic rats by novel object recognition test (NOR), elevated plus maze (EPM) and Morris water maze (MWM) tests. Scopolamine (2 mg/kg body wt, i.p.) was used to induce amnesia in rats. Piracetam (200 mg/kg body wt, i.p.) was used as positive control. BME at three different dosages (i.e., 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg body wt.) improved the impairment induced by scopolamine by increasing the discrimination index of NOR and by decreasing the transfer latency of EPM and escape latency of MWM tests. Our results further elucidate that BME administration has normalized the neurotransmitters (acetylcholine, glutamate, 5-hydroxytryptamine, dopamine, 3,4 dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, norepinephrine) levels that were altered by scopolamine administration in hippocampus of rat brain. BME administration also ameliorated scopolamine effect by down-regulating AChE and up-regulating BDNF, muscarinic M1 receptor and CREB expression in brain hippocampus confirms the potent neuroprotective role and these results are in corroboration with the earlier in vitro studies. BME administration showed significant protection against scopolamine-induced toxicity by restoring the levels of antioxidant and lipid peroxidation. These results indicate that, cognition-enhancing and neuromodulatory propensity of BME is through modulating the expression of AChE, BDNF, MUS-1, CREB and also by altering the levels of neurotransmitters in hippocampus of rat brain.

  13. PEGylated Carbon Nanotubes Impair Retrieval of Contextual Fear Memory and Alter Oxidative Stress Parameters in the Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Dal Bosco, Lidiane; Weber, Gisele E. B.; Parfitt, Gustavo M.; Paese, Karina; Gonçalves, Carla O. F.; Serodre, Tiago M.; Furtado, Clascídia A.; Santos, Adelina P.; Monserrat, José M.; Barros, Daniela M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are promising materials for biomedical applications, especially in the field of neuroscience; therefore, it is essential to evaluate the neurotoxicity of these nanomaterials. The present work assessed the effects of single-walled CNT functionalized with polyethylene glycol (SWCNT-PEG) on the consolidation and retrieval of contextual fear memory in rats and on oxidative stress parameters in the hippocampus. SWCNT-PEG were dispersed in water at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.1 mg/mL and infused into the rat hippocampus. The infusion was completed immediately after training and 30 min before testing of a contextual fear conditioning task, resulting in exposure times of 24 h and 30 min, respectively. The results showed that a short exposure to SWCNT-PEG impaired fear memory retrieval and caused lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus. This response was transient and overcome by the mobilization of antioxidant defenses at 24 h. These effects occurred at low and intermediate but not high concentration of SWCNT-PEG, suggesting that the observed biological response may be related to the concentration-dependent increase in particle size in SWCNT-PEG dispersions. PMID:25738149

  14. Experience Modulates the Effects of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors on Gene and Protein Expression in the Hippocampus: Impaired Plasticity in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Sewal, Angila S.; Patzke, Holger; Perez, Evelyn J.; Park, Pul; Lehrmann, Elin; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G.; Fletcher, Bonnie R.; Long, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) treatment has attracted considerable attention in the emerging area of cognitive neuroepigenetics. The possibility that ongoing cognitive experience importantly regulates the cell biological effects of HDACi administration, however, has not been systematically examined. In an initial experiment addressing this issue, we tested whether water maze training influences the gene expression response to acute systemic HDACi administration in the young adult rat hippocampus. Training powerfully modulated the response to HDACi treatment, increasing the total number of genes regulated to nearly 3000, including many not typically linked to neural plasticity, compared with <300 following HDACi administration alone. Although water maze training itself also regulated nearly 1800 genes, the specific mRNAs, gene networks, and biological pathways involved were largely distinct when the same experience was provided together with HDACi administration. Next, we tested whether the synaptic protein response to HDACi treatment is similarly dependent on recent cognitive experience, and whether this plasticity is altered in aged rats with memory impairment. Whereas synaptic protein labeling in the young hippocampus was selectively increased when HDACi administration was provided in conjunction with water maze training, combined treatment had no effect on synaptic proteins in the aged hippocampus. Our findings indicate that ongoing experience potently regulates the molecular consequences of HDACi treatment and that the interaction of recent cognitive experience with histone acetylation dynamics is disrupted in the aged hippocampus. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The possibility that interventions targeting epigenetic regulation could be effective in treating a range of neurodegenerative disorders has attracted considerable interest. Here we demonstrate in the rat hippocampus that ongoing experience powerfully modifies the molecular

  15. CHRONIC DEVELOPMENTAL LEAD EXPOSURE REDUCES NEUROGENESIS IN ADULT RAT HIPPOCAMPUS BUT DOES NOT IMPAIR SPATIAL LEARNING.

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has long been heralded that the mature brain does not generate new neurons, it only loses them as a function of injury, disease and age. An exciting recent finding in neuroscience has been that the dentate granule cell layer of the hippocampus has the distinctive property of ...

  16. Disruption of the Perineuronal Net in the Hippocampus or Medial Prefrontal Cortex Impairs Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hylin, Michael J.; Orsi, Sara A.; Moore, Anthony N.; Dash, Pramod K.

    2013-01-01

    The perineuronal net (PNN) surrounds neurons in the central nervous system and is thought to regulate developmental plasticity. A few studies have shown an involvement of the PNN in hippocampal plasticity and memory storage in adult animals. In addition to the hippocampus, plasticity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been demonstrated to…

  17. Long-Term Memory for Place Learning Is Facilitated by Expression of cAMP Response Element-Binding Protein in the Dorsal Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brightwell, Jennifer J.; Smith, Clayton A.; Neve, Rachael L.; Colombo, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Extensive research has shown that the hippocampus is necessary for consolidation of long-term spatial memory in rodents. We reported previously that rats using a place strategy to solve a cross maze task showed sustained phosphorylation of hippocampus cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a transcription factor implicated in…

  18. Early postnatal nicotine exposure causes hippocampus-dependent memory impairments in adolescent mice: association with altered nicotinic cholinergic modulation of LTP, but not impaired LTP

    PubMed Central

    Nakauchi, Sakura; Malvaez, Melissa; Su, Hailing; Kleeman, Elise; Dang, Richard; Wood, Marcelo A.; Sumikawa, Katumi

    2014-01-01

    Fetal nicotine exposure from smoking during pregnancy causes long-lasting cognitive impairments in offspring, yet little is known about the mechanisms that underlie this effect. Here we demonstrate that early postnatal exposure of mouse pups to nicotine via maternal milk impairs long-term, but not short-term, hippocampus-dependent memory during adolescence. At the Schaffer collateral (SC) pathway, the most widely studied synapses for a cellular correlate of hippocampus-dependent memory, the induction of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-dependent transient long-term potentiation (LTP) and protein synthesis-dependent long-lasting LTP are not diminished by nicotine exposure, but rather unexpectedly the threshold for LTP induction becomes lower after nicotine treatment. Using voltage sensitive dye to visualize hippocampal activity, we found that early postnatal nicotine exposure also results in enhanced CA1 depolarization and hyperpolarization after SC stimulation. Furthermore, we show that postnatal nicotine exposure induces pervasive changes to the nicotinic modulation of CA1 activity: activation of nicotinic receptors no longer increases CA1 network depolarization, acute nicotine inhibits rather than facilitates the induction of LTP at the SC pathway by recruiting an additional nicotinic receptor subtype, and acute nicotine no longer blocks LTP induction at the temporoammonic pathway. These findings reflect the pervasive impact of nicotine exposure during hippocampal development, and demonstrate an association of hippocampal memory impairments with altered nicotinic cholinergic modulation of LTP, but not impaired LTP. The implication of our results is that nicotinic cholinergic-dependent plasticity is required for long-term memory formation and that postnatal nicotine exposure disrupts this form of plasticity. PMID:25545599

  19. The Role of the Direct Perforant Path Input to the CA1 Subregion of the Dorsal Hippocampus in Memory Retention and Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Vago, David R.; Bevan, Adam; Kesner, Raymond P.

    2011-01-01

    Subregional analyses of the hippocampus have suggested a selective role for the CA1 subregion in intermediate/long-term spatial memory and consolidation, but not short-term acquisition or encoding processes. It remains unclear how the direct cortical projection to CA1 via the perforant path (pp) contributes to these CA1-dependent processes. It has been suggested that dopamine selectively modulates the pp projection to CA1 while having little to no effect on the Schaffer collateral (SC) projection to CA1. This series of behavioral and electro-physiological experiments takes advantage of this pharmacological dissociation to demonstrate that the direct pp inputs to CA1 are critical in CA1-dependent intermediate-term retention and retrieval function. Here we demonstrate that local infusion of the nonselective dopamine agonist, apomorphine (10, 15 μg), into the CA1 subregion of awake animals produces impairments in between-day retention and retrieval, sparing within-day encoding of a modified Hebb-Williams maze and contextual conditioning of fear. In contrast, apomorphine produces no deficits when infused into the CA3 subregion. To complement the behavioral analyses, electrophysiological data was collected. In anesthetized animals, local infusion of the same doses of apomorphine significantly modifies evoked responses in the distal dendrites of CA1 following angular bundle stimulation, but produces no significant effects in the more proximal dendritic layer following stimulation of the SC. These results support a modulatory role for dopamine in the EC-CA1, but not CA3-CA1 circuitry, and suggest the possibility of a more fundamental role for EC-CA1 synaptic transmission in terms of intermediate-term, but not short-term spatial memory. PMID:17604347

  20. Chronic restraint stress promotes learning and memory impairment due to enhanced neuronal endoplasmic reticulum stress in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in male mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong-Rong; Hu, Wen; Yin, Yan-Yan; Wang, Yu-Chan; Li, Wei-Ping; Li, Wei-Zu

    2015-02-01

    Chronic stress has been implicated in many types of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In our previous study, we demonstrated that chronic restraint stress (CRS) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction and oxidative damage in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in mice. In the present study, we investigated the effects of CRS (over a period of 8 weeks) on learning and memory impairment and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in male mice. The Morris water maze was used to investigate the effects of CRS on learning and memory impairment. Immunohistochemistry and immunoblot analysis were also used to determine the expression levels of protein kinase C α (PKCα), 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP) and mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF). The results revealed that CRS significantly accelerated learning and memory impairment, and induced neuronal damage in the frontal cortex and hippocampus CA1 region. Moreover, CRS significantly increased the expression of PKCα, CHOP and MANF, and decreased that of GRP78 in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Our data suggest that exposure to CRS (for 8 weeks) significantly accelerates learning and memory impairment, and the mechanisms involved may be related to ER stress in the frontal cortex and hippocampus.

  1. Ginsenoside Rg1 prevents cognitive impairment and hippocampus senescence in a rat model of D-galactose-induced aging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiahong; Mu, Xinyi; Zeng, Jin; Xu, Chunyan; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Mengsi; Li, Chengpeng; Chen, Jie; Li, Tinyu; Wang, Yaping

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis continues throughout the lifetime in the hippocampus, while the rate declines with brain aging. It has been hypothesized that reduced neurogenesis may contribute to age-related cognitive impairment. Ginsenoside Rg1 is an active ingredient of Panax ginseng in traditional Chinese medicine, which exerts anti-oxidative and anti-aging effects. This study explores the neuroprotective effect of ginsenoside Rg1 on the hippocampus of the D-gal (D-galactose) induced aging rat model. Sub-acute aging was induced in male SD rats by subcutaneous injection of D-gal (120 mg/kg·d) for 42 days, and the rats were treated with ginsenoside Rg1 (20 mg/kg·d, intraperitoneally) or normal saline for 28 days after 14 days of D-gal injection. In another group, normal male SD rats were treated with ginsenoside Rg1 alone (20 mg/kg·d, intraperitoneally) for 28 days. It showed that administration of ginsenoside Rg1 significantly attenuated all the D-gal-induced changes in the hippocampus, including cognitive capacity, senescence-related markers and hippocampal neurogenesis, compared with the D-gal-treated rats. Further investigation showed that ginsenoside Rg1 protected NSCs/NPCs (neural stem cells/progenitor cells) shown by increased level of SOX-2 expression; reduced astrocytes activation shown by decrease level of Aeg-1 expression; increased the hippocampal cell proliferation; enhanced the activity of the antioxidant enzymes GSH-Px (glutathione peroxidase) and SOD (Superoxide Dismutase); decreased the levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, which are the proinflammatory cytokines; increased the telomere lengths and telomerase activity; and down-regulated the mRNA expression of cellular senescence associated genes p53, p21Cip1/Waf1 and p19Arf in the hippocampus of aged rats. Our data provides evidence that ginsenoside Rg1 can improve cognitive ability, protect NSCs/NPCs and promote neurogenesis by enhancing the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capacity in the hippocampus.

  2. Short-term sleep deprivation impairs spatial working memory and modulates expression levels of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Xie, Meilan; Yan, Jie; He, Chao; Yang, Li; Tan, Gang; Li, Chao; Hu, Zhian; Wang, Jiali

    2015-06-01

    Hippocampus-dependent learning memory is sensitive to sleep deprivation (SD). Although the ionotropic glutamate receptors play a vital role in synaptic plasticity and learning and memory, however, whether the expression of these receptor subunits is modulated by sleep loss remains unclear. In the present study, western blotting was performed by probing with specific antibodies against the ionotropic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunits GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and against the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor subunits GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B. In hippocampus, down regulation of surface GluA1 and GluN2A surface expression were observed in both SD groups. However, surface expression level of GluA2, GluA3, GluN1 and GluN2B was significantly up-regulated in 8h-SD rats when compared to the 4h-SD rats. In parallel with the complex changes in AMPA and NMDA receptor subunit expressions, we found the 8h-SD impaired rat spatial working memory in 30-s-delay T-maze task, whereas no impairment of spatial learning was observed in 4h-SD rats. These results indicate that sleep loss alters the relative expression levels of the AMPA and NMDA receptors, thus affects the synaptic strength and capacity for plasticity and partially contributes to spatial memory impairment.

  3. [The effect of different anxiolytics on the anxiety state occurring in rats after stopping the electrical stimulation of the dorsal hippocampus].

    PubMed

    Beĭer, E V; Arushanian, E B

    1999-01-01

    The work shows growing anxiety of rats after electrical stimulation of the hippocampus during a conflict and according to the findings of multimetric testing. Various anxiolytics (diazepam, melatonin, and propranolol) completely relieved the symptoms of hippocampal hyperactivity.

  4. Chronic Stress Impairs α1-Adrenoceptor-Induced Endocannabinoid-Dependent Synaptic Plasticity in the Dorsal Raphe Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Roh-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Alpha 1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) control the activity of dorsal raphe nucleus (DRn) serotonin (5-HT) neurons and play crucial role in the regulation of arousal and stress homoeostasis. However, the precise role of these receptors in regulating glutamate synapses of rat DRn 5-HT neurons and whether chronic stress exposure alters such regulation remain unknown. In the present study, we examined the impact of chronic restraint stress on α1-AR-mediated regulation of glutamate synapses onto DRn 5-HT neurons. We found that, in the control condition, activation of α1-ARs induced an inward current and long-term depression (LTD) of glutamate synapses of DRn 5-HT neurons. The α1-AR LTD was initiated by postsynaptic α1-ARs but mediated by a decrease in glutamate release. The presynaptic expression of the α1-AR LTD was signaled by retrograde endocannabinoids (eCBs). Importantly, we found that chronic exposure to restraint stress profoundly reduced the magnitude of α1-AR LTD but had no effect on the amplitude of α1-AR-induced inward current. Chronic restraint stress also reduced the CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of EPSC and the eCB-mediated depolarization-induced suppression of excitation. Collectively, these results indicate that chronic restraint stress impairs the α1-AR LTD by reducing the function of presynaptic CB1 receptors and reveal a novel mechanism by which noradrenaline controls synaptic strength and plasticity in the DRn. They also provide evidence that chronic stress impairs eCB signaling in the DRn, which may contribute, at least in part, to the dysregulation of the stress homeostasis. PMID:25355210

  5. (28)silicon radiation impairs neuronal output in CA1 neurons of mouse ventral hippocampus without altering dendritic excitability.

    PubMed

    Rudobeck, Emil; Nelson, Gregory A; Sokolova, Irina V; Vlkolinský, Roman

    2014-04-01

    An unavoidable complication of space travel is exposure to radiation consisting of high-energy charged particles (HZE), such as Fe and Si nuclei. HZE radiation can affect neuronal functions at the level of the synapse or neuronal soma without inducing significant neuronal death. Different radiation species impart distinct patterns of radiation damage depending on their track structure, dose rate and fluence. Moreover, structural differences exist along the dorsoventral axis of the hippocampus that may underlie different radiosensitivities within the same neuronal field (e.g., the CA1 pyramidal cell population of the hippocampus). In this study we tested the functional effects of low doses of (28)Si radiation on excitability and synaptic plasticity in hippocampal slices prepared strictly from the ventral hippocampus. We used extracellular electrophysiological techniques to record field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) and population spikes in hippocampal CA1 neurons from C57BL/6J male mice 3 months after exposure to (28)Si radiation (600 MeV/n; 0.25 and 1 Gy, whole body). In irradiated mice we found prominent decrements in population spike amplitudes and reduced maximal neuronal output without changes in dendritic field EPSP. Reduced field EPSP vs. population spike ratios indicate radiation-induced impairment of the EPSP-spike (E-S) coupling. This effect was not associated with significant changes in the magnitude of short- and long-term synaptic plasticity [long-term potentiation (LTP)]. These data confirm that irradiation with (28)Si particles at relatively low doses alters the properties of the hippocampal network, which can limit its connectivity with other brain centers.

  6. Pre-training administration of tianeptine, but not propranolol, protects hippocampus-dependent memory from being impaired by predator stress.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Adam M; Park, Collin R; Zoladz, Phillip R; Muñoz, Carmen; Fleshner, Monika; Diamond, David M

    2008-02-01

    Extensive research has shown that the antidepressant tianeptine blocks the adverse effects of chronic stress on hippocampal functioning. The current series of experiments extended this area of investigation by examining the influence of tianeptine on acute stress-induced impairments of spatial (hippocampus-dependent) memory. Tianeptine (10 mg/kg, ip) administered to adult male rats before, but not after, water maze training blocked the amnestic effects of predator stress (occurring between training and retrieval) on memory. The protective effects of tianeptine on memory occurred in rats which had extensive pre-stress training, as well as in rats which had only a single day of training. Tianeptine blocked stress effects on memory without altering the stress-induced increase in corticosterone levels. Propranolol, a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist (5 and 10 mg/kg, ip), in contrast, did not block stress-induced amnesia. These findings indicate that treatment with tianeptine, unlike propanolol, provides an effective means with which to block the adverse effects of stress on cognitive functions of the hippocampus.

  7. Beware of your Cre-Ation: lacZ expression impairs neuronal integrity and hippocampus-dependent memory.

    PubMed

    Reichel, J M; Bedenk, B T; Gassen, N C; Hafner, K; Bura, S A; Almeida-Correa, S; Genewsky, A; Dedic, N; Giesert, F; Agarwal, A; Nave, K-A; Rein, T; Czisch, M; Deussing, J M; Wotjak, C T

    2016-10-01

    Expression of the lacZ-sequence is a widely used reporter-tool to assess the transgenic and/or transfection efficacy of a target gene in mice. Once activated, lacZ is permanently expressed. However, protein accumulation is one of the hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases. Furthermore, the protein product of the bacterial lacZ gene is ß-galactosidase, an analog to the mammalian senescence-associated ß-galactosidase, a molecular marker for aging. Therefore we studied the behavioral, structural and molecular consequences of lacZ expression in distinct neuronal sub-populations. lacZ expression in cortical glutamatergic neurons resulted in severe impairments in hippocampus-dependent memory accompanied by marked structural alterations throughout the CNS. In contrast, GFP expression or the expression of the ChR2/YFP fusion product in the same cell populations did not result in either cognitive or structural deficits. GABAergic lacZ expression caused significantly decreased hyper-arousal and mild cognitive deficits. Attenuated structural and behavioral consequences of lacZ expression could also be induced in adulthood, and lacZ transfection in neuronal cell cultures significantly decreased their viability. Our findings provide a strong caveat against the use of lacZ reporter mice for phenotyping studies and point to a particular sensitivity of the hippocampus formation to detrimental consequences of lacZ expression. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Learning impairment induced by lesion of the CA1 field of the primate hippocampus: attempts to ameliorate the impairment by transplantation of fetal CA1 tissue.

    PubMed

    Ridley, R M; Pearson, C; Kershaw, T R; Hodges, H; Maclean, C J; Hoyle, C; Baker, H F

    1997-06-01

    Monkeys with bilateral excitotoxic lesion of the CA1 field of the hippocampus were severely impaired at learning visuospatial conditional tasks. This was not a general spatial impairment, because the animals were not impaired on serial spatial reversal, which requires response flexibility in the spatial domain; they were not impaired at learning to choose the position furthest away from a single stimulus, which requires analysis of spatial layout of the test area, and they were not impaired at discriminating between two patterns that differed only in orientation. CA1-lesioned monkeys were impaired at learning a visuospatial conditional task when trials of the two component types "if AA go left" and "if BB go right" were presented according to either a pseudorandom or alternating schedule; but they were not impaired if one component type of trial was presented until three consecutive correct responses were made, followed by the other type of trial, to three consecutive correct responses. In all cases testing continued until a criterion of 27 of 30 consecutive correct responses across both types of trial was achieved. Although this suggests that CA1-lesioned animals are particularly prone to interference effects, they had no difficulty in learning ten concurrent visual discriminations presented against either a uniform background or with each discrimination presented against its own distinctive background, a condition that might reduce interference in unoperated monkeys. Interference following hippocampal damage might occur at a deeper level than stimulus identification such that animals with hippocampal damage may be able to learn about many aspects of different stimuli in parallel but may be unable to learn about multiple related aspects of the same subject matter. Monkeys with grafts of fetal CA1 tissue in the lesioned CA1 field showed significant improvement relative to CA1-lesioned animals on those tasks on which CA1-lesioned animals were impaired, although they

  9. Grouping Pentylenetetrazol-Induced Epileptic Rats According to Memory Impairment and MicroRNA Expression Profiles in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xixia; Wu, Yuan; Huang, Qi; Zou, Donghua; Qin, Weihan; Chen, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a close relationship between abnormal regulation of microRNA (miRNA) and various types of diseases, including epilepsy and other neurological disorders of memory. However, the role of miRNA in the memory impairment observed in epilepsy remains unknown. In this study, a model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) was induced via pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) kindling in Sprague-Dawley rats. First, the TLE rats were subjected to Morris water maze to identify those with memory impairment (TLE-MI) compared with TLE control rats (TLE-C), which presented normal memory. Both groups were analyzed to detect dysregulated miRNAs in the hippocampus; four up-regulated miRNAs (miR-34c, miR-374, miR-181a, and miR-let-7c-1) and seven down-regulated miRNAs (miR-1188, miR-770-5p, miR-127-5p, miR-375, miR-331, miR-873-5p, and miR-328a) were found. Some of the dysregulated miRNAs (miR-34c, miR-1188a, miR-328a, and miR-331) were confirmed using qRT-PCR, and their blood expression patterns were identical to those of their counterparts in the rat hippocampus. The targets of these dysregulated miRNAs and other potentially enriched biological signaling pathways were analyzed using bioinformatics. Following these results, the MAPK, apoptosis and hippocampal signaling pathways might be involved in the molecular mechanisms underlying the memory disorders of TLE. PMID:25962166

  10. Impaired mitochondrial respiration and protein nitration in the rat hippocampus after acute inhalation of combustion smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Heung M.; Reed, Jason; Greeley, George H.; Englander, Ella W.

    2009-03-01

    Survivors of massive inhalation of combustion smoke endure critical injuries, including lasting neurological complications. We have previously reported that acute inhalation of combustion smoke disrupts the nitric oxide homeostasis in the rat brain. In this study, we extend our findings and report that a 30-minute exposure of awake rats to ambient wood combustion smoke induces protein nitration in the rat hippocampus and that mitochondrial proteins are a sensitive nitration target in this setting. Mitochondria are central to energy metabolism and cellular signaling and are critical to proper cell function. Here, analyses of the mitochondrial proteome showed elevated protein nitration in the course of a 24-hour recovery following exposure to smoke. Mass spectrometry identification of several significantly nitrated mitochondrial proteins revealed diverse functions and involvement in central aspects of mitochondrial physiology. The nitrated proteins include the ubiquitous mitochondrial creatine kinase, F1-ATP synthase {alpha} subunit, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3), succinate dehydrogenase Fp subunit, and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC1) protein. Furthermore, acute exposure to combustion smoke significantly compromised the respiratory capacity of hippocampal mitochondria. Importantly, elevated protein nitration and reduced mitochondrial respiration in the hippocampus persisted beyond the time required for restoration of normal oxygen and carboxyhemoglobin blood levels after the cessation of exposure to smoke. Thus, the time frame for intensification of the various smoke-induced effects differs between blood and brain tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that nitration of essential mitochondrial proteins may contribute to the reduction in mitochondrial respiratory capacity and underlie, in part, the brain pathophysiology after acute inhalation of combustion smoke.

  11. Detection of histone acetylation levels in the dorsal hippocampus reveals early tagging on specific residues of H2B and H4 histones in response to learning.

    PubMed

    Bousiges, Olivier; Neidl, Romain; Majchrzak, Monique; Muller, Marc-Antoine; Barbelivien, Alexandra; Pereira de Vasconcelos, Anne; Schneider, Anne; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Boutillier, Anne-Laurence

    2013-01-01

    The recent literature provides evidence that epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone modification are crucial to gene transcription linked to synaptic plasticity in the mammalian brain--notably in the hippocampus--and memory formation. We measured global histone acetylation levels in the rat hippocampus at an early stage of spatial or fear memory formation. We found that H3, H4 and H2B underwent differential acetylation at specific sites depending on whether rats had been exposed to the context of a task without having to learn or had to learn about a place or fear therein: H3K9K14 acetylation was mostly responsive to any experimental conditions compared to naive animals, whereas H2B N-terminus and H4K12 acetylations were mostly associated with memory for either spatial or fear learning. Altogether, these data suggest that behavior/experience-dependent changes differently regulate specific acetylation modifications of histones in the hippocampus, depending on whether a memory trace is established or not: tagging of H3K9K14 could be associated with perception/processing of testing-related manipulations and context, thereby enhancing chromatin accessibility, while tagging of H2B N-terminus tail and H4K12 could be more closely associated with the formation of memories requiring an engagement of the hippocampus.

  12. Acute predator stress impairs the consolidation and retrieval of hippocampus-dependent memory in male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Park, Collin R.; Zoladz, Phillip R.; Conrad, Cheryl D.; Fleshner, Monika; Diamond, David M.

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the effects of an acute predator stress experience on spatial learning and memory in adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats. All rats were trained to learn the location of a hidden escape platform in the radial-arm water maze (RAWM), a hippocampus-dependent spatial memory task. In the control (non-stress) condition, female rats were superior to the males in the accuracy and consistency of their spatial memory performance tested over multiple days of training. In the stress condition, rats were exposed to the cat for 30 min immediately before or after learning, or before the 24-h memory test. Predator stress dramatically increased corticosterone levels in males and females, with females exhibiting greater baseline and stress-evoked responses than males. Despite these sex differences in the overall magnitudes of corticosterone levels, there were significant sex-independent correlations involving basal and stress-evoked corticosterone levels, and memory performance. Most importantly, predator stress impaired short-term memory, as well as processes involved in memory consolidation and retrieval, in male and female rats. Overall, we have found that an intense, ethologically relevant stressor produced a largely equivalent impairment of memory in male and female rats, and sex-independent corticosterone-memory correlations. These findings may provide insight into commonalities in how traumatic stress affects the brain and memory in men and women. PMID:18391188

  13. Genetic Disruption of the Core Circadian Clock Impairs Hippocampus-Dependent Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wardlaw, Sarah M.; Phan, Trongha X.; Saraf, Amit; Chen, Xuanmao; Storm, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Perturbing the circadian system by electrolytically lesioning the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) or varying the environmental light:dark schedule impairs memory, suggesting that memory depends on the circadian system. We used a genetic approach to evaluate the role of the molecular clock in memory. Bmal1[superscript -/-] mice, which are arrhythmic…

  14. Antidepressants that inhibit both serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake impair long-term potentiation in hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Jennifer D.; Cavender, Hannah M.; Lima, Hope K.; Grover, Lawrence M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Monoamine reuptake inhibitors can stimulate expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and alter long-term potentiation (LTP), a widely used model for the synaptic mechanisms that underlie memory formation. BDNF expression is up-regulated during LTP, and BDNF in turn positively modulates LTP. Previously, we found that treatment with venlafaxine, a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), but not citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) reduced LTP in hippocampal area CA1 without changing hippocampal BDNF protein expression. Objectives We tested the hypothesis that combined serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition is necessary for LTP impairment, and we reexamined the potential role of BNDF by testing for region-specific changes in areas CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus. We also tested whether early events in the LTP signaling pathway were altered to impair LTP. Methods Animals were treated for 21 days with venlafaxine, imipramine, fluoxetine, or maprotiline. In vitro hippocampal slices were used for electrophysiological measurements. Protein expression was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blotting. Results LTP was impaired only following treatment with combined serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (venlafaxine, imipramine) but not with selective serotonin (fluoxetine) or norepinephrine (maprotiline) reuptake inhibitors. BDNF protein expression was not altered by venlafaxine or imipramine treatment, nor were postsynaptic depolarization during LTP inducing stimulation or synaptic membrane NMDA receptor subunit expression affected. Conclusions LTP is impaired by chronic treatment with antidepressant that inhibit both serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake; this impairment results from changes that are downstream of postsynaptic depolarization and calcium-influx. PMID:24781518

  15. Estradiol replacement enhances fear memory formation, impairs extinction and reduces COMT expression levels in the hippocampus of ovariectomized female mice.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Carmel M; Liu, Dan; Ade, Catherine; Schrader, Laura A

    2015-02-01

    Females experience depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and anxiety disorders at approximately twice the rate of males, but the mechanisms underlying this difference remain undefined. The effect of sex hormones on neural substrates presents a possible mechanism. We investigated the effect of ovariectomy at two ages, before puberty and in adulthood, and 17β-estradiol (E2) replacement administered chronically in drinking water on anxiety level, fear memory formation, and extinction. Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that estradiol replacement would impair fear memory formation and enhance extinction rate. Females, age 4 weeks and 10 weeks, were divided randomly into 4 groups; sham surgery, OVX, OVX+low E2 (200nM), and OVX+high E2 (1000nM). Chronic treatment with high levels of E2 significantly increased anxiety levels measured in the elevated plus maze. In both age groups, high levels of E2 significantly increased contextual fear memory but had no effect on cued fear memory. In addition, high E2 decreased the rate of extinction in both ages. Finally, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is important for regulation of catecholamine levels, which play a role in fear memory formation and extinction. COMT expression in the hippocampus was significantly reduced by high E2 replacement, implying increased catecholamine levels in the hippocampus of high E2 mice. These results suggest that estradiol enhanced fear memory formation, and inhibited fear memory extinction, possibly stabilizing the fear memory in female mice. This study has implications for a neurobiological mechanism for PTSD and anxiety disorders. PMID:25555360

  16. The effects of doxepin on stress-induced learning, memory impairments, and TNF-α level in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Azadbakht, Ali Ahmad; Radahmadi, Maryam; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooye; Reisi, Parham

    2015-01-01

    Stress has a profound impact on the nervous system and causes cognitive problems that are partly related to the inflammatory effects. Besides influencing the content of neurotransmitters, antidepressants such as doxepin are likely to have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-apoptotic effects. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of doxepin on passive avoidance learning and the levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the rat hippocampus following repeated restraint stress. Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups. Chronic stress was induced by keeping animals within an adjustable restraint chamber for 6 h every day for 21 successive days. In stress-doxepin group, stressed rats were given 1, 5 and 10 mg/kg of doxepin intraperitoneally (i.p) for 21 days and before placing them in restraint chamber. Healthy animals who served as control group and stressed rats received normal saline i.p. For evaluation of learning and memory, initial latency and step-through latency were determined using passive avoidance learning test. TNF-α levels were measured in hippocampus by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) at the end of experiment. Induced stress considerably decreased the step through latencies in the rats (P<0.05) but doxepin administration prevented these changes. Stress-doxepin groups did not reveal any differences compared to control group at any given doses. TNF-α level was increased significantly (P<0.05) in stress group. Only the low dose of doxepin (1 mg/kg) decreased TNF-α level. The present findings indicated that learning and memory are impaired in stressful conditions and doxepin prevented memory deficit. It seems that inflammation may involve in induced stress memory deficits, and that doxepin is helpful in alleviating the neural complications due to stress. PMID:26752995

  17. Estradiol replacement enhances fear memory formation, impairs extinction and reduces COMT expression levels in the hippocampus of ovariectomized female mice.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Carmel M; Liu, Dan; Ade, Catherine; Schrader, Laura A

    2015-02-01

    Females experience depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and anxiety disorders at approximately twice the rate of males, but the mechanisms underlying this difference remain undefined. The effect of sex hormones on neural substrates presents a possible mechanism. We investigated the effect of ovariectomy at two ages, before puberty and in adulthood, and 17β-estradiol (E2) replacement administered chronically in drinking water on anxiety level, fear memory formation, and extinction. Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that estradiol replacement would impair fear memory formation and enhance extinction rate. Females, age 4 weeks and 10 weeks, were divided randomly into 4 groups; sham surgery, OVX, OVX+low E2 (200nM), and OVX+high E2 (1000nM). Chronic treatment with high levels of E2 significantly increased anxiety levels measured in the elevated plus maze. In both age groups, high levels of E2 significantly increased contextual fear memory but had no effect on cued fear memory. In addition, high E2 decreased the rate of extinction in both ages. Finally, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is important for regulation of catecholamine levels, which play a role in fear memory formation and extinction. COMT expression in the hippocampus was significantly reduced by high E2 replacement, implying increased catecholamine levels in the hippocampus of high E2 mice. These results suggest that estradiol enhanced fear memory formation, and inhibited fear memory extinction, possibly stabilizing the fear memory in female mice. This study has implications for a neurobiological mechanism for PTSD and anxiety disorders.

  18. The effects of doxepin on stress-induced learning, memory impairments, and TNF-α level in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Azadbakht, Ali Ahmad; Radahmadi, Maryam; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooye; Reisi, Parham

    2015-01-01

    Stress has a profound impact on the nervous system and causes cognitive problems that are partly related to the inflammatory effects. Besides influencing the content of neurotransmitters, antidepressants such as doxepin are likely to have anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-apoptotic effects. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of doxepin on passive avoidance learning and the levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in the rat hippocampus following repeated restraint stress. Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups. Chronic stress was induced by keeping animals within an adjustable restraint chamber for 6 h every day for 21 successive days. In stress-doxepin group, stressed rats were given 1, 5 and 10 mg/kg of doxepin intraperitoneally (i.p) for 21 days and before placing them in restraint chamber. Healthy animals who served as control group and stressed rats received normal saline i.p. For evaluation of learning and memory, initial latency and step-through latency were determined using passive avoidance learning test. TNF-α levels were measured in hippocampus by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) at the end of experiment. Induced stress considerably decreased the step through latencies in the rats (P<0.05) but doxepin administration prevented these changes. Stress-doxepin groups did not reveal any differences compared to control group at any given doses. TNF-α level was increased significantly (P<0.05) in stress group. Only the low dose of doxepin (1 mg/kg) decreased TNF-α level. The present findings indicated that learning and memory are impaired in stressful conditions and doxepin prevented memory deficit. It seems that inflammation may involve in induced stress memory deficits, and that doxepin is helpful in alleviating the neural complications due to stress.

  19. Galvanic vestibular stimulation impairs cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the rat hippocampus but not spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yiwen; Geddes, Lisa; Sato, Go; Stiles, Lucy; Darlington, Cynthia L; Smith, Paul F

    2014-05-01

    Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) is a method of activating the peripheral vestibular system using direct current that is widely employed in clinical neurological testing. Since movement is recognized to stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis and movement is impossible without activation of the vestibular system, we speculated that activating the vestibular system in rats while minimizing movement, by delivering GVS under anesthesia, would affect hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis, and spatial memory. Compared with the sham control group, the number of cells incorporating the DNA replication marker, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), was significantly reduced in the bilateral hippocampi in both the cathode left-anode right and cathode right-anode left stimulation groups (P ≤ 0.0001). The majority of the BrdU(+ve) cells co-expressed Ki-67, a marker for the S phase of the cell cycle, suggesting that these BrdU(+ve) cells were still in the cell cycle; however, there was no significant difference in the degree of co-labeling between the two stimulation groups. Single labeling for doublecortin (DCX), a marker of immature neurons, showed that while there was no significant difference between the different groups in the number of DCX(+ve) cells in the right dentate gryus, in the left dentate gyrus there was a significant decrease in the cathode left-anode right group compared with the sham controls (P ≤ 0.03). Nonetheless, when animals were tested in place recognition, object exploration and Morris water maze tasks, there were no significant differences between the GVS groups and the sham controls. These results suggest that GVS can have striking effects on cell proliferation and possibly neurogenesis in the hippocampus, without affecting spatial memory.

  20. Zaprinast impairs spatial memory by increasing PDE5 expression in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Mauro; Pompili, Assunta; Cardarelli, Silvia; Castelli, Valentina; Biagioni, Stefano; Sancesario, Giuseppe; Gasbarri, Antonella

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we report the effect of post-training intraperitoneal administration of zaprinast on rat memory retention in the Morris water maze task that revealed a significant memory impairment at the intermediate dose of 10mg/kg. Zaprinast is capable of inhibiting both striatal and hippocampal PDE activity but to a different extent which is probably due to the different PDE isoforms expressed in these areas. To assess the possible involvement of cyclic nucleotides in rat memory impairment, we compared the effects obtained 30 min after the zaprinast injection with respect to 24h after injection by measuring both cyclic nucleotide levels and PDE activity. As expected, 30 min after the zaprinast administration, we observed an increase of cyclic nucleotides, which returned to a basal level within 24h, with the exception of the hippocampal cGMP which was significantly decreased at the dose of 10mg/kg of zaprinast. This increase in the hippocampal region is the result of a cGMP-specific PDE5 induction, confirmed by sildenafil inhibition, in agreement with literature data that demonstrate transcriptional regulation of PDE5 by cAMP/cGMP intracellular levels. Our results highlight the possible rebound effect of PDE inhibitors. PMID:25281278

  1. Zaprinast impairs spatial memory by increasing PDE5 expression in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Mauro; Pompili, Assunta; Cardarelli, Silvia; Castelli, Valentina; Biagioni, Stefano; Sancesario, Giuseppe; Gasbarri, Antonella

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we report the effect of post-training intraperitoneal administration of zaprinast on rat memory retention in the Morris water maze task that revealed a significant memory impairment at the intermediate dose of 10mg/kg. Zaprinast is capable of inhibiting both striatal and hippocampal PDE activity but to a different extent which is probably due to the different PDE isoforms expressed in these areas. To assess the possible involvement of cyclic nucleotides in rat memory impairment, we compared the effects obtained 30 min after the zaprinast injection with respect to 24h after injection by measuring both cyclic nucleotide levels and PDE activity. As expected, 30 min after the zaprinast administration, we observed an increase of cyclic nucleotides, which returned to a basal level within 24h, with the exception of the hippocampal cGMP which was significantly decreased at the dose of 10mg/kg of zaprinast. This increase in the hippocampal region is the result of a cGMP-specific PDE5 induction, confirmed by sildenafil inhibition, in agreement with literature data that demonstrate transcriptional regulation of PDE5 by cAMP/cGMP intracellular levels. Our results highlight the possible rebound effect of PDE inhibitors.

  2. Bupropion-induced inhibition of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in heterologous cells and neurons from dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Gómez, Elizabeth; Arias, Hugo R; Feuerbach, Dominik; Miranda-Morales, Marcela; Mihailescu, Stefan; Targowska-Duda, Katarzyna M; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; García-Colunga, Jesús

    2014-10-01

    The pharmacological activity of bupropion was compared between α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in heterologous cells and hippocampal and dorsal raphe nucleus neurons. The inhibitory activity of bupropion was studied on GH3-α7 cells by Ca2+ influx, as well as on neurons from the dorsal raphe nucleus and interneurons from the stratum radiatum of the hippocampal CA1 region by using a whole-cell voltage-clamp technique. In addition, the interaction of bupropion with the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was determined by [3H]imipramine competition binding assays and molecular docking. The fast component of acetylcholine- and choline-induced currents from both brain regions was inhibited by methyllycaconitine, indicating the participation of α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Choline-induced currents in hippocampal interneurons were partially inhibited by 10 µM bupropion, a concentration that could be reached in the brain during clinical administration. Additionally, both agonist-induced currents were reversibly inhibited by bupropion at concentrations that coincide with its inhibitory potency (IC50=54 µM) and binding affinity (Ki=63 µM) for α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from heterologous cells. The [3H]imipramine competition binding and molecular docking results support a luminal location for the bupropion binding site(s). This study may help to understand the mechanisms of actions of bupropion at neuronal and molecular levels related with its therapeutic actions on depression and for smoking cessation.

  3. Dopamine D1 receptor blockade impairs alcohol seeking without reducing dorsal striatal activation to cues of alcohol availability

    PubMed Central

    Fanelli, Rebecca R; Robinson, Donita L

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Alcohol-associated cues activate both ventral and dorsal striatum in functional brain imaging studies of heavy drinkers. In rodents, alcohol-associated cues induce changes in neuronal firing frequencies and increase dopamine release in ventral striatum, but the impact of alcohol-associated cues on neuronal activity in dorsal striatum is unclear. We previously reported phasic changes in action potential frequency in the dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatum after cues that signaled alcohol availability, prompting approach behavior. Methods We investigated the hypothesis that dopamine transmission modulates these phasic firing changes. Rats were trained to self-administer alcohol, and neuronal activity was monitored with extracellular electrophysiology during “anticipatory” cues that signaled the start of the operant session. Sessions were preceded by systemic administration of the D1-type dopamine receptor antagonist SCH23390 (0, 10, and 20 μg/kg). Results SCH23390 significantly decreased firing rates during the 60 s prior to cue onset without reducing phasic excitations immediately following the cues. While neuronal activation to cues might be expected to initiate behavioral responses, in this study alcohol seeking was reduced despite the presence of dorsal striatal excitations to alcohol cues. Conclusions These data suggest that D1 receptor antagonism reduces basal firing rates in the dorsal striatum and modulates the ability of neuronal activation to “anticipatory” cues to initiate alcohol seeking in rats with an extensive history of alcohol self-administration. PMID:25642390

  4. Pharmacological elevation of anandamide impairs short-term memory by altering the neurophysiology in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Goonawardena, Anushka V; Sesay, John; Sexton, Cheryl Ann; Riedel, Gernot; Hampson, Robert E

    2011-01-01

    In rodents, many exogenous cannabinoid agonists including Δ(9)-THC and WIN55,212-2 (WIN-2) have been shown to impair short-term memory (STM) by inhibition of hippocampal neuronal assemblies. However, the mechanisms by which endocannabinoids such as anandamide and 2-arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG) modulate STM processes are not well understood. Here the effects of anandamide on performance of a Delayed-Non-Match-to-Sample (DNMS) task (i.e. STM task) and concomitant hippocampal ensemble activity were assessed following administration of either URB597 (0.3, 3.0 mg/kg), an inhibitor of the Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH), AM404 (1.5, 10.0 mg/kg), a putative anandamide uptake/FAAH inhibitor, or R-methanandamide (3.0, 10.0 mg/kg), a stable analog of anandamide. Principal cells from hippocampal CA3/CA1 were recorded extracellularly by multi-electrode arrays in Long-Evans rats during DNMS task (1-30 s delays) performance and tracked throughout drug administration and recovery. Both R-methanandamide and URB597 caused dose- and delay-dependent deficits in DNMS performance with suppression of hippocampal ensemble activity during the encoding (sample) phase. R-methanandamide-induced effects were not reversed by capsaicin excluding a contribution of TRPV-1 receptors. AM404 produced subtle deficits at longer delay intervals but did not alter hippocampal neuronal activity during task-specific events. Collectively, these data indicate that endocannabinoid levels affect performance in a STM task and their pharmacological elevation beyond normal concentrations is detrimental also for the underlying physiological responses. They also highlight a specific window of memory processing, i.e. encoding, which is sensitive to cannabinoid modulation.

  5. Dorsal hippocampal lesions disrupt Pavlovian delay conditioning and conditioned-response timing.

    PubMed

    Tam, Shu K E; Bonardi, Charlotte

    2012-04-21

    The involvement of the rat dorsal hippocampus (dhpc) in Pavlovian conditioning and timing of conditioned responding was examined in an appetitive preparation in which presentation of a relatively long, 40-s auditory conditioned stimulus (CS) was followed immediately by food delivery. Dorsal hippocampal lesions impaired Pavlovian conditioning in this task. They also produced a deficit in interval timing, replicating previous findings with short CSs. The conditioning and timing deficits observed are consistent with the findings from single-unit recording studies in other species, and suggest that the involvement of the dhpc in Pavlovian processes could be more general than is assumed by many of the current theories of hippocampal function.

  6. Differential Regulation of MAPK Phosphorylation in the Dorsal Hippocampus in Response to Prolonged Morphine Withdrawal-Induced Depressive-Like Symptoms in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jianguo; Wu, Bin; Dang, Wei; Du, Ying; Zhou, Qiong; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Depression is one of the most frequent neuropsychiatric comorbidities associated with opiate addiction. Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and MAPK phosphatase (MKP) are involved in drug addiction and depression. However, the potential role of MAPK and MKP in depression caused by morphine withdrawal remains unclear. We utilized a mouse model of repeated morphine administration to examine the molecular mechanisms that contribute to prolonged withdrawal induced depressive-like behaviors. Depressive-like behaviors were significant at 1 week after withdrawal and worsened over time. Phospho-ERK (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase) was decreased and MKP-1 was elevated in the hippocampus, and JNK (c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase), p38 (p38 protein kinase) and MKP-3 were unaffected. A pharmacological blockade of MKP-1 by intra-hippocampal sanguinarine (SA) infusion prevented the development of depressive-like behaviors and resulted in relatively normal levels of MKP-1 and phospho-ERK after withdrawal. Our findings support the association between hippocampal MAPK phosphorylation and prolonged morphine withdrawal-induced depression, and emphasize the MKP-1 as an negative regulator of the ERK phosphorylation that contributes to depression. PMID:23823128

  7. Cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the dorsal hippocampus and prelimbic medial prefrontal cortex modulate anxiety-like behavior in rats: additional evidence.

    PubMed

    Lisboa, Sabrina F; Borges, Anna A; Nejo, Priscila; Fassini, Aline; Guimarães, Francisco S; Resstel, Leonardo B

    2015-06-01

    Endocannabinoids (ECBs) such as anandamide (AEA) act by activating cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) or 2 (CB2) receptors. The anxiolytic effect of drugs that facilitate ECB effects is associated with increase in AEA levels in several encephalic areas, including the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Activation of CB1 receptors by CB1 agonists injected directly into these areas is usually anxiolytic. However, depending on the encephalic region being investigated and on the stressful experiences, opposite effects were observed, as reported in the ventral HIP. In addition, contradictory results have been reported after CB1 activation in the dorsal HIP (dHIP). Therefore, in the present paper we have attempted to verify if directly interfering with ECB metabolism/reuptake in the prelimbic (PL) portion of the medial PFC (MPFC) and dHIP would produce different effects in two conceptually distinct animal models: the elevated plus maze (EPM) and the Vogel conflict test (VCT). We observed that drugs which interfere with ECB reuptake/metabolism in both the PL and in the dentate gyrus of the dHIP induced anxiolytic-like effect, in both the EPM and in the VCT via CB1 receptors, suggesting that CB1 signaling in these brain regions modulates defensive responses to both innate and learned threatening stimuli. This data further strengthens previous results indicating modulation of hippocampal and MPFC activity via CB1 by ECBs, which could be therapeutically targeted to treat anxiety disorders.

  8. Behavioral pharmacogenetic analysis on the role of the α4 GABAA receptor subunit in the ethanol-mediated impairment of hippocampus-dependent contextual learning

    PubMed Central

    Cushman, Jesse D.; Moore, Melissa D.; Jacobs, Nate S.; Olsen, Richard W.; Fanselow, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Background A major effect of low dose ethanol is impairment of hippocampus-dependent cognitive function. α4/δ-containing GABAAR’s are highly expressed within the dentate gyrus region of the hippocampus where they mediate a tonic inhibitory current that is sensitive to enhancement by low ethanol concentrations. These receptors are also powerful modulators of learning and memory, suggesting that they could play an important role in ethanol’s cognitive-impairing effects. The goal of the present study was to develop a high-throughput cognitive ethanol assay, amenable to use in genetically modified mice that could be used to test this hypothesis. Methods We developed a procedure where pre-exposure to a conditioning chamber is used to rescue the “immediate shock deficit.” Using this task, ethanol can be specifically targeted at the hippocampus-dependent process of contextual learning without interfering with pain sensitivity or behavioral performance. Results Validation of this task in C57Bl6 mice indicated that 1.0 g/kg ethanol and 10 mg/kg allopregnanolone disrupt contextual learning. Ro15-4513 reversed the effects of ethanol but not allopregnanolone, whereas it produced an impairment when given alone. The high-throughput nature of this task allowed for its application in a large cohort of α4 GABAAR KO mice. Loss of the α4 GABAAR subunit produced an enhanced sensitivity to the cognitive impairing effects of ethanol. This is consistent with the enhanced ethanol sensitivity of synaptic GABAARs that has been previously observed in the dentate gyrus in these mice, but inconsistent with the reduced ethanol sensitivity of extrasynaptic GABAAR’s observed in the same cells. Conclusions Overall, these findings are consistent with our hypothesis that ethanol acts directly at GABAA receptors to impair hippocampus-dependent cognitive function. Furthermore, validation of this high-throughput assay will allow for future studies to use anatomically and temporally

  9. Impaired Visual Object Processing Across an Occipital- Frontal-Hippocampal Brain Network in Schizophrenia: An integrated neuroimaging study

    PubMed Central

    Sehatpour, Pejman; Dias, Elisa C.; Butler, Pamela D.; Revheim, Nadine; Guilfoyle, David N.; Foxe, John J.; Javitt, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Perceptual closure refers to the ability to identify objects with partial information. Deficits in schizophrenia are indexed by impaired generation of the closure-related negativity (NCL) from ventral stream visual cortex (lateral occipital complex, LOC), as part of a network of brain regions that also includes dorsal stream visual regions, prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus. This study evaluates network-level interactions during perceptual closure in schizophrenia using parallel ERP, fMRI and neuropsychological assessment. Methods ERP were obtained from 24 patients and 20 healthy volunteers in response to fragmented (closeable) and control scrambled (noncloseable) line drawings. fMRI were obtained from 11 patients and 12 controls. Patterns of between group differences for predefined ERP components and fMRI regions of interest were determined using both analysis of variance and structural equation modeling. Global neuropsychological performance was assessed using elements of the WAIS-III, WMS-III and MATRICS batteries. Results Patients showed impaired visual P1 generation, reflecting dorsal stream dysfunction, along with impaired generation of NCL components over PFC and LOC. In fMRI, patients showed impaired activation of dorsal and ventral visual regions, PFC and hippocampus. Impaired activation of dorsal stream visual regions contributed significantly to impaired PFC activation. Impaired PFC activation contributed significantly to impaired activation of hippocampus and LOC. Impaired LOC and hippocampal activation contributed significantly to deficits on WAIS-III Perceptual Organization Index (POI) and other tests of impaired perceptual processing in schizophrenia. Conclusion Schizophrenia is associated with severe activation deficits across a distributed network of sensory and higher order cognitive regions. Deficit in early visual processing within the dorsal visual stream contributes significantly to impaired frontal activation which, in turn

  10. Role of hippocampus in polymodal-cue guided tasks in rats.

    PubMed

    Miniaci, Maria Concetta; Lippiello, Pellegrino; Monda, Marcellino; Scotto, Pietro

    2016-09-01

    To examine how signals from different sensory modalities are integrated to generate an appropriate goal-oriented behavior, we trained rats in an eight-arm radial maze to visit a cue arm provided with intramaze cues from different sensory modalities, i.e. visual, tactile and auditory, in order to obtain a reward. When the same rats were then examined on test trials in which the cue arm contained one of the stimuli that the animals were trained with (i.e. light, sound or rough sheet), they showed a significant impairment with respect to the performance on the polymodal-cue task. The contribution of the dorsal hippocampus to the acquisition and retention of polymodal-cue guided task was also examined. We found that rats with dorsal hippocampal lesions before training showed a significant deficit in the acquisition of polymodal-cue oriented task that improved with overtraining. The selective lesion of the dorsal hippocampus after training disrupted memory retention, but the animals' performance improved following retraining of the polymodal task. All hippocampal lesioned rats displayed an impaired performance on the unimodal test. These findings suggest that the dorsal hippocampus contributes to the processing of multimodal sensory information for the associative memory formation and consolidation. PMID:27342815

  11. Prenatal exposure to a novel antipsychotic quetiapine: impact on neuro-architecture, apoptotic neurodegeneration in fetal hippocampus and cognitive impairment in young rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, K P; Tripathi, Nidhi

    2015-05-01

    Reports on prenatal exposure to some of the first generation antipsychotic drugs like, haloperidol, their effects on fetal neurotoxicity and functional impairments in the offspring, are well documented. But studies on in utero exposure to second generation antipsychotics, especially quetiapine, and its effects on fetal neurotoxicity, apoptotic neurodegeneration, postnatal developmental delay and neurobehavioral consequences are lacking. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of prenatal administration to equivalent therapeutic doses of quetiapine on neuro-architectural abnormalities, neurohistopathological changes, apoptotic neurodegeneration in fetal hippocampus, and postnatal development and growth as well as its long-lasting imprint on cognitive impairment in young-adult offspring. Pregnant Wistar rats (n=24) were exposed to selected doses (55 mg, 80 mg and 100mg/kg) of quetiapine, equivalent to human therapeutic doses, from gestation day 6 to 21 orally with control subjects. Half of the pregnant subjects of each group were sacrificed at gestation day 21 for histopathological, confocal and electron microscopic studies and rest of the dams were allowed to deliver naturally. Their pups were reared postnatally up to 10 weeks of age for neurobehavioral observations. In quetiapine treated groups, there was significant alterations in total and differential thickness of three typical layers of hippocampus associated with neuronal cells deficit and enhanced apoptotic neurodegeneration in the CA1 area of fetal hippocampus. Prenatally drug treated rat offspring displayed post-natal developmental delay till postnatal day 70, and these young-adult rats displayed cognitive impairment in Morris water maze and passive avoidance regimes as long-lasting impact of the drug. Therefore, quetiapine should be used with cautions considering its developmental neurotoxicological and neurobehavioral potential in animal model, rat.

  12. Pentoxifylline Alleviates Perinatal Hypoxic-Ischemia-Induced Short-term Memory Impairment by Suppressing Apoptosis in the Hippocampus of Rat Pups

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage is a major cause of acute mortality and chronic neurologic morbidity in infants and children. We investigated the effects of pentoxifylline, a methylxanthine derivative and type-4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor, on short-term memory and apoptotic neuronal cell death in the hippocampus following perinatal hypoxic-ischemia in newborn rats. Methods: We used a step-down avoidance task to evaluate short-term memory and 3ʹ-5ʹ-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) assay to detect cAMP levels. We evaluated apoptosis using a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay for evidence of DNA fragmentation, immunohistochemistry for caspase-3 levels, and western blot for Bcl-2 and Bax. Results: Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic injury increased apoptotic cell death in the hippocampus, resulting in impaired short-term memory with decreased cAMP levels. Pentoxifylline treatment improved short-term memory by suppressing apoptotic cell death in the hippocampus with elevated cAMP levels. Conclusions: Pentoxifylline ameliorated perinatal hypoxic-ischemia in rat pups. This alleviating effect could be ascribed to the inhibition apoptosis due to increased cAMP production by pentoxifylline. PMID:27377942

  13. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate alleviates spatial memory impairment in APP/PS1 mice by restoring IRS-1 signaling defects in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ning; Han, Kun; Kong, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Xiu-Mei; Sha, Sha; Ren, Gui-Ru; Cao, Yun-Peng

    2013-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) fundamentally represents a metabolic disease associated with brain insulin resistance. TNF-α/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling plays a central role in serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1). (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a potent antioxidant, has been verified to attenuate peripheral insulin resistance by reducing IRS-1 signaling blockage. This study aimed to investigate the effects and possible mechanisms of EGCG on central IRS-1 signaling in vivo. APP/PS1 mice were treated with EGCG, and spatial memory was assessed by the Morris water maze test. Levels of soluble and insoluble Aβ42 in the hippocampus were determined by ELISA. The activation of NF-α/JNK and IRS signaling was detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Our results showed that EGCG ameliorated the impaired learning and memory in APP/PS1 mice. Notably, we found a significant reduction of IRS-1pS636 level accompanied with decreased Aβ42 levels in the hippocampus of 13-month-old female APP/PS1 mice after treatment with EGCG (2 or 6 mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks. Furthermore, EGCG treatment inhibited TNF-α/JNK signaling and increased the phosphorylation of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3β in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice. In conclusion, our study provides evidence that long-term consumption of EGCG may alleviate AD-related cognitive deficits by effectively attenuating central insulin resistance.

  14. Transient inactivation of the pigeon hippocampus or the nidopallium caudolaterale during extinction learning impairs extinction retrieval in an appetitive conditioning paradigm.

    PubMed

    Lengersdorf, Daniel; Stüttgen, Maik C; Uengoer, Metin; Güntürkün, Onur

    2014-05-15

    The majority of experiments exploring context-dependent extinction learning employ Pavlovian fear conditioning in rodents. Since mechanisms of appetitive and aversive learning are known to differ at the neuronal level, we sought to investigate extinction learning in an appetitive setting. Working with pigeons, we established a within-subject ABA renewal paradigm based on Rescorla (Q J Exp Psychol 61:1793) and combined it with pharmacological interventions during extinction. From the fear conditioning literature, it is known that both prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus are core structures for context-specific extinction learning. Accordingly, we transiently inactivated the nidopallium caudolaterale (NCL, a functional analogue of mammalian prefrontal cortex) and the hippocampus in separate experiments by intracranial infusion of the sodium-channel blocker tetrodotoxin immediately before extinction training. We find that TTX in both structures non-specifically suppresses conditioned responding, as revealed by a reduction of response rate to both the extinguished conditioned stimulus and a control stimulus which remained reinforced throughout the experiment. Furthermore, TTX during extinction training impaired later extinction retrieval assessed under drug-free conditions. This was true when responding to the extinguished stimulus was assessed in the context of extinction but not when tested in the context of acquisition, although both contexts were matched with respect to their history of conditioning. These results indicate that both NCL and hippocampus are involved in extinction learning under appetitive conditions or, more specifically, in the consolidation of extinction memory, and that their contribution to extinction is context-specific.

  15. Tiliacora triandra, an Anti-Intoxication Plant, Improves Memory Impairment, Neurodegeneration, Cholinergic Function, and Oxidative Stress in Hippocampus of Ethanol Dependence Rats

    PubMed Central

    Phunchago, Nattaporn; Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Chaisiwamongkol, Kowit

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in brain dysfunctions induced by alcohol. Since less therapeutic agent against cognitive deficit and brain damage induced by chronic alcohol consumption is less available, we aimed to assess the effect of Tiliacora triandra extract, a plant possessing antioxidant activity, on memory impairment, neuron density, cholinergic function, and oxidative stress in hippocampus of alcoholic rats. Male Wistar rats were induced ethanol dependence condition by semivoluntary intake of alcohol for 15 weeks. Alcoholic rats were orally given T. triandra at doses of 100, 200, and 400 mg·kg−1BW for 14 days. Memory assessment was performed every 7 days while neuron density, activities of AChE, SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px and, MDA level in hippocampus were assessed at the end of study. Interestingly, the extract mitigated the increased escape latency, AChE and MDA level. The extract also mitigated the decreased retention time, SOD, CAT, and GSH-Px activities, and neurons density in hippocampus induced by alcohol. These data suggested that the extract improved memory deficit in alcoholic rats partly via the decreased oxidative stress and the suppression of AChE. Therefore, T. triandra is the potential reagent for treating brain dysfunction induced by alcohol. However, further researches are necessary to understand the detail mechanism and possible active ingredient. PMID:26180599

  16. Optogenetic activation of intracellular adenosine A2A receptor signaling in the hippocampus is sufficient to trigger CREB phosphorylation and impair memory.

    PubMed

    Li, P; Rial, D; Canas, P M; Yoo, J-H; Li, W; Zhou, X; Wang, Y; van Westen, G J P; Payen, M-P; Augusto, E; Gonçalves, N; Tomé, A R; Li, Z; Wu, Z; Hou, X; Zhou, Y; IJzerman, A P; PIJzerman, Ad; Boyden, E S; Cunha, R A; Qu, J; Chen, J-F

    2015-11-01

    Human and animal studies have converged to suggest that caffeine consumption prevents memory deficits in aging and Alzheimer's disease through the antagonism of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs). To test if A2AR activation in the hippocampus is actually sufficient to impair memory function and to begin elucidating the intracellular pathways operated by A2AR, we have developed a chimeric rhodopsin-A2AR protein (optoA2AR), which retains the extracellular and transmembrane domains of rhodopsin (conferring light responsiveness and eliminating adenosine-binding pockets) fused to the intracellular loop of A2AR to confer specific A2AR signaling. The specificity of the optoA2AR signaling was confirmed by light-induced selective enhancement of cAMP and phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-MAPK) (but not cGMP) levels in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells, which was abolished by a point mutation at the C terminal of A2AR. Supporting its physiological relevance, optoA2AR activation and the A2AR agonist CGS21680 produced similar activation of cAMP and p-MAPK signaling in HEK293 cells, of p-MAPK in the nucleus accumbens and of c-Fos/phosphorylated-CREB (p-CREB) in the hippocampus, and similarly enhanced long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. Remarkably, optoA2AR activation triggered a preferential p-CREB signaling in the hippocampus and impaired spatial memory performance, while optoA2AR activation in the nucleus accumbens triggered MAPK signaling and modulated locomotor activity. This shows that the recruitment of intracellular A2AR signaling in the hippocampus is sufficient to trigger memory dysfunction. Furthermore, the demonstration that the biased A2AR signaling and functions depend on intracellular A2AR loops prompts the possibility of targeting the intracellular A2AR-interacting partners to selectively control different neuropsychiatric behaviors. PMID:25687775

  17. Fluoride and arsenic exposure impairs learning and memory and decreases mGluR5 expression in the hippocampus and cortex in rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shoufang; Su, Jing; Yao, Sanqiao; Zhang, Yanshu; Cao, Fuyuan; Wang, Fei; Wang, Huihui; Li, Jun; Xi, Shuhua

    2014-01-01

    Fluoride and arsenic are two common inorganic contaminants in drinking water that are associated with impairment in child development and retarded intelligence. The present study was conducted to explore the effects on spatial learning, memory, glutamate levels, and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) expression in the hippocampus and cortex after subchronic exposure to fluoride, arsenic, and a fluoride and arsenic combination in rats. Weaned male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to four groups. The control rats drank tap water. Rats in the three exposure groups drank water with sodium fluoride (120 mg/L), sodium arsenite (70 mg/L), and a sodium fluoride (120 mg/L) and sodium arsenite (70 mg/L) combination for 3 months. Spatial learning and memory was measured in Morris water maze. mGluR1 and mGluR5 mRNA and protein expression in the hippocampus and cortex was detected using RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Compared with controls, learning and memory ability declined in rats that were exposed to fluoride and arsenic both alone and combined. Combined fluoride and arsenic exposure did not have a more pronounced effect on spatial learning and memory compared with arsenic and fluoride exposure alone. Compared with controls, glutamate levels decreased in the hippocampus and cortex of rats exposed to fluoride and combined fluoride and arsenic, and in cortex of arsenic-exposed rats. mGluR5 mRNA and protein expressions in the hippocampus and mGluR5 protein expression in the cortex decreased in rats exposed to arsenic alone. Interestingly, compared with fluoride and arsenic exposure alone, fluoride and arsenic combination decreased mGluR5 mRNA expression in the cortex and protein expression in the hippocampus, suggesting a synergistic effect of fluoride and arsenic. These data indicate that fluoride and arsenic, either alone or combined, can decrease learning and memory ability in rats. The mechanism may be associated with changes of glutamate level and

  18. Fluoride and arsenic exposure impairs learning and memory and decreases mGluR5 expression in the hippocampus and cortex in rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shoufang; Su, Jing; Yao, Sanqiao; Zhang, Yanshu; Cao, Fuyuan; Wang, Fei; Wang, Huihui; Li, Jun; Xi, Shuhua

    2014-01-01

    Fluoride and arsenic are two common inorganic contaminants in drinking water that are associated with impairment in child development and retarded intelligence. The present study was conducted to explore the effects on spatial learning, memory, glutamate levels, and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) expression in the hippocampus and cortex after subchronic exposure to fluoride, arsenic, and a fluoride and arsenic combination in rats. Weaned male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to four groups. The control rats drank tap water. Rats in the three exposure groups drank water with sodium fluoride (120 mg/L), sodium arsenite (70 mg/L), and a sodium fluoride (120 mg/L) and sodium arsenite (70 mg/L) combination for 3 months. Spatial learning and memory was measured in Morris water maze. mGluR1 and mGluR5 mRNA and protein expression in the hippocampus and cortex was detected using RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Compared with controls, learning and memory ability declined in rats that were exposed to fluoride and arsenic both alone and combined. Combined fluoride and arsenic exposure did not have a more pronounced effect on spatial learning and memory compared with arsenic and fluoride exposure alone. Compared with controls, glutamate levels decreased in the hippocampus and cortex of rats exposed to fluoride and combined fluoride and arsenic, and in cortex of arsenic-exposed rats. mGluR5 mRNA and protein expressions in the hippocampus and mGluR5 protein expression in the cortex decreased in rats exposed to arsenic alone. Interestingly, compared with fluoride and arsenic exposure alone, fluoride and arsenic combination decreased mGluR5 mRNA expression in the cortex and protein expression in the hippocampus, suggesting a synergistic effect of fluoride and arsenic. These data indicate that fluoride and arsenic, either alone or combined, can decrease learning and memory ability in rats. The mechanism may be associated with changes of glutamate level and

  19. Fluoride and Arsenic Exposure Impairs Learning and Memory and Decreases mGluR5 Expression in the Hippocampus and Cortex in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shoufang; Su, Jing; Yao, Sanqiao; Zhang, Yanshu; Cao, Fuyuan; Wang, Fei; Wang, Huihui; Li, Jun; Xi, Shuhua

    2014-01-01

    Fluoride and arsenic are two common inorganic contaminants in drinking water that are associated with impairment in child development and retarded intelligence. The present study was conducted to explore the effects on spatial learning, memory, glutamate levels, and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) expression in the hippocampus and cortex after subchronic exposure to fluoride, arsenic, and a fluoride and arsenic combination in rats. Weaned male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to four groups. The control rats drank tap water. Rats in the three exposure groups drank water with sodium fluoride (120 mg/L), sodium arsenite (70 mg/L), and a sodium fluoride (120 mg/L) and sodium arsenite (70 mg/L) combination for 3 months. Spatial learning and memory was measured in Morris water maze. mGluR1 and mGluR5 mRNA and protein expression in the hippocampus and cortex was detected using RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Compared with controls, learning and memory ability declined in rats that were exposed to fluoride and arsenic both alone and combined. Combined fluoride and arsenic exposure did not have a more pronounced effect on spatial learning and memory compared with arsenic and fluoride exposure alone. Compared with controls, glutamate levels decreased in the hippocampus and cortex of rats exposed to fluoride and combined fluoride and arsenic, and in cortex of arsenic-exposed rats. mGluR5 mRNA and protein expressions in the hippocampus and mGluR5 protein expression in the cortex decreased in rats exposed to arsenic alone. Interestingly, compared with fluoride and arsenic exposure alone, fluoride and arsenic combination decreased mGluR5 mRNA expression in the cortex and protein expression in the hippocampus, suggesting a synergistic effect of fluoride and arsenic. These data indicate that fluoride and arsenic, either alone or combined, can decrease learning and memory ability in rats. The mechanism may be associated with changes of glutamate level and

  20. Honokiol abrogates chronic restraint stress-induced cognitive impairment and depressive-like behaviour by blocking endoplasmic reticulum stress in the hippocampus of mice.

    PubMed

    Jangra, Ashok; Dwivedi, Shubham; Sriram, Chandra Shaker; Gurjar, Satendra Singh; Kwatra, Mohit; Sulakhiya, Kunjbihari; Baruah, Chandana C; Lahkar, Mangala

    2016-01-01

    The primary objective of our study is to investigate the neuroprotective efficacy of honokiol and imipramine against restraint stress (RS)-induced cognitive impairment and depressive-like behaviour in mice. We examined whether the neuroprotective activity of honokiol and imipramine mediates through the inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Adult Swiss albino mice were restrained for 6h/day for 28 days. Honokiol (3 and 10mg/kg) and Imipramine (10 and 30mg/kg) were administered for last 7 days to the different groups. Cognitive function was assessed by Morris water maze and novel object recognition test. Forced swimming test and tail suspension test were performed to evaluate the restraint stress-induced depressive-like behaviour. Proinflammatory cytokines, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and ER stress markers i.e. 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) were quantified in the hippocampus. We observed cognitive impairment and depressive-like behaviour in RS-exposed animals. Honokiol (10mg/kg) treated group depicted marked reduction in cognitive impairment and depressive-like behaviour. However, imipramine (10 and 30mg/kg) prevented the depressive-like behaviour but failed to prevent RS-induced cognitive impairment. Moreover, proinflammatory cytokines, GRP78 and CHOP were elevated in the hippocampus of stressed mice as compared to unstressed mice. Honokiol (10mg/kg) significantly prevented the RS-induced elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines and endoplasmic reticulum stress markers. Our results clearly suggest the beneficial potential of honokiol in restraint stress through inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Honokiol could be an intriguing therapeutic approach in endoplasmic reticulum stress related neuro-pathophysiological conditions.

  1. Conditional deletion of α-CaMKII impairs integration of adult-generated granule cells into dentate gyrus circuits and hippocampus-dependent learning.

    PubMed

    Arruda-Carvalho, Maithe; Restivo, Leonardo; Guskjolen, Axel; Epp, Jonathan R; Elgersma, Ype; Josselyn, Sheena A; Frankland, Paul W

    2014-09-01

    New granule cells are continuously integrated into hippocampal circuits throughout adulthood, and the fine-tuning of this process is likely important for efficient hippocampal function. During development, this integration process is critically regulated by the α-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (α-CaMKII), and here we ask whether this role is conserved in the adult brain. To do this, we developed a transgenic strategy to conditionally delete α-CaMKII from neural progenitor cells and their progeny in adult mice. First, we found that the selective deletion of α-CaMKII from newly generated dentate granule cells led to an increase in dendritic complexity. Second, α-CaMKII deletion led to a reduction in number of mature synapses and cell survival. Third, consistent with altered morphological and synaptic development, acquisition of one-trial contextual fear conditioning was impaired after deletion of α-CaMKII from newly generated dentate granule cells. Previous work in Xenopus identified α-CaMKII as playing a key role in the stabilization of dendritic and synaptic structure during development. The current study indicates that α-CaMKII plays a plays a similar, cell-autonomous role in the adult hippocampus and, in addition, reveals that the loss of α-CaMKII from adult-generated granule cells is associated with impaired hippocampus-dependent learning.

  2. Effect of Beta-Asarone on Impairment of Spatial Working Memory and Apoptosis in the Hippocampus of Rats Exposed to Chronic Corticosterone Administration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bombi; Sur, Bongjun; Cho, Seong-Guk; Yeom, Mijung; Shim, Insop; Lee, Hyejung; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    β-asarone (BAS) is an active component of Acori graminei rhizoma, a traditional medicine used clinically in treating dementia and chronic stress in Korea. However, the cognitive effects of BAS and its mechanism of action have remained elusive. The purpose of this study was to examine whether BAS improved spatial cognitive impairment induced in rats following chronic corticosterone (CORT) administration. CORT administration (40 mg/kg, i.p., 21 days) resulted in cognitive impairment in the avoidance conditioning test (AAT) and the Morris water maze (MWM) test that was reversed by BAS (200 mg/kg, i.p). Additionally, as assessed by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR analysis, the administration of BAS significantly alleviated memory-associated decreases in the expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) proteins and mRNAs in the hippocampus. Also, BAS administration significantly restored the expression of Bax and Bcl-2 mRNAs in the hippocampus. Thus, BAS may be an effective therapeutic for learning and memory disturbances, and its neuroprotective effect was mediated, in part, by normalizing the CORT response, resulting in regulation of BDNF and CREB functions and anti-apoptosis in rats. PMID:26535083

  3. Consumption of molecular hydrogen prevents the stress-induced impairments in hippocampus-dependent learning tasks during chronic physical restraint in mice.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Kazufumi; Nakashima-Kamimura, Naomi; Mikami, Toshio; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Ohta, Shigeo

    2009-01-01

    We have reported that hydrogen (H(2)) acts as an efficient antioxidant by gaseous rapid diffusion. When water saturated with hydrogen (hydrogen water) was placed into the stomach of a rat, hydrogen was detected at several microM level in blood. Because hydrogen gas is unsuitable for continuous consumption, we investigated using mice whether drinking hydrogen water ad libitum, instead of inhaling hydrogen gas, prevents cognitive impairment by reducing oxidative stress. Chronic physical restraint stress to mice enhanced levels of oxidative stress markers, malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, in the brain, and impaired learning and memory, as judged by three different methods: passive avoidance learning, object recognition task, and the Morris water maze. Consumption of hydrogen water ad libitum throughout the whole period suppressed the increase in the oxidative stress markers and prevented cognitive impairment, as judged by all three methods, whereas hydrogen water did not improve cognitive ability when no stress was provided. Neural proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus was suppressed by restraint stress, as observed by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation and Ki-67 immunostaining, proliferation markers. The consumption of hydrogen water ameliorated the reduced proliferation although the mechanistic link between the hydrogen-dependent changes in neurogenesis and cognitive impairments remains unclear. Thus, continuous consumption of hydrogen water reduces oxidative stress in the brain, and prevents the stress-induced decline in learning and memory caused by chronic physical restraint. Hydrogen water may be applicable for preventive use in cognitive or other neuronal disorders. PMID:18563058

  4. Hippocampus and two-way active avoidance conditioning: Contrasting effects of cytotoxic lesion and temporary inactivation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Bast, Tobias; Wang, Yu-Cong; Zhang, Wei-Ning

    2015-12-01

    Hippocampal lesions tend to facilitate two-way active avoidance (2WAA) conditioning, where rats learn to cross to the opposite side of a conditioning chamber to avoid a tone-signaled footshock. This classical finding has been suggested to reflect that hippocampus-dependent place/context memory inhibits 2WAA (a crossing response to the opposite side is inhibited by the memory that this is the place where a shock was received on the previous trial). However, more recent research suggests other aspects of hippocampal function that may support 2WAA learning. More specifically, the ventral hippocampus has been shown to contribute to behavioral responses to aversive stimuli and to positively modulate the meso-accumbens dopamine system, whose activation has been implicated in 2WAA learning. Permanent hippocampal lesions may not reveal these contributions because, following complete and permanent loss of hippocampal output, other brain regions may mediate these processes or because deficits could be masked by lesion-induced extra-hippocampal changes, including an upregulation of accumbal dopamine transmission. Here, we re-examined the hippocampal role in 2WAA learning in Wistar rats, using permanent NMDA-induced neurotoxic lesions and temporary functional inhibition by muscimol or tetrodotoxin (TTX) infusion. Complete hippocampal lesions tended to facilitate 2WAA learning, whereas ventral (VH) or dorsal hippocampal (DH) lesions had no effect. In contrast, VH or DH muscimol or TTX infusions impaired 2WAA learning. Ventral infusions caused an immediate impairment, whereas after dorsal infusions rats showed intact 2WAA learning for 40-50 min, before a marked deficit emerged. These data show that functional inhibition of ventral hippocampus disrupts 2WAA learning, while the delayed impairment following dorsal infusions may reflect the time required for drug diffusion to ventral hippocampus. Overall, using temporary functional inhibition, our study shows that the ventral

  5. ApoE4 expression accelerates hippocampus-dependent cognitive deficits by enhancing Aβ impairment of insulin signaling in an Alzheimer’s disease mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Elizabeth S.; Shetty, Mahesh Shivarama; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Chen, Christopher; Soong, Tuck Wah; Wong, Boon-Seng

    2016-01-01

    The apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) is the strongest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The AD brain was shown to be insulin resistant at end stage, but the interplay between insulin signaling, ApoE4 and Aβ across time, and their involvement in memory decline is unclear. To investigate insulin response in the ageing mouse hippocampus, we crossed the human ApoE-targeted replacement mice with the mutant human amyloid precursor protein (APP) mice (ApoExAPP). While hippocampal Aβ levels were comparable between ApoE3xAPP and ApoE4xAPP mice at 26 weeks, insulin response was impaired in the ApoE4xAPP hippocampus. Insulin treatment was only able to stimulate insulin signaling and increased AMPA-GluR1 phosphorylation in forskolin pre-treated hippocampal slices from ApoE3xAPP mice. In ApoE4xAPP mice, insulin dysfunction was also associated with poorer spatial memory performance. Using dissociated hippocampal neuron in vitro, we showed that insulin response in ApoE3 and ApoE4 neurons increased AMPA receptor-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) amplitudes and GluR1-subunit insertion. Pre-treatment of ApoE3 neurons with Aβ42 did not affect insulin-mediated GluR1 subunit insertion. However, impaired insulin sensitivity observed only in the presence of ApoE4 and Aβ42, attenuated GluR1-subunit insertion. Taken together, our results suggest that ApoE4 enhances Aβ inhibition of insulin-stimulated AMPA receptor function, which accelerates memory impairment in ApoE4xAPP mice. PMID:27189808

  6. ApoE4 expression accelerates hippocampus-dependent cognitive deficits by enhancing Aβ impairment of insulin signaling in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Chan, Elizabeth S; Shetty, Mahesh Shivarama; Sajikumar, Sreedharan; Chen, Christopher; Soong, Tuck Wah; Wong, Boon-Seng

    2016-05-18

    The apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) is the strongest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The AD brain was shown to be insulin resistant at end stage, but the interplay between insulin signaling, ApoE4 and Aβ across time, and their involvement in memory decline is unclear. To investigate insulin response in the ageing mouse hippocampus, we crossed the human ApoE-targeted replacement mice with the mutant human amyloid precursor protein (APP) mice (ApoExAPP). While hippocampal Aβ levels were comparable between ApoE3xAPP and ApoE4xAPP mice at 26 weeks, insulin response was impaired in the ApoE4xAPP hippocampus. Insulin treatment was only able to stimulate insulin signaling and increased AMPA-GluR1 phosphorylation in forskolin pre-treated hippocampal slices from ApoE3xAPP mice. In ApoE4xAPP mice, insulin dysfunction was also associated with poorer spatial memory performance. Using dissociated hippocampal neuron in vitro, we showed that insulin response in ApoE3 and ApoE4 neurons increased AMPA receptor-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (mEPSC) amplitudes and GluR1-subunit insertion. Pre-treatment of ApoE3 neurons with Aβ42 did not affect insulin-mediated GluR1 subunit insertion. However, impaired insulin sensitivity observed only in the presence of ApoE4 and Aβ42, attenuated GluR1-subunit insertion. Taken together, our results suggest that ApoE4 enhances Aβ inhibition of insulin-stimulated AMPA receptor function, which accelerates memory impairment in ApoE4xAPP mice.

  7. A Single Neonatal Injection of Ethinyl Estradiol Impairs Passive Avoidance Learning and Reduces Expression of Estrogen Receptor α in the Hippocampus and Cortex of Adult Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, Tatsuomi; Nakamura, Takahiro J.; Komine, Chiaki; Goto, Yoshikuni; Mizoguchi, Yasushi; Yoshida, Midori; Kondo, Yasuhiko; Kawaguchi, Maiko

    2016-01-01

    Although perinatal exposure of female rats to estrogenic compounds produces irreversible changes in brain function, it is still unclear how the amount and timing of exposure to those substances affect learning function, or if exposure alters estrogen receptor α (ERα) expression in the hippocampus and cortex. In adult female rats, we investigated the effects of neonatal exposure to a model estrogenic compound, ethinyl estradiol (EE), on passive avoidance learning and ERα expression. Female Wistar-Imamichi rats were subcutaneously injected with oil, 0.02 mg/kg EE, 2 mg/kg EE, or 20 mg/kg 17β-estradiol within 24 h after birth. All females were tested for passive avoidance learning at the age of 6 weeks. Neonatal 0.02 mg/kg EE administration significantly disrupted passive avoidance compared with oil treatment in gonadally intact females. In a second experiment, another set of experimental females, treated as described above, was ovariectomized under pentobarbital anesthesia at 10 weeks of age. At 15–17 weeks of age, half of each group received a subcutaneous injection of 5 μg estradiol benzoate a day before the passive avoidance learning test. Passive avoidance learning behavior was impaired by the 0.02 mg/kg EE dose, but notably only in the estradiol benzoate-injected group. At 17–19 weeks of age, hippocampal and cortical samples were collected from rats with or without the 5 μg estradiol benzoate injection, and western blots used to determine ERα expression. A significant decrease in ERα expression was observed in the hippocampus of the estradiol-injected, neonatal EE-treated females. The results demonstrated that exposure to EE immediately after birth decreased learning ability in adult female rats, and that this may be at least partly mediated by the decreased expression of ERα in the hippocampus. PMID:26741502

  8. A Single Neonatal Injection of Ethinyl Estradiol Impairs Passive Avoidance Learning and Reduces Expression of Estrogen Receptor α in the Hippocampus and Cortex of Adult Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Tatsuomi; Nakamura, Takahiro J; Komine, Chiaki; Goto, Yoshikuni; Mizoguchi, Yasushi; Yoshida, Midori; Kondo, Yasuhiko; Kawaguchi, Maiko

    2016-01-01

    Although perinatal exposure of female rats to estrogenic compounds produces irreversible changes in brain function, it is still unclear how the amount and timing of exposure to those substances affect learning function, or if exposure alters estrogen receptor α (ERα) expression in the hippocampus and cortex. In adult female rats, we investigated the effects of neonatal exposure to a model estrogenic compound, ethinyl estradiol (EE), on passive avoidance learning and ERα expression. Female Wistar-Imamichi rats were subcutaneously injected with oil, 0.02 mg/kg EE, 2 mg/kg EE, or 20 mg/kg 17β-estradiol within 24 h after birth. All females were tested for passive avoidance learning at the age of 6 weeks. Neonatal 0.02 mg/kg EE administration significantly disrupted passive avoidance compared with oil treatment in gonadally intact females. In a second experiment, another set of experimental females, treated as described above, was ovariectomized under pentobarbital anesthesia at 10 weeks of age. At 15-17 weeks of age, half of each group received a subcutaneous injection of 5 μg estradiol benzoate a day before the passive avoidance learning test. Passive avoidance learning behavior was impaired by the 0.02 mg/kg EE dose, but notably only in the estradiol benzoate-injected group. At 17-19 weeks of age, hippocampal and cortical samples were collected from rats with or without the 5 μg estradiol benzoate injection, and western blots used to determine ERα expression. A significant decrease in ERα expression was observed in the hippocampus of the estradiol-injected, neonatal EE-treated females. The results demonstrated that exposure to EE immediately after birth decreased learning ability in adult female rats, and that this may be at least partly mediated by the decreased expression of ERα in the hippocampus. PMID:26741502

  9. Early intervention with intranasal NPY prevents single prolonged stress-triggered impairments in hypothalamus and ventral hippocampus in male rats.

    PubMed

    Laukova, Marcela; Alaluf, Lishay G; Serova, Lidia I; Arango, Victoria; Sabban, Esther L

    2014-10-01

    Intranasal administration of neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a promising treatment strategy to reduce traumatic stress-induced neuropsychiatric symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We evaluated the potential of intranasal NPY to prevent dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, a core neuroendocrine feature of PTSD. Rats were exposed to single prolonged stress (SPS), a PTSD animal model, and infused intranasally with vehicle or NPY immediately after SPS stressors. After 7 days undisturbed, hypothalamus and hippocampus, 2 structures regulating the HPA axis activity, were examined for changes in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and CRH expression. Plasma ACTH and corticosterone, and hypothalamic CRH mRNA, were significantly higher in the vehicle but not NPY-treated group, compared with unstressed controls. Although total GR levels were not altered in hypothalamus, a significant decrease of GR phosphorylated on Ser232 and increased FK506-binding protein 5 mRNA were observed with the vehicle but not in animals infused with intranasal NPY. In contrast, in the ventral hippocampus, only vehicle-treated animals demonstrated elevated GR protein expression and increased GR phosphorylation on Ser232, specifically in the nuclear fraction. Additionally, SPS-induced increase of CRH mRNA in the ventral hippocampus was accompanied by apparent decrease of CRH peptide particularly in the CA3 subfield, both prevented by NPY. The results show that early intervention with intranasal NPY can prevent traumatic stress-triggered dysregulation of the HPA axis likely by restoring HPA axis proper negative feedback inhibition via GR. Thus, intranasal NPY has a potential as a noninvasive therapy to prevent negative effects of traumatic stress.

  10. PTU-induced hypothyroidism in rats leads to several early neuropathological signs of Alzheimer's disease in the hippocampus and spatial memory impairments.

    PubMed

    Chaalal, Amina; Poirier, Roseline; Blum, David; Gillet, Brigitte; Le Blanc, Pascale; Basquin, Marie; Buée, Luc; Laroche, Serge; Enderlin, Valérie

    2014-11-01

    The multifactorial causes impacting the risk of developing sporadic forms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) remain to date poorly understood. Epidemiologic studies in humans and research in rodents have suggested that hypothyroidism could participate in the etiology of AD. Recently, we reported that adult-onset hypothyroidism in rats favors β-amyloid peptide production in the hippocampus. Here, using the same hypothyroidism model with the antithyroid molecule propythiouracyl (PTU), we further explored AD-related features, dysfunctional cell-signaling mechanisms and hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. In vivo MRI revealed a progressive decrease in cerebral volume of PTU-treated rats. In the hippocampus, hypothyroidism resulted in tau hyperphosphorylation and increases in several proinflammatory cytokines. These modifications were associated with impaired spatial memory and reduced hippocampal expression of signaling molecules important for synaptic plasticity and memory, including neurogranin, CaMKII, ERK, GSK3β, CREB, and expression of the transcription factor EGR1/Zif268. These data strengthen the idea that hypothyroidism represents an important factor influencing the risk of developing sporadic forms of AD.

  11. Performance of Hippocampus Volumetry with FSL-FIRST for Prediction of Alzheimer's Disease Dementia in at Risk Subjects with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Suppa, Per; Hampel, Harald; Kepp, Timo; Lange, Catharina; Spies, Lothar; Fiebach, Jochen B; Dubois, Bruno; Buchert, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    MRI-based hippocampus volume, a core feasible biomarker of Alzheimer's disease (AD), is not yet widely used in clinical patient care, partly due to lack of validation of software tools for hippocampal volumetry that are compatible with routine workflow. Here, we evaluate fully-automated and computationally efficient hippocampal volumetry with FSL-FIRST for prediction of AD dementia (ADD) in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) from phase 1 of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Receiver operating characteristic analysis of FSL-FIRST hippocampal volume (corrected for head size and age) revealed an area under the curve of 0.79, 0.70, and 0.70 for prediction of aMCI-to-ADD conversion within 12, 24, or 36 months, respectively. Thus, FSL-FIRST provides about the same power for prediction of progression to ADD in aMCI as other volumetry methods.

  12. Music application alleviates short-term memory impairments through increasing cell proliferation in the hippocampus of valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Min; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Choi, Hyun-Hee

    2016-06-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder and this disorder shows impairment in reciprocal social interactions, deficits in communication, and restrictive and repetitive patterns of behaviors and interests. The effect of music on short-term memory in the view of cell proliferation in the hippocampus was evaluated using valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups. Animal model of autism was made by subcutaneous injection of 400-mg/kg valproic acid into the rat pups on the postnatal day 14. The rat pups in the music-applied groups were exposed to the 65-dB comfortable classic music for 1 hr once a day, starting postnatal day 15 and continued until postnatal day 28. In the present results, short-term memory was deteriorated by autism induction. The numbers of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyridine (BrdU)-positive, Ki-67-positive, and doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were decreased by autism induction. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) expressions in the hippocampus were also suppressed in the autistic rat pups. Music application alleviated short-term memory deficits with enhancing the numbers of BrdU-positive, Ki-67-positive, and DCX-positive cells in the autistic rat pups. Music application also enhanced BDNF and TrkB expressions in the autistic rat pups. The present study show that application of music enhanced hippocampal cell proliferation and alleviated short-term memory impairment through stimulating BDNF-TrkB signaling in the autistic rat pups. Music can be suggested as the therapeutic strategy to overcome the autism-induced memory deficits. PMID:27419108

  13. Music application alleviates short-term memory impairments through increasing cell proliferation in the hippocampus of valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Min; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Choi, Hyun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder and this disorder shows impairment in reciprocal social interactions, deficits in communication, and restrictive and repetitive patterns of behaviors and interests. The effect of music on short-term memory in the view of cell proliferation in the hippocampus was evaluated using valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups. Animal model of autism was made by subcutaneous injection of 400-mg/kg valproic acid into the rat pups on the postnatal day 14. The rat pups in the music-applied groups were exposed to the 65-dB comfortable classic music for 1 hr once a day, starting postnatal day 15 and continued until postnatal day 28. In the present results, short-term memory was deteriorated by autism induction. The numbers of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyridine (BrdU)-positive, Ki-67-positive, and doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were decreased by autism induction. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) expressions in the hippocampus were also suppressed in the autistic rat pups. Music application alleviated short-term memory deficits with enhancing the numbers of BrdU-positive, Ki-67-positive, and DCX-positive cells in the autistic rat pups. Music application also enhanced BDNF and TrkB expressions in the autistic rat pups. The present study show that application of music enhanced hippocampal cell proliferation and alleviated short-term memory impairment through stimulating BDNF-TrkB signaling in the autistic rat pups. Music can be suggested as the therapeutic strategy to overcome the autism-induced memory deficits. PMID:27419108

  14. Music application alleviates short-term memory impairments through increasing cell proliferation in the hippocampus of valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Min; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Choi, Hyun-Hee

    2016-06-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder and this disorder shows impairment in reciprocal social interactions, deficits in communication, and restrictive and repetitive patterns of behaviors and interests. The effect of music on short-term memory in the view of cell proliferation in the hippocampus was evaluated using valproic acid-induced autistic rat pups. Animal model of autism was made by subcutaneous injection of 400-mg/kg valproic acid into the rat pups on the postnatal day 14. The rat pups in the music-applied groups were exposed to the 65-dB comfortable classic music for 1 hr once a day, starting postnatal day 15 and continued until postnatal day 28. In the present results, short-term memory was deteriorated by autism induction. The numbers of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyridine (BrdU)-positive, Ki-67-positive, and doublecortin (DCX)-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus were decreased by autism induction. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) expressions in the hippocampus were also suppressed in the autistic rat pups. Music application alleviated short-term memory deficits with enhancing the numbers of BrdU-positive, Ki-67-positive, and DCX-positive cells in the autistic rat pups. Music application also enhanced BDNF and TrkB expressions in the autistic rat pups. The present study show that application of music enhanced hippocampal cell proliferation and alleviated short-term memory impairment through stimulating BDNF-TrkB signaling in the autistic rat pups. Music can be suggested as the therapeutic strategy to overcome the autism-induced memory deficits.

  15. GESTATIONAL AND LACTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO PROPYLTHIOURACIL INDUCES HYPOTHYROIDISM AND IMPAIRS SYNAPTIC TRANSMISSION AND PLASTICITY IN AREA CA1 OF HIPPOCAMPUS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although severe developmental hypothyroidism leads to stunted growth, alterations in hippocampal structure, and impaired performance on a variety of behavioral learning tasks, the impact of milder forms of hypothyroidism has not been adequately assessed. Preliminary reports of ...

  16. Reduction in NPY-positive neurons and dysregulation of excitability in young senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) hippocampus precede the onset of cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Sawano, Erika; Iwatani, Kanako; Tominaga-Yoshino, Keiko; Ogura, Akihiko; Tashiro, Tomoko

    2015-10-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) strain is considered a neurodegeneration model showing age-related cognitive deficits with little physical impairment. Young SAMP8 mice, however, exhibit signs of disturbances in development such as marked hyperactivity and reduced anxiety well before the onset of cognitive impairment. As the key enzyme in local regulation of thyroid hormone (TH) signaling, type 2 deiodinase, was significantly reduced in the SAMP8 hippocampus relative to that of the normally aging SAM-resistant 1 (SAMR1), we used these two strains to compare the development of the hippocampal GABAergic system, which is known to be strongly affected by hypothyroidism. Among GABAergic components, neuronal K+ /Cl- co-transporter 2 was down-regulated in SAMP8 transiently at 2 weeks. Although distribution of total GABAergic neurons was similar in both strains, 22-30% reduction was observed in the neuropeptide Y (NPY)-positive subpopulation of GABAergic neurons in SAMP8. Electrophysiological studies on hippocampal slices obtained at 4 weeks revealed that epileptiform activity, induced by high-frequency stimulation, lasted four times longer in SAMP8 compared with SAMR1, indicating a dysregulation of excitability that may be linked to the behavioral abnormalities of young SAMP8 and to neurodegeneration later on in life. Local attenuation of TH signaling may thus impact the normal development of the GABAergic system. PMID:26250996

  17. Postnatal treadmill exercise alleviates short-term memory impairment by enhancing cell proliferation and suppressing apoptosis in the hippocampus of rat pups born to diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Hoon; Sung, Yun-Hee; Lee, Hee-Hyuk; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Sung-Eun; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Bo-Kyun

    2014-08-01

    During pregnancy, diabetes mellitus exerts detrimental effects on the development of the fetus, especially the central nervous system. In the current study, we evaluated the effects of postnatal treadmill exercise on short-term memory in relation with cell proliferation and apoptosis in the hippocampus of rat pups born to streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic maternal rats. Adult female rats were mated with male rats for 24 h. Two weeks after mating, the pregnant female rats were divided into two groups: control group and STZ injection group. The pregnant rats in the STZ injection group were administered 40 mg/kg of STZ intraperitoneally. After birth, the rat pups were divided into the following four groups: control group, control with postnatal exercise group, maternal STZ-injection group, and maternal STZ-injection with postnatal exercise group. The rat pups in the postnatal exercise groups were made to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day, 5 times per week for 2 weeks beginning 4 weeks after birth. The rat pups born to diabetic rats were shown to have short-term memory impairment with suppressed cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Postnatal treadmill exercise alleviated short-term memory impairment by increased cell proliferation and suppressed apoptosis in the rat pups born to diabetic rats. These findings indicate that postnatal treadmill exercise may be used as a valuable strategy to ameliorate neurodevelopmental problems in children born to diabetics.

  18. Lithium chloride administration prevents spatial learning and memory impairment in repeated cerebral ischemia-reperfusion mice by depressing apoptosis and increasing BDNF expression in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Fan, Mingyue; Jin, Wei; Zhao, Haifeng; Xiao, Yining; Jia, Yanqiu; Yin, Yu; Jiang, Xin; Xu, Jing; Meng, Nan; Lv, Peiyuan

    2015-09-15

    Lithium has been reported to have neuroprotective effects, but the preventive and treated role on cognition impairment and the underlying mechanisms have not been determined. In the present study, C57Bl/6 mice were subjected to repeated bilateral common carotid artery occlusion to induce the learning and memory deficits. 2 mmol/kg or 5 mmol/kg of lithium chloride (LiCl) was injected intraperitoneally per day before (for 7 days) or post (for 28 days) the operation. This repeated cerebral ischemia-reperfusion (IR) induced dynamic overexpression of ratio of Bcl-2/Bax and BDNF in hippocampus of mice. LiCl pretreatment and treatment significantly decreased the escape latency and increased the percentage of time that the mice spent in the target quadrant in Morris water maze. 2 mmol/kg LiCl evidently reversed the morphologic changes, up-regulated the survival neuron count and increased the BDNF gene and protein expression. 5 mmol/kg pre-LiCl significantly increased IR-stimulated reduce of Bcl-2/Bax and p-CREB/CREB. These results described suggest that pre-Li and Li treatment may induce a pronounced prevention on cognitive impairment. These effects may relay on the inhibition of apoptosis and increasing BDNF and p-CREB expression.

  19. Rescue of Cyclic AMP Mediated Long Term Potentiation Impairment in the Hippocampus of Mecp2 Knockout (Mecp2-/y) Mice by Rolipram

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Saju; Niebert, Marcus; Richter, Diethelm W.

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) patients experience learning difficulties and memory loss. Analogous deficits of hippocampal plasticity are reported in mouse models of RTT. To elucidate the underlying pathophysiology, we studied long term potentiation (LTP) at the CA3 to CA1 synapses in the hippocampus in acute brain slices from WT and Mecp2-/y mice, by either activating cAMP dependent pathway or using high frequency stimulation, by means of patch clamp. We have observed that, the NMDA channel current characteristics remain unchanged in the Mecp2-/y mice. The adenylyl cyclase (AC) agonist forskolin evoked a long lasting potentiation of evoked EPSCs in WT CA1 neurons, but only minimally enhanced the EPSCs in the Mecp2-/y mice. This weaker potentiation in Mecp2-/y mice was ameliorated by application of phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor rolipram. The hyperpolarization activated cyclic nucleotide gated channel current (Ih) was potentiated to similar extent by forskolin in both phenotypes. Multiple tetanus induced cAMP-dependent plasticity was also impaired in the Mecp2-/y mice, and was also partially rescued by rolipram. Western blot analysis of CA region of Mecp2-/y mice hippocampus revealed more than twofold up-regulation of protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunits, while the expression of the catalytic subunit remained unchanged. We hypothesize that the overexpressed PKA regulatory subunits buffer cAMP and restrict the PKA mediated phosphorylation of target proteins necessary for LTP. Blocking the degradation of cAMP, thereby saturating the regulatory subunits alleviated this defect. PMID:26869885

  20. Oxaloacetate restores the long-term potentiation impaired in rat hippocampus CA1 region by 2-vessel occlusion.

    PubMed

    Marosi, Máté; Fuzik, János; Nagy, Dávid; Rákos, Gabriella; Kis, Zsolt; Vécsei, László; Toldi, József; Ruban-Matuzani, Angela; Teichberg, Vivian I; Farkas, Tamás

    2009-02-14

    Various acute brain pathological conditions are characterized by the presence of elevated glutamate concentrations in the brain interstitial fluids. It has been established that a decrease in the blood glutamate level enhances the brain-to-blood efflux of glutamate, removal of which from the brain may prevent glutamate excitotoxicity and its contribution to the long-lasting neurological deficits seen in stroke. A decrease in blood glutamate level can be achieved by exploiting the glutamate-scavenging properties of the blood-resident enzyme glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase, which transforms glutamate into 2-ketoglutarate in the presence of the glutamate co-substrate oxaloacetate. The present study had the aim of an evaluation of the effects of the blood glutamate scavenger oxaloacetate on the impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) induced in the 2-vessel occlusion ischaemic model in rat. Transient (30-min) incomplete forebrain ischaemia was produced 72 h before LTP induction. Although the short transient brain hypoperfusion did not induce histologically identifiable injuries in the CA1 region (Fluoro-Jade B, S-100 and cresyl violet), it resulted in an impaired LTP function in the hippocampal CA1 region without damaging the basal synaptic transmission between the Schaffer collaterals and the pyramidal neurons. This impairment could be fended off in a dose-dependent manner by the intravenous administration of oxaloacetate in saline (at doses between 1.5 mmol and 0.1 mumol) immediately after the transient hypoperfusion. Our results suggest that oxaloacetate-mediated blood and brain glutamate scavenging contributes to the restoration of the LTP after its impairment by brain ischaemia.

  1. Acupuncture ameliorates cognitive impairment and hippocampus neuronal loss in experimental vascular dementia through Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Rui; Shi, Guang-Xia; Yang, Jing-Wen; Yan, Chao-Qun; Lin, Li-Ting; Du, Si-Qi; Zhu, Wen; He, Tian; Zeng, Xiang-Hong; Xu, Qian; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2015-12-01

    Emerging evidence suggests acupuncture could exert neuroprotection in the vascular dementia via anti-oxidative effects. However, the involvement of Nrf2, a master regulator of antioxidant defense, in acupuncture-induced neuroprotection in vascular dementia remains undetermined. The goal of our study was to investigate the contribution of Nrf2 in acupuncture and its effects on vascular dementia. Morris water maze and Nissl staining were used to assess the effect of acupuncture on cognitive function and hippocampal neurodegeneration in experimental vascular dementia. The distribution of Nrf2 in neurons in hippocampus, the protein expression of Nrf2 in both cytosol and nucleus, and the protein and mRNA levels of its downstream target genes NQO1 and HO-1 were detected by double immunofluorescent staining, Western blotting and realtime PCR analysis respectively. Cognitive function and microglia activation were measured in both wild-type and Nrf2 gene knockout mice after acupuncture treatment. We found that acupuncture could remarkably reverse the cognitive deficits, neuron cell loss, reactive oxygen species production, and decreased cerebral blood flow. It was notable that acupuncture enhanced nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in neurons and up-regulate the protein and mRNA levels of Nrf2 and its target genes HO-1 and NQO1. Moreover, acupuncture could significantly down-regulated the over-activation of microglia after common carotid artery occlusion surgery. However, the reversed cognitive deficits, neuron cell loss and microglia activation by acupuncture were abolished in Nrf2 gene knockout mice. In conclusion, these findings provide evidence that the neuroprotection of acupuncture in models of vascular dementia was via the Nrf2 activation and Nrf2-dependent microglia activation. PMID:26546103

  2. Propofol Mitigates Learning and Memory Impairment After Electroconvulsive Shock in Depressed Rats by Inhibiting Autophagy in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Hao, Xue-chao; Luo, Jie; Lv, Feng; Wei, Ke; Min, Su

    2016-01-01

    Background The present study explored the effects of propofol on hippocampal autophagy and synaptophysin in depression-model rats undergoing electroconvulsive shock (ECS). Material/Methods The rat depression model was established by exposing Sprague-Dawley rats to stress for 28 consecutive days. Forty rats were assigned randomly into the depression group (group D; no treatment), the ECS group (group E), the propofol group (group P), and the propofol + ECS group (group PE). Open field tests and sucrose preference tests were applied to evaluate the depression behavior; and Morris water maze tests were used to assess the learning and memory function of the rats. Western blotting was used to detect the expression of Beclin-1 and LC3-II/I; and ELISA was applied to assess the expression of synaptophysin. Results Rats in group E and group PE scored higher in the open field and sucrose preference tests compared with those in group D. Furthermore, rats in group E also had a longer escape latency, a shorter space exploration time, and increased expression of Beclin-1, LC3-II/I, and synaptophysin. Compared with group E, rats in group PE possessed a shorter escape latency, a longer space exploration time, reduced expression of Beclin-1, LC3-II/I, and synaptophysin. Conclusions Propofol could inhibit excessive ECS-induced autophagy and synaptophysin overexpression in the hippocampus, thus protecting the learning and memory functions in depressed rats after ECS. The inhibitory effects of propofol on the overexpression of synaptophysin may result from its inhibitory effects on the excessive induction of autophagy. PMID:27203836

  3. Propofol Mitigates Learning and Memory Impairment After Electroconvulsive Shock in Depressed Rats by Inhibiting Autophagy in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Hao, Xue-Chao; Luo, Jie; Lv, Feng; Wei, Ke; Min, Su

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The present study explored the effects of propofol on hippocampal autophagy and synaptophysin in depression-model rats undergoing electroconvulsive shock (ECS). MATERIAL AND METHODS The rat depression model was established by exposing Sprague-Dawley rats to stress for 28 consecutive days. Forty rats were assigned randomly into the depression group (group D; no treatment), the ECS group (group E), the propofol group (group P), and the propofol + ECS group (group PE). Open field tests and sucrose preference tests were applied to evaluate the depression behavior; and Morris water maze tests were used to assess the learning and memory function of the rats. Western blotting was used to detect the expression of Beclin-1 and LC3-II/I; and ELISA was applied to assess the expression of synaptophysin. RESULTS Rats in group E and group PE scored higher in the open field and sucrose preference tests compared with those in group D. Furthermore, rats in group E also had a longer escape latency, a shorter space exploration time, and increased expression of Beclin-1, LC3-II/I, and synaptophysin. Compared with group E, rats in group PE possessed a shorter escape latency, a longer space exploration time, reduced expression of Beclin-1, LC3-II/I, and synaptophysin. CONCLUSIONS Propofol could inhibit excessive ECS-induced autophagy and synaptophysin overexpression in the hippocampus, thus protecting the learning and memory functions in depressed rats after ECS. The inhibitory effects of propofol on the overexpression of synaptophysin may result from its inhibitory effects on the excessive induction of autophagy. PMID:27203836

  4. Impairment of object recognition memory by maternal bisphenol A exposure is associated with inhibition of Akt and ERK/CREB/BDNF pathway in the male offspring hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Li, Zhihui; Han, Haijun; Luo, Guangying; Zhou, Bingrui; Wang, Shaolin; Wang, Jundong

    2016-02-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a commonly used endocrine-disrupting chemical used as a component of polycarbonates plastics that has potential adverse effects on human health. Exposure to BPA during development has been implicated in memory deficits, but the mechanism of action underlying the effect is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of maternal exposure to BPA on object recognition memory and the expressions of proteins important for memory, especially focusing on the ERK/CREB/BDNF pathway. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley female rats were orally treated with either vehicle or BPA (0.05, 0.5, 5 or 50 mg/kg BW/day) during days 9-20 of gestation. Male offspring were tested on postnatal day 21 with the object recognition task. Recognition memory was assessed using the object recognition index (index=the time spent exploring the novel object/(the time spent exploring the novel object+the time spent exploring the familiar object)). In the test session performed 90 min after the training session, BPA-exposed male offspring not only spent more time in exploring the familiar object at the highest dose than the control, but also displayed a significantly decreased the object recognition index at the doses of 0.5, 5 and 50 mg/kg BW/day. During the test session performed 24h after the training session, BPA-treated males did not change the time spent exploring the familiar object, but had a decreased object recognition index at 5 and 50 mg/kg BW/day, when compared to control group. These findings indicate that object recognition memory was susceptible to maternal BPA exposure. Western blot analysis of hippocampi from BPA-treated male offspring revealed a decrease in Akt, phospho-Akt, p44/42 MAPK and phospho-p44/42 MAPK protein levels, compared to controls. In addition, BPA significantly inhibited the levels of phosphorylation of CREB and BDNF in the hippocampus. Our results show that maternal BPA exposure may full impair object recognition memory, and that

  5. Impairment of object recognition memory by maternal bisphenol A exposure is associated with inhibition of Akt and ERK/CREB/BDNF pathway in the male offspring hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Li, Zhihui; Han, Haijun; Luo, Guangying; Zhou, Bingrui; Wang, Shaolin; Wang, Jundong

    2016-02-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a commonly used endocrine-disrupting chemical used as a component of polycarbonates plastics that has potential adverse effects on human health. Exposure to BPA during development has been implicated in memory deficits, but the mechanism of action underlying the effect is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of maternal exposure to BPA on object recognition memory and the expressions of proteins important for memory, especially focusing on the ERK/CREB/BDNF pathway. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley female rats were orally treated with either vehicle or BPA (0.05, 0.5, 5 or 50 mg/kg BW/day) during days 9-20 of gestation. Male offspring were tested on postnatal day 21 with the object recognition task. Recognition memory was assessed using the object recognition index (index=the time spent exploring the novel object/(the time spent exploring the novel object+the time spent exploring the familiar object)). In the test session performed 90 min after the training session, BPA-exposed male offspring not only spent more time in exploring the familiar object at the highest dose than the control, but also displayed a significantly decreased the object recognition index at the doses of 0.5, 5 and 50 mg/kg BW/day. During the test session performed 24h after the training session, BPA-treated males did not change the time spent exploring the familiar object, but had a decreased object recognition index at 5 and 50 mg/kg BW/day, when compared to control group. These findings indicate that object recognition memory was susceptible to maternal BPA exposure. Western blot analysis of hippocampi from BPA-treated male offspring revealed a decrease in Akt, phospho-Akt, p44/42 MAPK and phospho-p44/42 MAPK protein levels, compared to controls. In addition, BPA significantly inhibited the levels of phosphorylation of CREB and BDNF in the hippocampus. Our results show that maternal BPA exposure may full impair object recognition memory, and that

  6. Goal-oriented searching mediated by ventral hippocampus early in trial-and-error learning.

    PubMed

    Ruediger, Sarah; Spirig, Dominique; Donato, Flavio; Caroni, Pico

    2012-11-01

    Most behavioral learning in biology is trial and error, but how these learning processes are influenced by individual brain systems is poorly understood. Here we show that ventral-to-dorsal hippocampal subdivisions have specific and sequential functions in trial-and-error maze navigation, with ventral hippocampus (vH) mediating early task-specific goal-oriented searching. Although performance and strategy deployment progressed continuously at the population level, individual mice showed discrete learning phases, each characterized by particular search habits. Transitions in learning phases reflected feedforward inhibitory connectivity (FFI) growth occurring sequentially in ventral, then intermediate, then dorsal hippocampal subdivisions. FFI growth at vH occurred abruptly upon behavioral learning of goal-task relationships. vH lesions or the absence of vH FFI growth delayed early learning and disrupted performance consistency. Intermediate hippocampus lesions impaired intermediate place learning, whereas dorsal hippocampus lesions specifically disrupted late spatial learning. Trial-and-error navigational learning processes in naive mice thus involve a stereotype sequence of increasingly precise subtasks learned through distinct hippocampal subdivisions. Because of its unique connectivity, vH may relate specific goals to internal states in learning under healthy and pathological conditions.

  7. Caspase-6 activity in the CA1 region of the hippocampus induces age-dependent memory impairment

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, A C; Ramcharitar, J; Afonso, V; Hamel, E; Bennett, D A; Pakavathkumar, P; Albrecht, S

    2014-01-01

    Active Caspase-6 is abundant in the neuropil threads, neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles of Alzheimer disease brains. However, its contribution to the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease is unclear. Here, we show that higher levels of Caspase-6 activity in the CA1 region of aged human hippocampi correlate with lower cognitive performance. To determine whether Caspase-6 activity, in the absence of plaques and tangles, is sufficient to cause memory deficits, we generated a transgenic knock-in mouse that expresses a self-activated form of human Caspase-6 in the CA1. This Caspase-6 mouse develops age-dependent spatial and episodic memory impairment. Caspase-6 induces neuronal degeneration and inflammation. We conclude that Caspase-6 activation in mouse CA1 neurons is sufficient to induce neuronal degeneration and age-dependent memory impairment. These results indicate that Caspase-6 activity in CA1 could be responsible for the lower cognitive performance of aged humans. Consequently, preventing or inhibiting Caspase-6 activity in the aged may provide an efficient novel therapeutic approach against Alzheimer disease. PMID:24413155

  8. A Novel Selective Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtype 1 Antagonist Reduces Seizures without Impairing Hippocampus-Dependent LearningS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sheffler, Douglas J.; Williams, Richard; Bridges, Thomas M.; Xiang, Zixiu; Kane, Alexander S.; Byun, Nellie E.; Jadhav, Satyawan; Mock, Mathew M.; Zheng, Fang; Lewis, L. Michelle; Jones, Carrie K.; Niswender, Colleen M.; Weaver, Charles D.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that selective antagonists of specific subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) may provide a novel approach for the treatment of certain central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including epileptic disorders, Parkinson's disease, and dystonia. Unfortunately, previously reported antagonists are not highly selective for specific mAChR subtypes, making it difficult to definitively establish the functional roles and therapeutic potential for individual subtypes of this receptor subfamily. The M1 mAChR is of particular interest as a potential target for treatment of CNS disorders. We now report the discovery of a novel selective antagonist of M1 mAChRs, termed VU0255035 [N-(3-oxo-3-(4-(pyridine-4-yl)piperazin-1-yl)propyl)-benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole-4 sulfonamide]. Equilibrium radioligand binding and functional studies demonstrate a greater than 75-fold selectivity of VU0255035 for M1 mAChRs relative to M2-M5. Molecular pharmacology and mutagenesis studies indicate that VU0255035 is a competitive orthosteric antagonist of M1 mAChRs, a surprising finding given the high level of M1 mAChR selectivity relative to other orthosteric antagonists. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings demonstrate that VU0255035 inhibits potentiation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor currents by the muscarinic agonist carbachol in hippocampal pyramidal cells. VU0255035 has excellent brain penetration in vivo and is efficacious in reducing pilocarpine-induced seizures in mice. We were surprised to find that doses of VU0255035 that reduce pilocarpine-induced seizures do not induce deficits in contextual freezing, a measure of hippocampus-dependent learning that is disrupted by nonselective mAChR antagonists. Taken together, these data suggest that selective antagonists of M1 mAChRs do not induce the severe cognitive deficits seen with nonselective mAChR antagonists and could provide a novel approach for the treatment certain of CNS disorders. PMID:19407080

  9. Regular Exercise Prevents Sleep Deprivation Associated Impairment of Long-Term Memory and Synaptic Plasticity in The CA1 Area of the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Zagaar, Munder; Dao, An; Levine, Amber; Alhaider, Ibrahim; Alkadhi, Karim

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: The present study aimed to investigate the effects of treadmill exercise on sleep deprivation (S-D)-induced impairment of hippocampal dependent long-term memory, late phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) and its signaling cascade in the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) area. Experimental Design: Animals were conditioned to run on treadmills for 4 weeks then deprived of sleep for 24 h using the columns-in-water method. We tested the effect of exercise and/or S-D on behavioral performance using a post-learning paradigm in the radial arm water maze (RAWM) and in vivo extracellular recording in the CA1 area. The levels of L-LTP-related molecules in the CA1 area were then assessed both before and after L-LTP induction. Measurements and Results: After 24 h of S-D, spatial long-term memory impairment in the RAWM and L-LTP suppression was prevented by 4 weeks of regular exercise. Regular exercise also restored the S-D-associated decreases in the basal levels of key signaling molecules such as: calcium/calmodulin kinase IV (CaMKIV), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/ERK), phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (P-CREB) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), in the CA1 area. After L-LTP induction, regular exercise also prevented the S-D-induced down regulation of BDNF and P-CREB protein levels. Conclusions: The results suggest that our exercise protocol may prevent 24-h S-D-induced impairments in long-term memory and LTP by preventing deleterious changes in the basal and post-stimulation levels of P-CREB and BDNF associated with S-D. Citation: Zagaar M; Dao A; Levine A; Alhaider I; Alkadhi K. Regular exercise prevents sleep deprivation associated impairment of long-term memory and synaptic plasticity in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. SLEEP 2013;36(5):751-761. PMID:23633758

  10. Attenuation of 1-(m-chlorophenyl)-biguanide induced hippocampus-dependent memory impairment by a standardised extract of Bacopa monniera (BESEB CDRI-08).

    PubMed

    Rajan, Koilmani Emmanuvel; Singh, Hemant K; Parkavi, Arunagiri; Charles, Prisila Dulcy

    2011-11-01

    Bacopa monniera is a well-known medhya-rasayana (memory enhancing and rejuvenating) plant in Indian traditional medical system of Ayurveda. The effect of a standardized extract of Bacopa monniera (BESEB CDRI-08) on serotonergic receptors and its influence on other neurotransmitters during hippocampal-dependent learning was evaluated in the present study. Wistar rat pups received a single dose of BESEB CDRI-08 during postnatal days 15-29 showed higher latency during hippocampal-dependent learning accompanied with enhanced 5HT(3A) receptor expression, serotonin and acetylcholine levels in hippocampus. Furthermore, 5HT(3A) receptor agonist 1-(m-chlorophenyl)-biguanide (mCPBG) impaired learning in the passive avoidance task followed by reduction of 5HT(3A) receptor expression, 5HT and ACh levels. Administration of BESEB CDRI-08 along with mCPBG attenuated mCPBG induced behavioral, molecular and neurochemical alterations. Our results suggest that BESEB CDRI-08 possibly acts on serotonergic system, which in turn influences the cholinergic system through 5-HT(3) receptor to improve the hippocampal-dependent task.

  11. Impairment of GABA release in the hippocampus at the time of the first spontaneous seizure in the pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Soukupová, Marie; Binaschi, Anna; Falcicchia, Chiara; Zucchini, Silvia; Roncon, Paolo; Palma, Eleonora; Magri, Eros; Grandi, Enrico; Simonato, Michele

    2014-07-01

    The alterations in GABA release have not yet been systematically measured along the natural course of temporal lobe epilepsy. In this work, we analyzed GABA extracellular concentrations (using in vivo microdialysis under basal and high K(+)-evoked conditions) and loss of two GABA interneuron populations (parvalbumin and somatostatin neurons) in the ventral hippocampus at different time-points after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in the rat, i.e. during development and progression of epilepsy. We found that (i) during the latent period between the epileptogenic insult, status epilepticus, and the first spontaneous seizure, basal GABA outflow was reduced to about one third of control values while the number of parvalbumin-positive cells was reduced by about 50% and that of somatostatin-positive cells by about 25%; nonetheless, high K(+) stimulation increased extracellular GABA in a proportionally greater manner during latency than under control conditions; (ii) at the time of the first spontaneous seizure (i.e., when the diagnosis of epilepsy is made in humans) this increased responsiveness to stimulation disappeared, i.e. there was no longer any compensation for GABA cell loss; (iii) thereafter, this dysfunction remained constant until a late phase of the disease. These data suggest that a GABAergic hyper-responsiveness can compensate for GABA cell loss and protect from occurrence of seizures during latency, whereas impaired extracellular GABA levels can favor the occurrence of spontaneous recurrent seizures and the maintenance of an epileptic state.

  12. ANI inactivation: unconditioned anxiolytic effects of anisomycin in the ventral hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Anastasia; Ward-Flanagan, Rachel; Dickson, Clayton T; Treit, Dallas

    2014-11-01

    Although hippocampal function is typically described in terms of memory, recent evidence suggests a differentiation along its dorsal/ventral axis, with dorsal regions serving memory and ventral regions serving emotion. While long-term memory is thought to be dependent on de novo protein synthesis because it is blocked by translational inhibitors such as anisomycin (ANI), online (moment-to-moment) functions of the hippocampus (such as unconditioned emotional responding) should not be sensitive to such manipulations since they are unlikely to involve neuroplasticity. However, ANI has recently been shown to suppress neural activity which suggests (1) that protein synthesis is critical for neural function and (2) that paradigms using ANI are confounded by its inactivating effects. We tested this idea using a neurobehavioral assay which compared the influence of intrahippocampal infusions of ANI at dorsal and ventral sites on unconditioned emotional behavior of rats. We show that ANI infusions in ventral, but not dorsal, hippocampus produced a suppression of anxiety-related responses in two well-established rodent tests: the elevated plus maze and shock-probe burying tests. These results are similar to those previously observed when ventral hippocampal activity is directly suppressed (e.g., by using sodium channel blockers). The present study offers compelling behavioral evidence for the proposal that ANI adversely affects ongoing neural function and therefore its influence is not simply limited to impairing the consolidation of long-term memories

  13. ANI inactivation: unconditioned anxiolytic effects of anisomycin in the ventral hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Anastasia; Ward-Flanagan, Rachel; Dickson, Clayton T; Treit, Dallas

    2014-11-01

    Although hippocampal function is typically described in terms of memory, recent evidence suggests a differentiation along its dorsal/ventral axis, with dorsal regions serving memory and ventral regions serving emotion. While long-term memory is thought to be dependent on de novo protein synthesis because it is blocked by translational inhibitors such as anisomycin (ANI), online (moment-to-moment) functions of the hippocampus (such as unconditioned emotional responding) should not be sensitive to such manipulations since they are unlikely to involve neuroplasticity. However, ANI has recently been shown to suppress neural activity which suggests (1) that protein synthesis is critical for neural function and (2) that paradigms using ANI are confounded by its inactivating effects. We tested this idea using a neurobehavioral assay which compared the influence of intrahippocampal infusions of ANI at dorsal and ventral sites on unconditioned emotional behavior of rats. We show that ANI infusions in ventral, but not dorsal, hippocampus produced a suppression of anxiety-related responses in two well-established rodent tests: the elevated plus maze and shock-probe burying tests. These results are similar to those previously observed when ventral hippocampal activity is directly suppressed (e.g., by using sodium channel blockers). The present study offers compelling behavioral evidence for the proposal that ANI adversely affects ongoing neural function and therefore its influence is not simply limited to impairing the consolidation of long-term memories PMID:24910137

  14. Sustained Dorsal Hippocampal Activity is Not Obligatory for Either the Maintenance or Retrieval of Long-Term Spatial Memory

    PubMed Central

    Broadbent, Nicola J.; Squire, Larry R.; Clark, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Memories are initially stored in a labile state and are subject to modification by a variety of treatments, including disruption of hippocampal function. We infused a sodium channel blocker (or CNQX) to inactivate the rat dorsal hippocampus reversibly for 1 week following training on a task of spatial memory (the water maze). Previous work with conventional lesions has established that the dorsal hippocampus is essential for both the acquisition and expression of memory in this task. The question in the present study was whether chronic disruption of neuronal activity in the dorsal hippocampus after training would abolish memory or whether memory would survive extended disruption of hippocampal activity. As expected from earlier work, we found that performance was impaired during the infusion period. The critical test occurred 1 week after the lesion was reversed. We found that retention of the water maze recovered to control levels. Accordingly, sustained hippocampal activity following training is not obligatory for either the maintenance of long-term spatial memory or its subsequent retrieval. PMID:19921702

  15. {gamma}-aminobutyric acid{sub A} (GABA{sub A}) receptor regulates ERK1/2 phosphorylation in rat hippocampus in high doses of Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE)-induced impairment of spatial memory

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng Gang; Zhang Wenbin; Zhang Yun; Chen Yaoming; Liu Mingchao; Yao Ting; Yang Yanxia; Zhao Fang; Li Jingxia; Huang Chuanshu; Luo Wenjing Chen Jingyuan

    2009-04-15

    Experimental and occupational exposure to Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) has been reported to induce neurotoxicological and neurobehavioral effects, such as headache, nausea, dizziness, and disorientation, etc. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in MTBE-induced neurotoxicity are still not well understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of MTBE on spatial memory and the expression and function of GABA{sub A} receptor in the hippocampus. Our results demonstrated that intraventricular injection of MTBE impaired the performance of the rats in a Morris water maze task, and significantly increased the expression of GABA{sub A} receptor {alpha}1 subunit in the hippocampus. The phosphorylation of ERK1/2 decreased after the MTBE injection. Furthermore, the decreased ability of learning and the reduction of phosphorylated ERK1/2 level of the MTBE-treated rats was partly reversed by bicuculline injected 30 min before the training. These results suggested that MTBE exposure could result in impaired spatial memory. GABA{sub A} receptor may play an important role in the MTBE-induced impairment of learning and memory by regulating the phosphorylation of ERK in the hippocampus.

  16. The influence of cannabinoids on learning and memory processes of the dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jarid; Packard, Mark G

    2015-11-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that the mammalian endocannabinoid system plays an integral role in learning and memory. Our understanding of how cannabinoids influence memory comes predominantly from studies examining cognitive and emotional memory systems mediated by the hippocampus and amygdala, respectively. However, recent evidence suggests that cannabinoids also affect habit or stimulus-response (S-R) memory mediated by the dorsal striatum. Studies implementing a variety of maze tasks in rats indicate that systemic or intra-dorsolateral striatum infusions of cannabinoid receptor agonists or antagonists impair habit memory. In mice, cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor knockdown can enhance or impair habit formation, whereas Δ(9)THC tolerance enhances habit formation. Studies in human cannabis users also suggest an enhancement of S-R/habit memory. A tentative conclusion based on the available data is that acute disruption of the endocannabinoid system with either agonists or antagonists impairs, whereas chronic cannabinoid exposure enhances, dorsal striatum-dependent S-R/habit memory. CB1 receptors are required for multiple forms of striatal synaptic plasticity implicated in memory, including short-term and long-term depression. Interactions with the hippocampus-dependent memory system may also have a role in some of the observed effects of cannabinoids on habit memory. The impairing effect often observed with acute cannabinoid administration argues for cannabinoid-based treatments for human psychopathologies associated with a dysfunctional habit memory system (e.g. post-traumatic stress disorder and drug addiction/relapse). In addition, the enhancing effect of repeated cannabinoid exposure on habit memory suggests a novel neurobehavioral mechanism for marijuana addiction involving the dorsal striatum-dependent memory system. PMID:26092091

  17. The influence of cannabinoids on learning and memory processes of the dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jarid; Packard, Mark G

    2015-11-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that the mammalian endocannabinoid system plays an integral role in learning and memory. Our understanding of how cannabinoids influence memory comes predominantly from studies examining cognitive and emotional memory systems mediated by the hippocampus and amygdala, respectively. However, recent evidence suggests that cannabinoids also affect habit or stimulus-response (S-R) memory mediated by the dorsal striatum. Studies implementing a variety of maze tasks in rats indicate that systemic or intra-dorsolateral striatum infusions of cannabinoid receptor agonists or antagonists impair habit memory. In mice, cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor knockdown can enhance or impair habit formation, whereas Δ(9)THC tolerance enhances habit formation. Studies in human cannabis users also suggest an enhancement of S-R/habit memory. A tentative conclusion based on the available data is that acute disruption of the endocannabinoid system with either agonists or antagonists impairs, whereas chronic cannabinoid exposure enhances, dorsal striatum-dependent S-R/habit memory. CB1 receptors are required for multiple forms of striatal synaptic plasticity implicated in memory, including short-term and long-term depression. Interactions with the hippocampus-dependent memory system may also have a role in some of the observed effects of cannabinoids on habit memory. The impairing effect often observed with acute cannabinoid administration argues for cannabinoid-based treatments for human psychopathologies associated with a dysfunctional habit memory system (e.g. post-traumatic stress disorder and drug addiction/relapse). In addition, the enhancing effect of repeated cannabinoid exposure on habit memory suggests a novel neurobehavioral mechanism for marijuana addiction involving the dorsal striatum-dependent memory system.

  18. Impaired assessment of cumulative lifetime familiarity for object concepts after left anterior temporal-lobe resection that includes perirhinal cortex but spares the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Ben; Duke, Devin; Rosenbaum, R Shayna; McRae, Ken; Köhler, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    The ability to recognize the prior occurrence of objects can operate effectively even in the absence of successful recollection of episodic contextual detail about a relevant past object encounter. The pertinent process, familiarity assessment, is typically probed in humans with recognition-memory tasks that include an experimentally controlled study phase for a list of items. When meaningful stimuli such as words or pictures of common objects are employed, participants must judge familiarity with reference to the recent experimental encounter rather than their lifetime of autobiographical experience, which may have involved hundreds or thousands of exposures across numerous episodic contexts. Humans can, however, also judge the cumulative familiarity of objects concepts they have encountered over their lifetime. At present, little is known about the cognitive and neural mechanisms that support this ability. Here, we tested an individual (NB) with a rare left anterior temporal-lobe lesion that included perirhinal cortex but spared the hippocampus, who had previously been found to exhibit selective impairments in familiarity assessment on verbal recognition-memory tasks. As NB exhibits normal recollection abilities, her case presents a unique opportunity to examine potential links between both types of familiarity. In Experiment 1, we demonstrated that NB's impairment in making recognition judgments affects cumulative frequency judgments for exposure to concept names in a recent study episode. Experiments 2 and 3 revealed, with a task borrowed from the semantic-memory literature, that NB's impairments do indeed extend to abnormalities in judging cumulative lifetime familiarity for object concepts. These abnormalities were not limited to verbal processing, and were present even when pictures were offered as additional cues. Moreover, they showed sensitivity to concept structure as reflected in semantic feature norms; we only observed them for judgments on object

  19. Impaired hippocampus-dependent spatial flexibility and sociability represent autism-like phenotypes in GluK2 mice.

    PubMed

    Micheau, Jacques; Vimeney, Alice; Normand, Elisabeth; Mulle, Christophe; Riedel, Gernot

    2014-09-01

    Autism is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder with high heritability. grik2 (which encodes the GluK2 subunit of kainate receptors) has been identified as a susceptibility gene in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), but its role in the core and associated symptoms of ASD still remains elusive. We used mice lacking GluK2 (GluK2 KO) to examine their endophenotype with a view to modeling aspects of autism, including social deficits, stereotyped and repetitive behavior and decreased cognitive abilities. Anxiety was recorded in the elevated plus maze, social behavior in a three-chamber apparatus, and cognition in different water maze protocols. Deletion of the GluK2 gene reduced locomotor activity and sociability as indicated by the social interaction task. In addition, GluK2 KO mice learnt to locate a hidden platform in a water maze surrounded by a curtain with hanging cues faster than wild-type mice. They maintained a bias toward the target quadrant when some of these cues were removed, at which point wild-types orthogonalized the behavior and showed no memory. However, GluK2 KO mice were impaired in spatial reversal learning. These behavioral data together with previously published electrophysiology showing severe anomalies in CA3 network activity, suggest a computational shift in this network for enhanced propensity of pattern completion that would explain the loss of behavioral flexibility in GluK2 KO mice. Although a single mutation cannot recapitulate the entire core symptoms of ASD, our data provide evidence for glutamatergic dysfunction underlying a number of social- and cognition-related phenotypes relevant to ASD.

  20. MTHFR deficiency or reduced intake of folate or choline in pregnant mice results in impaired short-term memory and increased apoptosis in the hippocampus of wild-type offspring.

    PubMed

    Jadavji, N M; Deng, L; Malysheva, O; Caudill, M A; Rozen, R

    2015-08-01

    Genetic or nutritional disturbances in one-carbon metabolism, with associated hyperhomocysteinemia, can result in complex disorders including pregnancy complications and neuropsychiatric diseases. In earlier work, we showed that mice with a complete deficiency of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), a critical enzyme in folate and homocysteine metabolism, had cognitive impairment with disturbances in choline metabolism. Maternal demands for folate and choline are increased during pregnancy and deficiencies of these nutrients result in several negative outcomes including increased resorption and delayed development. The goal of this study was to investigate the behavioral and neurobiological impact of a maternal genetic deficiency in MTHFR or maternal nutritional deficiency of folate or choline during pregnancy on 3-week-old Mthfr(+/+) offspring. Mthfr(+/+) and Mthfr(+/-) females were placed on control diets (CD); and Mthfr(+/+) females were placed on folate-deficient diets (FD) or choline-deficient diets (ChDD) throughout pregnancy and lactation until their offspring were 3weeks of age. Short-term memory was assessed in offspring, and hippocampal tissue was evaluated for morphological changes, apoptosis, proliferation and choline metabolism. Maternal MTHFR deficiency resulted in short-term memory impairment in offspring. These dams had elevated levels of plasma homocysteine when compared with wild-type dams. There were no differences in plasma homocysteine in offspring. Increased apoptosis and proliferation was observed in the hippocampus of offspring from Mthfr(+/-) mothers. In the maternal FD and ChDD study, offspring also showed short-term memory impairment with increased apoptosis in the hippocampus; increased neurogenesis was observed in ChDD offspring. Choline acetyltransferase protein was increased in the offspring hippocampus of both dietary groups and betaine was decreased in the hippocampus of FD offspring. Our results reveal short-term memory

  1. MTHFR deficiency or reduced intake of folate or choline in pregnant mice results in impaired short-term memory and increased apoptosis in the hippocampus of wild-type offspring.

    PubMed

    Jadavji, N M; Deng, L; Malysheva, O; Caudill, M A; Rozen, R

    2015-08-01

    Genetic or nutritional disturbances in one-carbon metabolism, with associated hyperhomocysteinemia, can result in complex disorders including pregnancy complications and neuropsychiatric diseases. In earlier work, we showed that mice with a complete deficiency of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), a critical enzyme in folate and homocysteine metabolism, had cognitive impairment with disturbances in choline metabolism. Maternal demands for folate and choline are increased during pregnancy and deficiencies of these nutrients result in several negative outcomes including increased resorption and delayed development. The goal of this study was to investigate the behavioral and neurobiological impact of a maternal genetic deficiency in MTHFR or maternal nutritional deficiency of folate or choline during pregnancy on 3-week-old Mthfr(+/+) offspring. Mthfr(+/+) and Mthfr(+/-) females were placed on control diets (CD); and Mthfr(+/+) females were placed on folate-deficient diets (FD) or choline-deficient diets (ChDD) throughout pregnancy and lactation until their offspring were 3weeks of age. Short-term memory was assessed in offspring, and hippocampal tissue was evaluated for morphological changes, apoptosis, proliferation and choline metabolism. Maternal MTHFR deficiency resulted in short-term memory impairment in offspring. These dams had elevated levels of plasma homocysteine when compared with wild-type dams. There were no differences in plasma homocysteine in offspring. Increased apoptosis and proliferation was observed in the hippocampus of offspring from Mthfr(+/-) mothers. In the maternal FD and ChDD study, offspring also showed short-term memory impairment with increased apoptosis in the hippocampus; increased neurogenesis was observed in ChDD offspring. Choline acetyltransferase protein was increased in the offspring hippocampus of both dietary groups and betaine was decreased in the hippocampus of FD offspring. Our results reveal short-term memory

  2. Levels of Neural Progenitors in the Hippocampus Predict Memory Impairment and Relapse to Drug Seeking as a Function of Excessive Methamphetamine Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Recinto, Patrick; Samant, Anjali Rose H; Chavez, Gustavo; Kim, Airee; Yuan, Clara J; Soleiman, Matthew; Grant, Yanabel; Edwards, Scott; Wee, Sunmee; Koob, George F; George, Olivier; Mandyam, Chitra D

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine affects the hippocampus, a brain region crucial for learning and memory, as well as relapse to drug seeking. Rats self-administered methamphetamine for 1 h twice weekly (intermittent-short-I-ShA), 1 h daily (limited-short-ShA), or 6 h daily (extended-long-LgA) for 22 sessions. After 22 sessions, rats from each access group were withdrawn from self-administration and underwent spatial memory (Y-maze) and working memory (T-maze) tests followed by extinction and reinstatement to methamphetamine seeking or received one intraperitoneal injection of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label progenitors in the hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ) during the synthesis phase. Two-hour-old and 28-day-old surviving BrdU-immunoreactive cells were quantified. I-ShA rats performed better on the Y-maze and had a greater number of 2-h-old SGZ BrdU cells than nondrug controls. LgA rats, but not ShA rats, performed worse on the Y- and T-maze and had a fewer number of 2-h-old SGZ BrdU cells than nondrug and I-ShA rats, suggesting that new hippocampal progenitors, decreased by methamphetamine, were correlated with impairment in the acquisition of new spatial cues. Analyses of addiction-related behaviors after withdrawal and extinction training revealed methamphetamine-primed reinstatement of methamphetamine-seeking behavior in all three groups (I-ShA, ShA, and LgA), and this effect was enhanced in LgA rats compared with I-ShA and ShA rats. Protracted withdrawal from self-administration enhanced the survival of SGZ BrdU cells, and methamphetamine seeking during protracted withdrawal enhanced Fos expression in the dentate gyrus and medial prefrontal cortex in LgA rats to a greater extent than in ShA and I-ShA rats. These results indicate that changes in the levels of the proliferation and survival of hippocampal neural progenitors and neuronal activation of hippocampal granule cells predict the effects of methamphetamine self-administration (limited vs extended

  3. Acute nicotine treatment attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced cognitive dysfunction by increasing BDNF expression and inhibiting neuroinflammation in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wei, Penghui; Liu, Qingshen; Li, Dong; Zheng, Qiang; Zhou, Jinfeng; Li, Jianjun

    2015-09-14

    Although nicotine has been shown to improve cognitive function in various studies, the mechanisms underlying acute nicotine treatment-induced neuroprotection remain incompletely understood. In this study, we evaluated the effect of acute nicotine treatment on the cognitive impairment induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and explored the underlying mechanism. We found that acute nicotine injection markedly attenuated LPS-elicited cognitive deficits and suppressed the strong LPS-induced release of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α into serum and the dorsal hippocampus at 4 and 24h after LPS injection. Western blot analysis indicated a clear increase in the levels of cleaved caspase-3 in LPS-treated animals but not in nicotine- or saline-treated animals. Furthermore, nicotine administration led to a significant increase in BDNF mRNA expression at 4 and 24h and in BDNF protein expression at 24h after LPS injection in the dorsal hippocampus. Taken together, acute nicotine administration attenuated LPS-induced cognitive dysfunction, and this neuroprotective effect may be related to the up-regulation of BDNF and the inhibition of neuroinflammation and apoptosis-related proteins in the dorsal hippocampus. PMID:26259694

  4. Acute nicotine treatment attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced cognitive dysfunction by increasing BDNF expression and inhibiting neuroinflammation in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wei, Penghui; Liu, Qingshen; Li, Dong; Zheng, Qiang; Zhou, Jinfeng; Li, Jianjun

    2015-09-14

    Although nicotine has been shown to improve cognitive function in various studies, the mechanisms underlying acute nicotine treatment-induced neuroprotection remain incompletely understood. In this study, we evaluated the effect of acute nicotine treatment on the cognitive impairment induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and explored the underlying mechanism. We found that acute nicotine injection markedly attenuated LPS-elicited cognitive deficits and suppressed the strong LPS-induced release of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α into serum and the dorsal hippocampus at 4 and 24h after LPS injection. Western blot analysis indicated a clear increase in the levels of cleaved caspase-3 in LPS-treated animals but not in nicotine- or saline-treated animals. Furthermore, nicotine administration led to a significant increase in BDNF mRNA expression at 4 and 24h and in BDNF protein expression at 24h after LPS injection in the dorsal hippocampus. Taken together, acute nicotine administration attenuated LPS-induced cognitive dysfunction, and this neuroprotective effect may be related to the up-regulation of BDNF and the inhibition of neuroinflammation and apoptosis-related proteins in the dorsal hippocampus.

  5. The molecular cascades of long-term potentiation underlie memory consolidation of one-trial avoidance in the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus, but not in the basolateral amygdala or the neocortex.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Iván; Bevilaqua, Lia R M; Rossato, Janine I; da Silva, Weber C; Bonini, Juliana; Medina, Jorge H; Cammarota, Martín

    2008-10-01

    Data accumulated through the past 15 years showed that memory consolidation of one-trial avoidance learning relies on a sequence of molecular events in the CA1 region of the hippocampus that is practically identical to that of long-term potentiation (LTP) in that area. Recent findings have indeed described CA1 LTP concomitant to the consolidation of this and other tasks. However, abundant evidence suggests that, in addition, other molecular events, involving some of the same steps but with different timing and in different sequence in the basolateral amygdala, entorhinal, parietal and cingulate cortex are as important as those of the hippocampus for memory consolidation. Here we review the hippocampal mechanisms involved and the possible interconnections between all these processes. Overall, the findings indicate that memory consolidation of even a task as deceivingly simple as one-trial avoidance relies on hippocampal LTP but also requires the concomitant participation of other brain systems and molecular events. Further, they point to the mechanisms that account for the enhanced consolidation usually seen for emotion-laden memories.

  6. MPTP Impairs Dopamine D1 Receptor-Mediated Survival of Newborn Neurons in Ventral Hippocampus to Cause Depressive-Like Behaviors in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tingting; Hong, Juan; Di, Tingting; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by motor symptoms with depression. We evaluated the influence of dopaminergic depletion on hippocampal neurogenesis process to explore mechanisms of depression production. Five consecutive days of 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) injection in mice (MPTP-mice) reduced dopaminergic fibers in hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). MPTP-mice exhibited depressive-like behaviors later for 2–3 weeks. BrdU was injected 4 h after last-injection of MPTP. BrdU-positive (BrdU+) cells in dorsal (d-DG) and ventral (v-DG) DG were examined on day 1 (D1), 7 (D7), 14 (D14) and 21 (D21) after BrdU injection. Fewer D7-, D14- and D21-BrdU+ cells or BrdU+/NeuN+ cells, but not D1-BrdU+ cells, were found in v-DG of MPTP-mice than in controls. However, the number of BrdU+ cells in d-DG did not differ between the both. Loss of doublecortin-positive (DCX+) cells was observed in v-DG of MPTP-mice. Protein kinase A (PKA) and Ca2+/cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation were reduced in v-DG of MPTP-mice, which were reversed by D1-like receptor (D1R) agonist SKF38393, but not D2R agonist quinpirole. The treatment of MPTP-mice with SKF38393 on days 2–7 after BrdU-injection reduced the loss of D7- and D21-BrdU+ cells in v-DG and improved the depressive-like behaviors; these changes were sensitive to PKA inhibitor H89. Moreover, the v-DG injection of SKF38393 in MPTP-mice could reduce the loss of D21-BrdU+ cells and relieve the depressive-like behaviors. In control mice, the blockade of D1R by SCH23390 caused the reduction of D21-BrdU+ cells in v-DG and the depressive-like behaviors. Our results indicate that MPTP-reduced dopaminergic depletion impairs the D1R-mediated early survival of newborn neurons in v-DG, producing depressive-like behaviors. PMID:27790091

  7. Low Dose Prenatal Alcohol Exposure Does Not Impair Spatial Learning and Memory in Two Tests in Adult and Aged Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Carlie L.; Burne, Thomas H. J.; Lavidis, Nickolas A.; Moritz, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Consumption of alcohol during pregnancy can have detrimental impacts on the developing hippocampus, which can lead to deficits in learning and memory function. Although high levels of alcohol exposure can lead to severe deficits, there is a lack of research examining the effects of low levels of exposure. This study used a rat model to determine if prenatal exposure to chronic low dose ethanol would result in deficits in learning and memory performance and if this was associated with morphological changes within the hippocampus. Sprague Dawley rats were fed a liquid diet containing 6% (vol/vol) ethanol (EtOH) or an isocaloric control diet throughout gestation. Male and Female offspring underwent behavioural testing at 8 (Adult) or 15 months (Aged) of age. Brains from these animals were collected for stereological analysis of pyramidal neuron number and dendritic morphology within the CA1 and CA3 regions of the dorsal hippocampus. Prenatal ethanol exposed animals did not differ in spatial learning or memory performance in the Morris water maze or Y maze tasks compared to Control offspring. There was no effect of prenatal ethanol exposure on pyramidal cell number or density within the dorsal hippocampus. Overall, this study indicates that chronic low dose prenatal ethanol exposure in this model does not have long term detrimental effects on pyramidal cells within the dorsal hippocampus or impair spatial learning and memory performance. PMID:24978807

  8. Encoding, consolidation, and retrieval of contextual memory: differential involvement of dorsal CA3 and CA1 hippocampal subregions.

    PubMed

    Daumas, Stéphanie; Halley, Hélène; Francés, Bernard; Lassalle, Jean-Michel

    2005-01-01

    Studies on human and animals shed light on the unique hippocampus contributions to relational memory. However, the particular role of each hippocampal subregion in memory processing is still not clear. Hippocampal computational models and theories have emphasized a unique function in memory for each hippocampal subregion, with the CA3 area acting as an autoassociative memory network and the CA1 area as a critical output structure. In order to understand the respective roles of the CA3- and CA1-hippocampal areas in the formation of contextual memory, we studied the effects of the reversible inactivation by lidocaine of the CA3 or CA1 areas of the dorsal hippocampus on acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval of a contextual fear conditioning. Whereas infusions of lidocaine never impaired elementary tone conditioning, their effects on contextual conditioning provided interesting clues about the role of these two hippocampal regions. They demonstrated first that the CA3 area is necessary for the rapid elaboration of a unified representation of the context. Secondly, they suggested that the CA1 area is rather involved in the consolidation process of contextual memory. Third, they showed that CA1 or CA3 inactivation during retention test has no effect on contextual fear retrieval when a recognition memory procedure is used. In conclusion, our findings point as evidence that CA1 and CA3 subregions of the dorsal hippocampus play important and different roles in the acquisition and consolidation of contextual fear memory, whereas they are not required for context recognition.

  9. Fornix White Matter is Correlated with Resting-State Functional Connectivity of the Thalamus and Hippocampus in Healthy Aging but Not in Mild Cognitive Impairment – A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Kehoe, Elizabeth G.; Farrell, Dervla; Metzler-Baddeley, Claudia; Lawlor, Brian A.; Kenny, Rose Anne; Lyons, Declan; McNulty, Jonathan P.; Mullins, Paul G.; Coyle, Damien; Bokde, Arun L.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we wished to examine the relationship between the structural connectivity of the fornix, a white matter (WM) tract in the limbic system, which is affected in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and Alzheimer’s disease, and the resting-state functional connectivity (FC) of two key related subcortical structures, the thalamus, and hippocampus. Twenty-two older healthy controls (HC) and 18 older adults with aMCI underwent multi-modal MRI scanning. The fornix was reconstructed using constrained-spherical deconvolution-based tractography. The FC between the thalamus and hippocampus was calculated using a region-of-interest approach from which the mean time series were exacted and correlated. Diffusion tensor imaging measures of the WM microstructure of the fornix were correlated against the Fisher Z correlation values from the FC analysis. There was no difference between the groups in the fornix WM measures, nor in the resting-state FC of the thalamus and hippocampus. We did however find that the relationship between functional and structural connectivity differed significantly between the groups. In the HCs, there was a significant positive association between linear diffusion (CL) in the fornix and the FC of the thalamus and hippocampus, however, there was no relationship between these measures in the aMCI group. These preliminary findings suggest that in aMCI, the relationship between the functional and structural connectivity of regions of the limbic system may be significantly altered compared to healthy ageing. The combined use of diffusion weighted imaging and functional MRI may advance our understanding of neural network changes in aMCI, and elucidate subtle changes in the relationship between structural and functional brain networks. PMID:25698967

  10. Performance in hippocampus- and PFC-dependent cognitive domains are not concomitantly impaired in rats exposed to 20cGy of 1GeV/n (56)Fe particles.

    PubMed

    Britten, Richard A; Miller, Vania D; Hadley, Melissa M; Jewell, Jessica S; Macadat, Evangeline

    2016-08-01

    NASA is currently conducting ground based experiments to determine whether the radiation environment that astronauts will encounter on deep space missions will have an impact on their long-term health and their ability to complete the various tasks during the mission. Emerging data suggest that exposure of rodents to mission-relevant HZE radiation doses does result in the impairment of various neurocognitive processes. An essential part of mission planning is a probabilistic risk assessment process that takes into account the likely incidence and severity of a problem. To date few studies have reported the impact of space radiation in a format that is amenable to PRA, and those that have only reported data for a single cognitive process. This study has established the ability of individual male Wistar rats to conduct a hippocampus-dependent (spatial memory) task and a cortex-dependent (attentional set shifting task) 90 days after exposure to 20cGy 1GeV/n (56)Fe particles. Radiation-induced impairment of performance in one cognitive domain was not consistently associated with impaired performance in the other domain. Thus sole reliance upon a single measure of cognitive performance may substantially under-estimate the risk of cognitive impairment, and ultimately it may be necessary to establish the likelihood that mission-relevant HZE doses will impair performance in the three or four cognitive domains that NASA considers to be most critical for mission success, and build a PRA using the composite data from such studies. PMID:27662783

  11. Performance in hippocampus- and PFC-dependent cognitive domains are not concomitantly impaired in rats exposed to 20 cGy of 1 GeV/n 56Fe particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britten, Richard A.; Miller, Vania D.; Hadley, Melissa M.; Jewell, Jessica S.; Macadat, Evangeline

    2016-08-01

    NASA is currently conducting ground based experiments to determine whether the radiation environment that astronauts will encounter on deep space missions will have an impact on their long-term health and their ability to complete the various tasks during the mission. Emerging data suggest that exposure of rodents to mission-relevant HZE radiation doses does result in the impairment of various neurocognitive processes. An essential part of mission planning is a probabilistic risk assessment process that takes into account the likely incidence and severity of a problem. To date few studies have reported the impact of space radiation in a format that is amenable to PRA, and those that have only reported data for a single cognitive process. This study has established the ability of individual male Wistar rats to conduct a hippocampus-dependent (spatial memory) task and a cortex-dependent (attentional set shifting task) 90 days after exposure to 20 cGy 1 GeV/n 56Fe particles. Radiation-induced impairment of performance in one cognitive domain was not consistently associated with impaired performance in the other domain. Thus sole reliance upon a single measure of cognitive performance may substantially under-estimate the risk of cognitive impairment, and ultimately it may be necessary to establish the likelihood that mission-relevant HZE doses will impair performance in the three or four cognitive domains that NASA considers to be most critical for mission success, and build a PRA using the composite data from such studies.

  12. Reevaluating the Role of the Hippocampus in Delay Eyeblink Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bo; Zhang, Hui-ming; Li, Yi-ding; Li, Xuan; Li, Qiong; Sui, Jian-feng

    2013-01-01

    The role of the hippocampus in delay eyeblink conditioning (DEC) remains controversial. Here, we investigated the involvement of the hippocampus in DEC with a soft tone as the conditioned stimulus (CS) by using electrolytic lesions or muscimol inactivation of guinea pig dorsal hippocampus. Interestingly, when a soft tone was used as a CS, electrolytic lesions of the hippocampus significantly retarded acquisition of the conditioned response (CR), and muscimol infusions into hippocampus distinctly inhibited the acquisition and expression of CR, but had no significant effect on consolidation of well-learned CR. In contrast, both electrolytic lesions and muscimol inactivation of hippocampus produced no significant deficits in the CR when a loud tone was used as the CS. These results demonstrate that the hippocampus is essential for the DEC when the delay task was rendered more difficult. PMID:23951119

  13. Functional inactivation of the rat hippocampus disrupts avoidance of a moving object.

    PubMed

    Telensky, Petr; Svoboda, Jan; Blahna, Karel; Bureš, Jan; Kubik, Stepan; Stuchlik, Ales

    2011-03-29

    The hippocampus is well known for its critical involvement in spatial memory and information processing. In this study, we examined the effect of bilateral hippocampal inactivation with tetrodotoxin (TTX) in an "enemy avoidance" task. In this paradigm, a rat foraging on a circular platform (82 cm diameter) is trained to avoid a moving robot in 20-min sessions. Whenever the rat is located within 25 cm of the robot's center, it receives a mild electrical foot shock, which may be repeated until the subject makes an escape response to a safe distance. Seventeen young male Long-Evans rats were implanted with cannulae aimed at the dorsal hippocampus 14 d before the start of the training. After 6 d of training, each rat received a bilateral intrahippocampal infusion of TTX (5 ng in 1 μL) 40 min before the training session on day 7. The inactivation severely impaired avoidance of a moving robot (n = 8). No deficit was observed in a different group of rats (n = 9) that avoided a stable robot that was only displaced once in the middle of the session, showing that the impairment was not due to a deficit in distance estimation, object-reinforcement association, or shock sensitivity. This finding suggests a specific role of the hippocampus in dynamic cognitive processes required for flexible navigation strategies such as continuous updating of information about the position of a moving stimulus.

  14. Amitriptyline and carbamazepine utilize voltage-gated ion channel suppression to impair excitability of sensory dorsal horn neurons in thin tissue slice: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Matthias; Czorlich, Patrick; Nagaraj, Chandran; Schnöbel-Ehehalt, Rose; Li, Yingji; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna; Olschewski, Horst; Heschl, Stefan; Olschewski, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Amitriptyline, carbamazepine and gabapentin are often used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. However, their analgesic action on central sensory neurons is still not fully understood. Moreover, the expression pattern of their target ion channels is poorly elucidated in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Thus, we performed patch-clamp investigations in visualized neurons of lamina I-III of the spinal cord. The expression of the different voltage-gated ion channels, as the targets of these drugs, was detected by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Neurons of the lamina I-III express the TTX-sensitive voltage-gated Na(+) as well as voltage-gated K(+) subunits assembling the fast inactivating (A-type) currents and the delayed rectifier K(+) currents. Our pharmacological studies show that tonically-firing, adapting-firing and single spike neurons responded dose-dependently to amitriptyline and carbamazepine. The ion channel inhibition consecutively reduced the firing rate of tonically-firing and adapting-firing neurons. This study provides evidence for the distribution of voltage-gated Na(+) and K(+) subunits in lamina I-III of the spinal cord and for the action of drugs used for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Our work confirms that modulation of voltage-gated ion channels in the central nervous system contributes to the antinociceptive effects of these drugs. PMID:26945616

  15. Repeated exposure of adult rats to Aroclor 1254 induces neuronal injury and impairs the neurochemical manifestations of the NMDA receptor-mediated intracellular signaling in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hilgier, Wojciech; Łazarewicz, Jerzy W; Strużynska, Lidia; Frontczak-Baniewicz, Małgorzata; Albrecht, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Aroclor 1254 is a mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), a class of environmental toxins which cause a wide spectrum of neurotoxic effects. Learning and memory deficits are the profound effects of PCBs which may be related to hippocampal dysfunction. To get insight into the underlying neurochemical mechanisms, we employed the microdialysis technique to investigate the effect of repeated exposure of adult male Wistar rats to Aroclor 1254 (10mg/kg b.w., daily, ig., for 14days), on the neurochemical parameters of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic signaling in the hippocampus in vivo assessed using the microdialysis technique. The results demonstrated that exposure to Aroclor 1254, which was associated with substantial neuronal damage and loss in the hippocampus, markedly decreased the NMDA-induced extracellular accumulation of newly loaded (45)CaCl(2), cGMP and glutamate, and reduced the basal content of the NO precursor, arginine, indicating inhibition of the NMDA/NO/cGMP pathway. Aroclor 1254 exposure also decreased the basal microdialysate content of glutamate and glutamine, which may cause inadequate supply of the neurotransmitter glutamate, while the level of two other neuroactive amino acids, aspartate or taurine was not affected by the exposure. The results underscore neuronal lesion and inhibition of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic signaling in hippocampus as a potential major contributor to the cognitive deficits associated with exposure to PCB.

  16. Loss of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in CA1 hippocampus and cortex impairs long-term depression, reduces dendritic spine density and disrupts learning

    PubMed Central

    Brigman, Jonathan L.; Wright, Tara; Talani, Giuseppe; Prasad-Mulcare, Shweta; Jinde, Seiichiro; Seabold, Gail K.; Mathur, Poonam; Davis, Margaret I.; Bock, Roland; Gustin, Richard M.; Colbran, Roger J.; Alvarez, Veronica A.; Nakazawa, Kazu; Delpire, Eric; Lovinger, David M.; Holmes, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are key mediators of certain forms of synaptic plasticity and learning. NMDAR complexes are heteromers composed of an obligatory GluN1 subunit and one or more GluN2 (GluN2A- GluN2D) subunits. Different subunits confer distinct physiological and molecular properties to NMDARs, but their contribution to synaptic plasticity and learning in the adult brain remains uncertain. Here, we generated mice lacking GluN2B in pyramidal neurons of cortex and CA1 subregion of hippocampus. We found that hippocampal principal neurons of adult GluN2B mutants had faster decaying NMDAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) than non-mutant controls, and were insensitive to GluN2B but not NMDAR antagonism. A sub-saturating form of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) was impaired in the mutants, whereas a saturating form of LTP was intact. A NMDAR-dependent form of long-term depression (LTD) produced by low-frequency stimulation combined with glutamate transporter inhibition was abolished in the mutants. Additionally, mutants exhibited decreased dendritic spine density in CA1 hippocampal neurons as compared to controls. On multiple assays for corticohippocampal-mediated learning and memory (hidden platform Morris water maze, T-maze spontaneous alternation, Pavlovian trace fear conditioning), mutants were impaired. These data further demonstrate the importance of GluN2B for synaptic plasticity in the adult hippocampus and suggest a particularly critical role in LTD, at least the form studied here. The finding that loss of GluN2B was sufficient to cause learning deficits illustrates the contribution of GluN2B-mediated forms of plasticity to memory formation, with implications for elucidating NMDAR-related dysfunction in disease-related cognitive impairment. PMID:20357110

  17. Glucocorticoid receptor deletion from the dorsal raphé nucleus of mice reduces dysphoria-like behavior and impairs hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis feedback inhibition.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Melanie Y; Jacobson, Lauren

    2014-05-01

    Glucocorticoids can cause depression and anxiety. Mechanisms for glucocorticoid effects on mood are largely undefined. The dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN) produces the majority of serotonin in the brain, and expresses glucocorticoid receptors (GR). Because we previously showed that antidepressants used to treat depression and anxiety decrease DRN GR expression, we hypothesized that deleting DRN GR would have anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects. We also hypothesized that DRN GR deletion would disinhibit activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Adeno-associated virus pseudotype AAV2/9 expressing either Cre recombinase (DRNGRKO mice) or GFP (DRN-GFP mice) was injected into the DRN of floxed GR mice to test these hypotheses. Three weeks after injection, mice underwent 21 days of social defeat or control handling and were tested for anxiety-like behavior (open-field test, elevated-plus maze), depression-like behavior [sucrose preference, forced-swim test (FST), tail-suspension test (TST)], social interaction, and circadian and stress-induced HPA activity. DRN GR deletion decreased anxiety-like behavior in control but not in defeated mice. DRN GR deletion decreased FST and tended to decrease TST despair-like behavior in both control and defeated mice, but did not affect sucrose preference. Exploration of social (a novel mouse) as well as neutral (an empty box) targets was increased in DRNGRKO mice, suggesting that DRN GR deletion also promotes active coping. DRN GR deletion increased stress-induced HPA activity without strongly altering circadian HPA activity. We have shown a novel role for DRN GR to mediate anxiety- and despair-like behavior and to regulate HPA negative feedback during acute stress.

  18. Glucocorticoid receptor deletion from the dorsal raphé nucleus of mice reduces dysphoria-like behavior and impairs hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis feedback inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Melanie Y.; Jacobson, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids can cause depression and anxiety. Mechanisms for glucocorticoid effects on mood are largely undefined. The dorsal raphé nucleus (DRN) produces the majority of serotonin in the brain, and expresses glucocorticoid receptors (GR). Since we previously showed that antidepressants used to treat depression and anxiety decrease DRN GR expression, we hypothesized that deleting DRN GR would have anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects. We also hypothesized that DRN GR deletion would disinhibit activity of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. Adeno-associated virus pseudotype AAV2/9 expressing either Cre recombinase (DRNGRKO mice) or GFP (DRN-GFP mice) was injected into the DRN of floxed GR mice to test these hypotheses. Three weeks after injection, mice underwent 10d of social defeat or control handling and tested for anxiety-like behavior (open field test, elevated plus maze), depression-like behavior (sucrose preference, forced swim test (FST), tail suspension (TST)), social interaction, and circadian and stress-induced HPA activity. DRN GR deletion decreased anxiety-like behavior in control but not in defeated mice. DRN GR deletion decreased FST and tended to decrease TST despair-like behavior in both control and defeated mice, but did not affect sucrose preference. Exploration of social (a novel mouse) as well as neutral targets (an empty box) was increased in DRNGRKO mice, suggesting that DRN GR deletion also promotes active coping. DRN GR deletion increased stress-regulated HPA activity without strongly altering circadian HPA activity. We have shown a novel role for DRN GR to mediate anxiety- and despair-like behavior and to regulate HPA negative feedback during acute stress. PMID:24684372

  19. Involvement of the hippocampus and associative parietal cortex in the use of proximal and distal landmarks for navigation.

    PubMed

    Save, E; Poucet, B

    2000-05-01

    Rats with dorsal hippocampus or associative parietal cortex (APC) lesions and sham-operated controls were trained on variants of the Morris water maze navigation task. In the 'proximal landmark condition', the rats had to localize the hidden platform solely on the basis of three salient object landmarks placed directly in the swimming pool. In the 'distal landmark condition', rats could rely only on distal landmarks (room cues) to locate the platform. In the 'beacon condition', the platform location was signaled by a salient cue directly attached to it. Rats with hippocampal lesions were impaired in the distal and to a less extent in the proximal landmark condition whereas rats with parietal lesions were impaired only in the proximal landmark condition. None of the lesioned groups was impaired in the beacon condition. These results suggest that the processing of information related to proximal, distal landmarks or associated beacon are mediated by different neural systems. The hippocampus would contribute to both proximal and distal landmark processing whereas the APC would be involved in the processing of proximal landmarks only. Navigation relying on a cued-platform would not require participation of the hippocampus nor the APC. Assuming that the processing of proximal landmarks heavily depends on the integration of visuospatial and idiothetic information, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the APC plays a role in the combination of multiple sensory information and contributes to the formation of an allocentric spatial representation.

  20. Differential effects of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptor inverse agonists Rec 27/0224 and Rec 27/0074 on electrophysiological responses to 5-HT1A receptor activation in rat dorsal raphe nucleus and hippocampus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Corradetti, Renato; Mlinar, Boris; Falsini, Chiara; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Cilia, Antonio; Destefani, Carla; Testa, Rodolfo

    2005-10-01

    The pharmacological properties of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, {2-[4-(2-bromo-5-methoxybenzyl)piperazin-1-yl]ethyl}-(2-trifluoromethoxyphenyl)amide (Rec 27/0224), and cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, (2-methoxy-phenyl)-{2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-piperazin-1-yl]ethyl}amide (Rec 27/0074), were characterized using radioligand displacement and guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thiotriphosphate) ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding assays, as well as electrophysiological experiments, in rat hippocampal and dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) slices. Both compounds showed a high affinity (Ki, approximately 1 nM) and selectivity (>70-fold) at human 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptors versus other 5-HT receptors. In [35S]GTPgammaS binding assays on HeLa cells stably expressing human 5-HT1A receptors, Rec 27/0224 and Rec 27/0074 inhibited basal [35S]GTPgammaS binding by 44.8 +/- 1.7% (pEC50 = 8.58) and 25 +/- 2.5% (pEC50 = 8.86), respectively. In intracellularly recorded CA1 pyramidal cells, 5-HT1A (hetero)receptor-mediated hyperpolarization, elicited by 100 nM 5-carboxamidoytryptamine (5-CT), was partially antagonized by Rec 27/0224 (approximately 50%; IC50 = 18.0 nM) and Rec 27/0074 (74%; IC50 = 0.8 nM). In extracellularly recorded DRN serotonergic neurons, Rec 27/0224 and Rec 27/0074 fully antagonized the inhibition of firing caused by the activation of 5-HT1A (auto)receptors by 30 nM 5-CT with an IC50 of 34.9 nM and 16.5 nM, respectively. The antagonism had a slow time course, reaching a steady state within 60 min. Both compounds also antagonized the citalopram-elicited, endogenous 5-HT-mediated inhibition of cell firing. In conclusion, Rec 27/0224 and Rec 27/0074 exhibited inverse agonism in [35S]GTPgammaS binding assays and differential antagonistic properties on 5-HT1A receptor-mediated responses in the hippocampus but not in the DRN. Whether this differential effect is causally related to inverse agonist activity is unclear. The qualitatively different nature of the antagonism in the hippocampus versus

  1. Structure-function associations in hippocampus in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Chepenik, Lara G; Wang, Fei; Spencer, Linda; Spann, Marisa; Kalmar, Jessica H; Womer, Fay; Kale Edmiston, E; Pittman, Brian; Blumberg, Hilary P

    2012-04-01

    Hippocampus volume decreases and verbal memory deficits have been reported in bipolar disorder (BD) as independent observations. We investigated potential associations between these deficits in subjects with BD. Hippocampus volumes were measured on magnetic resonance images of 31 subjects with BD and 32 healthy comparison (HC) subjects. The California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition (CVLT) assessed verbal memory function in these subjects. Compared to the HC group, the BD group showed both significantly smaller hippocampus volumes and impaired performance on CVLT tests of immediate, short delay and long delay cued and free recall. Further, smaller hippocampus volume correlated with impaired performance in BD. Post hoc analyses revealed a trend towards improved memory in BD subjects taking antidepressant medications. These results support associations between morphological changes in hippocampus structure in BD and verbal memory impairment. They provide preliminary evidence pharmacotherapy may reverse hippocampus-related memory deficits. PMID:22342942

  2. Polychlorinated biphenyls impair blood-brain barrier integrity via disruption of tight junction proteins in cerebrum, cerebellum and hippocampus of female Wistar rats: neuropotential role of quercetin.

    PubMed

    Selvakumar, K; Prabha, R Lakshmi; Saranya, K; Bavithra, S; Krishnamoorthy, G; Arunakaran, J

    2013-07-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) comprise a ubiquitous class of toxic substances associated with carcinogenic and tumor-promoting effects as well as neurotoxic properties. Reactive oxygen species, which is produced from PCBs, alters blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, which is paralleled by cytoskeletal rearrangements and redistribution and disappearance of tight junction proteins (TJPs) like claudin-5 and occludin. Quercetin, a potent antioxidant present in onion and other vegetables, appears to protect brain cells against oxidative stress, a tissue-damaging process associated with Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative disorders. The aim of this study is to analyze the role of quercetin on oxidative stress markers and transcription of transmembrane and cytoplasmic accessory TJPs on cerebrum, cerebellum and hippocampus of female rats exposed to PCBs. Rats were divided into the following four groups. Group I: received only vehicle (corn oil) intraperitoneally (i.p.); group II: received Aroclor 1254 at a dose of 2 mg/kg body weight (bwt)/day (i.p); group III: received Aroclor 1254 (i.p.) and simultaneously quercetin 50 mg/kg bwt/day through gavage and group IV: received quercetin alone gavage. From the experiment, the levels of hydrogen peroxide, lipid peroxidation and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were observed to increase significantly in cerebrum, cerebellum and hippocampus as 50%, 25% and 20%, respectively, after exposure to PCB, and the messenger RNA expression of TJP in rats exposed to PCBs is decreased and is retrieved to the normal level simultaneously in quercetin-treated rats. Hence, quercetin can be used as a preventive medicine to PCBs exposure and prevents neurodegenerative disorders.

  3. Inhibition of injury-induced cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus impairs spontaneous cognitive recovery after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dong; Daniels, Teresa E; Rolfe, Andrew; Waters, Michael; Hamm, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Neurogenesis persists throughout life in the neurogenic regions of the mature mammalian brain, and this response is enhanced after traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the hippocampus, adult neurogenesis plays an important role in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory functions and is thought to contribute to the spontaneous cognitive recovery observed after TBI. Utilizing an antimitotic agent, arabinofuranosyl cytidine (Ara-C), the current study investigated the direct association of injury-induced hippocampal neurogenesis with cognitive recovery. In this study, adult rats received a moderate lateral fluid percussion injury followed by a 7-day intraventricular infusion of 2% Ara-C or vehicle. To examine the effect of Ara-C on cell proliferation, animals received intraperitoneal injections of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU), to label dividing cells, and were sacrificed at 7 days after injury. Brain sections were immunostained for BrdU or doublecortin (DCX), and the total number of BrdU(+) or DCX(+) cells in the hippocampus was quantified. To examine the outcome of inhibiting the injury-induced cell proliferative response on cognitive recovery, animals were assessed on Morris water maze (MWM) tasks at 21-25 or 56-60 days postinjury. We found that a 7-day infusion of Ara-C significantly reduced the total number of BrdU(+) and DCX(+) cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) in both hemispheres. Moreover, inhibition of the injury-induced cell proliferative response in the DG completely abolished the innate cognitive recovery on MWM performance at 56-60 days postinjury. These results support the causal relationship of injury-induced hippocampal neurogenesis on cognitive functional recovery and suggest the importance of this endogenous repair mechanism on restoration of hippocampal function.

  4. The Effects of Sesquiterpenes-Rich Extract of Alpinia oxyphylla Miq. on Amyloid-β-Induced Cognitive Impairment and Neuronal Abnormalities in the Cortex and Hippocampus of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shao-Huai; Zhao, Xu; Liu, Bing; Li, Huan; Liu, Ai-Jing; Wu, Bo; Bi, Kai-Shun

    2014-01-01

    As a kind of medicine which can also be used as food, Alpinia oxyphylla Miq. has a long clinical history in China. A variety of studies demonstrated the significant neuroprotective activity effects of chloroform (CF) extract from the fruits of Alpinia oxyphylla. In order to further elucidate the possible mechanisms of CF extract which mainly contains sesquiterpenes with neuroprotection on the cognitive ability, mice were injected with Aβ1−42 and later with CF in this study. The results showed that the long-term treatment of CF enhanced the cognitive performances in behavior tests, increased activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-px) and decreased the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and amyloid-β (Aβ), and reversed the activation of microglia, degeneration of neuronal acidophilia, and nuclear condensation in the cortex and hippocampus. These results demonstrate that CF ameliorates learning and memory deficits by attenuating oxidative stress and regulating the activation of microglia and degeneration of neuronal acidophilia to reinforce cholinergic functions. PMID:25180067

  5. The effects of sesquiterpenes-rich extract of Alpinia oxyphylla Miq. on amyloid-β-induced cognitive impairment and neuronal abnormalities in the cortex and hippocampus of mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shao-Huai; Zhao, Xu; Liu, Bing; Li, Huan; Liu, Ai-Jing; Wu, Bo; Bi, Kai-Shun; Jia, Ying

    2014-01-01

    As a kind of medicine which can also be used as food, Alpinia oxyphylla Miq. has a long clinical history in China. A variety of studies demonstrated the significant neuroprotective activity effects of chloroform (CF) extract from the fruits of Alpinia oxyphylla. In order to further elucidate the possible mechanisms of CF extract which mainly contains sesquiterpenes with neuroprotection on the cognitive ability, mice were injected with Aβ(1-42) and later with CF in this study. The results showed that the long-term treatment of CF enhanced the cognitive performances in behavior tests, increased activities of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-px) and decreased the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and amyloid-β (Aβ), and reversed the activation of microglia, degeneration of neuronal acidophilia, and nuclear condensation in the cortex and hippocampus. These results demonstrate that CF ameliorates learning and memory deficits by attenuating oxidative stress and regulating the activation of microglia and degeneration of neuronal acidophilia to reinforce cholinergic functions.

  6. Anisomycin injection in area CA3 of the hippocampus impairs both short-term and long-term memories of contextual fear.

    PubMed

    Remaud, Jessica; Ceccom, Johnatan; Carponcy, Julien; Dugué, Laura; Menchon, Gregory; Pech, Stéphane; Halley, Helene; Francés, Bernard; Dahan, Lionel

    2014-05-15

    Protein synthesis is involved in the consolidation of short-term memory into long-term memory. Previous electrophysiological data concerning LTP in CA3 suggest that protein synthesis in that region might also be necessary for short-term memory. We tested this hypothesis by locally injecting the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin in hippocampal area CA1 or CA3 immediately after contextual fear conditioning. As previously shown, injections in CA1 impaired long-term memory but spared short-term memory. Conversely, injections in CA3 impaired both long-term and short-term memories. We conclude that early steps of experience-induced plasticity occurring in CA3 and underlying short-term memory require protein synthesis.

  7. Anisomycin injection in area CA3 of the hippocampus impairs both short-term and long-term memories of contextual fear.

    PubMed

    Remaud, Jessica; Ceccom, Johnatan; Carponcy, Julien; Dugué, Laura; Menchon, Gregory; Pech, Stéphane; Halley, Helene; Francés, Bernard; Dahan, Lionel

    2014-06-01

    Protein synthesis is involved in the consolidation of short-term memory into long-term memory. Previous electrophysiological data concerning LTP in CA3 suggest that protein synthesis in that region might also be necessary for short-term memory. We tested this hypothesis by locally injecting the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin in hippocampal area CA1 or CA3 immediately after contextual fear conditioning. As previously shown, injections in CA1 impaired long-term memory but spared short-term memory. Conversely, injections in CA3 impaired both long-term and short-term memories. We conclude that early steps of experience-induced plasticity occurring in CA3 and underlying short-term memory require protein synthesis. PMID:25171422

  8. Propylthiouracil (PTU)-induced hypothyroidism in the developing rat impairs synaptic transmission and plasticity in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, M E; Paczkowski, C

    2003-10-10

    Reductions in thyroid hormone during critical periods of brain development can have devastating effects on neurological function that are permanent. Neurochemical, molecular and structural alterations in a variety of brain regions have been well documented, but little information is available on the consequences of developmental hypothyroidism on synaptic function. Developing rats were exposed to the thyrotoxicant, propylthiouracil (PTU: 0 or 15 ppm), through the drinking water of pregnant dams beginning on GD18 and extending throughout the lactational period. Male offspring were allowed to mature after termination of PTU exposure at weaning on PND21 and electrophyiological assessments of field potentials in the dentate gyrus were conducted under urethane anesthesia between 2 and 5 months of age. PTU dramatically reduced thyroid hormones on PND21 and produced deficits in body weight that persisted to adulthood. Synaptic transmission was impaired as evidenced by reductions in excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) slope and population spike (PS) amplitudes at a range of stimulus intensities. Long-term potentiation of the EPSP slope was impaired at both modest and strong intensity trains, whereas a paradoxical increase in PS amplitude was observed in PTU-treated animals in response to high intensity trains. These data are the first to describe functional impairments in synaptic transmission and plasticity in situ as a result of PTU treatment and suggest that perturbations in synaptic function may contribute to learning deficits associated with developmental hypothyroidism.

  9. Role of Amygdala and Hippocampus in the Neural Circuit Subserving Conditioned Defeat in Syrian Hamsters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markham, Chris M.; Taylor, Stacie L.; Huhman, Kim L.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the roles of the amygdala and hippocampus in the formation of emotionally relevant memories using an ethological model of conditioned fear termed conditioned defeat (CD). Temporary inactivation of the ventral, but not dorsal hippocampus (VH, DH, respectively) using muscimol disrupted the acquisition of CD, whereas pretraining VH…

  10. The reduced serum free triiodothyronine and increased dorsal hippocampal SNAP-25 and Munc18-1 had existed in middle-aged CD-1 mice with mild spatial cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lei; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Fang; Yang, Qi-Gang; Wang, Chao; Chen, Yong-Ping; Chen, Gui-Hai

    2013-12-01

    Changes of synaptic proteins in highlighted brain regions and decreased serum thyroid hormones (THs) have been implied in age-related learning and memory decline. Previously, we showed significant pairwise correlations among markedly impaired spatial learning and memory ability, decreased serum free triiodothyronine (FT3) and increased hippocampal SNAP-25 and Munc18-1 in old Kunming mice. However, whether these changes and the correlations occur in middle-age mice remains unclear. Since this age is one of the best stages to study age-related cognitive decline, we explored the spatial learning and memory ability, serum THs, cerebral SNAP-25 and Munc18-1 levels and their relationships of middle-aged mice in this study. The learning and memory abilities of 35 CD-1 mice (19 mice aged 6 months and 16 mice aged 12 months) were measured with a radial six-arm water maze (RAWM). The SNAP-25 and Munc18-1 levels were semi-quantified by Western blotting and the serum THs were detected by radioimmunoassay. The results showed the middle-aged mice had decreased serum FT3, increased dorsal hippocampal (DH) SNAP-25 and Munc18-1, and many or long number of errors and latency in both learning and memory phases of the RAWM. The Pearson's correlation test showed that the DH SANP-25 and Munc18-1 levels were positively correlated with the number of errors and latency in learning phases of the RAWM. Meanwhile, the DH SANP-25 and Munc18-1 levels negatively correlated with the serum FT3 level. These results suggested that reduced FT3 with increased DH SNAP-25 and Munc18-1 levels might be involved in the spatial learning ability decline in the middle-aged mice.

  11. Dorsal Hippocampus Function in Learning and Expressing a Spatial Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Norman M.; Gaskin, Stephane

    2006-01-01

    Learning to discriminate between spatial locations defined by two adjacent arms of a radial maze in the conditioned cue preference paradigm requires two kinds of information: latent spatial learning when the rats explore the maze with no food available, and learning about food availability in two spatial locations when the rats are then confined…

  12. Impaired learning in a spatial working memory version and in a cued version of the water maze in rats with MPTP-induced mesencephalic dopaminergic lesions.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Edmar; Wietzikoski, Samantha; Camplessei, Milton; Silveira, Rodolfo; Takahashi, Reinaldo N; Da Cunha, Claudio

    2002-05-01

    A lesion in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) of rats induced by intra-nigral administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) caused specific loss of dopamine and its nonconjugated metabolites in the dorsal striatum and in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), but not in the hippocampus or the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens). This lesion did not alter the motor performance of the rats or learning of a spatial reference memory task in the water maze but impaired learning of a spatial working memory task and also of a cued version of the water maze. The results are discussed by relating the selective memory deficits observed in these water maze tasks to the PFC, dorsal striatum, and hippocampus. Some parallels between the memory deficits in these SNc-lesioned rats and Parkinson's disease patients are also discussed.

  13. Major diencephalic inputs to the hippocampus: supramammillary nucleus and nucleus reuniens. Circuitry and function

    PubMed Central

    Vertes, Robert P.

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus receives two major external inputs from the diencephalon, that is, from the supramammillary nucleus (SUM) and nucleus reuniens (RE) of the midline thalamus. These two afferents systems project to separate, nonoverlapping, regions of the hippocampus. Specifically, the SUM distributes to the dentate gyrus (DG) and to CA2 of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus, whereas RE projects to CA1 of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus and to the subiculum. SUM and RE fibers to the hippocampus participate in common as well as in separate functions. Both systems would appear to amplify signals from other sources to their respective hippocampal targets. SUM amplifies signals from the entorhinal cortex (EC) to DG, whereas RE may amplify them from CA3 (and EC) to CA1 of the hippocampus. This “amplification” may serve to promote the transfer, encoding, and possibly storage of information from EC to DG and from CA3 and EC to CA1. Regarding their unique actions on the hippocampus, the SUM is a vital part of an ascending brainstem to hippocampal system generating the theta rhythm of the hippocampus, whereas RE importantly routes information from the medial prefrontal cortex to the hippocampus to thereby mediate functions involving both structures. In summary, although, to date, SUM and RE afferents to the hippocampus have not been extensively explored, the SUM and RE exert a profound influence on the hippocampus in processes of learning and memory. PMID:26072237

  14. Malformations of dorsal induction.

    PubMed

    Kanekar, Sangam; Kaneda, Heather; Shively, Alexis

    2011-06-01

    Dorsal induction includes the formation and closure of neural tube, occurs during 3-5 weeks of gestation. Neurulation occurs in two phases, primary neurulation (formation of the neural plate and subsequently neural tube) and secondary neurulation (formation of distal cord and sacral and coccygeal segments). Failure of dorsal induction leads to anencephaly, exencephaly, cephaloceles, Chiari malformation and spinal dysraphism. In this article we discuss the relevant embryology, etiopathology and detail imaging appearances of these malformations.

  15. Time course of dorsal and ventral hippocampal involvement in the expression of trace fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Cox, David; Czerniawski, Jennifer; Ree, Fredrick; Otto, Tim

    2013-11-01

    While a number of early studies demonstrated that hippocampal damage attenuates the expression of recent, but not remotely trained tasks, an emerging body of evidence has shown that damage to, or inactivation of, the hippocampus often impairs recall across a wide range of training-testing intervals. Collectively, these data suggest that the time course of hippocampal involvement in the storage or recall of previously-acquired memories may differ according to hippocampal subregion and the particular learning task under consideration. The present study examined the contributions of dorsal (DH) and ventral (VH) hippocampus to the expression of previously-acquired trace fear conditioning, a form of Pavlovian conditioning in which the offset of an initially neutral cue or cues and the onset of an aversive stimulus is separated by a temporal (trace) interval. Specifically, either saline or the GABA-A agonist muscimol was infused into DH or VH prior to testing either 1, 7, 28, or 42 days after trace fear conditioning. The results revealed a marked dissociation: pre-testing inactivation of DH failed to impair performance at any time-point, while pre-testing inactivation of VH impaired performance at all time-points. Importantly, pre-testing inactivation of VH had no effect on the performance of previously-acquired delay conditioning, suggesting that the deficits observed in trace conditioning cannot be attributed to a deficit in performance of the freezing response. Collectively, these data suggest that VH, but not DH, remains a neuroanatomical locus critical to the recall or expression of trace fear conditioning over an extended period of time.

  16. The neuron-astrocyte-microglia triad involvement in neuroinflammaging mechanisms in the CA3 hippocampus of memory-impaired aged rats.

    PubMed

    Lana, Daniele; Iovino, Ludovica; Nosi, Daniele; Wenk, Gary L; Giovannini, Maria Grazia

    2016-10-01

    We examined the effects of inflammaging on memory encoding, and qualitative and quantitative modifications on proinflammatory proteins, apoptosis, neurodegeneration and morphological changes of neuron-astrocyte-microglia triads in CA3 Stratum Pyramidale (SP), Stratum Lucidum (SL) and Stratum Radiatum (SR) of young (3months) and aged rats (20months). Aged rats showed short-term memory impairments in the inhibitory avoidance task, increased expression of iNOS and activation of p38MAPK in SP, increase of apoptotic neurons in SP and of ectopic neurons in SL, and decrease of CA3 pyramidal neurons. The number of astrocytes and their branches length decreased in the three CA3 subregions of aged rats, with morphological signs of clasmatodendrosis. Total and activated microglia increased in the three CA3 subregions of aged rats. In aged rats CA3, astrocytes surrounded ectopic degenerating neurons forming "micro scars" around them. Astrocyte branches infiltrated the neuronal cell body, and, together with activated microglia formed "triads". In the triads, significantly more numerous in CA3 SL and SR of aged rats, astrocytes and microglia cooperated in fragmentation and phagocytosis of ectopic neurons. Inflammaging-induced modifications of astrocytes and microglia in CA3 of aged rats may help clearing neuronal debris derived from low-grade inflammation and apoptosis. These events might be common mechanisms underlying many neurodegenerative processes. The frequency to which they appear might depend upon, or might be the cause of, the burden and severity of neurodegeneration. Targeting the triads may represent a therapeutic strategy which may control inflammatory processes and spread of further cellular damage to neighboring cells. PMID:27466072

  17. The neuron-astrocyte-microglia triad involvement in neuroinflammaging mechanisms in the CA3 hippocampus of memory-impaired aged rats.

    PubMed

    Lana, Daniele; Iovino, Ludovica; Nosi, Daniele; Wenk, Gary L; Giovannini, Maria Grazia

    2016-10-01

    We examined the effects of inflammaging on memory encoding, and qualitative and quantitative modifications on proinflammatory proteins, apoptosis, neurodegeneration and morphological changes of neuron-astrocyte-microglia triads in CA3 Stratum Pyramidale (SP), Stratum Lucidum (SL) and Stratum Radiatum (SR) of young (3months) and aged rats (20months). Aged rats showed short-term memory impairments in the inhibitory avoidance task, increased expression of iNOS and activation of p38MAPK in SP, increase of apoptotic neurons in SP and of ectopic neurons in SL, and decrease of CA3 pyramidal neurons. The number of astrocytes and their branches length decreased in the three CA3 subregions of aged rats, with morphological signs of clasmatodendrosis. Total and activated microglia increased in the three CA3 subregions of aged rats. In aged rats CA3, astrocytes surrounded ectopic degenerating neurons forming "micro scars" around them. Astrocyte branches infiltrated the neuronal cell body, and, together with activated microglia formed "triads". In the triads, significantly more numerous in CA3 SL and SR of aged rats, astrocytes and microglia cooperated in fragmentation and phagocytosis of ectopic neurons. Inflammaging-induced modifications of astrocytes and microglia in CA3 of aged rats may help clearing neuronal debris derived from low-grade inflammation and apoptosis. These events might be common mechanisms underlying many neurodegenerative processes. The frequency to which they appear might depend upon, or might be the cause of, the burden and severity of neurodegeneration. Targeting the triads may represent a therapeutic strategy which may control inflammatory processes and spread of further cellular damage to neighboring cells.

  18. Adult Onset-hypothyroidism has Minimal Effects on Synaptic Transmission in the Hippocampus of Rats Independent of Hypothermia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Thyroid hormones (TH) influence central nervous system (CNS) function during development and in adulthood. The hippocampus, a brain area critical for learning and memory is sensitive to TH insufficiency. Synaptic transmission in the hippocampus is impaired following...

  19. Chewing Maintains Hippocampus-Dependent Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huayue; Iinuma, Mitsuo; Onozuka, Minoru; Kubo, Kin-Ya

    2015-01-01

    Mastication (chewing) is important not only for food intake, but also for preserving and promoting the general health. Recent studies have showed that mastication helps to maintain cognitive functions in the hippocampus, a central nervous system region vital for spatial memory and learning. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent progress of the association between mastication and the hippocampus-dependent cognitive function. There are multiple neural circuits connecting the masticatory organs and the hippocampus. Both animal and human studies indicated that cognitive functioning is influenced by mastication. Masticatory dysfunction is associated with the hippocampal morphological impairments and the hippocampus-dependent spatial memory deficits, especially in elderly. Mastication is an effective behavior for maintaining the hippocampus-dependent cognitive performance, which deteriorates with aging. Therefore, chewing may represent a useful approach in preserving and promoting the hippocampus-dependent cognitive function in older people. We also discussed several possible mechanisms involved in the interaction between mastication and the hippocampal neurogenesis and the future directions for this unique fascinating research. PMID:26078711

  20. Chewing Maintains Hippocampus-Dependent Cognitive Function.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huayue; Iinuma, Mitsuo; Onozuka, Minoru; Kubo, Kin-Ya

    2015-01-01

    Mastication (chewing) is important not only for food intake, but also for preserving and promoting the general health. Recent studies have showed that mastication helps to maintain cognitive functions in the hippocampus, a central nervous system region vital for spatial memory and learning. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent progress of the association between mastication and the hippocampus-dependent cognitive function. There are multiple neural circuits connecting the masticatory organs and the hippocampus. Both animal and human studies indicated that cognitive functioning is influenced by mastication. Masticatory dysfunction is associated with the hippocampal morphological impairments and the hippocampus-dependent spatial memory deficits, especially in elderly. Mastication is an effective behavior for maintaining the hippocampus-dependent cognitive performance, which deteriorates with aging. Therefore, chewing may represent a useful approach in preserving and promoting the hippocampus-dependent cognitive function in older people. We also discussed several possible mechanisms involved in the interaction between mastication and the hippocampal neurogenesis and the future directions for this unique fascinating research.

  1. [HIPPOCAMPUS AS AN ORGANIZER OF RESENT ATTENTION].

    PubMed

    Serkova, V V; Nikolskaya, K A; Eremina, L V

    2015-06-01

    The damage of dorsal hippocampus in mice F1 from DBA/2J and C57BL/6J on the learning in conditions of free choice in a complex multialternative maze was studied. It was revealed that the HPC-mice were able to form a 4-links food-getting habit in the cyclic form. The main differences affected the conjugation of the investigate activity, behavioral efficiency and inhibition of mistakes. While these processes developed by the same exponential types in control, this conjugation were absent in HPC-mice. The main defects were found in stage of habit stabilization: motivational state stability reduced sharply and duration of transition from disorganization to organizing behavior increased. It is supposed that the hippocampus involved in learning and memory indirectly because its main role is organization of the dominant state providing the stability of attention for habit realization.

  2. The relationships of dog hippocampus to sex and paw preference.

    PubMed

    Aydinlioglu, Atif; Arslan, Kadir; Cengiz, Nurettin; Ragbetli, Murat; Erdogan, Ender

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have described paw preference and asymmetry in dog brains. Electrical activity of the dorsal hippocampus also indicated the existence of hippocampal asymmetry in dogs. In the present study, the possible paw and sex-related asymmetries and right-left differences in dog hippocampus were investigated. The hippocampus was dissected and weighed. Each hippocampus was cut into slices by the slicing apparatus placed horizontally on the tissues. The volumetric measurements were performed using the formula modified from the Cavalieri principle. The present study indicated the significant sex and paw differences and no right-left asymmetry in dog hippocampi. The morphological asymmetries in normal subjects might be related to functional hippocampal asymmetries in memory or in cognitive skills.

  3. Dorsal hippocampal NMDA receptors mediate the interactive effects of arachidonylcyclopropylamide and MDMA/ecstasy on memory retrieval in rats.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Marzieh; Rezayof, Ameneh; Vousooghi, Nasim; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-04-01

    A combination of cannabis and ecstasy may change the cognitive functions more than either drug alone. The present study was designed to investigate the possible involvement of dorsal hippocampal NMDA receptors in the interactive effects of arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA) and ecstasy/MDMA on memory retrieval. Adult male Wistar rats were cannulated into the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus (intra-CA1) and memory retrieval was examined using the step-through type of passive avoidance task. Intra-CA1 microinjection of a selective CB1 receptor agonist, ACPA (0.5-4ng/rat) immediately before the testing phase (pre-test), but not after the training phase (post-training), impaired memory retrieval. In addition, pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of MDMA (0.5-1μg/rat) dose-dependently decreased step-through latency, indicating an amnesic effect of the drug by itself. Interestingly, pre-test microinjection of a higher dose of MDMA into the CA1 regions significantly improved ACPA-induced memory impairment. Moreover, pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of a selective NMDA receptor antagonist, D-AP5 (1 and 2μg/rat) inhibited the reversal effect of MDMA on the impairment of memory retrieval induced by ACPA. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of the same doses of D-AP5 had no effect on memory retrieval alone. These findings suggest that ACPA or MDMA consumption can induce memory retrieval impairment, while their co-administration improves this amnesic effect through interacting with hippocampal glutamatergic-NMDA receptor mechanism. Thus, it seems that the tendency to abuse cannabis with ecstasy may be for avoiding cognitive dysfunction.

  4. Dorsal hippocampal NMDA receptors mediate the interactive effects of arachidonylcyclopropylamide and MDMA/ecstasy on memory retrieval in rats.

    PubMed

    Ghaderi, Marzieh; Rezayof, Ameneh; Vousooghi, Nasim; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-04-01

    A combination of cannabis and ecstasy may change the cognitive functions more than either drug alone. The present study was designed to investigate the possible involvement of dorsal hippocampal NMDA receptors in the interactive effects of arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA) and ecstasy/MDMA on memory retrieval. Adult male Wistar rats were cannulated into the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus (intra-CA1) and memory retrieval was examined using the step-through type of passive avoidance task. Intra-CA1 microinjection of a selective CB1 receptor agonist, ACPA (0.5-4ng/rat) immediately before the testing phase (pre-test), but not after the training phase (post-training), impaired memory retrieval. In addition, pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of MDMA (0.5-1μg/rat) dose-dependently decreased step-through latency, indicating an amnesic effect of the drug by itself. Interestingly, pre-test microinjection of a higher dose of MDMA into the CA1 regions significantly improved ACPA-induced memory impairment. Moreover, pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of a selective NMDA receptor antagonist, D-AP5 (1 and 2μg/rat) inhibited the reversal effect of MDMA on the impairment of memory retrieval induced by ACPA. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of the same doses of D-AP5 had no effect on memory retrieval alone. These findings suggest that ACPA or MDMA consumption can induce memory retrieval impairment, while their co-administration improves this amnesic effect through interacting with hippocampal glutamatergic-NMDA receptor mechanism. Thus, it seems that the tendency to abuse cannabis with ecstasy may be for avoiding cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26612394

  5. Chronic social isolation decreases glutamate and glutamine levels and induces oxidative stress in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yuan; Yan, Gen; Xuan, Yinghua; Peng, Hui; Huang, Qing-Jun; Wu, Renhua; Xu, Haiyun

    2015-04-01

    Social isolation (SI) rearing of rodents is a developmental manipulation, which is commonly compared with the psychological stressors in humans as it produces several behavioral outcomes similar to those observed in humans with early life stress. To explain the SI-induced behavioral outcomes, animal studies have been performed to examine the dopaminergic and glutamatergic systems in the brain. In this study, we measured possible changes in levels of glutamate and glutamine of SI-rats using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We also assessed the oxidative stress parameters in certain brain regions to see if glutamate and/or glutamine changes, if any, are associated with oxidative stress. SI rearing for 8 weeks decreased the activities of antioxidant enzymes catalase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and the total antioxidant capacity, but increased levels of hydrogen peroxide, in certain brain regions, of which prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were most vulnerable. It also decreased levels of glutamate, glutamine, N-acetyl-l-aspartate (NAA), and phosphocreatine in the dorsal hippocampus, but not in the cerebral cortex. Decreased phosphocreatine and NAA indicate energy metabolism deficit in brain cells; the latter also suggests the neuronal viability was inhibited. Decreased glutamate and glutamine may suggest the neuron-glial integrity was implicated by chronic SI. These neurochemical and biochemical changes may contribute to the SI-induced behavioral abnormalities including a high level of anxiety, social interaction deficit, and impaired spatial working memory shown in this study.

  6. Hippocampus: remembering the choices.

    PubMed

    Eichenbaum, Howard

    2013-03-20

    The hippocampus is said to be involved in "navigation" and "memory" as if these were distinct functions. In this issue of Neuron, Singer et al. (2013) provide evidence that the hippocampus retrieves spatial sequences in support of memory, strengthening a convergence between the two perspectives on hippocampal function.

  7. Hippocampus at 25.

    PubMed

    Eichenbaum, Howard; Amaral, David G; Buffalo, Elizabeth A; Buzsáki, György; Cohen, Neal; Davachi, Lila; Frank, Loren; Heckers, Stephan; Morris, Richard G M; Moser, Edvard I; Nadel, Lynn; O'Keefe, John; Preston, Alison; Ranganath, Charan; Silva, Alcino; Witter, Menno

    2016-10-01

    The journal Hippocampus has passed the milestone of 25 years of publications on the topic of a highly studied brain structure, and its closely associated brain areas. In a recent celebration of this event, a Boston memory group invited 16 speakers to address the question of progress in understanding the hippocampus that has been achieved. Here we present a summary of these talks organized as progress on four main themes: (1) Understanding the hippocampus in terms of its interactions with multiple cortical areas within the medial temporal lobe memory system, (2) understanding the relationship between memory and spatial information processing functions of the hippocampal region, (3) understanding the role of temporal organization in spatial and memory processing by the hippocampus, and (4) understanding how the hippocampus integrates related events into networks of memories. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Hippocampus at 25.

    PubMed

    Eichenbaum, Howard; Amaral, David G; Buffalo, Elizabeth A; Buzsáki, György; Cohen, Neal; Davachi, Lila; Frank, Loren; Heckers, Stephan; Morris, Richard G M; Moser, Edvard I; Nadel, Lynn; O'Keefe, John; Preston, Alison; Ranganath, Charan; Silva, Alcino; Witter, Menno

    2016-10-01

    The journal Hippocampus has passed the milestone of 25 years of publications on the topic of a highly studied brain structure, and its closely associated brain areas. In a recent celebration of this event, a Boston memory group invited 16 speakers to address the question of progress in understanding the hippocampus that has been achieved. Here we present a summary of these talks organized as progress on four main themes: (1) Understanding the hippocampus in terms of its interactions with multiple cortical areas within the medial temporal lobe memory system, (2) understanding the relationship between memory and spatial information processing functions of the hippocampal region, (3) understanding the role of temporal organization in spatial and memory processing by the hippocampus, and (4) understanding how the hippocampus integrates related events into networks of memories. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27399159

  9. β-Arrestins Negatively Regulate the Toll Pathway in Shrimp by Preventing Dorsal Translocation and Inhibiting Dorsal Transcriptional Activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie-Jie; Lan, Jiang-Feng; Shi, Xiu-Zhen; Yang, Ming-Chong; Niu, Guo-Juan; Ding, Ding; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2016-04-01

    The Toll signaling pathway plays an important role in the innate immunity ofDrosophila melanogasterand mammals. The activation and termination of Toll signaling are finely regulated in these animals. Although the primary components of the Toll pathway were identified in shrimp, the functions and regulation of the pathway are seldom studied. We first demonstrated that the Toll signaling pathway plays a central role in host defense againstStaphylococcus aureusby regulating expression of antimicrobial peptides in shrimp. We then found that β-arrestins negatively regulate Toll signaling in two different ways. β-Arrestins interact with the C-terminal PEST domain of Cactus through the arrestin-N domain, and Cactus interacts with the RHD domain of Dorsal via the ankyrin repeats domain, forming a heterotrimeric complex of β-arrestin·Cactus·Dorsal, with Cactus as the bridge. This complex prevents Cactus phosphorylation and degradation, as well as Dorsal translocation into the nucleus, thus inhibiting activation of the Toll signaling pathway. β-Arrestins also interact with non-phosphorylated ERK (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase) through the arrestin-C domain to inhibit ERK phosphorylation, which affects Dorsal translocation into the nucleus and phosphorylation of Dorsal at Ser(276)that impairs Dorsal transcriptional activity. Our study suggests that β-arrestins negatively regulate the Toll signaling pathway by preventing Dorsal translocation and inhibiting Dorsal phosphorylation and transcriptional activity. PMID:26846853

  10. Time-dependent impairment of inhibitory avoidance retention in rats by posttraining infusion of a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor into cortical and limbic structures.

    PubMed

    Walz, R; Roesler, R; Quevedo, J; Sant'Anna, M K; Madruga, M; Rodrigues, C; Gottfried, C; Medina, J H; Izquierdo, I

    2000-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is abundantly expressed in postmitotic neurons of the developed nervous system. MAPK is activated and required for induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 area of the hippocampus, which is blocked by the specific inhibitor of the MAPK kinase, PD 098059. Recently it was demonstrated that MAPK is activated in the hippocampus after training and is necessary for contextual fear conditioning learning. The present work tests the role of the MAPK cascade in step-down inhibitory avoidance (IA) retention. PD 098059 (50 microM) was bilaterally injected (0.5 microl/side) into the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus or entorhinal cortex at 0, 90, 180, or 360 min, or into the amygdala or parietal cortex at 0, 180, or 360 min after IA training in rats using a 0.4-mA foot shock. Retention testing was carried out 24 h after training. PD 098059 impaired retention when injected into the dorsal hippocampus at 180 min, but not 0, 90, and 360 min after training. When infused into the entorhinal cortex, PD 098059 was amnestic at 0 and 180 min, but not at 90 and 360 min after training. The MAPKK inhibitor also impairs IA retention when infused into the parietal cortex immediately after training, but not at 180 or 360 min. Infusions performed into amygdala were amnestic at 180 min, but not at 0 and 360 min after training. Our results suggest a time-dependent involvement of the MAPK cascade in the posttraining memory processing of IA; the time dependency is different in the hippocampus, amygdala, entorhinal cortex, or parietal cortex of rats.

  11. Involvement of dorsal hippocampal alpha-adrenergic receptors in the effect of scopolamine on memory retrieval in inhibitory avoidance task.

    PubMed

    Azami, Nasrin-Sadat; Piri, Morteza; Oryan, Shahrbano; Jahanshahi, Mehrdad; Babapour, Vahab; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2010-05-01

    The present study evaluated the possible role of alpha-adrenergic receptors of the dorsal hippocampus on scopolamine-induced amnesia and scopolamine state-dependent memory in adult male Wistar rats. The animals were bilaterally implanted with chronic cannulae in the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus, trained in a step-through type inhibitory avoidance task, and tested 24h after training to measure step-through latency. Results indicate that post-training or pre-test intra-CA1 administration of scopolamine (1 and 2 microg/rat) dose-dependently reduced the step-through latency, showing an amnestic response. Amnesia produced by post-training scopolamine (2 microg/rat) was reversed by pre-test administration of the scopolamine that is due to a state-dependent effect. Interestingly, pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of alpha1-adrenergic agonist, phenylephrine (1 and 2 microg/rat) or alpha2-adrenergic agonist, clonidine improved post-training scopolamine (2 microg/rat)-induced retrieval impairment. Furthermore, pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of phenylephrine (0.25, 0.5 and 1 microg/rat) or clonidine (0.25, 0.5 and 1 microg/rat) with an ineffective dose of scopolamine (0.25 microg/rat), synergistically improved memory performance impaired by post-training scopolamine. On the other hand, pre-test injection of alpha1-receptors antagonist prazosin (1 and 2 microg/rat) or alpha2-receptors antagonist yohimbine (1 and 2 microg/rat) prevented the restoration of memory by pre-test scopolamine. It is important to note that pre-test intra-CA1 administration of the same doses of prazosin or yohimbine, alone did not affect memory retrieval. These results suggest that alpha1- and alpha2-adrenergic receptors of the dorsal hippocampal CA1 regions may play an important role in scopolamine-induced amnesia and scopolamine state-dependent memory.

  12. Dorsal spine osteoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Pranshu; Singh, Rahul; Garg, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    Benign osteoblastoma is a rare primary neoplasm comprising less than 1% of primary bone tumors.[1] We report a case of a 20-year-old female patient presenting with progressive paraparesis over one year and back pain over the dorsal spine gradually increasing in severity over a year. Computerised tomomography (CT) of the spine revealed a well-defined 3.5 × 3.0 cm mass heterodense expansile bony lesion arising from the lamina of the D12 vertebra, having lytic and sclerotic component and causing compromise of the bony spinal canal. D12 laminectomy and total excision of the tumor was done. PMID:27057242

  13. Dorsal Hippocampal CREB Is Both Necessary and Sufficient for Spatial Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sekeres, Melanie J.; Neve, Rachael L.; Frankland, Paul W.; Josselyn, Sheena A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the transcription factor CREB has been widely implicated in memory, whether it is sufficient to produce spatial memory under conditions that do not normally support memory formation in mammals is unknown. We found that locally and acutely increasing CREB levels in the dorsal hippocampus using viral vectors is sufficient to induce robust…

  14. The neurosteroid allopregnanolone impairs object memory and contextual fear memory in male C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Rabinowitz, Akiva; Cohen, Sarah J; Finn, Deborah A; Stackman, Robert W

    2014-07-01

    Allopregnanolone (ALLO, or 3α-hydroxy-5α-pregnan-20-one) is a steroid metabolite of progesterone and a potent endogenous positive allosteric modulator of GABA-A receptors. Systemic ALLO has been reported to impair spatial, but not nonspatial learning in the Morris water maze (MWM) and contextual memory in rodents. These cognitive effects suggest an influence of ALLO on hippocampal-dependent memory, although the specific nature of the neurosteroid's effects on learning, memory or performance is unclear. The present studies aimed to determine: (i) the memory process(es) affected by systemic ALLO using a nonspatial object memory task; and (ii) whether ALLO affects object memory via an influence within the dorsal hippocampus. Male C57BL/6J mice received systemic ALLO either before or immediately after the sample session of a novel object recognition (NOR) task. Results demonstrated that systemic ALLO impaired the encoding and consolidation of object memory. A subsequent study revealed that bilateral microinfusion of ALLO into the CA1 region of dorsal hippocampus immediately following the NOR sample session also impaired object memory consolidation. In light of debate over the hippocampal-dependence of object recognition memory, we also tested systemic ALLO-treated mice on a contextual and cued fear-conditioning task. Systemic ALLO impaired the encoding of contextual memory when administered prior to the context pre-exposure session. Together, these results indicate that ALLO exhibits primary effects on memory encoding and consolidation, and extend previous findings by demonstrating a sensitivity of nonspatial memory to ALLO, likely by disrupting dorsal hippocampal function.

  15. Patterns of hippocampal cell loss based on subregional lesions of the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Jerman, Taylor S; Kesner, Raymond P; Lee, Inah; Berman, Robert F

    2005-12-14

    It is widely accepted that the hippocampus plays an essential role in memory. Furthermore, studies have suggested that subregions within the hippocampus contribute differentially to specific behavioral components of memory. These studies typically rely on lesions produced by localized injections of neurotoxins (e.g., ibotenic acid or colchicine) into targeted subregions of the hippocampus. In the present study, the specificity of ibotenic acid lesions into areas CA1 and CA3 and colchicine lesions into the dorsal dentate gyrus (DG) was tested. Specifically, the effects of lesions within the dorsal hippocampus, the ventral hippocampus, and areas outside the hippocampus (e.g., lateral septum and entorhinal cortex) were evaluated using Fluoro-Jade, a histofluorescent stain for degenerating neurons. The results show that cell loss is relatively uniform after ibotenic acid injections into areas CA1 and CA3 and variable after colchicine injections into DG. CA1 and CA3 lesions appeared mostly localized to those relative subregions, and DG lesions appeared highly localized to the DG. Using these lesion procedures, little cell loss was apparent in the ventral hippocampus, and no cell loss was apparent in the entorhinal cortex. It is suggested that the lesion procedures described in this study produce relatively selective lesions of neurons within specific subregions of the hippocampus and should be useful for studies examining possible differential contributions of hippocampal subregions to memory processes. PMID:16307731

  16. Dorsal column stimulator applications

    PubMed Central

    Yampolsky, Claudio; Hem, Santiago; Bendersky, Damián

    2012-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used to treat neuropathic pain since 1967. Following that, technological progress, among other advances, helped SCS become an effective tool to reduce pain. Methods: This article is a non-systematic review of the mechanism of action, indications, results, programming parameters, complications, and cost-effectiveness of SCS. Results: In spite of the existence of several studies that try to prove the mechanism of action of SCS, it still remains unknown. The mechanism of action of SCS would be based on the antidromic activation of the dorsal column fibers, which activate the inhibitory interneurons within the dorsal horn. At present, the indications of SCS are being revised constantly, while new applications are being proposed and researched worldwide. Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is the most common indication for SCS, whereas, the complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is the second one. Also, this technique is useful in patients with refractory angina and critical limb ischemia, in whom surgical or endovascular treatment cannot be performed. Further indications may be phantom limb pain, chronic intractable pain located in the head, face, neck, or upper extremities, spinal lumbar stenosis in patients who are not surgical candidates, and others. Conclusion: Spinal cord stimulation is a useful tool for neuromodulation, if an accurate patient selection is carried out prior, which should include a trial period. Undoubtedly, this proper selection and a better knowledge of its underlying mechanisms of action, will allow this cutting edge technique to be more acceptable among pain physicians. PMID:23230533

  17. Pointing in visual periphery: is DF's dorsal stream intact?

    PubMed

    Hesse, Constanze; Ball, Keira; Schenk, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Observations of the visual form agnosic patient DF have been highly influential in establishing the hypothesis that separate processing streams deal with vision for perception (ventral stream) and vision for action (dorsal stream). In this context, DF's preserved ability to perform visually-guided actions has been contrasted with the selective impairment of visuomotor performance in optic ataxia patients suffering from damage to dorsal stream areas. However, the recent finding that DF shows a thinning of the grey matter in the dorsal stream regions of both hemispheres in combination with the observation that her right-handed movements are impaired when they are performed in visual periphery has opened up the possibility that patient DF may potentially also be suffering from optic ataxia. If lesions to the posterior parietal cortex (dorsal stream) are bilateral, pointing and reaching deficits should be observed in both visual hemifields and for both hands when targets are viewed in visual periphery. Here, we tested DF's visuomotor performance when pointing with her left and her right hand toward targets presented in the left and the right visual field at three different visual eccentricities. Our results indicate that DF shows large and consistent impairments in all conditions. These findings imply that DF's dorsal stream atrophies are functionally relevant and hence challenge the idea that patient DF's seemingly normal visuomotor behaviour can be attributed to her intact dorsal stream. Instead, DF seems to be a patient who suffers from combined ventral and dorsal stream damage meaning that a new account is needed to explain why she shows such remarkably normal visuomotor behaviour in a number of tasks and conditions. PMID:24626162

  18. Loss of hippocampal function impairs pattern separation on a mouse touch-screen operant paradigm.

    PubMed

    Josey, Megan; Brigman, Jonathan L

    2015-11-01

    The hippocampus is heavily involved in the learning and memory processes necessary to successfully encode environmental stimuli and representations over time. Impairment of hippocampal function is associated with numerous neuropsychiatric diseases and can lead to detriments in the quality of life. In order to take full advantage of preclinical models of these disorders, there is a need for the development of more refined measures of clinically relevant hippocampal behaviors. While arena-based navigation tasks have provided fundamental information regarding the role of the hippocampus in spatial memory, the development of automated operant variants have had mixed results. Recently, an automated touch-screen paradigm has been shown to be highly sensitive to hippocampal function in the rat and eliminated mediating strategies that arose in previous tasks. Here we show that mice with lesions encompassing the entire ventral portion of the dorsal hippocampus are impaired on pattern separation behavior using a delayed nonmatching-to-location (TUNL) adapted for mice. Lesioned mice readily acquired the task at control rates when separations were maximal and delay periods were short while decreasing separations significantly impaired lesion mice. However, in contrast to previously reported results in the rat, consistently increasing delays did not significantly impair performance in the lesion group. Presentation of a variable delay within a session significantly impaired performance in lesion mice across delay periods. The current results demonstrate the utility of a touch-screen paradigm for measuring hippocampal-dependent pattern separation in the mouse and establish the paradigm as an important platform for future studies in disease models.

  19. Loss of hippocampal function impairs pattern separation on a mouse touch-screen operant paradigm.

    PubMed

    Josey, Megan; Brigman, Jonathan L

    2015-11-01

    The hippocampus is heavily involved in the learning and memory processes necessary to successfully encode environmental stimuli and representations over time. Impairment of hippocampal function is associated with numerous neuropsychiatric diseases and can lead to detriments in the quality of life. In order to take full advantage of preclinical models of these disorders, there is a need for the development of more refined measures of clinically relevant hippocampal behaviors. While arena-based navigation tasks have provided fundamental information regarding the role of the hippocampus in spatial memory, the development of automated operant variants have had mixed results. Recently, an automated touch-screen paradigm has been shown to be highly sensitive to hippocampal function in the rat and eliminated mediating strategies that arose in previous tasks. Here we show that mice with lesions encompassing the entire ventral portion of the dorsal hippocampus are impaired on pattern separation behavior using a delayed nonmatching-to-location (TUNL) adapted for mice. Lesioned mice readily acquired the task at control rates when separations were maximal and delay periods were short while decreasing separations significantly impaired lesion mice. However, in contrast to previously reported results in the rat, consistently increasing delays did not significantly impair performance in the lesion group. Presentation of a variable delay within a session significantly impaired performance in lesion mice across delay periods. The current results demonstrate the utility of a touch-screen paradigm for measuring hippocampal-dependent pattern separation in the mouse and establish the paradigm as an important platform for future studies in disease models. PMID:26265370

  20. CPEB3 Deficiency Elevates TRPV1 Expression in Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons to Potentiate Thermosensation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Yi-Shuian

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein 3 (CPEB3) is a sequence-specific RNA-binding protein that downregulates translation of multiple plasticity-related proteins (PRPs) at the glutamatergic synapses. Activity-induced synthesis of PRPs maintains long-lasting synaptic changes that are critical for memory consolidation and chronic pain manifestation. CPEB3-knockout (KO) mice show aberrant hippocampus-related plasticity and memory, so we investigated whether CPEB3 might have a role in nociception-associated plasticity. CPEB3 is widely expressed in the brain and peripheral afferent sensory neurons. CPEB3-KO mice with normal mechanosensation showed hypersensitivity to noxious heat. In the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain model, CPEB3-KO animals showed normal thermal hyperalgesia and transiently enhanced mechanical hyperalgesia. Translation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) RNA was suppressed by CPEB3 in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), whereas CFA-induced inflammation reversed this inhibition. Moreover, CPEB3/TRPV1 double-KO mice behaved like TRPV1-KO mice, with severely impaired thermosensation and thermal hyperalgesia. An enhanced thermal response was recapitulated in non-inflamed but not inflamed conditional-KO mice, with cpeb3 gene ablated mostly but not completely, in small-diameter nociceptive DRG neurons. CPEB3-regulated translation of TRPV1 RNA may play a role in fine-tuning thermal sensitivity of nociceptors. PMID:26915043

  1. Nicotine shifts the temporal activation of hippocampal protein kinase A and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 to enhance long-term, but not short-term, hippocampus-dependent memory.

    PubMed

    Gould, Thomas J; Wilkinson, Derek S; Yildirim, Emre; Poole, Rachel L F; Leach, Prescott T; Simmons, Steven J

    2014-03-01

    Acute nicotine enhances hippocampus-dependent learning through nicotine binding to β2-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), but it is unclear if nicotine is targeting processes involved in short-term memory (STM) leading to a strong long-term memory (LTM) or directly targeting LTM. In addition, the molecular mechanisms involved in the effects of nicotine on learning are unknown. Previous research indicates that protein kinase A (PKA), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and protein synthesis are crucial for LTM. Therefore, the present study examined the effects of nicotine on STM and LTM and the involvement of PKA, ERK1/2, and protein synthesis in the nicotine-induced enhancement of hippocampus-dependent contextual learning in C57BL/6J mice. The protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin impaired contextual conditioning assessed at 4 h but not 2 h post-training, delineating time points for STM (2 h) and LTM (4 h and beyond). Nicotine enhanced contextual conditioning at 4, 8, and 24 h but not 2 h post-training, indicating nicotine specifically enhances LTM but not STM. Furthermore, nicotine did not rescue deficits in contextual conditioning produced by anisomycin, suggesting that the nicotine enhancement of contextual conditioning occurs through a protein synthesis-dependent mechanism. In addition, inhibition of dorsal hippocampal PKA activity blocked the effect of acute nicotine on learning, and nicotine shifted the timing of learning-related PKA and ERK1/2 activity in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus. Thus, the present results suggest that nicotine specifically enhances LTM through altering the timing of PKA and ERK1/2 signaling in the hippocampus, and suggests that the timing of PKA and ERK1/2 activity could contribute to the strength of memories.

  2. Dorsal and ventral language pathways in persistent developmental stuttering.

    PubMed

    Kronfeld-Duenias, Vered; Amir, Ofer; Ezrati-Vinacour, Ruth; Civier, Oren; Ben-Shachar, Michal

    2016-08-01

    Persistent developmental stuttering is a speech disorder that affects an individual's ability to fluently produce speech. While the disorder mainly manifests in situations that require language production, it is still unclear whether persistent developmental stuttering is indeed a language impairment, and if so, which language stream is implicated in people who stutter. In this study, we take a neuroanatomical approach to this question by examining the structural properties of the dorsal and ventral language pathways in adults who stutter (AWS) and fluent controls. We use diffusion magnetic resonance imaging and individualized tract identification to extract white matter volumes and diffusion properties of these tracts in samples of adults who do and do not stutter. We further quantify diffusion properties at multiple points along the tract and examine group differences within these diffusivity profiles. Our results show differences in the dorsal, but not in the ventral, language-related tracts. Specifically, AWS show reduced volume of the left dorsal stream, as well as lower anisotropy in the right dorsal stream. These data provide neuroanatomical support for the view that stuttering involves an impairment in the bidirectional mapping between auditory and articulatory cortices supported by the dorsal pathways, not in lexical access and semantic aspects of language processing which are thought to rely more heavily on the left ventral pathways. PMID:27179916

  3. Dissociable Roles of Prelimbic and Infralimbic Cortices, Ventral Hippocampus, and Basolateral Amygdala in the Expression and Extinction of Conditioned Fear

    PubMed Central

    Sierra-Mercado, Demetrio; Padilla-Coreano, Nancy; Quirk, Gregory J

    2011-01-01

    Current models of conditioned fear expression and extinction involve the basolateral amygdala (BLA), ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), and the hippocampus (HPC). There is some disagreement with respect to the specific roles of these structures, perhaps due to subregional differences within each area. For example, growing evidence suggests that infralimbic (IL) and prelimbic (PL) subregions of vmPFC have opposite influences on fear expression. Moreover, it is the ventral HPC (vHPC), rather than the dorsal HPC, that projects to vmPFC and BLA. To help determine regional specificity, we used small doses of the GABAA agonist muscimol to selectively inactivate IL, PL, BLA, or vHPC in an auditory fear conditioning and extinction paradigm. Infusions were performed prior to extinction training, allowing us to assess the effects on both fear expression and subsequent extinction memory. Inactivation of IL had no effect on fear expression, but impaired the within-session acquisition of extinction as well as extinction memory. In contrast, inactivation of PL impaired fear expression, but had no effect on extinction memory. Inactivation of the BLA or vHPC impaired both fear expression and extinction memory. Post-extinction inactivations had no effect in any structure. We suggest a model in which amygdala-dependent fear expression is modulated by inputs from PL and vHPC, whereas extinction memory requires extinction-induced plasticity in IL, BLA, and/or vHPC. PMID:20962768

  4. Choline acetyltransferase in the hippocampus is associated with learning strategy preference in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Hawley, Wayne R; Witty, Christine F; Daniel, Jill M; Dohanich, Gary P

    2015-08-01

    One principle of the multiple memory systems hypothesis posits that the hippocampus-based and striatum-based memory systems compete for control over learning. Consistent with this notion, previous research indicates that the cholinergic system of the hippocampus plays a role in modulating the preference for a hippocampus-based place learning strategy over a striatum-based stimulus--response learning strategy. Interestingly, in the hippocampus, greater activity and higher protein levels of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), the enzyme that synthesizes acetylcholine, are associated with better performance on hippocampus-based learning and memory tasks. With this in mind, the primary aim of the current study was to determine if higher levels of ChAT and the high-affinity choline uptake transporter (CHT) in the hippocampus were associated with a preference for a hippocampus-based place learning strategy on a task that also could be solved by relying on a striatum-based stimulus--response learning strategy. Results confirmed that levels of ChAT in the dorsal region of the hippocampus were associated with a preference for a place learning strategy on a water maze task that could also be solved by adopting a stimulus-response learning strategy. Consistent with previous studies, the current results support the hypothesis that the cholinergic system of the hippocampus plays a role in balancing competition between memory systems that modulate learning strategy preference.

  5. Choline reverses scopolamine-induced memory impairment by improving memory reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Blake, M G; Boccia, M M; Krawczyk, M C; Delorenzi, A; Baratti, C M

    2012-09-01

    It is widely known that pre-training systemic administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine (SCP) (0.5mg/kg, i.p.) leads to anterograde memory impairment in retention tests. The administration of the α(7)-nicotinic receptor agonist choline (Ch) in the dorsal hippocampus (0.8μg/hippocampus) immediately after memory reactivation allowed recovery from scopolamine-induced memory impairment. This effect of Ch was time-dependent, and retention performance was not affected in drug-treated mice that were not subjected to memory reactivation, suggesting that the performance effects are not due to non-specific effects of the drug. The effects of Ch also depended on the age of the reactivated memory. Altogether, our results suggest that Ch exerts its effects by modulating memory reconsolidation, and that the memory impairment induced by low doses of SCP is a memory expression failure and not a storage deficit. Therefore, reconsolidation, among other functions, might serve to change memory expression in later tests. Summarizing, our results open new avenues about the behavioral significance and the physiological functions of memory reconsolidation, providing new strategies for recovering memories from some types of amnesia.

  6. Neocortical activation of the hippocampus during sleep in infant rats.

    PubMed

    Mohns, Ethan J; Blumberg, Mark S

    2010-03-01

    We recently reported that the majority of hippocampal neurons in newborn rats increase their activity in association with myoclonic twitches, which are indicative of active sleep. Because spindle bursts in the developing somatosensory neocortex occur in response to sensory feedback from myoclonic twitching, we hypothesized that the state-dependent activity of the newborn hippocampus arises from sensory feedback that sequentially activates the neocortex and then hippocampus, constituting an early form of neocortical-hippocampal communication. Here, in unanesthetized 5- to 6-d-old rats, we test this hypothesis by recording simultaneously from forelimb and barrel regions of somatosensory neocortex and dorsal hippocampus during periods of spontaneous sleep and wakefulness and in response to peripheral stimulation. Myoclonic twitches were consistently followed by neocortical spindle bursts, which were in turn consistently followed by bursts of hippocampal unit activity; moreover, spindle burst power was positively correlated with hippocampal unit activity. In addition, exogenous stimulation consistently evoked this neocortical-to-hippocampal sequence of activation. Finally, parahippocampal lesions that disrupted functional connections between the neocortex and hippocampus effectively disrupted the transmission of both spontaneous and evoked neocortical activity to the hippocampus. These findings suggest that sleep-related motor activity contributes to the development of neocortical and hippocampal circuits and provides a foundation on which coordinated activity between these two forebrain structures develops.

  7. Hippocampus and Medial Prefrontal Cortex Contributions to Trace and Contextual Fear Memory Expression over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeman, Christopher L.; Bauer, Philip S.; Pierson, Jamie L.; Quinn, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous work has shown that damage to the dorsal hippocampus (DH) occurring at recent, but not remote, timepoints following acquisition produces a deficit in trace conditioned fear memory expression. The opposite pattern has been observed with lesions to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The present studies address: (1) whether these lesion…

  8. A role for the lateral dorsal tegmentum in memory and decision neural circuitry.

    PubMed

    Redila, Van; Kinzel, Chantelle; Jo, Yong Sang; Puryear, Corey B; Mizumori, Sheri J Y

    2015-01-01

    A role for the hippocampus in memory is clear, although the mechanism for its contribution remains a matter of debate. Converging evidence suggests that hippocampus evaluates the extent to which context-defining features of events occur as expected. The consequence of mismatches, or prediction error, signals from hippocampus is discussed in terms of its impact on neural circuitry that evaluates the significance of prediction errors: Ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine cells burst fire to rewards or cues that predict rewards (Schultz, Dayan, & Montague, 1997). Although the lateral dorsal tegmentum (LDTg) importantly controls dopamine cell burst firing (Lodge & Grace, 2006) the behavioral significance of the LDTg control is not known. Therefore, we evaluated LDTg functional activity as rats performed a spatial memory task that generates task-dependent reward codes in VTA (Jo, Lee, & Mizumori, 2013; Puryear, Kim, & Mizumori, 2010) and another VTA afferent, the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPTg, Norton, Jo, Clark, Taylor, & Mizumori, 2011). Reversible inactivation of the LDTg significantly impaired choice accuracy. LDTg neurons coded primarily egocentric information in the form of movement velocity, turning behaviors, and behaviors leading up to expected reward locations. A subset of the velocity-tuned LDTg cells also showed high frequency bursts shortly before or after reward encounters, after which they showed tonic elevated firing during consumption of small, but not large, rewards. Cells that fired before reward encounters showed stronger correlations with velocity as rats moved toward, rather than away from, rewarded sites. LDTg neural activity was more strongly regulated by egocentric behaviors than that observed for PPTg or VTA cells that were recorded by Puryear et al. and Norton et al. While PPTg activity was uniquely sensitive to ongoing sensory input, all three regions encoded reward magnitude (although in different ways), reward expectation, and reward

  9. Neuroinflammation in the normal aging hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, R M; Kitt, M M; Watkins, L R; Maier, S F

    2015-11-19

    A consequence of normal aging is a greater susceptibility to memory impairments following an immune challenge such as infection, surgery, or traumatic brain injury. The neuroinflammatory response, produced by these challenges results in increased and prolonged production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the otherwise healthy aged brain. Here we discuss the mechanisms by which long-lasting elevations in pro-inflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus produce memory impairments. Sensitized microglia are a primary source of this exaggerated neuroinflammatory response and appear to be a hallmark of the normal aging brain. We review the current understanding of the causes and effects of normal aging-induced microglial sensitization, including dysregulations of the neuroendocrine system, potentiation of neuroinflammatory responses following an immune challenge, and the impairment of memories. We end with a discussion of therapeutic approaches to prevent these deleterious effects.

  10. Modulation of ethanol state-dependent learning by dorsal hippocampal NMDA receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Rezayof, Ameneh; Sharifi, Khadijeh; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Rassouli, Yassaman

    2008-12-01

    The possible role of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors of dorsal hippocampus on ethanol state-dependent learning was studied in adult male mice (Pasteur Institute, Iran). As a model of memory, a single-trial step-down passive avoidance task was used. All animals were bilaterally implanted with cannulae into the CA1 regions of dorsal hippocampi. Results show that intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of ethanol (0.5 and 1 g/kg) 30 min before training impaired memory performance in animals when tested 24h later. Pretest administration of the same doses of ethanol-induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under pretraining ethanol (1 g/kg, i.p.) influence. Pretest intra-CA1 microinjection of NMDA (0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 microg/mouse) by itself had no effect on memory retrieval and ethanol-induced amnesia. However, pretest intra-CA1 administration of the same doses of NMDA with an ineffective dose of ethanol (0.25 g/kg, i.p.) significantly restored the retrieval and potentiated ethanol state-dependent learning. On the other hand, pretest administration of a competitive NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5 (D-(-)-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid) (0.01, 0.1, and 1 microg/mouse, intra-CA1) or a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 maleate [(5S, 10R)-(+)-5-Methyl-10, 11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo [a, d] cyclohepten-5, 10-imine maleate] (0.25, 0.5, and 1 g/mouse, intra-CA1) 5 min before the administration of ethanol (1 g/kg, i.p.) significantly inhibited ethanol state-dependent learning. Intra-CA1 pretest administration of D-AP5 (0.01, 0.1, and 1 microg/mouse) or MK-801 maleate [5S, 10R)-(+)-5-Methyl-10, 11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo [a, d] cyclohepten-5, 10-imine maleate] (0.25, 0.5, and 1 microg/mouse) alone did not affect memory retention. It may be concluded that dorsal hippocampal NMDA receptors are involved in mediating ethanol state-dependent learning.

  11. Hippocampus, delay discounting, and vicarious trial-and-error.

    PubMed

    Bett, David; Murdoch, Lauren H; Wood, Emma R; Dudchenko, Paul A

    2015-05-01

    In decision-making, an immediate reward is usually preferred to a delayed reward, even if the latter is larger. We tested whether the hippocampus is necessary for this form of temporal discounting, and for vicarious trial-and-error at the decision point. Rats were trained on a recently developed, adjustable delay-discounting task (Papale et al. (2012) Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci 12:513-526), which featured a choice between a small, nearly immediate reward, and a larger, delayed reward. Rats then received either hippocampus or sham lesions. Animals with hippocampus lesions adjusted the delay for the larger reward to a level similar to that of sham-lesioned animals, suggesting a similar valuation capacity. However, the hippocampus lesion group spent significantly longer investigating the small and large rewards in the first part of the sessions, and were less sensitive to changes in the amount of reward in the large reward maze arm. Both sham- and hippocampus-lesioned rats showed a greater amount of vicarious trial-and-error on trials in which the delay was adjusted. In a nonadjusting version of the delay discounting task, animals with hippocampus lesions showed more variability in their preference for a larger reward that was delayed by 10 s compared with sham-lesioned animals. To verify the lesion behaviorally, rat were subsequently trained on a water maze task, and rats with hippocampus lesions were significantly impaired compared with sham-lesioned animals. The findings on the delay discounting tasks suggest that damage to the hippocampus may impair the detection of reward magnitude.

  12. Suppression of glucocorticoid secretion enhances cholinergic transmission in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Kazushige; Shoji, Hirotaka; Ikeda, Ryuji; Tanaka, Yayoi; Maruyama, Wakako; Tabira, Takeshi

    2008-08-15

    We previously demonstrated that suppression of glucocorticoid secretion by adrenalectomy (ADX) impaired prefrontal cortex-sensitive working memory, but not reference memory. Since the cholinergic system in the hippocampus is also involved in these memories, we examined the effects of glucocorticoid suppression on cholinergic transmission in the rat hippocampus. A microdialysis study revealed that ADX did not affect the basal acetylcholine release, but enhanced the KCl-evoked response. This enhanced response was reversed by the corticosterone replacement treatment. The extracellular choline concentrations increased under both basal and KCl-stimulated conditions in the ADX rats, and these increases were also reversed by the corticosterone replacement. These results indicate that suppression of glucocorticoid secretion enhances cholinergic transmission in the hippocampus in response to stimuli. It is possible that this enhanced cholinergic transmission may not contribute to the ADX-induced working memory impairment, but it may be involved in maintenance of reference memory.

  13. Dorsal and ventral stream sensitivity in normal development and hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Gunn, Alison; Cory, Elizabeth; Atkinson, Janette; Braddick, Oliver; Wattam-Bell, John; Guzzetta, Andrea; Cioni, Giovanni

    2002-05-01

    Form and motion coherence thresholds can provide comparable measures of global visual processing in the ventral and dorsal streams respectively. Normal development of thresholds was tested in 360 normally developing children aged 4-11 and in normal adults. The two tasks showed similar developmental trends, with some greater variability and a slight delay in motion coherence compared to form coherence performance, in reaching adult levels. To examine the proposal of dorsal stream vulnerability related to specific developmental disorders, we compared 24 children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy with the normally developing group. Hemiplegic children performed significantly worse than controls on the motion coherence task for their age, but not on the form coherence task; however, within this group no specific brain area was significantly associated with poor motion compared to form coherence performance. These results suggest that extrastriate mechanisms mediating these thresholds normally develop in parallel, but that the dorsal stream has a greater, general vulnerability to early neurological impairment. PMID:11997698

  14. Habenula lesions cause impaired cognitive performance in rats: implications for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lecourtier, Lucas; Neijt, Hans C; Kelly, Peter H

    2004-05-01

    Cognitive impairment is a prominent feature of schizophrenia. Currently there is no well-accepted explanation of the aetiology of this disorder, but recent evidence indicates that dysfunction of the habenula may be involved. We therefore examined whether habenula lesions in Sprague-Dawley rats cause behavioural changes resembling those of schizophrenia. Rats received either habenula lesions, a sham operation or a small lesion of the overlying dorsal hippocampus as a check that effects observed were not due to incidental damage to this structure. As there are alterations of social behaviour, sensorimotor gating and cognition in schizophrenia, we examined comparable behaviours. Social interaction time was measured during a 5-min encounter with a novel juvenile conspecific. Prepulse inhibition of an acoustic startle response, as an index of sensorimotor gating, was measured with prepulses of various amplitudes, and spatial cognitive performance was assessed in the Morris water maze task. Histological analysis showed that habenula lesions substantially damaged both medial and lateral habenula bilaterally while largely sparing neighbouring structures. Assay of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in the interpeduncular nucleus terminal region of the habenulo-interpeduncular tract, showed marked reduction (by 80%) in habenula-lesioned animals. Habenula-lesioned rats, but not the control group with small dorsal hippocampus lesions, showed marked impairment of Morris maze performance compared to the sham-operated control group. Social interaction time and prepulse inhibition were not significantly altered in either lesion group. The results are consistent with a role of the habenula in cognition, and with the view that pathology of the habenula may contribute to the cognitive impairments of schizophrenia.

  15. High-Frequency Stimulation-Induced Synaptic Potentiation in Dorsal and Ventral CA1 Hippocampal Synapses: The Involvement of NMDA Receptors, mGluR5, and (L-Type) Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papatheodoropoulos, Costas; Kouvaros, Stylianos

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the ventral hippocampus (VH) for long-lasting long-term potentiation (LTP) and the mechanisms underlying its lower ability for shortlasting LTP compared with the dorsal hippocampus (DH) are unknown. Using recordings of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) from the CA1 field of adult rat hippocampal slices, we found that…

  16. Stress Effects on the Hippocampus: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Eun Joo; Pellman, Blake; Kim, Jeansok J.

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrollable stress has been recognized to influence the hippocampus at various levels of analysis. Behaviorally, human and animal studies have found that stress generally impairs various hippocampal-dependent memory tasks. Neurally, animal studies have revealed that stress alters ensuing synaptic plasticity and firing properties of hippocampal…

  17. Hippocampal inactivation with TTX impairs long-term spatial memory retrieval and modifies brain metabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Conejo, Nélida María; Cimadevilla, José Manuel; González-Pardo, Héctor; Méndez-Couz, Marta; Arias, Jorge Luis

    2013-01-01

    Functional inactivation techniques enable studying the hippocampal involvement in each phase of spatial memory formation in the rat. In this study, we applied tetrodotoxin unilaterally or bilaterally into the dorsal hippocampus to evaluate the role of this brain structure in retrieval of memories acquired 28 days before in the Morris water maze. We combined hippocampal inactivation with the assessment of brain metabolism using cytochrome oxidase histochemistry. Several brain regions were considered, including the hippocampus and other related structures. Results showed that both unilateral and bilateral hippocampal inactivation impaired spatial memory retrieval. Hence, whereas subjects with bilateral hippocampal inactivation showed a circular swim pattern at the side walls of the pool, unilateral inactivation favoured swimming in the quadrants adjacent to the target one. Analysis of cytochrome oxidase activity disclosed regional differences according to the degree of hippocampal functional blockade. In comparison to control group, animals with bilateral inactivation showed increased CO activity in CA1 and CA3 areas of the hippocampus during retrieval, while the activity of the dentate gyrus substantially decreased. However, unilateral inactivated animals showed decreased CO activity in Ammon's horn and the dentate gyrus. This study demonstrated that retrieval recruits differentially the hippocampal subregions and the balance between them is altered with hippocampal functional lesions.

  18. Hippocampal inactivation with TTX impairs long-term spatial memory retrieval and modifies brain metabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Conejo, Nélida María; Cimadevilla, José Manuel; González-Pardo, Héctor; Méndez-Couz, Marta; Arias, Jorge Luis

    2013-01-01

    Functional inactivation techniques enable studying the hippocampal involvement in each phase of spatial memory formation in the rat. In this study, we applied tetrodotoxin unilaterally or bilaterally into the dorsal hippocampus to evaluate the role of this brain structure in retrieval of memories acquired 28 days before in the Morris water maze. We combined hippocampal inactivation with the assessment of brain metabolism using cytochrome oxidase histochemistry. Several brain regions were considered, including the hippocampus and other related structures. Results showed that both unilateral and bilateral hippocampal inactivation impaired spatial memory retrieval. Hence, whereas subjects with bilateral hippocampal inactivation showed a circular swim pattern at the side walls of the pool, unilateral inactivation favoured swimming in the quadrants adjacent to the target one. Analysis of cytochrome oxidase activity disclosed regional differences according to the degree of hippocampal functional blockade. In comparison to control group, animals with bilateral inactivation showed increased CO activity in CA1 and CA3 areas of the hippocampus during retrieval, while the activity of the dentate gyrus substantially decreased. However, unilateral inactivated animals showed decreased CO activity in Ammon's horn and the dentate gyrus. This study demonstrated that retrieval recruits differentially the hippocampal subregions and the balance between them is altered with hippocampal functional lesions. PMID:23724089

  19. Hippocampal Inactivation with TTX Impairs Long-Term Spatial Memory Retrieval and Modifies Brain Metabolic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Conejo, Nélida María; Cimadevilla, José Manuel; González-Pardo, Héctor; Méndez-Couz, Marta; Arias, Jorge Luis

    2013-01-01

    Functional inactivation techniques enable studying the hippocampal involvement in each phase of spatial memory formation in the rat. In this study, we applied tetrodotoxin unilaterally or bilaterally into the dorsal hippocampus to evaluate the role of this brain structure in retrieval of memories acquired 28 days before in the Morris water maze. We combined hippocampal inactivation with the assessment of brain metabolism using cytochrome oxidase histochemistry. Several brain regions were considered, including the hippocampus and other related structures. Results showed that both unilateral and bilateral hippocampal inactivation impaired spatial memory retrieval. Hence, whereas subjects with bilateral hippocampal inactivation showed a circular swim pattern at the side walls of the pool, unilateral inactivation favoured swimming in the quadrants adjacent to the target one. Analysis of cytochrome oxidase activity disclosed regional differences according to the degree of hippocampal functional blockade. In comparison to control group, animals with bilateral inactivation showed increased CO activity in CA1 and CA3 areas of the hippocampus during retrieval, while the activity of the dentate gyrus substantially decreased. However, unilateral inactivated animals showed decreased CO activity in Ammon's horn and the dentate gyrus. This study demonstrated that retrieval recruits differentially the hippocampal subregions and the balance between them is altered with hippocampal functional lesions. PMID:23724089

  20. Music exposure improves spatial cognition by enhancing the BDNF level of dorsal hippocampal subregions in the developing rats.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yingshou; Chen, Wenxi; Wang, Yanran; Jing, Wei; Gao, Shan; Guo, Daqing; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-03-01

    Previous research has shown that dorsal hippocampus plays an important role in spatial memory process. Music exposure can enhance brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression level in dorsal hippocampus (DH) and thus enhance spatial cognition ability. But whether music experience may affect different subregions of DH in the same degree remains unclear. Here, we studied the effects of exposure to Mozart K.448 on learning behavior in developing rats using the classical Morris water maze task. The results showed that early music exposure could enhance significantly learning performance of the rats in the water maze test. Meanwhile, the BDNF/TrkB level of dorsal hippocampus CA3 (dCA3) and dentate gyrus (dDG) was significantly enhanced in rats exposed to Mozart music as compared to those without music exposure. In contrast, the BDNF/TrkB level of dorsal hippocampus CA1 (dCA1) was not affected. The results suggest that the spatial memory improvement by music exposure in rats may be associated with the enhanced BDNF/TrkB level of dCA3 and dDG.

  1. Anti-dorsal root ganglion neuron antibody in a case of dorsal root ganglionitis associated with Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Satake, M; Yoshimura, T; Iwaki, T; Yamada, T; Kobayashi, T

    1995-10-01

    We report the case of a 59-year-old woman with primary Sjögren's syndrome who developed hypesthesia, hypalgesia, and neurogenic arthropathy in her lower limbs. Neurological examination and electrophysiological studies indicated involvement of the dorsal root ganglia. The immunohistochemistry of sections of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) showed that the IgG in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the patient bound to the neuronal perikarya of small DRG neurons but not to the cerebellum or peripheral nerves. These results, consistent with particular impairment of pain and touch senses, suggest that dorsal root ganglionitis in primary Sjögren's syndrome is mediated by humoral autoimmunity.

  2. Fumanjian, a Classic Chinese Herbal Formula, Can Ameliorate the Impairment of Spatial Learning and Memory through Apoptotic Signaling Pathway in the Hippocampus of Rats with Aβ1–40-Induced Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hai-yan; Cui, Zhi-hui; Li, Hui-qin; Wang, Yi-ru; Chen, Xiang; Li, Ji-huang; Xv, Dong-mei

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and lacks disease-altering treatments. Fumanjian (FMJ), a famous classic Chinese herbal prescription for dementia, was first recorded in the Complete Works of Jingyue during the Ming Dynasty. This study aimed to investigate whether FMJ could prevent cognitive deficit and take neuroprotective effects in Aβ1–40-induced rat model through apoptotic signaling pathway. AD model was established by bilateral injection of Aβ1–40 into hippocampus in rat. All rats were tested for their capabilities of spatial navigation and memorization by Morris water maze. Apoptosis was tested using TUNEL staining in hippocampus neuronal cells; RT-PCR tested expression of Bcl-2 and Bax mRNA; western blotting tested protein level of cleaved caspase-3. After 14 days of treatment, FMJ significantly improved the escape latency and enhanced platform-cross number compared with the Aβ1–40-injected group (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). FMJ also significantly decreased number of TUNEL-positive neuronal apoptosis and the expressions of Bax and cleaved Caspase-3 and increased the expression of Bcl-2 (P < 0.01) compared with AD model group. In conclusion, FMJ exerts a protective effect against Aβ1–40-induced learning and memory deficits and neuronal apoptosis, suggesting that FMJ could be used as a potential therapeutic formula for AD. PMID:25050129

  3. Methamphetamine differentially affects BDNF and cell death factors in anatomically defined regions of the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Galinato, Melissa H.; Orio, Laura; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine exposure reduces hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and neurogenesis and these alterations partially contribute to hippocampal maladaptive plasticity. The potential mechanisms underlying methamphetamine-induced maladaptive plasticity were identified in the present study. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; a regulator of LTP and neurogenesis), and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) were studied in the dorsal and ventral hippocampal tissue lysates in rats that intravenously self-administered methamphetamine in a limited access (1 h/day) or extended access (6 h/day) paradigm for 17 days post baseline sessions. Extended access methamphetamine enhanced expression of BDNF with significant effects observed in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus. Methamphetamine-induced enhancements in BDNF expression were not associated with TrkB receptor activation as indicated by phospho (p)-TrkB-706 levels. Conversely, methamphetamine produced hypophosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunit 2B (GluN2B) at Tyr-1472 in the ventral hippocampus, indicating reduced receptor activation. In addition, methamphetamine enhanced expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and reduced pro-apoptotic protein Bax levels in the ventral hippocampus, suggesting a mechanism for reducing cell death. Analysis of Akt, a pro-survival kinase that suppresses apoptotic pathways and pAkt at Ser-473 demonstrated that extended access methamphetamine reduces Akt expression in the ventral hippocampus. These data reveal that alterations in Bcl-2 and Bax levels by methamphetamine were not associated with enhanced Akt expression. Given that hippocampal function and neurogenesis vary in a subregion-specific fashion, where dorsal hippocampus regulates spatial processing and has higher levels of neurogenesis, whereas ventral hippocampus regulates anxiety-related behaviors, these data suggest that methamphetamine self-administration initiates distinct allostatic changes in

  4. Histamine in the basolateral amygdala promotes inhibitory avoidance learning independently of hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Fernando; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Provensi, Gustavo; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Baldi, Elisabetta; Bucherelli, Corrado; Munari, Leonardo; Izquierdo, Ivan; Blandina, Patrizio

    2015-05-12

    Recent discoveries demonstrated that recruitment of alternative brain circuits permits compensation of memory impairments following damage to brain regions specialized in integrating and/or storing specific memories, including both dorsal hippocampus and basolateral amygdala (BLA). Here, we first report that the integrity of the brain histaminergic system is necessary for long-term, but not for short-term memory of step-down inhibitory avoidance (IA). Second, we found that phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) responsive-element-binding protein, a crucial mediator in long-term memory formation, correlated anatomically and temporally with histamine-induced memory retrieval, showing the active involvement of histamine function in CA1 and BLA in different phases of memory consolidation. Third, we found that exogenous application of histamine in either hippocampal CA1 or BLA of brain histamine-depleted rats, hence amnesic, restored long-term memory; however, the time frame of memory rescue was different for the two brain structures, short lived (immediately posttraining) for BLA, long lasting (up to 6 h) for the CA1. Moreover, long-term memory was formed immediately after training restoring of histamine transmission only in the BLA. These findings reveal the essential role of histaminergic neurotransmission to provide the brain with the plasticity necessary to ensure memorization of emotionally salient events, through recruitment of alternative circuits. Hence, our findings indicate that the histaminergic system comprises parallel, coordinated pathways that provide compensatory plasticity when one brain structure is compromised. PMID:25918368

  5. Histamine in the basolateral amygdala promotes inhibitory avoidance learning independently of hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Benetti, Fernando; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Provensi, Gustavo; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Baldi, Elisabetta; Bucherelli, Corrado; Munari, Leonardo; Izquierdo, Ivan; Blandina, Patrizio

    2015-01-01

    Recent discoveries demonstrated that recruitment of alternative brain circuits permits compensation of memory impairments following damage to brain regions specialized in integrating and/or storing specific memories, including both dorsal hippocampus and basolateral amygdala (BLA). Here, we first report that the integrity of the brain histaminergic system is necessary for long-term, but not for short-term memory of step-down inhibitory avoidance (IA). Second, we found that phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) responsive-element-binding protein, a crucial mediator in long-term memory formation, correlated anatomically and temporally with histamine-induced memory retrieval, showing the active involvement of histamine function in CA1 and BLA in different phases of memory consolidation. Third, we found that exogenous application of histamine in either hippocampal CA1 or BLA of brain histamine-depleted rats, hence amnesic, restored long-term memory; however, the time frame of memory rescue was different for the two brain structures, short lived (immediately posttraining) for BLA, long lasting (up to 6 h) for the CA1. Moreover, long-term memory was formed immediately after training restoring of histamine transmission only in the BLA. These findings reveal the essential role of histaminergic neurotransmission to provide the brain with the plasticity necessary to ensure memorization of emotionally salient events, through recruitment of alternative circuits. Hence, our findings indicate that the histaminergic system comprises parallel, coordinated pathways that provide compensatory plasticity when one brain structure is compromised. PMID:25918368

  6. Increased anterior cingulate cortex and hippocampus activation in Complex PTSD during encoding of negative words.

    PubMed

    Thomaes, Kathleen; Dorrepaal, Ethy; Draijer, Nel; de Ruiter, Michiel B; Elzinga, Bernet M; Sjoerds, Zsuzsika; van Balkom, Anton J; Smit, Johannes H; Veltman, Dick J

    2013-02-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with impaired memory performance coupled with functional changes in brain areas involved in declarative memory and emotion regulation. It is not yet clear how symptom severity and comorbidity affect neurocognitive functioning in PTSD. We performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study with an emotional declarative memory task in 28 Complex PTSD patients with comorbid depressive and personality disorders, and 21 healthy non-trauma-exposed controls. In Complex PTSD patients--compared to controls--encoding of later remembered negative words vs baseline was associated with increased blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response in the left ventral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and dorsal ACC extending to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) together with a trend for increased left hippocampus activation. Patients tended to commit more False Alarms to negative words compared to controls, which was associated with enhanced left ventrolateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex (vlPFC/OFC) responses. Severity of child abuse was positively correlated with left ventral ACC activity and severity of depression with (para) hippocampal and ventral ACC activity. Presented results demonstrate functional abnormalities in Complex PTSD in the frontolimbic brain circuit also implicated in fear conditioning models, but generally in the opposite direction, which may be explained by severity of the trauma and severity of comorbid depression in Complex PTSD.

  7. Histamine in the basolateral amygdala promotes inhibitory avoidance learning independently of hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Fernando; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Provensi, Gustavo; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Baldi, Elisabetta; Bucherelli, Corrado; Munari, Leonardo; Izquierdo, Ivan; Blandina, Patrizio

    2015-05-12

    Recent discoveries demonstrated that recruitment of alternative brain circuits permits compensation of memory impairments following damage to brain regions specialized in integrating and/or storing specific memories, including both dorsal hippocampus and basolateral amygdala (BLA). Here, we first report that the integrity of the brain histaminergic system is necessary for long-term, but not for short-term memory of step-down inhibitory avoidance (IA). Second, we found that phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) responsive-element-binding protein, a crucial mediator in long-term memory formation, correlated anatomically and temporally with histamine-induced memory retrieval, showing the active involvement of histamine function in CA1 and BLA in different phases of memory consolidation. Third, we found that exogenous application of histamine in either hippocampal CA1 or BLA of brain histamine-depleted rats, hence amnesic, restored long-term memory; however, the time frame of memory rescue was different for the two brain structures, short lived (immediately posttraining) for BLA, long lasting (up to 6 h) for the CA1. Moreover, long-term memory was formed immediately after training restoring of histamine transmission only in the BLA. These findings reveal the essential role of histaminergic neurotransmission to provide the brain with the plasticity necessary to ensure memorization of emotionally salient events, through recruitment of alternative circuits. Hence, our findings indicate that the histaminergic system comprises parallel, coordinated pathways that provide compensatory plasticity when one brain structure is compromised.

  8. The dorsal prefrontal and dorsal anterior cingulate cortices exert complementary network signatures during encoding and retrieval in associative memory.

    PubMed

    Woodcock, Eric A; White, Richard; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A

    2015-09-01

    Cognitive control includes processes that facilitate execution of effortful cognitive tasks, including associative memory. Regions implicated in cognitive control during associative memory include the dorsal prefrontal (dPFC) and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC). Here we investigated the relative degrees of network-related interactions originating in the dPFC and dACC during oscillating phases of associative memory: encoding and cued retrieval. Volunteers completed an established object-location associative memory paradigm during fMRI. Psychophysiological interactions modeled modulatory network interactions from the dPFC and dACC during memory encoding and retrieval. Results were evaluated in second level analyses of variance with seed region and memory process as factors. Each seed exerted differentiable modulatory effects during encoding and retrieval. The dACC exhibited greater modulation (than the dPFC) on the fusiform and parahippocampal gyrus during encoding, while the dPFC exhibited greater modulation (than the dACC) on the fusiform, hippocampus, dPFC and basal ganglia. During retrieval, the dPFC exhibited greater modulation (than the dACC) on the parahippocampal gyrus, hippocampus, superior parietal lobule, and dPFC. The most notable finding was a seed by process interaction indicating that the dACC and the dPFC exerted complementary modulatory control on the hippocampus during each of the associative memory processes. These results provide evidence for differentiable, yet complementary, control-related modulation by the dACC and dPFC, while establishing the primacy of dPFC in exerting network control during both associative memory phases. Our approach and findings are relevant for understanding basic processes in human memory and psychiatric disorders that impact associative memory-related networks. PMID:25960314

  9. Effect of dorsal hippocampal lesion compared to dorsal hippocampal blockade by atropine on reference memory in vision deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Dhume, R A; Noronha, A; Nagwekar, M D; Mascarenhas, J F

    1989-10-01

    In order to study the primacy of the hippocampus in place learning function 24 male adult albino rats were hippocampally-lesioned in dorsal hippocampus involving fornical damage (group I); sham operated for comparison with group I (group II); cannulated for instillation of atropine sulphate in the same loci as group I (group III); and cannulated for instillation of saline which served as control for group III (group IV). All the animals were enucleated and their reference memory (long-term memory) was tested, using open 4-arm radial maze. There was loss of reference memory in groups I and III. However, hippocampally-lesioned animals, showed recovery of reference memory deficit within a short period of 10 days or so. Whereas atropinized animals showed persistent reference memory deficit as long as the instillation effect continued. The mechanism involved in the recovery of reference memory in hippocampally-lesioned animals and persistent deficit of reference memory in atropinized animals has been postulated to explain the primacy of hippocampus in the place learning function under normal conditions.

  10. Post-Training Unilateral Amygdala Lesions Selectively Impair Contextual Fear Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flavell, Charlotte R.; Lee, Jonathan L. C.

    2012-01-01

    The basolateral amygdala (BLA) and the dorsal hippocampus (dHPC) are both structures with key roles in contextual fear conditioning. During fear conditioning, it is postulated that contextual representations of the environment are formed in the hippocampus, which are then associated with foot shock in the amygdala. However, it is not known to what…

  11. Object recognition memory and the rodent hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Nicola J; Gaskin, Stephane; Squire, Larry R; Clark, Robert E

    2010-01-01

    In rodents, the novel object recognition task (NOR) has become a benchmark task for assessing recognition memory. Yet, despite its widespread use, a consensus has not developed about which brain structures are important for task performance. We assessed both the anterograde and retrograde effects of hippocampal lesions on performance in the NOR task. Rats received 12 5-min exposures to two identical objects and then received either bilateral lesions of the hippocampus or sham surgery 1 d, 4 wk, or 8 wk after the final exposure. On a retention test 2 wk after surgery, the 1-d and 4-wk hippocampal lesion groups exhibited impaired object recognition memory. In contrast, the 8-wk hippocampal lesion group performed similarly to controls, and both groups exhibited a preference for the novel object. These same rats were then given four postoperative tests using unique object pairs and a 3-h delay between the exposure phase and the test phase. Hippocampal lesions produced moderate and reliable memory impairment. The results suggest that the hippocampus is important for object recognition memory.

  12. Exercise Prevents Memory Impairment Induced by Arsenic Exposure in Mice: Implication of Hippocampal BDNF and CREB.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao-Fei; Wang, Qing-Qing; Yu, Zi-Jiang; Yu, Yan; Xiao, Chao-Lun; Kang, Chao-Sheng; Ge, Guo; Linghu, Yan; Zhu, Jun-De; Li, Yu-Mei; Li, Qiang-Ming; Luo, Shi-Peng; Yang, Dang; Li, Lin; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Tian, Guang

    2015-01-01

    High concentrations of arsenic, which can be occasionally found in drinking water, have been recognized as a global health problem. Exposure to arsenic can disrupt spatial memory; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we tested whether exercise could interfere with the effect of arsenic exposure on the long-term memory (LTM) of object recognition in mice. Arsenic (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/ kg, i.g.) was administered daily for 12 weeks. We found that arsenic at dosages of 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg decreased body weight and increased the arsenic content in the brain. The object recognition LTM (tested 24 h after training) was disrupted by 3 mg/ kg and 10 mg/ kg, but not 1 mg/ kg arsenic exposure. Swimming exercise also prevented LTM impairment induced by 3 mg/ kg, but not with 10 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylated cAMP-response element binding protein (pCREB) in the CA1 and dentate gyrus areas (DG) of the dorsal hippocampus were decreased by 3 mg/ kg and 10 mg/ kg, but not by 1 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure. The decrease in BDNF and pCREB in the CA1 and DG induced by 3 mg/ kg, but not 10 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure were prevented by swimming exercise. Arsenic exposure did not affect the total CREB expression in the CA1 or DG. Taken together, these results indicated that swimming exercise prevented the impairment of object recognition LTM induced by arsenic exposure, which may be mediated by BDNF and CREB in the dorsal hippocampus.

  13. Exercise Prevents Memory Impairment Induced by Arsenic Exposure in Mice: Implication of Hippocampal BDNF and CREB

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zi-Jiang; Yu, Yan; Xiao, Chao-Lun; Kang, Chao-Sheng; Ge, Guo; Linghu, Yan; Zhu, Jun-De; Li, Yu-Mei; Li, Qiang-Ming; Luo, Shi-Peng; Yang, Dang; Li, Lin; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Tian, Guang

    2015-01-01

    High concentrations of arsenic, which can be occasionally found in drinking water, have been recognized as a global health problem. Exposure to arsenic can disrupt spatial memory; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we tested whether exercise could interfere with the effect of arsenic exposure on the long-term memory (LTM) of object recognition in mice. Arsenic (0, 1, 3, and 10 mg/ kg, i.g.) was administered daily for 12 weeks. We found that arsenic at dosages of 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg decreased body weight and increased the arsenic content in the brain. The object recognition LTM (tested 24 h after training) was disrupted by 3 mg/ kg and 10 mg/ kg, but not 1 mg/ kg arsenic exposure. Swimming exercise also prevented LTM impairment induced by 3 mg/ kg, but not with 10 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and phosphorylated cAMP-response element binding protein (pCREB) in the CA1 and dentate gyrus areas (DG) of the dorsal hippocampus were decreased by 3 mg/ kg and 10 mg/ kg, but not by 1 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure. The decrease in BDNF and pCREB in the CA1 and DG induced by 3 mg/ kg, but not 10 mg/ kg, of arsenic exposure were prevented by swimming exercise. Arsenic exposure did not affect the total CREB expression in the CA1 or DG. Taken together, these results indicated that swimming exercise prevented the impairment of object recognition LTM induced by arsenic exposure, which may be mediated by BDNF and CREB in the dorsal hippocampus. PMID:26368803

  14. Dorsal raphe nucleus and harm avoidance: A resting-state investigation.

    PubMed

    Meylakh, N; Henderson, L A

    2016-06-01

    The temperament dimension of harm avoidance defines an individual's biological tendency to exhibit altering levels of anxious, inhibiting, and cautious behavior. High harm avoidance and anxiety are highly comorbid, likely due to activity in similar neural circuitries involving the dorsal raphe nucleus. Despite the many investigations that have explored personality factors and brain function, none have determined the influence of ongoing activity within dorsal raphe networks on harm avoidance. The aim of this study was to explore such a relationship. In 62 healthy subjects, a series of 180 functional magnetic resonance images covering the entire brain were collected, and each subject completed the 240-item TCI-R questionnaire. Independent component analyses were performed to define the dorsal raphe network and then to determine the regions significantly correlated with harm avoidance. The independent component analyses revealed three signal intensity fluctuation maps encompassing the dorsal raphe nucleus, showing interactions with regions of the amygdala, hippocampus, nucleus accumbens, and prefrontal, insular, and cingulate cortices. Within these systems, the resting signal intensity was significantly coupled to harm avoidance in the bilateral basal amygdala, bilateral ventral hippocampus, bilateral insula, bilateral nucleus accumbens, and medial prefrontal cortex. Note that we could not measure serotonergic output, but instead measured signal changes in the dorsal raphe that likely reflect synaptic activity. These data provide evidence that at rest, signal intensity fluctuations within the dorsal raphe networks are related to harm avoidance. Given the strong relationship between harm avoidance and anxiety-like behaviors, it is possible that ongoing activity within this identified neural circuitry can contribute to an individual developing anxiety disorders.

  15. Multiple repressive mechanisms in the hippocampus during memory formation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jun; Yu, Nam-Kyung; Choi, Jun-Hyeok; Sim, Su-Eon; Kang, SukJae Joshua; Kwak, Chuljung; Lee, Seung-Woo; Kim, Ji-il; Choi, Dong Il; Kim, V Narry; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2015-10-01

    Memory stabilization after learning requires translational and transcriptional regulations in the brain, yet the temporal molecular changes that occur after learning have not been explored at the genomic scale. We used ribosome profiling and RNA sequencing to quantify the translational status and transcript levels in the mouse hippocampus after contextual fear conditioning. We revealed three types of repressive regulations: translational suppression of ribosomal protein-coding genes in the hippocampus, learning-induced early translational repression of specific genes, and late persistent suppression of a subset of genes via inhibition of estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1/ERα) signaling. In behavioral analyses, overexpressing Nrsn1, one of the newly identified genes undergoing rapid translational repression, or activating ESR1 in the hippocampus impaired memory formation. Collectively, this study unveils the yet-unappreciated importance of gene repression mechanisms for memory formation.

  16. Role of dorsal hippocampal orexin-1 receptors in memory restoration induced by morphine sensitization phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Alijanpour, S; Tirgar, F; Zarrindast, M-R

    2016-01-15

    The present study was examined the blockade of CA1 orexin-1 receptors (OX1Rs) of the dorsal hippocampus in the induction or expression phase on morphine sensitization-induced memory restoration using the Morris water maze (MWM) apparatus. Results showed that pre-training administration of morphine (5mg/kg, s.c.) increases escape latency and traveled distance, while does not alter swimming speed. This supports the impairing effect of morphine on the spatial memory acquisition in male adult rats. Also, in the retrieval session (probe trial) this treatment decreased the time spent in the target quadrant. Moreover, morphine-induced sensitization (15 or 20mg/kg, s.c.; once daily for 3days and followed by 5days no drug treatment) restored the memory acquisition/retrieval deficit which had been induced by pre-training administration of morphine (5mg/kg, s.c.). Intra-CA1 microinjection of subthreshold doses of SB-334867 (OX1Rs antagonist; 10, 20 and 40nmol/rat), 5min before morphine (20mg/kg/day×3days, s.c.; induction phase for morphine sensitization) did not alter restoration of memory acquisition/retrieval produced by the morphine sensitization phenomenon. In contrast, microinjection of subthreshold doses of SB-334867 (10, 20 and 40nmol/rat) into the CA1 region in the training session, 5min prior to morphine (5mg/kg, s.c.; expression phase for morphine sensitization) blocked the spatial memory acquisition/retrieval in morphine-sensitized rats. In conclusion, these findings show that morphine sensitization reverses morphine-induced amnesia. Furthermore, the blockade of CA1 OX1Rs in the expression phase, but not in the induction phase, disrupts memory restoration induced by morphine sensitization.

  17. Memory extinction requires gene expression in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Vianna, Monica R; Igaz, Lionel Muller; Coitinho, Adriana S; Medina, Jorge H; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2003-05-01

    Rats with cannulae in the dorsal CA1 region of the hippocampus were trained in one-trial step-down inhibitory avoidance, and submitted to four consecutive daily test sessions without the footshock. This produced extinction of the conditioned response in control animals. The bilateral infusion into the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus of two different inhibitors of gene transcription, DRB (80 microg/side) or alpha-amanitin (25 pg/side), or of the protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin (80 microg/side) blocked extinction of the CR. The treatments were effective when given 15 min before, but not 1 or 3h after the first test session. Retrieval itself was not affected by the drugs. The treatments did not affect general activity in an open field or anxiety levels measured in an elevated plus maze. The data indicate that gene transcription and protein synthesis are necessary at the time of the first test session in order to generate extinction. These requirements are to be expected from learning that involves new synaptic associations.

  18. Epinephrine and glucose modulate training-related CREB phosphorylation in old rats: relationships to age-related memory impairments.

    PubMed

    Morris, Ken A; Gold, Paul E

    2013-02-01

    Epinephrine enhances memory in young adult rats, in part, by increasing blood glucose levels needed to modulate memory. In old rats, epinephrine is deficient at raising blood glucose levels and thus is only moderately effective at enhancing memory. In contrast, systemic glucose injections improve memory in old rats, with resulting memory performance equal to that of young rats. The diminished response of glucose to training in old rats may blunt downstream neurochemical and molecular mechanisms needed to upregulate memory processes. In the first experiment, young adult and old rats were trained on an inhibitory avoidance task with immediate post-training injections of aCSF or glucose into the dorsal hippocampus. Old rats had significant memory impairments compared to young rats 7 days after training. Intrahippocampal injections of glucose reversed age-related deficits, improving memory scores in old rats to values seen in young rats. A second experiment examined age-related changes in activation of the transcription factor CREB, which is widely implicated in memory formation and may act downstream of hormonal and metabolic signals. Activation was assessed in response to training with systemic injections of epinephrine and glucose at doses known to enhance memory. Young adult and old rats were trained on inhibitory avoidance with immediate post-training systemic injections of saline, epinephrine, or glucose. After training, old rats had significant impairments in CREB phosphorylation in area CA1 and the dentate gyrus region of the hippocampus, and in the basolateral and lateral amygdala. Epinephrine and glucose attenuated age-related deficits in CREB phosphorylation, but were more effective in the amygdala and hippocampus, respectively. Together, these results support the view that age-related changes in blood glucose responses to epinephrine contribute to memory impairments, which may be related to alterations in regional patterns of CREB phosphorylation.

  19. Spatial memory extinction differentially affects dorsal and ventral hippocampal metabolic activity and associated functional brain networks.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Couz, Marta; González-Pardo, Héctor; Vallejo, Guillermo; Arias, Jorge L; Conejo, Nélida M

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies showed the involvement of brain regions associated with both spatial learning and associative learning in spatial memory extinction, although the specific role of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus and the extended hippocampal system including the mammillary body in the process is still controversial. The present study aimed to identify the involvement of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus, together with cortical regions, the amygdaloid nuclei, and the mammillary bodies in the extinction of a spatial memory task. To address these issues, quantitative cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry was applied as a metabolic brain mapping method. Rats were trained in a reference memory task using the Morris water maze, followed by an extinction procedure of the previously acquired memory task. Results show that rats learned successfully the spatial memory task as shown by the progressive decrease in measured latencies to reach the escape platform and the results obtained in the probe test. Spatial memory was subsequently extinguished as shown by the descending preference for the previously reinforced location. A control naïve group was added to ensure that brain metabolic changes were specifically related with performance in the spatial memory extinction task. Extinction of the original spatial learning task significantly modified the metabolic activity in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus, the amygdala and the mammillary bodies. Moreover, the ventral hippocampus, the lateral mammillary body and the retrosplenial cortex were differentially recruited in the spatial memory extinction task, as shown by group differences in brain metabolic networks. These findings provide new insights on the brain regions and functional brain networks underlying spatial memory, and specifically spatial memory extinction. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Spatial representations in dorsal hippocampal neurons during a tactile-visual conditional discrimination task.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Amy L; Owens, Cullen B; Peters, Gregory J; Adelman, Peter C; Cline, Kathryn M

    2012-02-01

    Trajectory-dependent coding in dorsal CA1 of hippocampus has been evident in various spatial memory tasks aiming to model episodic memory. Hippocampal neurons are considered to be trajectory-dependent if the neuron has a place field located on an overlapping segment of two trajectories and exhibits a reliable difference in firing rate between the two trajectories. It is unclear whether trajectory-dependent coding in hippocampus is a mechanism used by the rat to solve spatial memory tasks. A first step in answering this question is to compare results between studies using tasks that require spatial working memory and those that do not. We recorded single units from dorsal CA1 of hippocampus during performance of a discrete-trial, tactile-visual conditional discrimination (CD) task in a T-maze. In this task, removable floor inserts that differ in texture and appearance cue the rat to visit either the left or right goal arm to receive a food reward. Our goal was to assess whether trajectory coding would be evident in the CD task. Our results show that trajectory coding was rare in the CD task, with only 12 of 71 cells with place fields on the maze stem showing a significant firing rate difference between left and right trials. For comparison, we recorded from dorsal CA1 during the acquisition and performance of a continuous spatial alternation task identical to that used in previous studies and found a proportion of trajectory coding neurons similar to what has been previously reported. Our data suggest that trajectory coding is not a universal mechanism used by the hippocampus to disambiguate similar trajectories, and instead may be more likely to appear in tasks that require the animal to retrieve information about a past trajectory, particularly in tasks that are continuous rather than discrete in nature.

  1. Spatial memory extinction differentially affects dorsal and ventral hippocampal metabolic activity and associated functional brain networks.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Couz, Marta; González-Pardo, Héctor; Vallejo, Guillermo; Arias, Jorge L; Conejo, Nélida M

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies showed the involvement of brain regions associated with both spatial learning and associative learning in spatial memory extinction, although the specific role of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus and the extended hippocampal system including the mammillary body in the process is still controversial. The present study aimed to identify the involvement of the dorsal and ventral hippocampus, together with cortical regions, the amygdaloid nuclei, and the mammillary bodies in the extinction of a spatial memory task. To address these issues, quantitative cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry was applied as a metabolic brain mapping method. Rats were trained in a reference memory task using the Morris water maze, followed by an extinction procedure of the previously acquired memory task. Results show that rats learned successfully the spatial memory task as shown by the progressive decrease in measured latencies to reach the escape platform and the results obtained in the probe test. Spatial memory was subsequently extinguished as shown by the descending preference for the previously reinforced location. A control naïve group was added to ensure that brain metabolic changes were specifically related with performance in the spatial memory extinction task. Extinction of the original spatial learning task significantly modified the metabolic activity in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus, the amygdala and the mammillary bodies. Moreover, the ventral hippocampus, the lateral mammillary body and the retrosplenial cortex were differentially recruited in the spatial memory extinction task, as shown by group differences in brain metabolic networks. These findings provide new insights on the brain regions and functional brain networks underlying spatial memory, and specifically spatial memory extinction. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27102086

  2. Postnatal nicotine effects on the expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the developing piglet hippocampus and brainstem.

    PubMed

    Vivekanandarajah, Arunnjah; Waters, Karen A; Machaalani, Rita

    2015-12-01

    Postnatal exposure to cigarette smoke during infancy is associated with increased number of respiratory illnesses, impaired pulmonary function, and the occurrence of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). It is also associated with reduced cognitive functioning and attention deficits in childhood. Nicotine, the major neurotoxic component of cigarette smoke, induces its actions by binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Using a piglet model of postnatal nicotine exposure, we studied the immunohistochemical expression of nAChR subunits α2, α3, α4, α5, α7, α9, β1 and β2 in the brainstem medulla and the hippocampus, given the role of these structures in cardiorespiratory control and cognition, respectively. We compared piglets exposed postnatally to 2mg/kg/day nicotine for 14 days (n=14: 7 males: 7 females) to controls (n=14: 7 males: 7 females). In the hippocampus, decreased expression was seen for α3 in CA1 (p=0.017), α9 in CA1 (p<0.001) and CA2 (p<0.001), β1 in CA1 (p=0.001) and CA2 (p=0.001) and β2 in CA3 (p=0.036). In the medulla, the nucleus of the spinal trigeminal tract had increased α2 and α4; vestibular nucleus increased α2 and α3, and decreased α4; hypoglossal decreased α3 and β1; dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus decreased α4 and β1. This is the first demonstration that non-classical nAChR subunits are affected by postnatal nicotine in the developing brain, and the implications are discussed. PMID:26440997

  3. Postnatal nicotine effects on the expression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the developing piglet hippocampus and brainstem.

    PubMed

    Vivekanandarajah, Arunnjah; Waters, Karen A; Machaalani, Rita

    2015-12-01

    Postnatal exposure to cigarette smoke during infancy is associated with increased number of respiratory illnesses, impaired pulmonary function, and the occurrence of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). It is also associated with reduced cognitive functioning and attention deficits in childhood. Nicotine, the major neurotoxic component of cigarette smoke, induces its actions by binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Using a piglet model of postnatal nicotine exposure, we studied the immunohistochemical expression of nAChR subunits α2, α3, α4, α5, α7, α9, β1 and β2 in the brainstem medulla and the hippocampus, given the role of these structures in cardiorespiratory control and cognition, respectively. We compared piglets exposed postnatally to 2mg/kg/day nicotine for 14 days (n=14: 7 males: 7 females) to controls (n=14: 7 males: 7 females). In the hippocampus, decreased expression was seen for α3 in CA1 (p=0.017), α9 in CA1 (p<0.001) and CA2 (p<0.001), β1 in CA1 (p=0.001) and CA2 (p=0.001) and β2 in CA3 (p=0.036). In the medulla, the nucleus of the spinal trigeminal tract had increased α2 and α4; vestibular nucleus increased α2 and α3, and decreased α4; hypoglossal decreased α3 and β1; dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus decreased α4 and β1. This is the first demonstration that non-classical nAChR subunits are affected by postnatal nicotine in the developing brain, and the implications are discussed.

  4. Activity-based anorexia has differential effects on apical dendritic branching in dorsal and ventral hippocampal CA1.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Tara G; Barbarich-Marsteller, Nicole C; Chan, Thomas E; Aoki, Chiye

    2014-11-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is an eating disorder to which adolescent females are particularly vulnerable. Like AN, activity-based anorexia (ABA), a rodent model of AN, results in elevation of stress hormones and has genetic links to anxiety disorders. The hippocampus plays a key role in the regulation of anxiety and responds with structural changes to hormones and stress, suggesting that it may play a role in AN. The hippocampus of ABA animals exhibits increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor and increased GABA receptor expression, but the structural effects of ABA have not been studied. We used Golgi staining of neurons to determine whether ABA in female rats during adolescence results in structural changes to the apical dendrites in hippocampal CA1 and contrasted to the effects of food restriction (FR) and exercise (EX), the environmental factors used to induce ABA. In the dorsal hippocampus, which preferentially mediates spatial learning and cognition, cells of ABA animals had less total dendritic length and fewer dendritic branches in stratum radiatum (SR) than in control (CON). In the ventral hippocampus, which preferentially mediates anxiety, ABA evoked more branching in SR than CON. In both dorsal and ventral regions, the main effect of exercise was localized to the SR while the main effect of food restriction occurred in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare. Taken together with data on spine density, these results indicate that ABA elicits pathway-specific changes in the hippocampus that may underlie the increased anxiety and reduced behavioral flexibility observed in ABA.

  5. The hippocampus and visual perception

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Andy C. H.; Yeung, Lok-Kin; Barense, Morgan D.

    2012-01-01

    In this review, we will discuss the idea that the hippocampus may be involved in both memory and perception, contrary to theories that posit functional and neuroanatomical segregation of these processes. This suggestion is based on a number of recent neuropsychological and functional neuroimaging studies that have demonstrated that the hippocampus is involved in the visual discrimination of complex spatial scene stimuli. We argue that these findings cannot be explained by long-term memory or working memory processing or, in the case of patient findings, dysfunction beyond the medial temporal lobe (MTL). Instead, these studies point toward a role for the hippocampus in higher-order spatial perception. We suggest that the hippocampus processes complex conjunctions of spatial features, and that it may be more appropriate to consider the representations for which this structure is critical, rather than the cognitive processes that it mediates. PMID:22529794

  6. Encoding and reactivation patterns predictive of successful memory performance are topographically organized along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Nozomu H; Sauvage, Magdalena M

    2016-01-01

    An ongoing debate in human memory research is whether the encoding and the retrieval of memory engage the same part of the hippocampus and the same cells, or whether encoding preferentially involves the anterior part of the hippocampus and retrieval its posterior part. Here, we used a human to rat translational behavioral approach combined to high-resolution molecular imaging to address this issue. We showed that successful memory performance is predicted by encoding and reactivation patterns only in the dorsal part of the rat hippocampus (posterior part in humans), but not in the ventral part (anterior part in humans). Our findings support the view that the encoding and the retrieval processes per se are not segregated along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus, but that activity predictive of successful memory is and concerns specifically the dorsal part of the hippocampus. In addition, we found evidence that these processes are likely to be mediated by the activation/reactivation of the same cells at this level. Given the translational character of the task, our results suggest that both the encoding and the retrieval processes take place in the same cells of the posterior part of the human hippocampus. PMID:26174148

  7. Gateways of ventral and dorsal streams in mouse visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Quanxin; Gao, Enquan; Burkhalter, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    It is widely held that the spatial processing functions underlying rodent navigation are similar to those encoding human episodic memory (Doeller et al, 2010). Spatial and nonspatial information are provided by all senses including vision. It has been suggested that visual inputs are fed to the navigational network in cortex and hippocampus through dorsal and ventral intracortical streams (Whitlock et al, 2008), but this has not been shown directly in rodents. We have used cyto- and chemoarchitectonic markers, topographic mapping of receptive fields and pathway tracing to determine in mouse visual cortex whether the lateromedial (LM) and the anterolateral fields (AL), which are the principal targets of primary visual cortex (V1) (Wang and Burkhalter, 2007) specialized for processing nonspatial and spatial visual information (Gao et al, 2006), are distinct areas with diverse connections. We have found that the LM/AL border coincides with a change in type 2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (m2AChR) expression in layer 4 and with the representation of the lower visual field periphery. Our quantitative analyses further show that LM strongly projects to temporal cortex as well as the lateral entorhinal cortex, which has weak spatial selectivity (Hargreaves et al, 2005). In contrast, AL has stronger connections with posterior parietal cortex, motor cortex and the spatially selective medial entorhinal cortex (Haftig et al, 2005). These results support the notion that LM and AL are architecturally, topographically and connectionally distinct areas of extrastriate visual cortex and that they are gateways for ventral and dorsal streams. PMID:21289200

  8. Balanced Shh signaling is required for proper formation and maintenance of dorsal telencephalic midline structures

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The rostral telencephalic dorsal midline is an organizing center critical for the formation of the future cortex and hippocampus. While the intersection of WNTs, BMPs, and FGFs establishes boundaries within this critical center, a direct role of Shh signaling in this region remains controversial. In this paper we show that both increased and decreased Shh signaling directly affects boundary formation within the telencephalic dorsal midline. Results Viral over-expression of Shh in the embryonic telencephalon prevents formation of the cortical hem and choroid plexus, while expanding the roof plate. In a transgenic model where cholesterol-lacking ShhN is expressed from one allele (ShhN/+), genes expressed in all three domains, cortical hem, choroid plexus and roof plate expand. In Gli1/2 -/- mutant brains, where Shh signaling is reduced, the roof plate expands, again at the expense of cortical hem and plexus. Cell autonomous activation of Shh signaling in the dorsal midline through Gdf7-driven activated Smoothened expression results in expansion of the Wnt3a-expressing cortical hem into the plexus domain. In addition, developmental stage determines dorsal midline responsiveness to Shh. Conclusions Together, these data demonstrate that balanced Shh signaling is critical for maintaining regional boundaries within the dorsal midline telencephalic organizing center. PMID:21114856

  9. Regional-specific effect of fluoxetine on rapidly dividing progenitors along the dorsoventral axis of the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qi-Gang; Lee, Daehoon; Ro, Eun Jeoung; Suh, Hoonkyo

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampus-dependent cognitive and emotional function appears to be regionally dissociated along the dorsoventral (DV) axis of the hippocampus. Recent observations that adult hippocampal neurogenesis plays a critical role in both cognition and emotion raised an interesting question whether adult neurogenesis within specific subregions of the hippocampus contributes to these distinct functions. We examined the regional-specific and cell type-specific effects of fluoxetine, which requires adult hippocampal neurogenesis to function as an antidepressant, on the proliferation of hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). Fluoxetine specifically increased proliferation of NSCs located in the ventral region of the hippocampus while the mitotic index of NSCs in the dorsal portion of the hippocampus remained unaltered. Moreover, within the ventral hippocampus, type II NSC and neuroblast populations specifically responded to fluoxetine, showing increased proliferation; however, proliferation of type I NSCs was unchanged in response to fluoxetine. Activation or inhibition of serotonin receptor 1A (5-HTR1A) recapitulated or abolished the effect of fluoxetine on proliferation of type II NSCs and neuroblast populations in the ventral hippocampus. Our study showed that the effect of fluoxetine on proliferation is dependent upon the type and the position of the NSCs along the DV axis of the hippocampus. PMID:27759049

  10. Learning-Induced Gene Expression in the Hippocampus Reveals a Role of Neuron -Astrocyte Metabolic Coupling in Long Term Memory

    PubMed Central

    Tadi, Monika; Allaman, Igor; Lengacher, Sylvain; Grenningloh, Gabriele; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the expression of genes related to brain energy metabolism and particularly those encoding glia (astrocyte)-specific functions in the dorsal hippocampus subsequent to learning. Context-dependent avoidance behavior was tested in mice using the step-through Inhibitory Avoidance (IA) paradigm. Animals were sacrificed 3, 9, 24, or 72 hours after training or 3 hours after retention testing. The quantitative determination of mRNA levels revealed learning-induced changes in the expression of genes thought to be involved in astrocyte-neuron metabolic coupling in a time dependent manner. Twenty four hours following IA training, an enhanced gene expression was seen, particularly for genes encoding monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1, MCT4), alpha2 subunit of the Na/K-ATPase and glucose transporter type 1. To assess the functional role for one of these genes in learning, we studied MCT1 deficient mice and found that they exhibit impaired memory in the inhibitory avoidance task. Together, these observations indicate that neuron-glia metabolic coupling undergoes metabolic adaptations following learning as indicated by the change in expression of key metabolic genes. PMID:26513352

  11. Learning-Induced Gene Expression in the Hippocampus Reveals a Role of Neuron -Astrocyte Metabolic Coupling in Long Term Memory.

    PubMed

    Tadi, Monika; Allaman, Igor; Lengacher, Sylvain; Grenningloh, Gabriele; Magistretti, Pierre J

    2015-01-01

    We examined the expression of genes related to brain energy metabolism and particularly those encoding glia (astrocyte)-specific functions in the dorsal hippocampus subsequent to learning. Context-dependent avoidance behavior was tested in mice using the step-through Inhibitory Avoidance (IA) paradigm. Animals were sacrificed 3, 9, 24, or 72 hours after training or 3 hours after retention testing. The quantitative determination of mRNA levels revealed learning-induced changes in the expression of genes thought to be involved in astrocyte-neuron metabolic coupling in a time dependent manner. Twenty four hours following IA training, an enhanced gene expression was seen, particularly for genes encoding monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1, MCT4), alpha2 subunit of the Na/K-ATPase and glucose transporter type 1. To assess the functional role for one of these genes in learning, we studied MCT1 deficient mice and found that they exhibit impaired memory in the inhibitory avoidance task. Together, these observations indicate that neuron-glia metabolic coupling undergoes metabolic adaptations following learning as indicated by the change in expression of key metabolic genes. PMID:26513352

  12. The effect of insulin and insulin-like growth factors on hippocampus- and amygdala-dependent long-term memory formation.

    PubMed

    Stern, Sarah A; Chen, Dillon Y; Alberini, Cristina M

    2014-10-01

    Recent work has reported that the insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) promotes memory enhancement. Furthermore, impaired insulin or IGF1 functions have been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration and cognitive impairments, hence implicating the insulin/IGF system as an important target for cognitive enhancement and/or the development of novel treatments against cognitive disorders. Here, we tested the effect of intracerebral injections of IGF1, IGF2, or insulin on memory consolidation and persistence in rats. We found that a bilateral injection of insulin into the dorsal hippocampus transiently enhances hippocampal-dependent memory and an injection of IGF1 has no effect. None of the three peptides injected into the amygdala affected memories critically engaging this region. Together with previous data on IGF2, these results indicate that IGF2 produces the most potent and persistent effect as a memory enhancer on hippocampal-dependent memories. We suggest that the memory-enhancing effects of insulin and IGF2 are likely mediated by distinct mechanisms. PMID:25227250

  13. Dorsal variant blister aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Couldwell, William T; Chamoun, Roukoz

    2012-01-01

    Dorsal variant proximal carotid blister aneurysms are treacherous lesions to manage. It is important to recognize this variant on preoperative angiographic imaging, in anticipation of surgical strategies for their treatment. Strategies include trapping the involved segment and revascularization if necessary. Other options include repair of the aneurysm rupture site directly. Given that these are not true berry aneurysms, repair of the rupture site involves wrapping or clip-grafting techniques. The case presented here was a young woman with a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured dorsal variant blister aneurysm. The technique used is demonstrated in the video and is a modified clip-wrap technique using woven polyester graft material. The patient was given aspirin preoperatively as preparation for the clip-wrap technique. It is the authors' current protocol to attempt a direct repair with clip-wrapping and leaving artery sacrifice with or without bypass as a salvage therapy if direct repair is not possible. Assessment of vessel patency after repair is performed by intraoperative Doppler and indocyanine green angiography. Intraoperative somatosensory and motor evoked potential monitoring is performed in all cases. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/crUreWGQdGo.

  14. Hippocampal synaptotagmin-4 is correlated with impaired spatial learning and memory in SAMP8 mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi-Gang; Chen, Gui-Hai; Wang, Fang; Wang, Long-Hai

    2015-10-21

    The mechanism underlying age-related cognitive impairment remains unclear. To determine whether synaptotagmin (Syt)-1 and Syt-4 are involved in age-related cognitive impairment, we used a radial six-arm water maze (RAWM) to evaluate spatial learning and memory deficits in the senescence accelerated prone mouse 8. The Syt-1 and Syt-4 levels of different subregions of the dorsal hippocampus (DH) were detected through immunohistochemistry. The RAWM results revealed that 13- and 9-month-old mice exhibited longer latencies and more errors in both the learning and memory phases than 5-month-old mice. Similar results were observed in the comparison of 13-month-old mice to 9-month-old mice. Compared with the 9- and/or 5-month-old mice, the 13-month-old mice exhibited higher Syt-1 and Syt-4 levels in the majority of the DH subregions with the exception of Syt-1 in the dentate gyrus-hilus and Syt-4 in the dentate gyrus-hilus and cornu ammonis 1 pyramidal cell layer. With the exception of Syt-1 in the 9-month-old mice, the Syt-1 and Syt-4 levels in several DH subregions overall and in each group were significantly correlated with the performances on the RAWM. Therefore, the altered Syt-1 and Syt-4 levels in the different DH layers may have been involved in the impairments in spatial learning and memory during normal aging.

  15. Liposarcome dorsal: aspect clinique rare

    PubMed Central

    Agbessi, Odry; Arrob, Adil; Fiqhi, Kamal; Khalfi, Lahcen; Nassih, Mohammed; El Khatib, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Décrit la première fois par Virchow en 1860, le liposarcome est une tumeur mésenchymateuse rare. Cette rareté est relative car les liposarcomes représentent quand même 14 à 18% de l'ensemble des tumeurs malignes des parties molles et ils constituent le plus fréquent des sarcomes des parties molles. Pour la majorité des auteurs, il ne se développerait jamais sur un lipome ou une lipomatose préexistant. Nous rapportons un cas de volumineux liposarcome de la face dorsale du tronc. L'histoire de la maladie, l'aspect clinique inhabituel « de tumeur dans tumeur », l'aspect de la pièce opératoire nous fait évoquer la possibilité de la transformation maligne d'un lipome bénin préexistant. PMID:26113914

  16. Seasonal change in the avian hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sherry, David F; MacDougall-Shackleton, Scott A

    2015-04-01

    The hippocampus plays an important role in cognitive processes, including memory and spatial orientation, in birds. The hippocampus undergoes seasonal change in food-storing birds and brood parasites, there are changes in the hippocampus during breeding, and further changes occur in some species in association with migration. In food-storing birds, seasonal change in the hippocampus occurs in fall and winter when the cognitively demanding behaviour of caching and retrieving food occurs. The timing of annual change in the hippocampus of food-storing birds is quite variable, however, and appears not to be under photoperiod control. A variety of factors, including cognitive performance, exercise, and stress may all influence seasonal change in the avian hippocampus. The causal processes underlying seasonal change in the avian hippocampus have not been extensively examined and the more fully described hormonal influences on the mammalian hippocampus may provide hypotheses for investigating the control of hippocampal seasonality in birds.

  17. Neurogenesis along the septo-temporal axis of the hippocampus: are depression and the action of antidepressants region-specific?

    PubMed

    Tanti, A; Belzung, C

    2013-11-12

    In recent years, both major depression and antidepressant therapy have been linked to adult hippocampal neurogenesis. The hippocampus is not a homogeneous brain area, and a converging body of evidence indicates a functional dissociation along its septo-temporal axis, the dorsal part being involved more in learning/memory and spatial navigation, while the ventral sub-region is linked more to emotional behavior and regulation of the neuroendocrine stress axis. Research has therefore been conducted in an attempt to relate effects of models of depression and of antidepressant therapies to adult neurogenesis along the septo-temporal axis of the hippocampus. The present paper reviews the current literature addressing this question and discusses the possible mechanisms involved and the functional significance of such regional effects. This review shows that animal models of depression elicit an effect restricted to the ventral hippocampus more frequently than a dorsal-specific effect. However, this is also stage specific, and concerns neurogenesis, rather than cell proliferation or survival. Surprisingly, the same does not apply regarding the effects of selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors that act in a more uniform way on dorsal and ventral adult neurogenesis in most studies. Some recently introduced clinical compounds (e.g., agomelatine) or putative antidepressants have a specific action on the ventral sub-region, indicating that an action restricted to this part of the brain may be sufficient to achieve remission. Finally, non-pharmacological manipulations that are also endowed with antidepressant effects, such as environmental enrichment or physical exercise, also act on both subdivisions, although some studies pointed to specificity of dorsal neurogenesis. The different treatments, acting either on the dorsal or on the ventral sub-regions, could promote recovery by improving either ventral- or dorsal-related functions, both contributing in a different way to

  18. The bumps on the hippocampus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Ver Hoef, Lawrence

    2016-03-01

    The hippocampus has been the focus of more imaging research than any other subcortical structure in the human brain. However a feature that has been almost universally overlooked are the bumpy ridges on the inferior aspect of the hippocampus, which we refer to as hippocampal dentation. These bumps arise from folds in the CA1 layer of Ammon's horn. Similar to the folding of the cerebral cortex, hippocampal dentation allows for greater surface area in a confined space. However, while quantitative studies of radiologic brain images have been advancing for decades, examining numerous approaches to hippocampal segmentation and morphology analysis, virtually all published 3D renderings of the hippocampus show the under surface to be quite smooth or mildly irregular; we have rarely seen the characteristic bumpy structure in the reconstructed 3D scene, one exception being the 9.4T postmortem study. This is presumably due to the fact that, based on our experience with high resolution images, there is a dramatic degree of variability in hippocampal dentation between individuals from very smooth to highly dentated. An apparent question is, does this indicate that this specific morphological signature can only be captured using expensive ultra-high field techniques? Or, is such information buried in the data we commonly acquire, awaiting a computation technique that can extract and render it clearly? In this study, we propose a super-resolution technique that captures the fine scale morphometric features of the hippocampus based on common T1-weighted 3T MR images.

  19. Neural Representations of Location Outside the Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knierim, James J.

    2006-01-01

    Place cells of the rat hippocampus are a dominant model system for understanding the role of the hippocampus in learning and memory at the level of single-unit and neural ensemble responses. A complete understanding of the information processing and computations performed by the hippocampus requires detailed knowledge about the properties of the…

  20. Molecular mechanisms involved in interleukin 1-beta (IL-1β)-induced memory impairment. Modulation by alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH).

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, P; Machado, I; Vilcaes, A; Caruso, C; Roth, G A; Schiöth, H; Lasaga, M; Scimonelli, T

    2013-11-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines can affect cognitive processes such as learning and memory. Particularly, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) influences the consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memories. We previously reported that administration of IL-1β in dorsal hippocampus impaired contextual fear memory consolidation. Different mechanisms have been implicated in the action of IL-1β on long-term potentiation (LTP), but the processes by which this inhibition occurs in vivo remain to be elucidated. We herein report that intrahippocampal injection of IL-1β induced a significant increase in p38 phosphorylation after contextual fear conditioning. Also, treatment with SB203580, an inhibitor of p38, reversed impairment induced by IL-1β on conditioned fear behavior, indicating that this MAPK would be involved in the effect of the cytokine. We also showed that IL-1β administration produced a decrease in glutamate release from dorsal hippocampus synaptosomes and that treatment with SB203580 partially reversed this effect. Our results indicated that IL-1β-induced impairment in memory consolidation could be mediated by a decrease in glutamate release. This hypothesis is sustained by the fact that treatment with d-cycloserine (DCS), a partial agonist of the NMDA receptor, reversed the effect of IL-1β on contextual fear memory. Furthermore, we demonstrated that IL-1β produced a temporal delay in ERK phosphorylation and that DCS administration reversed this effect. We also observed that intrahippocampal injection of IL-1β decreased BDNF expression after contextual fear conditioning. We previously demonstrated that α-MSH reversed the detrimental effect of IL-1β on memory consolidation. The present results demonstrate that α-MSH administration did not modify the decrease in glutamate release induced by IL-1β. However, intrahippocampal injection of α-MSH prevented the effect on ERK phosphorylation and BDNF expression induced by IL-1β after contextual fear conditioning

  1. The hippocampus contributes to memory expression during transitive inference in mice.

    PubMed

    Devito, Loren M; Kanter, Benjamin R; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2010-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that the hippocampus plays a role in transitive inference, the capacity to link overlapping memories and subsequently make novel judgments between elements of those memories that are only indirectly related. However, it is unclear whether the hippocampus is involved primarily during the original acquisition of the overlapping memories, or additionally during the flexible expression of those memories during transitive judgments. Here, we demonstrated that selective hippocampal damage produced after acquisition of the overlapping memories resulted in a severe impairment in subsequent transitive inference judgments, indicating that the hippocampus does play an important role beyond the initial learning phase. Furthermore, this study extends to mice a role for the hippocampus in transitive inference, as previously observed in other species.

  2. The Role of the Hippocampus in Retaining Relational Information across Short Delays: The Importance of Memory Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeneson, Annette; Mauldin, Kristin N.; Hopkins, Ramona O.; Squire, Larry R.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with hippocampal damage are sometimes impaired at remembering information across delays as short as a few seconds. How are these impairments to be understood? One possibility is that retention of some kinds of information is critically dependent on the hippocampus, regardless of the retention interval and regardless of whether the task…

  3. Applying Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) Over the Dorsal Visual Pathway Induces Schizophrenia-like Disruption of Perceptual Closure.

    PubMed

    Amiaz, Revital; Vainiger, Dana; Gershon, Ari A; Weiser, Mark; Lavidor, Michal; Javitt, Daniel C

    2016-07-01

    Perceptual closure ability is postulated to depend upon rapid transmission of magnocellular information to prefrontal cortex via the dorsal stream. In contrast, illusory contour processing requires only local interactions within primary and ventral stream visual regions, such as lateral occipital complex. Schizophrenia is associated with deficits in perceptual closure versus illusory contours processing that is hypothesized to reflect impaired magnocellular/dorsal stream. Perceptual closure and illusory contours performance was evaluated in separate groups of 12 healthy volunteers during no TMS, and during repetitive 10 Hz rTMS stimulation over dorsal stream or vertex (TMS-vertex). Perceptual closure and illusory contours were performed in 11 schizophrenia patients, no TMS was applied in these patients. TMS effects were evaluated with repeated measures ANOVA across treatments. rTMS significantly increased perceptual closure identification thresholds, with significant difference between TMS-dorsal stream and no TMS. TMS-dorsal stream also significantly reduced perceptual closure but not illusory contours accuracy. Schizophrenia patients showed increased perceptual closure identification thresholds relative to controls in the no TMS condition, but similar to controls in the TMS-dorsal stream condition. Conclusions of this study are that magnocellular/dorsal stream input is critical for perceptual closure but not illusory contours performance, supporting both trickledown theories of normal perceptual closure function, and magnocellular/dorsal stream theories of visual dysfunction in schizophrenia.

  4. Some behavioral effects of transecting ventral or dorsal fiber connections of the septum in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ross, J F; Grossman, L; Grossman, S P

    1975-03-01

    The behavioral effects of large electrolytic lesions in the septal area were compared with those of knife cuts that severed the ventral or dorsal connections of this structure. Rats with septal lesions lost weight and were transiently hyperdipsic. Ventral cuts produced similar effects, but dorsal cuts did not. All three operations decreased the latency to eat in a novel environment, increased the intake of sweetened milk, enhanced acquisition of a food-rewarded running response, and facilitated acquisition of a shuttle box avoidance response, The lesion, but neither of the knife cuts, reduced the effects of punishment and impaired the acquisition of a one-way avoidance response. PMID:1150960

  5. Impaired retention of spatial memory after transection of longitudinally oriented axons of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffenach, Hill-Aina; Sloviter, Robert S.; Moser, Edvard I.; Moser, May-Britt

    2002-03-01

    Longitudinally oriented axon collaterals of CA3 pyramidal cells may be critical for integrating distributed information in the hippocampus. To investigate the possible role of this pathway in the retention of spatial memory, we made a single transversely oriented cut through the dorsal CA3 region of each hippocampus. Although the lesion involved <3% of the hippocampal volume, it nonetheless disrupted memory retention in a water maze in preoperatively trained rats. New learning in a different water maze was attenuated. No significant impairment occurred in rats with longitudinally oriented cuts, or in animals with ibotenic acid-induced lesions of similar magnitude. To characterize the effect of a focal lesion on the integrity of longitudinally projecting axons, we stained degenerating cells and fibers in rats with unilateral CA3 transections by using FluoroJade-B. Degenerating terminals were seen across a wide region posterior to the cut, and were present in the strata of areas CA3 and CA1 that are innervated by CA3 pyramidal cells. These results suggest that the integrity of longitudinally oriented, translamellar axons of CA3 pyramidal cells may be necessary for efficient acquisition and retention of spatial memory.

  6. Impaired retention of spatial memory after transection of longitudinally oriented axons of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Steffenach, Hill-Aina; Sloviter, Robert S; Moser, Edvard I; Moser, May-Britt

    2002-03-01

    Longitudinally oriented axon collaterals of CA3 pyramidal cells may be critical for integrating distributed information in the hippocampus. To investigate the possible role of this pathway in the retention of spatial memory, we made a single transversely oriented cut through the dorsal CA3 region of each hippocampus. Although the lesion involved <3% of the hippocampal volume, it nonetheless disrupted memory retention in a water maze in preoperatively trained rats. New learning in a different water maze was attenuated. No significant impairment occurred in rats with longitudinally oriented cuts, or in animals with ibotenic acid-induced lesions of similar magnitude. To characterize the effect of a focal lesion on the integrity of longitudinally projecting axons, we stained degenerating cells and fibers in rats with unilateral CA3 transections by using FluoroJade-B. Degenerating terminals were seen across a wide region posterior to the cut, and were present in the strata of areas CA3 and CA1 that are innervated by CA3 pyramidal cells. These results suggest that the integrity of longitudinally oriented, translamellar axons of CA3 pyramidal cells may be necessary for efficient acquisition and retention of spatial memory.

  7. Dissociated repetition deficits in aphasia can reflect flexible interactions between left dorsal and ventral streams and gender-dimorphic architecture of the right dorsal stream

    PubMed Central

    Berthier, Marcelo L.; Froudist Walsh, Seán; Dávila, Guadalupe; Nabrozidis, Alejandro; Juárez y Ruiz de Mier, Rocío; Gutiérrez, Antonio; De-Torres, Irene; Ruiz-Cruces, Rafael; Alfaro, Francisco; García-Casares, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of brain-damaged subjects presenting with dissociated repetition deficits after selective injury to either the left dorsal or ventral auditory pathways can provide further insight on their respective roles in verbal repetition. We evaluated repetition performance and its neural correlates using multimodal imaging (anatomical MRI, DTI, fMRI, and18FDG-PET) in a female patient with transcortical motor aphasia (TCMA) and in a male patient with conduction aphasia (CA) who had small contiguous but non-overlapping left perisylvian infarctions. Repetition in the TCMA patient was fully preserved except for a mild impairment in nonwords and digits, whereas the CA patient had impaired repetition of nonwords, digits and word triplet lists. Sentence repetition was impaired, but he repeated novel sentences significantly better than clichés. The TCMA patient had tissue damage and reduced metabolism in the left sensorimotor cortex and insula. DTI showed damage to the left temporo-frontal and parieto-frontal segments of the arcuate fasciculus (AF) and part of the left ventral stream together with well-developed right dorsal and ventral streams, as has been reported in more than one-third of females. The CA patient had tissue damage and reduced metabolic activity in the left temporoparietal cortex with additional metabolic decrements in the left frontal lobe. DTI showed damage to the left temporo-parietal and temporo-frontal segments of the AF, but the ventral stream was spared. The direct segment of the AF in the right hemisphere was also absent with only vestigial remains of the other dorsal subcomponents present, as is often found in males. fMRI during word and nonword repetition revealed bilateral perisylvian activation in the TCMA patient suggesting recruitment of spared segments of the left dorsal stream and right dorsal stream with propagation of signals to temporal lobe structures suggesting a compensatory reallocation of resources via the ventral streams. The CA

  8. Conscious Experience and Episodic Memory: Hippocampus at the Crossroads

    PubMed Central

    Behrendt, Ralf-Peter

    2013-01-01

    If an instance of conscious experience of the seemingly objective world around us could be regarded as a newly formed event memory, much as an instance of mental imagery has the content of a retrieved event memory, and if, therefore, the stream of conscious experience could be seen as evidence for ongoing formation of event memories that are linked into episodic memory sequences, then unitary conscious experience could be defined as a symbolic representation of the pattern of hippocampal neuronal firing that encodes an event memory – a theoretical stance that may shed light into the mind-body and binding problems in consciousness research. Exceedingly detailed symbols that describe patterns of activity rapidly self-organizing, at each cycle of the θ rhythm, in the hippocampus are instances of unitary conscious experience that jointly constitute the stream of consciousness. Integrating object information (derived from the ventral visual stream and orbitofrontal cortex) with contextual emotional information (from the anterior insula) and spatial environmental information (from the dorsal visual stream), the hippocampus rapidly forms event codes that have the informational content of objects embedded in an emotional and spatiotemporally extending context. Event codes, formed in the CA3-dentate network for the purpose of their memorization, are not only contextualized but also allocentric representations, similarly to conscious experiences of events and objects situated in a seemingly objective and observer-independent framework of phenomenal space and time. Conscious perception, creating the spatially and temporally extending world that we perceive around us, is likely to be evolutionarily related to more fleeting and seemingly internal forms of conscious experience, such as autobiographical memory recall, mental imagery, including goal anticipation, and to other forms of externalized conscious experience, namely dreaming and hallucinations; and evidence pointing

  9. Cholinergic Modulation of the Hippocampus during Encoding and Retrieval of Tone/Shock-Induced Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Jason L.; Kesner, Raymond P.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the role of acetylcholine (ACh) during encoding and retrieval of tone/shock-induced fear conditioning with the aim of testing Hasselmo's cholinergic modulation model of encoding and retrieval using a task sensitive to hippocampal disruption. Lesions of the hippocampus impair acquisition and retention of contextual conditioning with…

  10. Differential Effects of Cannabinoid Receptor Agonist on Social Discrimination and Contextual Fear in Amygdala and Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segev, Amir; Akirav, Irit

    2011-01-01

    We examined whether the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN; 5 [mu]g/side) microinjected into the hippocampus or the amygdala would differentially affect memory processes in a neutral vs. an aversive task. In the aversive contextual fear task, WIN into the basolateral amygdala impaired fear acquisition/consolidation, but not retrieval.…

  11. Kindling-Induced Changes in Plasticity of the Rat Amygdala and Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Manja; Siegmund, Herbert; Pape, Hans-Christian; Albrecht, Doris

    2005-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is often accompanied by interictal behavioral abnormalities, such as fear and memory impairment. To identify possible underlying substrates, we analyzed long-term synaptic plasticity in two relevant brain regions, the lateral amygdala (LA) and the CA1 region of the hippocampus, in the kindling model of epilepsy. Wistar…

  12. Stress affects theta activity in limbic networks and impairs novelty-induced exploration and familiarization

    PubMed Central

    Jacinto, Luis R.; Reis, Joana S.; Dias, Nuno S.; Cerqueira, João J.; Correia, José H.; Sousa, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to a novel environment triggers the response of several brain areas that regulate emotional behaviors. Here, we studied theta oscillations within the hippocampus (HPC)-amygdala (AMY)-medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) network in exploration of a novel environment and subsequent familiarization through repeated exposures to that same environment; in addition, we assessed how concomitant stress exposure could disrupt this activity and impair both behavioral processes. Local field potentials (LFP) were simultaneously recorded from dorsal and ventral hippocampus (dHPC and vHPC, respectively), basolateral amygdala (BLA) and mPFC in freely behaving rats while they were exposed to a novel environment, then repeatedly re-exposed over the course of 3 weeks to that same environment and, finally, on re-exposure to a novel unfamiliar environment. A longitudinal analysis of theta activity within this circuit revealed a reduction of vHPC and BLA theta power and vHPC-BLA theta coherence through familiarization which was correlated with a return to normal exploratory behavior in control rats. In contrast, a persistent over-activation of the same brain regions was observed in stressed rats that displayed impairments in novel exploration and familiarization processes. Importantly, we show that stress also affected intra-hippocampal synchrony and heightened the coherence between vHPC and BLA. In summary, we demonstrate that modulatory theta activity in the aforementioned circuit, namely in the vHPC and BLA, is correlated with the expression of anxiety in novelty-induced exploration and familiarization in both normal and pathological conditions. PMID:24137113

  13. Personal authentication through dorsal hand vein patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-Bin; Hao, Shu-Sheng; Lee, Jen-Chun

    2011-08-01

    Biometric identification is an emerging technology that can solve security problems in our networked society. A reliable and robust personal verification approach using dorsal hand vein patterns is proposed in this paper. The characteristic of the approach needs less computational and memory requirements and has a higher recognition accuracy. In our work, the near-infrared charge-coupled device (CCD) camera is adopted as an input device for capturing dorsal hand vein images, it has the advantages of the low-cost and noncontact imaging. In the proposed approach, two finger-peaks are automatically selected as the datum points to define the region of interest (ROI) in the dorsal hand vein images. The modified two-directional two-dimensional principal component analysis, which performs an alternate two-dimensional PCA (2DPCA) in the column direction of images in the 2DPCA subspace, is proposed to exploit the correlation of vein features inside the ROI between images. The major advantage of the proposed method is that it requires fewer coefficients for efficient dorsal hand vein image representation and recognition. The experimental results on our large dorsal hand vein database show that the presented schema achieves promising performance (false reject rate: 0.97% and false acceptance rate: 0.05%) and is feasible for dorsal hand vein recognition.

  14. Involvement of dorsal hippocampal and medial septal nicotinic receptors in cross state-dependent memory between WIN55, 212-2 and nicotine or ethanol in mice.

    PubMed

    Alijanpour, S; Rezayof, A

    2013-08-15

    The present study examined whether nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) of the CA1 regions of the dorsal hippocampus and medial septum (MS) are involved in cross state-dependent memory retrieval between WIN55, 212-2 (WIN, a non-selective CB1/CB2 receptor agonist) and nicotine or ethanol. Memory retrieval was measured in one-trial step-down type passive avoidance apparatus in male adult mice. Pre-training intraperitoneal administration of WIN (0.1-1mg/kg) dose-dependently impaired memory retrieval when it was tested 24h later. Pre-test systemic administration of nicotine (0.6 and 0.7mg/kg, s.c.) or ethanol (0.5g/kg, i.p.) improved WIN-induced memory impairment, suggesting a cross state-dependent memory retrieval between the drugs. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of nicotine (1 and 2μg/mouse) before systemic administration of an ineffective dose of nicotine (0.5mg/kg, s.c.) or ethanol (0.25g/kg) significantly reversed WIN-induced memory impairment. Pre-test intra-CA1 microinjection of mecamylamine (1 and 3μg/mouse) inhibited cross state-dependent memory between WIN and nicotine or ethanol. Moreover, pre-test intra-MS microinjection of nicotine (1 and 2μg/mouse) in combination with systemic administration of a lower dose of nicotine (0.5mg/kg), but not ethanol (0.25g/kg), improved memory impairment induced by pre-training administration of WIN. On the other hand, in the animals that received pre-training WIN and pre-test systemic administration of nicotine (0.7mg/kg), but not ethanol (0.5g/kg), pre-test intra-MS microinjection of mecamylamine (1-5μg/mouse) inhibited WIN-nicotine state-dependent memory retrieval. It should be noted that pre-test intra-CA1 or intra-MS microinjection of nicotine or mecamylamine by itself had no effect on memory retrieval and also could not reverse memory impairment induced by pre-training administration of WIN. It can be concluded that WIN and nicotine or WIN and ethanol can induce state-dependent memory retrieval. In

  15. The Dorsal Anterior Cingulate Cortex Modulates Dialectical Self-Thinking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Peng, Kaiping; Bai, Yang; Li, Rui; Zhu, Ying; Sun, Pei; Guo, Hua; Yuan, Chun; Rotshtein, Pia; Sui, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Dialectical self-thinking involves holding the view that one can possess contradictory traits such as extraverted and introverted. Prior work has demonstrated that the dorsal part of anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) plays a crucial role in conflict monitoring as well as self-related processing. Here, we tested the function of dACC in dialectical self-thinking using a modified classical self-referential paradigm (self- vs. other-referential thinking), in which participants had to make a judgment whether a simultaneously presented pair of contradictory or non-contradictory traits properly described them while brain activity was recording using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The data showed that activity in the dACC during the processing of self-relevant conflicting information was positively correlated with participants' dispositional level of naïve dialecticism (measured with the Dialectical Self Scale). Psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analyses further revealed increased functional connectivity between the dACC and the caudate, middle temporal gyrus and hippocampus during the processing of self-relevant conflicting information for dialectical thinkers. These results support the hypothesis that the dACC has a key role in dialectical self-thinking. PMID:26903940

  16. The Dorsal Anterior Cingulate Cortex Modulates Dialectical Self-Thinking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Peng, Kaiping; Bai, Yang; Li, Rui; Zhu, Ying; Sun, Pei; Guo, Hua; Yuan, Chun; Rotshtein, Pia; Sui, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Dialectical self-thinking involves holding the view that one can possess contradictory traits such as extraverted and introverted. Prior work has demonstrated that the dorsal part of anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) plays a crucial role in conflict monitoring as well as self-related processing. Here, we tested the function of dACC in dialectical self-thinking using a modified classical self-referential paradigm (self- vs. other-referential thinking), in which participants had to make a judgment whether a simultaneously presented pair of contradictory or non-contradictory traits properly described them while brain activity was recording using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The data showed that activity in the dACC during the processing of self-relevant conflicting information was positively correlated with participants’ dispositional level of naïve dialecticism (measured with the Dialectical Self Scale). Psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analyses further revealed increased functional connectivity between the dACC and the caudate, middle temporal gyrus and hippocampus during the processing of self-relevant conflicting information for dialectical thinkers. These results support the hypothesis that the dACC has a key role in dialectical self-thinking. PMID:26903940

  17. Ketamine alters oscillatory coupling in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Caixeta, Fábio V.; Cornélio, Alianda M.; Scheffer-Teixeira, Robson; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Tort, Adriano B. L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies show that higher order oscillatory interactions such as cross-frequency coupling are important for brain functions that are impaired in schizophrenia, including perception, attention and memory. Here we investigated the dynamics of oscillatory coupling in the hippocampus of awake rats upon NMDA receptor blockade by ketamine, a pharmacological model of schizophrenia. Ketamine (25, 50 and 75 mg/kg i.p.) increased gamma and high-frequency oscillations (HFO) in all depths of the CA1-dentate axis, while theta power changes depended on anatomical location and were independent of a transient increase of delta oscillations. Phase coherence of gamma and HFO increased across hippocampal layers. Phase-amplitude coupling between theta and fast oscillations was markedly altered in a dose-dependent manner: ketamine increased hippocampal theta-HFO coupling at all doses, while theta-gamma coupling increased at the lowest dose and was disrupted at the highest dose. Our results demonstrate that ketamine alters network interactions that underlie cognitively relevant theta-gamma coupling. PMID:23907109

  18. Hippocampus-dependent learning in SKAP-HOM deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Anna; Grecksch, Gisela; Reinhold, Annegret; Schraven, Burkhart; Becker, Axel

    2014-08-15

    SKAP-HOM is an adapter protein which regulates the cross-talk between immunoreceptors and integrins and is involved in signal transduction. It is present in murine brain structures such as the hippocampus, frontal cortex, and cerebellum. In the present study we investigated types of hippocampus-dependent learning (fear conditioning, social memory, and the Morris Water Maze) and locomotor sensitization to amphetamine in transgenic SKAP-HOM deficient mice (-/-) in comparison with respective controls (+/+). Animals from both groups showed comparable fear conditioning, and the extinction of conditioned fear was accelerated in -/-. In terms of sociability, there were no differences between the animals, but in -/- mice social memory was impaired. There was no difference between the two groups of mice in spatial learning and memory measured in the Morris Water Maze. Wild-type and deficient animals exhibited similar sensitization to amphetamine. In reaction to amphetamine challenge, the response in +/+ was enhanced. It was hypothesized that SKAP-HOM deficiency does not affect hippocampus-dependent learning in general, but that its effects on cognitive tasks seem to be dependent on the nature of the cognitive task, i.e. spatial vs. non-spatial.

  19. Rule encoding in dorsal striatum impacts action selection.

    PubMed

    Bissonette, Gregory B; Roesch, Matthew R

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive flexibility is a hallmark of prefrontal cortical (PFC) function yet little is known about downstream area involvement. The medial dorsal striatum (mDS) receives major projections from the PFC and is uniquely situated to perform the integration of responses with rule information. In this study, we use a novel rule shifting task in rats that mirrors non-human primate and human studies in its temporal precision and counterbalanced responses. We record activity from single neurons in the mDS while rats switch between different rules for reward. Additionally, we pharmacologically inactivate mDS by infusion of a baclofen/muscimol cocktail. Inactivation of mDS impaired the ability to shift to a new rule and increased the number of regressive errors. While recording in mDS, we identified neurons modulated by direction whose activity reflected the conflict between competing rule information. We show that a subset of these neurons was also rule selective, and that the conflict between competing rule cues was resolved as behavioural performance improved. Other neurons were modulated by rule, but not direction. These neurons became selective before behavioural performance accurately reflected the current rule. These data provide an additional locus for investigating the mechanisms underlying behavioural flexibility. Converging lines of evidence from multiple human psychiatric disorders have implicated dorsal striatum as an important and understudied neural substrate of flexible cognition. Our data confirm the importance of mDS, and suggest a mechanism by which mDS mediates abstract cognition functions.

  20. Effects of HZE irradiation on chemical neurotransmission in rodent hippocampus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Mayumi

    Space radiation represents a significant risk to the CNS (central nervous system) during space missions. Most harmful are the HZE (high mass, highly charged (Z), high energy) particles, e.g. 56Fe, which possess high ionizing ability, dense energy deposition pattern, and high penetrance. Accumulating evidence suggests that radiation has significant impact on cognitive functions. In ground-base experiments, HZE radiation induces pronounced deficits in hippocampus dependent learning and memory in rodents. However, the mechanisms underlying these impairments are mostly unknown. Exposure to HZE radiation elevates the level of oxidation, resulting in cell loss, tissue damage and functional deficits through direct ionization and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). When hippocampal slices were exposed to ROS, neuronal excitability was reduced. My preliminary results showed enhanced radio-vulnerability of the hippocampus and reduction in basal and depolarization-evoked [3H]-norepinephrine release after HZE exposure. These results raised the possibility that HZE radiation deteriorates cognitive function through radiation-induced impairments in hippocampal chemical neurotransmission, the hypothesis of this dissertation. In Aim 1 I have focused on the effects of HZE radiation on release of major neurotransmitter systems in the hippocampus. I have further extended my research on the levels of receptors of these systems in Aim 2. In Aim 3, I have studied the level of oxidation in membranes of my samples. My research reveals that HZE radiation significantly reduces hyperosmotic sucrose evoked [3H]-glutamate and [14C]-GABA release both three and six months post irradiation. The same radiation regimen also significantly enhances oxidative stress as indicated by increased levels of lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus, suggesting that increased levels of lipid peroxidation may play a role in reduction of neurotransmitter release. HZE radiation also significantly reduces

  1. Opposing dorsal/ventral stream dynamics during figure-ground segregation.

    PubMed

    Wokke, Martijn E; Scholte, H Steven; Lamme, Victor A F

    2014-02-01

    The visual system has been commonly subdivided into two segregated visual processing streams: The dorsal pathway processes mainly spatial information, and the ventral pathway specializes in object perception. Recent findings, however, indicate that different forms of interaction (cross-talk) exist between the dorsal and the ventral stream. Here, we used TMS and concurrent EEG recordings to explore these interactions between the dorsal and ventral stream during figure-ground segregation. In two separate experiments, we used repetitive TMS and single-pulse TMS to disrupt processing in the dorsal (V5/HMT⁺) and the ventral (lateral occipital area) stream during a motion-defined figure discrimination task. We presented stimuli that made it possible to differentiate between relatively low-level (figure boundary detection) from higher-level (surface segregation) processing steps during figure-ground segregation. Results show that disruption of V5/HMT⁺ impaired performance related to surface segregation; this effect was mainly found when V5/HMT⁺ was perturbed in an early time window (100 msec) after stimulus presentation. Surprisingly, disruption of the lateral occipital area resulted in increased performance scores and enhanced neural correlates of surface segregation. This facilitatory effect was also mainly found in an early time window (100 msec) after stimulus presentation. These results suggest a "push-pull" interaction in which dorsal and ventral extrastriate areas are being recruited or inhibited depending on stimulus category and task demands. PMID:24116840

  2. Cognitive control of meal onset and meal size: Role of dorsal hippocampal-dependent episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Parent, Marise B

    2016-08-01

    There is a large gap in our understanding of how top-down cognitive processes, such as memory, influence energy intake. Similarly, there is limited knowledge regarding how the brain controls the timing of meals and meal frequency. Understanding how cognition influences ingestive behavior and how the brain controls meal frequency will provide a more complete explanation of the neural mechanisms that regulate energy intake and may also increase our knowledge of the factors that contribute to diet-induced obesity. We hypothesize that dorsal hippocampal neurons, which are critical for memory of personal experiences (i.e., episodic memory), form a memory of a meal, inhibit meal onset during the period following a meal, and limit the amount ingested at the next meal. In support, we describe evidence from human research suggesting that episodic memory of a meal inhibits intake and review data from human and non-human animals showing that impaired hippocampal function is associated with increased intake. We then describe evidence from our laboratory showing that inactivation of dorsal hippocampal neurons decreases the interval between sucrose meals and increases intake at the next meal. We also describe our evidence suggesting that sweet orosensation is sufficient to induce synaptic plasticity in dorsal hippocampal neurons and raise the possibility that impaired dorsal hippocampal function and episodic memory deficits contribute to the development and/or maintenance of diet-induced obesity. Finally, we raise some critical questions that need to be addressed in future research. PMID:27083124

  3. Impaired Odor Recognition Memory in Patients with Hippocampal Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Daniel A.; Squire, Larry R.; Hopkins, Ramona O.

    2004-01-01

    In humans, impaired recognition memory following lesions thought to be limited to the hippocampal region has been demonstrated for a wide variety of tasks. However, the importance of the human hippocampus for olfactory recognition memory has scarcely been explored. We evaluated the ability of memory-impaired patients with damage thought to be…

  4. Genomic approach to selective vulnerability of the hippocampus in brain ischemia-hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Kastner, Rainald

    2015-11-19

    Transient global ischemia selectively damages neurons in specific brain areas. A reproducible pattern of selective vulnerability is observed in the dorsal hippocampus of rodents where ischemic damage typically affects neurons in the CA1 area while sparing neurons in CA3 and granule cells. The "neuronal factors" underlying the differential vulnerability of CA1 versus CA3 have been of great interest. This review first provides on overview of the histological pattern of ischemic-hypoxic damage, the phenomenon of delayed neuronal death, the necrosis-apoptosis discussion, and multiple molecular mechanisms studied in the hippocampus. Subsequently, genomic studies of basal gene expression in CA1 and CA3 are summarized and changes in gene expression in response to global brain ischemia are surveyed. A formal analysis is presented for the overlap between genes expressed under basal conditions in the hippocampus and genes responding to ischemia-hypoxia in general. A possible role of the elusive vascular factors in selective vulnerability is reviewed, and a gene set for angiogenesis is then shown to be enriched in the CA3 gene set. A survey of selective vulnerability in the human hippocampus in relation to genomic studies in ischemia-hypoxia is presented, and neurodegeneration genes with high expression in CA1 are highlighted (e.g. WFS1). It is concluded that neuronal factors dominate the selective vulnerability of CA1 but that vascular factors also deserve more systematic studies. PMID:26383255

  5. Astrocyte fatty acid binding protein-7 is a marker for neurogenic niches in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Young, John K; Heinbockel, Thomas; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C

    2013-12-01

    Recent research has determined that newborn neurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus of the macaque are frequently adjacent to astrocytes immunoreactive for fatty acid binding protein-7 (FABP7). To investigate if a similar relationship between FABP7-positive (FABP7+) astrocytes and proliferating cells exists in the rodent brain, sections of brains from juvenile rats were stained by immunohistochemistry to demonstrate newborn cells (antibody to Ki67 protein) and FABP7+ astrocytes. In rat brains, FABP7+ astrocytes were particularly abundant in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and were frequently close to dividing cells immunoreactive for Ki67 protein. FABP7+ astrocytes were also present in the olfactory bulbs, arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, and in the dorsal medulla subjacent to the area postrema, sites where more modest numbers of newborn neurons can also be found. These data suggest that regional accumulations of FABP7+ astrocytes may represent reservoirs of cells having the potential for neurogenesis. Because FABP7+ astrocytes are particularly abundant in the hippocampus, and since the gene for FABP7 has been linked to Alzheimer's disease, age-related changes in FABP7+ astrocytes (mitochondrial degeneration) may be relevant to age-associated disorders of the hippocampus.

  6. Episodic and declarative memory: role of the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Tulving, E; Markowitsch, H J

    1998-01-01

    The fact that medial temporal lobe structures, including the hippocampus, are critical for declarative memory is firmly established by now. The understanding of the role that these structures play in declarative memory, however, despite great efforts spent in the quest, has eluded investigators so far. Given the existing scenario, novel ideas that hold the promise of clarifying matters should be eagerly sought. One such idea was recently proposed by Vargha-Khadem and her colleagues (Science 1997; 277:376-380) on the basis of their study of three young people suffering from anterograde amnesia caused by early-onset hippocampal pathology. The idea is that the hippocampus is necessary for remembering ongoing life's experiences (episodic memory), but not necessary for the acquisition of factual knowledge (semantic memory). We discuss the reasons why this novel proposal makes good sense and why it and its ramifications should be vigorously pursued. We review and compare declarative and episodic theories of amnesia, and argue that the findings reported by Vargha-Khadem and her colleagues fit well into an episodic theory that retains components already publicized, and adds new ones suggested by the Vargha-Khadem et al. study. Existing components of this theory include the idea that acquisition of factual knowledge can occur independently of episodic memory, and the idea that in anterograde amnesia it is quite possible for episodic memory to be more severely impaired than semantic memory. We suggest a realignment of organization of memory such that declarative memory is defined in terms of features and properties that are common to both episodic and semantic memory. The organization of memory thus modified gives greater precision to the Vargha-Khadem et al. neuroanatomical model in which declarative memory depends on perihippocampal cortical regions but not on the hippocampus, whereas episodic memory, which is separate from declarative memory, depends on the hippocampus.

  7. Dorsal and Ventral Pathways for Prosody.

    PubMed

    Sammler, Daniela; Grosbras, Marie-Hélène; Anwander, Alfred; Bestelmeyer, Patricia E G; Belin, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    Our vocal tone--the prosody--contributes a lot to the meaning of speech beyond the actual words. Indeed, the hesitant tone of a "yes" may be more telling than its affirmative lexical meaning. The human brain contains dorsal and ventral processing streams in the left hemisphere that underlie core linguistic abilities such as phonology, syntax, and semantics. Whether or not prosody--a reportedly right-hemispheric faculty--involves analogous processing streams is a matter of debate. Functional connectivity studies on prosody leave no doubt about the existence of such streams, but opinions diverge on whether information travels along dorsal or ventral pathways. Here we show, with a novel paradigm using audio morphing combined with multimodal neuroimaging and brain stimulation, that prosody perception takes dual routes along dorsal and ventral pathways in the right hemisphere. In experiment 1, categorization of speech stimuli that gradually varied in their prosodic pitch contour (between statement and question) involved (1) an auditory ventral pathway along the superior temporal lobe and (2) auditory-motor dorsal pathways connecting posterior temporal and inferior frontal/premotor areas. In experiment 2, inhibitory stimulation of right premotor cortex as a key node of the dorsal stream decreased participants' performance in prosody categorization, arguing for a motor involvement in prosody perception. These data draw a dual-stream picture of prosodic processing that parallels the established left-hemispheric multi-stream architecture of language, but with relative rightward asymmetry. PMID:26549262

  8. Topographic and quantitative description of rat dorsal column fibres arising from the lumbar dorsal roots.

    PubMed

    Smith, K J; Bennett, B J

    1987-08-01

    The number and topographic distribution of the profiles of degenerating primary afferent fibres were determined within the rat dorsal column 3-4 weeks after division of the lumbar and S2 dorsal roots. The degenerating fibres were identified in toluidine blue-stained 1 micron transverse sections taken at different spinal levels, and their positions were marked with the aid of a drawing tube. Fibres entered the dorsal column at its lateral margin and sent projections rostrally and caudally. Fibres ascending the column were displaced medially in an orderly progression as the fibres of more rostral roots entered the cord. Most ascending fibres were lost from the dorsal columns within 2-3 segments of their site of entry, with only 15%, on average, reaching cervical levels. The descending fibres maintained a less organised topographic distribution, and typically only 3% of fibres entering the dorsal column descended two segments from their site of entry.

  9. Pre-ictal increase in theta synchrony between the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex in a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Broggini, Ana Clara Silveira; Esteves, Ingrid Miranda; Romcy-Pereira, Rodrigo Neves; Leite, João Pereira; Leão, Richardson Naves

    2016-05-01

    The pathologically synchronized neuronal activity in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) can be triggered by network events that were once normal. Under normal conditions, hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) work in synchrony during a variety of cognitive states. Abnormal changes in this circuit may aid to seizure onset and also help to explain the high association of TLE with mood disorders. We used a TLE rat model generated by perforant path (PP) stimulation to understand whether synchrony between dorsal hippocampal and mPFC networks is altered shortly before a seizure episode. We recorded hippocampal and mPFC local field potentials (LFPs) of animals with spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRSs) to verify the connectivity between these regions. We showed that SRSs decrease hippocampal theta oscillations whereas coherence in theta increases over time prior to seizure onset. This increase in synchrony is accompanied by a stronger coupling between hippocampal theta and mPFC gamma oscillation. Finally, using Granger causality we showed that hippocampus/mPFC synchrony increases in the pre-ictal phase and this increase is likely to be caused by hippocampal networks. The dorsal hippocampus is not directly connected to the mPFC; however, the functional coupling in theta between these two structures rises pre-ictally. Our data indicates that the increase in synchrony between dorsal hippocampus and mPFC may be predictive of seizures and may help to elucidate the network mechanisms that lead to seizure generation. PMID:26953232

  10. A direct morphometric comparison of five labeling protocols for multi-atlas driven automatic segmentation of the hippocampus in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nestor, Sean M; Gibson, Erin; Gao, Fu-Qiang; Kiss, Alex; Black, Sandra E

    2013-02-01

    Hippocampal volumetry derived from structural MRI is increasingly used to delineate regions of interest for functional measurements, assess efficacy in therapeutic trials of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and has been endorsed by the new AD diagnostic guidelines as a radiological marker of disease progression. Unfortunately, morphological heterogeneity in AD can prevent accurate demarcation of the hippocampus. Recent developments in automated volumetry commonly use multi-template fusion driven by expert manual labels, enabling highly accurate and reproducible segmentation in disease and healthy subjects. However, there are several protocols to define the hippocampus anatomically in vivo, and the method used to generate atlases may impact automatic accuracy and sensitivity - particularly in pathologically heterogeneous samples. Here we report a fully automated segmentation technique that provides a robust platform to directly evaluate both technical and biomarker performance in AD among anatomically unique labeling protocols. For the first time we test head-to-head the performance of five common hippocampal labeling protocols for multi-atlas based segmentation, using both the Sunnybrook Longitudinal Dementia Study and the entire Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 1 (ADNI-1) baseline and 24-month dataset. We based these atlas libraries on the protocols of (Haller et al., 1997; Killiany et al., 1993; Malykhin et al., 2007; Pantel et al., 2000; Pruessner et al., 2000), and a single operator performed all manual tracings to generate de facto "ground truth" labels. All methods distinguished between normal elders, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and AD in the expected directions, and showed comparable correlations with measures of episodic memory performance. Only more inclusive protocols distinguished between stable MCI and MCI-to-AD converters, and had slightly better associations with episodic memory. Moreover, we demonstrate that protocols including more posterior

  11. Dorsal wrist ganglion: Current review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sanjay; Gupta, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    Ganglion cyst is the most common soft tissue tumour of hand. Sixty to seventy percent of ganglion cysts are found in the dorsal aspect of the wrist. They may affect any age group; however they are more common in the twenties to forties. Its origin and pathogenesis remains enigmatic. Non-surgical treatment is unreliable with a high recurrence rates. Open surgical excision leads to unsightly scar and poor outcome. Arthroscopy excision has shown very promising result with very low recurrence rate. We reviewed the current literature available on dorsal wrist ganglion. PMID:25983472

  12. Mnemonic convergence in the human hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Backus, Alexander R.; Bosch, Sander E.; Ekman, Matthias; Grabovetsky, Alejandro Vicente; Doeller, Christian F.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to form associations between a multitude of events is the hallmark of episodic memory. Computational models have espoused the importance of the hippocampus as convergence zone, binding different aspects of an episode into a coherent representation, by integrating information from multiple brain regions. However, evidence for this long-held hypothesis is limited, since previous work has largely focused on representational and network properties of the hippocampus in isolation. Here we identify the hippocampus as mnemonic convergence zone, using a combination of multivariate pattern and graph-theoretical network analyses of functional magnetic resonance imaging data from humans performing an associative memory task. We observe overlap of conjunctive coding and hub-like network attributes in the hippocampus. These results provide evidence for mnemonic convergence in the hippocampus, underlying the integration of distributed information into episodic memory representations. PMID:27325442

  13. DEVELOPMENTAL CIGARETTE SMOKE EXPOSURE: HIPPOCAMPUS PROTEOME AND METABOLOME PROFILES IN LOW BIRTH WEIGHT PUPS

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Rachel E.; Chen, Jing; Jagadapillai, Rekha; Jang, HyeJeong; Abomoelak, Bassam; Brock, Guy; Greene, Robert M.; Pisano, M. Michele

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke during development is linked to neurodevelopmental delays and cognitive impairment including impulsivity, attention deficit disorder, and lower IQ. However, brain region specific biomolecular alterations induced by developmental cigarette smoke exposure (CSE) remain largely unexplored. In the current molecular phenotyping study, a mouse model of ‘active’ developmental CSE (serum cotinine>50 ng/mL) spanning pre-implantation through third trimester-equivalent brain development (gestational day (GD) 1 through postnatal day (PD) 21) was utilized. Hippocampus tissue collected at the time of cessation of exposure was processed for gel-based proteomic and non-targeted metabolomic profiling with Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) for selection of features of interest. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was utilized to identify candidate molecular and metabolic pathways impacted within the hippocampus. CSE impacted glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, fatty acid metabolism, and neurodevelopment pathways within the developing hippocampus. PMID:24486158

  14. Developmental cigarette smoke exposure: hippocampus proteome and metabolome profiles in low birth weight pups.

    PubMed

    Neal, Rachel E; Chen, Jing; Jagadapillai, Rekha; Jang, Hyejeong; Abomoelak, Bassam; Brock, Guy; Greene, Robert M; Pisano, M Michele

    2014-03-20

    Exposure to cigarette smoke during development is linked to neurodevelopmental delays and cognitive impairment including impulsivity, attention deficit disorder, and lower IQ. However, brain region specific biomolecular alterations induced by developmental cigarette smoke exposure (CSE) remain largely unexplored. In the current molecular phenotyping study, a mouse model of 'active' developmental CSE (serum cotinine > 50 ng/mL) spanning pre-implantation through third trimester-equivalent brain development (gestational day (GD) 1 through postnatal day (PD) 21) was utilized. Hippocampus tissue collected at the time of cessation of exposure was processed for gel-based proteomic and non-targeted metabolomic profiling with partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) for selection of features of interest. Ingenuity pathway analysis was utilized to identify candidate molecular and metabolic pathways impacted within the hippocampus. CSE impacted glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, fatty acid metabolism, and neurodevelopment pathways within the developing hippocampus.

  15. Assembly of the dorsal horn somatotopic map.

    PubMed

    Brown, P B; Koerber, H R; Millecchia, R

    1997-01-01

    We hypothesize: (a) peripheral innervation densities determine map scales in dorsal horn, (b) dorsal horn cell (DHC) receptive field (RF) geometries are determined by map scales, and (c) morphologies of primary afferents (PAs) and DHCs reflect their developmental history. We suggest the following sequence: (A) PAs project in a somatotopic mediolateral sequence. (B) DHCs assemble prototype RFs by sampling presynaptic neuropil with their dendrites. (C) PAs then project to all levels where their RFs are contained within prototype RFs of DHCs. (D) A competitive mechanism produces the adult form of DHC RFs. (E) Adult distributions of PA terminals and DHC dendrites reflect this developmental history. (F) Mediolateral somatotopic gradients are determined by RF densities of axons entering at the same levels. (G) Map scales at different rostrocaudal levels are determined by somatotopic gradients. (H) Geometries of DHC RFs are determined by constant convergence and divergence of monosynaptic connections. (I) Secondary processes further modify geometries of DHC RFs. (J) Residual self-organizing capacity supports maintenance and plastic mechanisms. We adduce the following evidence: (1) agreement between monosynaptically coupled inputs and cells' excitatory low threshold mechanoreceptive fields; (2) the temporal sequence of events during penetration of the gray matter by PAs; (3)variation of PA terminal and DHC dendritic domains as a function of map scale; (4) somatotopic gradients and geometries of DHC RFs in adult dorsal horn; (5) calculations of peripheral innervation densities and dorsal horn map scales; and (6) constant divergence and convergence between PAs and DHCs. PMID:9399410

  16. Loss of Hoxb8 alters spinal dorsal laminae and sensory responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Holstege, Jan C.; de Graaff, Wim; Hossaini, Mehdi; Cano, Sebastian Cardona; Jaarsma, Dick; van den Akker, Eric; Deschamps, Jacqueline

    2008-01-01

    Although Hox gene expression has been linked to motoneuron identity, a role of these genes in development of the spinal sensory system remained undocumented. Hoxb genes are expressed at high levels in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Hoxb8 null mutants manifest a striking phenotype of excessive grooming and hairless lesions on the lower back. Applying local anesthesia underneath the hairless skin suppressed excessive grooming, indicating that this behavior depends on peripheral nerve activity. Functional ablation of mouse Hoxb8 also leads to attenuated response to nociceptive and thermal stimuli. Although spinal ganglia were normal, a lower postmitotic neural count was found in the dorsalmost laminae at lumbar levels around birth, leading to a smaller dorsal horn and a correspondingly narrowed projection field of nociceptive and thermoceptive afferents. The distribution of the dorsal neuronal cell types that we assayed, including neurons expressing the itch-specific gastrin-releasing peptide receptor, was disorganized in the lumbar region of the mutant. BrdU labeling experiments and gene-expression studies at stages around the birth of these neurons suggest that loss of Hoxb8 starts impairing development of the upper laminae of the lumbar spinal cord at approximately embryonic day (E)15.5. Because none of the neuronal markers used was unexpressed in the adult dorsal horn, absence of Hoxb8 does not impair neuronal differentiation. The data therefore suggest that a lower number of neurons in the upper spinal laminae and neuronal disorganization in the dorsal horn underlie the sensory defects including the excessive grooming of the Hoxb8 mutant. PMID:18430798

  17. Aging in the cerebellum and hippocampus and associated behaviors over the adult life span of CB6F1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Kennard, John A.; Brown, Kevin L.; Woodruff-Pak, Diana S.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we examined the effects of normal aging in the hippocampus and cerebellum, as well as behaviors associated with these substrates. A total of 67 CB6F1 hybrid mice were tested at one of five ages (4, 8, 12, 18 or 25 months) on the context pre-exposure facilitation effect modification of fear conditioning (CPFE), rotorod, Barnes maze, acoustic startle, Morris water maze (MWM) and 500 ms trace eyeblink classical conditioning (EBCC). Behavioral tasks were chosen to increase the ability to detect age-related changes in learning, as trace EBCC is considered a more difficult paradigm (compared to delay EBCC) and the CPFE has been found to be more sensitive to hippocampus insults than standard contextual fear conditioning. To assess the effects of age on the brain, hippocampus volume was calculated and unbiased stereology was used to estimate the number of Purkinje neurons in the cerebellar cortex. A significant, age-related loss of Purkinje neurons was found—beginning at 12 months of age—and hippocampus volume remained stable over the adult life span. Age-related impairment was found, beginning at 12–18 months in the rotorod, and mice with fewer Purkinje neurons showed greater impairment in this task. CB6F1 mice retained auditory acuity across the life span and mice aged 25 months showed significant age-related impairment in the EBCC task; however, deficits were not associated with the loss of Purkinje neurons. Although the CPFE task is considered more sensitive to hippocampus insult, no age-related impairment was found. Spatial memory retention was impaired in the Barnes maze at 25 months, but no significant deficits were seen in the MWM. These results support the finding of differential aging in the hippocampus and cerebellum. PMID:23764510

  18. On the origins of dorsal root potentials.

    PubMed

    LLOYD, D P C; McINTYRE, A K

    1949-03-20

    The "dorsal root potential" consists of five successive deflections designated for convenience, D.R.I, II, III, IV, and V. Of these, D.R.V alone constitutes the dorsal root potential of prior description. A study has been made of the general properties of those deflections not previously described. Dorsal root potentials are electrotonic extensions into the extramedullary root segment, the result of electrical interactions within the cord comparable to those that have been studied in peripheral nerve. Although the anatomical and electrical conditions of interaction are infinitely more complex in the cord than in nerve, it is seen that the fact of parallel distribution of primary afferent fibers pertaining to neighboring dorsal roots provides a sufficient anatomical basis for qualitative analysis in the first approximation of dorsal root potentials. An extension of the theory of interaction between neighboring nerve fibers has been made to include an especial case of interaction between fibers orientated at right angles to one another. The predictions have been tested in a nerve model and found correct. Given this elaboration, and the stated anatomical propositions, existing knowledge of interaction provides an adequate theoretical basis for an elementary understanding of dorsal root potentials. The study of general properties and the analysis of dorsal root potentials have led to the formulation of certain conclusions that follow. D.R.I, II, and III record the electrotonic spread of polarization resulting from the external field of impulses conducted in the intramedullary segment and longitudinal trajects of primary afferent fibers. D.R.IV arises in part as the result of activity in primary afferent fibers, and in part as the result of activity in secondary neurons. In either case the mode of production is the same, and the responsible agent is residual negativity in the active collaterals, or, more precisely, the external field of current flow about the

  19. Pattern separation in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Yassa, Michael A.; Stark, Craig E. L.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to discriminate among similar experiences is a critical feature of episodic memory. This ability has long been hypothesized to require the hippocampus, with computational models suggesting it is dependent on pattern separation. However, empirical data for the hippocampus’ role in pattern separation was not available until recently. This review summarizes data from electrophysiological recordings, lesion studies, immediate early gene imaging, transgenic mouse models, as well as human functional neuroimaging that provide convergent evidence for the involvement of particular hippocampal subfields in this key process. We discuss the impact of aging and adult neurogenesis on pattern separation, as well as highlight several challenges to linking across species and approaches and suggest future directions for investigation. PMID:21788086

  20. Noopept stimulates the expression of NGF and BDNF in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ostrovskaya, R U; Gudasheva, T A; Zaplina, A P; Vahitova, Ju V; Salimgareeva, M H; Jamidanov, R S; Seredenin, S B

    2008-09-01

    We studied the effect of original dipeptide preparation Noopept (N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine ethyl ester, GVS-111) with nootropic and neuroprotective properties on the expression of mRNA for neurotropic factors NGF and BDNF in rat hippocampus. Expression of NGF and BDNF mRNA in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus was studied by Northern blot analysis. Taking into account the fact that pharmacological activity of Noopept is realized after both acute and chronic treatment, we studied the effect of single and long-term treatment (28 days) with this drug. Expression of the studied neurotropic factors in the cerebral cortex was below the control after single administration of Noopept, while chronic administration caused a slight increase in BDNF expression. In the hippocampus, expression of mRNA for both neurotrophins increased after acute administration of Noopept. Chronic treatment with Noopept was not followed by the development of tolerance, but even potentiated the neurotrophic effect. These changes probably play a role in neuronal restoration. We showed that the nootropic drug increases expression of neurotrophic factors in the hippocampus. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that neurotrophin synthesis in the hippocampus determines cognitive function, particularly in consolidation and delayed memory retrieval. Published data show that neurotrophic factor deficiency in the hippocampus is observed not only in advanced Alzheimer's disease, but also at the stage of mild cognitive impairment (pre-disease state). In light of this our findings suggest that Noopept holds much promise to prevent the development of Alzheimer's disease in patients with mild cognitive impairment. Moreover, therapeutic effectiveness of Noopept should be evaluated at the initial stage of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19240853

  1. Property of Regenerating Serotonin Fibers in the Hippocampus of Human Migration Disorders Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Shuichi; Ehara, Ayuka; Ohmomo, Hideki

    Individual mood and mental conditions exert a great influence on one's own kansei. Abnormality or dysfunction of the 5-HT neuron system in the developing and/or adult brain is closely associated with their conditions. Thus, the 5-HT neuron system may play an important role in the neuronal mechanisms underlying kansei. Interestingly, previous studies have shown that heterotopic clusters in the hippocampus (hippocampal heterotopia), deriving from neocortical neurons, after prenatally treated with methylazoxymethanol acetate in rat (MAM rat), exhibit abundant 5-HT innervation. After neonatal intracisternal 5, 7-dihydroxytryptamine (DHT) injection, these 5-HT fibers degenerate and disappear throughout the forebrain, and then regenerating 5-HT fibers densely innervate in the hippocampal heterotopia. The 5-HT fiber system in the hippocampal heterotopia of MAM rat provides useful experimental models for study the plasticity of human migration disorder. In the present study, to evaluate the properties of regenerating 5-HT fibers in the hippocampal heterotopia of MAM rats, we examined the origin of these projections by combined retrograde transport and immunohistochemical methods. Prenatal exposure to MAM resulted in the formation of hippocampal heterotopia in the dorsal hippocampus. Regenerating 5-HT fibers formed a dense innervation within the hippocampal heterotopia after neonatal DHT injection. These projections appeared to arise mainly from 5-HT neurons in the median raphe nucleus, with a small portion from 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus. These findings suggest a specific profile of regenerating 5-HT fibers, providing the new insights for serotonergic plasticity.

  2. Chronic immobilization in the malpar1 knockout mice increases oxidative stress in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, María; Castilla-Ortega, Estela; Pedraza, Carmen; Blanco, Eduardo; Hurtado-Guerrero, Isaac; Barbancho, Miguel Angel; Chun, Jerold; Rodríguez-de-Fonseca, Fernando; Estivill-Torrús, Guillermo; Santín Núñez, Luis Javier

    2012-10-01

    The lysophosphatidic acid LPA₁ receptor has recently been involved in the adaptation of the hippocampus to chronic stress. The absence of LPA₁ receptor aggravates the chronic stress-induced impairment of both hippocampal neurogenesis and apoptosis that were accompanied with hippocampus-dependent memory deficits. Apoptotic death and neurogenesis in the hippocampus are regulated by oxidative stress. In the present work, we studied the involvement of LPA₁ receptor signaling pathway in the regulation of the hippocampal redox after chronic stress. To this end, we used malpar1 knockout (KO) and wild-type mice assigned to either chronic stress (21 days of restraint, 3 h/day) or control conditions. Lipid peroxidation, the activity of the antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX), as well as mitochondrial function stimulation, monitored through the activity of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), were studied in the hippocampus. Our results showed that chronic immobilization stress enhanced lipid peroxidation as well as the activity of the antioxidant enzymes studied (CAT, SOD, and GPX). This effect was only observed in absence of LPA₁ receptor. Furthermore, only malpar1 KO mice submitted to chronic stress exhibited a severe downregulation of the COX activity, suggesting the presence of mitochondrial damage. Altogether, these results suggest that malpar1 KO mice display enhanced oxidative stress in the hippocampus after chronic stress. This may be involved in the hippocampal abnormalities observed in this genotype after chronic immobilization, including memory, neurogenesis, and apoptosis.

  3. Diffusion tensor imaging of the hippocampus in MCI and early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fellgiebel, Andreas; Yakushev, Igor

    2011-01-01

    The hippocampus is among the first brain structures to be affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Microstructural alterations within this region have been quantified in vivo using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a relatively novel MRI-based technique for mapping diffusion properties of water. Existing evidence indicates that DTI-derived mean diffusivity (MD) of the anterior hippocampus is more predictive than ordinary volumetric indices of the degree of episodic memory impairment in patients with early AD. Thus, altered MD of the (anterior) hippocampus might be highly indicative of hippocampal dysfunction, thereby potentially qualifying this measure as a candidate marker for monitoring progression of AD. Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm this concept. DTI-based assessment of hippocampal microstructure might be also of value for early AD diagnosis and for predicting the course of cognitive decline in subjects at risk for Alzheimer's dementia. Mean diffusivity as microstructural and volume as macrostructural index of hippocampal integrity seem to reflect different, albeit overlapping, aspects of the neurodegenerative process. In contrast, fractional anisotropy is less efficient for quantifying microstructural integrity of the diseased hippocampus in the clinical context. Development of automatic algorithms, providing MD measurements of the hippocampus for routine use, is a task for future studies. PMID:21971465

  4. The Effect of Diabetes Mellitus on Apoptosis in Hippocampus: Cellular and Molecular Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Akram; Hami, Javad; Razavi, Shahnaz; Esfandiary, Ebrahim; Hejazi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is associated with cognitive deficits in humans and animals. These deficits are paralleled by neurophysiological and structural changes in brain. In diabetic animals, impairments of spatial learning, memory, and cognition occur in association with distinct changes in hippocampus, a key brain area for many forms of learning and memory and are particularly sensitive to changes in glucose homeostasis. However, the multifactorial pathogenesis of diabetic encephalopathy is not yet completely understood. Apoptosis plays a crucial role in diabetes-induce neuronal loss in hippocampus. Methods: The effects of diabetes on hippocampus and cognitive/behavioral dysfunctions in experimental models of diabetes are reviewed, with a focus on the negative impact on increased neuronal apoptosis and related cellular and molecular mechanisms. Results: Of all articles that were assessed, most of the experimental studies clearly showed that diabetes causes neuronal apoptosis in hippocampus through multiple mechanisms, including oxidative stress, inhibition of caspases, disturbance in expression of apoptosis regulator genes, as well as deficits in mitochondrial function. The balance between pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic signaling may determine the neuronal apoptotic outcome in vitro and in vivo models of experimental diabetes. Conclusions: Dissecting out the mechanisms responsible for diabetes-related changes in the hippocampal cell apoptosis helps improve treatment of impaired cognitive and memory functions in diabetic individuals. PMID:27076895

  5. Glycine N-methyltransferase expression in the hippocampus and its role in neurogenesis and cognitive performance

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Manuel; Rabaneda, Luis G.; Murillo-Carretero, Maribel; Ortega-Martínez, Sylvia; Martínez-Chantar, María L.; Woodhoo, Ashwin; Luka, Zigmund; Wagner, Conrad; Lu, Shelly C.; Mato, José M.; Micó, Juan A.; Castro, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus is a brain area characterized by its high plasticity, observed at all levels of organization: molecular, synaptic and cellular, the latter refering to the capacity of neural precursors within the hippocampus to give rise to new neurons throughout life. Recent findings suggest that promoter methylation is a plastic process subjected to regulation, and this plasticity seems to be particularly important for hippocampal neurogenesis. We have detected the enzyme GNMT (a liver metabolic enzyme) in the hippocampus. GNMT regulates intracellular levels of SAMe, which is a universal methyl donor implied in almost all methylation reactions and, thus, of prime importance for DNA methylation. In addition, we show that deficiency of this enzyme in mice (Gnmt−/−) results in high SAMe levels within the hippocampus, reduced neurogenic capacity, and spatial learning and memory impairment. In vitro, SAMe inhibited neural precursor cell division in a concentration-dependent manner, but only when proliferation signals were triggered by bFGF. Indeed, SAMe inhibited the bFGF-stimulated MAP kinase signaling cascade, resulting in decreased cyclin E expression. These results suggest that alterations in the concentration of SAMe impair neurogenesis and contribute to cognitive decline. PMID:24687756

  6. Glycine N-methyltransferase expression in the hippocampus and its role in neurogenesis and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Manuel; Rabaneda, Luis G; Murillo-Carretero, Maribel; Ortega-Martínez, Sylvia; Martínez-Chantar, María L; Woodhoo, Ashwin; Luka, Zigmund; Wagner, Conrad; Lu, Shelly C; Mato, José M; Micó, Juan A; Castro, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    The hippocampus is a brain area characterized by its high plasticity, observed at all levels of organization: molecular, synaptic, and cellular, the latter referring to the capacity of neural precursors within the hippocampus to give rise to new neurons throughout life. Recent findings suggest that promoter methylation is a plastic process subjected to regulation, and this plasticity seems to be particularly important for hippocampal neurogenesis. We have detected the enzyme GNMT (a liver metabolic enzyme) in the hippocampus. GNMT regulates intracellular levels of SAMe, which is a universal methyl donor implied in almost all methylation reactions and, thus, of prime importance for DNA methylation. In addition, we show that deficiency of this enzyme in mice (Gnmt-/-) results in high SAMe levels within the hippocampus, reduced neurogenic capacity, and spatial learning and memory impairment. In vitro, SAMe inhibited neural precursor cell division in a concentration-dependent manner, but only when proliferation signals were triggered by bFGF. Indeed, SAMe inhibited the bFGF-stimulated MAP kinase signaling cascade, resulting in decreased cyclin E expression. These results suggest that alterations in the concentration of SAMe impair neurogenesis and contribute to cognitive decline.

  7. Hippocampus in health and disease: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Kuljeet Singh; Dhikav, Vikas

    2012-01-01

    Hippocampus is a complex brain structure embedded deep into temporal lobe. It has a major role in learning and memory. It is a plastic and vulnerable structure that gets damaged by a variety of stimuli. Studies have shown that it also gets affected in a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. In last decade or so, lot has been learnt about conditions that affect hippocampus and produce changes ranging from molecules to morphology. Progresses in radiological delineation, electrophysiology, and histochemical characterization have made it possible to study this archicerebral structure in greater detail. Present paper attempts to give an overview of hippocampus, both in health and diseases. PMID:23349586

  8. Early asymmetric cues triggering the dorsal/ventral gene regulatory network of the sea urchin embryo

    PubMed Central

    Cavalieri, Vincenzo; Spinelli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Dorsal/ventral (DV) patterning of the sea urchin embryo relies on a ventrally-localized organizer expressing Nodal, a pivotal regulator of the DV gene regulatory network. However, the inceptive mechanisms imposing the symmetry-breaking are incompletely understood. In Paracentrotus lividus, the Hbox12 homeodomain-containing repressor is expressed by prospective dorsal cells, spatially facing and preceding the onset of nodal transcription. We report that Hbox12 misexpression provokes DV abnormalities, attenuating nodal and nodal-dependent transcription. Reciprocally, impairing hbox12 function disrupts DV polarity by allowing ectopic expression of nodal. Clonal loss-of-function, inflicted by blastomere transplantation or gene-transfer assays, highlights that DV polarization requires Hbox12 action in dorsal cells. Remarkably, the localized knock-down of nodal restores DV polarity of embryos lacking hbox12 function. Finally, we show that hbox12 is a dorsal-specific negative modulator of the p38-MAPK activity, which is required for nodal expression. Altogether, our results suggest that Hbox12 function is essential for proper positioning of the DV organizer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04664.001 PMID:25457050

  9. Bilateral dorsal funicular lesions alter sensorimotor behaviour in rats.

    PubMed

    Kanagal, Srikanth G; Muir, Gillian D

    2007-06-01

    Spinal cord injury models often involve damage to the corticospinal tract (CST) because of the functional importance of this pathway in humans. In rats, the main component of the CST travels in the dorsal funiculus and cannot be damaged without concurrent damage to overlying sensory fibers. To distinguish deficits due to the loss of CST from those due to sensory fiber damage, we bilaterally axotomized ascending sensory fibers in dorsal columns without CST damage in one group of rats (ascending sensory pathways, ASP) and compared the results to a group with damage to ascending sensory fibers with CST damage (ASP+CST). We assessed the ability of rats to perform a skilled reaching task and to walk over a horizontal ladder. We also measured the forces exerted on the ground (ground reaction forces, GRF) and limb contact patterns produced during overground locomotion. After ASP lesions alone, endpoint measurements of reaching success and footslip errors on the ladder showed transitory impairments, although detailed analysis revealed persistent deficits in skilled forelimb movements. ASP+CST lesions caused persistent deficits in reaching success and ladder footslips throughout the 8-week post-surgical period. Measurement of GRFs and limb timing during overground locomotion revealed differences in both groups at 8 weeks post-surgery compared to pre-surgical values, but no differences between ASP and ASP+CST groups. These results emphasize the normal contribution of both ascending sensory axons and CST axons during skilled limb movements and support a role for ascending sensory information, but not descending CST input, during overground locomotion. These results also illustrate the value of using sensitive methods to reveal detailed behavioural changes after spinal injury. PMID:17451687

  10. Deep dorsal vein arterialisation in vascular impotence.

    PubMed

    Wespes, E; Corbusier, A; Delcour, C; Vandenbosch, G; Struyven, J; Schulman, C C

    1989-11-01

    A series of 12 patients with vasculogenic impotence (4 arterial lesions; 8 arterial and venous lesions) underwent deep dorsal vein arterialisation after pre-operative assessment by a multidisciplinary approach. Cumulative graft patency was 58% (7 of 12 patients) up to 21 months but only 4 patients developed almost normal erections. Digital angiography, with and without the intracavernous injection of papaverine, was performed during follow-up to determine the vascular physiological status. At flaccidity, the corpora cavernosa were never opacified in the absence of a venocorporeal shunt. The penile glans was always visualised. Opacification of the deep dorsal vein and the circumflex system decreased with penile rigidity, resulting from their compression between Buck's fascia and the tunica albuginea. Intracavernous pressure recorded before and after the surgical procedure showed a marked increase when a caverno-venous shunt was performed. Hypervascularisation of the glans occurred in 2 cases. The relevance of this new surgical technique and its functional mechanism are discussed.

  11. Traumatic Brain Injury Upregulates Phosphodiesterase Expression in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Nicole M; Titus, David J; Oliva, Anthony A; Furones, Concepcion; Atkins, Coleen M

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in significant impairments in hippocampal synaptic plasticity. A molecule critically involved in hippocampal synaptic plasticity, 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate, is downregulated in the hippocampus after TBI, but the mechanism that underlies this decrease is unknown. To address this question, we determined whether phosphodiesterase (PDE) expression in the hippocampus is altered by TBI. Young adult male Sprague Dawley rats received sham surgery or moderate parasagittal fluid-percussion brain injury. Animals were analyzed by western blotting for changes in PDE expression levels in the hippocampus. We found that PDE1A levels were significantly increased at 30 min, 1 h and 6 h after TBI. PDE4B2 and 4D2 were also significantly increased at 1, 6, and 24 h after TBI. Additionally, phosphorylation of PDE4A was significantly increased at 6 and 24 h after TBI. No significant changes were observed in levels of PDE1B, 1C, 3A, 8A, or 8B between 30 min to 7 days after TBI. To determine the spatial profile of these increases, we used immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry at 24 h after TBI. PDE1A and phospho-PDE4A localized to neuronal cell bodies. PDE4B2 was expressed in neuronal dendrites, microglia and infiltrating CD11b(+) immune cells. PDE4D was predominantly found in microglia and infiltrating CD11b(+) immune cells. To determine if inhibition of PDE4 would improve hippocampal synaptic plasticity deficits after TBI, we treated hippocampal slices with rolipram, a pan-PDE4 inhibitor. Rolipram partially rescued the depression in basal synaptic transmission and converted a decaying form of long-term potentiation (LTP) into long-lasting LTP. Overall, these results identify several possible PDE targets for reducing hippocampal synaptic plasticity deficits and improving cognitive function acutely after TBI. PMID:26903822

  12. Fos, nociception and the dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Coggeshall, Richard E

    2005-12-01

    The protooncogene c-fos is rapidly activated after noxious stimuli to express the protein Fos in spinal dorsal horn neurons that are in the 'correct' locations for nociceptive information transfer. As such, therefore, mapping Fos expression in these neurons is at present the best global marker for efficiently locating populations of neurons in the awake animal that respond to nociceptive input. This allows, among other things, precise behavioral measurements to be correlated with Fos expression. Two arenas where mapping dorsal horn Fos expression has made a major impact are in the anatomy of nociceptive systems and as a useful assay for the analgesic properties of various therapeutic regimens. Also Fos expression is the only way to map populations of neurons that are responding to non-localized input such as withdrawal after addiction and vascular occlusion. Another insight is that it shows a clear activation of neurons in superficial 'pain-processing' laminae by innocuous stimuli after nerve lesions, a finding that presumably bears on the allodynia that often accompanies these lesions. It is to be understood, however, that the Fos localizations are not sufficient unto themselves, but the major function of these studies is to efficiently locate populations of cells in nociceptive pathways so that powerful anatomic and physiologic techniques can be brought to bear efficiently. Thus, the purpose of this review is to summarize the studies whose numbers are geometrically expanding that deal with Fos in the dorsal horn and the conclusions therefrom.

  13. Ventral and dorsal pathways for language

    PubMed Central

    Saur, Dorothee; Kreher, Björn W.; Schnell, Susanne; Kümmerer, Dorothee; Kellmeyer, Philipp; Vry, Magnus-Sebastian; Umarova, Roza; Musso, Mariacristina; Glauche, Volkmar; Abel, Stefanie; Huber, Walter; Rijntjes, Michel; Hennig, Jürgen; Weiller, Cornelius

    2008-01-01

    Built on an analogy between the visual and auditory systems, the following dual stream model for language processing was suggested recently: a dorsal stream is involved in mapping sound to articulation, and a ventral stream in mapping sound to meaning. The goal of the study presented here was to test the neuroanatomical basis of this model. Combining functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a novel diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-based tractography method we were able to identify the most probable anatomical pathways connecting brain regions activated during two prototypical language tasks. Sublexical repetition of speech is subserved by a dorsal pathway, connecting the superior temporal lobe and premotor cortices in the frontal lobe via the arcuate and superior longitudinal fascicle. In contrast, higher-level language comprehension is mediated by a ventral pathway connecting the middle temporal lobe and the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex via the extreme capsule. Thus, according to our findings, the function of the dorsal route, traditionally considered to be the major language pathway, is mainly restricted to sensory-motor mapping of sound to articulation, whereas linguistic processing of sound to meaning requires temporofrontal interaction transmitted via the ventral route. PMID:19004769

  14. The hippocampus is functionally connected to the striatum and orbitofrontal cortex during context dependent decision making.

    PubMed

    Ross, Robert S; Sherrill, Katherine R; Stern, Chantal E

    2011-11-14

    Many of our everyday actions are only appropriate in certain situations and selecting the appropriate behavior requires that we use current context and previous experience to guide our decisions. The current study examined hippocampal functional connectivity with prefrontal and striatal regions during a task that required participants to make decisions based on the contextual retrieval of overlapping sequential representations. Participants learned four sequences comprised of six faces each. An overlapping condition was created by having two sequences with two identical faces as the middle images. A non-overlapping condition contained two sequences that did not share any faces between them. Hippocampal functional connectivity was assessed during the presentation period and at the critical choice, where participants had to make a contextually dependent decision. The left hippocampus showed significantly increased functional connectivity with dorsal and ventral striatum and anterior cingulate cortex during the presentation period of the overlapping compared to the non-overlapping condition after participants knew the sequences. At the critical choice point of the overlapping condition, the left hippocampus showed stronger functional connectivity with the orbitofrontal cortex. These functional connectivity results suggest that the hippocampus may play a role in decision making by predicting the possibilities of what might come next, allowing orbitofrontal and striatal regions to evaluate the expected choice options in order to make the correct action at the choice point. PMID:22000080

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Rat Hippocampus under Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun; Li, Yujuan; Zhang, Yongqian; Liu, Yahui; Deng, Yulin

    It has been found that microgravity may lead to impairments in cognitive functions performed by CNS. However, the exact mechanism of effects of microgravity on the learning and memory function in animal nervous system is not elucidated yet. Brain function is mainly mediated by membrane proteins and their dysfunction causes degeneration of the learning and memory. To induce simulated microgravity, the rat tail suspension model was established. Comparative O (18) labeling quantitative proteomic strategy was applied to detect the differentially expressed proteins in rat brain hippocampus. The proteins in membrane fraction from rat hippocampus were digested by trypsin and then the peptides were separated by off-gel for the first dimension with 24 wells device encompassing the pH range of 3 - 10. An off-gel fraction was subjected into LC-ESI-QTOF in triplicate. Preliminary results showed that nearly 77% of the peptides identified were specific to one fraction. 676 proteins were identified among which 108 proteins were found differentially expressed under simulated microgravity. Using the KOBAS server, many enriched pathways, such as metabolic pathway, synaptic vesicle cycle, endocytosis, calcium signaling pathway, and SNAREs pathway were identified. Furthermore, it has been found that neurotransmitter released by Ca (2+) -triggered synaptic vesicles fusion may play key role in neural function. Rab 3A might inhibit the membrane fusion and neurotransmitter release. The protein alteration of the synaptic vesicle cycle may further explain the effects of microgravity on learning and memory function in rats. Key words: Microgravity; proteomics; synaptic vesicle; O (18) ({}) -labeling

  16. Stress effects on the hippocampus: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Joo; Pellman, Blake; Kim, Jeansok J

    2015-09-01

    Uncontrollable stress has been recognized to influence the hippocampus at various levels of analysis. Behaviorally, human and animal studies have found that stress generally impairs various hippocampal-dependent memory tasks. Neurally, animal studies have revealed that stress alters ensuing synaptic plasticity and firing properties of hippocampal neurons. Structurally, human and animal studies have shown that stress changes neuronal morphology, suppresses neuronal proliferation, and reduces hippocampal volume. Since the inception of stress research nearly 80 years ago, much focus has been on the varying levels of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis neuroendocrine hormones, namely glucocorticoids, as mediators of the myriad stress effects on the hippocampus and as contributing factors to stress-associated psychopathologies such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, reports of glucocorticoid-produced alterations in hippocampal functioning vary widely across studies. This review provides a brief history of stress research, examines how the glucocorticoid hypothesis emerged and guides contemporary stress research, and considers alternative approaches to understanding the mechanisms underlying stress effects on hippocampal functioning.

  17. Neuromodulatory signaling in hippocampus-dependent memory retrieval.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Steven A

    2015-04-01

    Considerable advances have been made toward understanding the molecular signaling events that underlie memory acquisition and consolidation. In contrast, less is known about memory retrieval, despite its necessity for utilizing learned information. This review focuses on neuromodulatory and intracellular signaling events that underlie memory retrieval mediated by the hippocampus, for which the most information is currently available. Among neuromodulators, adrenergic signaling is required for the retrieval of various types of hippocampus-dependent memory. Although they contribute to acquisition and/or consolidation, cholinergic and dopaminergic signaling are generally not required for retrieval. Interestingly, while not required for retrieval, serotonergic and opioid signaling may actually constrain memory retrieval. Roles for histamine and non-opioid neuropeptides are currently unclear but possible. A critical effector of adrenergic signaling in retrieval is reduction of the slow afterhyperpolarization mediated by β1 receptors, cyclic AMP, protein kinase A, Epac, and possibly ERK. In contrast, stress and glucocorticoids impair retrieval by decreasing cyclic AMP, mediated in part by the activation of β2 -adrenergic receptors. Clinically, alterations in neuromodulatory signaling and in memory retrieval occur in Alzheimer's disease, Down syndrome, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder, and recent evidence has begun to link changes in neuromodulatory signaling with effects on memory retrieval.

  18. Stress effects on the hippocampus: a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Joo; Pellman, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrollable stress has been recognized to influence the hippocampus at various levels of analysis. Behaviorally, human and animal studies have found that stress generally impairs various hippocampal-dependent memory tasks. Neurally, animal studies have revealed that stress alters ensuing synaptic plasticity and firing properties of hippocampal neurons. Structurally, human and animal studies have shown that stress changes neuronal morphology, suppresses neuronal proliferation, and reduces hippocampal volume. Since the inception of stress research nearly 80 years ago, much focus has been on the varying levels of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis neuroendocrine hormones, namely glucocorticoids, as mediators of the myriad stress effects on the hippocampus and as contributing factors to stress-associated psychopathologies such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, reports of glucocorticoid-produced alterations in hippocampal functioning vary widely across studies. This review provides a brief history of stress research, examines how the glucocorticoid hypothesis emerged and guides contemporary stress research, and considers alternative approaches to understanding the mechanisms underlying stress effects on hippocampal functioning. PMID:26286651

  19. Human Hippocampus Arbitrates Approach-Avoidance Conflict

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Dominik R.; Guitart-Masip, Marc; Packard, Pau A.; Miró, Júlia; Falip, Mercè; Fuentemilla, Lluís; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Animal models of human anxiety often invoke a conflict between approach and avoidance [1, 2]. In these, a key behavioral assay comprises passive avoidance of potential threat and inhibition, both thought to be controlled by ventral hippocampus [2–6]. Efforts to translate these approaches to clinical contexts [7, 8] are hampered by the fact that it is not known whether humans manifest analogous approach-avoidance dispositions and, if so, whether they share a homologous neurobiological substrate [9]. Here, we developed a paradigm to investigate the role of human hippocampus in arbitrating an approach-avoidance conflict under varying levels of potential threat. Across four experiments, subjects showed analogous behavior by adapting both passive avoidance behavior and behavioral inhibition to threat level. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we observe that threat level engages the anterior hippocampus, the human homolog of rodent ventral hippocampus [10]. Testing patients with selective hippocampal lesions, we demonstrate a causal role for the hippocampus with patients showing reduced passive avoidance behavior and inhibition across all threat levels. Our data provide the first human assay for approach-avoidance conflict akin to that of animal anxiety models. The findings bridge rodent and human research on passive avoidance and behavioral inhibition and furnish a framework for addressing the neuronal underpinnings of human anxiety disorders, where our data indicate a major role for the hippocampus. PMID:24560572

  20. Effect of exercise on synaptophysin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase levels in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of a rat model of developmental stress

    PubMed Central

    Hescham, Sarah; Grace, Laurian; Kellaway, Lauriston A; Bugarith, Kishor; Russell, Vivienne A

    2010-01-01

    Stress affects the brain differently depending on the timing, duration and intensity of the stressor. Separation from the dam for 3 hours per day is a potent stressor for rat pups which causes activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, evidenced by increased plasma levels of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and glucocorticoids. Behaviourally, animals display anxiety-like behaviour while structurally, changes occur in neuronal dendrites and spines in the hippocampus and prefrontal regions involved in emotion and behaviour control. The aim of the present study was to determine whether maternal separation alters expression of synaptic markers, synaptophysin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, CaMKII, in rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. A second aim was to determine whether voluntary exercise had a beneficial effect on the expression of these proteins in rat brain. Maternal separation occurred from postnatal day 2 (P2) to P14 for 3 hours per day. Exercised rats were housed in cages with attached running wheels from P29 to P49. At P65, the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were removed for protein quantification. Maternal separation did not have any effect while exercise increased synaptophysin and CaMKII in the ventral hippocampus but not in the dorsal hippocampus or prefrontal cortex. Since the ventral hippocampus is associated with anxiety-related behaviour, these findings are consistent with the fact that voluntary exercise increases anxiety-like behaviour and improves learning and memory. PMID:19821017

  1. Effect of exercise on synaptophysin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase levels in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of a rat model of developmental stress.

    PubMed

    Hescham, Sarah; Grace, Laurian; Kellaway, Lauriston A; Bugarith, Kishor; Russell, Vivienne A

    2009-12-01

    Stress affects the brain differently depending on the timing, duration and intensity of the stressor. Separation from the dam for 3 h per day is a potent stressor for rat pups which causes activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, evidenced by increased plasma levels of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and glucocorticoids. Behaviourally, animals display anxiety-like behaviour while structurally, changes occur in neuronal dendrites and spines in the hippocampus and prefrontal regions involved in emotion and behaviour control. The aim of the present study was to determine whether maternal separation alters expression of synaptic markers, synaptophysin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), in rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. A second aim was to determine whether voluntary exercise had a beneficial effect on the expression of these proteins in rat brain. Maternal separation occurred from postnatal day 2 (P2) to P14 for 3 h per day. Exercised rats were housed in cages with attached running wheels from P29 to P49. At P65, the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were removed for protein quantification. Maternal separation did not have any effect while exercise increased synaptophysin and CaMKII in the ventral hippocampus but not in the dorsal hippocampus or prefrontal cortex. Since the ventral hippocampus is associated with anxiety-related behaviour, these findings are consistent with the fact that voluntary exercise increases anxiety-like behaviour and improves learning and memory.

  2. The hippocampus is required for short-term topographical memory in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Tom; Bird, Chris M.; Chan, Dennis; Cipolotti, Lisa; Husain, Masud; Vargha-Khadem, Faraneh; Burgess, Neil

    2009-01-01

    The hippocampus plays a crucial role within the neural systems for long-term memory, but little if any role in the short-term retention of some types of stimuli. Nonetheless, the hippocampus may be specialized for allocentric topographical processing which impacts on short-term memory or even perception. To investigate this we developed performance-matched tests of perception (match-to-sample) and short-term memory (2s delayed-match-to-sample) for the topography and for the non-spatial aspects of visual scenes. Four patients with focal hippocampal damage and one with more extensive damage, including right parahippocampal gyrus, were tested. All five patients showed impaired topographical memory and spared non-spatial processing in both memory and perception. Topographical perception was profoundly impaired in the patient with parahippocampal damage, mildly impaired in two of the hippocampal cases and clearly preserved in the other two hippocampal cases (including one with dense amnesia). Our results suggest that the hippocampus supports allocentric topographical processing that is indispensable when appropriately tested after even very short delays, while the presence of the sample scene can allow successful topographical perception without it, possibly via a less flexible parahippocampal representation. PMID:17143905

  3. Percutaneous Irreversible Electroporation of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Carcinoma Using the Dorsal Approach: A Case Report

    SciTech Connect

    Scheffer, Hester J. Melenhorst, Marleen C. A. M.; Vogel, Jantien A.; Tilborg, Aukje A. J. M. van; Nielsen, Karin Kazemier, Geert; Meijerink, Martijn R.

    2015-06-15

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel image-guided ablation technique that is increasingly used to treat locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma (LAPC). We describe a 67-year-old male patient with a 5 cm stage III pancreatic tumor who was referred for IRE. Because the ventral approach for electrode placement was considered dangerous due to vicinity of the tumor to collateral vessels and duodenum, the dorsal approach was chosen. Under CT-guidance, six electrodes were advanced in the tumor, approaching paravertebrally alongside the aorta and inferior vena cava. Ablation was performed without complications. This case describes that when ventral electrode placement for pancreatic IRE is impaired, the dorsal approach could be considered alternatively.

  4. Differential effects of dorsal hippocampal inactivation on expression of recent and remote drug and fear memory.

    PubMed

    Raybuck, J D; Lattal, K M

    2014-05-21

    Drugs of abuse generate strong drug-context associations, which can evoke powerful drug cravings that are linked to reinstatement in animal models and to relapse in humans. Work in learning and memory has demonstrated that contextual memories become more distributed over time, shifting from dependence on the hippocampus for retrieval to dependence on cortical structures. Implications for such changes in the structure of memory retrieval to addiction are unknown. Thus, to determine if the passage of time alters the substrates of conditioned place preference (CPP) memory retrieval, we investigated the effects of inactivation of the dorsal hippocampus (DH) with the GABA-A receptor agonist muscimol on expression of recent or remote CPP. We compared these effects with the same manipulation on expression of contextual fear conditioning. DH inactivation produced similar deficits in expression of both recent and remote CPP, but blocked expression of recent but not remote contextual fear memory. We describe the implications of these findings for mechanisms underlying long-term storage of contextual information. PMID:24686177

  5. Clasmatodendrosis and β-amyloidosis in aging hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Mercatelli, Raffaella; Lana, Daniele; Bucciantini, Monica; Giovannini, Maria Grazia; Cerbai, Francesca; Quercioli, Franco; Zecchi-Orlandini, Sandra; Delfino, Giovanni; Wenk, Gary L; Nosi, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    Alterations of the tightly interwoven neuron/astrocyte interactions are frequent traits of aging, but also favor neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease (AD). These alterations reflect impairments of the innate responses to inflammation-related processes, such as β-amyloid (Aβ) burdening. Multidisciplinary studies, spanning from the tissue to the molecular level, are needed to assess how neuron/astrocyte interactions are influenced by aging. Our study addressed this requirement by joining fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy/phasor multiphoton analysis with confocal microscopy, implemented with a novel method to separate spectrally overlapped immunofluorescence and Aβ autofluorescence. By comparing data from young control rats, chronically inflamed rats, and old rats, we identified age-specific alterations of neuron/astrocyte interactions in the hippocampus. We found a correlation between Aβ aggregation (+300 and +800% of aggregated Aβ peptide in chronically inflamed and oldvs.control rats, respectively) and fragmentation (clasmatodendrosis) of astrocyte projections (APJs) (+250 and +1300% of APJ fragments in chronically inflamed and oldvs.control rats, respectively). Clasmatodendrosis, in aged rats, associates with impairment of astrocyte-mediated Aβ clearance (-45% of Aβ deposits on APJs, and +33% of Aβ deposits on neurons in oldvs.chronically inflamed rats). Furthermore, APJ fragments colocalize with Aβ deposits and are involved in novel Aβ-mediated adhesions between neurons. These data define the effects of Aβ deposition on astrocyte/neuron interactions as a key topic in AD biology.-Mercatelli, R., Lana, D., Bucciantini, M., Giovannini, M. G., Cerbai, F., Quercioli, F., Zecchi-Orlandini, S., Delfino, G., Wenk, G. L., Nos, D. Clasmatodendrosis and β-amyloidosis in aging hippocampus. PMID:26722005

  6. The effect of tianeptine in the prevention of radiation-induced neurocognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Akyurek, Serap; Senturk, Vesile; Oncu, Bedriye; Ozyigit, Gokhan; Yilmaz, Sercan; Gokce, Saban Cakir

    2008-12-01

    Radiation-induced neurocognitive impairment is an undesirable radiation-induced toxicity and a common health problem in patients with primary or metastatic brain tumor. It greatly impairs quality of life for long-term brain tumor survivors. Hippocampus is the most important brain structure for neurocognitive functions. It has been shown that radiation affects the hippocampal neurogenesis due to either induce the apoptosis or reduce the precursor cell proliferation in the hippocampus. Radiation-induced microglial inflammatory response is also negative regulator of neurogenesis. Tianeptine is a clinically effective antidepressant that induces neurogenesis. It has also been shown that tianeptine is able to reduce apoptosis and cytoprotective against the effects of proinflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus. Given the putative role of impaired hippocampal neurogenesis in radiation-induced neurocognitive impairment we think that tianeptine can be effective for preventing radiation-induced neurocognitive impairment by increasing hippocampal neurogenesis.

  7. Involvement of dorsal striatal α1-containing GABAA receptors in methamphetamine-associated rewarding memories.

    PubMed

    Jiao, D-L; Liu, Y; Long, J-D; Du, J; Ju, Y-Y; Zan, G-Y; Liu, J-G; Zhao, M

    2016-04-21

    Rewarding memories induced by addictive drugs may contribute to persistent drug-seeking behaviors, which is an important contributing factor to drug addiction. However, the biological mechanisms underlying drug-associated rewarding memories have not yet been fully understood, especially the new synthetic drugs, such as amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS). In this study, using the rat-conditioned place preference (CPP) model, a classic animal model for the reward-associated effects of addictive drugs, we found that the expression level of GABAA α1 subunits was significantly decreased in the dorsal striatum (Dstr) after conditioned methamphetamine (METH) pairing, and no significant differences were observed in the other four rewarding memory-associated areas (medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), nucleus accumbens (NAc), amygdala (Amy), and dorsal hippocampus (DH)). Intra-Dstr injection of either the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol or the specific α1GABAA receptor-preferring benzodiazepine (BDZ) agonist zolpidem significantly abolished METH CPP formation. Thus, this study extends previous findings by showing that GABAA receptors, particularly the α1-containing GABAA receptors, may be strongly implicated in METH-associated rewarding memories. This work provides us with a new perspective on the goal of treating ATS addiction. PMID:26868969

  8. Involvement of dorsal striatal α1-containing GABAA receptors in methamphetamine-associated rewarding memories.

    PubMed

    Jiao, D-L; Liu, Y; Long, J-D; Du, J; Ju, Y-Y; Zan, G-Y; Liu, J-G; Zhao, M

    2016-04-21

    Rewarding memories induced by addictive drugs may contribute to persistent drug-seeking behaviors, which is an important contributing factor to drug addiction. However, the biological mechanisms underlying drug-associated rewarding memories have not yet been fully understood, especially the new synthetic drugs, such as amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS). In this study, using the rat-conditioned place preference (CPP) model, a classic animal model for the reward-associated effects of addictive drugs, we found that the expression level of GABAA α1 subunits was significantly decreased in the dorsal striatum (Dstr) after conditioned methamphetamine (METH) pairing, and no significant differences were observed in the other four rewarding memory-associated areas (medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), nucleus accumbens (NAc), amygdala (Amy), and dorsal hippocampus (DH)). Intra-Dstr injection of either the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol or the specific α1GABAA receptor-preferring benzodiazepine (BDZ) agonist zolpidem significantly abolished METH CPP formation. Thus, this study extends previous findings by showing that GABAA receptors, particularly the α1-containing GABAA receptors, may be strongly implicated in METH-associated rewarding memories. This work provides us with a new perspective on the goal of treating ATS addiction.

  9. Equivalent activation of the hippocampus by face-face and face-laugh paired associate learning and recognition.

    PubMed

    Holdstock, J S; Crane, J; Bachorowski, J-A; Milner, B

    2010-11-01

    The human hippocampus is known to play an important role in relational memory. Both patient lesion studies and functional-imaging studies have shown that it is involved in the encoding and retrieval from memory of arbitrary associations. Two recent patient lesion studies, however, have found dissociations between spared and impaired memory within the domain of relational memory. Recognition of associations between information of the same kind (e.g., two faces) was spared, whereas recognition of associations between information of different kinds (e.g., face-name or face-voice associations) was impaired by hippocampal lesions. Thus, recognition of associations between information of the same kind may not be mediated by the hippocampus. Few imaging studies have directly compared activation at encoding and recognition of associations between same and different types of information. Those that have have shown mixed findings and been open to alternative interpretation. We used fMRI to compare hippocampal activation while participants studied and later recognized face-face and face-laugh paired associates. We found no differences in hippocampal activation between our two types of stimulus materials during either study or recognition. Study of both types of paired associate activated the hippocampus bilaterally, but the hippocampus was not activated by either condition during recognition. Our findings suggest that the human hippocampus is normally engaged to a similar extent by study and recognition of associations between information of the same kind and associations between information of different kinds.

  10. Enhanced dendritic spine number of neurons of the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and nucleus accumbens in old rats after chronic donepezil administration

    PubMed Central

    Alcantara-Gonzalez, Faviola; Juarez, Ismael; Solis, Oscar; Martinez-Tellez, Isaura; Camacho-Abrego, Israel; Masliah, Eliezer; Mena, Raul; Flores, Gonzalo

    2010-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease brains morphological changes in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus have been observed. These changes are particularly reflected in the decrement of both the dendritic tree and spine number. Donepezil is a potent and selective acetylcholinesterase inhibitor used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. We have studied the effect of oral administration of this drug on the morphology of neuronal cells from the brain of aged rats. We examined dendrites of pyramidal neurons of the PFC, dorsal or ventral hippocampus and medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). Donepezil (1 mg/Kg, vo) was administrated every day for 60 days to rats aged 10 and 18 months. Dendritic morphology was studied by the Golgi-Cox stain procedure followed by Sholl analysis at 12 and 20 months ages, respectively. In all Donepezil treated-rats a significant increment of the dendritic spines number in pyramidal neurons of the PFC, dorsal hippocampus was observed. However, pyramidal neurons of the ventral hippocampus and medium spiny cells of the NAcc only showed an increase in the number of their spines in 12 months old-rats. Our results suggest that Donepezil prevents the alterations of the neuronal dendrite morphology caused by aging. PMID:20336627

  11. The roles of the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus in a spatial paired-association task.

    PubMed

    Lee, Inah; Solivan, Frances

    2008-05-01

    Although the roles of both the hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) have been suggested in a spatial paired-associate memory task, both areas were investigated separately in prior studies. The current study investigated the relative contributions of the hippocampus and mPFC to spatial paired-associate learning within a single behavioral paradigm. In a novel behavioral task, a pair of different objects appeared repeatedly across trials, but in different arms in a radial maze, and different rules were associated with those arms for reward. Specifically, in an "object-in-place" arm, the rat was required to choose a particular object associated with the arm. In a "location-in-place" arm, the animal was required to choose a certain within-arm location (ignoring the object occupying the location). Compared to normal animals, rats with ibotenic acid-based lesions in the hippocampus showed an irrecoverable impairment in performance in both object-in-place and location-in-place arms. When the mPFC was inactivated by muscimol (GABA(A) receptor agonist) in the normal animals with intact hippocampi, they showed the same severe impairment as seen in the hippocampal lesioned rats only in object-in-place arms. The results confirm that the hippocampus is necessary for a biconditional paired-associate task when space is a critical component. The mPFC, however, is more selectively involved in the object-place paired-associate task than in the location-place paired-associate task. The current task powerfully demonstrates an experimental situation in which both the hippocampus and mPFC are required and may serve as a useful paradigm for investigating the neural mechanisms of object-place association.

  12. Early life stress perturbs the maturation of microglia in the developing hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Delpech, Jean-Christophe; Wei, Lan; Hao, Jin; Yu, Xiaoqing; Madore, Charlotte; Butovsky, Oleg; Kaffman, Arie

    2016-10-01

    Children exposed to abuse or neglect show abnormal hippocampal development and similar findings have been reported in rodent models. Using brief daily separation (BDS), a mouse model of early life stress, we previously showed that exposure to BDS impairs hippocampal function in adulthood and perturbs synaptic maturation, synaptic pruning, axonal growth and myelination in the developing hippocampus. Given that microglia are involved in these developmental processes, we tested whether BDS impairs microglial activity in the hippocampus of 14 (during BDS) and 28-day old mice (one week after BDS). We found that BDS increased the density and altered the morphology of microglia in the hippocampus of 14-day old pups, effects that were no longer present on postnatal day (PND) 28. Despite the normal cell number and morphology seen at PND28, the molecular signature of hippocampal microglia, assessed using the NanoString immune panel, was altered at both ages. We showed that during normal hippocampal development, microglia undergo significant changes between PND14 and PND28, including reduced cell density, decreased ex vivo phagocytic activity, and an increase in the expression of genes involved in inflammation and cell migration. However, microglia harvested from the hippocampus of 28-day old BDS mice showed an increase in phagocytic activity and reduced expression of genes that normally increase across development. Promoter analysis indicated that alteration in the transcriptional activity of PU.1, Creb1, Sp1, and RelA accounted for most of the transcriptional changes seen during normal microglia development and for most of the BDS-induced changes at PND14 and PND28. These findings are the first to demonstrate that early life stress dysregulates microglial function in the developing hippocampus and to identify key transcription factors that are likely to mediate these changes. PMID:27301858

  13. Early life stress perturbs the maturation of microglia in the developing hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Delpech, Jean-Christophe; Wei, Lan; Hao, Jin; Yu, Xiaoqing; Madore, Charlotte; Butovsky, Oleg; Kaffman, Arie

    2016-01-01

    Children exposed to abuse or neglect show abnormal hippocampal development and similar findings have been reported in rodent models. Using brief daily separation (BDS), a mouse model of early life stress, we previously showed that exposure to BDS impairs hippocampal function in adulthood and perturbs synaptic maturation, synaptic pruning, axonal growth and myelination in the developing hippocampus. Given that microglia are involved in these developmental processes, we tested whether BDS impairs microglial activity in the hippocampus of 14 (during BDS) and 28-day old mice (one week after BDS). We found that BDS increased the density and altered the morphology of microglia in the hippocampus of 14-day old pups, effects that were no longer present on postnatal day (PND) 28. Despite the normal cell number and morphology seen at PND28, the molecular signature of hippocampal microglia, assessed using the NanoString immune panel, was altered at both ages. We showed that during normal hippocampal development, microglia undergo significant changes between PND14 and PND28, including reduced cell density, decreased ex vivo phagocytic activity, and an increase in the expression of genes involved in inflammation and cell migration. However, microglia harvested from the hippocampus of 28-day old BDS mice showed an increase in phagocytic activity and reduced expression of genes that normally increase across development. Promoter analysis indicated that alteration in the transcriptional activity of PU.1, Creb1, Sp1, and RelA accounted for most of the transcriptional changes seen during normal microglia development and for most of the BDS-induced changes at PND14 and PND28. These findings are the first to demonstrate that early life stress dysregulates microglial function in the developing hippocampus and to identify key transcription factors that are likely to mediate these changes. PMID:27301858

  14. Genetic activation of ERK5 MAP kinase enhances adult neurogenesis and extends hippocampus-dependent long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenbin; Pan, Yung-Wei; Zou, Junhui; Li, Tan; Abel, Glen M; Palmiter, Richard D; Storm, Daniel R; Xia, Zhengui

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that inhibition of adult neurogenesis impairs the formation of hippocampus-dependent memory. However, it is not known whether increasing adult neurogenesis affects the persistence of hippocampus-dependent long-term memory. Furthermore, signaling mechanisms that regulate adult neurogenesis are not fully defined. We recently reported that the conditional and targeted knock-out of ERK5 MAP kinase in adult neurogenic regions of the mouse brain attenuates adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and disrupts several forms of hippocampus-dependent memory. Here, we developed a gain-of-function knock-in mouse model to specifically activate endogenous ERK5 in the neurogenic regions of the adult brain. We report that the selective and targeted activation of ERK5 increases adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus by enhancing cell survival, neuronal differentiation, and dendritic complexity. Conditional ERK5 activation also improves the performance of challenging forms of spatial learning and memory and extends hippocampus-dependent long-term memory. We conclude that enhancing signal transduction of a single signaling pathway within adult neural stem/progenitor cells is sufficient to increase adult neurogenesis and improve the persistence of hippocampus-dependent memory. Furthermore, activation of ERK5 may provide a novel therapeutic target to improve long-term memory.

  15. [Individual typological characteristics of higher nervous performance and asymmetry of hippocampus and amygdala electrical activity in dogs].

    PubMed

    Chilingarian, L I

    2002-01-01

    Electrical activity of the frontal cortex, dorsal hippocampus, basolateral amygdala and lateral hypothalamus of both hemispheres was recorded in nine dogs in the state of quiet wakefulness without any stimulation. Individual typological features of higher nervous activity were assessed by the animal performance under conditions of free choice of the reinforcement mode: either high probable but of low alimentary quality, or with low probability but more valuable. Mean values of the maxima of crosscorrelation function between electrical activity of the investigated structures of two hemispheres were used as a basis for assessment of conditions for interaction between left and right formations. For the hippocampus and amygdala, in some dogs these conditions were the best in the theta and beta 2 ranges, in other animals--in the theta and alpha bands. In phlegmatic dogs, spectral densities in the theta range were higher in the left hippocampus than in the symmetrical structure, in sanguine animals spectral densities in the theta and beta 2 ranges in the hippocampus and amygdala were higher in the right hemisphere than in the left one. Thus, the hemispheric asymmetry of electrical activity of the limbic formations seems to be an important factor, which determines the individual typological features of the higher nervous activity in dogs.

  16. Sequential involvement of NMDA receptor-dependent processes in hippocampus, amygdala, entorhinal cortex and parietal cortex in memory processing.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, M.S.; Schaeffer, E.; Schmitz, P.K.; Medina, J.H.; Quevedo, J.; Quillfeldt, J.A.; Izquierdo, I.

    1996-08-01

    Rats bilaterally implanted with cannulae in the CA1 region of the dorsal hippocampus and/or in the amygdaloid nucleus, in the entorhinal cortex, and in the posterior parietal cortex, were trained in a step-down inhibitory avoidance task. At various times after training (immediately, 30, 60 or 90min) they received, through the cannulae, 0.5µl microinfusions of saline or of 5.0µg of AP5 dissolved in saline. A retention test was carried out 24h after training. Retention test performance was hindered by AP5 given into hippocampus, amygdala, or both hippocampus and amygdala immediately but not 30min post-training. The drug was amnestic when given into the entorhinal cortex 30, 60 or 90min after training, or into the parietal cortex 60 or 90min after training, but not at earlier times. The findings suggest a sequential entry in operation, in the post-training period, of NMDA-receptor mediated mechanisms involved in memory processing; first in hippocampus and amygdala, 30min later in entorhinal cortex, and 30min later in posterior parietal cortex.

  17. α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) reverses impairment of memory reconsolidation induced by interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) hippocampal infusions.

    PubMed

    Machado, Ivana; González, Patricia; Schiöth, Helgi Birgir; Lasaga, Mercedes; Scimonelli, Teresa Nieves

    2010-11-01

    Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) significantly influences cognitive processes. Treatments which raise the level of IL-1β in the brain impair memory consolidation in contextual fear conditioning. However, the effect of IL-1β on memory reconsolidation has not yet been established. The melanocortin α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) exerts potent anti-inflammatory actions by antagonizing the effect of proinflammatory cytokines. Five subtypes of melanocortin receptors (MC1R-MC5R) have been identified, of which MC3R and MC4R are predominant in the central nervous system. The present experiments show that the injection of IL-1β (5 ng/0.25 μl) in dorsal hippocampus up to 30 min after re-exposition to the context decreases freezing during the contextual fear test. Impairment of memory reconsolidation was reversed by treatment with α-MSH (0.05 μg/0.25 μl). Administration of the MC4 receptor antagonist HS014 (0.5 μg/0.25 μl) blocked the effect of α-MSH. These results suggest that IL-1β may influence memory reconsolidation and that activation of central MC4R could lead to improve cognitive performance.

  18. PROPYLTHIOURACIL (PTU)-INDUCED HYPOTHYROIDISM REDUCES FIELD POTENTIAL AMPLITUDE BUT DOES NOT IMPAIR DENTATE GYRUS LTP IN VIVO.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developmental exposure to hypothyroid-inducing agents leads to reductions in body weight, alterations in hippocampal structure, and impaired performance on a variety of behavioral learning tasks. Electrophysiological properties of the hippocampus in hypothyroid animals, however...

  19. Spatial tuning and brain state account for dorsal hippocampal CA1 activity in a non-spatial learning task

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Kevin Q; Lubenov, Evgueniy V; Papadopoulou, Maria; Siapas, Athanassios G

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is a brain area crucial for episodic memory in humans. In contrast, studies in rodents have highlighted its role in spatial learning, supported by the discovery of place cells. Efforts to reconcile these views have found neurons in the rodent hippocampus that respond to non-spatial events but have not unequivocally dissociated the spatial and non-spatial influences on these cells. To disentangle these influences, we trained freely moving rats in trace eyeblink conditioning, a hippocampally dependent task in which the animal learns to blink in response to a tone. We show that dorsal CA1 pyramidal neurons are all place cells, and do not respond to the tone when the animal is moving. When the animal is inactive, the apparent tone-evoked responses reflect an arousal-mediated resumption of place-specific firing. These results suggest that one of the main output stages of the hippocampus transmits only spatial information, even in this non-spatial task. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14321.001 PMID:27487561

  20. Functions and Regulation of Circular Dorsal Ruffles

    PubMed Central

    Hoon, Jing-Ling; Wong, Wai-Keung

    2012-01-01

    Cells construct a number of plasma membrane structures to meet a range of physiological demands. Driven by juxtamembrane actin machinery, these actin-based membrane protrusions are essential for the operation and maintenance of cellular life. They are required for diverse cellular functions, such as directed cell motility, cell spreading, adhesion, and substrate/matrix degradation. Circular dorsal ruffles (CDRs) are one class of such structures characterized as F-actin-rich membrane projections on the apical cell surface. CDRs commence their formation minutes after stimulation as flat, open, and immature ruffles and progressively develop into fully enclosed circular ruffles. These “rings” then mature and contract centrifugally before subsiding. Serving a critical function in receptor internalization and cell migration, CDRs are thus highly dynamic but transient formations. Here, we review the current state of knowledge concerning the regulation of circular dorsal ruffles. We focus specifically on the biochemical pathways leading to CDR formation in order to better define the roles and functions of these enigmatic structures. PMID:22927640

  1. Isolated dorsal dislocation of the tarsal naviculum

    PubMed Central

    Hamdi, Kaziz; Hazem, Ben Ghozlen; Yadh, Zitoun; Faouzi, Abid

    2015-01-01

    Isolated dislocation of the tarsal naviculum is an unusual injury, scarcely reported in the literature. The naviculum is surrounded by the rigid bony and ligamentous support hence fracture dislocation is more common than isolated dislocation. The mechanism and treatment options remain unclear. In this case report, we describe a 31 year old man who sustained an isolated dorsal dislocation of the left tarsal naviculum, without fracture, when he was involved in a motor vehicle collision. The reported mechanism of the dislocation is a hyper plantar flexion force applied to the midfoot, resulting in a transient disruption of the ligamentous support of the naviculum bone, with dorsal displacement of the bone. The patient was treated with open reduction and Krischner-wire fixation of the navicular after the failure of closed reduction. The wires were removed after 6 weeks postoperatively. Physiotherapy for stiffness and midfoot pain was recommended for 2 months. At 6 months postoperatively, limping, midfoot pain and weakness were reported, no X-ray abnormalities were found. The patient returned to his obvious activities with a normal range of motion. PMID:26806978

  2. The benefits and drawbacks of nicotine exposure in the cortex and hippocampus of old rats.

    PubMed

    Barros, D M; Galhardi, F G; Ribas Ferreira, J L; Guterres, L B; Dickel, O; Geracitano, L A; Izquierdo, I; Monserrat, J M

    2007-05-01

    Nicotine is the main alkaloid of tobacco and possesses well-established stimulant effects. Previous reports show that nicotine at low doses improves memory functions, while high doses impair memory. This study aims to analyze the effects of nicotine (NIC) on inhibitory avoidance task and on DNA damage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration, total antioxidant capacity, and lipid peroxidation in cortex and hippocampus of old rats. Male Wistar rats of 24-26 months old (620-700g) were exposed i.p. to two doses (0.3 and 1mg/kg) of NIC daily during 9 days. The treatment NIC 0.3 enhanced long-term memory (p<0.05), whereas NIC 1 improved both short and long-term memories (p<0.05). DNA damage was observed only in hippocampus (p<0.05) after NIC 1 exposure. A similar result was obtained for ROS: higher levels were detected at NIC 1 treatment in hippocampus (p<0.05). No alterations in the total antioxidant capacity were verified after NIC exposure (0.3 and 1mg/kg) in both tissues (p>0.05). Finally, evidence of oxidative damage was observed in terms of lipid peroxides levels, being higher at NIC 1 in hippocampus (p<0.05). Overall the results indicate that deleterious effects paralleled the improved short and long-term memories at the highest NIC dose, since augmented DNA damage, ROS concentration and lipid peroxides levels were registered. PMID:17350101

  3. The benefits and drawbacks of nicotine exposure in the cortex and hippocampus of old rats.

    PubMed

    Barros, D M; Galhardi, F G; Ribas Ferreira, J L; Guterres, L B; Dickel, O; Geracitano, L A; Izquierdo, I; Monserrat, J M

    2007-05-01

    Nicotine is the main alkaloid of tobacco and possesses well-established stimulant effects. Previous reports show that nicotine at low doses improves memory functions, while high doses impair memory. This study aims to analyze the effects of nicotine (NIC) on inhibitory avoidance task and on DNA damage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration, total antioxidant capacity, and lipid peroxidation in cortex and hippocampus of old rats. Male Wistar rats of 24-26 months old (620-700g) were exposed i.p. to two doses (0.3 and 1mg/kg) of NIC daily during 9 days. The treatment NIC 0.3 enhanced long-term memory (p<0.05), whereas NIC 1 improved both short and long-term memories (p<0.05). DNA damage was observed only in hippocampus (p<0.05) after NIC 1 exposure. A similar result was obtained for ROS: higher levels were detected at NIC 1 treatment in hippocampus (p<0.05). No alterations in the total antioxidant capacity were verified after NIC exposure (0.3 and 1mg/kg) in both tissues (p>0.05). Finally, evidence of oxidative damage was observed in terms of lipid peroxides levels, being higher at NIC 1 in hippocampus (p<0.05). Overall the results indicate that deleterious effects paralleled the improved short and long-term memories at the highest NIC dose, since augmented DNA damage, ROS concentration and lipid peroxides levels were registered.

  4. The effects of 30 mT electromagnetic fields on hippocampus cells of rats

    PubMed Central

    Teimori, Farzaneh; Khaki, Amir A.; Rajabzadeh, Asghar; Roshangar, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the use of electromagnetic waves in the treatment of some acute and chronic diseases, application of these waves in everyday life has created several problems for humans, especially the nerve system. In this study, the effects of 30mT electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on the hippocampus is investigated. Methods: Twenty-four 5-month Wistar rats weighing 150–200 g were divided into two groups. The experimental group rats were under the influence of an EMF at an intensity of 3 mT for approximately 4 hours a day (from 8 AM to 12 PM) during 10 weeks. After the hippocampus was removed, thin slides were prepared for transmission electron microscope (TEM) to study the ultrastructural tissue. Cell death detection POD kits were used to determine the apoptosis rate. Results: The results of the TEM showed that, in the hippocampus of the experimental group, in comparison to the control group, there was a substantial shift; even intracellular organelles such as the mitochondria were morphologically abnormal and uncertain. The number of apoptotic cells in the exposed group compared to the control group showed significant changes. Conclusions: Similar to numerous studies that have reported the effects of EMFs on nerves system, it was also confirmed in this lecture. Hence, the hippocampus which is important in regulating emotions, behavior, motivation, and memory functions, may be impaired by the negative impacts of EMFs. PMID:27453795

  5. Hippocampus-dependent place learning enables spatial flexibility in C57BL6/N mice

    PubMed Central

    Kleinknecht, Karl R.; Bedenk, Benedikt T.; Kaltwasser, Sebastian F.; Grünecker, Barbara; Yen, Yi-Chun; Czisch, Michael; Wotjak, Carsten T.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial navigation is a fundamental capability necessary in everyday life to locate food, social partners, and shelter. It results from two very different strategies: (1) place learning which enables for flexible way finding and (2) response learning that leads to a more rigid “route following.” Despite the importance of knockout techniques that are only available in mice, little is known about mice' flexibility in spatial navigation tasks. Here we demonstrate for C57BL6/N mice in a water-cross maze (WCM) that only place learning enables spatial flexibility and relearning of a platform position, whereas response learning does not. This capability depends on an intact hippocampal formation, since hippocampus lesions by ibotenic acid (IA) disrupted relearning. In vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging revealed a volume loss of ≥60% of the hippocampus as a critical threshold for relearning impairments. In particular the changes in the left ventral hippocampus were indicative of relearning deficits. In summary, our findings establish the importance of hippocampus-dependent place learning for spatial flexibility and provide a first systematic analysis on spatial flexibility in mice. PMID:23293591

  6. Function of dorsal fins in bamboo shark during steady swimming.

    PubMed

    Maia, Anabela; Wilga, Cheryl A

    2013-08-01

    To gain insight into the function of the dorsal fins in white-spotted bamboo sharks (Orectolobiformes: Hemiscyillidae) during steady swimming, data on three-dimensional kinematics and electromyographic recordings were collected. Bamboo sharks were induced to swim at 0.5 and 0.75 body lengths per second in a laminar flow tank. Displacement, lag and angles were analyzed from high-speed video images. Onset, offset, duration, duty cycle and asynchrony index were calculated from three muscle implants on each side of each dorsal fin. The dorsal fins were displaced more laterally than the undulating body. In addition, the dorsal tips had larger lateral displacement than the trailing edges. Increased speed was accompanied by an increase in tail beat frequency with constant tail beat amplitude. However, lateral displacement of the fins and duration of muscle bursts remained relatively constant with increased speed. The range of lateral motion was greater for the second dorsal fin (mean 33.3°) than for the first dorsal fin (mean 28.4°). Bending within the fin was greater for the second dorsal fin (mean 43.8°) than for the first dorsal fin (mean 30.8°). Muscle onset and offset among implants on the same side of each dorsal fin was similar. Three-dimensional conformation of the dorsal fins was caused by interactions between muscle activity, material properties, and incident flow. Alternating bilateral activity occurred in both dorsal fins, further supporting the active role of these hydrofoils in thrust production during steady swimming. The dorsal fins in bamboo sharks are capable of thrust production during steady swimming and do not appear to function as stabilizing structures.

  7. Limbic but not non-limbic kindling impairs conditioned fear and promotes plasticity of NPY and its Y2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Botterill, J J; Guskjolen, A J; Marks, W N; Caruncho, H J; Kalynchuk, L E

    2015-11-01

    Epileptic seizures negatively affect cognition. However, the mechanisms that contribute to cognitive impairments after seizures are largely unknown. Here, we examined the effects of long-term kindling (i.e., 99 stimulations) of limbic (basolateral amygdala, dorsal hippocampus) and non-limbic (caudate nucleus) brain sites on conditioned fear and hippocampal plasticity. We first showed that kindling had no effect on acquisition of a hippocampal-dependent trace fear-conditioning task but limbic kindling impaired the retrieval of these fear memories. To determine the relationship between memory and hippocampal neuronal activity, we examined the expression of Fos protein 90 min after memory retrieval (i.e., 4 days after the last kindling stimulation). We found that limbic kindling, but not non-limbic kindling, decreased Fos expression in the granule cell layer, hilus, CA3 pyramidal cell layer, and CA1 pyramidal cell layer. Next, to investigate a mechanism that could contribute to dampen hippocampal neuronal activity in limbic-kindled rats, we focused on the endogenous anticonvulsant neuropeptide Y (NPY), which is expressed in a subset of GABAergic interneurons and can prevent glutamate release through interactions with its Y2 receptor. We found that limbic kindling significantly decreased the number of NPY-immunoreactive cells in several hippocampal subfields despite minimal staining of the neurodegenerative marker Fluoro-Jade B. However, we also noted that limbic kindling enhanced NPY immunoreactivity throughout the mossy fiber pathway. In these same regions, we observed limbic kindling-induced de novo expression of the NPY Y2 receptor. These novel findings demonstrate the site-specific effects of kindling on cognition and NPY plasticity, and they provide evidence that altered hippocampal NPY after limbic seizures coincides with dampened neural activity and cognitive impairments.

  8. Navigating from hippocampus to parietal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Jonathan R.; Sutherland, Robert J.; Witter, Menno P.; Moser, May-Britt; Moser, Edvard I.

    2008-01-01

    The navigational system of the mammalian cortex comprises a number of interacting brain regions. Grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex and place cells in the hippocampus are thought to participate in the formation of a dynamic representation of the animal's current location, and these cells are presumably critical for storing the representation in memory. To traverse the environment, animals must be able to translate coordinate information from spatial maps in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus into body-centered representations that can be used to direct locomotion. How this is done remains an enigma. We propose that the posterior parietal cortex is critical for this transformation. PMID:18812502

  9. Mitochondrial plasticity of the hippocampus in a genetic rat model of depression after antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fenghua; Wegener, Gregers; Madsen, Torsten M; Nyengaard, Jens R

    2013-03-01

    Depressive disorders and the treatment thereof have been associated with a number of neuroplastic events, such as neurogenesis and synaptic remodeling in discrete areas of the brain. The associations of these events in changes regarding the energy supply have not been investigated. Here, we investigated the changes in mitochondrial plasticity and its correlation to morphological alterations of neuroplasticity in the hippocampus, both associated with a depressive phenotype, and after treatment, with antidepressant imipramine. Design-based stereological methods were used to estimate the number and volume of mitochondria in CA1 of the hippocampus in two different strains of rats, the Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Flinders rats, which display a genetic susceptibility to depressive behavior, the Flinders-sensitive line (FSL) and their corresponding controls, the Flinders-resistant line (FRL). Results showed a significantly reduced number of mitochondria in CA1, which was significantly smaller in the untreated FSL saline group compared to the FRL group. However, the mean volume of mitochondria was significantly larger in the FSL saline group compared to the FRL saline group. Following treatment, the FSL imipramine group showed a significant increase in the number of mitochondria compared to the FSL saline group. Treatment with imipramine in the SD rats did not induce significant differences in the number of mitochondria. Our results indicate that depression may be related to impairments of mitochondrial plasticity in the hippocampus and antidepressant treatment may counteract with the structural impairments. Moreover, the changes in mitochondrial morphology and number are a consistent feature of neuroplasticity.

  10. P53 regulates disruption of neuronal development in the adult hippocampus after irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y-Q; Cheng, ZW-C; Liu, SK-W; Aubert, I; Wong, C S

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis is implicated in neurocognitive dysfunction after cranial irradiation for brain tumors. How irradiation results in impaired neuronal development remains poorly understood. The Trp53 (p53) gene is known to regulate cellular DNA damage response after irradiation. Whether it has a role in disruption of late neuronal development remains unknown. Here we characterized the effects of p53 on neuronal development in adult mouse hippocampus after irradiation. Different bromodeoxyuridine incorporation paradigms and a transplantation study were used for cell fate mapping. Compared with wild-type mice, we observed profound inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis after irradiation in mice deficient in p53 despite the absence of acute apoptosis of neuroblasts. The putative neural stem cells were apoptosis resistant after irradiation regardless of p53 genotype. Cell fate mapping using different bromodeoxyuridine incorporation paradigms revealed enhanced activation of neural stem cells and their consequential exhaustion in the absence of p53 after irradiation. Both p53-knockout and wild-type mice demonstrated similar extent of microglial activation in the hippocampus after irradiation. Impairment of neuronal differentiation of neural progenitors transplanted in irradiated hippocampus was not altered by p53 genotype of the recipient mice. We conclude that by inhibiting neural progenitor activation, p53 serves to mitigate disruption of neuronal development after irradiation independent of apoptosis and perturbation of the neural stem cell niche. These findings suggest for the first time that p53 may have a key role in late effects in brain after irradiation. PMID:27752364

  11. Multimodal MRI of the hippocampus in Parkinson's disease with visual hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Yao, Nailin; Cheung, Charlton; Pang, Shirley; Shek-kwan Chang, Richard; Lau, Kui Kai; Suckling, John; Yu, Kevin; Ka-Fung Mak, Henry; Chua, Siew Eng; Ho, Shu-Leong; McAlonan, Grainne M

    2016-01-01

    Visual hallucinations carry poor prognosis in Parkinson's disease. Here we tested the hypothesis that the hippocampus and visuospatial memory impairment play a central role in the pathology of PD with visual hallucinations. Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was carried out in 12 people with PD and visual hallucinations; 15 PD individuals without hallucinations; and 14 healthy controls. Age, gender, cognitive ability, and education level were matched across the three groups. PD patients were taking dopaminergic medication. Hippocampal volume, shape, mean diffusivity (MD), and functional connectivity within the whole brain were examined. Visuospatial memory was compared between groups, and correlations with hippocampal MD, functional connectivity, and the severity of hallucinations were explored. There were no macrostructural differences across groups, but individuals with hallucinations had higher diffusivity in posterior hippocampus than the other two groups. Visuospatial memory was poorer in both PD groups compared to controls, and was correlated with hallucinations. Finally, hippocampal functional connectivity in the visual cortices was lower in those with hallucinations than other groups, and this correlated with visuospatial memory impairment. In contrast, functional connectivity between the hippocampus and default mode network regions and frontal regions was greater in the PD hallucinators compared to other groups. We suggest that hippocampal pathology, which disrupts visuospatial memory, makes a key contribution to visual hallucinations in PD. These findings may pave the way for future studies of imaging biomarkers to measure treatment response in those with PD who are most at risk of poor outcomes.

  12. Dorsal striatum is necessary for stimulus-value but not action-value learning in humans.

    PubMed

    Vo, Khoi; Rutledge, Robb B; Chatterjee, Anjan; Kable, Joseph W

    2014-12-01

    Several lines of evidence implicate the striatum in learning from experience on the basis of positive and negative feedback. However, the necessity of the striatum for such learning has been difficult to demonstrate in humans, because brain damage is rarely restricted to this structure. Here we test a rare individual with widespread bilateral damage restricted to the dorsal striatum. His performance was impaired and not significantly different from chance on several classic learning tasks, consistent with current theories regarding the role of the striatum. However, he also exhibited remarkably intact performance on a different subset of learning paradigms. The tasks he could perform can all be solved by learning the value of actions, while those he could not perform can only be solved by learning the value of stimuli. Although dorsal striatum is often thought to play a specific role in action-value learning, we find surprisingly that dorsal striatum is necessary for stimulus-value but not action-value learning in humans.

  13. Dorsal Wrist Capsular Tears in Association with Scapholunate Instability: Results of an Arthroscopic Dorsal Capsuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Adeline Cambon; Kerfant, Nathalie; Wahegaonkar, Abhijeet L.; Tandara, Andrea A.; Mathoulin, Christophe L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to report the association of dorsal wrist capsular avulsion with scapholunate ligament instability and to evaluate the results of an arthroscopy-assisted repair. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 10 patients with a mean age of 39.1 years suffering from chronic dorsal wrist pain. They underwent a wrist arthroscopy with an evaluation of the scapholunate ligament complex from the radiocarpal and midcarpal compartments. An avulsion of the dorsal intercarpal ligament (DICL) from the scapholunate interosseous ligament (SLIL) was visible from the radiocarpal compartment in all cases, while the SLIL was intact. The DICL tear was repaired with an arthroscopy-assisted dorsal capsuloplasty. Patients were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively by the QuickDASH (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand) questionnaire, by the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain, and by a clinical and radiological examination. Results Preoperatively, all patients had reduced flexion and radial deviation of the affected wrist. On the lateral radiograph, 5 of the 10 patients showed an increase of the scapholunate angle (60 to 85°). The scapholunate instability was graded as Messina–European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS) II in five cases and as grade IIIB in five cases. A tear of the ulnar part of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) was found in seven cases. At a mean followup of 16 months, the wrist range of motion (ROM), the grip strength, the QuickDASH, and the VAS of pain improved significatively. The scapholunate angle was normalized in all cases. Discussion Isolated tears of the DICL at its insertion from the dorsal part of the SLIL can be associated with scapholunate instability in the absence of an injury to the SLIL. The diagnosis is made arthroscopically. The arthroscopic dorsal capsuloplasty is a minimally invasive technique that provides short-term satisfactory results. Further studies are needed to determine whether

  14. MHC class I immune proteins are critical for hippocampus-dependent memory and gate NMDAR-dependent hippocampal long-term depression

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, P. Austin; Sage, Jennifer R.; Wood, Suzanne C.; Davenport, Christopher M.; Anagnostaras, Stephan G.; Boulanger, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Memory impairment is a common feature of conditions that involve changes in inflammatory signaling in the brain, including traumatic brain injury, infection, neurodegenerative disorders, and normal aging. However, the causal importance of inflammatory mediators in cognitive impairments in these conditions remains unclear. Here we show that specific immune proteins, members of the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC class I), are essential for normal hippocampus-dependent memory, and are specifically required for NMDAR-dependent forms of long-term depression (LTD) in the healthy adult hippocampus. In β2m−/−TAP−/−mice, which lack stable cell-surface expression of most MHC class I proteins, NMDAR-dependent LTD in area CA1 of adult hippocampus is abolished, while NMDAR-independent forms of potentiation, facilitation, and depression are unaffected. Altered NMDAR-dependent synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of β2m−/−TAP−/−mice is accompanied by pervasive deficits in hippocampus-dependent memory, including contextual fear memory, object recognition memory, and social recognition memory. Thus normal MHC class I expression is essential for NMDAR-dependent hippocampal synaptic depression and hippocampus-dependent memory. These results suggest that changes in MHC class I expression could be an unexpected cause of disrupted synaptic plasticity and cognitive deficits in the aging, damaged, and diseased brain. PMID:23959708

  15. Parcellating the neuroanatomical basis of impaired decision-making in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Newcombe, Virginia F J; Outtrim, Joanne G; Chatfield, Doris A; Manktelow, Anne; Hutchinson, Peter J; Coles, Jonathan P; Williams, Guy B; Sahakian, Barbara J; Menon, David K

    2011-03-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a devastating consequence of traumatic brain injury that affects the majority of those who survive with moderate-to-severe injury, and many patients with mild head injury. Disruption of key monoaminergic neurotransmitter systems, such as the dopaminergic system, may play a key role in the widespread cognitive dysfunction seen after traumatic axonal injury. Manifestations of injury to this system may include impaired decision-making and impulsivity. We used the Cambridge Gambling Task to characterize decision-making and risk-taking behaviour, outside of a learning context, in a cohort of 44 patients at least six months post-traumatic brain injury. These patients were found to have broadly intact processing of risk adjustment and probability judgement, and to bet similar amounts to controls. However, a patient preference for consistently early bets indicated a higher level of impulsiveness. These behavioural measures were compared with imaging findings on diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. Performance in specific domains of the Cambridge Gambling Task correlated inversely and specifically with the severity of diffusion tensor imaging abnormalities in regions that have been implicated in these cognitive processes. Thus, impulsivity was associated with increased apparent diffusion coefficient bilaterally in the orbitofrontal gyrus, insula and caudate; abnormal risk adjustment with increased apparent diffusion coefficient in the right thalamus and dorsal striatum and left caudate; and impaired performance on rational choice with increased apparent diffusion coefficient in the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, and the superior frontal gyri, right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, the dorsal and ventral striatum, and left hippocampus. Importantly, performance in specific cognitive domains of the task did not correlate with diffusion tensor imaging abnormalities in areas not implicated in their performance. The ability to

  16. Parcellating the neuroanatomical basis of impaired decision-making in traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Outtrim, Joanne G.; Chatfield, Doris A.; Manktelow, Anne; Hutchinson, Peter J.; Coles, Jonathan P.; Williams, Guy B.; Sahakian, Barbara J.; Menon, David K.

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is a devastating consequence of traumatic brain injury that affects the majority of those who survive with moderate-to-severe injury, and many patients with mild head injury. Disruption of key monoaminergic neurotransmitter systems, such as the dopaminergic system, may play a key role in the widespread cognitive dysfunction seen after traumatic axonal injury. Manifestations of injury to this system may include impaired decision-making and impulsivity. We used the Cambridge Gambling Task to characterize decision-making and risk-taking behaviour, outside of a learning context, in a cohort of 44 patients at least six months post-traumatic brain injury. These patients were found to have broadly intact processing of risk adjustment and probability judgement, and to bet similar amounts to controls. However, a patient preference for consistently early bets indicated a higher level of impulsiveness. These behavioural measures were compared with imaging findings on diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. Performance in specific domains of the Cambridge Gambling Task correlated inversely and specifically with the severity of diffusion tensor imaging abnormalities in regions that have been implicated in these cognitive processes. Thus, impulsivity was associated with increased apparent diffusion coefficient bilaterally in the orbitofrontal gyrus, insula and caudate; abnormal risk adjustment with increased apparent diffusion coefficient in the right thalamus and dorsal striatum and left caudate; and impaired performance on rational choice with increased apparent diffusion coefficient in the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, and the superior frontal gyri, right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, the dorsal and ventral striatum, and left hippocampus. Importantly, performance in specific cognitive domains of the task did not correlate with diffusion tensor imaging abnormalities in areas not implicated in their performance. The ability to

  17. Theories of the dorsal bundle extinction effect.

    PubMed

    Mason, S T; Iversen, S D

    1979-07-01

    Selective destruction of the noradrenaline systems in the rat brain using the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine has been found to cause resistance to extinction in a number of behavioural situations. Several theories concerning the behavioural mechanism altered by the lesion, and hence about the role of noradrenaline in normal brain functioning, are proposed and evaluated. Theories suggesting a role for noradrenaline in activity, perseveration, internal inhibition, frustrative non-reward, motivation, or secondary reinforcement, fail to explain all the available evidence and direct tests of each theory fails to support its predictions. A model which suggests that noreadrenaline is involved in attentional behaviour, specifically in filtering out or learning to ignore irrelevant environmental stimuli, is successful in explaining all available data and direct tests of the lesioned rats' attentional capacity serve to confirm many of the predictions of an attentional theory of the dorsal bundle extinction effect.

  18. Upregulation of 5-HT2C receptors in hippocampus of pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats: antagonism by Bacopa monnieri.

    PubMed

    Krishnakumar, Amee; Nandhu, M S; Paulose, C S

    2009-10-01

    Emotional disturbances, depressive mood, anxiety, aggressive behavior, and memory impairment are the common psychiatric features associated with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The present study was carried out to investigate the role of Bacopa monnieri extract in hippocampus of pilocarpine-induced temporal lobe epileptic rats through the 5-HT(2C) receptor in relation to depression. Our results showed upregulation of 5-HT(2C) receptors with a decreased affinity in hippocampus of pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats. Also, there was an increase in 5-HT(2C) gene expression and inositol triphosphate content in epileptic hippocampus. Carbamazepine and B. monnieri treatments reversed the alterations in 5-HT(2C) receptor binding, gene expression, and inositol triphosphate content in treated epileptic rats as compared to untreated epileptic rats. The forced swim test confirmed the depressive behavior pattern during epilepsy that was nearly completely reversed by B. monnieri treatment.

  19. Calcium Signaling in Intact Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Gemes, Geza; Rigaud, Marcel; Koopmeiners, Andrew S.; Poroli, Mark J.; Zoga, Vasiliki; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ca2+ is the dominant second messenger in primary sensory neurons. In addition, disrupted Ca2+ signaling is a prominent feature in pain models involving peripheral nerve injury. Standard cytoplasmic Ca2+ recording techniques use high K+ or field stimulation and dissociated neurons. To compare findings in intact dorsal root ganglia, we used a method of simultaneous electrophysiologic and microfluorimetric recording. Methods Dissociated neurons were loaded by bath-applied Fura-2-AM and subjected to field stimulation. Alternatively, we adapted a technique in which neuronal somata of intact ganglia were loaded with Fura-2 through an intracellular microelectrode that provided simultaneous membrane potential recording during activation by action potentials (APs) conducted from attached dorsal roots. Results Field stimulation at levels necessary to activate neurons generated bath pH changes through electrolysis and failed to predictably drive neurons with AP trains. In the intact ganglion technique, single APs produced measurable Ca2+ transients that were fourfold larger in presumed nociceptive C-type neurons than in nonnociceptive Aβ-type neurons. Unitary Ca2+ transients summated during AP trains, forming transients with amplitudes that were highly dependent on stimulation frequency. Each neuron was tuned to a preferred frequency at which transient amplitude was maximal. Transients predominantly exhibited monoexponential recovery and had sustained plateaus during recovery only with trains of more than 100 APs. Nerve injury decreased Ca2+ transients in C-type neurons, but increased transients in Aβ-type neurons. Conclusions Refined observation of Ca2+ signaling is possible through natural activation by conducted APs in undissociated sensory neurons and reveals features distinct to neuronal types and injury state. PMID:20526180

  20. Adolescent exposure to cocaine increases anxiety-like behavior and induces morphologic and neurochemical changes in the hippocampus of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Mao, Z; Zhu, C; Li, M; Cao, C; Guan, Y; Yuan, J; Xie, G; Guan, X

    2016-01-28

    Repeated exposure to cocaine during adolescence may affect both physical and psychological conditions in the brain, and increase the risk of psychiatric disorders and addiction behaviors in adulthood. Adolescence represents a critical development period for the hippocampus. Moreover, different regions of the hippocampus are involved in different functions. Dorsal hippocampus (dHP) has been implicated in learning and memory, whereas ventral hippocampus (vHP) plays an important role in emotional processing. In this study, the rats that were exposed to cocaine during adolescence (postnatal days, P28-P42) showed higher anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze test in adulthood (P80), but displayed normal spatial learning and memory in the Morris water maze test. Furthermore, repeated exposure to cocaine during adolescence lead to alterations in morphology of pyramidal neurons, activities of astrocytes, and levels of proteins that involved in synaptic transmission, apoptosis, inflammation and addiction in both dHP and vHP of adult rats. These findings suggest that repeated exposure to cocaine during adolescence in rats may elicit morphologic and neurochemical changes in the hippocampus when the animals reach adulthood. These changes may contribute to the increased susceptibility for psychiatric disorders and addiction seen in adults. PMID:26621120

  1. Adolescent exposure to cocaine increases anxiety-like behavior and induces morphologic and neurochemical changes in the hippocampus of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Mao, Z; Zhu, C; Li, M; Cao, C; Guan, Y; Yuan, J; Xie, G; Guan, X

    2016-01-28

    Repeated exposure to cocaine during adolescence may affect both physical and psychological conditions in the brain, and increase the risk of psychiatric disorders and addiction behaviors in adulthood. Adolescence represents a critical development period for the hippocampus. Moreover, different regions of the hippocampus are involved in different functions. Dorsal hippocampus (dHP) has been implicated in learning and memory, whereas ventral hippocampus (vHP) plays an important role in emotional processing. In this study, the rats that were exposed to cocaine during adolescence (postnatal days, P28-P42) showed higher anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze test in adulthood (P80), but displayed normal spatial learning and memory in the Morris water maze test. Furthermore, repeated exposure to cocaine during adolescence lead to alterations in morphology of pyramidal neurons, activities of astrocytes, and levels of proteins that involved in synaptic transmission, apoptosis, inflammation and addiction in both dHP and vHP of adult rats. These findings suggest that repeated exposure to cocaine during adolescence in rats may elicit morphologic and neurochemical changes in the hippocampus when the animals reach adulthood. These changes may contribute to the increased susceptibility for psychiatric disorders and addiction seen in adults.

  2. Coordinated network activity in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Draguhn, Andreas; Keller, Martin; Reichinnek, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus expresses a variety of highly organized network states which bind its individual neurons into collective modes of activity. These patterns go along with characteristic oscillations of extracellular potential known as theta, gamma, and ripple oscillations. Such network oscillations share some important features throughout the entire central nervous system of higher animals: they are restricted to a defined behavioral state, they are mostly generated by subthreshold synaptic activity, and they entrain active neurons to fire action potentials at strictly defined phases of the oscillation cycle, thereby providing a unifying 'zeitgeber' for coordinated multineuronal activity. Recent work from the hippocampus of rodents and humans has revealed how the resulting spatiotemporal patterns support the formation of neuronal assemblies which, in our present understanding, form the neuronal correlate of spatial, declarative, or episodic memories. In this review, we introduce the major types of spatiotemporal activity patterns in the hippocampus, describe the underlying neuronal mechanisms, and illustrate the concept of memory formation within oscillating networks. Research on hippocampus-dependent memory has become a key model system at the interface between cellular and cognitive neurosciences. The next step will be to translate our increasing insight into the mechanisms and systemic functions of neuronal networks into urgently needed new therapeutic strategies. PMID:24777128

  3. Andrographolide Stimulates Neurogenesis in the Adult Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Arredondo, Sebastian B.; Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Hancke, Juan; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2015-01-01

    Andrographolide (ANDRO) is a labdane diterpenoid component of Andrographis paniculata widely used for its anti-inflammatory properties. We have recently determined that ANDRO is a competitive inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a key enzyme of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade. Since this signaling pathway regulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus, we evaluated whether ANDRO stimulates this process. Treatment with ANDRO increased neural progenitor cell proliferation and the number of immature neurons in the hippocampus of 2- and 10-month-old mice compared to age-matched control mice. Moreover, ANDRO stimulated neurogenesis increasing the number of newborn dentate granule neurons. Also, the effect of ANDRO was evaluated in the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. In these mice, ANDRO increased cell proliferation and the density of immature neurons in the dentate gyrus. Concomitantly with the increase in neurogenesis, ANDRO induced the activation of the Wnt signaling pathway in the hippocampus of wild-type and APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice determined by increased levels of β-catenin, the inactive form of GSK-3β, and NeuroD1, a Wnt target gene involved in neurogenesis. Our findings indicate that ANDRO stimulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus suggesting that this drug could be used as a therapy in diseases in which neurogenesis is affected. PMID:26798521

  4. Neurofunctional topography of the human hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer L; Barron, Daniel S; Kirby, Lauren A J; Bottenhorn, Katherine L; Hill, Ashley C; Murphy, Jerry E; Katz, Jeffrey S; Salibi, Nouha; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fox, Peter T

    2015-12-01

    Much of what was assumed about the functional topography of the hippocampus was derived from a single case study over half a century ago. Given advances in the imaging sciences, a new era of discovery is underway, with potential to transform the understanding of healthy processing as well as the ability to treat disorders. Coactivation-based parcellation, a meta-analytic approach, and ultra-high field, high-resolution functional and structural neuroimaging to characterize the neurofunctional topography of the hippocampus was employed. Data revealed strong support for an evolutionarily preserved topography along the long-axis. Specifically, the left hippocampus was segmented into three distinct clusters: an emotional processing cluster supported by structural and functional connectivity to the amygdala and parahippocampal gyrus, a cognitive operations cluster, with functional connectivity to the anterior cingulate and inferior frontal gyrus, and a posterior perceptual cluster with distinct structural connectivity patterns to the occipital lobe coupled with functional connectivity to the precuneus and angular gyrus. The right hippocampal segmentation was more ambiguous, with plausible 2- and 5-cluster solutions. Segmentations shared connectivity with brain regions known to support the correlated processes. This represented the first neurofunctional topographic model of the hippocampus using a robust, bias-free, multimodal approach.

  5. Decoding Neuronal Ensembles in the Human Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Hassabis, Demis; Chu, Carlton; Rees, Geraint; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Molyneux, Peter D.; Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background The hippocampus underpins our ability to navigate, to form and recollect memories, and to imagine future experiences. How activity across millions of hippocampal neurons supports these functions is a fundamental question in neuroscience, wherein the size, sparseness, and organization of the hippocampal neural code are debated. Results Here, by using multivariate pattern classification and high spatial resolution functional MRI, we decoded activity across the population of neurons in the human medial temporal lobe while participants navigated in a virtual reality environment. Remarkably, we could accurately predict the position of an individual within this environment solely from the pattern of activity in his hippocampus even when visual input and task were held constant. Moreover, we observed a dissociation between responses in the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus, suggesting that they play differing roles in navigation. Conclusions These results show that highly abstracted representations of space are expressed in the human hippocampus. Furthermore, our findings have implications for understanding the hippocampal population code and suggest that, contrary to current consensus, neuronal ensembles representing place memories must be large and have an anisotropic structure. PMID:19285400

  6. Andrographolide Stimulates Neurogenesis in the Adult Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Arredondo, Sebastian B; Tapia-Rojas, Cheril; Hancke, Juan; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2015-01-01

    Andrographolide (ANDRO) is a labdane diterpenoid component of Andrographis paniculata widely used for its anti-inflammatory properties. We have recently determined that ANDRO is a competitive inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a key enzyme of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade. Since this signaling pathway regulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus, we evaluated whether ANDRO stimulates this process. Treatment with ANDRO increased neural progenitor cell proliferation and the number of immature neurons in the hippocampus of 2- and 10-month-old mice compared to age-matched control mice. Moreover, ANDRO stimulated neurogenesis increasing the number of newborn dentate granule neurons. Also, the effect of ANDRO was evaluated in the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. In these mice, ANDRO increased cell proliferation and the density of immature neurons in the dentate gyrus. Concomitantly with the increase in neurogenesis, ANDRO induced the activation of the Wnt signaling pathway in the hippocampus of wild-type and APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice determined by increased levels of β-catenin, the inactive form of GSK-3β, and NeuroD1, a Wnt target gene involved in neurogenesis. Our findings indicate that ANDRO stimulates neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus suggesting that this drug could be used as a therapy in diseases in which neurogenesis is affected. PMID:26798521

  7. Unconscious relational encoding depends on hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Duss, Simone B.; Reber, Thomas P.; Hänggi, Jürgen; Schwab, Simon; Wiest, Roland; Müri, René M.; Brugger, Peter; Gutbrod, Klemens

    2014-01-01

    Textbooks divide between human memory systems based on consciousness. Hippocampus is thought to support only conscious encoding, while neocortex supports both conscious and unconscious encoding. We tested whether processing modes, not consciousness, divide between memory systems in three neuroimaging experiments with 11 amnesic patients (mean age = 45.55 years, standard deviation = 8.74, range = 23–60) and 11 matched healthy control subjects. Examined processing modes were single item versus relational encoding with only relational encoding hypothesized to depend on hippocampus. Participants encoded and later retrieved either single words or new relations between words. Consciousness of encoding was excluded by subliminal (invisible) word presentation. Amnesic patients and controls performed equally well on the single item task activating prefrontal cortex. But only the controls succeeded on the relational task activating the hippocampus, while amnesic patients failed as a group. Hence, unconscious relational encoding, but not unconscious single item encoding, depended on hippocampus. Yet, three patients performed normally on unconscious relational encoding in spite of amnesia capitalizing on spared hippocampal tissue and connections to language cortex. This pattern of results suggests that processing modes divide between memory systems, while consciousness divides between levels of function within a memory system. PMID:25273998

  8. Coordinated network activity in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Draguhn, Andreas; Keller, Martin; Reichinnek, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus expresses a variety of highly organized network states which bind its individual neurons into collective modes of activity. These patterns go along with characteristic oscillations of extracellular potential known as theta, gamma, and ripple oscillations. Such network oscillations share some important features throughout the entire central nervous system of higher animals: they are restricted to a defined behavioral state, they are mostly generated by subthreshold synaptic activity, and they entrain active neurons to fire action potentials at strictly defined phases of the oscillation cycle, thereby providing a unifying 'zeitgeber' for coordinated multineuronal activity. Recent work from the hippocampus of rodents and humans has revealed how the resulting spatiotemporal patterns support the formation of neuronal assemblies which, in our present understanding, form the neuronal correlate of spatial, declarative, or episodic memories. In this review, we introduce the major types of spatiotemporal activity patterns in the hippocampus, describe the underlying neuronal mechanisms, and illustrate the concept of memory formation within oscillating networks. Research on