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Sample records for dos clones gt

  1. [Cloning and functional analysis of the cotton Trihelix transcription factor GhGT29].

    PubMed

    Yue, Li; Xiaodong, Liu; Yongmei, Dong; Zongming, Xie; Shouyi, Chen

    2015-12-01

    Trihelix transcription factors are important proteins involved in response to abiotic stresses in plants. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of Trihelix in cottons will lay the foundation to improve stress tolerance by gene engineering. In this study, a gene encoding Trihelix transcription factor was isolated in upland cottons using reverse transcription PCR according to bioinformatic analysis. The gene was named as GhGT29 (GenBank accession No. JQ013097), which was 1 092 bp, contained a 1 089 bp open reading frame and encoded a protein of 363 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 40.9 kDa and a isoelectric point of 5.45. SMART analysis showed GhGT29 contained one typical SANT motif. Phylogenetic analysis showed that GhGT29 belonged to the SH4 subfamily of the Trihelix family and was most closely related to AtSH4-like1 and AtSH4-like2. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed that GhGT29 was induced by high salt, drought, cold and abscisic acid. The expression profile also revealed that GhGT29 was constitutively expressed in all tested tissues, such as roots, stems, leaves, flowers, ovules (0 DPA) and fibers (12 DPA). The expression level of GhGT29 was the highest in flowers and the lowest in stems. Using the Arabidopsis protoplasts assay system, we found that the GhGT29 protein was located in cell nuclei and had trans-activation activity. These results revealed that GhGT29 might be involved in the regulation of stress resistance-related genes in stress signaling pathways in upland cottons.

  2. Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    Cloning describes the processes used to create an exact genetic replica of another cell, tissue or organism. ... named Dolly. There are three different types of cloning: Gene cloning, which creates copies of genes or ...

  3. Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... that have been cloned from somatic cells include: cat, deer, dog, horse, mule, ox, rabbit and rat. ... with cell division. In other mammals, such as cats, rabbits and mice, the two spindle proteins are ...

  4. Rice Glycosyltransferase (GT) Phylogenomic Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Ronald, Pamela

    The Ronald Laboratory staff at the University of California-Davis has a primary research focus on the genes of the rice plant. They study the role that genetics plays in the way rice plants respond to their environment. They created the Rice GT Database in order to integrate functional genomic information for putative rice Glycosyltransferases (GTs). This database contains information on nearly 800 putative rice GTs (gene models) identified by sequence similarity searches based on the Carbohydrate Active enZymes (CAZy) database. The Rice GT Database provides a platform to display user-selected functional genomic data on a phylogenetic tree. This includes sequence information, mutant line information, expression data, etc. An interactive chromosomal map shows the position of all rice GTs, and links to rice annotation databases are included. The format is intended to "facilitate the comparison of closely related GTs within different families, as well as perform global comparisons between sets of related families." [From http://ricephylogenomics.ucdavis.edu/cellwalls/gt/genInfo.shtml] See also the primary paper discussing this work: Peijian Cao, Laura E. Bartley, Ki-Hong Jung and Pamela C. Ronalda. Construction of a Rice Glycosyltransferase Phylogenomic Database and Identification of Rice-Diverged Glycosyltransferases. Molecular Plant, 2008, 1(5): 858-877.

  5. Asymmetric GT of social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold

    2010-04-01

    Web citation indexes are computed according to a data vector X collected from the frequency of user accesses, citations weighted by other sites' popularities, and modified by the financial sponsorship in a proprietary manner. The indexing determining the information to be retrieved by the public should be made responsible transparently in at least two ways. One shall balance the inbound linkages pointed at the specific i-th site called the popularity (see paper for equation) with the outbound linkages (see paper for equation) called the risk factor before the release of new information as environmental impact analysis. The relationship between these two factors cannot be assumed equivalent (undirected) as in the case of many mainstream Graph Theory (GT) models.

  6. Family 34 glycosyltransferase (GT34) genes and proteins in Pinus radiata (radiata pine) and Pinus taeda (loblolly pine).

    PubMed

    Ade, Carsten P; Bemm, Felix; Dickson, James M J; Walter, Christian; Harris, Philip J

    2014-04-01

    Using a functional genomics approach, four candidate genes (PtGT34A, PtGT34B, PtGT34C and PtGT34D) were identified in Pinus taeda. These genes encode CAZy family GT34 glycosyltransferases that are involved in the synthesis of cell-wall xyloglucans and heteromannans. The full-length coding sequences of three orthologs (PrGT34A, B and C) were isolated from a xylem-specific cDNA library from the closely related Pinus radiata. PrGT34B is the ortholog of XXT1 and XXT2, the two main xyloglucan (1→6)-α-xylosyltransferases in Arabidopsis thaliana. PrGT34C is the ortholog of XXT5 in A. thaliana, which is also involved in the xylosylation of xyloglucans. PrGT34A is an ortholog of a galactosyltransferase from fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) that is involved in galactomannan synthesis. Truncated coding sequences of the genes were cloned into plasmid vectors and expressed in a Sf9 insect cell-culture system. The heterologous proteins were purified, and in vitro assays showed that, when incubated with UDP-xylose and cellotetraose, cellopentaose or cellohexaose, PrGT34B showed xylosyltransferase activity, and, when incubated with UDP-galactose and the same cello-oligosaccharides, PrGT34B showed some galactosyltransferase activity. The ratio of xylosyltransferase to galactosyltransferase activity was 434:1. Hydrolysis of the galactosyltransferase reaction products using galactosidases showed the linkages formed were α-linkages. Analysis of the products of PrGT34B by MALDI-TOF MS showed that up to three xylosyl residues were transferred from UDP-xylose to cellohexaose. The heterologous proteins PrGT34A and PrGT34C showed no detectable enzymatic activity.

  7. Registration of maize inbred line GT603

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GT603 (Reg. No. xxxx, PI xxxxxx) is a yellow dent maize (Zea mays L.) inbred line developed and released by the USDA-ARS Crop Protection and Management Research Unit in cooperation with the University of Georgia Coastal Plain Experiment Station in 2010. GT603 was developed through seven generations ...

  8. Registration of maize inbred line 'GT888'

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize (Zea mays L.) inbred line GT888 (PI 670116) was developed and released by the USDA-ARS in cooperation with the University of Georgia, and in participation with the USDA Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) project. GT888 was derived from GEM population DK888:N11 (GEMN-0177), which has 50% tro...

  9. GT Strength in Odd-A Nuclei^*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, J. W.; Du, Q. Q.

    1998-04-01

    We measured the complete set of polarization-transfer observables (D_ij) for the ^13C(p,n)^13N and ^15N(p,n)^15O reactions at 135 MeV. From the D_ijs we constructed the spin-independent, spin-longitudinal, and spin-transverse responses [1] D_0, D_q, Dn and D_p. From these responses we extracted, in a model-independent way, the Δ J=0 and Δ J=1 (``F'' and ``GT'') fractions of the J^π=1/2^-arrow1/2^- g.s. to g.s. transitions for these reactions. The ``F'' fraction, f_F=D_0(0^circ); the ``GT'' fraction, f_GT=D_q(0^circ)+D_n(0^circ)+D_p(0^circ)= 1- D_0(0^circ). The extracted GT fractions, f_GT, are substantially larger than one would predict from β-decay matrix elements and the systematics of the (p,n) reaction on even-A nuclei. These results confirm earlier, model-dependent determinations of f_GT obtained from the (p,n) reaction on ^13C, ^15N and ^39K at other energies [2], [3], [4], indicating that considerable caution must be used when extracting B(GT) matrix elements from odd-A (p,n) data. * Research supported in part by the U.S. NSF. [1] M. Ichimura, K. Kawahigashi, Phys. Rev. C 45 1822 (1992). [2] T. N. Taddeucci, C. A. Goulding, T. A. Carey, R. C. Byrd, C. D. Goodman, C. Gaarde, J. Larsen, D. Horen, J. Rapaport, and E. Sugarbaker, Nucl. Phys. A469 125 (1987). [3] H. Sakai, H. Okamura, N. Matsuoka, A. Shimizu, T. Suda, M. Ieiri and H. M. Shimizu, Nuclear Physics A579 45-61 (1994). [4] W. Huang, Ph.D. dissertation, Indiana U., 1991, (unpublished).

  10. GT Merge Process: Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, M P; Dodge, D; Myers, S C

    2008-06-10

    This document summarizes the process used to merge GT25 and better data between LANL and LLNL. The merge also includes OUO arrivals provided by AFTAC for events in the merge. The merge process is mostly automated and includes extensive quality control operations at each step. Events in common between the labs are identified and resolved using GT level criteria. Arrivals in common between the labs are also resolved through the use of agreed upon arrival author rankings. Finally, baselined origin times are computed for all crustal events using either teleseismic P-arrivals and the iasp91 model or, in certain regions, regional P-arrivals and regional velocity models that are known to be consistent with teleseismic iasp91 P-wave predictions. We combine the core tables from each contributor and resolve unique and common GT events between contributors. Next, we merge at the pick level so that each distinct EVENT-STATION-PHASE tuple has a unique arrival. All BMEB (Bondar-Myers-Engdahl-Bergman) GT are recalculated and evaluated for adherence to their criteria. Finally, new origin times are computed (baselining) for the merged GT events. In addition to the reconciliation of events and picks between contributors, the merge process involves several quality control steps that are intended to remove outlier and irrelevant data from the final results. The process is described in the section entitled 'Merge Steps'.

  11. GT Merge Process: Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, M P; Dodge, D; Myers, S C

    2008-06-10

    This document summarizes the process used to merge GT25 and better data between LANL and LLNL for use in a tomographic inversion for Pn velocity of Eurasia. The merge process is automated and includes extensive quality control operations at each step. Events in common between the labs are identified and resolved using GT level criteria. Arrivals in common between the labs are also resolved through the use of agreed upon arrival author rankings. Finally, baselined origin times are computed for all crustal events using either teleseismic P-arrivals and the iasp91 model or, in certain regions, regional P-arrivals and regional velocity models that are known to be consistent with teleseismic iasp91 P-wave predictions. We combine the core tables from each lab and first resolve unique and common GT events between LANL and LLNL. Phase names are then checked and possibly adjusted for consistency. Next, we merge at the pick level so that each distinct EVENT-STATION-PHASE tuple has a unique arrival. All BMEB (Bondar-Myers-Engdahl-Bergman) GT are evaluated for adherence to their criteria, and possibly re-calculated. Finally, new origin times are computed (baselining) for the merged GT events. In addition to the reconciliation of events and picks between LANL and LLNL, the merge process involves several quality control steps that are intended to remove outlier and irrelevant data from the final results.

  12. Comparative analysis of GT14/GT14-like family genes in Arabidopsis, Oryza, Populus, Sorghum and Vitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Chuyu; Li, Ting; Tuskan, Gerald A; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Yang, Xiaohan

    2011-01-01

    Glycosyltransferase family14 (GT14) belongs to the glycosyltransferase (GT) superfamily that plays important roles in the biosynthesis of cell walls, the most abundant source of cellulosic biomass for bioethanol production. It has been hypothesized that DUF266 proteins are a new class of GTs related to GT14. In this study, we identified 62 GT14 and 106 DUF266 genes (named GT14-like herein) in Arabidopsis, Oryza, Populus, Sorghum and Vitis. Our phylogenetic analysis separated GT14 and GT14-like genes into two distinct clades, which were further divided into eight and five groups, respectively. Similarities in protein domain, 3D structure and gene expression were uncovered between the two phylogenetic clades, supporting the hypothesis that GT14 and GT14-like genes belong to one family. Therefore, we proposed a new family name, GT14/GT14-like family that combines both subfamilies. Variation in gene expression and protein subcellular localization within the GT14-like subfamily were greater than those within the GT14 subfamily. One-half of the Arabidopsis and Populus GT14/GT14-like genes were found to be preferentially expressed in stem/xylem, indicating that they are likely involved in cell wall biosynthesis. This study provided new insights into the evolution and functional diversification of the GT14/GT14-like family genes.

  13. The Poplar GT8E and GT8F Glycosyltransferases are Functional Orthologs of Arabidopsis PARVUS Involved in Gulcuronoxylan Biosynthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The poplar GT8E and GT8F glycosyltransferases have previously been shown to be associated with wood formation, but their roles in the biosynthesis of wood components are not known. Here, we show that PoGT8E and PoGT8F are expressed in vessels and fibers during wood formation and ...

  14. The Wheat GT Factor TaGT2L1D Negatively Regulates Drought Tolerance and Plant Development

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xin; Liu, Haipei; Ji, Hongtao; Wang, Youning; Dong, Baodi; Qiao, Yunzhou; Liu, Mengyu; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    GT factors are trihelix transcription factors that specifically regulate plant development and stress responses. Recently, several GT factors have been characterized in different plant species; however, little is known about the role of GT factors in wheat. Here, we show that TaGT2L1A, TaGT2L1B, and TaGT2L1D are highly homologous in hexaploid wheat, and are localized to wheat chromosomes 2A, 2B, and 2D, respectively. These TaGT2L1 genes encode proteins containing two SANT domains and one central helix. All three homologs were ubiquitously expressed during wheat development and were responsive to osmotic stress. Functional analyses demonstrated that TaGT2L1D acts as a transcriptional repressor; it was able to suppress the expression of AtSDD1 in Arabidopsis by binding directly to the GT3 box in its promoter that negatively regulates drought tolerance. TaGT2L1D overexpression markedly increased the number of stomata and reduced drought tolerance in gtl1-3 plants. Notably, ectopic expression of TaGT2L1D also affected floral organ development and overall plant growth. These results demonstrate that TaGT2L1 is an ortholog of AtGTL1, and that it plays an evolutionarily conserved role in drought resistance by fine tuning stomatal density in wheat. Our data also highlight the role of TaGT2L1 in plant growth and development. PMID:27245096

  15. High antagonist potency of GT-2227 and GT-2331, new histamine H3 receptor antagonists, in two functional models.

    PubMed

    Tedford, C E; Hoffmann, M; Seyedi, N; Maruyama, R; Levi, R; Yates, S L; Ali, S M; Phillips, J G

    1998-06-26

    GT-2227 (4-(6-cyclohexylhex-cis-3-enyl)imidazole) and GT-2331 ((1R,2R)-4-(2-(5,5-dimethylhex-1-ynyl)cyclopropyl)imidazole) were developed as new potent histamine H3 receptor antagonists. The functional activity of these ligands on the histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of neurogenic contraction of the guinea-pig jejunum and histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of norepinephrine release from guinea-pig heart synaptosomes were investigated. GT-2227 and GT-2331 both antagonized the inhibitory effects of (R)-alpha-methylhistamine on the contraction induced by electrical field stimulation in the guinea-pig jejunum with pA2 values of 7.9+/-0.1 and 8.5+/-0.03, respectively. In addition, GT-2227 and GT-2331 antagonized the inhibition of norepinephrine release in cardiac synaptosomes by GT-2203 ((1R,2R)-trans-2-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)cyclopropylamine), a histamine H3 receptor agonist. The current results demonstrate the antagonist activity for both GT-2227 and GT-2331 in two functional assays for histamine H3 receptors.

  16. Technical Reliability Assessment of the Actigraph GT1M Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Pedro; Mota, Jorge; Esliger, Dale; Welk, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the Actigraph GT1M (Pensacola, FL, USA) accelerometer activity count and step functions. Fifty GT1M accelerometers were initialized to collect simultaneous acceleration counts and steps data using 15-sec epochs. All reliability testing was completed using a mechanical shaker plate to…

  17. 3. AIR TO GROUND RADAR TYPE GT2122 & GRRR 2324, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. AIR TO GROUND RADAR TYPE GT2122 & GRRR 2324, CIRCA 1978, INTERIOR OF BUILDING 408, LOOKING WEST. - Mill Valley Air Force Station, Operations Building & Annex, East Ridgecrest Boulevard, Mount Tamalpais, Mill Valley, Marin County, CA

  18. Characterisation of Muta™Mouse λgt10-lacZ transgene: evidence for in vivo rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Shwed, Philip S.; Crosthwait, Jennifer; Douglas, George R.; Seligy, Vern L.

    2010-01-01

    The multicopy λgt10-lacZ transgene shuttle vector of Muta™Mouse serves as an important tool for genotoxicity studies. Here, we describe a model for λgt10-lacZ transgene molecular structure, based on characterisation of transgenes recovered from animals of our intramural breeding colony. Unique nucleotide sequences of the 47 513 bp monomer are reported with GenBank® assigned accession numbers. Besides defining ancestral mutations of the λgt10 used to construct the transgene and the Muta™Mouse precursor (strain 40.6), we validated the sequence integrity of key λ genes needed for the Escherichia coli host-based mutation reporting assay. Using three polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based chromosome scanning and cloning strategies, we found five distinct in vivo transgene rearrangements, which were common to both sexes, and involved copy fusions generating ∼10 defective copies per haplotype. The transgene haplotype was estimated by Southern hybridisation and real-time–polymerase chain reaction, which yielded 29.0 ± 4.0 copies based on spleen DNA of Muta™Mouse, and a reconstructed CD2F1 genome with variable λgt10-lacZ copies. Similar analysis of commercially prepared spleen DNA from Big Blue® mouse yielded a haplotype of 23.5 ± 3.1 copies. The latter DNA is used in calibrating a commercial in vitro packaging kit for E.coli host-based mutation assays of both transgenic systems. The model for λgt10-lacZ transgene organisation, and the PCR-based methods for assessing copy number, integrity and rearrangements, potentially extends the use of Muta™Mouse construct for direct, genomic-type assays that detect the effects of clastogens and aneugens, without depending on an E.coli host, for reporting effects. PMID:20724577

  19. HTGR-GT and electrical load integrated control

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, T.; Openshaw, F.; Pfremmer, D.

    1980-05-01

    A discussion of the control and operation of the HTGR-GT power plant is presented in terms of its closely coupled electrical load and core cooling functions. The system and its controls are briefly described and comparisons are made with more conventional plants. The results of analyses of selected transients are presented to illustrate the operation and control of the HTGR-GT. The events presented were specifically chosen to show the controllability of the plant and to highlight some of the unique characteristics inherent in this multiloop closed-cycle plant.

  20. Why Clone?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for tens of millions of years to clone dinosaurs. They run into trouble, however, when they realize ... and fiercer than expected. Could we really clone dinosaurs? In theory? Yes. You would need: A well- ...

  1. [NRC/GT: Six Year One Research Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gubbins, E. Jean, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This newsletter focuses on six Year 1 research projects associated with the National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented (NRC/GT). The updates address: "Regular Classroom Practices With Gifted Students: Findings from the Classroom Practices Survey" (Francis X. Archambault, Jr. and others); "The Classroom Practices Study:…

  2. The Development of the CryoTel™ LT and GT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, Reuven

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes the considerations, design modifications and test results for the recently-developed Sunpower CryoTel™ LT and GT. After successful market introduction of the CryoTel™ CT, it became evident that some basic design modifications would render the unit available to a wider range of application. The CryoTel™ LT is a low-temperature variant of the original design. The LT's cooling capacity is 0.5W @ 23 K. The CryoTel™ GT is the enhanced performance variant. The GT's cooling capacity is 15 W @ 77 K. Both LT and GT largely retain the original structure and components and therefore benefit from the low-cost manufacturing profile of the original. Sunpower's main analysis and simulation tools were in-house codes and Gedeon Associates' SAGE Stirling cycle simulation. The CryoTel™ is a Linear Free Piston Integral Stirling cryocooler that makes use of Gas Bearing technology for non-contact operation and a microprocessor based driver/controller with a closed-loop temperature control.

  3. GT2RDF: Semantic Representation of Genetic Testing Data

    PubMed Central

    Paul Rupa, Anamika; Singh, Sweta; Zhu, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated by the Human Genome Project, genetic testing has become an increasingly integral component in diagnosis, treatment, management, and prevention of numerous diseases and conditions. More than 480 laboratories perform genetic tests for more than 4,600 rare and common medical conditions. These tests can effectively help health professionals to determine or predict the genetic conditions of their patients. However, physicians have not actively incorporated such innovative genetic technology into their clinical practices according to two national wide surveys commissioned by UnitedHealth Group. To fill the gap of insufficient use of a large number of genetic tests, we generated a single Resource Description Framework (RDF) resource, called GT2RDF (Genetic Testing data to RDF) by integrating information about disease, gene, phenotype, genetic test, and drug from multiple sources including Genetic Testing Registry (GTR), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), MedGen, Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO), ClinVar, National Drug File Reference Terminology (NDF-RT). Meanwhile, we manually annotated and extracted information from 200 randomly selected GeneReviews chapters, and integrated into the GT2RDF. We performed two case studies to demonstrate the usability of the GT2RDF. GT2RDF will serve as a data foundation to support the design of a genetic testing recommendation system, called iGenetics, which will ultimately facilitate the pace of precision medicine by means of actively and effectively incorporating innovative genetic technology in clinical settings. Abbreviations: GT2RDF: Genetic Testing data to RDF; SWT: Semantic web technology; OWL: Ontology Web Language; RDF: Resource Description Framework; SPARQL: SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language; GTR: Genetic Testing Registry; OMIM: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man; HPO: Human Phenotype Ontology; NDF-RT: National Drug File Reference Terminology; UMLS: Unified Medical Language System. PMID:28269903

  4. GT2RDF: Semantic Representation of Genetic Testing Data.

    PubMed

    Paul Rupa, Anamika; Singh, Sweta; Zhu, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated by the Human Genome Project, genetic testing has become an increasingly integral component in diagnosis, treatment, management, and prevention of numerous diseases and conditions. More than 480 laboratories perform genetic tests for more than 4,600 rare and common medical conditions. These tests can effectively help health professionals to determine or predict the genetic conditions of their patients. However, physicians have not actively incorporated such innovative genetic technology into their clinical practices according to two national wide surveys commissioned by UnitedHealth Group. To fill the gap of insufficient use of a large number of genetic tests, we generated a single Resource Description Framework (RDF) resource, called GT2RDF (Genetic Testing data to RDF) by integrating information about disease, gene, phenotype, genetic test, and drug from multiple sources including Genetic Testing Registry (GTR), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), MedGen, Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO), ClinVar, National Drug File Reference Terminology (NDF-RT). Meanwhile, we manually annotated and extracted information from 200 randomly selected GeneReviews chapters, and integrated into the GT2RDF. We performed two case studies to demonstrate the usability of the GT2RDF. GT2RDF will serve as a data foundation to support the design of a genetic testing recommendation system, called iGenetics, which will ultimately facilitate the pace of precision medicine by means of actively and effectively incorporating innovative genetic technology in clinical settings. Abbreviations: GT2RDF: Genetic Testing data to RDF; SWT: Semantic web technology; OWL: Ontology Web Language; RDF: Resource Description Framework; SPARQL: SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language; GTR: Genetic Testing Registry; OMIM: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man; HPO: Human Phenotype Ontology; NDF-RT: National Drug File Reference Terminology; UMLS: Unified Medical Language System.

  5. [Cloning - controversies].

    PubMed

    Twardowski, T; Michalska, A

    2001-01-01

    Cloning of the human being is not only highly controversial; in the opinion of the authors it is impossible - we are not able to reproduce human behaviour and character traits. Reproduction through cloning is limited to personal genome resources. The more important is protection of genomic characteristics as private property and taking advantage of cloning for production of the human organs directly or through xenotransplants. In this paper we present the legislation related to cloning in Poland, in the European Union and other countries. We also indicate who and why is interested in cloning.

  6. Helicobacter hepaticus Hh0072 gene encodes a novel alpha1-3-fucosyltransferase belonging to CAZy GT11 family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Lau, Kam; Cheng, Jiansong; Yu, Hai; Li, Yanhong; Sugiarto, Go; Huang, Shengshu; Ding, Li; Thon, Vireak; Wang, Peng G; Chen, Xi

    2010-09-01

    Lewis x (Le(x)) and sialyl Lewis x (SLe(x))-containing glycans play important roles in numerous physiological and pathological processes. The key enzyme for the final step formation of these Lewis antigens is alpha1-3-fucosyltransferase. Here we report molecular cloning and functional expression of a novel Helicobacter hepaticus alpha1-3-fucosyltransferase (HhFT1) which shows activity towards both non-sialylated and sialylated Type II oligosaccharide acceptor substrates. It is a promising catalyst for enzymatic and chemoenzymatic synthesis of Le(x), sialyl Le(x) and their derivatives. Unlike all other alpha1-3/4-fucosyltransferases characterized so far which belong to Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy, http://www.cazy.org/) glycosyltransferase family GT10, the HhFT1 shares protein sequence homology with alpha1-2-fucosyltransferases and belongs to CAZy glycosyltransferase family GT11. The HhFT1 is thus the first alpha1-3-fucosyltransferase identified in the GT11 family.

  7. Use of Conversion Adaptors to Clone Antigen Genes in Lambda gt11

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    gradients of 19, 30, and 50%. with 4 units ofT 4 DNA ligase for 60 min at Chromosomal DNA was prepared by dode- 16°C. Because the adaptor-insert...0.75 M and 6.5%. respectively. After chill- Biotec. Madison. WI) and 0.5 unit of T4 ing on ice for I h. the mixture was centri- DNA ligase , in 5ul of

  8. GT-CATS: Tracking Operator Activities in Complex Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callantine, Todd J.; Mitchell, Christine M.; Palmer, Everett A.

    1999-01-01

    Human operators of complex dynamic systems can experience difficulties supervising advanced control automation. One remedy is to develop intelligent aiding systems that can provide operators with context-sensitive advice and reminders. The research reported herein proposes, implements, and evaluates a methodology for activity tracking, a form of intent inferencing that can supply the knowledge required for an intelligent aid by constructing and maintaining a representation of operator activities in real time. The methodology was implemented in the Georgia Tech Crew Activity Tracking System (GT-CATS), which predicts and interprets the actions performed by Boeing 757/767 pilots navigating using autopilot flight modes. This report first describes research on intent inferencing and complex modes of automation. It then provides a detailed description of the GT-CATS methodology, knowledge structures, and processing scheme. The results of an experimental evaluation using airline pilots are given. The results show that GT-CATS was effective in predicting and interpreting pilot actions in real time.

  9. Academic Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally…

  10. Turbulent transport measurements in a model of GT-combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikishev, L. M.; Gobyzov, O. A.; Sharaborin, D. K.; Lobasov, A. S.; Dulin, V. M.; Markovich, D. M.; Tsatiashvili, V. V.

    2016-10-01

    To reduce NOx formation modern industrial power gas-turbines utilizes lean premixed combustion of natural gas. The uniform distribution of local fuel/air ratio in the combustion chamber plays one of the key roles in the field of lean combustion to prevent thermo-acoustic pulsations. Present paper reports on simultaneous Particle Image Velocimetry and acetone Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence measurements in a cold model of GT-combustor to investigate mixing processes which are relevant to the organization of lean premixed combustion. Velocity and passive admixture pulsations correlations were measured to verify gradient closer model, which is often used in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation of turbulent mixing.

  11. Molecular cloning.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Juliane C

    2013-01-01

    This protocol describes the basic steps involved in conventional plasmid-based cloning. The goals are to insert a DNA fragment of interest into a receiving vector plasmid, transform the plasmid into E. coli, recover the plasmid DNA, and check for correct insertion events.

  12. Helium turbomachine design for GT-MHR power plant

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, C.F.; Orlando, R.J.; Cotzas, G.M.

    1994-07-01

    The power conversion system in the gas turbine modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) power plant is based on a highly recuperated closed Brayton cycle. The major component in the direct cycle system is a helium closed-cycle gas turbine rated at 286 MW(e). The rotating group consists of an intercooled helium turbocompressor coupled to a synchronous generator. The vertical rotating assembly is installed in a steel vessel, together with the other major components (i.e., recuperator, precooler, intercooler, and connecting ducts and support structures). The rotor is supported on an active magnetic bearing system. The turbine operates directly on the reactor helium coolant, and with a temperature of 850{degree}C (1562{degree}F) the plant efficiency is over 47%. This paper addresses the design and development planning of the helium turbomachine, and emphasizes that with the utilization of proven technology, this second generation nuclear power plant could be in service in the first decade of the 21st century.

  13. A photometric and orbital analysis of GT MUSCAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdoch, K. A.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Gilmore, A. C.

    1995-10-01

    GT Mus is a quadruple system comprising a long-period RS CVn-type binary (HD 101379) and a pair of eclipsing A dwarfs (HD 101380). Six and a half years of UBV (RI)_C photometry obtained at the Mt John University Observatory has enabled identification of four distinct types of photometric variability in this system. These are (1) a slowly changing mean magnitude, which probably arises from an activity-cycle-like effect in the active component of HD 101379, (2) a periodic variation (P_rot~64d), which is attributed to rotational modulation due to spots on the active star, (3) a periodic variation (P_eclipse=2.7546d) due to the eclipses of HD 101380, and (4) an excess in the I band, which occurs on a short time-scale (<1d) and is probably associated with HD 101379 activity. The evolution of the light curve of HD 101379 is fast with respect to the rotational period, suggesting rapid spot evolution for which we anticipate a possible model. The colours of HD 101379, even at maximum brightness, are excessively red for its spectral type, unless there is significant reddening by dust. Radial velocity measurements of HD 101379 are also presented, along with an improved determination of the orbit of this somewhat long-period (P_orb=61.448d) system.

  14. The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented (NRC/GT) Newsletter, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gubbins, E. Jean, Ed.; Siegle, Del, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    These two newsletters of The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented (NRC/GT) present articles concerned with research on the education of gifted and talented students. The articles are: "NRC/GT's Suggestions: Evaluating Your Programs and Services" (E. Jean Gubbins); "Professional Development Practices in Gifted Education: Results of a…

  15. The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented (NRC/GT) Newsletter, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gubbins, E. Jean, Ed.; Siegle, Del, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    These two newsletters of The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented (NRC/GT) present articles concerned with research on the education of gifted and talented students. The articles include: "NRC/GT: Making Decisions and Determining Next Steps" (E. Jean Gubbins); "Free Summer Programs for Talented Teens" (D. Betsy McCoach); "High End…

  16. GT-2: in vivo transcriptional activation activity and definition of novel twin DNA binding domains with reciprocal target sequence selectivity.

    PubMed

    Ni, M; Dehesh, K; Tepperman, J M; Quail, P H

    1996-06-01

    GT-2 is a novel DNA binding protein that interacts with a triplet functionally defined, positively acting GT-box motifs (GT1-bx, GT2-bx, and GT3-bx) in the rice phytochrome A gene (PHYA) promoter. Data from a transient transfection assay used here show that recombinant GT-2 enhanced transcription from both homologous and heterologous GT-box-containing promoters, thereby indicating that this protein can function as a transcriptional activator in vivo. Previously, we have shown that GT-2 contains separate DNA binding determinants in its N- and C-terminal halves, with binding site preferences for the GT3-bx and GT2-bx promoter motifs, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that the minimal DNA binding domains reside within dual 90-amino acid polypeptide segments encompassing duplicated sequences, termed trihelix regions, in each half of the molecule, plus 15 additional immediately adjacent amino acids downstream. These minimal binding domains retained considerable target sequence selectivity for the different GT-box motifs, but this selectivity was enhanced by a separate polypeptide segment farther downstream on the C-terminal side of each trihelix region. Therefore, the data indicate that the twin DNA binding domains of GT-2 each consist of a general GT-box recognition core with intrinsic differential binding activity toward closely related target motifs and a modified sequence conferring higher resolution reciprocal selectivity between these motifs.

  17. GT160-246, a toxin binding polymer for treatment of Clostridium difficile colitis.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, C B; Cannon, E P; Brezzani, A; Pitruzzello, M; Dinardo, C; Rinard, E; Acheson, D W; Fitzpatrick, R; Kelly, P; Shackett, K; Papoulis, A T; Goddard, P J; Barker, R H; Palace, G P; Klinger, J D

    2001-08-01

    GT160-246, a high-molecular-weight soluble anionic polymer, was tested in vitro and in vivo for neutralization of Clostridium difficile toxin A and B activities. Five milligrams of GT160-246 per ml neutralized toxin-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis in Vero cells induced by 5 ng of toxin A per ml or 1.25 ng of toxin B per ml. In ligated rat ileal loops, 1 mg of GT160-246 neutralized fluid accumulation caused by 5 microg of toxin A. At doses as high as 80 mg/loop, cholestyramine provided incomplete neutralization of fluid accumulation caused by 5 microg of toxin A. GT160-246 protected 80% of the hamsters from mortality caused by infection with C. difficile, whereas cholestyramine protected only 10% of animals. Treatment of C. difficile-infected hamsters with metronidazole initially protected 100% of the hamsters from mortality, but upon removal of treatment, 80% of the hamsters had relapses and died. In contrast, removal of GT160-246 treatment did not result in disease relapse in the hamsters. GT160-246 showed no antimicrobial activity in tests with a panel of 16 aerobic bacteria and yeast and 22 anaerobic bacteria and did not interfere with the in vitro activities of most antibiotics. GT160-246 offers a novel, nonantimicrobial treatment of C. difficile disease in humans.

  18. Event-specific plasmid standards and real-time PCR methods for transgenic Bt11, Bt176, and GA21 maize and transgenic GT73 canola.

    PubMed

    Taverniers, Isabel; Windels, Pieter; Vaïtilingom, Marc; Milcamps, Anne; Van Bockstaele, Erik; Van den Eede, Guy; De Loose, Marc

    2005-04-20

    Since the 18th of April 2004, two new regulations, EC/1829/2003 on genetically modified food and feed products and EC/1830/2003 on traceability and labeling of GMOs, are in force in the EU. This new, comprehensive regulatory framework emphasizes the need of an adequate tracing system. Unique identifiers, such as the transgene genome junction region or a specific rearrangement within the transgene DNA, should form the basis of such a tracing system. In this study, we describe the development of event-specific tracing systems for transgenic maize lines Bt11, Bt176, and GA21 and for canola event GT73. Molecular characterization of the transgene loci enabled us to clone an event-specific sequence into a plasmid vector, to be used as a marker, and to develop line-specific primers. Primer specificity was tested through qualitative PCRs and dissociation curve analysis in SYBR Green I real-time PCRs. The primers were then combined with event-specific TaqMan probes in quantitative real-time PCRs. Calibration curves were set up both with genomic DNA samples and the newly synthesized plasmid DNA markers. It is shown that cloned plasmid GMO target sequences are perfectly suitable as unique identifiers and quantitative calibrators. Together with an event-specific primer pair and a highly specific TaqMan probe, the plasmid markers form crucial components of a unique and straighforward tracing system for Bt11, Bt176, and GA21 maize and GT73 canola events.

  19. Development of Orally Administered γ-Tocotrienol (GT3) Nanoemulsion for Radioprotection

    PubMed Central

    Ledet, Grace A.; Biswas, Shukla; Kumar, Vidya P.; Graves, Richard A.; Mitchner, Demaurian M.; Parker, Taylor M.; Bostanian, Levon A.; Ghosh, Sanchita P.; Mandal, Tarun K.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to formulate γ-tocotrienol (GT3) in a nanoemulsion formulation as a prophylactic orally administered radioprotective agent; and (2) to optimize the storage conditions to preserve the structural integrity of both the formulation and the compound. γ-tocotrienol was incorporated into a nanoemulsion and lyophilized with lactose. Ultra performance liquid chromatography–mass spectroscopy (UPLC–MS) was used to monitor the chemical stability of GT3 over time, the particle size and ζ potential, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to study the physical stability of the nanoemulsion. Radioprotective and toxicity studies were performed in mice. The liquid formulation exhibited GT3 degradation at all storage temperatures. Lyophilization, in the presence of lactose, significantly reduced GT3 degradation. Both the liquid and lyophilized nanoemulsions had stable particle size and ζ potential when stored at 4 °C. Toxicity studies of the nanoemulsion resulted in no observable toxicity in mice at an oral dose of 600 mg/kg GT3. The nano-formulated GT3 (300 mg/kg) demonstrated enhanced survival efficacy compared to GT3 alone (200 and 400 mg/kg) in CD2F1 mice exposed to total body gamma radiation. The optimal long-term storage of formulated GT3 is as a powder at −20 °C to preserve drug and formulation integrity. Formulation of GT3 as a nanoemulsion for oral delivery as a prophylactic radioprotectant shows promise and warrants further investigation. PMID:28029115

  20. Multi-color lightcurve observation of the asteroid (163249) 2002 GT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, M.; Abe, S.

    2014-07-01

    NASA's Deep Impact/EPOXI spacecraft plans to encounter the asteroid (163249) 2002 GT, classified as a PHA (Potentially Hazardous Asteroid), on January 4, 2020. However, the taxonomic type and spin state of 2002 GT remain to be determined. We have carried out ground-based multi-color (B-V-R-I) lightcurve observations taking advantage of the 2002 GT Characterization Campaign by NASA. Multi-color lightcurve measurements allow us to estimate the rotation period and obtain strong constraints on the shape and pole orientation. Here we found that the rotation period of 2002 GT is estimated to be 3.7248 ± 0.1664 h. In mid-2013, 2002 GT passed at 0.015 au from the Earth, resulting an exceptional opportunity for ground-based characterization. Using the 0.81-m telescope of the Tenagra Observatory (110°52'44.8''W, +31°27'44.4''N, 1312 m) in Arizona, USA, and the Johnson-Cousins BVRI filters, we have found lightcurves of 2002 GT (Figure). The Tenagra II 0.81-m telescope is used for research of the Hayabusa2 target Asteroid (162173) 1999 JU_3. The lightcurves (relative magnitude) show that the rotation period of 2002 GT, the target of NASA's Deep Impact/EPOXI spacecraft, is estimated to be 3.7248 ± 0.1664 hr. On June 9, 2013, we had 7 hours of ground-based observations on 2002 GT from 4:00 to 11:00 UTC. The number of comparison stars for differential photometry was 34. Because of tracking the fast-moving asteroid, it was necessary to have the same comparison star among the fields of vision. We have also obtained absolute photometry of 2002 GT on June 13, 2013.

  1. Dynamics and control modeling of the closed-cycle gas turbine (GT-HTGR) power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bardia, A.

    1980-02-01

    The simulation if presented for the 800-MW(e) two-loop GT-HTGR plant design with the REALY2 transient analysis computer code, and the modeling of control strategies called for by the inherently unique operational requirements of a multiple loop GT-HTGR is described. Plant control of the GT-HTGR is constrained by the nature of its power conversion loops (PCLs) in which the core cooling flow and the turbine flow are directly related and thus changes in flow affect core cooling as well as turbine power. Additionally, the high thermal inertia of the reactor core precludes rapid changes in the temperature of the turbine inlet flow.

  2. [Eugenics and human cloning].

    PubMed

    Boloz, W

    2001-01-01

    Because of legislative bans there are still no reports of human cloning. However eager public debate is currently running, concerning medical, legal, social and ethical aspects of human cloning. Arguments for and against human cloning are presented. An important argument against cloning is the danger of eugenic tendencies connected with cloning, which could lead to genetic discrimination.

  3. Energy recuperation in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and gas turbine (GT) combined system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchonthara, Prapan; Bhattacharya, Sankar; Tsutsumi, Atsushi

    A combined power generation system consisting of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and a gas turbine (GT) with steam and heat recuperation (HR) was evaluated using a commercial process simulation tool, ASPEN Plus. The effect of steam recuperation (SR) on the overall efficiency of the combined system was investigated by comparing the SOFC-GT during heat and steam recuperation (HSR) against the system during only heat recuperation. At low turbine inlet temperatures (TITs), the overall efficiency of the SOFC-GT combined system with heat and steam recuperation improved by showing an increase in TIT and a reduction in pressure ratio (PR). On the other hand, at high TITs, the opposite trend was observed. The integration of steam recuperation was found to improve the overall efficiency and specific power of SOFC-GT combined systems with a relatively compact SOFC component.

  4. Genetically modified flax expressing NAP-SsGT1 transgene: examination of anti-inflammatory action.

    PubMed

    Matusiewicz, Magdalena; Kosieradzka, Iwona; Zuk, Magdalena; Szopa, Jan

    2014-09-22

    The aim of the work was to define the influence of dietary supplementation with GM (genetically modified) GT#4 flaxseed cake enriched in polyphenols on inflammation development in mice liver. Mice were given ad libitum isoprotein diets: (1) standard diet; (2) high-fat diet rich in lard, high-fat diet enriched with 30% of (3) isogenic flax Linola seed cake; and (4) GM GT#4 flaxseed cake; for 96 days. Administration of transgenic and isogenic seed cake lowered body weight gain, of transgenic to the standard diet level. Serum total antioxidant status was statistically significantly improved in GT#4 flaxseed cake group and did not differ from Linola. Serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, lipid profile and the liver concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α were ameliorated by GM and isogenic flaxseed cake consumption. The level of pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ did not differ between mice obtaining GM GT#4 and non-GM flaxseed cakes. The C-reactive protein concentration was reduced in animals fed GT#4 flaxseed cake and did not differ from those fed non-GM flaxseed cake-based diet. Similarly, the liver structure of mice consuming diets enriched in flaxseed cake was improved. Dietetic enrichment with GM GT#4 and non-GM flaxseed cakes may be a promising solution for health problems resulting from improper diet.

  5. Sleep quality in efavirenz-treated Chinese HIV patients - comparing between GT and GG genotype of CYP2B6-516 G/T polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shui Shan; To, Kin Wang; Lee, Man Po; Wong, Ngai Sze; Chan, Denise P C; Li, Patrick C K; Cheung, Siu Wai; Chan, Raphael C Y

    2014-03-01

    Seventy-two adult Chinese HIV-positive treatment-naïve patients were recruited in a study to evaluate prospectively the associations between CYP2B6 516 G/T polymorphisms and sleep quality following treatment with an efavirenz-based regimen. Overall, the patients gave an allelic frequency of 0.3 for CYP2B6 516 T, and a genotype frequency of 9.4% for TT. Compared to GG, GT gave a higher median value of plasma efavirenz level at four weeks (3.77 mg/L vs 2.59 mg/L, p < 0.001) and 12 months (3.57 mg/L vs 2.97 mg/L, p = 0.026). Using generalised estimating equations analysis to track the variance over time, there was poorer Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index in GT compared to GG, while GT was associated with a higher efavirenz level of >4 mg/L. There was however no difference in the component sleep scores nor was there direct association between sleep quality and plasma efavirenz levels. The results suggested that CYP2B6 genotype was associated with different patterns of sleep problems, further investigation of which is warranted with the objective of optimizing therapy with efavirenz-based regimens.

  6. Molecular cloning and amino acid sequence of human 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Funk, C.D.; Radmark, O.; Hoeoeg, J.O.; Joernvall, H.; Samuelsson, B.

    1988-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34), a Ca/sup 2 +/- and ATP-requiring enzyme, catalyzes the first two steps in the biosynthesis of the peptidoleukotrienes and the chemotactic factor leukotriene B/sub 4/. A cDNA clone corresponding to 5-lipoxygenase was isolated from a human lung lambda gt11 expression library by immunoscreening with a polyclonal antibody. Additional clones from a human placenta lambda gt11 cDNA library were obtained by plaque hybridization with the /sup 32/P-labeled lung cDNA clone. Sequence data obtained from several overlapping clones indicate that the composite DNAs contain the complete coding region for the enzyme. From the deduced primary structure, 5-lipoxygenase encodes a 673 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 77,839. Direct analysis of the native protein and its proteolytic fragments confirmed the deduced composition, the amino-terminal amino acid sequence, and the structure of many internal segments. 5-Lipoxygenase has no apparent sequence homology with leukotriene A/sub 4/ hydrolase or Ca/sup 2 +/-binding proteins. RNA blot analysis indicated substantial amounts of an mRNA species of approx. = 2700 nucleotides in leukocytes, lung, and placenta.

  7. The Clone Factory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Beryl

    2005-01-01

    Have humans been cloned? Is it possible? Immediate interest is sparked when students are asked these questions. In response to their curiosity, the clone factory activity was developed to help them understand the process of cloning. In this activity, students reenact the cloning process, in a very simplified simulation. After completing the…

  8. Molecular cloning and biochemical characterization of the UDP-glucose: flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase from Concord grape (Vitis labrusca).

    PubMed

    Hall, Dawn; Yuan, Xiao Xin; Murata, Jun; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2012-02-01

    Glucosylation of anthocyanidin substrates at the 3-O-position is crucial for the red pigmentation of grape berries and wine. The gene that encodes the enzyme involved in this reaction has been cloned from Vitis labrusca cv. Concord, heterologously expressed, and the recombinant enzyme (rVL3GT) was characterized. VL3GT has 96% amino acid sequence identity with Vitis vinifera VV3GT and groups phylogenetically with several other flavonoid 3-O-glycosyltransferases. In vitro substrate specificity studies and kinetic analyses of rVL3GT indicate that this enzyme preferentially glucosylates cyanidin as compared with quercetin. Crude protein extracts from several Concord grape tissues were assayed for glucosyltransferase activity with cyanidin and quercetin as acceptor substrates. A comparison of the VL3GT activities toward with these substrates showed that the 3GT enzyme activity is consistent with the expression of VL3GT in these tissues and is coincident with the biosynthesis of anthocyanins in both location and developmental stages. Enzyme activities in grape mesocarp, pre-veraison exocarp, leaf, flower bud, and flower tissues glucosylated quercetin but not cyanidin at high rates, suggesting the presence of additional enzymes which are able to glucosylate the 3-O-position of flavonols with higher specificity than anthocyanidins.

  9. The activity of interleukin-4 receptor alpha-chain promoter is regulated by a GT box element.

    PubMed

    Dorado, Beatriz; Martín-Saavedra, Francisco M; Jerez, María J; Ballester, Sara

    2006-04-01

    Interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R) is the cell surface complex through which interleukin-4 (IL-4) signals exert its critical biological effects. The alpha-chain of IL-4R is responsible for the high affinity binding of IL-4. In this report, is characterized, the 5' untranslated flanking region of murine IL-4Ralpha gene in the Th2 clone D10.G4.1. We have analyzed a DNA fragment spanning from -995 to +84 relative to the transcription start point. Mutagenesis analysis shows that, neither the previously described Stat6 (-395) nor the NFAT (-266) and NFkappaB (+25) sequences localized here, are involved in the IL-4Ralpha promoter activity. Reporter assays demonstrate that maximum transcriptional activity is achieved by the -89 to +84 sequence and this activity is independent of a TATA-like box located at -25. We have identified a GT box located at -45 as the critical element for the IL-4Ralpha promoter activity. Experiments in SL2 cells, which lack endogenous Sp proteins, show that IL-4Ralpha minimal promoter is transactivated by proteins of Sp family.

  10. Ganglioside GT1b protects human spermatozoa from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA and membrane damage.

    PubMed

    Gavella, Mirjana; Garaj-Vrhovac, Verica; Lipovac, Vaskresenija; Antica, Mariastefania; Gajski, Goran; Car, Nikica

    2010-06-01

    We have reported previously that various gangliosides, the sialic acid containing glycosphingolipids, provide protection against sperm injury caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we investigated the effect of treatment of human spermatozoa with ganglioside GT1b on hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced DNA fragmentation and plasma membrane damage. Single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay) used in the assessment of sperm DNA integrity showed that in vitro supplemented GT1b (100 microm) significantly reduced DNA damage induced by H(2)O(2) (200 microm) (p < 0.05). Measurements of Annexin V binding in combination with the propidium iodide vital dye labelling demonstrated that the spermatozoa pre-treated with GT1b exhibited a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the percentage of live cells with intact membrane and decreased phosphatidylserine translocation after exposure to H(2)O(2). Flow cytometry using the intracellular ROS-sensitive fluorescence dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate dye employed to investigate the transport of the extracellularly supplied H(2)O(2) into the cell interior revealed that ganglioside GT1b completely inhibited the passage of H(2)O(2) through the sperm membrane. These results suggest that ganglioside GT1b may protect human spermatozoa from H(2)O(2)-induced damage by rendering sperm membrane more hydrophobic, thus inhibiting the diffusion of H(2)O(2) across the membrane.

  11. Bacterial β-Kdo glycosyltransferases represent a new glycosyltransferase family (GT99)

    PubMed Central

    Ovchinnikova, Olga G.; Mallette, Evan; Koizumi, Akihiko; Lowary, Todd L.; Kimber, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    Kdo (3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid) is an eight-carbon sugar mostly confined to Gram-negative bacteria. It is often involved in attaching surface polysaccharides to their lipid anchors. α-Kdo provides a bridge between lipid A and the core oligosaccharide in all bacterial LPSs, whereas an oligosaccharide of β-Kdo residues links “group 2” capsular polysaccharides to (lyso)phosphatidylglycerol. β-Kdo is also found in a small number of other bacterial polysaccharides. The structure and function of the prototypical cytidine monophosphate-Kdo–dependent α-Kdo glycosyltransferase from LPS assembly is well characterized. In contrast, the β-Kdo counterparts were not identified as glycosyltransferase enzymes by bioinformatics tools and were not represented among the 98 currently recognized glycosyltransferase families in the Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes database. We report the crystallographic structure and function of a prototype β-Kdo GT from WbbB, a modular protein participating in LPS O-antigen synthesis in Raoultella terrigena. The β-Kdo GT has dual Rossmann-fold motifs typical of GT-B enzymes, but extensive deletions, insertions, and rearrangements result in a unique architecture that makes it a prototype for a new GT family (GT99). The cytidine monophosphate-binding site in the C-terminal α/β domain closely resembles the corresponding site in bacterial sialyltransferases, suggesting an evolutionary connection that is not immediately evident from the overall fold or sequence similarities. PMID:27199480

  12. Identification of cDNA clones expressing immunodiagnostic antigens from Trichinella spiralis

    SciTech Connect

    Zarlenga, D.; Gamble, H.R.

    1987-05-01

    A cDNA expression library was built in lambda gt11 phage using poly A mRNA isolated from Trichinella spiralis muscle stage larvae. This library was screened with rabbit antibodies to parasite excretory-secretory (ES) products and greater than 180 clones were isolated. Thirteen clones producing highly immunogenic protein antigens were plaque purified and rescreened with pig antisera to T.spiralis, Trichuris suis or Ascaris suum to identify clones producing epitopes specific to T.spiralis ES products, only. Two clones, TsAc-2 and TsAc-8, which displayed strong interactions with pig antisera to T. spiralis were lysogenized in E. coli Y1089 and the protein extracted. Western blots of the crude fusion proteins revealed molecular weights of 133 kD and 129 kD, respectively. Northern blot analysis of total RNA with TSP labelled cDNA:lambda gt11 probes indicated single RNA transcripts for each clone with molecular sizes corresponding to 800-850 nucleotides. dscDNA inserts were estimated by southern blot analysis to be 500 bp and 340 bp, respectively, with no cross-hybridization observed between the cloned sequences. Dot blots using pig sera to screen crude fusion protein preparations, total bacterial protein (negative controls) and crude worm extract or ES products from T.spiralis, T.suis and A.suum (positive controls) corroborated the specificity and sensitivity of these clones as potential diagnostic antigens for swine trichinellosis.

  13. [Construction of genomic library of L. interrogans serovar lai using lambda gt11 as the vector and a study of recombiant plasmid pDL121].

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Dai, B; Jing, B; Wu, W; Li, S; Fang, Z; Zhao, H; Ye, D; Yan, R; Liu, J; Song, S; Yang, Y; Zhang, Y; Liu, F; Tu, Y; Yang, H; Huang, Z; Liang, L; Hu, L; Zhao, M

    1997-03-01

    A genomic library of L. interrogans serovar lai strain 017 has been constructed using lambda gt11 as the vector. DNA was partially digested by two blunt-end restriction enzymes, then methylated with EcoR I methylase; after EcoR I linker was added to the DNA, the linker-ended DNA was ligated to the dephosphorylated EcoR I digested lambda gt11 arms. The recombined DNA was packaged in vitro, and used to transduct E. coli Y1090 for amplification. There were 2.1 x 10(6) recombinant bacteriophages as recognized by their ability to form white plaques plated on Lac host in the presence of both IPTG and X-Ga1. A positive clone, designated lambda DL12, was screened with a rabbit anti-serum against L. interrogans serovar lai from the genomic library. The DNA from lambda DL12 was subcloned into plasmid pUC18. A recombinant (designated as pDL121) was obtained. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that a 23 kd was expressed in E. coli JM 103 harboring pDL121. Western blotting analysis showed that a specific protein band molecular weight of 23 kd could be recognized by the rabbit antiserum against L. interrogans serovar lai strain 017.

  14. LU60645GT and MA132843GT Catalogues of Lunar and Martian Impact Craters Developed Using a Crater Shape-based Interpolation Crater Detection Algorithm for Topography Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salamuniccar, Goran; Loncaric, Sven; Mazarico, Erwan Matias

    2012-01-01

    For Mars, 57,633 craters from the manually assembled catalogues and 72,668 additional craters identified using several crater detection algorithms (CDAs) have been merged into the MA130301GT catalogue. By contrast, for the Moon the most complete previous catalogue contains only 14,923 craters. Two recent missions provided higher-quality digital elevation maps (DEMs): SELENE (in 1/16° resolution) and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (we used up to 1/512°). This was the main motivation for work on the new Crater Shape-based interpolation module, which improves previous CDA as follows: (1) it decreases the number of false-detections for the required number of true detections; (2) it improves detection capabilities for very small craters; and (3) it provides more accurate automated measurements of craters' properties. The results are: (1) LU60645GT, which is currently the most complete (up to D>=8 km) catalogue of Lunar craters; and (2) MA132843GT catalogue of Martian craters complete up to D>=2 km, which is the extension of the previous MA130301GT catalogue. As previously achieved for Mars, LU60645GT provides all properties that were provided by the previous Lunar catalogues, plus: (1) correlation between morphological descriptors from used catalogues; (2) correlation between manually assigned attributes and automated measurements; (3) average errors and their standard deviations for manually and automatically assigned attributes such as position coordinates, diameter, depth/diameter ratio, etc; and (4) a review of positional accuracy of used datasets. Additionally, surface dating could potentially be improved with the exhaustiveness of this new catalogue. The accompanying results are: (1) the possibility of comparing a large number of Lunar and Martian craters, of e.g. depth/diameter ratio and 2D profiles; (2) utilisation of a method for re-projection of datasets and catalogues, which is very useful for craters that are very close to poles; and (3) the extension of the

  15. Optimizing the G/T ratio of the DSS-13 34-meter beam-waveguide antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esquivel, M. S.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations using Physical Optics computer software were done to optimize the gain-to-noise temperature (G/T) ratio of DSS-13, the DSN's 34-m beam-waveguide antenna, at X-band for operation with the ultra-low-noise amplifier maser system. A better G/T value was obtained by using a 24.2-dB far-field-gain smooth-wall dual-mode horn than by using the standard X-band 22.5-dB-gain corrugated horn.

  16. Optimizing the G/T ratio of the DSS-13 34-meter beam-waveguide antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esquivel, M. S.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations using Physical Optics computer software were done to optimize the gain-to-noise-temperature (G/T) ratio of Deep Space Station (DSS)-13, the Deep Space Network's (DSN's) 34-m beam-waveguide antenna, at X-band for operation with the ultra-low-noise amplifier maser system. A better G/T value was obtained by using a 24.2-dB far-field-gain smooth-wall dual-mode horn than by using the standard X-band 22.5-dB-gain corrugated horn.

  17. Multipartite asymmetric quantum cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Iblisdir, S.; Gisin, N.; Acin, A.; Cerf, N.J.; Filip, R.; Fiurasek, J.

    2005-10-15

    We investigate the optimal distribution of quantum information over multipartite systems in asymmetric settings. We introduce cloning transformations that take N identical replicas of a pure state in any dimension as input and yield a collection of clones with nonidentical fidelities. As an example, if the clones are partitioned into a set of M{sub A} clones with fidelity F{sup A} and another set of M{sub B} clones with fidelity F{sup B}, the trade-off between these fidelities is analyzed, and particular cases of optimal N{yields}M{sub A}+M{sub B} cloning machines are exhibited. We also present an optimal 1{yields}1+1+1 cloning machine, which is an example of a tripartite fully asymmetric cloner. Finally, it is shown how these cloning machines can be optically realized.

  18. Aristotle and headless clones.

    PubMed

    Mosteller, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Cloned organisms can be genetically altered so that they do not exhibit higher brain functioning. This form of therapeutic cloning allows for genetically identical organs and tissues to be harvested from the clone for the use of the organism that is cloned. "Spare parts" cloning promises many opportunities for future medical advances. What is the ontological and ethical status of spare parts, headless clones? This paper attempts to answer this question from the perspective of Aristotle's view of the soul. Aristotle's metaphysics as applied to his view of biological essences generates an ethic that can contribute to moral reasoning regarding the use of headless spare parts clones. The task of this paper is to show the implications that Aristotle's view of the soul, if it is true, would have on the ethics of headless, spare parts cloning.

  19. The "Invisible" Gifted and Talented Bilingual Students: A Current Report on Enrollment in GT Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esquierdo, J. Joy; Arreguin-Anderson, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The issue of underrepresentation in gifted and talented (GT) programs has developed into a critical educational concern. At the core are ambiguous identification assessment practices, especially for bilingual students. To illustrate, this article reports data from the last decade that supports the underrepresentation of gifted Hispanic bilingual…

  20. Comparison of Yamax pedometer and GT3X accelerometer steps in a free-living sample

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to compare steps detected by the Yamax pedometer (PEDO) versus the GT3X accelerometer (ACCEL) in free-living adults. Daily PEDO and ACCEL steps were collected from a sample of 23 overweight and obese participants (18 females; mean +/- sd: age = 52.6 +/- 8.4 yr.; body mass index = 3...

  1. Animal Cloning and Food Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... milk from clones of cattle, swine (pigs), and goats, and the offspring of clones from any species ... composition of food products from cattle, swine, and goat clones, or the offspring of any animal clones, ...

  2. Molecular cloning of a Brassica napus thiohydroximate S-glucosyltransferase gene and its expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Marillia, Elizabeth-France; MacPherson, Jim M.; Tsang, Edward W. T.; Van Audenhove, Katrien; Keller, Wilf A.; GrootWassink, Jan W. D.

    2001-10-01

    A genomic clone encoding a thiohydroximate S-glucosyltransferase (S-GT) was isolated from Brassica napus by library screening with probes generated by PCR using degenerated primers. Its corresponding cDNA was amplified by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR and also cloned by cDNA library screening. The genomic clone was 5 896 bp long and contained a 173-bp intron. At least two copies of the S-GT gene were present in B. napus. The full-length cDNA clone was 1.5 kb long and contained an open reading frame encoding a 51-kDa polypeptide. The deduced amino acid sequence shared a significant degree of homology with other glucosyltransferases characterized in other species, including a highly conserved motif within this family of enzymes corresponding to the glucose-binding domain. The recombinant protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, and the enzyme activity was tested by a biochemical assay based on the measure of glucose incorporation. The high thiohydroximate S-GT activity detected from the recombinant protein confirmed that this clone was indeed a S-glucosyltransferase.

  3. 78 FR 29810 - Receipt of Petition for Decision That Nonconforming 2003 BMW K 1200 GT Motorcycles Are Eligible...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... 2003 BMW K 1200 GT Motorcycles Are Eligible for Importation AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety... Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) of a petition for a decision that 2003 BMW K 1200 GT Motorcycles... (Registered Importer R-09-005) has petitioned NHTSA to decide whether non-U.S. certified 2003 BMW K 1200...

  4. Gonadotropic hormone (GtH) receptors in the testis of the troutSalmo gairdneri: in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Le Gac, F; Breton, B; Bougoussa, M

    1988-10-01

    A particulate fraction obtained from trout testis at the time of spermiation shows saturable binding sites for(125)I-labeled salmon gonadotropin ((125)I-GtH). Non-gonadal tissues (liver, muscle and spleen) did not demonstrate specific(125)I-GtH binding. The tracer's specific activity was determined by the self-displacement method (18 to 30 μCi/μg). Maximal specific binding ability of(125)I-GtH varied from 20 to 30% of the labelled ligand added, depending on the hormone preparation. Specific binding of(125)I-GtH to 20 mg of the testis membrane varied from 40 to 85% of the total binding depending on the method of membrane prepratation, and was competitively inhibited by concentrations of unlabelled GtH ranging from ca 1 to 1000 ng/ml of incubate. Gonadotropin of mammalian origin, ovine TSH or salmon prolactin competed only weakly, or not at all, for testicular gonadotropin binding sites (relative potencies s-GtH>FSH=hCG>s-PRL>bTSH). Scatchard analysis of equilibrium binding studies shows that saturable gonadotropin binding was due to a class of high affinity binding sites (sites I Ka≊3×10(10) M(-1)) and possibly to a second class of lower affinity binding sites (sites II Ka=5 to 14×10(8) M(-1)). The binding capacity of sites I, as measured in enriched membrane preparations, was 45±18 fmoles/g of testis during the period of spermiation. The concentration of GtH required to obtain half maximal displacement of(125)I-GtH in the binding studies was of the same order of magnitude as the apparent ED50 for GtH stimulation of 11-Cetotestosterone (11KT) secretion by trout testesin vitro. Mammalian LH and FSH were 100 to 1000 folds less potent than salmor GtH to increase 11 KT secretion.

  5. Activation of clones producing self-reactive antibodies by foreign antigen and antiidiotype antibody carrying the internal image of the antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, N C; Fidanza, V; Mayer, R; Mazza, G; Fougereau, M; Bona, C

    1989-01-01

    Because we found in previous work that a high fraction of antibodies exhibiting various specificities bound to glutamic acid 50-tyrosine50 homopolymer (GT) and expressed pGAT cross-reactive idiotype (IdX), we studied the activation of clones producing multireactive antibodies in 1-mo-old MRL/lpr and C3H/HeJ mice bearing VHJ haplotype. The activation of such clones was studied after mice were immunized with GT in CFA, HP20 (an anti-Id MAb carrying the internal image of GT in the D region), and a synthetic peptide corresponding to the D segment of HP20. Our results indicate that immunized mice produced both GT- and self-reactive antibodies. Study of the immunochemical properties of MAb showed that they exhibit multispecific properties and bind with similar-affinity constants to GT or self-antigens such as DNA, Smith antigen (Sm), and IgG2a. An important fraction of antibodies obtained from MRL/lpr mice immunized with HP20 expressed pGAT IdX and some of these antibodies share IdX expressed on anti-DNA, Sm, and rheumatoid factor (RFs) antibodies. The hybridomas producing multispecific autoantibodies use heavy-chain- (VH) and light-chain-variable region (VK) genes from various V gene families, suggesting that they do not derive from the pool of GAT precursors. Sequencing of VH and VK genes of two antibodies show that they can use closely related VHJ558, unmutated VK1, or different VK genes than those used by anti-GT antibodies. Our data demonstrate that clones producing antibodies binding to GT and self-antigens with similar-affinity constants can be activated by foreign or anti-Id antibodies carrying the internal image of the antigen or even by a synthetic peptide corresponding to the D segment of anti-Id antibodies. Images PMID:2760212

  6. The DBA Analysis of One Control Rod Withdrawal Out of the HTR-10GT Core

    SciTech Connect

    Mingang Lang; Yujie Dong

    2006-07-01

    The 10 MW High Temperature Gas Cooled Test Reactor (HTR-10) has been built in Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) and has been operating successfully since the beginning of 2003. The core outlet temperature of HTR-10 is 700 deg. C. To verify the technology of gas-turbine direct cycle, INET has planned to increase its core outlet temperature to 750 deg. C and use a helium gas turbine instead of the steam generator (then the reactor is called HTR-10GT). Though HTR-10 has good intrinsic safety, the design basic accidents and beyond design basic accidents of HTR10-GT must be analyzed according to China's nuclear regulations due to changed operation parameters. THERMIX code system is used to study the accident on one control rod withdrawal out of the core by a mistake. After a control rod in the side reflector was withdrawn out at a speed of 1 cm/s by a mistake, a positive reactivity was inserted and the reactor power increased and the temperature of the core increased. When the neutron flux of power measuring range exceeded 123% and the core outlet temperature was lager than 800 deg. C, the reactor was scrammed. During the accident sequence the maximum fuel temperature was 1200.9 deg. C. It was lower than the fuel temperature limitation of 1230 deg. C. The paper compares the analysis result of HTR10-GT to those of HTR-10. The results shows that the HTR-10GT is still safe during the accident though its operating temperature is higher than HTR-10 when the fuel safety limits are the same. (authors)

  7. Observing Campaign for Potential Deep Impact Flyby Target 163249 (2002 GT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pittichova, Jana; Chesley, S. R.; Abell, P. A.; Benner, L. A. M.

    2012-01-01

    The Deep Impact spacecraft is currently on course for a Jan. 4, 2020 flyby of the sub-kilometer near-Earth asteroid 163249 (2002 GT). The re-targeting will be complete with a final small maneuver scheduled for Oct. 4, 2012. 2002 GT, which is also designated as a Potentially Hazardous Asteroid (PHA), has a well-determined orbit and is approx 800 m in diameter (H=18.3). Little more is known about the nature of this object, but in mid-2013 it will pass near the Earth, affording an exceptional opportunity for ground-based characterization. At this apparition 2002 GT will be in range of Arecibo. In addition to Doppler measurements, radar delay observations with precisions of a few microseconds are expected and have a good chance of revealing whether the system is binary or not. The asteroid will be brighter than 16th mag., which will facilitate a host of observations at a variety of wavelengths. Light curve measurements across a wide range of viewing perspectives will reveal the rotation rate and ultimately lead to strong constraints on the shape and pole orientation. Visible and infrared spectra will constrain the mineralogy, taxonomy, albedo and size. Along with the radar observations, optical astrometry will further constrain the orbit, both to facilitate terminal guidance operations and to potentially reveal nongravitational forces acting on the asteroid. Coordinating all of these observations will be a significant task and we encourage interested observers to collaborate in this effort. The 2013 apparition of 2002 GT represents a unique opportunity to characterize a potential flyby target, which will aid interpretation of the high-resolution flyby imagery and aid planning and development of the flyby imaging sequence. The knowledge gained from this flyby will be highly relevant to the human exploration program at NASA, which desires more information on the physical characteristics of sub-kilometer near-Earth asteroids.

  8. Thermal Emission Photometry of Deep Impact Flyby Target (163249) 2002 GT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Lucy F.; Moskovitz, N. A.; Licandro, J.; Emery, J. P.; Reddy, V.; Vilas, F.; 2002 GT Observing Team

    2013-10-01

    Near-Earth asteroid (163249) 2002 GT is now the target of a Deep Impact spacecraft flyby in Jan. 2020 (see Pittichova et al., this volume, for details of the flyby and observing campaign). Thermal emission photometry of 2002 GT was obtained from NIRI on Gemini-North in the L' and M' filters, which are centered at 3.76 and 4.68 microns respectively. J- and K-band reflectance photometry was also acquired in support of the thermal observations. The full JKL'M' set was acquired on UT 2013-Jun-13 at a solar phase angle of 53 degrees. A further set of photometry in J, K, and L' only was carried out on 2013-Jun-19 at a phase angle of 65 degrees. High water vapor conditions at Mauna Kea during this period unfortunately prevented acquisition of a second set of M' measurements. In addition, N-band photometry of 2002 GT was conducted on 2013-Jun-10 from CanariCam at the 10-meter Gran Telescopio Canarias using a beta version of the moving object guiding system. Data were acquired in three filters between 8.7 and 12.5 microns, although the limitations of the guiding are complicating the analysis. (We note that N-band observing was not offered by either Gemini or IRTF during this apparition.) Data analysis is ongoing and results will be discussed. We appreciate the efforts of the Gemini and GTC staff in support of these observing programs.

  9. The Vitamin E Analog Gamma-Tocotrienol (GT3) and Statins Synergistically Up-Regulate Endothelial Thrombomodulin (TM)

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rupak; Ghosh, Sanchita P.; Zhou, Daohong; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Statins; a class of routinely prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs; inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzymeA reductase (HMGCR) and strongly induce endothelial thrombomodulin (TM); which is known to have anti-inflammatory; anti-coagulation; anti-oxidant; and radioprotective properties. However; high-dose toxicity limits the clinical use of statins. The vitamin E family member gamma-tocotrienol (GT3) also suppresses HMGCR activity and induces TM expression without causing significant adverse side effects; even at high concentrations. To investigate the synergistic effect of statins and GT3 on TM; a low dose of atorvastatin and GT3 was used to treat human primary endothelial cells. Protein-level TM expression was measured by flow cytometry. TM functional activity was determined by activated protein C (APC) generation assay. Expression of Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2), one of the key transcription factors of TM, was measured by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). TM expression increased in a dose-dependent manner after both atorvastatin and GT3 treatment. A combined treatment of a low-dose of atorvastatin and GT3 synergistically up-regulated TM expression and functional activity. Finally; atorvastatin and GT3 synergistically increased KLF2 expression. These findings suggest that combined treatment of statins with GT3 may provide significant health benefits in treating a number of pathophysiological conditions; including inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27869747

  10. MTP -493G>T polymorphism and susceptibility to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Wang, Lu; Su, Xiao; Hu, Xiao-Fang

    2014-06-01

    Microsomal transfer protein (MTP), a lipid transfer protein localized in the endoplasmic reticulum of hepatocytes and enterocytes, plays an important role in the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Many existing studies have demonstrated that a common polymorphism (-493G>T, rs1800591 G>T) in the MTP gene may be implicated in the development and progression of NAFLD, but individually published results are inconclusive. This meta-analysis aimed to investigate whether MTP -493G>T polymorphism may be a potential risk factor for NAFLD. We searched CISCOM, CINAHL, Web of Science, PubMed, Google Scholar, EBSCO, Cochrane Library, and CBM databases from inception through October 1, 2013. Meta-analysis was performed using the STATA 12.0 software. Eleven clinical case-control studies with a total of 636 NAFLD cases and 918 healthy controls met the inclusion criteria. Our meta-analysis results revealed that MTP -493G>T polymorphism was strongly correlated with an increased risk of NAFLD. Subgroup analysis by ethnicity suggested that MTP -493G>T polymorphism might increase individuals' susceptibility to NAFLD among both Caucasian and non-Caucasian populations. No publication bias was observed in this meta-analysis. In short, the present meta-analysis indicates that MTP -493G>T polymorphisms may contribute to individuals' susceptibility to NAFLD. Thus, MTP -493G>T polymorphism may be a valuable and practical biomarker for early detection of NAFLD.

  11. Feasibility study for SOFC-GT hybrid locomotive power part II. System packaging and operating route simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Andrew S.; Brouwer, Jacob; Samuelsen, G. Scott

    2012-09-01

    This work assesses the feasibility of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell-Gas Turbine (SOFC-GT) hybrid power systems for use as the prime mover in freight locomotives. The available space in a diesel engine-powered locomotive is compared to that required for an SOFC-GT system, inclusive of fuel processing systems necessary for the SOFC-GT. The SOFC-GT space requirement is found to be similar to current diesel engines, without consideration of the electrical balance of plant. Preliminary design of the system layout within the locomotive is carried out for illustration. Recent advances in SOFC technology and implications of future improvements are discussed as well. A previously-developed FORTRAN model of an SOFC-GT system is then augmented to simulate the kinematics and power notching of a train and its locomotives. The operation of the SOFC-GT-powered train is investigated along a representative route in Southern California, with simulations presented for diesel reformate as well as natural gas reformate and hydrogen as fuels. Operational parameters and difficulties are explored as are comparisons of expected system performance to modern diesel engines. It is found that even in the diesel case, the SOFC-GT system provides significant savings in fuel and CO2 emissions, making it an attractive option for the rail industry.

  12. CDNA CLONING OF FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) ESTROGEN AND ANDROGEN RECEPTORS FOR USE IN STEROID RECEPTOR EXTRAPOLATION STUDIES FOR ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    cDNA Cloning of Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) Estrogen and Androgen Receptors for Use in Steroid Receptor Extrapolation Studies for Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals.

    Wilson, V.S.1,, Korte, J.2, Hartig P. 1, Ankley, G.T.2, Gray, L.E., Jr 1, , and Welch, J.E.1. 1U.S...

  13. Biosynthesis of the major brain gangliosides GD1a and GT1b

    PubMed Central

    Sturgill, Elizabeth R; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Lopez, Pablo HH; Colacurcio, Daniel; Vajn, Katarina; Lorenzini, Ileana; Majić, Senka; Yang, Won Ho; Heffer, Marija; Tiemeyer, Michael; Marth, Jamey D; Schnaar, Ronald L

    2012-01-01

    Gangliosides—sialylated glycosphingolipids—are the major glycoconjugates of nerve cells. The same four structures—GM1, GD1a, GD1b and GT1b—comprise the great majority of gangliosides in mammalian brains. They share a common tetrasaccharide core (Galβ1–3GalNAcβ1-4Galβ1-4Glcβ1-1′Cer) with one or two sialic acids on the internal galactose and zero (GM1 and GD1b) or one (GD1a and GT1b) α2–3-linked sialic acid on the terminal galactose. Whereas the genes responsible for the sialylation of the internal galactose are known, those responsible for terminal sialylation have not been established in vivo. We report that St3gal2 and St3gal3 are responsible for nearly all the terminal sialylation of brain gangliosides in the mouse. When brain ganglioside expression was analyzed in adult St3gal1-, St3gal2-, St3gal3- and St3gal4-null mice, only St3gal2-null mice differed significantly from wild type, expressing half the normal amount of GD1a and GT1b. St3gal1/2-double-null mice were no different than St3gal2-single-null mice; however, St3gal2/3-double-null mice were >95% depleted in gangliosides GD1a and GT1b. Total ganglioside expression (lipid-bound sialic acid) in the brains of St3gal2/3-double-null mice was equivalent to that in wild-type mice, whereas total protein sialylation was reduced by half. St3gal2/3-double-null mice were small, weak and short lived. They were half the weight of wild-type mice at weaning and displayed early hindlimb dysreflexia. We conclude that the St3gal2 and St3gal3 gene products (ST3Gal-II and ST3Gal-III sialyltransferases) are largely responsible for ganglioside terminal α2-3 sialylation in the brain, synthesizing the major brain gangliosides GD1a and GT1b. PMID:22735313

  14. Biosynthesis of the major brain gangliosides GD1a and GT1b.

    PubMed

    Sturgill, Elizabeth R; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Lopez, Pablo H H; Colacurcio, Daniel; Vajn, Katarina; Lorenzini, Ileana; Majić, Senka; Yang, Won Ho; Heffer, Marija; Tiemeyer, Michael; Marth, Jamey D; Schnaar, Ronald L

    2012-10-01

    Gangliosides-sialylated glycosphingolipids-are the major glycoconjugates of nerve cells. The same four structures-GM1, GD1a, GD1b and GT1b-comprise the great majority of gangliosides in mammalian brains. They share a common tetrasaccharide core (Galβ1-3GalNAcβ1-4Galβ1-4Glcβ1-1'Cer) with one or two sialic acids on the internal galactose and zero (GM1 and GD1b) or one (GD1a and GT1b) α2-3-linked sialic acid on the terminal galactose. Whereas the genes responsible for the sialylation of the internal galactose are known, those responsible for terminal sialylation have not been established in vivo. We report that St3gal2 and St3gal3 are responsible for nearly all the terminal sialylation of brain gangliosides in the mouse. When brain ganglioside expression was analyzed in adult St3gal1-, St3gal2-, St3gal3- and St3gal4-null mice, only St3gal2-null mice differed significantly from wild type, expressing half the normal amount of GD1a and GT1b. St3gal1/2-double-null mice were no different than St3gal2-single-null mice; however, St3gal2/3-double-null mice were >95% depleted in gangliosides GD1a and GT1b. Total ganglioside expression (lipid-bound sialic acid) in the brains of St3gal2/3-double-null mice was equivalent to that in wild-type mice, whereas total protein sialylation was reduced by half. St3gal2/3-double-null mice were small, weak and short lived. They were half the weight of wild-type mice at weaning and displayed early hindlimb dysreflexia. We conclude that the St3gal2 and St3gal3 gene products (ST3Gal-II and ST3Gal-III sialyltransferases) are largely responsible for ganglioside terminal α2-3 sialylation in the brain, synthesizing the major brain gangliosides GD1a and GT1b.

  15. HTGR-GT closed-cycle gas turbine: a plant concept with inherent cogeneration (power plus heat production) capability

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, C.F.

    1980-04-01

    The high-grade sensible heat rejection characteristic of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor-gas turbine (HTGR-GT) plant is ideally suited to cogeneration. Cogeneration in this nuclear closed-cycle plant could include (1) bottoming Rankine cycle, (2) hot water or process steam production, (3) desalination, and (4) urban and industrial district heating. This paper discusses the HTGR-GT plant thermodynamic cycles, design features, and potential applications for the cogeneration operation modes. This paper concludes that the HTGR-GT plant, which can potentially approach a 50% overall efficiency in a combined cycle mode, can significantly aid national energy goals, particularly resource conservation.

  16. Effect of ganglioside GT1b on the in vitro maturation of porcine oocytes and embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    HWANG, Seon-Ung; JEON, Yubyeol; YOON, Junchul David; CAI, Lian; KIM, Eunhye; YOO, Hyunju; KIM, Kyu-Jun; PARK, Kyu Mi; JIN, Minghui; KIM, Hyunggee; HYUN, Sang-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Ganglioside is an acidic glycosphingolipid with sialic acids residues. This study was performed to investigate the effect and mechanism of ganglioside GT1b in porcine oocytes in the process of in vitro maturation (IVM) and preimplantation development. Metaphase II (MII) rates were significantly (P < 0.05) different between the control group and the 5 nM GT1b treatment group. Intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels in oocytes matured with 5 nM and 20 nM and GT1b decreased significantly (P < 0.05). The 10 nM group showed a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels compared with the control group. Subsequently, the level of intracellular Ca2+ in oocytes treated with different concentrations of GT1b was measured. Intracellular Ca2+ was significantly (P < 0.05) increased with a higher concentration of GT1b in a dose-dependent manner. Real-time PCR was performed and showed that the expression of bradykinin 2 receptor (B2R) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta (CaMKIIδ) in cumulus cells was significantly (P < 0.05) decreased in the 20 nM GT1b treatment group. Treatment with 5 nM GT1b significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the expression of CaMKIIδ. In oocytes, treatment with 5 nM GT1b significantly (P < 0.05) decreased CaMKIIγ and POU5F1 (POU domain, class 5, transcription factor 1). However, treatment with 20 nM GT1b significantly (P < 0.05) increased the expression of POU5F1. Finally, embryonic developmental data showed no significant differences in the two experiments (parthenogenesis and in vitro fertilization). In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that GT1b plays an important role in increasing the nuclear maturation rate and decreasing the intracellular ROS levels during IVM. However, GT1b inhibited maturation of the cytoplasm by maintaining intracellular Ca2+ in the process of oocyte maturation regardless of the cell cycle stage. Therefore, GT1b is thought to act on another mechanism

  17. Apical extrusion of thermoplasticized obturating material in canals instrumented with Profile 0.06 or Profile GT.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mark J; McDonald, N J; Mullally, Patrick J

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the extrusion of thermoplacticized gutta-percha in teeth instrumented with Profile 0.06 or Profile GT, and obturated with Thermafil Plus and Thermafil GT, respectively. A total of 120, extracted, human maxillary central incisors were divided into four equal groups. Group 1 was instrumented with Profile 0.06 and obturated with Thermafil Plus. Group 2 was instrumented with Profile 0.06 and obturated using warm vertical condensation (negative control). Group 3 was instrumented with Profile GT and obturated with Thermafil GT. Group 4 was instrumented with Profile GT and obturated like Group 2 (negative control). Extrusion was graded as present or absent. Results found 9 of 30 extruded for group 1, 1 of 30 for group 2, 15 of 30 for group 3, and 2 of 30 for group 4. The results suggest that, in vitro, Thermafil GT may be more prone to extruding gutta-percha past the apical foramen than Thermafil Plus.

  18. [Human cloning or cannibalism].

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, L M

    2001-01-01

    In this article I develop the idea presented in my previous work that human cloning would be of little practical use since almost any aim that one would like to attain by multiple cloning of a concrete man or a group of people, are unattainable or it might be achieved by easier, cheaper and more efficient traditional methods. For this reason cloning of a man is unlikely to occur on a larger scale and only few people will decide to clone themselves. In this sense no social effects of human cloning will be disastrous for the human population. Yet investigations in human genetics are very important since they may provide medical applications far more important than human cloning. It is argued that the main trend of modern medicine: organ transplantation from an alien donor, will become socially dangerous in near future since the number of donors will be drastically smaller than the number of potential patients waiting for transplantations. This in turn may cause social conflicts and a form of medical cannibalism may arise. These problems and conflicts will be avoided if organ transplantation from an alien donor is replaced by organ cloning, i.e. by transplanting an organ developed from the patient.

  19. On cloning human beings.

    PubMed

    de Melo-Martin, Inmaculada

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show that arguments for and against cloning fail to make their case because of one or both of the following reasons: 1) they take for granted customary beliefs and assumptions that are far from being unquestionable; 2) they tend to ignore the context in which human cloning is developed. I will analyze some of the assumptions underlying the main arguments that have been offered for and against cloning. Once these assumptions are critically analyzed, arguments both rejecting and supporting human cloning seem to lose weight. I will first briefly present the main arguments that have been proposed against cloning and I will argue that they fail to establish their case. In the next section I will evaluate some of the positive arguments that have been offered supporting such technology. This analysis will show that the case for cloning also fails. Finally, I will maintain that because critics and especially supporters of this technology neglect the context in which human cloning is developed and might be implemented, their arguments are far from compelling.

  20. Statement on Human Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... form Search American Association for the Advancement of Science Statement on Human Cloning Tweet The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recognizes the intense debates within our society ...

  1. Do Managers Clone Themselves?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    A recent questionnaire survey provides statistics on male managers' views of female managers. The author recommends that male managers break out of their cloning behavior and that the goal ought to be a plurality in management. (Author/WD)

  2. Twins: A cloning experience.

    PubMed

    Prainsack, Barbara; Spector, Tim D

    2006-11-01

    Drawing upon qualitative interviews with monozygotic (identical) twins sharing 100% of their genes, and with dizygotic (fraternal) twins and singletons as control groups, this paper explores what it means to be genetically identical. (The twins interviewed were from the TwinsUK register in London.) In the context of the ongoing debate on human reproductive cloning, it examines questions such as: To what extent do identical twins perceive their emotional and physical bond to be a result of their genetic makeup? What would they think if they had been deliberately created genetically identical? How would they feel about being genetically identical to a person who was born a few years earlier or later? First, our respondents ascribed no great significance to the role of genes in their understanding of what it means to be identical twins. Second, the opinion that human reproductive cloning would "interfere with nature", or "contradict God's will", was expressed by our respondents exclusively on the abstract level. The more our respondents were able to relate a particular invented cloning scenario to their own life-worlds, the lower the prevalence of the argument. Third, for all three groups of respondents, the scenario of having been born in one of the other groups was perceived as strange. Fourth, the aspect that our respondents disliked about cloning scenarios was the potential motives of the cloners. Without equating monozygotic twins directly with "clones", these results from "naturally" genetically identical individuals add a new dimension to what a future cloning situation could entail: The cloned person might possibly (a) perceive a close physical and emotional connection to the progenitor as a blessing; (b) suffer from preconceptions of people who regard physical likeness as a sign of incomplete individuality; and (c) perceive the idea of not having been born a clone of a particular person as unpleasant.

  3. Designing Ground Antennas for Maximum G/T: Cassegrain or Gregorian?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.

    2005-01-01

    For optimum performance, a ground antenna system must maximize the ratio of received signal to the receiving system noise power, defined as the ratio of antenna gain to system-noise temperature (G/T). The total system noise temperature is the linear combination of the receiver noise temperature (including the feed system losses) and the antenna noise contribution. Hence, for very low noise cryogenic receiver systems, antenna noise-temperature properties are very significant contributors to G/T.It is well known that, for dual reflector systems designed for maximum gain, the gain performance of the antenna system is the same for both Cassegrain and Gregorian configurations. For a12-meter antenna designed to be part of the large array based Deep Space Network, a Cassegrain configuration designed for maximum G/T at X-band was 0.7 dB higher than the equivalent Gregorian configuration. This study demonstrates that, for maximum GIT, the dual shaped Cassegrain design is always better than the Gregorian.

  4. Subunit profiling and functional characteristics of acetylcholine receptors in GT1-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yuki; Ishii, Hirotaka; Kobayashi, Makito; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2017-03-01

    GnRH neurons form a final common pathway for the central regulation of reproduction. Although the involvement of acetylcholine in GnRH secretion has been reported, direct effects of acetylcholine and expression profiles of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) still remain to be studied. Using immortalized GnRH neurons (GT1-7 cells), we analyzed molecular expression and functionality of AChRs. Expression of the mRNAs were identified in the order α7 > β2 = β1 ≧ α4 ≧ α5 = β4 = δ > α3 for nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits and m4 > m2 for muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) subtypes. Furthermore, this study revealed that α7 nAChRs contributed to Ca(2+) influx and GnRH release and that m2 and m4 mAChRs inhibited forskolin-induced cAMP production and isobutylmethylxanthine-induced GnRH secretion. These findings demonstrate the molecular profiles of AChRs, which directly contribute to GnRH secretion in GT1-7 cells, and provide one possible regulatory action of acetylcholine in GnRH neurons.

  5. Sayarim Infrasound Calibration Explosion provides first GT0 dataset for CTBTO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Yefim

    2010-05-01

    The large-scale calibration explosion of about 82 tons of HE explosives, assembled as a pyramid on the soft sediment surface, was successfully conducted by the Geophysical Institute of Israel at Sayarim Military Range on 26 August 2009. High-pressure values, measured in the range 200-600 m, were higher than predicted, whereas the created crater and seismic magnitude were smaller than expected for this on-surface charge. These results confirm that the used explosives, charge design and upward detonation provided the necessary explosion energy generation and partition: maximum of energy to the atmosphere and minimum to the ground. The high-pressure observations were utilized for estimation of the important Ground Truth parameter - TNT equivalent yield of about 0.1 kT (based on positive impulse in air-shock wave). Thus the Sayarim Explosion provided the first full GT0 source dataset for on-surface large-scale explosions, recorded by infrasound stations of International Monitoring System (IMS). Infrasound signals were well observed at distances up to 3,500 km, at numerous portable and permanent stations in Israel, Mediterranean countries and north-central Europe, including two IMS stations I26DE and I48TN and two portable arrays in Austria and Northern Italy deployed by the CTBTO team. Obtained records were used for analysis of infrasound signal propagation, source location and yield estimation, and comparison with GT0 source parameters.

  6. Alloreactive T cell clones.

    PubMed

    Fitch, F W

    1984-01-01

    T cell clones are useful models for studying lymphocyte function both at the level of the individual cell and in interacting systems. Murine cytolytic and non- cytolyic T cell clones have been obtained with relative ease, and the particular procedure used to derive and maintain T cell clones may influence profoundly the characteristics of the resulting cells. The method of choice depends on the specific question to be asked. Although some clones have characteristics that would have been expected on the basis of results observed with bulk cell populations, other clones have rather unexpected properties. Although most T cell clones appear to be either cytolytic or non-cytolytic, this distinction is not always absolute. A high proportion of both cytolytic and non-cytolytic T cell clones have dual reactivity. This is true for cells which by other criteria appear to be true clones. The frequency of such cells is high enough to suggest that most if not all T cells may have reactivity for more than one antigenic determinant or that antigenic determinants recognized by T cells are shared widely and unexpectedly. It is not clear whether one or two different antigen receptors account for such dual reactivity. The nature of the T cell receptor for antigen remains obscure. T cell clones, because of their homogeneous nature, should make it easier to answer these important immunological questions. Although it remains to be determined how many distinct molecules account for the numerous biological activities found in the culture supernatants from antigen-stimulated T cell clones, it is clear that these factors influence several different types of cells that are involved directly and indirectly in immune responses. IL-2 stimulates both cytolytic and non-cytolytic T cells to proliferate. BCSF causes polyclonal activation of B cells, and there may be other factors which influence B cell responses to antigenic stimulation. IL-3 apparently stimulates maturation of immature T cells

  7. Molecular cloning of human terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, R C; Cheung, L C; Mattaliano, R J; Chang, L M; Bollum, F J

    1984-01-01

    A cDNA of the human terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase (TdT; "terminal transferase," EC 2.7.7.31) was isolated from a human lymphoblastoid cell cDNA library in lambda gt 11 by using immunological procedures. Four inserts containing 723 to 939 base pairs were recloned in pBR322 for hybridization and preliminary sequence studies. mRNA selected by hybridization to recombinant DNA was translated to a 58-kDa peptide that specifically immunoprecipitated with rabbit antibodies to calf terminal transferase and mouse monoclonal antibody to human terminal transferase. Blot hybridization of total poly(A)+ RNA from KM3 (TdT+) cells with nick-translated pBR322 recombinant DNA detected a message of about 2000 nucleotides, sufficient to code for the 580 amino acids in the protein. mRNA from terminal transferase- cells gave no signal in hybrid selection or RNA blot hybridization. The complete sequence of the 939-base-pair insert sequence was obtained from deletions cloned in pUC8. The DNA sequence contains an open reading frame coding for 238 amino acids, about 40% of the protein. Three peptides isolated by HPLC from tryptic digests of succinylated 58-kDa calf thymus terminal transferase were sequenced, providing 20, 18, and 22 residues of peptide sequence. A search of the translated sequence of the 939-base-pair insert shows three regions beginning after arginine that have greater than 90% homology with the sequence determined from the calf thymus terminal transferase peptides. These results provide unambiguous evidence that the human terminal transferase sequence has been cloned. Images PMID:6087320

  8. Microsatellite (GT)(n) repeats and SNPs in the von Willebrand factor gene promoter do not influence circulating von Willebrand factor levels under normal conditions.

    PubMed

    Daidone, Viviana; Cattini, Maria Grazia; Pontara, Elena; Sartorello, Francesca; Gallinaro, Lisa; Marotti, Alberto; Scaroni, Carla; Pagnan, Antonio; Casonato, Alessandra

    2009-02-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels vary considerably in normal individuals, influenced by inherited and acquired modulators. ABO blood group is the major inherited determinant of VWF levels, but a role has also been attributed to the VWF gene promoter, haplotype 1 (-3268G/-2709C/-2661A/-2527G) being associated with higher VWF levels than haplotype 2 (-3268C/-2709T/-2661G/-2527A), and the polymorphic locus (GT)(n) modulating the shear stress-induced activation of the VWF promoter. We characterized the (GT)(n) of the VWF promoter in 394 healthy individuals and assessed whether its variable length influenced VWF levels in normal conditions. (GT)(n) proved highly polymorphic, with alleles from 15 to 24 repeats long. (GT)(21) and (GT)(19) were the most common variants (37.4% and 34.4%, respectively). Short GT repeats (15-19) segregated mainly with haplotype 1, long GT repeats (20-24) with haplotype 2 (p < 0.0001). The number of GT repeats did not correlate with VWF levels, nor did such levels correlate with haplotypes 1 and 2, considered alone or in association with the (GT)(n) locus. We conclude that (GT)(n) and -3268/-2709/-2661/-2527 loci are in strong linkage disequilibrium. This polymorphic region of the VWF promoter does not affect VWF levels under normal conditions, though it might represent an environmentally activable VWF regulation site.

  9. Met-ase: Cloning and distinct chromosomal location of a serine protease preferentially expressed in human natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, M.J.; Trapani, J.A. ); Sayers, T.J.; Wiltrout, T. ); Powers, J.C. )

    1993-12-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a human NK serine protease was obtained by screening a [lambda]-gt10 library from the Lopez NK leukemia with the rat natural killer Met-ase (RNK-Met-1) cDNA clone. In Northern blot analysis human Met-ase (Hu-Met-1) cDNA hybridized with a 0.9-kb mRNA in two human NK leukemia cell lines, unstimulated human PBMC, and untreated purified CD3[sup [minus

  10. Extremal quantum cloning machines

    SciTech Connect

    Chiribella, G.; D'Ariano, G. M.; Perinotti, P.; Cerf, N.J.

    2005-10-15

    We investigate the problem of cloning a set of states that is invariant under the action of an irreducible group representation. We then characterize the cloners that are extremal in the convex set of group covariant cloning machines, among which one can restrict the search for optimal cloners. For a set of states that is invariant under the discrete Weyl-Heisenberg group, we show that all extremal cloners can be unitarily realized using the so-called double-Bell states, whence providing a general proof of the popular ansatz used in the literature for finding optimal cloners in a variety of settings. Our result can also be generalized to continuous-variable optimal cloning in infinite dimensions, where the covariance group is the customary Weyl-Heisenberg group of displacement000.

  11. Correlation between MTP -493G>T polymorphism and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Wang, S J; Shi, K; Chen, D; Jia, H; Zhu, J

    2014-12-04

    Several studies have found that microsomal transfer protein (MTP) may be important in the development and progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). In this meta-analysis, we evaluated the relationships between a common polymorphism (-493G>T, rs1800591 G>T) in the MTP gene and NAFLD risk. The PubMed, CISCOM, CINAHL, Web of Science, Google Scholar, EBSCO, Cochrane Library, and CBM databases were searched for relevant articles published before October 1, 2013 without any language restrictions. Meta-analysis was conducted using the STATA 12.0 software. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) were calculated. Eleven case-control studies were included in this meta-analysis. A total of 636 NAFLD patients and 918 healthy control subjects were examined in this meta-analysis. Our results indicate that the MTP -493G/T polymorphism increases the risk of NAFLD (G allele vs T allele: OR = 1.39, 95%CI = 1.17-1.65, P < 0.001; GG + GT vs TT: OR = 1.46, 95%CI = 1.02-2.09, P = 0.038, respectively). Subgroup analyses indicated that the MTP -493G/T polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of NAFLD in population-based, hospital-based, polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), and large sample-size subgroups under the allele and dominant models (all P < 0.05). However, we found no association between non-PCR-RFLP polymorphism and small sample-size subgroups (all P > 0.05). Our findings indicate that the MTP -493G/ T polymorphism may contribute to the development of NAFLD. Thus, the MTP -493G/T polymorphism may be a biomarker for the early detection of NAFLD.

  12. To clone alone: the United Nations' Human Cloning Declaration.

    PubMed

    Isasi, Rosario M; Annas, George J

    2006-01-01

    The United Nations labored for almost four years to create a treaty governing human cloning. In 2005 that effort was abandoned, and instead the United Nations' General Assembly adopted a "Declaration on Human Cloning".

  13. Secure the Clones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Thomas; Kirchner, Florent; Pichardie, David

    Exchanging mutable data objects with untrusted code is a delicate matter because of the risk of creating a data space that is accessible by an attacker. Consequently, secure programming guidelines for Java stress the importance of using defensive copying before accepting or handing out references to an internal mutable object. However, implementation of a copy method (like clone()) is entirely left to the programmer. It may not provide a sufficiently deep copy of an object and is subject to overriding by a malicious sub-class. Currently no language-based mechanism supports secure object cloning. This paper proposes a type-based annotation system for defining modular copy policies for class-based object-oriented programs. A copy policy specifies the maximally allowed sharing between an object and its clone. We present a static enforcement mechanism that will guarantee that all classes fulfill their copy policy, even in the presence of overriding of copy methods, and establish the semantic correctness of the overall approach in Coq. The mechanism has been implemented and experimentally evaluated on clone methods from several Java libraries.

  14. Applications of quantum cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomarico, E.; Sanguinetti, B.; Sekatski, P.; Zbinden, H.; Gisin, N.

    2011-10-01

    Quantum Cloning Machines (QCMs) allow for the copying of information, within the limits imposed by quantum mechanics. These devices are particularly interesting in the high-gain regime, i.e., when one input qubit generates a state of many output qubits. In this regime, they allow for the study of certain aspects of the quantum to classical transition. The understanding of these aspects is the root of the two recent applications that we will review in this paper: the first one is the Quantum Cloning Radiometer, a device which is able to produce an absolute measure of spectral radiance. This device exploits the fact that in the quantum regime information can be copied with only finite fidelity, whereas when a state becomes macroscopic, this fidelity gradually increases to 1. Measuring the fidelity of the cloning operation then allows to precisely determine the absolute spectral radiance of the input optical source. We will then discuss whether a Quantum Cloning Machine could be used to produce a state visible by the naked human eye, and the possibility of a Bell Experiment with humans playing the role of detectors.

  15. The Cloning of America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, Judith E.; Dobson, Russell L.

    1981-01-01

    Proposes that the U.S. school system purports to prize human variability, but many educators are engaged in activities that seek to homogenize students. Describes these activities, including diagnosis, labeling, ability grouping, and positive reinforcement. Presents suggestions for counselors to combat sources of cloning and self-validation. (RC)

  16. The First Human Cloned Embryo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cibelli, Jose B.; Lanza, Robert P.; West, Michael D.; Ezzell, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes a process known as parthenogenesis which produces cloned, early-stage embryos and human embryos generated only from eggs. Speculates that this technology puts therapeutic cloning within reach. (DDR)

  17. [Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Ming; Lei, An-Min; Hua, Jin-Lian; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning have widespread and attractive prospects in animal agriculture and biomedical applications. We reviewed that the quality of oocytes and nuclear reprogramming of somatic donor cells were the main reasons of the common abnormalities in cloned animals and the low efficiency of cloning and showed the problems and outlets in therapeutic cloning, such as some basic problems in nuclear transfer affected clinical applications of therapeutic cloning. Study on isolation and culture of nuclear transfer embryonic stem (ntES) cells and specific differentiation of ntES cells into important functional cells should be emphasized and could enhance the efficiency. Adult stem cells could help to cure some great diseases, but could not replace therapeutic cloning. Ethics also impeded the development of therapeutic cloning. It is necessary to improve many techniques and reinforce the research of some basic theories, then somatic nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning may apply to agriculture reproduction and benefit to human life better.

  18. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  19. Integration of a wave rotor to an ultra-micro gas turbine (UmuGT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iancu, Florin

    2005-12-01

    Wave rotor technology has shown a significant potential for performance improvement of thermodynamic cycles. The wave rotor is an unsteady flow machine that utilizes shock waves to transfer energy from a high energy fluid to a low energy fluid, increasing both the temperature and the pressure of the low energy fluid. Used initially as a high pressure stage for a gas turbine locomotive engine, the wave rotor was commercialized only as a supercharging device for internal combustion engines, but recently there is a stronger research effort on implementing wave rotors as topping units or pressure gain combustors for gas turbines. At the same time, Ultra Micro Gas Turbines (UmuGT) are expected to be a next generation of power source for applications from propulsion to power generation, from aerospace industry to electronic industry. Starting in 1995, with the MIT "Micro Gas Turbine" project, the mechanical engineering research world has explored more and more the idea of "Power MEMS". Microfabricated turbomachinery like turbines, compressors, pumps, but also electric generators, heat exchangers, internal combustion engines and rocket engines have been on the focus list of researchers for the past 10 years. The reason is simple: the output power is proportional to the mass flow rate of the working fluid through the engine, or the cross-sectional area while the mass or volume of the engine is proportional to the cube of the characteristic length, thus the power density tends to increase at small scales (Power/Mass=L -1). This is the so-called "cube square law". This work investigates the possibilities of incorporating a wave rotor to an UmuGT and discusses the advantages of wave rotor as topping units for gas turbines, especially at microscale. Based on documented wave rotor efficiencies at larger scale and subsidized by both, a gasdynamic model that includes wall friction, and a CFD model, the wave rotor compression efficiency at microfabrication scale could be estimated

  20. Water relations of populus clones

    SciTech Connect

    Pallardy, S.G.; Kozlowski, T.T.

    1981-02-01

    Stomatal aperture and water balance in the field of eight Populus clones varying in growth rate were closely related to environmental factors and clonal differences were clearly expressed. Leaf water potential (psi) was influenced by solar radiation, leaf conductance, evaporative demand, and soil moisture content. The effects of soil moisture on psi were greatly modified by atmospheric conditions and stomatal conductance. Several slow-growing clones exhibited extended periods of psi below that of rapidly growing clones, despite high evaporative demand and the much greater transpiring surfaces of the fast-growing clones. Stomata of all clones responded to changes in light intensity and vapor pressure gradient (VPG). Pronounced stomatal sensitivity to VPG of two rapidly growing clones of common parentage, and the resultant capacity of these clones to moderate water deficits under high evaporative demand, were associated with drought resistance in one of the parents. Seasonal maximum leaf conductance was positively related to growth in several clones, suggesting that rapidly growing clones possess the capacity to carry on higher rates of gas exchange under favorable conditions. Analysis of changes in psi with changes in transpirational flux density (TFD) showed that for four clones, psi change per unit change in TFD decreased as TFD increased, indicating plant adaptation for prevention of damaging psi even at high TFD. More rapidly growing clones exhibited a larger initial rate of decline in psi with TFD, but reduced the rate of decline more than slow-growing clones as TFD increased. (Refs. 41).

  1. Cloning Components of Human Telomerase.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    nuclear factor NF90 homolog. (5 clones). RNA binding protein. Poorly understood. 3. FRG1 . Poorly understood. 4. DEK. Weak homology to Tetrahymena p95...least some of the clones for poorly understood genes (e.g. Hax-1, FRG1 , NF90, NF45, KIAA0098, KIAA0026, BAC397c4). Aim II. Functional Cloning of the

  2. DNMT3B 579G>T promoter polymorphism and the risk for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haifeng; Du, Weiting; Gu, Dongsheng; Wang, Donghai; Xue, Feng; Ge, Jing; Sui, Tao; Yang, Renchi

    2009-01-01

    Epigenetics may influence the expression of numerous genes, which might contribute to autoimmune diseases. DNA methylation is mediated by DNA methyltransferases, especially DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B). Polymorphisms of the DNMT3B gene may influence DNMT3B activity on DNA methylation and increase the susceptibility to several diseases. The current study investigated the association between DNMT3B 579G>T and the risk for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The DNMT3B 579G>T polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-RFLP. There was no significant difference in genotype and allele distribution between the ITP patient and the controls (p = 0.722 and 0.667, respectively). Similar results were observed between the 2 groups when stratified by age and disease course, including acute in childhood, chronic in childhood, acute in adult and chronic in adult. Importantly, this study showed a statistical difference in the distribution of SNP of DNMT3B between Chinese and Koreans or Americans. It is shown that the SNP of DNMT3B 579G>T may not be used on its own as a marker to predict the susceptibility to ITP in a Chinese population and that DNMT3B 579G>T promoter SNP varies from one ethnic population to another.

  3. GT microsatellite repeats in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm in Croatian patients.

    PubMed

    Gregorek, Andrea Crkvenac; Gornik, Kristina Crkvenac; Polancec, Darija Stupin; Dabelic, Sanja

    2013-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex genetic disorder caused by the interplay of genetic and environmental risk factors. The number of (GT)(n) repeats in the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene promoter modulates transcription of this enzyme, which might have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiapoptotic, and antiproliferative effect. The distribution of alleles and genotypes in Croatian individuals genotyped for the (GT)(n) HO-1 polymorphism was similar to that in other European populations. Frequency of the short (S) alleles (GT < 25) was higher in AAA patients (41.9%) than in non-AAA individuals (28.2%, p = 0.0026) because there were more SL heterozygotes among the AAA patients. The SL genotype appeared to increase the risk for AAA, but the increase was not statistically significant after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia (OR = 1.53, 95% CI 0.90-3.09, p = 0.062). These findings contradict those of the only other study performed so far on the association of (GT)(n) HO-1 polymorphism and AAA.

  4. Validation of the Actigraph GT3X and ActivPAL Accelerometers for the Assessment of Sedentary Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Youngdeok; Barry, Vaughn W.; Kang, Minsoo

    2015-01-01

    This study examined (a) the validity of two accelerometers (ActiGraph GT3X [ActiGraph LLC, Pensacola, FL, USA] and activPAL [PAL Technologies Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland]) for the assessment of sedentary behavior; and (b) the variations in assessment accuracy by setting minimum sedentary bout durations against a proxy for direct observation using an…

  5. MTP -493G/T gene polymorphism is associated with steatosis in hepatitis C-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, E R F; Oliveira, C P M S; Correa-Giannella, M L; Stefano, J T; Cavaleiro, A M; Fortes, M A H Z; Muniz, M T C; Silva, F S; Pereira, L M M B; Carrilho, F J

    2012-01-01

    The reduction of hepatic microsomal transfer protein (MTP) activity results in fatty liver, worsening hepatic steatosis and fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C (CHC). The G allele of the MTP gene promoter, -493G/T, has been associated with lower transcriptional activity than the T allele. We investigated this association with metabolic and histological variables in patients with CHC. A total of 174 untreated patients with CHC were genotyped for MTP -493G/T by direct sequencing using PCR. All patients were negative for markers of Wilson's disease, hemochromatosis and autoimmune diseases and had current and past daily alcohol intake lower than 100 g/week. The sample distribution was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Among subjects with genotype 1, 56.8% of the patients with fibrosis grade 3+4 presented at least one G allele versus 34.3% of the patients with fibrosis grade 1+2 (OR = 1.8; 95%CI = 1.3-2.3). Logistic regression analysis with steatosis as the dependent variable identified genotypes GG+GT as independent protective factors against steatosis (OR = 0.4, 95%CI = 0.2-0.8; P = 0.01). The results suggest that the presence of the G allele of MTP -493G/T associated with lower hepatic MTP expression protects against steatosis in our CHC patients.

  6. Susceptibility of GT1-7 cells to mouse-passaged field scrapie isolates with a long incubation.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Okada, Hiroyuki; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Masujin, Kentaro; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    A typical feature of scrapie in sheep and goats is the accumulation of disease-associated prion protein. Scrapie consists of many strains with different biological properties. Nine natural sheep scrapie cases were transmitted to wild-type mice and mouse-passaged isolates were classified into 2 types based on incubation time: short and long. These 2 types displayed a distinct difference in their pathology. We attempted to transmit these mouse-passaged isolates to 2 murine cell lines (GT1-7 and L929) to compare their properties. All of the isolates were transmitted to L929 cells. However, only mouse-passaged field isolates with a long incubation time were transmitted to GT1-7 cells. This specific susceptibility of GT1-7 cells was also confirmed with a primary-passaged isolate that was not completely adapted to the new host species. Characterization of the mechanisms of the specific susceptibility of GT1-7 cells to isolates with a long incubation time may lead to a greater understanding of the differences among prion strains.

  7. Genetic mapping and QTL analysis of disease resistance traits in peanut population Tifrunner x GT-C20

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genetic map of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) with 426 SSR markers was constructed using a population of 162 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from a cross between ‘Tifrunner’ and ‘GT-C20’. Linkage groups (LGs) were assigned to chromosomes using published peanut reference maps. The total length of the...

  8. The Arabidopsis Family GT43 Glycosyltransferases Form Two Functionally Nonredundant Groups Essential for the Elongation of Glucuronoxylan Backbone

    EPA Science Inventory

    There exist four members of family GT43 glycosyltransferases in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome, and mutations of two of them, IRX9 and IRX14, have previously been shown to cause a defect in glucuronoxylan (GX) biosynthesis. However, it is currently unknown whether ...

  9. Three concepts of cloning in human beings.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ke-Hui

    2005-07-01

    Human cloning, organ cloning and tissue cloning are various types of cloning that occur at different levels with different methodologies. According to three standards of terminology for an embryo (fertilization through germ cells, development in the uterus and having the potential to produce a human life), tissue cloning and type I organ cloning will not produce an embryo. In contrast, human cloning and type II organ cloning will produce an embryo. Thus, only non-germinal tissue cloning and type I organ cloning are beyond the ethical question and will not change human beings as a species. Using cloned tissues to make new tissues or organs is promising for the future of medicine.

  10. FEN1 −69G>A and +4150G>T polymorphisms and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Maryam; Hashemi, Mohammad; Sanaei, Sara; Mashhadi, Mohammad Ali; Hashemi, Seyed Mehdi; Bahari, Gholamreza; Taheri, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), a DNA repair protein, is important in preventing carcinogenesis. Two functional germ line variants −69G>A (rs174538) and +4150G>T (rs4246215) in the FEN1 gene have been associated with risk of various types of cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible impact of FEN1 polymorphisms on risk of breast cancer (BC) in a sample of Iranian subjects. The FEN1 −69G>A and +4150G>T polymorphisms were analyzed in a case-control study that included 266 BC patients and 225 healthy females. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to genotype the variants. The findings demonstrated that the FEN1 −69G>A and +4150G>T polymorphisms were not associated with BC risk in co-dominant, dominant and recessive inheritance models. The findings indicated that GG/GT, GA/GG and GA/TT genotypes significantly decreased the risk of BC when compared with −69GG/+4150GG. Furthermore, haplotype analysis indicated that −69G/+4150T as well as −69A/+4150G significantly decreased the risk of BC compared with −69G/+4150G. Thus, these findings demonstrated that haplotypes of FEN1 −69G>A and +4150G>T polymorphisms decreased the risk of BC in an Iranian population. Further studies with larger sample sizes and different ethnicities are required to validate the present findings. PMID:27699013

  11. The FSHB -211G>T variant attenuates serum FSH levels in the supraphysiological gonadotropin setting of Klinefelter syndrome.

    PubMed

    Busch, Alexander S; Tüttelmann, Frank; Zitzmann, Michael; Kliesch, Sabine; Gromoll, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (47, XXY) is the most frequent genetic cause of male infertility and individuals share the endocrine hallmark of hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms located within the FSHB/FSHR gene were recently shown to impact serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels and other reproductive parameters in men. The objective of this study was to analyse the effect of FSHB-211G>T (c.-280G>T, rs10835638) as well as FSHR c.2039G>A (rs6166) and FSHR c.-29G>A (rs1394205) on endocrine and reproductive parameters in untreated and testosterone-treated Klinefelter patients. Patients were retrospectively selected from the clientele attending a university-based andrology centre. A total of 309 non-mosaic Klinefelter individuals between 18 and 65 years were included and genotyped for the variants by TaqMan assays. The untreated group comprised 248 men, in which the FSHB -211G>T allele was significantly associated with the reduced serum follicle-stimulating hormone levels (-6.5 U/l per T allele, P=1.3 × 10(-3)). Testosterone treatment (n=150) abolished the observed association. When analysing patients before and under testosterone treatment (n=89), gonadotropin levels were similarly suppressed independently of the FSHB genotype. The FSHR polymorphisms did not exhibit any significant influence in any group, neither on the endocrine nor reproductive parameters. In conclusion, a hypergonadotropic setting such as Klinefelter syndrome does not mask the FSHB -211G>T genotype effects on the follicle-stimulating hormone serum levels. The impact was indeed more pronounced compared with normal or infertile men, whereas gonadotropin suppression under testosterone treatment seems to be independent of the genotype. Thus, the FSHB -211G>T genotype is a key determinant in the regulation of gonadotropins in different reproductive-endocrine pathopyhsiologies.

  12. Identification and in silico characterization of soybean trihelix-GT and bHLH transcription factors involved in stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Marina Borges; Bücker-Neto, Lauro; Castilhos, Graciela; Turchetto-Zolet, Andreia Carina; Wiebke-Strohm, Beatriz; Bodanese-Zanettini, Maria Helena; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia

    2012-01-01

    Environmental stresses caused by either abiotic or biotic factors greatly affect agriculture. As for soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merril], one of the most important crop species in the world, the situation is not different. In order to deal with these stresses, plants have evolved a variety of sophisticated molecular mechanisms, to which the transcriptional regulation of target-genes by transcription factors is crucial. Even though the involvement of several transcription factor families has been widely reported in stress response, there still is a lot to be uncovered, especially in soybean. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the role of bHLH and trihelix-GT transcription factors in soybean responses to environmental stresses. Gene annotation, data mining for stress response, and phylogenetic analysis of members from both families are presented herein. At least 45 bHLH (from subgroup 25) and 63 trihelix-GT putative genes reside in the soybean genome. Among them, at least 14 bHLH and 11 trihelix-GT seem to be involved in responses to abiotic/biotic stresses. Phylogenetic analysis successfully clustered these with members from other plant species. Nevertheless, bHLH and trihelix-GT genes encompass almost three times more members in soybean than in Arabidopsis or rice, with many of these grouping into new clades with no apparent near orthologs in the other analyzed species. Our results represent an important step towards unraveling the functional roles of plant bHLH and trihelix-GT transcription factors in response to environmental cues. PMID:22802709

  13. Single-level optimization of a hybrid SOFC-GT power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calise, F.; Dentice d'Accadia, M.; Vanoli, L.; von Spakovsky, M. R.

    The detailed synthesis/design optimization of a hybrid solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine (SOFC-GT) power plant is presented in this paper. In the first part of the paper, the bulk-flow model used to simulate the plant is discussed. The performance of the centrifugal compressors and radial turbine is determined using maps, properly scaled in order to match the values required for mass flow rate and pressure ratio. Compact heat exchangers are simulated using Colburn and friction factor correlations. For the SOFC, the cell voltage versus current density curves (i.e. polarization curves) are generated on the basis of the Nernst potential and overvoltages. Validation of the SOFC polarization curves is accomplished with data available from Siemens Westinghouse. Both the steam-methane pre-reforming and internal reforming processes are modeled assuming the water-gas shift reaction to be equilibrium-controlled and the demethanization reactions to be kinetically controlled. Finally, a thermoeconomic model is developed by introducing capital cost functions for each plant component. The whole plant is first simulated for a fixed configuration. Then, a synthesis/design optimization of the plant is carried out using a traditional single-level approach. The results of the optimization are presented and discussed.

  14. Probabilistic cloning of equidistant states

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, O.; Roa, Luis; Delgado, A.

    2010-08-15

    We study the probabilistic cloning of equidistant states. These states are such that the inner product between them is a complex constant or its conjugate. Thereby, it is possible to study their cloning in a simple way. In particular, we are interested in the behavior of the cloning probability as a function of the phase of the overlap among the involved states. We show that for certain families of equidistant states Duan and Guo's cloning machine leads to cloning probabilities lower than the optimal unambiguous discrimination probability of equidistant states. We propose an alternative cloning machine whose cloning probability is higher than or equal to the optimal unambiguous discrimination probability for any family of equidistant states. Both machines achieve the same probability for equidistant states whose inner product is a positive real number.

  15. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism's chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  16. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  17. Comparison of GT3X accelerometer and Yamax pedometer steps/day in a free-living sample of overweight and obese adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to compare steps/day detected by the YAMAX SW-200 pedometer versus the Actigraph GT3X accelerometer in free-living adults. Daily YAMAX and GT3X steps were collected from a sample of 23 overweight and obese participants (78% female; age = 52.6 +/- 8.4 yr.; BMI = 31.0 +/-...

  18. Isolation of cDNA clones for differentially expressed genes of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A H; Blanton, R; Rottman, F; Maurer, R; Mahmoud, A

    1986-01-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms that control transformations during the life cycle of Schistosoma mansoni. To enable isolation of DNA sequences encoding developmentally regulated antigens a cDNA expression library in the vector lambda gt11 amp3 was constructed from adult mRNA and immunologically screened with sera from infected individuals. We report here on the properties of three recombinant clones that derive from developmentally regulated genes. Clone 10-3 encoded a beta-galactosidase fusion protein present in high abundance in infected Escherichia coli. Clones 7-2 and 8-2 also produced immunologically recognized proteins; however, the peptides did not appear to be beta-galactosidase fusion proteins. The expression of mRNAs hybridizing to these cDNAs was examined in the different stages of the parasite life cycle. Messenger RNA corresponding to clone 10-3, approximately equal to 1000 bases in length, was present in higher abundance in male worms than in females but was not detected in schistosome eggs. A 900-base mRNA hybridizing to clone 7-2 was observed in adult worms and eggs. Both clone 10-3 and clone 7-2 hybridized to smaller mRNAs in cercariae and freshly transformed schistosomula than in adult worms. Clone 8-2 contained tandem cDNA inserts. One cDNA hybridized to a 1700-base mRNA present in all stages, while the second hybridized to an 800-base mRNA specific to adult female worms. Images PMID:3461448

  19. A Novel Missense Mutation 224G>T (R75M) in SRY Coding Region Interferes with Nuclear Import and Results in 46, XY Complete Gonadal Dysgenesis

    PubMed Central

    He, Shanshan; Zhang, Tengfei; Yin, Chenxing; Chen, Yunping; Zheng, Shuqi; Zhang, Jixia; Li, Lin

    2016-01-01

    SRY-mutation-caused sex reversal is a rare disease and mostly associated with a de novo mutation since the patients with defective SRY is infertile. There are many reports about SRY-mutation associated 46, XY ovarian disorder of sex development (DSD), but few described their molecular mechanism. Here we report a de novo mutation 224G>T (R75M) in SRY associated with a phenotypic female, 46, XY karyotype and dysgerminoma. The wild and mutated SRY were cloned into recombinant plasmid and expressed in cells in vitro, the result showed the mutated SRY is greatly accumulated in cytoplasm while the wild type SRY is mostly localized in nucleus. To make sure no other genes were involved, we performed the trio-based whole exome sequencing using the DNA samples from the proband and the parents, and no mutations were identified especially in DHH, NR0B1, NR5A1, SOX9 and MAP3K1, indicating the de novo mutation in SRY is the single defect responsible for the female sex reversal. We also used bioinformatics simulation analysis to predict impact of the mutation on SRY function, and find the R75 in wild type SRY can form a hydrogen bond with serine at 91 (S91) that make the SRY protein well fit into the minor groove of target DNA, while the M75 in the mutated SRY can’t. Finally, we reviewed SRY mutations based on the available references and analyzed the mutation distribution patterns according to density and continuity, which may be useful for further study of the SRY structure, function, and its relatedness with DSD. PMID:28030592

  20. A Novel Missense Mutation 224G>T (R75M) in SRY Coding Region Interferes with Nuclear Import and Results in 46, XY Complete Gonadal Dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wufang; Wang, Bei; He, Shanshan; Zhang, Tengfei; Yin, Chenxing; Chen, Yunping; Zheng, Shuqi; Zhang, Jixia; Li, Lin

    2016-01-01

    SRY-mutation-caused sex reversal is a rare disease and mostly associated with a de novo mutation since the patients with defective SRY is infertile. There are many reports about SRY-mutation associated 46, XY ovarian disorder of sex development (DSD), but few described their molecular mechanism. Here we report a de novo mutation 224G>T (R75M) in SRY associated with a phenotypic female, 46, XY karyotype and dysgerminoma. The wild and mutated SRY were cloned into recombinant plasmid and expressed in cells in vitro, the result showed the mutated SRY is greatly accumulated in cytoplasm while the wild type SRY is mostly localized in nucleus. To make sure no other genes were involved, we performed the trio-based whole exome sequencing using the DNA samples from the proband and the parents, and no mutations were identified especially in DHH, NR0B1, NR5A1, SOX9 and MAP3K1, indicating the de novo mutation in SRY is the single defect responsible for the female sex reversal. We also used bioinformatics simulation analysis to predict impact of the mutation on SRY function, and find the R75 in wild type SRY can form a hydrogen bond with serine at 91 (S91) that make the SRY protein well fit into the minor groove of target DNA, while the M75 in the mutated SRY can't. Finally, we reviewed SRY mutations based on the available references and analyzed the mutation distribution patterns according to density and continuity, which may be useful for further study of the SRY structure, function, and its relatedness with DSD.

  1. To clone or not to clone--a Jewish perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Lipschutz, J H

    1999-01-01

    Many new reproductive methods such as artificial insemination, in vitro fertilisation, freezing of human embryos, and surrogate motherhood were at first widely condemned but are now seen in Western society as not just ethically and morally acceptable, but beneficial in that they allow otherwise infertile couples to have children. The idea of human cloning was also quickly condemned but debate is now emerging. This article examines cloning from a Jewish perspective and finds evidence to support the view that there is nothing inherently wrong with the idea of human cloning. A hypothesis is also advanced suggesting that even if a body was cloned, the brain, which is the essence of humanity, would remain unique. This author suggests that the debate should be changed from "Is cloning wrong?" to "When is cloning wrong?". PMID:10226913

  2. Biocompatibility studies of natural rubber latex from different tree clones and collection methods.

    PubMed

    Floriano, Juliana Ferreira; da Mota, Lígia Souza Lima Silveira; Furtado, Edson Luiz; Rossetto, Victor José Vieira; Graeff, Carlos F O

    2014-02-01

    Natural rubber latex (NRL) has several features that make it an excellent biomaterial to promote the growth and repair of tissues, skin and bones. Most of the research with NRL membranes uses a mixture of different clones and chemical preservatives in the collection process. In this study, we compared five clones that produce NRL, seeking to identify their differences in biocompatibility. The clones studied were RRIM 600, PB 235, GT1, PR 255 and IAN 873 commonly found in plantations in Brazil. We did also study the effect of ammonia used during latex collection. NRL membranes were prepared aseptically and sterilized. In the in vitro tests, the membranes remained in direct contact with mouse fibroblasts cells for three periods, 24, 48 and 72 h. In the in vivo tests, the membranes were implanted subcutaneously in rabbits. The results indicated the biocompatibility of the membranes obtained from all clones. Membranes from the clones RRIM 600 and IAN 873 induced greater cell proliferation, suggesting greater bioactivity. It was found that the membranes made from latex that was in contact with ammonia during collection, showed cytotoxic and genotoxic effects in cultures, as well as necrosis, and increased inflammatory cells in the rabbit's tissues close to the implant.

  3. Ethical issues in animal cloning.

    PubMed

    Fiester, Autumn

    2005-01-01

    The issue of human reproductive cloning has recently received a great deal attention in public discourse. Bioethicists, policy makers, and the media have been quick to identify the key ethical issues involved in human reproductive cloning and to argue, almost unanimously, for an international ban on such attempts. Meanwhile, scientists have proceeded with extensive research agendas in the cloning of animals. Despite this research, there has been little public discussion of the ethical issues raised by animal cloning projects. Polling data show that the public is decidedly against the cloning of animals. To understand the public's reaction and fill the void of reasoned debate about the issue, we need to review the possible objections to animal cloning and assess the merits of the anti-animal cloning stance. Some objections to animal cloning (e.g., the impact of cloning on the population of unwanted animals) can be easily addressed, while others (e.g., the health of cloned animals) require more serious attention by the public and policy makers.

  4. Unique motifs identify PIG-A proteins from glycosyltransferases of the GT4 family

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background The first step of GPI anchor biosynthesis is catalyzed by PIG-A, an enzyme that transfers N-acetylglucosamine from UDP-N-acetylglucosamine to phosphatidylinositol. This protein is present in all eukaryotic organisms ranging from protozoa to higher mammals, as part of a larger complex of five to six 'accessory' proteins whose individual roles in the glycosyltransferase reaction are as yet unclear. The PIG-A gene has been shown to be an essential gene in various eukaryotes. In humans, mutations in the protein have been associated with paroxysomal noctural hemoglobuinuria. The corresponding PIG-A gene has also been recently identified in the genome of many archaeabacteria although genes of the accessory proteins have not been discovered in them. The present study explores the evolution of PIG-A and the phylogenetic relationship between this protein and other glycosyltransferases. Results In this paper we show that out of the twelve conserved motifs identified by us eleven are exclusively present in PIG-A and, therefore, can be used as markers to identify PIG-A from newly sequenced genomes. Three of these motifs are absent in the primitive eukaryote, G. lamblia. Sequence analyses show that seven of these conserved motifs are present in prokaryote and archaeal counterparts in rudimentary forms and can be used to differentiate PIG-A proteins from glycosyltransferases. Using partial least square regression analysis and data involving presence or absence of motifs in a range of PIG-A and glycosyltransferases we show that (i) PIG-A may have evolved from prokaryotic glycosyltransferases and lipopolysaccharide synthases, members of the GT4 family of glycosyltransferases and (ii) it is possible to uniquely classify PIG-A proteins versus glycosyltransferases. Conclusion Besides identifying unique motifs and showing that PIG-A protein from G. lamblia and some putative PIG-A proteins from archaebacteria are evolutionarily closer to glycosyltransferases, these studies

  5. To clone or not to clone--whither the law?

    PubMed

    Lupton, M L

    1999-01-01

    The cloning of Dolly the lamb from adult cells by scientists at the Roslin Laboratories near Edinburgh in February 1997 has startled the world because it now opens the way to clone adult human beings. The reaction to Ian Wilmut's breakthrough has been instant and largely negative. Bills were rushed into both the US Senate and House of Representatives aimed at banning the cloning of human beings. Human cloning is premature at this stage, but there are many positive spin-offs of cloning in the field of genetic engineering, such as the production of human proteins such as blood clotting factors which aid in healing wounds. Progress by means of cloning can also be made into devising a cure for Parkinson's Disease amongst others. No lesser ethicist than John C. Fletcher of the University of Virginia foresees circumstances in which human cloning is acceptable e.g. to enable a couple to replace a dying child, to enable a couple, one of whom is infertile, to clone a child from either partner. Extensive regulation of cloning by the law is inevitable but, in doing so, the legislation should be careful not to outlaw research in this area which could be beneficial to mankind.

  6. Cloning and characterization of the aroA gene from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Garbe, T; Jones, C; Charles, I; Dougan, G; Young, D

    1990-01-01

    The aroA gene from Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been cloned by complementation of an aroA mutant of Escherichia coli after lysogenization with a recombinant DNA library in the lambda gt11 vector. Detailed characterization of the M. tuberculosis aroA gene by nucleotide sequencing and by immunochemical analysis of the expressed product indicates that it encodes a 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase that is structurally related to analogous enzymes from other bacterial, fungal, and plant sources. The potential use of the cloned gene in construction of genetically defined mutant strains of M. tuberculosis by gene replacement is proposed as a novel approach to the rational attenuation of mycobacterial pathogens and the possible development of new antimycobacterial vaccines. Images PMID:2123856

  7. Lessons learned from cloning dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, M J; Oh, H J; Kim, G A; Park, J E; Park, E J; Jang, G; Ra, J C; Kang, S K; Lee, B C

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this article is to review dog cloning research and to suggest its applications based on a discussion about the normality of cloned dogs. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was successfully used for production of viable cloned puppies despite limited understanding of in vitro dog embryo production. Cloned dogs have similar growth characteristics to those born from natural fertilization, with no evidence of serious adverse effects. The offspring of cloned dogs also have similar growth performance and health to those of naturally bred puppies. Therefore, cloning in domestic dogs can be applied as an assisted reproductive technique to conserve endangered species, to treat sterile canids or aged dogs, to improve reproductive performance of valuable individuals and to generate disease model animals.

  8. Therapeutic cloning and reproductive liberty.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Robert

    2009-04-01

    Concern for "reproductive liberty" suggests that decisions about embryos should normally be made by the persons who would be the genetic parents of the child that would be brought into existence if the embryo were brought to term. Therapeutic cloning would involve creating and destroying an embryo, which, if brought to term, would be the offspring of the genetic parents of the person undergoing therapy. I argue that central arguments in debates about parenthood and genetics therefore suggest that therapeutic cloning would be prima facie unethical unless it occurred with the consent of the parents of the person being cloned. Alternatively, if therapeutic cloning is thought to be legitimate, this undermines the case for some uses of reproductive cloning by implying that the genetic relation it establishes between clones and DNA donors does not carry the same moral weight as it does in cases of normal reproduction.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Kluyvera intestini Strain GT-16 Isolated from the Stomach of a Patient with Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tetz, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the novel, non-spore-forming Kluyvera intestini strain GT-16, isolated from the stomach of a patient with gastric cancer. The genome is 5,868,299 bp in length with a G+C content of 53.0%. It possesses 5,350 predicted protein-coding genes encoding virulence factors and antibiotic resistance proteins. PMID:28007864

  10. Scrapie protein degradation by cysteine proteases in CD11c+ dendritic cells and GT1-1 neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Luhr, Katarina M; Nordström, Elin K; Löw, Peter; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Taraboulos, Albert; Kristensson, Krister

    2004-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) of the CD11c(+) myeloid phenotype have been implicated in the spread of scrapie in the host. Previously, we have shown that CD11c(+) DC can cause a rapid degradation of proteinase K-resistant prion proteins (PrP(Sc)) in vitro, indicating a possible role of these cells in the clearance of PrP(Sc). To determine the mechanisms of PrP(Sc) degradation, CD11c(+) DC that had been exposed to PrP(Sc) derived from a neuronal cell line (GT1-1) infected with scrapie (ScGT1-1) were treated with a battery of protease inhibitors. Following treatment with the cysteine protease inhibitors (2S,3S)-trans-epoxysuccinyl-L-leucylamido-3-methylbutane (E-64c), its ethyl ester (E-64d), and leupeptin, the degradation of PrP(Sc) was inhibited, while inhibitors of serine and aspartic and metalloproteases (aprotinin, pepstatin, and phosphoramidon) had no effect. An endogenous degradation of PrP(Sc) in ScGT1-1 cells was revealed by inhibiting the expression of cellular PrP (PrP(C)) by RNA interference, and this degradation could also be inhibited by the cysteine protease inhibitors. Our data show that PrP(Sc) is proteolytically cleaved preferentially by cysteine proteases in both CD11c(+) DC and ScGT1-1 cells and that the degradation of PrP(Sc) by proteases is different from that of PrP(C). Interference by protease inhibitors with DC-induced processing of PrP(Sc) has the potential to modify prion spread, clearance, and immunization in a host.

  11. Molecular Cloning of Adenosinediphosphoribosyl Transferase.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-08

    ACCESSION NO.D,. 03261102F 2312 A~5 11. TITLE (include Securqt Classification) 0 Molecular Cloning of Adenosinediphosphoribosyl Transferase 12. PERSONAL...I’:- AFOSR.Tlt. 8 7 - 0 9 8,2 0IL * pi AFOSR- 85 -0377 PROGRESS REPORT Molecular Cloning of Adenosinediphosphoribosyl Transferase 5." Period of...Pharmacology and the Cardiovascular Research Institute September 8, 1987 .’, 5.’- "’S ". -f, AFOSR - 85 -0377 PROGRESS REPORT Molecular Cloning of

  12. Thermo-economic comparative analysis of gas turbine GT10 integrated with air and steam bottoming cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaja, Daniel; Chmielnak, Tadeusz; Lepszy, Sebastian

    2014-12-01

    A thermodynamic and economic analysis of a GT10 gas turbine integrated with the air bottoming cycle is presented. The results are compared to commercially available combined cycle power plants based on the same gas turbine. The systems under analysis have a better chance of competing with steam bottoming cycle configurations in a small range of the power output capacity. The aim of the calculations is to determine the final cost of electricity generated by the gas turbine air bottoming cycle based on a 25 MW GT10 gas turbine with the exhaust gas mass flow rate of about 80 kg/s. The article shows the results of thermodynamic optimization of the selection of the technological structure of gas turbine air bottoming cycle and of a comparative economic analysis. Quantities are determined that have a decisive impact on the considered units profitability and competitiveness compared to the popular technology based on the steam bottoming cycle. The ultimate quantity that can be compared in the calculations is the cost of 1 MWh of electricity. It should be noted that the systems analyzed herein are power plants where electricity is the only generated product. The performed calculations do not take account of any other (potential) revenues from the sale of energy origin certificates. Keywords: Gas turbine air bottoming cycle, Air bottoming cycle, Gas turbine, GT10

  13. Reduction of Hexavalent Chromium by Green Tea Polyphenols and Green Tea Nano Zero-Valent Iron (GT-nZVI).

    PubMed

    Chrysochoou, M; Reeves, K

    2017-03-01

    This study reports on the direct reduction of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] by green tea polyphenols, including a green tea solution and pure epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) solution. A linear trend was observed between the amount of reduced Cr(VI) and the amount of added polyphenols. The green tea solution showed a continued decrease in the observed stoichiometry with increasing pH, from a maximum of 1.4 mol per gallic acid equivalent (GAE) of green tea at pH 2.5, to 0.2 mol/GAE at pH 8.8. The EGCG solution exhibited different behavior, with a maximum stoichiometry of 2 at pH 7 and minimum of 1.6 at pH 4.4 and 8.9. When green tea was used to first react with Fe(3+) and form GT-nZVI, the amount of Cr(VI) reduced by a certain volume of GT-nZVI was double compared to green tea, and 6 times as high considering that GT-nZVI only contains 33 % green tea.

  14. Therapeutic cloning: The ethical limits

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, Peter A. . E-mail: p.whittaker@lancaster.ac.uk

    2005-09-01

    A brief outline of stem cells, stem cell therapy and therapeutic cloning is given. The position of therapeutic cloning with regard to other embryonic manipulations - IVF-based reproduction, embryonic stem formation from IVF embryos and reproductive cloning - is indicated. The main ethically challenging stages in therapeutic cloning are considered to be the nuclear transfer process including the source of eggs for this and the destruction of an embryo to provide stem cells for therapeutic use. The extremely polarised nature of the debate regarding the status of an early human embryo is noted, and some potential alternative strategies for preparing immunocompatible pluripotent stem cells are indicated.

  15. Experimental study of cesium 5D+5D-&gt;6S+(nL=9D,11S,7F) energy pooling collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Dai, Kang; Shen, Yifan

    2007-07-01

    We report experimentally the measured rate coefficients for the energy pooling (EP) collisions process Cs(5D)+Cs(5D)-&gt;Cs(6S)+Cs(nL=9D,11S,7F) in cesium densities of 10^(16)-10^(17) cm^(-3). The 5D state was populated via 8S-&gt;7P-&gt;5D spontaneous emission following two-step pumping 6S-&gt;6P_(3/2)-&gt;8S. Since the 5D-&gt;6P (3.0-3.6 microns) fluorescence could not be detected in this experiment, we carried out a relative measurement for the process 6P+5D-&gt;6S+7D. The excited-atom density and spatial distribution were mapped by monitoring the absorption of a counterpropagating single-mode laser beam, tuned to 6P_(3/2)-&gt;9S_(1/2) transition, which could be translated parallelly to the pump beam. The excited atom densities have been combined with the measured fluorescence ratios to yield EP rate coefficients. The average values for nL=9D,11S and 7F are 8.0+-4.0, 7.0+-3.5, and 9.3+-4.6 (in units of 10^(-10) cm3/s), respectively. Influence of the energy transfer process 11S+6S-&gt;7F+6S on the rate coefficients k_(11S) and k_(7F) is also discussed.

  16. Regulation of GNRH production by estrogen and bone morphogenetic proteins in GT1-7 hypothalamic cells.

    PubMed

    Otani, Hiroyuki; Otsuka, Fumio; Takeda, Masaya; Mukai, Tomoyuki; Terasaka, Tomohiro; Miyoshi, Tomoko; Inagaki, Kenichi; Suzuki, Jiro; Ogura, Toshio; Lawson, Mark A; Makino, Hirofumi

    2009-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are important regulators in the pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis. We here investigated the effects of BMPs on GNRH production controlled by estrogen using murine GT1-7 hypothalamic neuron cells. GT1-7 cells expressed estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha; ESR1 as listed in MGI Database), ERbeta (ESR2 as listed in MGI Database), BMP receptors, SMADs, and a binding protein follistatin. Treatment with BMP2 and BMP4 had no effect on Gnrh mRNA expression; however, BMP6 and BMP7 significantly increased Gnrh mRNA expression as well as GnRH production by GT1-7 cells. Notably, the reduction of Gnrh expression caused by estradiol (E(2)) was restored by cotreatment with BMP2 and BMP4, whereas it was not affected by BMP6 or BMP7. E(2) activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) signaling but did not activate p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling in GT1-7 cells. Inhibition of ERK1/ERK2 reversed the inhibitory effect of estrogen on Gnrh expression, whereas SAPK/JNK inhibition did not affect the E(2) actions. Expression levels of Eralpha and Erbeta were reduced by BMP2 and BMP4, but were increased by BMP6 and BMP7. Treatment with an ER antagonist inhibited the E(2) effects on Gnrh suppression including reduction of E(2)-induced ERK phosphorylation, suggesting the involvement of genomic ER actions in Gnrh suppression. BMP2 and BMP4 also suppressed estrogen-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/ERK2 and SAPK/JNK signaling, suggesting that BMP2 and BMP4 downregulate estrogen effects by attenuating ER-MAPK signaling. Considering that BMP6 and BMP7 increased the expression of alpha1E-subunit of R-type calcium channel (Cacna1e), which is critical for GNRH secretion, it is possible that BMP6 and BMP7 directly stimulate GNRH release by GT1-7 cells. Collectively, a newly uncovered interaction of BMPs and ER may be involved in

  17. GT-MSOCC - A domain for research on human-computer interaction and decision aiding in supervisory control systems. [Georgia Tech - Multisatellite Operations Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1987-01-01

    The Georgia Tech-Multisatellite Operations Control Center (GT-MSOCC), a real-time interactive simulation of the operator interface to a NASA ground control system for unmanned earth-orbiting satellites, is described. The GT-MSOCC program for investigating a range of modeling, decision aiding, and workstation design issues related to the human-computer interaction is discussed. A GT-MSOCC operator function model is described in which operator actions, both cognitive and manual, are represented as the lowest level discrete control network nodes, and operator action nodes are linked to information needs or system reconfiguration commands.

  18. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool.

    PubMed

    Henstock, Peter V; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow.

  19. [The discrete horror of cloning].

    PubMed

    Guibourg, Ricardo A

    2009-01-01

    The author raises the topic of cloning after the decision of the Argentine government, which concerned for the "dignity of the human person", passed a decree of need and urgency, No. 200/97 (Annex), prohibiting cloning experiments with human beings. Therefore, considering that the topic is so terribly urgent and necessary, the author feels it is timely to consider it.

  20. [Scientific ethics of human cloning].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Carlos Y

    2005-01-01

    True cloning is fission, budding or other types of asexual reproduction. In humans it occurs in monozygote twinning. This type of cloning is ethically and religiously good. Human cloning can be performed by twinning (TWClo) or nuclear transfer (NTClo). Both methods need a zygote or a nuclear transferred cell, obtained in vitro (IVTec). They are under the IVTec ethics. IVTecs use humans (zygotes, embryos) as drugs or things; increase the risk of malformations; increase development and size of abnormalities and may cause long-term changes. Cloning for preserving extinct (or almost extinct) animals or humans when sexual reproduction is not possible is ethically valid. The previous selection of a phenotype in human cloning violates some ethical principles. NTClo for reproductive or therapeutic purposes is dangerous since it increases the risk for nucleotide or chromosome mutations, de-programming or re-programming errors, aging or malignancy of the embryo cells thus obtained.

  1. Human cloning: can it be made safe?

    PubMed

    Rhind, Susan M; Taylor, Jane E; De Sousa, Paul A; King, Tim J; McGarry, Michelle; Wilmut, Ian

    2003-11-01

    There are continued claims of attempts to clone humans using nuclear transfer, despite the serious problems that have been encountered in cloning other mammals. It is known that epigenetic and genetic mechanisms are involved in clone failure, but we still do not know exactly how. Human reproductive cloning is unethical, but the production of cells from cloned embryos could offer many potential benefits. So, can human cloning be made safe?

  2. Wildlife conservation and reproductive cloning.

    PubMed

    Holt, William V; Pickard, Amanda R; Prather, Randall S

    2004-03-01

    Reproductive cloning, or the production of offspring by nuclear transfer, is often regarded as having potential for conserving endangered species of wildlife. Currently, however, low success rates for reproductive cloning limit the practical application of this technique to experimental use and proof of principle investigations. In this review, we consider how cloning may contribute to wildlife conservation strategies. The cloning of endangered mammals presents practical problems, many of which stem from the paucity of knowledge about their basic reproductive biology. However, situations may arise where resources could be targeted at recovering lost or under-represented genetic lines; these could then contribute to the future fitness of the population. Approaches of this type would be preferable to the indiscriminate generation of large numbers of identical individuals. Applying cloning technology to non-mammalian vertebrates may be more practical than attempting to use conventional reproductive technologies. As the scientific background to cloning technology was pioneered using amphibians, it may be possible to breed imminently threatened amphibians, or even restore extinct amphibian species, by the use of cloning. In this respect species with external embryonic development may have an advantage over mammals as developmental abnormalities associated with inappropriate embryonic reprogramming would not be relevant.

  3. Genotyping-in-Thousands by sequencing (GT-seq): A cost effective SNP genotyping method based on custom amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Nathan R; Harmon, Stephanie A; Narum, Shawn R

    2015-07-01

    Genotyping-in-Thousands by sequencing (GT-seq) is a method that uses next-generation sequencing of multiplexed PCR products to generate genotypes from relatively small panels (50-500) of targeted single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for thousands of individuals in a single Illumina HiSeq lane. This method uses only unlabelled oligos and PCR master mix in two thermal cycling steps for amplification of targeted SNP loci. During this process, sequencing adapters and dual barcode sequence tags are incorporated into the amplicons enabling thousands of individuals to be pooled into a single sequencing library. Post sequencing, reads from individual samples are split into individual files using their unique combination of barcode sequences. Genotyping is performed with a simple perl script which counts amplicon-specific sequences for each allele, and allele ratios are used to determine the genotypes. We demonstrate this technique by genotyping 2068 individual steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) samples with a set of 192 SNP markers in a single library sequenced in a single Illumina HiSeq lane. Genotype data were 99.9% concordant to previously collected TaqMan(™) genotypes at the same 192 loci, but call rates were slightly lower with GT-seq (96.4%) relative to Taqman (99.0%). Of the 192 SNPs, 187 were genotyped in ≥90% of the individual samples and only 3 SNPs were genotyped in <70% of samples. This study demonstrates amplicon sequencing with GT-seq greatly reduces the cost of genotyping hundreds of targeted SNPs relative to existing methods by utilizing a simple library preparation method and massive efficiency of scale.

  4. [The balanced force and the GT-rotary technique in comparison with the non-instrumental technique (NIT)].

    PubMed

    Lussi, Adrian; Hotz, Meret; Stich, Hermann

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the cleansing effect of the latest modification of the non-instrumentation technique (NIT) to that of conventional instrumentation. The root curvature in 100 vital human molars was determined by a standardized X-ray procedure and the teeth were assigned to five groups with 20 teeth each with an equal distribution of the root curvature. The preparation methods were the Balanced Force technique and the GT Rotary technique. Each root was irrigated with 40 ml of 3% sodium hypochlorite. The other groups were irrigated by NIT during 2.5, 5 or 10 minutes, respectively. The remaining pulpal tissue was stained and the root canals were exposed longitudinally. The teeth were then evaluated using a microscope and an image analysis-system. The residual organic debris in the apical, middle and coronal sections of the root canals were assessed as a percentage of the corresponding total examined length. The cleansing effect of the NIT in the coronal and middle parts of the canal used for 5 and 10 minutes was significantly better (p < 0.05) compared to using the device for 2.5 minutes. The cleansing effect of the NIT in the coronal and middle parts of the canal used for 5 and 10 minutes was also significantly better (p < 0.05) compared to using the GT Rotary or Balanced Force techniques. Apically, the cleansing effect of the NIT used for 5 and 10 minutes and the GT Rotary technique was significantly better (p < 0.05) compared to using the Balanced Force technique or the NIT for 2.5 minutes. It was concluded that the cleansing effect of the latest modification of the Non-instrumentation Technology (NIT) was equivalent to or better than that of conventional instrumentation requiring significantly less time.

  5. Hypertriglyceridemia associated with the c.553G>T APOA5 SNP results from aberrant hetero-disulfide bond formation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vineeta; Witkowski, Andrzej; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Dykstra, Andrew; Simonsen, Jens B.; Nelbach, Lisa; Beckstead, Jennifer A.; Pullinger, Clive R.; Kane, John P.; Malloy, Mary J.; Watson, Gordon; Forte, Trudy M.; Ryan, Robert O.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Apolipoprotein (apo) A-V is a low abundance plasma protein that modulates triacylglycerol (TG) homeostasis. Gene transfer studies were undertaken in apoa5 (−/−) mice to define the mechanism underlying the correlation between the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) c.553G>T in APOA5 and hypertriglyceridemia (HTG). Approach and Results Adeno-associated virus (AAV) 2/8 mediated gene transfer of wild type (WT) apoA-V induced a dramatic lowering of plasma TG in apoa5 (−/−) mice while AAV2/8-Gly162Cys apoA-V (corresponding to the c.553G>T SNP: rs2075291) had a modest effect. Characterization studies revealed that plasma levels of WT- and G162C apoA-V in transduced mice were similar and within the physiological range. Fractionation of plasma from mice transduced with AAV2/8-G162C apoA-V indicated that, unlike WT apoA-V, >50% of G162C apoA-V was recovered in the lipoprotein-free fraction. Non-reducing SDS-PAGE immunoblot analysis provided evidence that G162C apoA-V present in the lipoprotein-free fraction, but not that portion associated with lipoproteins, displayed altered electrophoretic mobility consistent with disulfide-linked hetero-dimer formation. Immunoprecipitation followed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry of human plasma from subjects homozygous for WT APOA5 and c.553G>T APOA5 revealed that G162C apoA-V forms adducts with extraneous plasma proteins including fibronectin, kininogen-1 and others. Conclusion Substitution of Cys for Gly at position 162 of mature apoA-V introduces a free cysteine that forms disulfide bonds with plasma proteins such that its lipoprotein binding and TG modulation functions are compromised. PMID:25127531

  6. Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract (SLiCE) cloning method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongwei; Werling, Uwe; Edelmann, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    SLiCE (Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract) is a novel cloning method that utilizes easy to generate bacterial cell extracts to assemble multiple DNA fragments into recombinant DNA molecules in a single in vitro recombination reaction. SLiCE overcomes the sequence limitations of traditional cloning methods, facilitates seamless cloning by recombining short end homologies (15-52 bp) with or without flanking heterologous sequences and provides an effective strategy for directional subcloning of DNA fragments from bacterial artificial chromosomes or other sources. SLiCE is highly cost-effective and demonstrates the versatility as a number of standard laboratory bacterial strains can serve as sources for SLiCE extract. We established a DH10B-derived E. coli strain expressing an optimized λ prophage Red recombination system, termed PPY, which facilitates SLiCE with very high efficiencies.

  7. Operational, control and protective system transient analyses of the closed-cycle GT-HTGR power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Openshaw, F.L.; Chan, T.W.

    1980-07-01

    This paper presents a description of the analyses of the control/protective system preliminary designs for the gas turbine high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (GT-HTGR) power plant. The control system is designed to regulate reactor power, control electric load and turbine speed, control the temperature of the helium delivered to the turbines, and control thermal transients experienced by the system components. In addition, it provides the required control programming for startup, shutdown, load ramp, and other expected operations. The control system also handles conditions imposed on the system during upset and emergency conditions such as loop trip, reactor trip, or electrical load rejection.

  8. Evaluation of Cathode Air Flow Transients in a SOFC/GT Hybrid System Using Hardware in the Loop Simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nana; Yang, Chen; Tucker, David

    2015-02-01

    Thermal management in the fuel cell component of a direct fired solid oxide fuel cell gas turbine (SOFC/GT) hybrid power system can be improved by effective management and control of the cathode airflow. The disturbances of the cathode airflow were accomplished by diverting air around the fuel cell system through the manipulation of a hot-air bypass valve in open loop experiments, using a hardware-based simulation facility designed and built by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The dynamic responses of the fuel cell component and hardware component of the hybrid system were studied in this paper.

  9. Biomimetic Cloning of Quantum Observables

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, U.; Sanz, M.; Lamata, L.; Solano, E.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a bio-inspired sequential quantum protocol for the cloning and preservation of the statistics associated to quantum observables of a given system. It combines the cloning of a set of commuting observables, permitted by the no-cloning and no-broadcasting theorems, with a controllable propagation of the initial state coherences to the subsequent generations. The protocol mimics the scenario in which an individual in an unknown quantum state copies and propagates its quantum information into an environment of blank qubits. Finally, we propose a realistic experimental implementation of this protocol in trapped ions. PMID:24809937

  10. Biomimetic Cloning of Quantum Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, U.; Sanz, M.; Lamata, L.; Solano, E.

    2014-05-01

    We propose a bio-inspired sequential quantum protocol for the cloning and preservation of the statistics associated to quantum observables of a given system. It combines the cloning of a set of commuting observables, permitted by the no-cloning and no-broadcasting theorems, with a controllable propagation of the initial state coherences to the subsequent generations. The protocol mimics the scenario in which an individual in an unknown quantum state copies and propagates its quantum information into an environment of blank qubits. Finally, we propose a realistic experimental implementation of this protocol in trapped ions.

  11. Human therapeutic cloning (NTSC): applying research from mammalian reproductive cloning.

    PubMed

    French, Andrew J; Wood, Samuel H; Trounson, Alan O

    2006-01-01

    Human therapeutic cloning or nuclear transfer stem cells (NTSC) to produce patient-specific stem cells, holds considerable promise in the field of regenerative medicine. The recent withdrawal of the only scientific publications claiming the successful generation of NTSC lines afford an opportunity to review the available research in mammalian reproductive somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) with the goal of progressing human NTSC. The process of SCNT is prone to epigenetic abnormalities that contribute to very low success rates. Although there are high mortality rates in some species of cloned animals, most surviving clones have been shown to have normal phenotypic and physiological characteristics and to produce healthy offspring. This technology has been applied to an increasing number of mammals for utility in research, agriculture, conservation, and biomedicine. In contrast, attempts at SCNT to produce human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been disappointing. Only one group has published reliable evidence of success in deriving a cloned human blastocyst, using an undifferentiated hESC donor cell, and it failed to develop into a hESC line. When optimal conditions are present, it appears that in vitro development of cloned and parthenogenetic embryos, both of which may be utilized to produce hESCs, may be similar to in vitro fertilized embryos. The derivation of ESC lines from cloned embryos is substantially more efficient than the production of viable offspring. This review summarizes developments in mammalian reproductive cloning, cell-to-cell fusion alternatives, and strategies for oocyte procurement that may provide important clues facilitating progress in human therapeutic cloning leading to the successful application of cell-based therapies utilizing autologous hESC lines.

  12. Methylotroph cloning vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Richard S.; Allen, Larry N.

    1989-04-25

    A cloning vehicle comprising: a replication determinant effective for replicating the vehicle in a non-C.sub.1 -utilizing host and in a C.sub.1 -utilizing host; DNA effective to allow the vehicle to be mobilized from the non-C.sub.1 -utilizing host to the C.sub.1 -utilizing host; DNA providing resistance to two antibiotics to which the wild-type C.sub.1 -utilizing host is susceptible, each of the antibiotic resistance markers having a recognition site for a restriction endonuclease; a cos site; and a means for preventing replication in the C.sub.1 -utilizing host. The vehicle is used for complementation mapping as follows. DNA comprising a gene from the C.sub.1 -utilizing organism is inserted at the restriction nuclease recognition site, inactivating the antibiotic resistance marker at that site. The vehicle can then be used to form a cosmid structure to infect the non-C.sub.1 -utilizing (e.g., E. coli) host, and then conjugated with a selected C.sub.1 -utilizing mutant. Resistance to the other antibiotic by the mutant is a marker of the conjugation. Other phenotypical changes in the mutant, e.g., loss of an auxotrophic trait, is attributed to the C.sub.1 gene. The vector is also used to inactivate genes whose protein products catalyze side reactions that divert compounds from a biosynthetic pathway to a desired product, thereby producing an organism that makes the desired product in higher yields.

  13. Cloning of a quantum measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo; Sedlak, Michal

    2011-10-15

    We analyze quantum algorithms for cloning of a quantum measurement. Our aim is to mimic two uses of a device performing an unknown von Neumann measurement with a single use of the device. When the unknown device has to be used before the bipartite state to be measured is available we talk about 1{yields}2 learning of the measurement, otherwise the task is called 1{yields}2 cloning of a measurement. We perform the optimization for both learning and cloning for arbitrary dimension d of the Hilbert space. For 1{yields}2 cloning we also propose a simple quantum network that achieves the optimal fidelity. The optimal fidelity for 1{yields}2 learning just slightly outperforms the estimate and prepare strategy in which one first estimates the unknown measurement and depending on the result suitably prepares the duplicate.

  14. A Clone of Your Own.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilodeau, Kirsten

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity used at the Washington Park Arboretum that helps students understand cloning through plant propagation. Students also learn how to make a pot from recycled newspapers and how to make soil that is appropriate for the plants. (DDR)

  15. Human Cloning: Let's Discuss It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taras, Loretta; Stavroulakis, Anthea M.; Ortiz, Mary T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes experiences with holding discussions on cloning at a variety of levels in undergraduate biology courses. Discusses teaching methods used and student reactions to the discussions. Contains 12 references. (WRM)

  16. Human cloning and 'posthuman' society.

    PubMed

    Blackford, Russell

    2005-01-01

    Since early 1997, when the creation of Dolly the sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer was announced in Nature, numerous government reports, essays, articles and books have considered the ethical problems and policy issues surrounding human reproductive cloning. In this article, I consider what response a modern liberal society should give to the prospect of human cloning, if it became safe and practical. Some opponents of human cloning have argued that permitting it would place us on a slippery slope to a repugnant future society, comparable to that portrayed in Aldous Huxley's novel, Brave New World. I conclude that, leaving aside concerns about safety, none of the psychological or social considerations discussed in this article provides an adequate policy justification for invoking the state's coercive powers to prevent human cloning.

  17. Computational Assessment of the GT-MHR Graphite Core Support Structural Integrity in Air-Ingress Accident Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Jong B. Lim; Eung S. Kim; Chang H. Oh; Richard R. Schultz; David A. Petti

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this project was to perform stress analysis for graphite support structures of the General Atomics’ 600 MWth GT-MHR prismatic core design using ABAQUS ® (ver. 6.75) to assess their structural integrity in air-ingress accident conditions where the structure weakens over time due to oxidation damages. The graphite support structures of prismatic type GT-MHR was analyzed based on the change of temperature, burn-off and corrosion depth during the accident period predicted by GAMMA, a multi-dimensional gas multi-component mixture analysis code developed in the Republic of Korea (ROK)/United States (US) International –Nuclear Engineering Research Initiative (I-NERI) project. Both the loading and thermal stresses were analyzed, but the thermal stress was not significant, leaving the loading stress to be the major factor. The mechanical strengths are exceeded between 11 to 11.5 days after loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA), corresponding to 5.5 to 6 days after the start of natural convection.

  18. Human OCT2 variant c.808G>T confers protection effect against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lanvers-Kaminsky, Claudia; Sprowl, Jason A; Malath, Ingrid; Deuster, Dirk; Eveslage, Maria; Schlatter, Eberhard; Mathijssen, Ron HJ; Boos, Joachim; Jürgens, Heribert; am Zehnhoff-Dinnesen, Antionette G; Sparreboom, Alex; Ciarimboli, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Aim Assuming that genetic variants of the SLC22A2 and SLC31A1 transporter affect patients’ susceptibility to cisplatin-induced ototoxicity, we compared the distribution of 11 SLC22A2 variants and the SLC31A1 variant rs10981694 between patients with and without cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. Patients & methods Genotyping was performed in 64 pediatric patients and significant findings were re-evaluated in 66 adults. Results The SLC22A2 polymorphism rs316019 (c.808G>T; Ser270Ala) was significantly associated with protection from cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in the pediatric (p = 0.022) and the adult cohort (p = 0.048; both: Fisher’s exact test). This result was confirmed by multiple logistic regression analysis accounting for age which was identified as a relevant factor for ototoxicity as well (rs316019: OR [G/T vs G/G] = 0.12, p = 0.009; age: OR [per year]: 0.84, p = 0.02). Conclusion These results identified rs316019 as potential pharmacogenomic marker for cisplatin-induced ototoxicity and point to a critical role of SLC22A2 for cisplatin transport in humans and its contribution to the organ specific side effects of this drug. PMID:25823781

  19. Analysis of systematic errors of the ASM/RXTE monitor and GT-48 γ-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidelis, V. V.

    2011-06-01

    The observational data concerning variations of light curves of supernovae remnants—the Crab Nebula, Cassiopeia A, Tycho Brahe, and pulsar Vela—over 14 days scale that may be attributed to systematic errors of the ASM/RXTE monitor are presented. The experimental systematic errors of the GT-48 γ-ray telescope in the mono mode of operation were also determined. For this the observational data of TeV J2032 + 4130 (Cyg γ-2, according to the Crimean version) were used and the stationary nature of its γ-ray emission was confirmed by long-term observations performed with HEGRA and MAGIC. The results of research allow us to draw the following conclusions: (1) light curves of supernovae remnants averaged for long observing periods have false statistically significant flux variations, (2) the level of systematic errors is proportional to the registered flux and decreases with increasing temporal scale of averaging, (3) the light curves of sources may be modulated by the year period, and (4) the systematic errors of the GT-48 γ-ray telescope, in the amount caused by observations in the mono mode and data processing with the stereo-algorithm come to 0.12 min-1.

  20. Cloning goes to the movies.

    PubMed

    Cormick, Craig

    2006-10-01

    Public attitude research conducted by Biotechnology Australia shows that one of the major sources of information on human reproductive cloning is movies. Traditionally, understanding of new and emerging technologies has come through the mass media but human cloning, being so widely addressed through the popular culture of movies, is more effectively defined by Hollywood than the news media or science media. But how well are the science and social issues of cloning portrayed in box office hits such as The Island, Multiplicity, Star Wars: Attack of the Clones and Jurassic Park? These movies have enormous reach and undoubted influence, and are therefore worth analyzing in some detail. This study looks at 33 movies made between 1971 and 2005 that address human reproductive cloning, and it categorizes the films based on their genre and potential influence. Yet rather than simply rating the quality of the science portrayed, the study compares the key messages in these movies with public attitudes towards cloning, to examine the correlations.

  1. Artificial cloning of domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Keefer, Carol L

    2015-07-21

    Domestic animals can be cloned using techniques such as embryo splitting and nuclear transfer to produce genetically identical individuals. Although embryo splitting is limited to the production of only a few identical individuals, nuclear transfer of donor nuclei into recipient oocytes, whose own nuclear DNA has been removed, can result in large numbers of identical individuals. Moreover, clones can be produced using donor cells from sterile animals, such as steers and geldings, and, unlike their genetic source, these clones are fertile. In reality, due to low efficiencies and the high costs of cloning domestic species, only a limited number of identical individuals are generally produced, and these clones are primarily used as breed stock. In addition to providing a means of rescuing and propagating valuable genetics, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) research has contributed knowledge that has led to the direct reprogramming of cells (e.g., to induce pluripotent stem cells) and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation during embryonic development. In this review, I provide a broad overview of the historical development of cloning in domestic animals, of its application to the propagation of livestock and transgenic animal production, and of its scientific promise for advancing basic research.

  2. Islamic perspectives on human cloning.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mahmoud

    2007-01-01

    The present paper seeks to assess various views from Islamic jurists relating to human cloning, which is one of the controversial topics in the recent past. Taking Islamic jurisprudence principles, such as the rule of necessity for self preservation and respect for human beings, the rule of la darar wa la dirar ('the necessity to refrain from causing harm to oneself and others') and the rule of usr wa haraj, one may indicate that if human cloning could not be prohibited, as such, it could still be opposed because it gives way to various harmful consequences, which include family disorder, chaos in the clone's family relationships, physical and mental diseases for clones and suffering of egg donors and surrogate mothers. However with due attention to the fact that the reasons behind the prohibition of abortion only restrict the destruction of human embryos in their post-implantation stages, human cloning for biomedical research and exploitation of stem cells from cloned embryos at the blastocyst stage for therapeutic purposes would be acceptable.

  3. Methylotroph cloning vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, R.S.; Allen, L.N.

    1989-04-25

    A cloning vehicle comprising: a replication determinant effective for replicating the vehicle in a non-C[sub 1]-utilizing host and in a C[sub 1]-utilizing host; DNA effective to allow the vehicle to be mobilized from the non-C[sub 1]-utilizing host to the C[sub 1]-utilizing host; DNA providing resistance to two antibiotics to which the wild-type C[sub 1]-utilizing host is susceptible, each of the antibiotic resistance markers having a recognition site for a restriction endonuclease; a cos site; and a means for preventing replication in the C[sub 1]-utilizing host. The vehicle is used for complementation mapping as follows. DNA comprising a gene from the C[sub 1]-utilizing organism is inserted at the restriction nuclease recognition site, inactivating the antibiotic resistance marker at that site. The vehicle can then be used to form a cosmid structure to infect the non-C[sub 1]-utilizing (e.g., E. coli) host, and then conjugated with a selected C[sub 1]-utilizing mutant. Resistance to the other antibiotic by the mutant is a marker of the conjugation. Other phenotypical changes in the mutant, e.g., loss of an auxotrophic trait, is attributed to the C[sub 1] gene. The vector is also used to inactivate genes whose protein products catalyze side reactions that divert compounds from a biosynthetic pathway to a desired product, thereby producing an organism that makes the desired product in higher yields. 3 figs.

  4. A novel Tetra-primer ARMS-PCR based assay for genotyping SNP rs12303764(G/T) of human Unc-51 like kinase 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Rohit; Duseja, Ajay; Changotra, Harish

    2017-02-01

    Various case-control studies have shown association of single nucleotide polymorphism rs12303764(G/T) in ULK1 with crohn's disease. The techniques used in these studies were time consuming, complicated and require sophisticated/expensive instruments. Therefore, in order to overcome these problems, we have developed a new, rapid and cost effective Tetra-primer ARMS-PCR assay to genotype single nucleotide polymorphism rs12303764(G/T) of ULK1 gene. We manually designed allele specific primers. DNA fragment amplified using outer primers was sequenced to obtain samples with known genotypes (GG, GT and TT) for further use in the development of T-ARMS-PCR assay. Amplification conditions were optimized for parameters; annealing temperature, Taq DNA polymerase and primers. The developed T-ARMS-PCR assay was applied to genotype one hundred samples from healthy individuals. Genotyping results of 10 DNA samples from healthy individuals for rs12303764(G/T) by T-ARMS-PCR assay and sequencing were concordant. The newly developed assay was further applied to genotype samples from 100 healthy individuals of North Indian origin. Genotype frequencies were 9, 34 and 57 % for GG, GT and TT, respectively. Allele frequencies were 0.26 and 0.74 for G and T, respectively. The allele frequencies were in Hardy-Weinberg's equilibrium (p = 0.2443). T-ARMS-PCR assay developed in our laboratory for genotyping rs12303764 (G/T) of ULK1 gene is time saving and cost-effective as compared to the available methods. Furthermore, this is the first study reporting allelic and genotype frequencies of ULK1 rs12303764 (G/T) variants in North Indian population.

  5. Cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding a maize glutathione-S-transferase in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Moore, R E; Davies, M S; O'Connell, K M; Harding, E I; Wiegand, R C; Tiemeier, D C

    1986-09-25

    The isolation and characterization of a family of maize glutathione-S-transferases (GST's) has been described previously. These enzymes are designated GSTs I, II and III based on size, substrate specificity and responsiveness to safeners. GST III has been shown to act on the herbicide alachlor as well as the commonly used substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). Clones were isolated from a maize cDNA library in lambda gt10. Three clones contained the entire coding region for GST III. The sequences of these clones were consistent with the known amino terminal GST III protein sequence. Moreover, expression of one of these clones in E. coli resulted in a GST activity as measured with both CDNB and alachlor, proving that at least one of the clones encodes an active GST III species. With the enzyme expressed in E. coli it will become possible to study enzyme structure-function relationships ex planta. While a number of different GST proteins are present in maize tissue the GST III gene is present in single or low copy in the genome.

  6. Cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding a maize glutathione-S-transferase in E. coli.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R E; Davies, M S; O'Connell, K M; Harding, E I; Wiegand, R C; Tiemeier, D C

    1986-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of a family of maize glutathione-S-transferases (GST's) has been described previously. These enzymes are designated GSTs I, II and III based on size, substrate specificity and responsiveness to safeners. GST III has been shown to act on the herbicide alachlor as well as the commonly used substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). Clones were isolated from a maize cDNA library in lambda gt10. Three clones contained the entire coding region for GST III. The sequences of these clones were consistent with the known amino terminal GST III protein sequence. Moreover, expression of one of these clones in E. coli resulted in a GST activity as measured with both CDNB and alachlor, proving that at least one of the clones encodes an active GST III species. With the enzyme expressed in E. coli it will become possible to study enzyme structure-function relationships ex planta. While a number of different GST proteins are present in maize tissue the GST III gene is present in single or low copy in the genome. Images PMID:3532034

  7. Local cloning of two product states

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Zhengfeng; Feng Yuan; Ying Mingsheng

    2005-09-15

    Local quantum operations and classical communication (LOCC) put considerable constraints on many quantum information processing tasks such as cloning and discrimination. Surprisingly, however, discrimination of any two pure states survives such constraints in some sense. We show that cloning is not that lucky; namely, probabilistic LOCC cloning of two product states is strictly less efficient than global cloning. We prove our result by giving explicitly the efficiency formula of local cloning of any two product states.

  8. Improvement of cloning efficiency in minipigs using post-thawed donor cells treated with roscovitine.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seongsoo; Oh, Keon Bong; Kwon, Dae-Jin; Ock, Sun-A; Lee, Jeong-Woong; Im, Gi-Sun; Lee, Sung-Soo; Lee, Kichoon; Park, Jin-Ki

    2013-11-01

    Massachusetts General Hospital miniature pigs (MGH minipigs) have been established for organ transplantation studies across the homozygous major histocompatibility complex, but cloning efficiency of MGH minipigs is extremely low. This study was designed to increase the productivity of MGH minipigs by nuclear transfer of post-thaw donor cells after 1 h co-incubation with roscovitine. The MGH minipig cells were genetically modified with GT KO (alpha1,3-galactosyltransferase knock-out) and hCD46 KI (human CD46 knock-in) and used as donor cells. The GT KO/hCD46 KI donor cells were cultured for either 3 days (control group) or 1 h after thawing with 15 μM roscovitine (experimental group) prior to the nuclear transfer. The relative percentage of the transgenic donor cells that entered into G0/G1 was 93.7 % (±2.54). This was different from the donor cells cultured for 1 h with the roscovitine-treated group (84.6 % ±4.6) (P < 0.05) and without roscovitine (78.6 % ±5.5) (P < 0.01), respectively. The pregnancy rate and delivery rate in the roscovitine group (8/12 and 6/8, respectively) were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than those in the control group (6/19 and 3/6, respectively). In the experimental group, 12 GT KO/hCD46 KI transgenic minipigs were successfully generated, and five minipigs among them survived for more than 6 months so far. The recipient-based individual cloning efficiency ranged from 0.74 to 2.54 %. In conclusion, gene-modified donor cells can be used for cloning of MGH minipigs if the cells are post-thawed and treated with roscovitine for 1 h prior to nuclear transfer.

  9. Local cloning of entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Gheorghiu, Vlad; Yu Li; Cohen, Scott M.

    2010-08-15

    We investigate the conditions under which a set S of pure bipartite quantum states on a DxD system can be locally cloned deterministically by separable operations, when at least one of the states is full Schmidt rank. We allow for the possibility of cloning using a resource state that is less than maximally entangled. Our results include that: (i) all states in S must be full Schmidt rank and equally entangled under the G-concurrence measure, and (ii) the set S can be extended to a larger clonable set generated by a finite group G of order |G|=N, the number of states in the larger set. It is then shown that any local cloning apparatus is capable of cloning a number of states that divides D exactly. We provide a complete solution for two central problems in local cloning, giving necessary and sufficient conditions for (i) when a set of maximally entangled states can be locally cloned, valid for all D; and (ii) local cloning of entangled qubit states with nonvanishing entanglement. In both of these cases, we show that a maximally entangled resource is necessary and sufficient, and the states must be related to each other by local unitary 'shift' operations. These shifts are determined by the group structure, so need not be simple cyclic permutations. Assuming this shifted form and partially entangled states, then in D=3 we show that a maximally entangled resource is again necessary and sufficient, while for higher-dimensional systems, we find that the resource state must be strictly more entangled than the states in S. All of our necessary conditions for separable operations are also necessary conditions for local operations and classical communication (LOCC), since the latter is a proper subset of the former. In fact, all our results hold for LOCC, as our sufficient conditions are demonstrated for LOCC, directly.

  10. Cloning and genomic nucleotide sequence of the matrix attachment region binding protein from the halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng-Ju; Wang, Tian-Yun; Wang, Ya-Feng; Yang, Rui; Li, Zhao-Xi

    2013-07-01

    In our previous study, the sequence of a matrix attachment region binding protein (MBP) cDNA was cloned from the unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina. However, the nucleotide sequence of this gene has not been reported so far. In this paper, the nucleotide sequence of MBP was cloned and characterized, and its gene copy number was determined. The MBP nucleotide sequence is 5641 bp long, and interrupted by 12 introns ranging from 132 to 562 bp. All the introns in the D. salina MBP gene have orthodox splice sites, exhibiting GT at the 5' end and AG at the 3' end. Southern blot analysis showed that MBP only has one copy in the D. salina genome.

  11. Isolation and characterization of two cDNA clones of anaerobically induced lactate dehydrogenase from barley roots

    SciTech Connect

    Hondred, D.; Hanson, A.D. )

    1990-05-01

    In barley roots during hypoxia, five lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isozymes accumulate with a concomitant increase in enzyme activity ({approximately}20-fold). These isozymes are thought to be tetramers resulting from the random association of the products of two Ldh loci. To investigate this system, cDNA clones of LDH have been isolated from a {lambda}gt11 library using antiserum raised against barley LDH purified {approximately}3,000-fold and using nucleic acid probes synthesized by the polymerase chain reaction. Two cDNA clones were obtained (1,305 and 1,166 bp). The deduced amino acid sequences of the two barley LDHs are 96% identical to each other, and 50% and 40% identical to vertebrate and bacterial LDHs, respectively. Northern blots identified a single mRNA band ({approximately}1.5 kb) whose level rose 8-fold during hypoxia.

  12. Chloride conducting light activated channel GtACR2 can produce both cessation of firing and generation of action potentials in cortical neurons in response to light.

    PubMed

    Malyshev, A Y; Roshchin, M V; Smirnova, G R; Dolgikh, D A; Balaban, P M; Ostrovsky, M A

    2017-02-15

    Optogenetics is a powerful technique in neuroscience that provided a great success in studying the brain functions during the last decade. Progress of optogenetics crucially depends on development of new molecular tools. Light-activated cation-conducting channelrhodopsin2 was widely used for excitation of cells since the emergence of optogenetics. In 2015 a family of natural light activated chloride channels GtACR was identified which appeared to be a very promising tool for using in optogenetics experiments as a cell silencer. Here we examined properties of GtACR2 channel expressed in the rat layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons by means of in utero electroporation. We have found that despite strong inhibition the light stimulation of GtACR2-positive neurons can surprisingly lead to generation of action potentials, presumably initiated in the axonal terminals. Thus, when using the GtACR2 in optogenetics experiments, its ability to induce action potentials should be taken into account. Our results also open an interesting possibility of using the GtACR2 both as cell silencer and cell activator in the same experiment varying the pattern of light stimulation.

  13. Lentivirus-mediated RNAi knockdown of LMP2A inhibits the growth of the Epstein-Barr-associated gastric carcinoma cell line GT38 in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangjun; Chen, Weichang; Liu, Pengfei; Zhou, Jundong; Liu, Bingtuan; Ye, Wu; Wang, Wenping; Shen, Xiuyun

    2017-01-01

    In this study, lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was applied to inhibit latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) gene expression, in order to explore the effects of LMP2A silencing on the growth of an Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC) cell line in vitro. Lentivirus-mediated RNAi technology was employed to specifically knock down the LMP2A gene in the EBV-positive gastric carcinoma cell line GT38. After infection, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, flow cytometry and colony formation assays were conducted to evaluate the expression of LMP2A and the biological behavior of the GT38 cell line in vitro. The results showed that the expression of the LMP2A gene was clearly downregulated in the infected cells, which indicated that a highly efficient and stable lentivirus vector was successfully constructed. In the GT38 cells in which the expression of LMP2A was downregulated, the proliferation and colony formation of the cells was significantly inhibited. In addition, it was found that the cell cycle of the GT38 cells was arrested in the G0/G1 phase and the apoptosis rate was increased. These results indicate that lentivirus-mediated RNAi knockdown of LMP2A inhibits the growth of the EBVaGC cell line GT38 in vitro, and suggests that LMP2A is a potential target for gene therapy in the treatment of EBVaGC. PMID:28123488

  14. Crystal Structure of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type a in Complex With the Cell Surface Co-Receptor GT1b-Insight Into the Toxin-Neuron Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stenmark, P.; Dupuy, J.; Inamura, A.; Kiso, M.; Stevens, R.C.

    2009-05-26

    Botulinum neurotoxins have a very high affinity and specificity for their target cells requiring two different co-receptors located on the neuronal cell surface. Different toxin serotypes have different protein receptors; yet, most share a common ganglioside co-receptor, GT1b. We determined the crystal structure of the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A binding domain (residues 873-1297) alone and in complex with a GT1b analog at 1.7 A and 1.6 A, respectively. The ganglioside GT1b forms several key hydrogen bonds to conserved residues and binds in a shallow groove lined by Tryptophan 1266. GT1b binding does not induce any large structural changes in the toxin; therefore, it is unlikely that allosteric effects play a major role in the dual receptor recognition. Together with the previously published structures of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B in complex with its protein co-receptor, we can now generate a detailed model of botulinum neurotoxin's interaction with the neuronal cell surface. The two branches of the GT1b polysaccharide, together with the protein receptor site, impose strict geometric constraints on the mode of interaction with the membrane surface and strongly support a model where one end of the 100 A long translocation domain helix bundle swing into contact with the membrane, initiating the membrane anchoring event.

  15. Cloning and expression of human tyrosine aminotransferase cDNA.

    PubMed

    Séralini, G E; Luu-Thé, V; Labrie, F

    1995-01-02

    Complementary DNA clones encoding human tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) were isolated by screening a normal adult woman liver lambda gt11 library with rat TAT cDNA. The largest isolated cDNA is 2051 bp long (EMBL accession number X55675). This cDNA was subcloned downstream of the cytomegalovirus promoter in the pCMV vector for transfection into human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. Expression of the TAT cDNA resulted in the synthesis of a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 50 kDa, as assessed by Western analysis, a value which is in close agreement with the predicted molecular weight of 50,399, for a deduced sequence of 454 amino acids. The expressed protein catalyzed specifically the conversion of L-[14C]tyrosine into p-[14C]hydroxyphenylpyruvate. The availability of a functional TAT cDNA provides a useful tool for detailed study of the structure-function relationship of the enzyme and its mutated derivatives.

  16. GT0 Explosion Sources for IMS Infrasound Calibration: Charge Design and Yield Estimation from Near-source Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Y.; Hofstetter, R.

    2014-03-01

    Three large-scale on-surface explosions were conducted by the Geophysical Institute of Israel (GII) at the Sayarim Military Range, Negev desert, Israel: about 82 tons of strong high explosives in August 2009, and two explosions of about 10 and 100 tons of ANFO explosives in January 2011. It was a collaborative effort between Israel, CTBTO, USA and several European countries, with the main goal to provide fully controlled ground truth (GT0) infrasound sources, monitored by extensive observations, for calibration of International Monitoring System (IMS) infrasound stations in Europe, Middle East and Asia. In all shots, the explosives were assembled like a pyramid/hemisphere on dry desert alluvium, with a complicated explosion design, different from the ideal homogenous hemisphere used in similar experiments in the past. Strong boosters and an upward charge detonation scheme were applied to provide more energy radiated to the atmosphere. Under these conditions the evaluation of the actual explosion yield, an important source parameter, is crucial for the GT0 calibration experiment. Audio-visual, air-shock and acoustic records were utilized for interpretation of observed unique blast effects, and for determination of blast wave parameters suited for yield estimation and the associated relationships. High-pressure gauges were deployed at 100-600 m to record air-blast properties, evaluate the efficiency of the charge design and energy generation, and provide a reliable estimation of the charge yield. The yield estimators, based on empirical scaled relations for well-known basic air-blast parameters—the peak pressure, impulse and positive phase duration, as well as on the crater dimensions and seismic magnitudes, were analyzed. A novel empirical scaled relationship for the little-known secondary shock delay was developed, consistent for broad ranges of ANFO charges and distances, which facilitates using this stable and reliable air-blast parameter as a new potential

  17. [Cloning and law in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Julesz, Máté

    2015-03-01

    Reproductive human cloning is prohibited in Hungary, as in many other countries. Therapeutic human cloning is not prohibited, just like in many other countries. Stem cell therapy is also allowed. Article III, paragraph (3) of the Hungarian basic law (constitution) strictly forbids total human cloning. Article 1 of the Additional Protocol to the Oviedo Convention, on the Prohibition of Cloning Human Beings (1998) stipulates that any intervention seeking to create a human being genetically identical to another human being, whether living or dead, is prohibited. In Hungary, according to Article 174 of the Criminal Code, total human cloning constitutes a crime. Article 180, paragraph (3) of the Hungarian Act on Health declares that embryos shall not be brought about for research purposes; research shall be conducted only on embryos brought about for reproductive purposes when this is authorized by the persons entitled to decide upon its disposal, or when the embryo is damaged. Article 180, paragraph (5) of the Hungarian Act on Health stipulates that multiple individuals who genetically conform to one another shall not be brought about. According to Article 181, paragraph (1) of the Hungarian Act on Health, an embryo used for research shall be kept alive for not longer than 14 days, not counting the time it was frozen for storage and the time period of research.

  18. [Mystery and problems of cloning].

    PubMed

    Nikitin, V A

    2010-01-01

    The attention of investigators is attracted to the fact that, in spite of great efforts in mammalian cloning, advances that have been made in this area of research are not great, and cloned animals have developmental pathologies often incompatible with life and/or reproduction ability. It is yet not clear what technical or biological factors underlie this, and how they are connected or interact with each other, which is more realistic strategically. There is a great number of articles dealing with the influence of cloning with the nuclear transfer on genetic and epigenetic reprogramming of donor cells. At the same time we can see the practical absence of analytical investigations concerning the technology of cloning as such, its weak points, and possible sources of cellular trauma in the course of microsurgery of nuclear transfer or twinning. This article discusses step by step several nuclear transfer techniques and the methods of dividing early preimplanted embryos for twinning with the aim to reveal possible sources of cell damage during micromanipulation that may have negative influence on the development of cloned organisms. Several new author's technologies based on the study of cell biophysical characteristics are described, which allow one to avoid cellular trauma during manipulation and minimize the possibility of cell damage at any rate.

  19. GT2_proyer_3: Unveiling the evolutionary paths of the most massive stars through the study of their ejected nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, P.

    2011-05-01

    Several important questions remain open regarding the latest stages of evolution of the most massive stars, in particular regarding the exact evolutionary paths between the various subtypes of O stars, LBVs and Wolf-Rayet stars, and the mass-loss history of these objects throughout their lives. In the framework of the MESS GTKP+GT1, we have obtained or will obtain PACS imaging of 9 massive star nebulae of various types (LBV, LBV candidate, OF/WN, Of?p, WR) and PACS spectroscopy of 4 of them. In this short follow-up proposal we want to obtain PACS line spectroscopy for 3 peculiar massive and evolved objects for which spectroscopy is lacking. In particular, these observations will allow to determine the elemental abundances in the nebulae as well as the mass of the neutral gas using the fine structure lines formed in the ionized gas and in the photo-dissociation region respectively.

  20. Detailed Characterization of AR Coatings on Si Solar Cells: A New Application of GT-FabScan 6000; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Butterfield, B.; Amieva, J.

    2004-08-01

    We have developed a new application of GT-FabScan for rapid mapping of AR coatings on Si solar cells. The system generates an image of the AR thickness and presents it in a color format using false colors. This measurement is made in less than 100 ms. The development of this application enables the system to generate thickness maps of the AR coating to determine the repeatability of the deposition system, as well as to ensure that downstream processing can be controlled. These data can also be used to determine the average thickness of the coating. Downstream processing is an important issue in current solar cell technology. This paper describes its importance to the PV industry and discusses the principles and method of this measurement.

  1. The topsy-turvy cloning law.

    PubMed

    Brassington, Iain; Oultram, Stuart

    2011-03-01

    In debates about human cloning, a distinction is frequently drawn between therapeutic and reproductive uses of the technology. Naturally enough, this distinction influences the way that the law is framed. The general consensus is that therapeutic cloning is less morally problematic than reproductive cloning--one can hold this position while holding that both are morally unacceptable--and the law frequently leaves the way open for some cloning for the sake of research into new therapeutic techniques while banning it for reproductive purposes. We claim that the position adopted by the law has things the wrong way around: if we accept a moral distinction between therapeutic and reproductive cloning, there are actually more reasons to be morally worried about therapeutic cloning than about reproductive cloning. If cloning is the proper object of legal scrutiny, then, we ought to make sure that we are scrutinising the right kind of clone.

  2. Human cloning and human dignity.

    PubMed

    Birnbacher, Dieter

    2005-03-01

    Judging from the official documents dealing with the moral and legal aspects of human reproductive cloning there seems to be a nearly worldwide consensus that reproductive cloning is incompatible with human dignity. The certainty of this judgement is, however, not matched by corresponding arguments. Is the incompatibility of reproductive with human dignity an ultimate moral intuition closed to further argument? The paper considers several ways by which the intuition might be connected with more familiar applications of the concept of human dignity, and argues that there is no such connection. It concludes that the central objections to human reproductive cloning are not objections relating to dignity but objections relating to risk, especially the risks imposed on children born in the course of testing the method's safety.

  3. Chronic exposure to KATP channel openers results in attenuated glucose sensing in hypothalamic GT1-7 neurons.

    PubMed

    Haythorne, Elizabeth; Hamilton, D Lee; Findlay, John A; Beall, Craig; McCrimmon, Rory J; Ashford, Michael L J

    2016-12-01

    Individuals with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) are often exposed to recurrent episodes of hypoglycaemia. This reduces hormonal and behavioural responses that normally counteract low glucose in order to maintain glucose homeostasis, with altered responsiveness of glucose sensing hypothalamic neurons implicated. Although the molecular mechanisms are unknown, pharmacological studies implicate hypothalamic ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) activity, with KATP openers (KCOs) amplifying, through cell hyperpolarization, the response to hypoglycaemia. Although initial findings, using acute hypothalamic KCO delivery, in rats were promising, chronic exposure to the KCO NN414 worsened the responses to subsequent hypoglycaemic challenge. To investigate this further we used GT1-7 cells to explore how NN414 affected glucose-sensing behaviour, the metabolic response of cells to hypoglycaemia and KATP activity. GT1-7 cells exposed to 3 or 24 h NN414 exhibited an attenuated hyperpolarization to subsequent hypoglycaemic challenge or NN414, which correlated with diminished KATP activity. The reduced sensitivity to hypoglycaemia was apparent 24 h after NN414 removal, even though intrinsic KATP activity recovered. The NN414-modified glucose responsiveness was not associated with adaptations in glucose uptake, metabolism or oxidation. KATP inactivation by NN414 was prevented by the concurrent presence of tolbutamide, which maintains KATP closure. Single channel recordings indicate that NN414 alters KATP intrinsic gating inducing a stable closed or inactivated state. These data indicate that exposure of hypothalamic glucose sensing cells to chronic NN414 drives a sustained conformational change to KATP, probably by binding to SUR1, that results in loss of channel sensitivity to intrinsic metabolic factors such as MgADP and small molecule agonists.

  4. Correlation between the NPPB gene promoter c.-1298 G/T polymorphism site and pulse pressure in the Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Zeng, K; Wu, X D; Cai, H D; Gao, Y G; Li, G; Liu, Q C; Gao, F; Chen, J H; Lin, C Z

    2014-04-29

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between the natriuretic peptide precursor B (NPPB) gene single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) c.-1298 G/T and pulse pressure (PP) of the Chinese Han population and the association between genotype and clinical indicators of hypertension. Peripheral blood was collected from 180 unrelated patients with hypertension and 540 healthy volunteers (control group), and DNA was extracted to amplify the 5'-flanking region and 2 exons of the NPPB gene by polymerase chain reaction; the fragment was sequenced after purification. The clinical data of all subjects were recorded, the distribution of the NPPB gene c.-1298 G/T polymorphism was determined, and differences in clinical indicators between the two groups were evaluated. The mean arterial pressure PP, and creatinine levels were significantly higher in the hypertension group than in the control group (P<0.05), but no other clinical indicators differed between the groups. There were no significant differences in genotype frequency and distribution of the NPPB gene c.-1298 G/T polymorphism between the hypertension group and the control group (P>0.05); in the control group, the mean PP of individuals with the SNP c.-1298 GG genotype was greater than that of individuals with the GT+TT genotype (P<0.05). In conclusion, there was no significant correlation between the NPPB gene c.-1298 G/T polymorphism and the incidence of essential hypertension in the Han population; however, the PP of the SNP c.-1298 GG genotype was greater than that of the GT+TT genotype in the control group.

  5. DOS cones along atomic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwapiński, Tomasz

    2017-03-01

    The electron transport properties of a linear atomic chain are studied theoretically within the tight-binding Hamiltonian and the Green’s function method. Variations of the local density of states (DOS) along the chain are investigated. They are crucial in scanning tunnelling experiments and give important insight into the electron transport mechanism and charge distribution inside chains. It is found that depending on the chain parity the local DOS at the Fermi level can form cone-like structures (DOS cones) along the chain. The general condition for the local DOS oscillations is obtained and the linear behaviour of the local density function is confirmed analytically. DOS cones are characterized by a linear decay towards the chain which is in contrast to the propagation properties of charge density waves, end states and Friedel oscillations in one-dimensional systems. We find that DOS cones can appear due to non-resonant electron transport, the spin–orbit scattering or for chains fabricated on a substrate with localized electrons. It is also shown that for imperfect chains (e.g. with a reduced coupling strength between two neighboring sites) a diamond-like structure of the local DOS along the chain appears.

  6. Brain-specific expression of MAP2 detected using a cloned cDNA probe

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    We describe the isolation of a set of overlapping cDNAs encoding mouse microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2), using an anti-MAP antiserum to screen a mouse brain cDNA expression library cloned in bacteriophage lambda gt11. The authenticity of these clones was established by the following criteria: (a) three non-identical clones each expressing a MAP2 immunoreactive fusion protein were independently isolated from the expression library; each of these clones cross-hybridized at the nucleic acid level; (b) anti-MAP antiserum was affinity purified using nitrocellulose-bound fusion protein; these antibodies detected only MAP2 in an immunoblot experiment of whole brain microtubule protein; (c) a series of cDNA "walking" experiments was done so as to obtain a non-overlapping cloned fragment corresponding to a different part of the same mRNA molecule. Upon subcloning this non-overlapping fragment into plasmid expression vectors, a fusion protein was synthesized that was immunoreactive with an anti-MAP2 specific antiserum. Thus, a single contiguous cloned mRNA molecule encodes at least two MAP2-specific epitopes; (d) the cloned cDNA probes detect an mRNA species in mouse brain that is of a size (approximately 9 kb) consistent with the coding capacity required by a 250,000-D protein. The MAP2-specific cloned cDNA probes were used in RNA blot transfer experiments to assay for the presence of MAP2 mRNA in a variety of mouse tissues. Though brain contained abundant quantities of MAP2 mRNA, no corresponding sequences were detectable in RNA prepared from liver, kidney, spleen, stomach, or thymus. We conclude that the expression of MAP2 is brain-specific. Use of the MAP2 specific cDNA probes in genomic Southern blot transfer experiments showed the presence of a single gene encoding MAP2 in mouse. The microheterogeneity of MAP2 is therefore ascribable either to alternative splicing within a single gene, or to posttranslational modification(s), or both. Under conditions of low

  7. Isolation and nucleotide sequence of a cDNA clone encoding rat mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, P M; Tellam, J; May, V L; Strauss, A W

    1986-01-01

    We have determined the complete sequence of the rat mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) precursor derived from nucleotide sequence of the cDNA. A single synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide probe was used to screen a rat atrial cDNA library constructed in lambda gt10. A 1.2 kb full-length cDNA clone provided the first complete amino acid sequence of pre-mMDH. The 1014 nucleotide-long open reading frame encodes the 314 residue long mature mMDH protein and a 24 amino acid NH2-terminal extension which directs mitochondrial import and is cleaved from the precursor after import to generate mature mMDH. The amino acid composition of the transit peptide is polar and basic. The pre-mMDH transit peptide shows marked homology with those of two other enzymes targeted to the rat mitochondrial matrix. Images PMID:3755817

  8. Cloning and characterization of a c-myc intron binding protein (MIBP1).

    PubMed

    Makino, R; Akiyama, K; Yasuda, J; Mashiyama, S; Honda, S; Sekiya, T; Hayashi, K

    1994-12-25

    The cDNA for a c-myc intron 1 binding protein 1 (MIBP1) in the rat was isolated from lambda gt11 and lambda ZAPII cDNA libraries. Sequencing of the cDNA clones revealed a long ORF which encoded a putative protein of 2437 amino acid residues. This protein has two widely separated zinc finger regions, each of which carries C2H2 motifs. When expressed in E. coli as a fusion protein, part of the MIBP1 showed sequence-specific binding to the target sequence, i.e., a 9-bp sequence in the rat c-myc intron 1. MIBP1 is most likely the rat counterpart of human MHC binding protein-2 (MBP-2/HIV-EP2), based on the 86% similarity in nucleotide sequence and 93% similarity in amno acid sequence. Northern blotting revealed a high level of MIBP1 mRNA in the brain.

  9. Isolation and characterization of two homologous cDNA clones from Torpedo electromotor neurons.

    PubMed

    Ngsee, J K; Scheller, R H

    1989-10-01

    Two homologous cDNA clones were isolated from a Torpedo california electric lobe lambda gt11 expression library using a polyclonal antiserum directed against proteins associated with synaptic vesicles. Northern blotting reveals an 8- to 9-kb transcript in the electric lobe and the spinal cord, but not in the brain or other non-neuronal tissues. Antibodies generated against a fusion protein synthesized in Escherichia coli reacted with a 85- to 90-kD species in the neurons of the electric lobe. The immunoreactivity is associated with microsomal membranes and can be extracted readily with high salt. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated a sparse punctate staining pattern in the cell body which colocalized with a subpopulation of post-Golgi vesicles.

  10. Healthy ageing of cloned sheep

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, K. D.; Corr, S. A.; Gutierrez, C. G.; Fisher, P. A.; Lee, J.-H.; Rathbone, A. J.; Choi, I.; Campbell, K. H. S.; Gardner, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    The health of cloned animals generated by somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been of concern since its inception; however, there are no detailed assessments of late-onset, non-communicable diseases. Here we report that SCNT has no obvious detrimental long-term health effects in a cohort of 13 cloned sheep. We perform musculoskeletal assessments, metabolic tests and blood pressure measurements in 13 aged (7–9 years old) cloned sheep, including four derived from the cell line that gave rise to Dolly. We also perform radiological examinations of all main joints, including the knees, the joint most affected by osteoarthritis in Dolly, and compare all health parameters to groups of 5-and 6-year-old sheep, and published reference ranges. Despite their advanced age, these clones are euglycaemic, insulin sensitive and normotensive. Importantly, we observe no clinical signs of degenerative joint disease apart from mild, or in one case moderate, osteoarthritis in some animals. Our study is the first to assess the long-term health outcomes of SCNT in large animals. PMID:27459299

  11. Clone Poems and the Microcomputer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irizarry, Estelle

    1989-01-01

    Describes how students can use the computer to study and create clone poems (altering original Spanish-language poems by substituting words and expressions), and how students can gain a deeper appreciation of the original poem's poetic structure and semantics. (CB)

  12. Human reproductive cloning: a conflict of liberties.

    PubMed

    Havstad, Joyce C

    2010-02-01

    Proponents of human reproductive cloning do not dispute that cloning may lead to violations of clones' right to self-determination, or that these violations could cause psychological harms. But they proceed with their endorsement of human reproductive cloning by dismissing these psychological harms, mainly in two ways. The first tactic is to point out that to commit the genetic fallacy is indeed a mistake; the second is to invoke Parfit's non-identity problem. The argument of this paper is that neither approach succeeds in removing our moral responsibility to consider and to prevent psychological harms to cloned individuals. In fact, the same commitment to personal liberty that generates the right to reproduce by means of cloning also creates the need to limit that right appropriately. Discussion of human reproductive cloning ought to involve a careful and balanced consideration of both the relevant aspects of personal liberty - the parents' right to reproductive freedom and the cloned child's right to self-determination.

  13. Probabilistic cloning of three symmetric states

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, O.; Bergou, J.; Delgado, A.

    2010-12-15

    We study the probabilistic cloning of three symmetric states. These states are defined by a single complex quantity, the inner product among them. We show that three different probabilistic cloning machines are necessary to optimally clone all possible families of three symmetric states. We also show that the optimal cloning probability of generating M copies out of one original can be cast as the quotient between the success probability of unambiguously discriminating one and M copies of symmetric states.

  14. Phase-covariant quantum cloning of qudits

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Heng; Imai, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Keiji; Wang, Xiang-Bin

    2003-02-01

    We study the phase-covariant quantum cloning machine for qudits, i.e., the input states in a d-level quantum system have complex coefficients with arbitrary phase but constant module. A cloning unitary transformation is proposed. After optimizing the fidelity between input state and single qudit reduced density operator of output state, we obtain the optimal fidelity for 1 to 2 phase-covariant quantum cloning of qudits and the corresponding cloning transformation.

  15. Molecular cloning, expression, and primary sequence of outer membrane protein P2 of Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, R; Tolan, R W

    1989-01-01

    The structural gene for the porin of Haemophilus influenzae type b, designated outer membrane protein P2, was cloned, and the DNA sequence was determined. An oligonucleotide probe generated by reverse translation of N-terminal amino acid sequence data from the purified protein was used to screen genomic DNA. The probe detected a single EcoRI fragment of approximately 1,700 base pairs which was cloned to lambda gt11 and then into M13 and partially sequenced. The derived amino acid sequence indicated that we had cloned the N-terminal portion of the P2 gene. An overlapping approximately 1,600-base-pair PvuII genomic fragment was cloned into M13, and the sequence of the remainder of the P2 gene was determined. The gene for P2 was then reconstructed under the control of the T7 promoter and expressed in Escherichia coli. The N-terminal sequence of the purified protein corresponds to residues 21 through 34 of the derived amino acid sequence. Thus, the protein is synthesized with a 20-amino-acid leader peptide. The Mr of the processed protein is 37,782, in good agreement with the estimate of 37,000 from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Images PMID:2535836

  16. Economical phase-covariant cloning of qudits

    SciTech Connect

    Buscemi, Francesco; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Macchiavello, Chiara

    2005-04-01

    We derive the optimal N{yields}M phase-covariant quantum cloning for equatorial states in dimension d with M=kd+N, k integer. The cloning maps are optimal for both global and single-qudit fidelity. The map is achieved by an 'economical' cloning machine, which works without ancilla.

  17. Local cloning of arbitrarily entangled multipartite states

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, Alastair; Ericsson, Marie

    2006-01-15

    We examine the perfect cloning of nonlocal, orthogonal states using only local operations and classical communication. We provide a complete characterisation of the states that can be cloned under these restrictions, and their relation to distinguishability. We also consider the case of catalytic cloning, which we show provides no enhancement to the set of clonable states.

  18. Health-based reference intervals for ALAT, ASAT and GT in serum, measured according to the recommendations of the European Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (ECCLS).

    PubMed

    Leino, A; Impivaara, O; Irjala, K; Mäki, J; Peltola, O; Järvisalo, J

    1995-05-01

    The reference intervals for the activities of L-alanine aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.2, ALAT), L-aspartate aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.1, ASAT) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (EC 2.3.2.2, GT) in serum were determined according to the recommendations of the European Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (ECCLS). Serum specimens from 954 subjects were analysed for ALAT and ASAT and from 794 subjects for GT. The subjects, aged 27-67 years, were participants in general health surveys. The reference population was formed by excluding subjects with any disease, or on any medication, affecting the liver, and also those consuming excessive amounts of alcohol. The 95% inner reference intervals for ALAT and ASAT were 9-50 (n = 189) and 15-36 U l-1 (n = 192) in men and 8-38 (n = 270) and 13-33 U l-1 (n = 270) in women. For GT the reference interval was 11-58 in men (n = 165) and 8-42 U l-1 in women (n = 220). Serum GT levels correlated clearly with alcohol consumption. Serum ALAT and ASAT were only slightly associated with alcohol consumption at levels less than 280 g per week in men and 190 g per week in women. There were modest positive associations between the three enzyme levels and body mass index. None of the enzymes correlated significantly with age.

  19. Ameliorative effects of SLC22A2 gene polymorphism 808 G/T and cimetidine on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in Chinese cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Wen

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the roles of SLC22A2 gene polymorphism 808 G/T and cimetidine on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity, a total of 123 Chinese cancer patients treated with cisplatin alone (n = 55) or in combination with cimetidine (n = 68) were genotyped. The changes of serum creatinine (SCr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and cystatin C levels were used as biomarkers for the evaluation of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. The changes of BUN and SCr levels showed no significant difference between groups divided by genotypes and treatments (P > 0.05). However, patients with mutant genotype (GT/TT) or with cimetidine treatment had smaller increase of the cystatin C levels compared to those with wild genotype (GG) or without cimetidine treatment (P < 0.05). In the non-cimetidine-treated group, the changes of cystatin C level in patients with mutant genotype (GT/TT) was significantly smaller than those with wild genotype (GG) (P = 0.043). In the wild type group, the cystatin C level change of patients without cimetidine treatment was significantly larger than those with cimetidine treatment (P = 0.007). These results suggested that SLC22A2 gene polymorphism 808 G/T and cimetidine could attenuate cisplatin nephrotoxicity in Chinese cancer patients. But the renoprotection mechanism of cimetidine might be damaged by the mutation.

  20. Sensitive detection of the c-KIT c.1430G>T mutation by mutant-specific polymerase chain reaction in feline mast cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Takanosu, M; Sato, M; Kagawa, Y

    2014-06-01

    Here, we describe the establishment of mutant-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of a c-KIT c.1430G>T mutation in feline mast cell tumours. Several mutations in feline c-KIT have been identified, with the c.1430G>T mutation accounting for a significant portion of feline mast cell tumour mutations. The c.1430G>T mutation in c-KIT exon 9 was detected in 15.7% (11 of 70) of samples by mutant-specific PCR but in only 7.1% (5 of 70) by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) in the genomic DNA isolated from 70 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections or cells collected by fine needle aspiration. Mutant-specific PCR showed remarkably higher detection rate than did PCR-RFLP. DNA sequence analysis did not always yield identical results to those of mutant-specific PCR, suggesting heterogeneity of tumour cells. Mutant-specific PCR is a valid and efficient screening tool for detection of the c-KIT c.1430G>T point mutation in feline mast cell tumours compared with PCR-RFLP and sequencing analysis.

  1. Identification and characterisation of F3GT1 and F3GGT1, two glycosyltransferases responsible for anthocyanin biosynthesis in red-fleshed kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis).

    PubMed

    Montefiori, Mirco; Espley, Richard V; Stevenson, David; Cooney, Janine; Datson, Paul M; Saiz, Anna; Atkinson, Ross G; Hellens, Roger P; Allan, Andrew C

    2011-01-01

    Much of the diversity of anthocyanins is due to the action of glycosyltransferases, which add sugar moieties to anthocyanidins. We identified two glycosyltransferases, F3GT1 and F3GGT1, from red-fleshed kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis) that perform sequential glycosylation steps. Red-fleshed genotypes of kiwifruit accumulate anthocyanins mainly in the form of cyanidin 3-O-xylo-galactoside. Genes in the anthocyanin and flavonoid biosynthetic pathway were identified and shown to be expressed in fruit tissue. However, only the expression of the glycosyltransferase F3GT1 was correlated with anthocyanin accumulation in red tissues. Recombinant enzyme assays in vitro and in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) demonstrated the role of F3GT1 in the production of cyanidin 3-O-galactoside. F3GGT1 was shown to further glycosylate the sugar moiety of the anthocyanins. This second glycosylation can affect the solubility and stability of the pigments and modify their colour. We show that recombinant F3GGT1 can catalyse the addition of UDP-xylose to cyanidin 3-galactoside. While F3GGT1 is responsible for the end-product of the pathway, F3GT1 is likely to be the key enzyme regulating the accumulation of anthocyanin in red-fleshed kiwifruit varieties.

  2. Metabolic Thresholds and Validated Accelerometer Cutoff Points for the Actigraph GT1M in Young Children Based on Measurements of Locomotion and Play Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimmy, Gerda; Dossegger, Alain; Seiler, Roland; Mader, Urs

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine metabolic thresholds and subsequent activity intensity cutoff points for the ActiGraph GT1M with various epochs spanning from 5 to 60 sec in young children. Twenty-two children, aged 4 to 9 years, performed 10 different activities including locomotion and play activities. Energy expenditure was…

  3. Role of Key Salt Bridges in Thermostability of G. thermodenitrificans EstGtA2: Distinctive Patterns within the New Bacterial Lipolytic Enzyme Family XV

    PubMed Central

    Charbonneau, David M.; Beauregard, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial lipolytic enzymes were originally classified into eight different families defined by Arpigny and Jaeger (families I-VIII). Recently, the discovery of new lipolytic enzymes allowed for extending the original classification to fourteen families (I-XIV). We previously reported that G. thermodenitrificans EstGtA2 (access no. AEN92268) belonged to a novel group of bacterial lipolytic enzymes. Here we propose a 15th family (family XV) and suggest criteria for the assignation of protein sequences to the N’ subfamily. Five selected salt bridges, hallmarks of the N’ subfamily (E3/R54, E12/R37, E66/R140, D124/K178 and D205/R220) were disrupted in EstGtA2 using a combinatorial alanine-scanning approach. A set of 14 (R/K→A) mutants was produced, including five single, three double, three triple and three quadruple mutants. Despite a high tolerance to non-conservative mutations for folding, all the alanine substitutions were destabilizing (decreasing Tm by 5 to 14°C). A particular combination of four substitutions exceeded this tolerance and prevents the correct folding of EstGtA2, leading to enzyme inactivation. Although other mutants remain active at low temperatures, the accumulation of more than two mutations had a dramatic impact on EstGtA2 activity at high temperatures suggesting an important role of these conserved salt bridge-forming residues in thermostability of lipolytic enzymes from the N’ subfamily. We also identified a particular interloop salt bridge in EstGtA2 (D194/H222), located at position i -2 and i -4 residues from the catalytic Asp and His respectively which is conserved in other related bacterial lipolytic enzymes (families IV and XIII) with high tolerance to mutations and charge reversal. We investigated the role of residue identity at position 222 in controlling stability-pH dependence in EstGtA2. The introduction of a His to Arg mutation led to increase thermostability under alkaline pH. Our results suggest primary targets for

  4. Evaluation of rs62527607 [GT] single nucleotide polymorphism located in BAALC gene in children with acute leukemia using mismatch PCR-RFLP.

    PubMed

    Nadimi, Motahareh; Rahgozar, Soheila; Moafi, Alireza; Tavassoli, Manoochehr; Mesrian Tanha, Hamzeh

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children and involves several factors that contribute to the development of multidrug resistance and treatment failure. According to our recent studies, the BAALC gene is identified to have high mRNA expression levels in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and those with multidrug resistance. Several polymorphisms are associated with the expression of this gene. To date, there has been no study on the rs62527607 [GT] single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of BAALC gene and its link with childhood acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemia (AML). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of this polymorphism in pediatric acute leukemia, as well as its relationship with prognosis. DNA samples were extracted from bone marrow slides of 129 children with ALL and 16 children with AML. The rs62527607 [GT] SNP was evaluated using mismatch polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP)-based analysis. The association between the SNP alleles and patient disease-free survival was then assessed. The prevalence of the T-allele of rs62527607 [GT] SNP in childhood T-ALL and pre-B-ALL was 28.3% and 11.2%, respectively. In the pre-B-ALL patients, 3 year disease free survival was associated with the GG genotype. Results showed a robust association between the rs62527607 SNP and the risk of relapse in ALL, but not AML, patients. T-ALL patients with the GT genotype had an 8.75 fold higher risk of relapse. The current study demonstrates a significant association between the genotype GT and the polymorphic allele G424T, and introduces this SNP as a negative prognostic factor in children with ALL.

  5. GT-repeat polymorphism in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter is associated with cardiovascular mortality risk in an arsenic-exposed population in northeastern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Meei-Maan; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chi-Ling; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Lien, Li-Ming; Lee, Te-Chang; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2010-11-01

    Inorganic arsenic has been associated with increased risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease and mortality in humans. A functional GT-repeat polymorphism in the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene promoter is inversely correlated with the development of coronary artery disease and restenosis after clinical angioplasty. The relationship of HO-1 genotype with arsenic-associated cardiovascular disease has not been studied. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between the HO-1 GT-repeat polymorphism and cardiovascular mortality in an arsenic-exposed population. A total of 504 study participants were followed up for a median of 10.7 years for occurrence of cardiovascular deaths (coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral arterial disease). Cardiovascular risk factors and DNA samples for determination of HO-1 GT repeats were obtained at recruitment. GT repeats variants were grouped into the S (< 27 repeats) or L allele ({>=} 27 repeats). Relative mortality risk was estimated using Cox regression analysis, adjusted for competing risk of cancer and other causes. For the L/L, L/S, and S/S genotype groups, the crude mortalities for cardiovascular disease were 8.42, 3.10, and 2.85 cases/1000 person-years, respectively. After adjusting for conventional cardiovascular risk factors and competing risk of cancer and other causes, carriers with class S allele (L/S or S/S genotypes) had a significantly reduced risk of cardiovascular mortality compared to non-carriers (L/L genotype) [OR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.16-0.90]. In contrast, no significant association was observed between HO-1 genotype and cancer mortality or mortality from other causes. Shorter (GT)n repeats in the HO-1 gene promoter may confer protective effects against cardiovascular mortality related to arsenic exposure.

  6. Predators induce cloning in echinoderm larvae.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Dawn; Strathmann, Richard R

    2008-03-14

    Asexual propagation (cloning) is a widespread reproductive strategy of plants and animals. Although larval cloning is well documented in echinoderms, identified stimuli for cloning are limited to those associated with conditions favorable for growth and reproduction. Our research shows that larvae of the sand dollar Dendraster excentricus also clone in response to cues from predators. Predator-induced clones were smaller than uncloned larvae, suggesting an advantage against visual predators. Our results offer another ecological context for asexual reproduction: rapid size reduction as a defense.

  7. Optimal quantum cloning via spin networks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qing; Cheng Jianhua; Wang Kelin; Du Jiangfeng

    2006-09-15

    In this paper we demonstrate that optimal 1{yields}M phase-covariant cloning quantum cloning is available via free dynamical evolution of spin networks. By properly designing the network and the couplings between spins, we show that optimal 1{yields}M phase-covariant cloning can be achieved if the initial state is prepared as a specific symmetric state. Especially, when M is an odd number, the optimal phase-covariant cloning can be achieved without ancillas. Moreover, we demonstrate that the same framework is capable for optimal 1{yields}2 universal cloning.

  8. No-cloning theorem on quantum logics

    SciTech Connect

    Miyadera, Takayuki; Imai, Hideki

    2009-10-15

    This paper discusses the no-cloning theorem in a logicoalgebraic approach. In this approach, an orthoalgebra is considered as a general structure for propositions in a physical theory. We proved that an orthoalgebra admits cloning operation if and only if it is a Boolean algebra. That is, only classical theory admits the cloning of states. If unsharp propositions are to be included in the theory, then a notion of effect algebra is considered. We proved that an atomic Archimedean effect algebra admitting cloning operation is a Boolean algebra. This paper also presents a partial result, indicating a relation between the cloning on effect algebras and hidden variables.

  9. Therapeutic and reproductive cloning: a critique.

    PubMed

    Bowring, Finn

    2004-01-01

    This article is a critical examination of the science and ethics of human cloning. It summarises the key scientific milestones in the development of nuclear transplantation, explains the importance of cloning to research into the medical potential of embryonic stem cells, and discusses the well-worn distinction between 'therapeutic' and 'reproductive' cloning. Suggesting that this distinction will be impossible to police, it goes on to consider the ethics of full human cloning. It is concluded that it represents an unacceptable form of parental despotism, and that the genetic engineering and cloning of future human beings will fracture the foundations of modern humanism.

  10. Clone DB: an integrated NCBI resource for clone-associated data.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Valerie A; Chen, Hsiu-Chuan; Clausen, Cliff; Meric, Peter A; Zhou, Zhigang; Bouk, Nathan; Husain, Nora; Maglott, Donna R; Church, Deanna M

    2013-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Clone DB (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/clone/) is an integrated resource providing information about and facilitating access to clones, which serve as valuable research reagents in many fields, including genome sequencing and variation analysis. Clone DB represents an expansion and replacement of the former NCBI Clone Registry and has records for genomic and cell-based libraries and clones representing more than 100 different eukaryotic taxa. Records provide details of library construction, associated sequences, map positions and information about resource distribution. Clone DB is indexed in the NCBI Entrez system and can be queried by fields that include organism, clone name, gene name and sequence identifier. Whenever possible, genomic clones are mapped to reference assemblies and their map positions provided in clone records. Clones mapping to specific genomic regions can also be searched for using the NCBI Clone Finder tool, which accepts queries based on sequence coordinates or features such as gene or transcript names. Clone DB makes reports of library, clone and placement data on its FTP site available for download. With Clone DB, users now have available to them a centralized resource that provides them with the tools they will need to make use of these important research reagents.

  11. Study on Off-Design Steady State Performances of Helium Gas Turbo-compressor for HTGR-GT

    SciTech Connect

    Qisen Ren; Xiaoyong Yang; Zhiyong Huang; Jie Wang

    2006-07-01

    The high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) coupled with direct gas turbine cycle is a promising concept in the future of nuclear power development. Both helium gas turbine and compressor are key components in the cycle. Under normal conditions, the mode of power adjustment is to control total helium mass in the primary loop using gas storage vessels. Meanwhile, thermal power of reactor core is regulated. This article analyzes off-design performances of helium gas turbine and compressors for high temperature gas-cooled reactor with gas turbine cycle (HTGR-GT) at steady state level of electric power adjustment. Moreover, performances of the cycle were simply discussed. Results show that the expansion ratio of turbine decreases as electric power reduces but the compression ratios of compressors increase, efficiencies of both turbine and compressors decrease to some extent. Thermal power does not vary consistently with electric power, the difference between these two powers increases as electric power reduces. As a result of much thermal energy dissipated in the temperature modulator set at core inlet, thermal efficiency of the cycle has a widely reduction under partial load conditions. (authors)

  12. Cleaning efficiency of nickel-titanium GT and .04 rotary files when used in a torque-controlled rotary handpiece.

    PubMed

    Suffridge, Calvin B; Hartwell, Gary R; Walker, Thomas L

    2003-05-01

    This study determined if the cleaning efficiency of nickel-titanium rotary files in an endodontic electric handpiece using a no-torque control setting was superior to that obtained when using the torque-control feature. Fifty extracted human anterior teeth with straight canals were divided into two groups of 20 and two control groups of 5. Canals were instrumented with GT and .04 ProFile nickel-titanium files until a size 35 advanced to working length. Samples were sectioned and the apical 6 mm of the canal was photographed (x20) and projected onto a 3- x 4-foot grid with squares measuring 0.5 inches each. Total debris was the percentage of the number of squares containing debris versus the total number of squares. The teeth in the torque-controlled group showed an average of 24.99% debris versus 15.55% for the teeth in the no-torque group. The difference was not statistically significant; therefore, no difference can be said to exist between the two torque settings in terms of cleaning efficiency.

  13. Method for cloning lymphoblastoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerling, U.; Kosinski, S.

    1989-02-14

    A method is described for increasing cloning frequency of human lymphocyte or lumphoblastoid cells which have been transformed with Epstein Barr virus comprising growing the transformed cells in a semi-solid agarose medium. A lower and an upper layer of agarose are used, the lower layer comprising fibroblasts suspended in the agarose layer and the upper layer comprising irradiated fibroblasts and the transformed cells suspended in the agarose layer wherein the upper agarose layer is added after the lower layer has gelled.

  14. Cloning expeditions: risky but rewarding.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Harvey

    2013-12-01

    In the 1980s, a good part of my laboratory was using the then-new recombinant DNA techniques to clone and characterize many important cell surface membrane proteins: GLUT1 (the red cell glucose transporter) and then GLUT2 and GLUT4, the red cell anion exchange protein (Band 3), asialoglycoprotein receptor subunits, sucrase-isomaltase, the erythropoietin receptor, and two of the subunits of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor. These cloned genes opened many new fields of basic research, including membrane insertion and trafficking of transmembrane proteins, signal transduction by many members of the cytokine and TGF-β families of receptors, and the cellular physiology of glucose and anion transport. They also led to many insights into the molecular biology of several cancers, hematopoietic disorders, and diabetes. This work was done by an exceptional group of postdocs and students who took exceptionally large risks in developing and using novel cloning technologies. Unsurprisingly, all have gone on to become leaders in the fields of molecular cell biology and molecular medicine.

  15. Cloning of the 5' mRNA for the 230-kD bullous pemphigoid antigen by rapid amplification of cDNA ends.

    PubMed

    Elgart, G W; Stanley, J R

    1993-08-01

    The 230-kD bullous pemphigoid antigen (BPAG1), defined by autoantibodies in patient sera, is a hemidesmosomal plaque protein in the same gene family as the intracellular proteins desmoplakin I/II and plectin. We had previously isolated, from a lambda gt11 library, overlapping cDNA clones with 6921 bp of mRNA sequence for BPAG1. The coding sequence encoded by these clones included the 3' stop codon but not the 5' coding and non-coding region of the mRNA. To obtain these sequences we used the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method called rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The PCR products were cloned into plasmids and sequenced. With five PCR primers we were able to obtain overlapping clones containing the 5' region of the mRNA. An upstream stop codon in frame with the rest of the coding sequence demonstrates that the full 5' coding sequence is obtained. Four different PCR products from two separate reactions had the same 5' end, suggesting that this 5' end is near, or at, the transcription start site. No alternatively spliced clones were found and no transmembrane site was predicted, confirming that BPAG1 is an intracellular hemidesmosomal plaque protein.

  16. Human pyridoxal phosphatase. Molecular cloning, functional expression, and tissue distribution.

    PubMed

    Jang, Young Min; Kim, Dae Won; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Won, Moo Ho; Baek, Nam-In; Moon, Byung Jo; Choi, Soo Young; Kwon, Oh-Shin

    2003-12-12

    Pyridoxal phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) and pyridoxine 5'-phosphate. A human brain cDNA clone was identified to the PLP phosphatase on the basis of peptide sequences obtained previously. The cDNA predicts a 296-amino acid protein with a calculated Mr of 31698. The open reading frame is encoded by two exons located on human chromosome 22q12.3, and the exon-intron junction contains the GT/AG consensus splice site. In addition, a full-length mouse PLP phosphatase cDNA of 1978 bp was also isolated. Mouse enzyme encodes a protein of 292 amino acids with Mr of 31512, and it is localized on chromosome 15.E1. Human and mouse PLP phosphatase share 93% identity in protein sequence. A BLAST search revealed the existence of putative proteins in organism ranging from bacteria to mammals. Catalytically active human PLP phosphatase was expressed in Escherichia coli, and characteristics of the recombinant enzyme were similar to those of erythrocyte enzyme. The recombinant enzyme displayed Km and kcat values for pyridoxal of 2.5 microM and 1.52 s(-1), respectively. Human PLP phosphatase mRNA is differentially expressed in a tissue-specific manner. A single mRNA transcript of 2.1 kb was detected in all human tissues examined and was highly abundant in the brain. Obtaining the molecular properties for the human PLP phosphatase may provide new direction for investigating metabolic pathway involving vitamin B6.

  17. From deep sequencing to actual clones.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Sara; Kumar, Sandeep; Naranjo, Leslie; Ferrara, Fortunato; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2014-10-01

    The application of deep sequencing to in vitro display technologies has been invaluable for the straightforward analysis of enriched clones. After sequencing in vitro selected populations, clones are binned into identical or similar groups and ordered by abundance, allowing identification of those that are most enriched. However, the greatest strength of deep sequencing is also its greatest weakness: clones are easily identified by their DNA sequences, but are not physically available for testing without a laborious multistep process involving several rounds of polymerization chain reaction (PCR), assembly and cloning. Here, using the isolation of antibody genes from a phage and yeast display selection as an example, we show the power of a rapid and simple inverse PCR-based method to easily isolate clones identified by deep sequencing. Once primers have been received, clone isolation can be carried out in a single day, rather than two days. Furthermore the reduced number of PCRs required will reduce PCR mutations correspondingly. We have observed a 100% success rate in amplifying clones with an abundance as low as 0.5% in a polyclonal population. This approach allows us to obtain full-length clones even when an incomplete sequence is available, and greatly simplifies the subcloning process. Moreover, rarer, but functional clones missed by traditional screening can be easily isolated using this method, and the approach can be extended to any selected library (scFv, cDNA, libraries based on scaffold proteins) where a unique sequence signature for the desired clones of interest is available.

  18. Agro-economic impact of cattle cloning.

    PubMed

    Faber, D C; Ferre, L B; Metzger, J; Robl, J M; Kasinathan, P

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the economic and social implications of cloned cattle, their products, and their offspring as related to production agriculture. Cloning technology in cattle has several applications outside of traditional production agriculture. These applications can include bio-medical applications, such as the production of pharmaceuticals in the blood or milk of transgenic cattle. Cloning may also be useful in the production of research models. These models may or may not include genetic modifications. Uses in agriculture include many applications of the technology. These include making genetic copies of elite seed stock and prize winning show cattle. Other purposes may range from "insurance" to making copies of cattle that have sentimental value, similar to cloning of pets. Increased selection opportunities available with cloning may provide for improvement in genetic gain. The ultimate goal of cloning has often been envisioned as a system for producing quantity and uniformity of the perfect dairy cow. However, only if heritability were 100%, would clone mates have complete uniformity. Changes in the environment may have significant impact on the productivity and longevity of the resulting clones. Changes in consumer preferences and economic input costs may all change the definition of the perfect cow. The cost of producing such animals via cloning must be economically feasible to meet the intended applications. Present inefficiencies limit cloning opportunities to highly valued animals. Improvements are necessary to move the applications toward commercial application. Cloning has additional obstacles to conquer. Social and regulatory acceptance of cloning is paramount to its utilization in production agriculture. Regulatory acceptance will need to address the animal, its products, and its offspring. In summary, cloning is another tool in the animal biotechnology toolbox, which includes artificial insemination, sexing of semen, embryo

  19. A DOS Primer for Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beecher, Henry

    1989-01-01

    Presents a basic orientation to the functions and capabilities of disk operating systems (DOS), aimed at the nontechnically oriented user of IBM personal computers and compatible microcomputers. Areas discussed include booting up, the use of floppy and hard disks, file storage and manipulation, and directories. Further readings are provided. (CLB)

  20. Glutamate increases toxicity of inorganic lead in GT1-7 neurons: partial protection induced by flunarizine.

    PubMed

    Loikkanen, Jarkko; Naarala, Jonne; Vähäkangas, Kirsi H; Savolainen, Kai M

    2003-12-01

    Recent studies point to an interaction between the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system and inorganic lead (Pb) neurotoxicity. Pb (1-100 microM) evoked cytotoxicity over the period of 72 h in mouse hypothalamic GT1-7 neurons. Glutamate (0.1 or 1 mM) on its own did not have any effect on cell viability. However, 1 mM glutamate clearly increased Pb-induced cell death at 48 and 72 h. Although flunarizine (0.1-10 microM), an antagonist of L- and T-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCCs), partially protected from the cytotoxicity induced by co-exposure to Pb (10 or 100 micro M) and glutamate (1 mM), it had no protective effect on cytotoxicity induced by Pb alone. The flunarizine-induced protection was dependent on time and observed only at 48 h. Neither verapamil, an antagonist of L-type VSCCs, nor DIDS, an inhibitor of anion exchange, at non-toxic concentrations (0.1-10 microM) had any effect on cytotoxicity induced by Pb alone or together with glutamate at any studied time point. Co-exposure to Pb and glutamate also resulted in more prominent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) than either of the compounds alone. Interestingly, we observed an increase in intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels in cells exposed to micromolar concentrations of Pb. Glutamate decreased the levels of intracellular GSH and also partially reduced the Pb-induced increase in GSH levels. These results suggest that the interaction of glutamate and Pb results in increased neuronal cell death via mechanisms that involve an increase in ROS production, a decrease in intracellular GSH defense against oxidative stress and probably T-type VSCCs.

  1. Hydrogen Fueled Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell-Gas Turbine (SOFC-GT) System for Long-Haul Rail Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Justin Jeff

    Freight movement of goods is the artery for America's economic health. Long-haul rail is the premier mode of transport on a ton-mile basis. Concerns regarding greenhouse gas and criteria pollutant emissions, however, have motivated the creation of annually increasing locomotive emissions standards. Health issues from diesel particulate matter, especially near rail yards, have also been on the rise. These factors and the potential to raise conventional diesel-electric locomotive performance warrants the investigation of using future fuels in a more efficient system for locomotive application. This research evaluates the dynamic performance of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell-Gas Turbine (SOFC-GT) Hybrid system operating on hydrogen fuel to power a locomotive over a rail path starting from the Port of Los Angeles and ending in the City of Barstow. Physical constraints, representative locomotive operation logic, and basic design are used from a previous feasibility study and simulations are performed in the MATLAB Simulink environment. In-house controls are adapted to and expanded upon. Results indicate high fuel-to-electricity efficiencies of at least 54% compared to a conventional diesel-electric locomotive efficiency of 35%. Incorporation of properly calibrated feedback and feed-forward controls enables substantial load following of difficult transients that result from train kinematics while maintaining turbomachinery operating requirements and suppressing thermal stresses in the fuel cell stack. The power split between the SOFC and gas turbine is deduced to be a deterministic factor in the balance between capital and operational costs. Using hydrogen results in no emissions if renewable and offers a potential of 24.2% fuel energy savings for the rail industry.

  2. Cloning and sequence analysis of the muramidase-2 gene from Enterococcus hirae.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, C P; Kariyama, R; Daneo-Moore, L; Shockman, G D

    1992-01-01

    Extracellular muramidase-2 of Enterococcus hirae ATCC 9790 was purified to homogeneity by substrate binding, guanidine-HCl extraction, and reversed-phase chromatography. A monoclonal antibody, 2F8, which specifically recognizes muramidase-2, was used to screen a genomic library of E. hirae ATCC 9790 DNA in bacteriophage lambda gt11. A positive phage clone containing a 4.5-kb DNA insert was isolated and analyzed. The EcoRI-digested 4.5-kb fragment was cut into 2.3-, 1.0-, and 1.5-kb pieces by using restriction enzymes KpnI, Sau3AI, and PstI, and each fragment was subcloned into plasmid pJDC9 or pUC19. The nucleotide sequence of each subclone was determined. The sequence data indicated an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 666 amino acid residues, with a calculated molecular mass of 70,678 Da. The first 24 N-terminal amino acids of purified extracellular muramidase-2 were in very good agreement with the deduced amino acid sequence after a 49-amino-acid putative signal sequence. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence showed the presence at the C-terminal region of the protein of six highly homologous repeat units separated by nonhomologous intervening sequences that are highly enriched in serine and threonine. The overall sequence showed a high degree of homology with a recently cloned Streptococcus faecalis autolysin. Images PMID:1347040

  3. Molecular cloning and nucleotide sequence of cDNA for human liver arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Haraguchi, Y.; Takiguchi, M.; Amaya, Y.; Kawamoto, S.; Matsuda, I.; Mori, M.

    1987-01-01

    Arginase (EC3.5.3.1) catalyzes the last step of the urea cycle in the liver of ureotelic animals. Inherited deficiency of the enzyme results in argininemia, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hyperammonemia. To facilitate investigation of the enzyme and gene structures and to elucidate the nature of the mutation in argininemia, the authors isolated cDNA clones for human liver arginase. Oligo(dT)-primed and random primer human liver cDNA libraries in lambda gt11 were screened using isolated rat arginase cDNA as a probe. Two of the positive clones, designated lambda hARG6 and lambda hARG109, contained an overlapping cDNA sequence with an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 322 amino acid residues (predicted M/sub r/, 34,732), a 5'-untranslated sequence of 56 base pairs, a 3'-untranslated sequence of 423 base pairs, and a poly(A) segment. Arginase activity was detected in Escherichia coli cells transformed with the plasmid carrying lambda hARG6 cDNA insert. RNA gel blot analysis of human liver RNA showed a single mRNA of 1.6 kilobases. The predicted amino acid sequence of human liver arginase is 87% and 41% identical with those of the rat liver and yeast enzymes, respectively. There are several highly conserved segments among the human, rat, and yeast enzymes.

  4. The cloning of T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, R H

    1982-02-01

    A new era of cellular immunology is clearly at hand. It is now possible, with a little bit of effort, to isolate monoclonal populations of T cells specific for any given antigen. The implications o f this technological advance are enormous in terms of applications to basic research and clinical medicine. In this article the two basic approaches that have been used to clone T lymphocytes are outlined, the pros and cons of each technique discussed and examples are given of recent experiments which have exploited this technology to gain new insights into T-cell specificity.

  5. Cloning cattle: the methods in the madness.

    PubMed

    Oback, Björn; Wells, David N

    2007-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is much more widely and efficiently practiced in cattle than in any other species, making this arguably the most important mammal cloned to date. While the initial objective behind cattle cloning was commercially driven--in particular to multiply genetically superior animals with desired phenotypic traits and to produce genetically modified animals-researchers have now started to use bovine SCNT as a tool to address diverse questions in developmental and cell biology. In this paper, we review current cattle cloning methodologies and their potential technical or biological pitfalls at any step of the procedure. In doing so, we focus on one methodological parameter, namely donor cell selection. We emphasize the impact of epigenetic and genetic differences between embryonic, germ, and somatic donor cell types on cloning efficiency. Lastly, we discuss adult phenotypes and fitness of cloned cattle and their offspring and illustrate some of the more imminent commercial cattle cloning applications.

  6. Unified universal quantum cloning machine and fidelities

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yinan; Shi Handuo; Xiong Zhaoxi; Jing Li; Mu Liangzhu; Ren Xijun; Fan Heng

    2011-09-15

    We present a unified universal quantum cloning machine, which combines several different existing universal cloning machines together, including the asymmetric case. In this unified framework, the identical pure states are projected equally into each copy initially constituted by input and one half of the maximally entangled states. We show explicitly that the output states of those universal cloning machines are the same. One importance of this unified cloning machine is that the cloning procession is always the symmetric projection, which reduces dramatically the difficulties for implementation. Also, it is found that this unified cloning machine can be directly modified to the general asymmetric case. Besides the global fidelity and the single-copy fidelity, we also present all possible arbitrary-copy fidelities.

  7. Telomeres and the ethics of human cloning.

    PubMed

    Allhoff, Fritz

    2004-01-01

    In search of a potential problem with cloning, I investigate the phenomenon of telomere shortening which is caused by cell replication; clones created from somatic cells will have shortened telomeres and therefore reach a state of senescence more rapidly. While genetic intervention might fix this problem at some point in the future, I ask whether, absent technological advances, this biological phenomenon undermines the moral permissibility of cloning.

  8. Association of RAD 51 135 G/C, 172 G/T and XRCC3 Thr241Met gene polymorphisms with increased risk of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Kayani, Mahmood Akhtar; Khan, Sumeera; Baig, Ruqia Mehmood; Mahjabeen, Ishrat

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination repair (HRR) plays an important role in protection against carcinogenic factors. Genes regulating the HRR mechanisms may impair their functions and consequently result in increased cancer susceptibility. RAD 51 and XRCC3 are key regulators of the HRR pathway and genetic variability in these may contribute to the appearance and progression of various cancers including head and neck cancer (HNC). The aim of the present study was to compare the distribution of genotypes of RAD51 (135G/C, 172 G/T) and XRCC3 (Thr241Met) polymorphisms between HNC patients and controls. Each polymorphism was genotyped using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymerase (PCR-RFLP) technique in 200 pathologically confirmed HNC patients along with 150 blood samples from normal, disease free healthy individuals. We observed that homozygous variant CC genotype of RAD51 135G/C was associated with a 2.5 fold increased HNC risk (OR=2.5; 95%CI=0.69-9.53; p<0.02), while second polymorphism of RAD 51 172 G/T, heterozygous variant GT genotype was associated with a 1.68 fold (OR=1.68; 95%CI=1.08-2.61; p<0.02) elevation when compared with controls. In the case of the Thr241Met polymorphism of XRCC3, we observed a 16 fold (OR=16; 95% CI= 3.78-69.67; p<0.0002) increased HNC risk in patients compared to controls. These results further suggested that RAD51 (135G/C, 172 G/T) and XRCC3 (Thr241Met) polymorphisms may be effective biomarkers for genetic susceptibility to HNC. Larger studies are needed to confirm our findings and identify the underlying mechanisms.

  9. Different Roles of DosS and DosT in the Hypoxic Adaptation of Mycobacteria▿

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Ju; Park, Kwang-Jin; Ko, In-Jeong; Kim, Young Min; Oh, Jeong-Il

    2010-01-01

    The DosS (DevS) and DosT histidine kinases form a two-component system together with the DosR (DevR) response regulator in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. DosS and DosT, which have high sequence similarity to each other over the length of their amino acid sequences, contain two GAF domains (GAF-A and GAF-B) in their N-terminal sensory domains. Complementation tests in conjunction with phylogenetic analysis showed that DevS of Mycobacterium smegmatis is more closely related to DosT than DosS. We also demonstrated in vivo that DosS and DosT of M. tuberculosis play a differential role in hypoxic adaptation. DosT responds to a decrease in oxygen tension more sensitively and strongly than DosS, which might be attributable to their different autooxidation rates. The different responsiveness of DosS and DosT to hypoxia is due to the difference in their GAF-A domains accommodating the hemes. Multiple alignment analysis of the GAF-A domains of mycobacterial DosS (DosT) homologs and subsequent site-directed mutagenesis revealed that just one substitution of E87, D90, H97, L118, or T169 of DosS with the corresponding residue of DosT is sufficient to convert DosS to DosT with regard to the responsiveness to changes in oxygen tension. PMID:20675480

  10. No end in sight to cloning debate.

    PubMed

    Graumann, Sigrid; Poltermann, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Since last August, Great Britain has allowed the cloning for research purposes. This fact has re-generated an existing debate, taking into account the prohibition of cloning of the UN, the States are debating whether cloning should be prohibited or in the contrary, it should also be admitted for reproductive purposes. This situation has generated an international uneasiness due to the lack of a universal consensus. This article analyses this situation, bringing the reader closer to the very controversial texts, such as the European Constitution and the UN Convention on Cloning.

  11. Quantum cloning disturbed by thermal Davies environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dajka, Jerzy; Łuczka, Jerzy

    2016-06-01

    A network of quantum gates designed to implement universal quantum cloning machine is studied. We analyze how thermal environment coupled to auxiliary qubits, `blank paper' and `toner' required at the preparation stage of copying, modifies an output fidelity of the cloner. Thermal environment is described in terms of the Markovian Davies theory. We show that such a cloning machine is not universal any more but its output is independent of at least a part of parameters of the environment. As a case study, we consider cloning of states in a six-state cryptography's protocol. We also briefly discuss cloning of arbitrary input states.

  12. Species-specific challenges in dog cloning.

    PubMed

    Kim, G A; Oh, H J; Park, J E; Kim, M J; Park, E J; Jo, Y K; Jang, G; Kim, M K; Kim, H J; Lee, B C

    2012-12-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is now an established procedure used in cloning of several species. SCNT in dogs involves multiple steps including the removal of the nuclear material, injection of a donor cell, fusion, activation of the reconstructed oocytes and finally transfer to a synchronized female recipient. There are therefore many factors that contribute to cloning efficiency. By performing a retrospective analysis of 2005-2012 published papers regarding dog cloning, we define the optimum procedure and summarize the specific feature for dog cloning.

  13. Human cloning: Eastern Mediterranean Region perspective.

    PubMed

    Abdur Rab, M; Khayat, M H

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in genomics and biotechnology have ushered in a new era in health development. Therapeutic cloning possesses enormous potential for revolutionizing medical and therapeutic techniques. Cloning technology, however, is perceived as having the potential for reproductive cloning, which raises serious ethical and moral concerns. It is important that the Islamic countries come to a consensus on this vital issue. Developing science and technology for better health is a religious and moral obligation. There is an urgent need for Muslim scholars to discuss the issue of stem cell research and cloning rationally; such dialogue will not only consider the scientific merits but also the moral, ethical and legal implications.

  14. (GT)n Repeat Polymorphism in Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) Correlates with Clinical Outcome after Myeloablative or Nonmyeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Køllgaard, Tania; Kornblit, Brian; Petersen, Jesper; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Mortensen, Bo Kok; Brændstrup, Peter; Sengeløv, Henrik; Høgdall, Estrid; Müller, Klaus; Vindeløv, Lars; Andersen, Mads Hald; thor Straten, Per

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a treatment for various hematologic diseases where efficacy of treatment is in part based on the graft versus tumour (GVT) activity of cells in the transplant. The cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation and it has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory functions. In humans a (GT)n repeat polymorphism regulates the expression of HO-1. We conducted fragment length analyses of the (GT)n repeat in the promotor region of the gene for HO-1 in DNA from donors and recipients receiving allogeneic myeloablative- (MA) (n = 110) or nonmyeloablative- (NMA-) (n = 250) HCT. Subsequently, we compared the length of the (GT)n repeat with clinical outcome after HCT. We demonstrated that transplants from a HO-1high donor after MA-conditioning (n = 13) is associated with higher relapse incidence at 3 years (p = 0.01, n = 110). In the NMA-conditioning setting transplantation of HO-1low donor cells into HO-1low recipients correlated significantly with decreased relapse related mortality (RRM) and longer progression free survival (PFS) (p = 0.03 and p = 0.008, respectively). Overall, our findings suggest that HO-1 may play a role for the induction of GVT effect after allogeneic HCT. PMID:27997582

  15. cDNA cloning and analysis of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, a salt inducible enzyme in sugar beet

    SciTech Connect

    McCue, K.F.; Hanson, A.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Betaine accumulates and serves as a compatible osmolyte in some plants subjected to drought or salinity stress. The last enzyme in the betaine biosynthetic pathway is betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). The activity of BADH increases in response to increasing salinity levels. This increase in activity corresponds to an increase in protein detectable by immunoblotting, and to an increase in the translatable BADH mRNA. BADH was cloned from a cDNA library constructed in {lambda}gt10 using poly(A){sup +} RNA from sugar beets salinized to 500 mM NaCl. cDNAs were size selected (>1kb) before ligation into the vector, and the library was screened with a spinach BADH cDNA probe. Three nearly full length clones obtained were confirmed as BADH by their nucleotide and deduced amino acid homology to spinach BADH. Clones averaged 1.8 kb and contained open reading frames of 500 amino acids at 80% identity with spinach BADH. RNA gel blot analysis of poly(A){sup +} RNA indicated that salinization to 500 mM NaCl resulted in a 5-fold increase of BADH mRNA level.

  16. Hypoxically inducible barley lactate dehydrogenase: cDNA cloning and molecular analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hondred, D. ); Hanson, A.D. Univ. de Montreal, Quebec )

    1990-09-01

    In the roots of barley and other cereals, hypoxia induces a set of five isozymes of L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; (S)-lactate:NADH oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.27). Biochemical and genetic data indicate that the five LDH isozymes are tetramers that arise from random association of the products of two Ldh loci. To investigate this system, cDNA clones of LDH were isolated from a {lambda}gt11 cDNA library derived from hypoxically treated barley roots. The library was screened with antiserum raised against barley LDH purified {approx}3,000-fold by an improved three-step procedure. Immunopositive clones were rescreened with a cDNA probe synthesized by the polymerase chain reaction using primers modeled from the amino acid sequences of two tryptic LDH peptides. Two types of LDH clones were found. Nucleotide sequence analysis of one representative insert of each type (respectively, 1,305 and 1,166 base pairs) revealed open reading framed encoding 10 peptide fragments of LDH. The 1,305-base-pair insert included the entire coding region of a 356-residue LDH monomer. The nucleotide sequences of the two LDH cDNAs were 92% identical in the coding region, but highly divergent in the 3{prime} noncoding region, and thus probably correspond to the two postulated Ldh loci. The deduced amino acid sequences of the two barley LDHs were 96% identical to each other and very similar to those from vertebrate and bacterial LDHs. RNA blot hybridization showed a single mRNA band of 1.5 kilobases whose level rose about 8-fold in roots during hypoxic induction, as did the level of translatable LDH message.

  17. Positional cloning by linkage disequilibrium.

    PubMed

    Maniatis, Nikolas; Collins, Andrew; Gibson, Jane; Zhang, Weihua; Tapper, William; Morton, Newton E

    2004-05-01

    Recently, metric linkage disequilibrium (LD) maps that assign an LD unit (LDU) location for each marker have been developed (Maniatis et al. 2002). Here we present a multiple pairwise method for positional cloning by LD within a composite likelihood framework and investigate the operating characteristics of maps in physical units (kb) and LDU for two bodies of data (Daly et al. 2001; Jeffreys et al. 2001) on which current ideas of blocks are based. False-negative indications of a disease locus (type II error) were examined by selecting one single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at a time as causal and taking its allelic count (0, 1, or 2, for the three genotypes) as a pseudophenotype, Y. By use of regression and correlation, association between every pseudophenotype and the allelic count of each SNP locus (X) was based on an adaptation of the Malecot model, which includes a parameter for location of the putative gene. By expressing locations in kb or LDU, greater power for localization was observed when the LDU map was fitted. The efficiency of the kb map, relative to the LDU map, to describe LD varied from a maximum of 0.87 to a minimum of 0.36, with a mean of 0.62. False-positive indications of a disease locus (type I error) were examined by simulating an unlinked causal SNP and the allele count was used as a pseudophenotype. The type I error was in good agreement with Wald's likelihood theorem for both metrics and all models that were tested. Unlike tests that select only the most significant marker, haplotype, or haploset, these methods are robust to large numbers of markers in a candidate region. Contrary to predictions from tagging SNPs that retain haplotype diversity, the sample with smaller size but greater SNP density gave less error. The locations of causal SNPs were estimated with the same precision in blocks and steps, suggesting that block definition may be less useful than anticipated for mapping a causal SNP. These results provide a guide to efficient

  18. What's so bad about human cloning?

    PubMed

    Breitowitz, Yitzchok

    2002-12-01

    There appears to be a consensus in the general community that reproductive cloning is an immoral technology that should be banned. It may, however, be argued, at least from the perspective of the Jewish tradition, that reproductive cloning has many positive benefits. It is thus essential that one carefully weigh the costs and the benefits before deciding on a definitive course of action.

  19. Cloning of endangered mammalian species: any progress?

    PubMed

    Loi, Pasqualino; Galli, Cesare; Ptak, Grazyna

    2007-05-01

    Attempts through somatic cell nuclear transfer to expand wild populations that have shrunk to critical numbers is a logical extension of the successful cloning of mammals. However, although the first mammal was cloned 10 years ago, nuclear reprogramming remains phenomenological, with abnormal gene expression and epigenetic deregulation being associated with the cloning process. In addition, although cloning of wild animals using host oocytes from different species has been successful, little is known about the implication of partial or total mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in cloned embryos, fetuses and offspring. Finally, there is a need for suitable foster mothers for inter-intra specific cloned embryos. Considering these issues, the limited success achieved in cloning endangered animals is not surprising. However, optimism comes from the rapid gain in the understanding of the molecular clues underlying nuclear reprogramming. If it is possible to achieve a controlled reversal of the differentiated state of a cell then it is probable that other issues that impair the cloning of endangered animals, such as the inter-intra species oocyte or womb donor, will be overcome in the medium term.

  20. The ethics of human reproductive cloning.

    PubMed

    Strong, Carson

    2005-03-01

    This article addresses the question of whether human reproductive cloning could be ethically justifiable in at least some cases involving infertile couples who would choose cloning as a way to have a genetically related child. At present, the risk of congenital anomalies constitutes a compelling argument against human reproductive cloning. The article explores whether reproductive cloning could be ethically justifiable if, at some future time, cloning becomes possible without an elevated risk of anomalies. It is argued that freedom to use cloning is a form of procreative freedom and, as such, deserves respect. All of the objections that have been raised against human reproductive cloning fall under three main categories: those that appeal to the interests of the child, those based on consequences for society, and those arising from teleological views. Objections that appeal to the child's interests are, in turn, of two main kinds: consequentialist and deontological. All of these types of objections are examined, and it is found that each involves serious problems that prevent it from being a reasonable objection in the context of the infertility cases considered. It is concluded that human reproductive cloning would be ethically justifiable in at least some cases involving infertile couples, provided that it could be performed without an elevated risk of anomalies.

  1. Chorioallantoic placenta defects in cloned mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wakisaka-Saito, Noriko; Kohda, Takashi . E-mail: tkhoda.epgn@tmd.ac.jp; Inoue, Kimiko; Ogonuki, Narumi; Miki, Hiromi; Hikichi, Takafusa; Mizutani, Eiji; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ogura, Atsuo; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2006-10-13

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer technology has been applied to produce live clones successfully in several mammalian species, but the success rates are very low. In mice, about half of the nuclear transfer embryos undergo implantation, but very few survive to term. We undertook detailed histological analyses of placentas from cloned mouse embryos generated from cumulus cells at 10.5 dpc of pregnancy, by which stage most clones have terminated their development. At 10.5 dpc, the extraembryonic tissues displayed several defined histological patterns, each reflecting their stage of developmental arrest. The most notable abnormality was the poor development of the spongiotrophoblast layer of diploid cells. This is in contrast to the placental hyperplasia frequently observed in somatic clones at 12.5 dpc or later stages. A variety of structural abnormalities were also observed in the embryos. Both placental and embryonic defects likely contribute to the low success rate of the mouse clones.

  2. Meat and milk compositions of bovine clones

    PubMed Central

    Tian, X. Cindy; Kubota, Chikara; Sakashita, Kunihito; Izaike, Yoshiaki; Okano, Ryoichi; Tabara, Norio; Curchoe, Carol; Jacob, Lavina; Zhang, Yuqin; Smith, Sadie; Bormann, Charles; Xu, Jie; Sato, Masumi; Andrew, Sheila; Yang, Xiangzhong

    2005-01-01

    The technology is now available for commercial cloning of farm animals for food production, but is the food safe for consumers? Here, we provide data on >100 parameters that compare the composition of meat and milk from beef and dairy cattle derived from cloning to those of genetic- and breed-matched control animals from conventional reproduction. The cloned animals and the comparators were managed under the same conditions and received the same diet. The composition of the meat and milk from the clones were largely not statistically different from those of matched comparators, and all parameters examined were within the normal industry standards or previously reported values. The data generated from our match-controlled experiments provide science-based information desired by regulatory agencies to address public concerns about the safety of meat and milk from somatic animal clones. PMID:15829585

  3. "Goodbye Dolly?" The ethics of human cloning.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J

    1997-01-01

    The ethical implications of human clones have been much alluded to, but have seldom been examined with any rigour. This paper examines the possible uses and abuses of human cloning and draws out the principal ethical dimensions, both of what might be done and its meaning. The paper examines some of the major public and official responses to cloning by authorities such as President Clinton, the World Health Organisation, the European parliament, UNESCO, and others and reveals their inadequacies as foundations for a coherent public policy on human cloning. The paper ends by defending a conception of reproductive rights of "procreative autonomy" which shows human cloning to be not inconsistent with human rights and dignity. PMID:9451604

  4. [Human cloning in Muslim and Arab law].

    PubMed

    Aldeeb Abu-Sahlieh, Sami A

    2009-01-01

    Cloning is a modern medical procedure that Muslim religious authorities treat en resorting to the general principles established by classical Muslim law based on the Koran and the Sunnah of Muhhamad as the messenger of God. In this regard, human beings are not capable of deciding what is or what is not lawful without resorting to divine norms. Cloning clashes with several principles. Firstly, the principle of the respect for life in relation to surpernumeraries, but Muslim authors are not in unanimous agreement on the determination of the moment at which life begins. Secondly, is the respect of progeny: cloning could only take place between a married couple. But even if these two principles are respected, cloning poses two major problems: the diversity of species expounded by the Koran and the Sunnah and a lack of interest. Which explains the quasi-unanimous opposition of Muslim writings regarding cloning.

  5. Controlled secret sharing protocol using a quantum cloning circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Satyabrata; Roy, Sovik; Chakraborty, Shantanav; Jagadish, Vinayak; Haris, M. K.; Kumar, Atul

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of controlling the success probability of a secret sharing protocol using a quantum cloning circuit. The cloning circuit is used to clone the qubits containing the encoded information and en route to the intended recipients. The success probability of the protocol depends on the cloning parameters used to clone the qubits. We also establish a relation between the concurrence of initially prepared state, entanglement of the mixed state received by the receivers after cloning scheme and the cloning parameters of cloning machine.

  6. [Worldviews and philosophical basis of human cloning].

    PubMed

    Lukowska, A T

    2001-01-01

    The article presents three standpoints on the question of moral permissibility of human cloning and shows the philosophical principles of it. 1. The moral consent to human cloning with the purposes of reproduction and therapy. The followers of human cloning refer to materialistic anthropology also to subjectivistic, relativistic and utilitarian ethics. 2. Those, who are adverse to human cloning with the purpose of reproduction, but they acquiesce to the so-called therapeutic cloning. They reject that human embryos and foetuses are individuals who come under protection of law. 3. Those, who reject human cloning for the purposes of reproduction and therapy alike. They assent to a personalistic anthropology and Christian ethics. A human being was created by God and human life begins at the moment of insemination. All three groups use various argumentation. The arguments for and against cloning are extracted from biology as well as psychology, philosophy, law and religion. The author of the article takes the last standpoint, but she does not see such arguments, that might convince the opposite parties to a suit.

  7. Human embryo cloning prohibited in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Liu, Athena

    2005-12-01

    Since the birth of Dolly (the cloned sheep) in 1997, debates have arisen on the ethical and legal questions of cloning-for-biomedical-research (more commonly termed "therapeutic cloning") and of reproductive cloning using human gametes. Hong Kong enacted the Human Reproductive Technology Ordinance (Cap 561) in 2000. Section 15(1)(e) of this Ordinance prohibits the "replacing of the nucleus of a cell of an embryo with a nucleus taken from any other cell," i.e., nucleus substitution. Section 15(1)(f) prohibits the cloning of any embryo. The scope of the latter, therefore, is arguably the widest, prohibiting all cloning techniques such as cell nucleus replacement, embryo splitting, parthenogenesis, and cloning using stem cell lines. Although the Human Reproductive Technology Ordinance is not yet fully operative, this article examines how these prohibitions may adversely impact on basic research and the vision of the Hong Kong scientific community. It concludes that in light of recent scientific developments, it is time to review if the law offers a coherent set of policies in this area.

  8. Economical quantum cloning in any dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Durt, Thomas; Fiurasek, Jaromir; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2005-11-15

    The possibility of cloning a d-dimensional quantum system without an ancilla is explored, extending on the economical phase-covariant cloning machine for qubits found in Phys. Rev. A 60, 2764 (1999). We prove the impossibility of constructing an economical version of the optimal universal 1{yields}2 cloning machine in any dimension. We also show, using an ansatz on the generic form of cloning machines, that the d-dimensional 1{yields}2 phase-covariant cloner, which optimally clones all balanced superpositions with arbitrary phases, can be realized economically only in dimension d=2. The used ansatz is supported by numerical evidence up to d=7. An economical phase-covariant cloner can nevertheless be constructed for d>2, albeit with a slightly lower fidelity than that of the optimal cloner requiring an ancilla. Finally, using again an ansatz on cloning machines, we show that an economical version of the 1{yields}2 Fourier-covariant cloner, which optimally clones the computational basis and its Fourier transform, is also possible only in dimension d=2.

  9. Microenvironmental pH-modified solid dispersions to enhance the dissolution and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble weakly basic GT0918, a developing anti-prostate cancer drug: preparation, characterization and evaluation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meiyan; He, Shaolong; Fan, Yunzhou; Wang, Yuli; Ge, Zhenzhong; Shan, Li; Gong, Wei; Huang, Xiaoli; Tong, Youzhi; Gao, Chunsheng

    2014-11-20

    The aim of the present work was to design a pH-modified solid dispersion (pH(M)-SD) that can improve the dissolution and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble weakly basic GT0918, a developing anti-prostate cancer drug. To select the appropriate acidifiers, a solubility test was carried out first. Solid dispersions (SDs) containing GT0918 and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were prepared using a solvent evaporation method and were characterized using dissolution studies in different media. The solid states of the SDs were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The in vivo pharmacokinetics of the pH(M)-SDs tablets were also studied in beagle dogs compared to the conventional tablets. The optimized pH(M)-SD (GT0918/PVP/citric acid, 1:2:2 weight ratio) exhibited a significant improvement in the dissolution behavior compared to both the physical mixture and the binary SDs. Solid-state characterization revealed that the amorphous formation of GT0918 in the SDs and the strong H-bonding were only found in the pH(M)-SDs containing citric acid. Furthermore, the GT0918-loaded pH(M)-SD tablets showed a higher AUC and a lower tmax compared to the conventional tablets. Accordingly, the pH(M)-SD might be an efficient route for enhancing the dissolution and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble GT0918.

  10. Mutual interaction of kisspeptin, estrogen and bone morphogenetic protein-4 activity in GnRH regulation by GT1-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Terasaka, Tomohiro; Otsuka, Fumio; Tsukamoto, Naoko; Nakamura, Eri; Inagaki, Kenichi; Toma, Kishio; Ogura-Ochi, Kanako; Glidewell-Kenney, Christine; Lawson, Mark A; Makino, Hirofumi

    2013-12-05

    Reproduction is integrated by interaction of neural and hormonal signals converging on hypothalamic neurons for controlling gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Kisspeptin, the peptide product of the kiss1 gene and the endogenous agonist for the GRP54 receptor, plays a key role in the regulation of GnRH secretion. In the present study, we investigated the interaction between kisspeptin, estrogen and BMPs in the regulation of GnRH production by using mouse hypothalamic GT1-7 cells. Treatment with kisspeptin increased GnRH mRNA expression and GnRH protein production in a concentration-dependent manner. The expression levels of kiss1 and GPR54 were not changed by kisspeptin stimulation. Kisspeptin induction of GnRH was suppressed by co-treatment with BMPs, with BMP-4 action being the most potent for suppressing the kisspeptin effect. The expression of kisspeptin receptor, GPR54, was suppressed by BMPs, and this effect was reversed in the presence of kisspeptin. It was also revealed that BMP-induced Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and Id-1 expression were suppressed and inhibitory Smad6/7 was induced by kisspeptin. In addition, estrogen induced GPR54 expression, while kisspeptin increased the expression levels of ERα and ERβ, suggesting that the actions of estrogen and kisspeptin are mutually enhanced in GT1-7 cells. Moreover, kisspeptin stimulated MAPKs and AKT signaling, and ERK signaling was functionally involved in the kisspeptin-induced GnRH expression. BMP-4 was found to suppress kisspeptin-induced GnRH expression by reducing ERK signaling activity. Collectively, the results indicate that the axis of kisspeptin-induced GnRH production is bi-directionally controlled, being augmented by an interaction between ERα/β and GPR54 signaling and suppressed by BMP-4 action in GT1-7 neuron cells.

  11. Sensitivity of an Elekta iView GT a-Si EPID model to delivery errors for pre-treatment verification of IMRT fields.

    PubMed

    Herwiningsih, Sri; Hanlon, Peta; Fielding, Andrew

    2014-12-01

    A Monte Carlo model of an Elekta iViewGT amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (a-Si EPID) has been validated for pre-treatment verification of clinical IMRT treatment plans. The simulations involved the use of the BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo codes to predict the response of the iViewGT a-Si EPID model. The predicted EPID images were compared to the measured images obtained from the experiment. The measured EPID images were obtained by delivering a photon beam from an Elekta Synergy linac to the Elekta iViewGT a-Si EPID. The a-Si EPID was used with no additional build-up material. Frame averaged EPID images were acquired and processed using in-house software. The agreement between the predicted and measured images was analyzed using the gamma analysis technique with acceptance criteria of 3 %/3 mm. The results show that the predicted EPID images for four clinical IMRT treatment plans have a good agreement with the measured EPID signal. Three prostate IMRT plans were found to have an average gamma pass rate of more than 95.0 % and a spinal IMRT plan has the average gamma pass rate of 94.3 %. During the period of performing this work a routine MLC calibration was performed and one of the IMRT treatments re-measured with the EPID. A change in the gamma pass rate for one field was observed. This was the motivation for a series of experiments to investigate the sensitivity of the method by introducing delivery errors, MLC position and dosimetric overshoot, into the simulated EPID images. The method was found to be sensitive to 1 mm leaf position errors and 10 % overshoot errors.

  12. Serum ASAT, ALAT, ALP, LD, GT, and CK determined in the Cobas-Bio centrifugal analyser by the methods of the Scandinavian Committee on Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, J M; Sotorrío, P; Alvarez-Uría, J; Estrada, J M; Quirós, A

    1982-04-01

    The recommended methods of the Scandinavian Committee on Enzymes [4, 5, 6, 7, 8] have been applied to the Cobas-Bio centrifugal analyser. Reagents and serum volumes were scaled down and final molarities were kept equal. Serum volumes in microliters were as follows: ASAT 30, ALAT 30, ALP 3, LD 5, GT 20, and CK 10. Including the dead space of the sample cup, the volume needed to perform all six tests was 113 microliter. Within-run and between-run precision (CV%) were as follows: ASAT 1.32 and 1.95, ALAT 1.68 and 2.93, ALP 1.56 and 3.10, LD 1.63 and 4.44, GT 0.81 and 2.23, and CK 1.02 and 1.94. Mean deviations (%) from target values of two commercial sera were as follows: ASAT -0.3 and -0.4, ALAT -0.4 and -2.2, ALP -1.8 and -7.3, LD 0.4 and -6.2, GT 13.9 and -10.7, and CK -4.9 and -1.3. Results of all the methods correlated well with those obtained with their respective manual methods. Analytical time for 28 samples of each analyte was 10 min, apart from CK which was 14 min. Reagent cost per sample was 0.6, 0.9, 0.1, 0.3, 0.9, and 26 US cents respectively. All reagents were prepared in the laboratory, except those for CK which were bought from J.T. Baker (Phillipsburgh, NJ, USA). In conclusion, the methods keep the features of the manual methods but they are more precise and practicable, much faster and cheaper, and use minimal amounts of sera more convenient for paediatric work.

  13. Short (GT)n microsatellite repeats in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter are associated with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory status in Mexican pediatric patients with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Armenta, Gabriela; González-Leal, Natalia; J Vázquez-de la Torre, Mayra; Muñoz-Valle, José Francisco; Ramos-Márquez, Martha E; Hernández-Cañaveral, Iván; Plascencia-Hernández, Arturo; Siller-López, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    An adequate immune and antioxidant response is a key to the resolution of sepsis. Heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) is a stress protein with a polymorphic (GT)n repeat in its gene promoter that regulates its expression in response to oxidative injury, such as that present in sepsis. HMOX1 is the rate-limiting enzyme of heme degradation, and the heme breakdown products, CO, Fe, and bilirubin, are considered to be biologically active metabolites with direct or indirect antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated the inflammatory and antioxidant response and the relationship with the HMOX1 levels and HMOX1 polymorphism in Mexican septic pediatric patients. In a case-control pilot study, we enrolled 64 septic patients and 72 hospitalized control patients without a diagnosis of sepsis. DNA extracted from buffy coat was genotyped for HMOX1 (GT)n polymorphism by PCR and markers of antioxidant and inflammatory status were quantified in plasma by analysis of the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), protein carbonyl (PC), interleukin (IL) 6, IL10, and HMOX1 levels. In septic children, oxidative and inflammatory markers were elevated, and HMOX1 levels were positively correlated with IL10 levels. Genotypic and allelic distribution of HMOX1 polymorphism showed no difference between groups. HMOX1 short-allele septic carriers (< 25 GT repeats) presented favorable ORAC, PC and IL10 levels. This study confirms that an active response against pediatric sepsis involves the expression of HMOX1 and IL10, suggesting that the high antioxidant status associated with HMOX1 short-allele septic carriers might provide a beneficial environment for sepsis resolution.

  14. A novel NF1 frame-shift mutation (c.702_703delGT) in a Chinese family with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Cai, S P; Fan, N; Chen, J; Xia, Z L; Wang, Y; Zhou, X M; Yin, Y; Wen, T L; Xia, Q J; Liu, X Y; Wang, H Y

    2014-07-24

    This study aimed to characterize the clinical features of a Chinese pedigree with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and to identify mutations in the NF1 gene. In this three-generation family containing 8 members, 5 had been diagnosed with NF1 and the others were asymptomatic. All members of the family underwent complete medical examinations. Molecular genetic analyses were performed on all subjects included in the study. All exons of NF1 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, sequenced, and compared with a reference database. Possible changes in function of the protein induced by amino acid variants were predicted by bioinformatic analysis. In this family, the 5 patients presented different clinical phenotypes, but all manifested typical café-au-lait macules. One novel frame-shift mutation, c.702_703delGT, in exon 7 of NF1 was identified in all affected family members, but not in the unaffected family members or in 102 normal controls. This mutation generates a premature stop codon at amino acid position 720. Additionally, a synonymous mutation c.702 G>A was found in 3 family members, including 2 affected and 1 normal individuals. In conclusion, our study suggests that a novel c.702_703delGT frame-shift mutation in NF1 is likely to be responsible for the pathogenesis of NF1 in this family. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that a c.702_703delGT mutation has been identified in a family with neurofibromatosis type 1.

  15. Comparison of computer codes (CE-THERM, FRAP-T5, GT3-FLECHT, and TRUMP-FLECHT) with data from the NRU-LOCA thermal hydraulic tests

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, C.L.; Rausch, W.N.; Hesson, G.M.

    1981-07-01

    The LOCA Simulation Program in the NRU reactor is the first set of experiments to provide data on the behavior of full-length, nuclear-heated PWR fuel bundles during the heatup, reflood, and quench phases of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). This paper compares the temperature time histories of 4 experimental test cases with 4 computer codes: CE-THERM, FRAP-T5, GT3-FLECHT, and TRUMP-FLECHT. The preliminary comparisons between prediction and experiment show that the state-of-the art fuel codes have large uncertainties and are not necessarily conservative in predicting peak temperatures, turn around times, and bundle quench times.

  16. Patterns of p53 G-->T transversions in lung cancers reflect the primary mutagenic signature of DNA-damage by tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Hainaut, P; Pfeifer, G P

    2001-03-01

    It is unquestionable that the major cause of lung cancer is cigarette smoking. p53 mutations are common in lung cancers from smokers but less common in non-smokers. A large fraction of the p53 mutations in lung cancers are G-->T transversions, a type of mutation that is infrequent in other tumors aside from hepatocellular carcinoma. Previous studies have indicated that there is a good correlation between G-->T transversion hotspots in lung cancers and sites of preferential formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) adducts along the p53 gene. The origin of p53 mutations in lung cancer has been questioned by recent reports suggesting that there are no significant differences in p53 mutation spectra between smokers and non-smokers and between lung cancers and non-lung cancers [S.N. Rodin and A.S. Rodin (2000) Human lung cancer and p53: The interplay between mutagenesis and selection. P:roc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA, 97, 12244-12249]. We have re-assessed these issues by using the latest update of the p53 mutation database of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (14 051 entries) as well as recent data from the primary literature on non-smokers. We come to the conclusion that the p53 mutation spectra are different between smokers and non-smokers and that this difference is highly statistically significant (G-->T transversions are 30 versus 10%; P < 0.0001, chi2 test). A similar difference is seen between lung cancers and non-lung cancers. At a number of mutational hotspots common to all cancers, a large fraction of the mutations are G-->T transversions in lung cancers but are almost exclusively G-->A transitions in non-lung cancers. Our data reinforce the notion that p53 mutations in lung cancers can be attributed to direct DNA damage from cigarette smoke carcinogens rather than to selection of pre-existing endogenous mutations.

  17. Cloning of rat homeobox genes

    SciTech Connect

    Sakoyama, Yasuhiko; Mizuta, Ikuko; Ogasawara, Naotake

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation of nine rat cognates of mouse homeoboxes within the four Hox gene clusters and a rat homologue of mouse IPF1 homeobox, RHbox No. 13A. The sequences of nine cloned homeoboxes are highly similar to those of the mouse and human homeoboxes in the Hox clusters. The restriction enzyme sites and map distances between each of the homeoboxes on the rat genome are nearly identical to those of mouse and human. Thus, we conclude that the isolated homeoboxes are the rat homologues of mouse homeoboxes within the four Hox clusters. A novel homeobox RHbox No. 13A is different from the Drosophila Antennapedia (Antp) sequence but is highly similar to the XlHbox8 (Xenopus laevis) and HtrA2 (Helobdella triserialis) homeoboxes. Forty-two amino acids of the last two-thirds of the RHbox No. 13A, XlHbox8, and mouse IPF1 homeodomains completely matched. In addition, these four homeodomains contain a unique His residue in the recognition helix of a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif. This His residue is not found in any of the previously published mammalian homeodomain sequences except mouse IPF1. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  18. [Therapeutic cloning. Biology, perspectives and alternatives].

    PubMed

    Maddox-Hyttel, Poul

    2003-02-24

    Certain diseases are caused by or cause irreversible loss of cells and may in the future be treated by cell-based therapies where spare cells are introduced into the body. Therapeutic cloning constitutes a scientifically and ethically challenging route to the generation of autologous patient specific spare cells: Stem cells for subsequent differentiation and transplantation are isolated from one week old embryos, which are produced by cloning by nuclear transfer from normal cells retrieved from a patient. Research in therapeutic cloning should be pursued in line with alternative strategies for obtaining stem cells. Finally, the molecular biology of cloning by nuclear transfer may hold the key to understanding trans-differentiation, which ultimately may allow for de-differentiation and subsequent re-differentiation of adult somatic cells for therapeutic purposes.

  19. Optimal cloning of mixed Gaussian states

    SciTech Connect

    Guta, Madalin; Matsumoto, Keiji

    2006-09-15

    We construct the optimal one to two cloning transformation for the family of displaced thermal equilibrium states of a harmonic oscillator, with a fixed and known temperature. The transformation is Gaussian and it is optimal with respect to the figure of merit based on the joint output state and norm distance. The proof of the result is based on the equivalence between the optimal cloning problem and that of optimal amplification of Gaussian states which is then reduced to an optimization problem for diagonal states of a quantum oscillator. A key concept in finding the optimum is that of stochastic ordering which plays a similar role in the purely classical problem of Gaussian cloning. The result is then extended to the case of n to m cloning of mixed Gaussian states.

  20. Endangered wolves cloned from adult somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Kyu; Jang, Goo; Oh, Hyun Ju; Yuda, Fibrianto; Kim, Hye Jin; Hwang, Woo Suk; Hossein, Mohammad Shamim; Kim, Joung Joo; Shin, Nam Shik; Kang, Sung Keun; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2007-01-01

    Over the world, canine species, including the gray wolf, have been gradually endangered or extinct. Many efforts have been made to recover and conserve these canids. The aim of this study was to produce the endangered gray wolf with somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for conservation. Adult ear fibroblasts from a female gray wolf (Canis lupus) were isolated and cultured in vitro as donor cells. Because of limitations in obtaining gray wolf matured oocytes, in vivo matured canine oocytes obtained by flushing the oviducts from the isthmus to the infundibulum were used. After removing the cumulus cells, the oocyte was enucleated, microinjected, fused with a donor cell, and activated. The reconstructed cloned wolf embryos were transferred into the oviducts of the naturally synchronized surrogate mothers. Two pregnancies were detected by ultrasonography at 23 days of gestation in recipient dogs. In each surrogate dog, two fetal sacs were confirmed by early pregnancy diagnosis at 23 days, but only two cloned wolves were delivered. The first cloned wolf was delivered by cesarean section on October 18, 2005, 60 days after embryo transfer. The second cloned wolf was delivered on October 26, 2005, at 61 days postembryo transfer. Microsatellite analysis was performed with genomic DNA from the donor wolf, the two cloned wolves, and the two surrogate female recipients to confirm the genetic identity of the cloned wolves. Analysis of 19 microsatellite loci confirmed that the cloned wolves were genetically identical to the donor wolf. In conclusion, we demonstrated live birth of two cloned gray wolves by nuclear transfer of wolf somatic cells into enucleated canine oocyte, indicating that SCNT is a practical approach for conserving endangered canids.

  1. A modified version of the digestion-ligation cloning method for more efficient molecular cloning.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Li, Yanling; Zhang, Jiannan; Chen, Hongman; Ren, Daming; Zhang, Lijun; An, Yingfeng

    2014-05-15

    Here we describe a modified version of the digestion-ligation approach for efficient molecular cloning. In comparison with the original method, the modified method has the additional steps of gel purification and a second ligation after the first ligation of the linearized vector and DNA insert. During this process, the efficiency and reproducibility could be significantly improved for both stick-end cloning and blunt-end cloning. As an improvement of the very important molecular cloning technique, this method may find a wide range of applications in bioscience and biotechnology.

  2. Fibroblast growth factor-1 stimulation of quiescent NIH 3T3 cells increases G/T mismatch-binding protein expression.

    PubMed Central

    Donohue, P J; Feng, S L; Alberts, G F; Guo, Y; Peifley, K A; Hsu, D K; Winkles, J A

    1996-01-01

    Polypeptide growth factors promote cell-cycle progression in part by the transcriptional activation of a diverse group of specific genes. We have used an mRNA differential-display approach to identify several fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-1 (acidic FGF)-inducible genes in NIH 3T3 cells. Here we report that one of these genes, called FGF-regulated (FR)-3, is predicted to encode G/T mismatch-binding protein (GTBP), a component of the mammalian DNA mismatch correction system. The murine GTBP gene is transiently expressed after FGF-1 or calf serum treatment, with maximal mRNA levels detected at 12 and 18 h post-stimulation. FGF-1-stimulated NIH 3T3 cells also express an increased amount of GTBP as determined by immunoblot analysis. These results indicate that elevated levels of GTBP may be required during the DNA synthesis phase of the cell cycle for efficient G/T mismatch recognition and repair. PMID:8870641

  3. Ketoolivosyl-tetracenomycin C: a new ketosugar bearing tetracenomycin reveals new insight into the substrate flexibility of glycosyltransferase ElmGT

    PubMed Central

    Nybo, S. Eric; Shabaan, Khaled A.; Kharel, Madan K.; Salas, José A.; Méndez, Carmen; Sutardjo, Happy; Rohr, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    A new tetracenomycin analogue, 8-demethyl-8-(4′-keto)-α-l-olivosyl-tetracenomycin C, was generated through combinatorial biosynthesis. Streptomyces lividans TK 24 (cos16F4) was used as a host for expression of a “sugar plasmid” (pKOL) directing the biosynthesis of NDP-4-keto-l-olivose. This strain harbors all of the genes necessary for production of 8-demethylt-etracenomycin C and the sugar flexible glycosyltransferase ElmGT. To the best of our knowledge, this report represents the first characterization of a tetracenomycin derivative decorated with a ketosugar moiety. Also, as far as we know, 4-keto-l-olivose has only been described as an intermediate of oleandomycin biosynthesis, but has not been described before as an appendage for a polyketide compound. Furthermore, this report gives further insight into the substrate flexibility of ElmGT to include an NDP-ketosugar, which is unusual and is rarely observed among glycosyltransferases from antibiotic biosynthetic pathways. PMID:22361136

  4. Role of G-->T transversions in the mutagenicity of alkylperoxyl radicals: induction of alkali-labile sites in bacteriophage M13mp19.

    PubMed

    Harkin, L A; Butler, L M; Burcham, P C

    1997-05-01

    The mutagenicity of peroxyl radicals, ubiquitous products of lipid peroxidation, was assessed using an in vitro M13 forward mutational assay. Single-stranded M13mp19 plasmids were incubated with a range of concentrations of the azo initiator 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride, and then transfected into competent, SOS-induced Escherichia coli JM105 cells. Incubation with peroxyl radicals produced a concentration-dependent decrease in phage survival, with a 500 microM concentration of the azo initiator reducing the transfection efficiency by more than 90% while inducing a corresponding 6-fold increase in lacZ alpha mutation frequencies. Peroxyl radical-induced mutagenesis was completely prevented by the peroxyl radical scavenger Trolox. Automated DNA sequence analysis of the lacZ alpha gene of 100 peroxyl radical-induced mutants revealed that the most frequent sequence changes were base pair substitutions (92/95), with G-->T transversions predominating (73/92). Alkaline treatment prior to transfection diminished the mutagenicity of damaged plasmids to a level resembling that of unmodified DNA. While abasic sites might account for the sensitivity to alkaline cleavage, the possibility that unidentified nonabasic alkaline-labile lesions also contribute to peroxyl radical mutagenesis cannot be excluded. Collectively, these findings raise the possibility that DNA damage caused by a major class of endogenous radicals contributes to one of the most common spontaneous mutational events, the G-->T transversion.

  5. Reproductive cloning combined with genetic modification.

    PubMed

    Strong, C

    2005-11-01

    Although there is widespread opposition to reproductive cloning, some have argued that its use by infertile couples to have genetically related children would be ethically justifiable. Others have suggested that lesbian or gay couples might wish to use cloning to have genetically related children. Most of the main objections to human reproductive cloning are based on the child's lack of unique nuclear DNA. In the future, it may be possible safely to create children using cloning combined with genetic modifications, so that they have unique nuclear DNA. The genetic modifications could be aimed at giving such children genetic characteristics of both members of the couple concerned. Thus, cloning combined with genetic modification could be appealing to infertile, lesbian, or gay couples who seek genetically related children who have genetic characteristics of both members. In such scenarios, the various objections to human reproductive cloning that are based on the lack of genetic uniqueness would no longer be applicable. The author argues that it would be ethically justifiable for such couples to create children in this manner, assuming these techniques could be used safely.

  6. [On the problem of human cloning].

    PubMed

    Smorag, Z

    2001-01-01

    Somatic cell cloning technique in mammals is still not very efficient, but intensive efforts have been made to improve it. Considering the great biological affinity of humans and animals, the cloning technique can in the not too distant future be applied in human cloning and improved to the point of becoming safe. Even when we make such an assumption, I consider it irrational and dangerous to clone the human in order to make their copies (with human cloning for therapeutic purposes being another problem). Life, which is generated by the union of egg cell and spermatozoon is an unforeseeable combination of genetic possibilities, but at the same time it offers a unique chance for the human being, both as an individual and a species. The creation of life by genetic duplication of an already formed individual means a great reduction not only in the biological sense. Action like this is evidence of extreme egocentrism and totalitarian thinking, and its proponents should first answer the question whether they would consider cloning themselves. An answer in the affirmative would help to establish the underlying reasons for their approval.

  7. DIGLIB. PC-DOS Graphics Subroutine Library

    SciTech Connect

    Burleson, R.R.

    1989-02-01

    DIGLIB is a collection of general graphics subroutines. It was designed to be small, reasonably fast, device-independent, and compatible with DEC-supplied operating systems for VAXes, PDP-11s, and LSI-11s, and the DOS operating system for IBM PCs and IBM-compatible machines. DIGLIB/PC runs on IBM PCs under PC-DOS or MS-DOS. The software is readily usable by casual programmers for two-dimensional plotting.

  8. Cloning: Past, Present, and the Exciting Future. Breakthroughs in Bioscience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Berardino, Marie A.

    This document explores the history of cloning by focusing on Dolly the Sheep, one of the first large animal clonings. The disadvantages and advantages of transgenic clones are discussed as well as the future implications of cloning from the perspective of human health. (Contains 10 resources.) (YDS)

  9. Cloning of a cuticular antigen that contains multiple tandem repeats from the filarial parasite Dirofilaria immitis.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, C B; Grandea, A G; Maina, C V; Jenkins, R E; Selkirk, M E; McReynolds, L A

    1992-01-01

    An unusual antigen composed of tandemly repeated protein units was cloned from the filarial parasite Dirofilaria immitis. The antigen was initially identified by screening a lambda gt11 cDNA library with serum from dogs immunized with irradiated D. immitis third-stage larvae. DNA sequence analysis of the cDNA clone, Di5, revealed a continuous open reading frame composed of two 399-base-pair repeats arranged in tandem. Southern blot analysis of genomic D. immitis DNA showed that the gene coding for Di5 is composed of a tandem array of 25-50 copies of this same 399-base-pair repeat. Antiserum raised against recombinant Di5 protein detected a protein "ladder," from about 14 to greater than 200 kDa with steps approximately 15 kDa apart, on immunoblots of D. immitis extract. Metabolic labeling of adult parasites with [35S]methionine showed that Di5 is synthesized as a large precursor that is subsequently cleaved to produce the ladder-like array. These results suggest that the characteristic ladder is created by proteolytic cleavage of the precursor at the same site in each monomer. The Di5 antigen was localized to the cuticle and hypodermis of adult D. immitis by immunoelectron microscopy. Both male and female parasites were found to release Di5 when cultured in vitro. DNA hybridization analysis demonstrated that Di5 is a member of a gene family present in many filarial parasites that infect both animal and human populations. Images PMID:1631084

  10. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of human holocarboxylase synthetase, a gene responsible for biotin dependency

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Y.; Aoki, Y.; Ishida, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS) catalyzes biotin incorporation into various carboxylases that require biotin as a prosthetic group. They are acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid synthesis; pyruvate carboxylase, a key enzyme of gluconeogenesis; propionyl-CoA carboxylase and 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase, enzymes involved in amino acid catabolism. HCS is therefore involved in various metabolic processes and is a key enzyme for biotin utilization by mammalian cells. Deficiency of HCS in man is known to cause biotin-responsive multiple carboxylase deficiency. Isolation of cDNA clones for the enzyme is essential to understand HCS and its deficiency at the molecular level. We purified bovine liver HCS and sequenced its proteolytic peptides. Degenerative oligonucleotide primers were synthesized from the two peptide sequences and used to amplify a putative HCS cDNA fragment from human liver by PCR. Using the amplified DNA fragment as a probe, we screened {lambda}gt10 human liver cDNA library and isolated 12 positive clones. The isolated cDNAs encoded a protein of 726 amino acids with molecular mass of 80,759. The protein contained several sequences identical or similar to those of peptides derived from the bovine liver HCS. The predicted protein had a homologous region with BirA which acts as both a biotin-[acetyl-CoA-carboxylase] ligase and a biotin repressor in E. coli, suggesting a functional relationship between the two proteins. We expressed the protein using pET3 a vector in E. coli (BL21 strain) and raised antiserum against the expressed protein. The antiserum immunoprecipitated HCS activities of human lymphoblasts and bovine liver. A one-base deletion and a missense mutation were found in cells from siblings with HCS deficiency. The human HCS gene was assigned to chromosome 21, region 21q22.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis.

  11. Cloning and Mutagenesis of a Cytochrome P-450 Locus from Bradyrhizobium japonicum That Is Expressed Anaerobically and Symbiotically

    PubMed Central

    Tully, Raymond E.; Keister, Donald L.

    1993-01-01

    Cytochromes P-450, which in many organisms participate in the metabolism of a variety of endobiotic and xenobiotic substances, are synthesized by symbiotic bacteroids of Bradyrhizobium japonicum. Polyclonal antibodies were raised against two cytochromes P-450 (CYP112 and CYP114) purified from bacteroids. A lambda gt11 expression clone of B. japonicum USDA 110 DNA that reacted with the anti-CYP112 antibody was obtained and was used to screen a library of USDA 110 genomic DNA in pLAFR1 for a clone of the P-450 locus. Forced expression of subclones of the P-450 locus in Escherichia coli produced polypeptides that reacted with either the anti-CYP112 antibody or the anti-CYP114 antibody; no cross-reactivity was evident. A Western blot (immunoblot) analysis showed that neither protein was present in free-living aerobically grown B. japonicum cells, but that both proteins were present in cells grown anaerobically, as well as in bacteroids. A mutant strain disrupted in the CYP112 locus produced neither CYP112 nor CYP114, indicating that the mutation was polar for CYP114. The mutant produced effective nodules on soybeans, even though the bacteroids contained no detectable P-450. This suggests that the cytochromes P-450 which we examined are not involved in an essential symbiotic function. Images PMID:16349113

  12. Genomic cloning, characterization and statistical analysis of an antitumor-analgesic peptide from Chinese scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Liu, Yanfeng; Chen, Qiqing; Zhang, Rong; Song, Yongbo; Jiang, Zhuopu; Wu, Chunfu; Zhang, Jinghai

    2010-09-01

    The genomic DNA sequence encoding an antitumor-analgesic peptide was amplified from the genome of Chinese scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch (BmKAGAP), then cloned and sequenced. An intron, with a high A + T content (61.6%), splits a glycine codon near the end of the precursor signal peptide and the consensus GT/AG splice junction was identified in the BmKAGAP gene. Using PCR amplification, we confirmed the identity of our cloned cDNA, and found that the BmKAGAP gene contained an intron of 506 bp in length, which was almost identical to that of the characterized scorpion sodium channel ligands in size, consensus junctions, putative branch point and A + T content. This is the first report of using a statistical method for Chinese scorpion B. martensii Karsch genomic sequence analysis, involving the extraction of some putative transcription regulatory factors. Moreover, it establishes a theoretical foundation for studying the relationship between scorpion evolution, gene expression and protein function.

  13. Tissue-specific expression and cDNA cloning of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associated polypeptide N

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, G.; Amara, S.G.; Lerner, M.R. )

    1988-07-01

    Sera from some patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other autoimmune diseases have antibodies against nuclear antigens. An example is anti-Sm sera, which recognize proteins associated with small nuclear RNA molecules (small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) particles). In this paper anti-Sm sera were used to probe immunoblots of various rat tissues. A previously unidentified M{sub r} 28,000 polypeptide was recognized by these anti-Sm sera. This polypeptide, referred to as N, is expressed in a tissue-specific manner, being most abundant in rat brain, less so in heart, and undetectable in the other tissues examined. Immunoprecipitation experiments using antibodies directed against the cap structure of small nuclear RNAs have demonstrated that N is a snRNP-associated polypeptide. Anti-Sm serum was also used to isolate a partial cDNA clone ({lambda}rb91) from a rat brain phage {lambda}gt11 cDNA expression library. A longer cDNA clone was obtained by rescreening the library with {lambda}rb91. In vitro transcription and subsequent translation of this subcloned, longer insert (pGMA2) resulted in a protein product with the same electrophoretic and immunological properties as N, confirming that pGMA2 encodes N. The tissue distribution of N and the involvement of snRNP particles in nuclear pre-mRNA processing may imply a role for N in tissue-specific pre-mRNA splicing.

  14. Cloning, expression and applicability of thermo-alkali-stable xylanase of Geobacillus thermoleovorans in generating xylooligosaccharides from agro-residues.

    PubMed

    Verma, Digvijay; Satyanarayana, T

    2012-03-01

    A xylanase gene (xyl-gt) of 1.224 kbp was cloned from the extremely thermophilic bacterium Geobacillus thermoleovorans that encodes a protein containing 408 amino acid residues. Eight conserved regions (signature sequences) of GH family 10 xylanases have been found in the xylanase. When the xylanase gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), the recombinant strain produced xylanase titer of 270 U mg(-1) which is 27-fold higher than the wild strain. It is optimally active at 80°C and pH 8.5 with a high thermostability over broad range of pH (6-12) and temperature (40-100°C). The end products of the hydrolysis of birch wood xylan and agro-residues included xylobiose, xylotriose, xylotetraose and xylopentaose. The xylanase of G. thermoleovorans is one of the rare xylanases that exhibits thermo-alkali-stability, and thus, it is a suitable candidate for pre-bleaching of paper pulps and generating xylooligosaccharides from agro-residues for use as prebiotics.

  15. Cloning Mice and Men: Prohibiting the Use of iPS Cells for Human Reproductive Cloning

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Bernard; Parham, Lindsay; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Cedars, Marcelle; Conklin, Bruce; Fisher, Susan; Gates, Elena; Giudice, Linda; Halme, Dina Gould; Hershon, William; Kriegstein, Arnold; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Wagner, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The use of iPSCs and tetraploid complementation for human reproductive cloning would raise profound ethical objections. Professional standards and laws that ban human reproductive cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer should be revised to also forbid it by other methods, such as iPSCs via tetraploid complementation. PMID:20085739

  16. Cloning mice and men: prohibiting the use of iPS cells for human reproductive cloning.

    PubMed

    Lo, Bernard; Parham, Lindsay; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Cedars, Marcelle; Conklin, Bruce; Fisher, Susan; Gates, Elena; Giudice, Linda; Halme, Dina Gould; Hershon, William; Kriegstein, Arnold; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Wagner, Richard

    2010-01-08

    The use of iPSCs and tetraploid complementation for human reproductive cloning would raise profound ethical objections. Professional standards and laws that ban human reproductive cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer should be revised to also forbid it by other methods, such as iPSCs via tetraploid complementation.

  17. Update on the First Cloned Dog and Outlook for Canine Cloning.

    PubMed

    Jang, Goo; Lee, ByeongChun

    2015-10-01

    As man's best friend, dogs have an important position in human society. Ten years ago, we reported the first cloned dog, and his birth has raised various scientific issues, such as those related to health, reproduction, and life span. He has developed without any unique health issues. In this article, we summarize and present perspectives on canine cloning.

  18. Molecular cloning, encoding sequence, and expression of vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J F; Kahn, J S; Esteban, M

    1986-01-01

    A rabbit poxvirus genomic library contained within the expression vector lambda gt11 was screened with polyclonal antiserum prepared against vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase)-I enzyme. Five positive phage clones containing from 0.72- to 2.5-kilobase-pair (kbp) inserts expressed a beta-galactosidase fusion protein that was reactive by immunoblotting with the NTPase-I antibody. Hybridization analysis allowed the location of this gene within the vaccinia HindIIID restriction fragment. From the known nucleotide sequence of the 16-kbp vaccinia HindIIID fragment, we identified a region that contains a 1896-base open reading frame coding for a 631-amino acid protein. Analysis of the complete sequence revealed a highly basic protein, with hydrophilic COOH and NH2 termini, various hydrophobic domains, and no significant homology to other known proteins. Translational studies demonstrate that NTPase-I belongs to a late class of viral genes. This protein is highly conserved among Orthopoxviruses. Images PMID:3025846

  19. Cloning and sequence analysis of candidate human natural killer-enhancing factor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Shau, H.; Butterfield, L.H.; Chiu, R.; Kim, A.

    1994-12-31

    A cytosol factor from human red blood cells enhances natural killer (NK) activity. This factor, termed NK-enhancing factor (NKEF), is a protein of 44000 M{sub r} consisting of two subunits of equal size linked by disulfide bonds. NKEF is expressed in the NK-sensitive erythroleukemic cell line K562. Using an antibody specific for NKEF as a probe for immunoblot screening, we isolated several clones from a {lambda}gt11 cDNA library of K562. Additional subcloning and sequencing revealed that the candidate NKEF cDNAs fell into one of two categories of closely related but non-identical genes, referred to as NKEF A and B. They are 88% identical in amino acid sequence and 71% identical in nucleotide sequence. Southern blot analysis suggests that there are two to three NKEF family members in the genome. Analysis of predicted amino acid sequences indicates that both NKEF A and B are cytosol proteins with several phosphorylation sites each, but that they have no glycosylation sites. They are significantly homologous to several other proteins from a wide variety of organisms ranging from prokaryotes to mammals, especially with regard to several well-conserved motifs within the amino acid sequences. The biological functions of these proteins in other species are mostly unknown, but some of them were reported to be induced by oxidative stress. Therefore, as well as for immunoregulation of NK activity, NKEF may be important for cells in coping with oxidative insults. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Toll-like receptor 7 Gln11Leu, c.4-151A/G, and +1817G/T polymorphisms in Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Serdal; Engin, Aynur; Özbilüm, Nil; Bakır, Mehmet

    2015-07-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a viral zoonosis. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) initiate signaling cascades leading to the activation of the innate immune system following CCHF infection. In this study, TLR7 (Gln11Leu, c.4-151A/G, and +1817G/T) polymorphisms were investigated in CCHF patients using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The study population comprised 149 CCHF patients and 171 controls. For the TLR7 Gln11Leu polymorphism, there was no significant difference between the case and control groups in allele (P = 0.144) and genotype frequencies (P = 0.219). In the TLR7 IVS1 +1817G/T polymorphism, a statistically significant difference was found in allele frequencies (P = 0.026), but there was no significant difference in the TLR7 c.4-151A/G polymorphism (P = 0.310). There was a statistically significant difference in the distribution of the TLR7 c.4-151GG genotypes frequencies between patients and controls (P = 0.042; OR = 2.23). Furthermore, there were statistically significant associations between the TLR7 c.4-151A/G polymorphism and both severe disease and patient mortality (P < 0.001 and P = 0.047, respectively). The TLR7 IVS1 +1817TT genotype was also significantly associated with the case group but not the control group (P = 0.045). A strong positive linkage among TLR 7 variants was found using haplotype analysis. The incidence of two haplotypes, AGG and AGT, was determined to exhibit significant differences between the case and control groups (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). These findings suggest that the TLR7 IVS1 +1817G/T and TLR7 c.4-151A/G polymorphisms may be important in the susceptibility or clinical course of CCHF disease.

  1. 5-Methylcytosine DNA glycosylase activity is also present in the human MBD4 (G/T mismatch glycosylase) and in a related avian sequence.

    PubMed

    Zhu, B; Zheng, Y; Angliker, H; Schwarz, S; Thiry, S; Siegmann, M; Jost, J P

    2000-11-01

    A 1468 bp cDNA coding for the chicken homolog of the human MBD4 G/T mismatch DNA glycosylase was isolated and sequenced. The derived amino acid sequence (416 amino acids) shows 46% identity with the human MBD4 and the conserved catalytic region at the C-terminal end (170 amino acids) has 90% identity. The non-conserved region of the avian protein has no consensus sequence for the methylated DNA binding domain. The recombinant proteins from human and chicken have G/T mismatch as well as 5-methylcytosine (5-MeC) DNA glycosylase activities. When tested by gel shift assays, human recombinant protein with or without the methylated DNA binding domain binds equally well to symmetrically, hemimethylated DNA and non-methylated DNA. However, the enzyme has only 5-MeC DNA glycosylase activity with the hemimethylated DNA. Footprinting of human MBD4 and of an N-terminal deletion mutant with partially depurinated and depyrimidinated substrate reveal a selective binding of the proteins to the modified substrate around the CpG. As for 5-MeC DNA glycosylase purified from chicken embryos, MBD4 does not use oligonucleotides containing mCpA, mCpT or mCpC as substrates. An mCpG within an A+T-rich oligonucleotide is a much better substrate than an A+T-poor sequence. The K:(m) of human MBD4 for hemimethylated DNA is approximately 10(-7) M with a V:(max) of approximately 10(-11) mol/h/microgram protein. Deletion mutations show that G/T mismatch and 5-MeC DNA glycosylase are located in the C-terminal conserved region. In sharp contrast to the 5-MeC DNA glycosylase isolated from the chicken embryo DNA demethylation complex, the two enzymatic activities of MBD4 are strongly inhibited by RNA. In situ hybridization with antisense RNA indicate that MBD4 is only located in dividing cells of differentiating embryonic tissues.

  2. The 894G>T endothelial nitric oxide synthase genetic polymorphism affects hemodynamic responses to mental stress performed before and after exercise.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Natália Galito; Neves, Fabricia Junqueira; Silva, Bruno Moreira; Sales, Allan Robson Kluser; Nóbrega, Antonio Claudio

    2012-03-01

    Nitric oxide is the primary mediator of vasodilation during mental stress. Since genetic polymorphisms in the nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene seem to impair the production of NO, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of an exercise bout on hemodynamic responses to mental stress in subjects with the 894G>T polymorphism of eNOS. Subjects without (wild-type group; n = 16) or with (polymorphic-type group; n = 19) the 894G>T polymorphism underwent a mental stress challenge before and after a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test. Blood pressure was measured by auscultation and forearm blood flow by venous occlusion plethysmography. The groups were similar regarding anthropometric, metabolic, resting blood pressure and exercise variables. Before exercise, systolic blood pressure response during mental stress was higher in the polymorphic-type group (∆wild-type: 8.0 ± 2.0% vs. ∆polymorphic-type: 12.5 ± 1.8%, P = 0.01), while the increase in forearm vascular conductance was similar between the groups (∆wild-type 90.8 ± 26.4% vs. ∆polymorphic-type: 86.3 ± 24.1%, P = 0.44). After exercise, the systolic blood pressure at baseline and during mental stress was lower than before exercise in the whole group (P < 0.05), but the pressure response during mental stress was still higher in the polymorphic-type group (∆wild-type: 5.8 ± 1.5% vs. ∆polymorphic-type: 10.2 ± 1.4%, P = 0.01). The increase in forearm vascular conductance was inhibited only in the polymorphic-type group (∆before exercise 86.3 ± 24.1% vs. ∆after exercise: 41.5 ± 12.6%, P = 0.04). In conclusion, these results suggest the 894G>T eNOS polymorphism is associated with altered hemodynamic responses to mental stress both before and after a single bout of dynamic exercise with potential clinical implications.

  3. High-throughput cloning, expression and purification of glycoside hydrolases using Ligation-Independent Cloning (LIC).

    PubMed

    Camilo, Cesar M; Polikarpov, Igor

    2014-07-01

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing techniques have led to an explosion in the amount of available genome sequencing data and this provided an inexhaustible source of uncharacterized glycoside hydrolases (GH) to be studied both structurally and enzymatically. Ligation-Independent Cloning (LIC), an interesting alternative to traditional, restriction enzyme-based cloning, and commercial recombinatorial cloning, was adopted and optimized successfully for a high throughput cloning, expression and purification pipeline. Using this platform, 130 genes encoding mainly uncharacterized glycoside hydrolases from 13 different organisms were cloned and submitted to a semi-automated protein expression and solubility screening in Escherichia coli, resulting in 73 soluble targets. The high throughput approach proved to be a powerful tool for production of recombinant glycoside hydrolases for further structural and biochemical characterization and confirmed that thioredoxin fusion tag (TRX) is a better choice to increase solubility of recombinant glycoside hydrolases expressed in E. coli, when compared to His-tag alone.

  4. Benefits and problems with cloning animals.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, L C; Bordignon, V; Babkine, M; Fecteau, G; Keefer, C

    2000-01-01

    Animal cloning is becoming a useful technique for producing transgenic farm animals and is likely to be used to produce clones from valuable adults. Other applications will also undoubtedly be discovered in the near future, such as for preserving endangered breeds and species. Although cloning promises great advantages for commerce and research alike, its outcome is not always certain due to high pregnancy losses and high morbidity and mortality during the neonatal period. Research into the mechanisms involved in the reprogramming of the nucleus is being conducted throughout the world in an attempt to better understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in correcting these problems. Although the cause of these anomalies remains mostly unknown, similar phenotypes have been observed in calves derived through in vitro fertilization, suggesting that culture conditions are involved in these phenomena. In the meantime, veterinarians and theriogenologists have an important role to play in improving the efficiency of cloning by finding treatments to assure normal gestation to term and to develop preventative and curative care for cloned neonates. Images Figure 1. PMID:11143925

  5. Association of the CYP2B6 c.516G>T polymorphism with high blood propofol concentrations in women from northern Greece.

    PubMed

    Mastrogianni, Orthodoxia; Gbandi, Emma; Orphanidis, Amvrosios; Raikos, Nikolaos; Goutziomitrou, Evangelia; Kolibianakis, Efstratios M; Tarlatzis, Basil C; Goulas, Antonis

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) is responsible for the initial biotransformation of profol, an extensively metabolized intravenous anesthetic. In this study we examined the effect of the apparently functional CYP2B6 c.516G>T polymorphism on the distribution of propofol concentrations, quantified by GC/MS analysis following a single bolus dose, in the blood of 44 Greek women undergoing oocyte retrieval. Univariate analysis using age, height, weight and smoking status as covariates, as well as the Mann-Whitney non-parametric test, revealed a strong trend of association of the T allele with high propofol concentrations determined in whole blood, shortly after a single bolus dose. Propofol concentrations which were higher than one standard deviation of the mean were almost invariably associated with carriage of the T allele.

  6. Phenotypic expression and origin of the rare beta-thalassemia splice site mutation HBB:c.315 + 1G>T.

    PubMed

    Broquere, Cédrick; Brudey, Karine; Harteveld, Cornelis L; Saint-Martin, Christian; Elion, Jacques; Giordano, Piero C; Romana, Marc

    2010-06-01

    We present the hematological characteristics of five patients from Surinam and the bordering French Guyana, who are carriers of the rare beta-thalassemia (beta-thal) mutation HBB:c.315+1G>T. Analysis of the phenotype/genotype relationship shows that this allele is a beta(0)-thal variant and illustrates the modulating effect of the alpha-globin gene status on the beta-thal phenotype. The ethnic origin of the five probands, belonging to the so-called Bush Negroes Maroons of Surinam and French Guyana, strongly suggests that this beta-thal mutation has a West African origin and spread in this ethnic group because of a founder effect and/or genetic drift.

  7. Biasing Simulations of DNA Base Pair Parameters with Application to Propellor Twisting in AT/AT, AA/TT, and AC/GT Steps and Their Uracil Analogs.

    PubMed

    Peguero-Tejada, Alfredo; van der Vaart, Arjan

    2017-01-23

    An accurate and efficient implementation of the six DNA base pair parameters as order parameters for enhanced sampling simulations is presented. The parameter definitions are defined by vector algebra operations on a reduced atomic set of the base pair, and correlate very well with standard definitions. Application of the model is illustrated by umbrella sampling simulations of propeller twisting within AT/AT, AA/TT, and AC/GT steps and their uracil analogs. Strong correlations are found between propeller twisting and a number of conformational parameters, including buckle, opening, BI/BII backbone configuration, and sugar puckering. The thymine methyl group is observed to notably alter the local conformational free energy landscape, with effects within and directly upstream of the thymine containing base pair.

  8. Human cloning: three mistakes and an alternative.

    PubMed

    Baylis, Françoise

    2002-06-01

    The current debate on the ethics of cloning humans is both uninspired and uninspiring. In large measure this is because of mistakes that permeate the discourse, including the mistake of thinking that cloning technology is strictly a reproductive technology when it is used to create whole beings. As a result, the challenge this technology represents regarding our understanding of ourselves and the species to which we belong typically is inappropriately downplayed or exaggerated. This has meant that important (albeit disquieting) societal issues and species-type concerns have not been fully explored. This paper, intended as a corrective, suggests that we take an alternate view of human cloning as both an enhancement and a reproductive technology. This proposed shift in the framework for analysis counters the current narrow framing of the issues and introduces new questions about the prospect of modifying the species.

  9. Scientific hazards of human reproductive 'cloning'.

    PubMed

    Young, Lorraine E

    2003-05-01

    The scientific and clinical professional societies and associations covering the remit of Human Fertility are unanimously opposed to human reproductive 'cloning'. This article describes the main scientific objections to human reproductive 'cloning'. Data collected from numerous studies in a range of animal species indicate a high incidence of fetal defects, a stillbirth rate typically of more than 90% and a lack of adequate information on postnatal development. These concerns are exacerbated by misconceptions about the current ability to screen preimplantation embryos for 'cloning-induced' defects. Scientists and clinicians are sometimes treated with mistrust in the eyes of the public and media over such issues, perhaps because scientific information is not as well communicated as it might be. The duty of reproductive specialists is to convey the limits of their knowledge on this issue to the public and policymakers.

  10. Bac clones generated from sheared dna

    SciTech Connect

    Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Vessere, Gery M.; Shu, Chung Li; Hoskins,Roger A.; Abad, Jose P.; de Pablos, Beatriz; Villasante, Alfredo; deJong, Pieter J.

    2006-08-09

    BAC libraries generated from restriction-digested genomic DNA display representational bias and lack some sequences. To facilitate completion of genome projects, procedures have been developed to create BACs from DNA physically sheared to create fragments extending up to 200kb. The DNA fragments were repaired to create blunt ends and ligated to a new BAC vector. This approach has been tested by generating BAC libraries from Drosophila DNA, with insert lengths of 50 kb to 150 kb. The libraries lack chimeric clone problems as determined by mapping paired BAC-end sequences of one library to the D. melanogaster genome sequence. The utility of ''sheared'' libraries was demonstrated by closure of a previous clone gap and by isolation of clones from telomeric regions, which were notably absent from previous Drosophila BAC libraries.

  11. Dogs cloned from adult somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeong Chun; Kim, Min Kyu; Jang, Goo; Oh, Hyun Ju; Yuda, Fibrianto; Kim, Hye Jin; Hossein, M Shamim; Shamim, M Hossein; Kim, Jung Ju; Kang, Sung Keun; Schatten, Gerald; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2005-08-04

    Several mammals--including sheep, mice, cows, goats, pigs, rabbits, cats, a mule, a horse and a litter of three rats--have been cloned by transfer of a nucleus from a somatic cell into an egg cell (oocyte) that has had its nucleus removed. This technology has not so far been successful in dogs because of the difficulty of maturing canine oocytes in vitro. Here we describe the cloning of two Afghan hounds by nuclear transfer from adult skin cells into oocytes that had matured in vivo. Together with detailed sequence information generated by the canine-genome project, the ability to clone dogs by somatic-cell nuclear transfer should help to determine genetic and environmental contributions to the diverse biological and behavioural traits associated with the many different canine breeds.

  12. Human reproductive cloning and reasons for deprivation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, D A

    2008-08-01

    Human reproductive cloning provides the possibility of genetically related children for persons for whom present technologies are ineffective. I argue that the desire for genetically related children is not, by itself, a sufficient reason to engage in human reproductive cloning. I show this by arguing that the value underlying the desire for genetically related children implies a tension between the parent and the future child. This tension stems from an instance of a deprivation and violates a general principle of reasons for deprivation. Alternative considerations, such as a right to procreative autonomy, do not appear helpful in making the case for human reproductive cloning merely on the basis of the desire for genetically related children.

  13. Isolation of cDNA clones for the catalytic gamma subunit of mouse muscle phosphorylase kinase: expression of mRNA in normal and mutant Phk mice.

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, J S; VanTuinen, P; Reeves, A A; Philip, B A; Caskey, C T

    1987-01-01

    We have isolated and characterized cDNA clones for the gamma subunit of mouse muscle phosphorylase kinase (gamma-Phk). These clones were isolated from a lambda gt11 mouse muscle cDNA library via screening with a synthetic oligonucleotide probe corresponding to a portion of the rabbit gamma-Phk amino acid sequence. The gamma-Phk cDNA clones code for a 387-amino acid protein that shares 93% amino acid sequence identity with the corresponding rabbit amino acid sequence. RNA gel blot analysis reveals that the muscle gamma-Phk probe hybridizes to two mRNA species (2.4 and 1.6 kilobases) in skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, and brain, but does not hybridize to liver RNA. Phk-deficient I-strain (Phk) mouse muscle contains reduced levels of gamma-Phk mRNA as compared with control mice. Although the Phk defect is an X-linked recessive trait, hybridization to a human-rodent somatic cell hybrid mapping panel shows that the gamma-Phk gene is not located on the X chromosome. Rather, the gamma-Phk cross-hybridizing human restriction fragments map to human chromosomes 7 (multiple) and 11 (single). Reduced gamma-Phk mRNA in I-strain mice, therefore, appears to be a consequence of the Phk-mutant trait and does not stem from a mutant gamma-subunit gene. Images PMID:3472241

  14. Neurokinin B Causes Acute GnRH Secretion and Repression of GnRH Transcription in GT1–7 GnRH Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Glidewell-Kenney, Christine A.; Shao, Paul P.; Iyer, Anita K.; Grove, Anna M. H.; Meadows, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic studies in human patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) identified mutations in the genes that encode neurokinin B (NKB) and the neurokinin 3 receptor (NK3R). However, determining the mechanism whereby NKB regulates gonadotropin secretion has been difficult because of conflicting results from in vivo studies investigating the luteinizing hormone (LH) response to senktide, a NK3R agonist. NK3R is expressed in a subset of GnRH neurons and in kisspeptin neurons that are known to regulate GnRH secretion. Thus, one potential source of inconsistency is that NKB could produce opposing direct and indirect effects on GnRH secretion. Here, we employ the GT1-7 cell model to elucidate the direct effects of NKB on GnRH neuron function. We find that GT1-7 cells express NK3R and respond to acute senktide treatment with c-Fos induction and increased GnRH secretion. In contrast, long-term senktide treatment decreased GnRH secretion. Next, we focus on the examination of the mechanism underlying the long-term decrease in secretion and determine that senktide treatment represses transcription of GnRH. We further show that this repression of GnRH transcription may involve enhanced c-Fos protein binding at novel activator protein-1 (AP-1) half-sites identified in enhancer 1 and the promoter, as well as chromatin remodeling at the promoter of the GnRH gene. These data indicate that NKB could directly regulate secretion from NK3R-expressing GnRH neurons. Furthermore, whether the response is inhibitory or stimulatory toward GnRH secretion could depend on the history or length of exposure to NKB because of a repressive effect on GnRH transcription. PMID:23393128

  15. Association of COMT val158met and DRD2 G>T genetic polymorphisms with individual differences in motor learning and performance in female young adults

    PubMed Central

    Boyden, Nate B.; Kwak, Youngbin; Humfleet, Jennifer; Burke, David T.; Müller, Martijn L. T. M.; Bohnen, Nico I.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals learn new skills at different rates. Given the involvement of corticostriatal pathways in some types of learning, variations in dopaminergic transmission may contribute to these individual differences. Genetic polymorphisms of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) enzyme and dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) genes partially determine cortical and striatal dopamine availability, respectively. Individuals who are homozygous for the COMT methionine (met) allele show reduced cortical COMT enzymatic activity, resulting in increased dopamine levels in the prefrontal cortex as opposed to individuals who are carriers of the valine (val) allele. DRD2 G-allele homozygotes benefit from a higher striatal dopamine level compared with T-allele carriers. We hypothesized that individuals who are homozygous for COMT met and DRD2 G alleles would show higher rates of motor learning. Seventy-two young healthy females (20 ± 1.9 yr) performed a sensorimotor adaptation task and a motor sequence learning task. A nonparametric mixed model ANOVA revealed that the COMT val-val group demonstrated poorer performance in the sequence learning task compared with the met-met group and showed a learning deficit in the visuomotor adaptation task compared with both met-met and val-met groups. The DRD2 TT group showed poorer performance in the sequence learning task compared with the GT group, but there was no difference between DRD2 genotype groups in adaptation rate. Although these results did not entirely come out as one might predict based on the known contribution of corticostriatal pathways to motor sequence learning, they support the role of genetic polymorphisms of COMT val158met (rs4680) and DRD2 G>T (rs 1076560) in explaining individual differences in motor performance and motor learning, dependent on task type. PMID:24225542

  16. Effect of glutamate and extracellular calcium on uptake of inorganic lead (Pb2+) in immortalized mouse hypothalamic GT1-7 neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Loikkanen, J; Naarala, J; Vähäkangas, K H; Savolainen, K M

    2006-01-25

    We have previously shown that although glutamate alone has no effects on viability of mouse hypothalamic GT1-7 cells, it clearly enhances Pb2+-induced cytotoxicity. It is likely that Pb2+ must enter cells to exert most of its toxic effects. Pb2+ is known to substitute for Ca2+ in many cellular processes. Therefore, we studied the uptake mechanisms of Pb2+ into GT1-7 neuronal cells with a special focus on the role of extracellular calcium (Ca2+), voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCCs) and glutamate. Basal uptake of Pb2+ (1 microM or 10 microM), i.e. without any external stimulus, clearly increased in nominally Ca2+-free buffer and was partially abolished by 13 mM Ca2+ when compared to uptake in the presence of a physiological concentration of extracellular Ca2+ (1.3 mM). Depolarization by 25 mM K+, or antagonists of VSCCs, verapamil (10 microM) or flunarizine (10 microM) had no clear effect on basal Pb2+ uptake. Glutamate (1 mM) increased Pb2+ uptake, but only when cells were treated with 1 microM Pb2+ in the presence of 1.3 mM Ca2+. Our data suggest that Pb2+ competes for the same cellular uptake pathways with Ca2+, although not via VSCCs. In addition, enhancement of Pb2+-induced neurotoxicity by glutamate may be due to increased neuronal uptake of Pb2+.

  17. The significance of c.690G>T polymorphism (rs34529039) and expression of the CEBPA gene in ovarian cancer outcome

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowska, Ewa; Podgorska, Agnieszka; Zolocinska, Aleksandra; Pienkowska-Grela, Barbara; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Balcerak, Anna; Lukasik, Martyna; Stachurska, Anna; Timorek, Agnieszka; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; El-Bahrawy, Mona; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    The CEBPA gene is known to be mutated or abnormally expressed in several cancers. This is the first study assessing the clinical impact of CEBPA gene status and expression on the ovarian cancer outcome. The CEBPA gene sequence was analyzed in 118 ovarian cancer patients (44 platinum/cyclophosphamide (PC)-treated and 74 taxane/platinum (TP)-treated), both in tumors and blood samples, and in blood from 236 healthy women, using PCR-Sanger sequencing and Real-Time quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based genotyping methods, respectively. The CEBPA mRNA level was examined with Reverse Transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). The results were correlated to different clinicopathological parameters. Thirty of 118 (25.4%) tumors harbored the CEBPA synonymous c.690G>T polymorphism (rs34529039), that we showed to be related to up-regulation of CEBPA mRNA levels (p=0.0059). The presence of the polymorphism was significantly associated with poor prognosis (p=0.005) and poor response to the PC chemotherapy regimen (p=0.024). In accordance, elevated CEBPA mRNA levels negatively affected patient survival (p<0.001) and tumor response to the PC therapy (p=0.014). The rs34529039 SNP did not affect the risk of developing ovarian cancer. This is the first study providing evidence that the c.690G>T, p.(Thr230Thr) (rs34529039) polymorphism of the CEBPA gene, together with up-regulation of its mRNA expression, are negative factors worsening ovarian cancer outcome. Their adverse clinical effect depends on a therapeutic regimen used, which might make them potential prognostic and predictive biomarkers for response to DNA-damaging chemotherapy. PMID:27602952

  18. Induction of T(4) UDP-GT activity, serum thyroid stimulating hormone, and thyroid follicular cell proliferation in mice treated with microsomal enzyme inducers.

    PubMed

    Hood, Alan; Allen, Marcia L; Liu, YaPing; Liu, Jie; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2003-04-01

    The microsomal enzyme inducers phenobarbital (PB), pregnenolone-16 alpha-carbonitrile (PCN), 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), and Aroclor 1254 (PCB) are known to induce thyroxine (T(4)) glucuronidation and reduce serum T(4) concentrations in rats. Also, microsomal enzyme inducers that increase serum TSH (i.e., PB and PCN) also increase thyroid follicular cell proliferation in rats. Little is known about the effects of these microsomal enzyme inducers on T(4) glucuronidation, serum thyroid hormone concentrations, serum TSH, and thyroid gland growth in mice. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that microsomal enzyme inducers induce T(4) UDP-GT activity, resulting in reduced serum T(4) concentrations, as well as increased serum TSH and thyroid follicular cell proliferation in mice. B6C3F male mice were fed a control diet or a diet containing PB (600, 1200, 1800, or 2400 ppm), PCN (250, 500, 1000, or 2000 ppm), 3MC (62.5, 125, 250, or 500 ppm), or PCB (10, 30, 100, or 300 ppm) for 21 days. All four inducers increased liver weight and hepatic microsomal UDP-GT activity toward chloramphenicol, alpha-naphthol, and T(4). PB and PCB decreased serum total T(4), but PCN and 3MC did not. Serum thyroid stimulating hormone was markedly increased by PCN and 3MC treatments, and slightly increased by PB and PCB treatments. All four microsomal enzyme inducers dramatically increased thyroid follicular cell proliferation in mice. The findings suggest that PB, PCN, 3MC, and PCB disrupt thyroid hormone homeostasis in mice.

  19. STAT4 rs7574865 G/T polymorphism is associated with rheumatoid arthritis and disease activity, but not with anti-CCP antibody levels in a Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Durán-Avelar, Ma de Jesús; Vibanco-Pérez, Norberto; Hernández-Pacheco, Raquel Rocío; Castro-Zambrano, América Del Carmen; Ortiz-Martínez, Liliana; Zambrano-Zaragoza, José Francisco

    2016-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease in whose etiology genetic factors are known to play an important role. Among the genes associated with RA, STAT4 could be an important factor in conducting helper T cells toward the pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17 lineages. The aim of this study is to determine the association of the STAT4 polymorphism rs7574865 with RA, disease activity, and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibody levels in a Mexican population. Genotyping was carried out using the Taqman® system from Applied Biosystems in 140 patients with RA and 150 healthy subjects. Disease activity was evaluated by a rheumatologist using the DAS28 and Spanish-HAQ-DI instruments. Anti-CCP levels were determined by ELISA. Associations of the genotypes of rs7574865 with DAS28, HAQ, and anti-CCP antibody levels with RA were determined. Findings showed that the GT and TT genotypes and the T allele from rs7574865 were all associated as risk factors for RA, independently of their anti-CCP status. An association with moderate-to-high disease activity (DAS28 ≥ 3.2) was also found. Additionally, patients with the GT or TT genotypes showed lower HAQ values than those who carried the GG genotype. No differences in anti-CCP antibody levels or DAS28 and genotypes were found. This work supports the association of the STAT4 rs7574865 polymorphism with RA and disease activity, but not with anti-CCP antibody levels in a Mexican population.

  20. Visfatin -948G/T and resistin -420C/G polymorphisms in Egyptian type 2 diabetic patients with and without cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Motawi, Tarek M K; Shaker, Olfat G; El-Sawalhi, Maha M; Abdel-Nasser, Zeinab M

    2014-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the main threats to human health in the 21st century. Visfatin/Nampt and resistin are novel adipokines that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) complication. Several genetic studies have shown inconsistent results regarding association of visfatin/Nampt gene (NAMPT) and resistin gene (RETN) polymorphisms with T2DM and CVD complications. Here, we investigate whether NAMPT -948G/T and RETN -420C/G polymorphisms are associated with T2DM, its CVD complications, and serum adipokines levels in 90 Egyptian diabetic patients (44 without CVD and 46 with CVD) along with 60 healthy control subjects. Higher frequencies of NAMPT -948G/G and RETN -420G/G were observed among T2DM patients compared with controls. Furthermore, the frequencies of these genotypes were significantly higher in T2DM patients with CVD than those without CVD. Both NAMPT -948G/G and RETN -420G/G genotypes and G alleles were significantly associated with T2DM and CVD in Egyptian diabetic patients. Moreover, serum visfatin/Nampt and resistin levels were markedly elevated in T2DM patients, with the highest values observed in G/G genotypes among T2DM patients with CVD. In addition, positive correlations were observed between plasma adipokines levels and CVD risk factors. In conclusion, our data suggests that genetic variations in NAMPT -948G/T and RETN -420C/G may contribute to the disposition for T2DM and its CVD complications in Egyptian patients. However, further studies with greater sample size should be performed to verify these results.

  1. A game theory-reinforcement learning (GT-RL) method to develop optimal operation policies for multi-operator reservoir systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani, Kaveh; Hooshyar, Milad

    2014-11-01

    Reservoir systems with multiple operators can benefit from coordination of operation policies. To maximize the total benefit of these systems the literature has normally used the social planner's approach. Based on this approach operation decisions are optimized using a multi-objective optimization model with a compound system's objective. While the utility of the system can be increased this way, fair allocation of benefits among the operators remains challenging for the social planner who has to assign controversial weights to the system's beneficiaries and their objectives. Cooperative game theory provides an alternative framework for fair and efficient allocation of the incremental benefits of cooperation. To determine the fair and efficient utility shares of the beneficiaries, cooperative game theory solution methods consider the gains of each party in the status quo (non-cooperation) as well as what can be gained through the grand coalition (social planner's solution or full cooperation) and partial coalitions. Nevertheless, estimation of the benefits of different coalitions can be challenging in complex multi-beneficiary systems. Reinforcement learning can be used to address this challenge and determine the gains of the beneficiaries for different levels of cooperation, i.e., non-cooperation, partial cooperation, and full cooperation, providing the essential input for allocation based on cooperative game theory. This paper develops a game theory-reinforcement learning (GT-RL) method for determining the optimal operation policies in multi-operator multi-reservoir systems with respect to fairness and efficiency criteria. As the first step to underline the utility of the GT-RL method in solving complex multi-agent multi-reservoir problems without a need for developing compound objectives and weight assignment, the proposed method is applied to a hypothetical three-agent three-reservoir system.

  2. Photonic Programmable Tele-Cloning Network

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Chen, Ming-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The concept of quantum teleportation allows an unknown quantum states to be broadcasted and processed in a distributed quantum network. The quantum information injected into the network can be diluted to distant multi-copies by quantum cloning and processed by arbitrary quantum logic gates which were programed in advance in the network quantum state. A quantum network combines simultaneously these fundamental quantum functions could lead to new intriguing applications. Here we propose a photonic programmable telecloning network based on a four-photon interferometer. The photonic network serves as quantum gate, quantum cloning and quantum teleportation and features experimental advantage of high brightness by photon recycling. PMID:27353838

  3. Photonic Programmable Tele-Cloning Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Chen, Ming-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    The concept of quantum teleportation allows an unknown quantum states to be broadcasted and processed in a distributed quantum network. The quantum information injected into the network can be diluted to distant multi-copies by quantum cloning and processed by arbitrary quantum logic gates which were programed in advance in the network quantum state. A quantum network combines simultaneously these fundamental quantum functions could lead to new intriguing applications. Here we propose a photonic programmable telecloning network based on a four-photon interferometer. The photonic network serves as quantum gate, quantum cloning and quantum teleportation and features experimental advantage of high brightness by photon recycling.

  4. Cloning of the complete Mycoplasma pneumoniae genome.

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, R; Herrmann, R

    1989-01-01

    The complete genome of Mycoplasma pneumoniae was cloned in an ordered library consisting of 34 overlapping or adjacent cosmids, one plasmid and two lambda phages. The genome size was determined by adding up the sizes of either the individual unique EcoRI restriction fragments of the gene bank or of the XhoI fragments of genomic M. pneumoniae DNA. The values from these calculations, 835 and 849 kbp, are in good agreement. An XhoI restriction map was constructed by identifying adjacent DNA fragments by probing with selected cosmid clones. Images PMID:2506532

  5. Photonic Programmable Tele-Cloning Network.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Chen, Ming-Cheng

    2016-06-29

    The concept of quantum teleportation allows an unknown quantum states to be broadcasted and processed in a distributed quantum network. The quantum information injected into the network can be diluted to distant multi-copies by quantum cloning and processed by arbitrary quantum logic gates which were programed in advance in the network quantum state. A quantum network combines simultaneously these fundamental quantum functions could lead to new intriguing applications. Here we propose a photonic programmable telecloning network based on a four-photon interferometer. The photonic network serves as quantum gate, quantum cloning and quantum teleportation and features experimental advantage of high brightness by photon recycling.

  6. A haplotype derived from the common variants at the -1997G/T and Sp1 binding site of the COL1A1 gene influences risk of postmenopausal osteoporosis in India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Monica; Singh, Puneetpal; Singh, Surinder; Juneja, Pawan Kumar; Kaur, Taranpal

    2013-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between Collagen 1 alpha 1 (COL1A1) polymorphism and osteoporosis in DEXA verified 349 (145 osteoporotic, 87 osteopenic and 117 normal) postmenopausal women of India, who were not taking hormone replacement therapy. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), that is, -1997G/T (rs1107946) and +1245G/T (rs1800012, Sp1) of the COL1A1 gene, were analyzed. Minor allele frequencies of rs1107946 and rs1800012 were 0.15 and 0.20 in osteoporotic women, 0.18 and 0.18 in osteopenic and 0.20 and 0.17 in women having normal bone mass. An allele dose effect with BMD of lumbar spine has been exhibited by major allele G of rs1107946 (GG: 0.86 g/cm(2), GT: 0.91 g/cm(2) and TT: 0.93 g/cm(2)) and minor allele T of rs1800012 (GG: 0.91 g/cm(2), GT: 0.87 g/cm(2) and TT: 0.81 g/cm(2)). Disease association analysis revealed a haplotype GT that confers approximately threefold higher risk of osteoporosis in the carriers (OR 3.12, 95% CI 1.24-8.88, P = 0.008) after adjusting the confounding effect of age, BMI and years since menopause. These results suggest that GT haplotype of COL1A1 gene is associated with a higher risk of postmenopausal osteoporosis in Northwest Indian women.

  7. Diversity of trematode genetic clones within amphipods and the timing of same-clone infections.

    PubMed

    Keeney, Devon B; Waters, Jonathan M; Poulin, Robert

    2007-03-01

    The genetic diversity of trematodes within second intermediate hosts has important implications for the evolution of trematode populations as these hosts are utilized after the parasites reproduce asexually within first intermediate hosts and before sexual reproduction within definitive hosts. We characterised the genetic clonal diversity of the marine trematode Maritrema novaezealandensis within amphipod (Paracalliope novizealandiae) second intermediate hosts using four to six microsatellite loci to determine if multiple copies of identical trematode clones existed within naturally infected amphipods. To determine the relative timing of infections by identical clones within hosts, trematode metacercariae were assigned to six developmental stages and the stages of identical clones were compared. The genotypes of 306 trematodes were determined from 44 amphipods each containing more than one trematode. Six pairs of identical trematode clones were recovered in total (representing five amphipods: 11% of amphipods with greater than one trematode) and all pairs of clones belonged to the same developmental stage. This suggests that identical clone infections are effectively synchronous. A general decrease in the number of metacercariae recovered, prevalence, and mean intensity of infection for each subsequent developmental stage coupled with large numbers of metacercariae (>9) only being recovered from recent infections, supports the occurrence of post-infection amphipod mortality and/or within-host trematode mortality. Taken together, our results indicate that natural infections are characterised by high genetic diversity, but that amphipods also periodically encounter "batches" of genetically identical clones, potentially setting the stage for interactions within and between clonal groups inside the host.

  8. Whole genome comparison of donor and cloned dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Min; Cho, Yun Sung; Kim, Hyunmin; Jho, Sungwoong; Son, Bongjun; Choi, Joung Yoon; Kim, Sangsoo; Lee, Byeong Chun; Bhak, Jong; Jang, Goo

    2013-10-21

    Cloning is a process that produces genetically identical organisms. However, the genomic degree of genetic resemblance in clones needs to be determined. In this report, the genomes of a cloned dog and its donor were compared. Compared with a human monozygotic twin, the genome of the cloned dog showed little difference from the genome of the nuclear donor dog in terms of single nucleotide variations, chromosomal instability, and telomere lengths. These findings suggest that cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer produced an almost identical genome. The whole genome sequence data of donor and cloned dogs can provide a resource for further investigations on epigenetic contributions in phenotypic differences.

  9. OEPR Cloning: an Efficient and Seamless Cloning Strategy for Large- and Multi-Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang-Jun; Jiang, Hui; Wu, Lei; Zhu, Ling-Yun; Meng, Er; Zhang, Dong-Yi

    2017-01-01

    Here, an efficient cloning strategy for large DNA fragments and for simultaneous assembly of multiple DNA fragments assembly is presented. This strategy is named OEPR (based on Overlap Extension PCR and Recombination in vivo). OEPR cloning is a seamless, restriction- and ligation-independent method. The method takes advantage of both homologous recombination enzymes in E. coli and overlap PCR. Using OEPR cloning, a long fragment (1–6 kb) or multiple fragments (2–4 fragments) can be easily constructed and simultaneously assembled into a target vector. PMID:28300166

  10. Cloning, expression, and nucleotide sequence of the Lactobacillus helveticus 481 gene encoding the bacteriocin helveticin J.

    PubMed Central

    Joerger, M C; Klaenhammer, T R

    1990-01-01

    Lactobacillus helveticus 481 produces a 37-kDa bacteriocin called helveticin J. Libraries of chromosomal DNA from L. helveticus were prepared in lambda gt11 and probed for phage-producing fusion proteins that could react with polyclonal helveticin J antibody. Two recombinant phage, HJ1 and HJ4, containing homologous inserts of 350 and 600 bp, respectively, produced proteins that reacted with antibody. These two phage clones specifically hybridized to L. helveticus 481 total genomic DNA but not to DNA from strains that did not produce helveticin J or strains producing unrelated bacteriocins. HJ1 and HJ4 lysogens produced beta-galactosidase fusion proteins that shared similar epitopes with each other and helveticin J. The intact helveticin J gene (hlv) was isolated by screening a library of L. helveticus chromosomal DNA in lambda EMBL3 with the insert DNA from phage HJ4 as a probe. The DNA sequence of a contiguous 3,364-bp region was determined. Two complete open reading frames (ORF), designated ORF2 and ORF3, were identified within the sequenced fragment. The 3' end of another open reading frame, ORF1, was located upstream of ORF2. A noncoding region and a putative promoter were located between ORF1 and ORF2. ORF2 could encode an 11,808-Da protein. The L. helveticus DNA inserts of the HJ1 and HJ4 clones reside within ORF3, which begins 30 bp downstream from the termination codon of ORF2. ORF3 could encode a 37,511-Da protein. Downstream from ORF3, the 5' end of another ORF (ORF4) was found. A Bg/II fragment containing ORF2 and ORF3 was cloned into pGK12, and the recombinant plasmid, pTRK135, was transformed into Lactobacillus acidophilus via electroporation. Transformants carrying pTRK135 produced a bacteriocin that was heat labile and exhibited an acitivity spectrum that was the same as that of helveticin J. Images PMID:2228964

  11. Molecular cloning of rat brain Na,K-ATPase alpha-subunit cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, J W; Mercer, R W; Caplan, M; Emanuel, J R; Sweadner, K J; Benz, E J; Levenson, R

    1985-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone for the rat brain Na,K-ATPase alpha subunit. A lambda gt11 cDNA expression library constructed from mRNA of 1- and 2-week-old rat brains was screened with an antibody reactive with rat brain Na,K-ATPase. A positive phage clone, lambda rb5, containing a 1200-base-pair cDNA insert expressed a beta-galactosidase-cDNA fusion protein that was reactive by immunoblotting with the Na,K-ATPase antibody. This fusion protein was also reactive in ELISA with a monoclonal antibody directed against the alpha subunit of the Na,K-ATPase. A 27S mRNA species exhibiting sequence hybridization to the cDNA insert of lambda rb5 was identified in rat brain, kidney, and liver, as well as in dog kidney. This 27S mRNA exhibited a tissue-specific pattern of abundance consistent with the relative abundance of Na,K-ATPase polypeptides in vivo: kidney greater than brain greater than liver. In a ouabain-resistant HeLa cell line, C+, which contains minute chromosomes and at least a 10-fold greater number of sodium pumps than parental HeLa cells, DNA sequences complementary to lambda rb5 cDNA were amplified approximately 40-fold. Analysis of the lambda rb5 cDNA sequence demonstrated a perfect nucleotide sequence match between a portion of the cDNA and the amino acid sequence of the Na,K-ATPase alpha-subunit fluorescein isothiocyanate binding site. Taken together, the data presented here demonstrate that the lambda rb5 cDNA clone is a portion of the gene coding for the rat brain Na,K-ATPase alpha subunit. The ATPase gene appears to be present in one or very few copies in the rat and human genomes and to be transcriptionally regulated in different rat tissues. In a ouabain-resistant human cell line, on the other hand, ouabain resistance appears to involve an increase in the number of gene copies coding for the Na,K-ATPase. Images PMID:2994074

  12. A DOS Primer for Librarians: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beecher, Henry

    1990-01-01

    Provides an introduction to DOS commands and strategies for the effective organization and use of hard disks. Functions discussed include the creation of directories and subdirectories, enhanced copying, the assignment of disk drives, and backing up the hard disk. (CLB)

  13. Ethical dimensions of therapeutic human cloning.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Michael J

    2002-09-11

    Therapeutic human cloning has the potential significantly to reduce human suffering and enhance human happiness. This is the main ethical argument in its favour. The main ethical arguments against it centre on questions to do with the moral status of the human embryo. A subsidiary set of arguments arises from the connections between therapeutic human cloning and reproductive cloning. Most of the ethical questions concerning the status of the human embryo have long been examined in the context of abortion, though they are being re-examined in the context of genetic screening and embryo research. A consensus on such matters seems extremely unlikely to result in the near future. The current role of ethicists may not, therefore, be so much to attempt to produce a definitive answer to the question of the status of the human embryo at the very early developmental stages at which therapeutic human cloning would take place, but more to help clarify arguments and indicate the implications of particular approaches. That is what this paper seeks to do.

  14. Cloning and cryptography with quantum continuous variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerf, N. J.; Iblisdir, S.; van Assche, G.

    2002-02-01

    The cloning of quantum variables with continuous spectra is investigated. We define a Gaussian 1-to-2 cloning machine that copies equally well two conjugate variables such as position and momentum or the two quadrature components of a light mode. The resulting cloning fidelity for coherent states, namely F=2/3, is shown to be optimal. An asymmetric version of this Gaussian cloner is then used to assess the security of a continuous-variable quantum key distribution scheme that allows two remote parties to share a Gaussian key. The information versus disturbance tradeoff underlying this continuous quantum cryptographic scheme is then analyzed for the optimal individual attack. Methods to convert the resulting Gaussian keys into secret key bits are also studied. Finally, the extension of the Gaussian cloner to optimal N-to-M continuous cloners is discussed, and it is shown how to implement these cloners for light modes using a phase-insensitive optical amplifier and beam splitters. In addition, a phase-conjugate input cloner is defined, yielding M clones and M' anticlones from N replicas of a coherent state and N' replicas of its phase-conjugate (with M'-M=N'-N). This novel kind of cloners is shown to outperform the standard N-to-M cloners in some cases.

  15. Cloning the human SUMO1 promoter.

    PubMed

    Nanos-Webb, Angela; Deyrieux, Adeline; Bian, Xue-lin; Rosas-Acosta, Germán; Wilson, Van G

    2010-03-01

    Regulation of the sumoylation system at the level of gene expression has not yet been explored. To begin to define transcriptional regulatory features, the promoter region for the SUMO1 gene was cloned from human genomic DNA and characterized. Initially, a 532 base pair fragment upstream of and including the predicted SUMO1 transcription start site (TSS) was cloned and shown to possess promoter activity. Subsequent deletion analysis showed that a smaller fragment containing 158 bp upstream of the TSS region exhibited basal promoter activity in both human and rodent cell lines. Within this basal promoter fragment, there were predicted binding sites for numerous transcription factors, including the nude mouse gene product, Whn (FoxN1). Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that Whn could bind to an ACGC motif adjacent to the TSR, and in transfection studies Whn stimulated a 3-fold increase in transcription from this cloned promoter in keratinocytes (HaCaT cells). Mutation of the ACGC motif abrogated both Whn binding and transcriptional activation, indicating that the Whn effect is likely due to direct interaction with this promoter element. Consistent with these observations on the cloned promoter region, Whn also modestly stimulated transcription from the endogenous, genomic SUMO1 promoter in HaCaT cells, consistent with Whn potentially playing a regulatory role for SUMO1 transcription in keratinocytes.

  16. Experimental Eavesdropping Based on Optimal Quantum Cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Lemr, Karel; Černoch, Antonín; Soubusta, Jan; Miranowicz, Adam

    2013-04-01

    The security of quantum cryptography is guaranteed by the no-cloning theorem, which implies that an eavesdropper copying transmitted qubits in unknown states causes their disturbance. Nevertheless, in real cryptographic systems some level of disturbance has to be allowed to cover, e.g., transmission losses. An eavesdropper can attack such systems by replacing a noisy channel by a better one and by performing approximate cloning of transmitted qubits which disturb them but below the noise level assumed by legitimate users. We experimentally demonstrate such symmetric individual eavesdropping on the quantum key distribution protocols of Bennett and Brassard (BB84) and the trine-state spherical code of Renes (R04) with two-level probes prepared using a recently developed photonic multifunctional quantum cloner [Lemr et al., Phys. Rev. A 85, 050307(R) (2012)PLRAAN1050-2947]. We demonstrated that our optimal cloning device with high-success rate makes the eavesdropping possible by hiding it in usual transmission losses. We believe that this experiment can stimulate the quest for other operational applications of quantum cloning.

  17. Genetic crossing vs cloning by computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, S.

    1997-06-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulation using Penna`s bit string model, and compare the process of asexual reproduction by cloning with that by genetic crossover. We find them to be comparable as regards survival of a species, and also if a natural disaster is simulated.

  18. Clone history shapes Populus drought responses.

    PubMed

    Raj, Sherosha; Bräutigam, Katharina; Hamanishi, Erin T; Wilkins, Olivia; Thomas, Barb R; Schroeder, William; Mansfield, Shawn D; Plant, Aine L; Campbell, Malcolm M

    2011-07-26

    Just as animal monozygotic twins can experience different environmental conditions by being reared apart, individual genetically identical trees of the genus Populus can also be exposed to contrasting environmental conditions by being grown in different locations. As such, clonally propagated Populus trees provide an opportunity to interrogate the impact of individual environmental history on current response to environmental stimuli. To test the hypothesis that current responses to an environmental stimulus, drought, are contingent on environmental history, the transcriptome- level drought responses of three economically important hybrid genotypes-DN34 (Populus deltoides × Populus nigra), Walker [P. deltoides var. occidentalis × (Populus laurifolia × P. nigra)], and Okanese [Walker × (P. laurifolia × P. nigra)]-derived from two different locations were compared. Strikingly, differences in transcript abundance patterns in response to drought were based on differences in geographic origin of clones for two of the three genotypes. This observation was most pronounced for the genotypes with the longest time since establishment and last common propagation. Differences in genome-wide DNA methylation paralleled the transcriptome level trends, whereby the clones with the most divergent transcriptomes and clone history had the most marked differences in the extent of total DNA methylation, suggesting an epigenomic basis for the clone history-dependent transcriptome divergence. The data provide insights into the interplay between genotype and environment in the ecologically and economically important Populus genus, with implications for the industrial application of Populus trees and the evolution and persistence of these important tree species and their associated hybrids.

  19. Computerized Adaptive Testing with Item Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glas, Cees A. W.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2003-01-01

    Developed a multilevel item response (IRT) model that allows for differences between the distributions of item parameters of families of item clones. Results from simulation studies based on an item pool from the Law School Admission Test illustrate the accuracy of the item pool calibration and adaptive testing procedures based on the model. (SLD)

  20. No-cloning of quantum steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Ching-Yi; Lambert, Neill; Liao, Teh-Lu; Nori, Franco; Li, Che-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering allows two parties to verify their entanglement, even if one party’s measurements are untrusted. This concept has not only provided new insights into the nature of non-local spatial correlations in quantum mechanics, but also serves as a resource for one-sided device-independent quantum information tasks. Here, we investigate how EPR steering behaves when one-half of a maximally entangled pair of qudits (multidimensional quantum systems) is cloned by a universal cloning machine. We find that EPR steering, as verified by a criterion based on the mutual information between qudits, can only be found in one of the copy subsystems but not both. We prove that this is also true for the single-system analogue of EPR steering. We find that this restriction, which we term ‘no-cloning of quantum steering’, elucidates the physical reason why steering can be used to secure sources and channels against cloning-based attacks when implementing quantum communication and quantum computation protocols.

  1. Cloning: Learning to Replay the Genetic Tape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, David J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes how plants can be produced by cloning by using tissue culture methods to mass-produce rare native prairie plants and trying to transfer some of the genetic characteristics of native grasses into cultivated cereals. The experiment was conducted at South Dakota State University. (HM)

  2. Universal CG cloning of polymerase chain reaction products.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Julian; Brown, Andrew J

    2015-02-15

    Single-insert cloning of DNA fragments without restriction enzymes has traditionally been achieved using TA cloning, with annealing of a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fragment containing a single overhanging 3' A to a plasmid vector containing a 3' T. In this article, we show that the analogous "CG cloning" is faster and far more efficient, using AhdI to generate a C-vector. For an afternoon ligation, CG cloning achieved double the cloning efficiency and more than 4-fold the number of transformants compared with TA cloning. However, blunt-end ligation was markedly more efficient than both. CG cloning could prove to be extremely useful for single-copy high-throughput cloning.

  3. To Clone or Not To Clone: Method Analysis for Retrieving Consensus Sequences In Ancient DNA Samples

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Misa; Barta, Jodi Lynn; Monroe, Cara; Kemp, Brian M.

    2011-01-01

    The challenges associated with the retrieval and authentication of ancient DNA (aDNA) evidence are principally due to post-mortem damage which makes ancient samples particularly prone to contamination from “modern” DNA sources. The necessity for authentication of results has led many aDNA researchers to adopt methods considered to be “gold standards” in the field, including cloning aDNA amplicons as opposed to directly sequencing them. However, no standardized protocol has emerged regarding the necessary number of clones to sequence, how a consensus sequence is most appropriately derived, or how results should be reported in the literature. In addition, there has been no systematic demonstration of the degree to which direct sequences are affected by damage or whether direct sequencing would provide disparate results from a consensus of clones. To address this issue, a comparative study was designed to examine both cloned and direct sequences amplified from ∼3,500 year-old ancient northern fur seal DNA extracts. Majority rules and the Consensus Confidence Program were used to generate consensus sequences for each individual from the cloned sequences, which exhibited damage at 31 of 139 base pairs across all clones. In no instance did the consensus of clones differ from the direct sequence. This study demonstrates that, when appropriate, cloning need not be the default method, but instead, should be used as a measure of authentication on a case-by-case basis, especially when this practice adds time and cost to studies where it may be superfluous. PMID:21738625

  4. Novel mutations c.28G>T (p.Ala10Ser) and c.189G>T (p.Glu63Asp) in WDR62 associated with early onset acanthosis and hyperkeratosis in a patient with autosomal recessive microcephaly type 2

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Yang, Zhiyun; Deng, Weiping; Chen, Dongna; Deng, Jianlian; Su, Yan; Li, Yang; Wu, Chao; Wang, Ye; Zeng, Hao; Wang, Yiming; Li, Xunhua

    2016-01-01

    Microcephaly (MCPH) is a developmental disorder characterized by reduced brain size and intellectual disability. A proportion of microcephaly is caused by defects in a single gene. Microcephaly 2 (MCPH2) is one of the most frequent subtypes of MCPH.WD repeat-containing protein 62 gene (WDR62) is the most frequently mutated gene in MCPH2 patients. Phenotypes involving dermatological changes in MCPH2 have not been reported. We have identified and investigated a 5-year-old Chinese girl with markedly reduced brain size (86% of normal size), intellectual disability and psychomotor developmental delay. The patient also exhibited spattered blisters and reduced hair density on her head, anisochromasia with reticular hyperpigmentation and hypopigmentation on the trunk, which she has had since the age of 4 and had been found by her parents. Histological examination of a skin biopsy revealed acanthosis, hyperkeratosis and necrotic keratinocytes. Whole exome and Sanger sequencing identified two novel missense mutations, c.28G>T and c.189G>T, in the WDR62 gene. Both the mutations non-synonymously affect evolutionarily conserved amino acids and are predicted to be disease causing. We report the first case of MCPH2 that also presented with marked dermatological changes. Our findings expand the mutational and phenotypical spectra of MCPH2 and are valuable in the mutation-based pre- and post-natal screening and genetic diagnosis for MCPH2. PMID:27852057

  5. IVA cloning: A single-tube universal cloning system exploiting bacterial In Vivo Assembly.

    PubMed

    García-Nafría, Javier; Watson, Jake F; Greger, Ingo H

    2016-06-06

    In vivo homologous recombination holds the potential for optimal molecular cloning, however, current strategies require specialised bacterial strains or laborious protocols. Here, we exploit a recA-independent recombination pathway, present in widespread laboratory E.coli strains, to develop IVA (In Vivo Assembly) cloning. This system eliminates the need for enzymatic assembly and reduces all molecular cloning procedures to a single-tube, single-step PCR, performed in <2 hours from setup to transformation. Unlike other methods, IVA is a complete system, and offers significant advantages over alternative methods for all cloning procedures (insertions, deletions, site-directed mutagenesis and sub-cloning). Significantly, IVA allows unprecedented simplification of complex cloning procedures: five simultaneous modifications of any kind, multi-fragment assembly and library construction are performed in approximately half the time of current protocols, still in a single-step fashion. This system is efficient, seamless and sequence-independent, and requires no special kits, enzymes or proprietary bacteria, which will allow its immediate adoption by the academic and industrial molecular biology community.

  6. IVA cloning: A single-tube universal cloning system exploiting bacterial In Vivo Assembly

    PubMed Central

    García-Nafría, Javier; Watson, Jake F.; Greger, Ingo H.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo homologous recombination holds the potential for optimal molecular cloning, however, current strategies require specialised bacterial strains or laborious protocols. Here, we exploit a recA-independent recombination pathway, present in widespread laboratory E.coli strains, to develop IVA (In Vivo Assembly) cloning. This system eliminates the need for enzymatic assembly and reduces all molecular cloning procedures to a single-tube, single-step PCR, performed in <2 hours from setup to transformation. Unlike other methods, IVA is a complete system, and offers significant advantages over alternative methods for all cloning procedures (insertions, deletions, site-directed mutagenesis and sub-cloning). Significantly, IVA allows unprecedented simplification of complex cloning procedures: five simultaneous modifications of any kind, multi-fragment assembly and library construction are performed in approximately half the time of current protocols, still in a single-step fashion. This system is efficient, seamless and sequence-independent, and requires no special kits, enzymes or proprietary bacteria, which will allow its immediate adoption by the academic and industrial molecular biology community. PMID:27264908

  7. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1987-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:3575113

  8. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1989-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:2654889

  9. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1988-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:3368330

  10. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1990-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:2333227

  11. A Gateway MultiSite Recombination Cloning Toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Lena K.; Stowers, R. Steven

    2011-01-01

    The generation of DNA constructs is often a rate-limiting step in conducting biological experiments. Recombination cloning of single DNA fragments using the Gateway system provided an advance over traditional restriction enzyme cloning due to increases in efficiency and reliability. Here we introduce a series of entry clones and a destination vector for use in two, three, and four fragment Gateway MultiSite recombination cloning whose advantages include increased flexibility and versatility. In contrast to Gateway single-fragment cloning approaches where variations are typically incorporated into model system-specific destination vectors, our Gateway MultiSite cloning strategy incorporates variations in easily generated entry clones that are model system-independent. In particular, we present entry clones containing insertions of GAL4, QF, UAS, QUAS, eGFP, and mCherry, among others, and demonstrate their in vivo functionality in Drosophila by using them to generate expression clones including GAL4 and QF drivers for various trp ion channel family members, UAS and QUAS excitatory and inhibitory light-gated ion channels, and QUAS red and green fluorescent synaptic vesicle markers. We thus establish a starter toolkit of modular Gateway MultiSite entry clones potentially adaptable to any model system. An inventory of entry clones and destination vectors for Gateway MultiSite cloning has also been established (www.gatewaymultisite.org). PMID:21931740

  12. Distribution of quantum Fisher information in asymmetric cloning machines

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xing; Yao, Yao; Zhou, Lei-Ming; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2014-01-01

    An unknown quantum state cannot be copied and broadcast freely due to the no-cloning theorem. Approximate cloning schemes have been proposed to achieve the optimal cloning characterized by the maximal fidelity between the original and its copies. Here, from the perspective of quantum Fisher information (QFI), we investigate the distribution of QFI in asymmetric cloning machines which produce two nonidentical copies. As one might expect, improving the QFI of one copy results in decreasing the QFI of the other copy. It is perhaps also unsurprising that asymmetric phase-covariant cloning outperforms universal cloning in distributing QFI since a priori information of the input state has been utilized. However, interesting results appear when we compare the distributabilities of fidelity (which quantifies the full information of quantum states), and QFI (which only captures the information of relevant parameters) in asymmetric cloning machines. Unlike the results of fidelity, where the distributability of symmetric cloning is always optimal for any d-dimensional cloning, we find that any asymmetric cloning outperforms symmetric cloning on the distribution of QFI for d ≤ 18, whereas some but not all asymmetric cloning strategies could be worse than symmetric ones when d > 18. PMID:25484234

  13. Optimal cloning for finite distributions of coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, P.T.; Ralph, T.C.; Dolinska, A.

    2004-04-01

    We derive optimal cloning limits for finite Gaussian distributions of coherent states and describe techniques for achieving them. We discuss the relation of these limits to state estimation and the no-cloning limit in teleportation. A qualitatively different cloning limit is derived for a single-quadrature Gaussian quantum cloner.

  14. Technological Literacy and Human Cloning. Resources in Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how technology educators can deal with advances in human genetics, specifically, cloning. Includes a definition and history of cloning, discusses its benefits, and looks at social concerns and arguments for and against human cloning. Includes classroom activities and websites. (Contains 10 references.) (JOW)

  15. Human research cloning, embryos, and embryo-like artifacts.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Insoo; Jung, Kyu Won

    2006-01-01

    Research suggests that cloning is incapable of producing a viable embryo when it is used on primate eggs. In fact, the entity created may not qualify as an embryo at all. If the results stand, cloning avoids the moral objections typically lodged against it, and cloning is itself an "alternative source" of stem cells.

  16. Genetic mapping and quantitative trait loci analysis for disease resistance using F2 and F5 generation-based genetic maps derived from 'Tifrunner' x'GT-C20' in peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One mapping population derived from Tifrunner × GT-C20 has shown great potential in developing a high dense genetic map and identification of QTLs for important disease resistance, Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and leaf spot (LS). Both F2 and F5 generation-based genetic maps were constructed prev...

  17. GnRH agonist reduces estrogen receptor dimerization in GT1-7 cells: evidence for cross-talk between membrane-initiated estrogen and GnRH signaling.

    PubMed

    Chason, Rebecca J; Kang, Jung-Hoon; Gerkowicz, Sabrina A; Dufau, Maria L; Catt, Kevin J; Segars, James H

    2015-03-15

    17β-estradiol (E2), a key participant on the initiation of the LH surge, exerts both positive and negative feedback on GnRH neurons. We sought to investigate potential interactions between estrogen receptors alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ) and gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R) in GT1-7 cells. Radioligand binding studies demonstrated a significant decrease in saturation E2 binding in cells treated with GnRH agonist. Conversely, there was a significant reduction in GnRH binding in GT1-7 cells treated with E2. In BRET(1) experiments, ERα-ERα dimerization was suppressed in GT1-7 cells treated with GnRH agonist (p < 0.05). There was no evidence of direct interaction between ERs and GnRH-R. This study provides the first evidence of reduced ERα homodimerization by GnRH agonist. Collectively, these findings demonstrate significant cross-talk between membrane-initiated GnRH and E2 signaling in GT1-7 cells.

  18. A new hemoglobin variant: Hb Meylan [β73(E17)Asp → Phe; HBB: c.220G>T; c.221A>T] with a double base mutation at the same codon.

    PubMed

    Renoux, Céline; Feray, Cécile; Joly, Philippe; Zanella-Cleon, Isabelle; Garcia, Caroline; Lacan, Philippe; Couprie, Nicole; Francina, Alain

    2015-01-01

    We report a new β-globin chain variant: Hb Meylan [β73(E17)Asp → Phe; HBB: c.220G>T; c.221A>T]. The new variant results from a double nucleotide mutation at the same codon. The possible molecular mechanisms are discussed.

  19. Local circulating clones of Staphylococcus aureus in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Zurita, Jeannete; Barba, Pedro; Ortega-Paredes, David; Mora, Marcelo; Rivadeneira, Sebastián

    The spread of pandemic Staphylococcus aureus clones, mainly methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), must be kept under surveillance to assemble an accurate, local epidemiological analysis. In Ecuador, the prevalence of the USA300 Latin American variant clone (USA300-LV) is well known; however, there is little information about other circulating clones. The aim of this work was to identify the sequence types (ST) using a Multiple-Locus Variable number tandem repeat Analysis 14-locus genotyping approach. We analyzed 132 S. aureus strains that were recovered from 2005 to 2013 and isolated in several clinical settings in Quito, Ecuador. MRSA isolates composed 46.97% (62/132) of the study population. Within MRSA, 37 isolates were related to the USA300-LV clone (ST8-MRSA-IV, Panton-Valentine Leukocidin [PVL] +) and 10 were related to the Brazilian clone (ST239-MRSA-III, PVL-). Additionally, two isolates (ST5-MRSA-II, PVL-) were related to the New York/Japan clone. One isolate was related to the Pediatric clone (ST5-MRSA-IV, PVL-), one isolate (ST45-MRSA-II, PVL-) was related to the USA600 clone, and one (ST22-MRSA-IV, PVL-) was related to the epidemic UK-EMRSA-15 clone. Moreover, the most prevalent MSSA sequence types were ST8 (11 isolates), ST45 (8 isolates), ST30 (8 isolates), ST5 (7 isolates) and ST22 (6 isolates). Additionally, we found one isolate that was related to the livestock associated S. aureus clone ST398. We conclude that in addition to the high prevalence of clone LV-ST8-MRSA-IV, other epidemic clones are circulating in Quito, such as the Brazilian, Pediatric and New York/Japan clones. The USA600 and UK-EMRSA-15 clones, which were not previously described in Ecuador, were also found. Moreover, we found evidence of the presence of the livestock associated clone ST398 in a hospital environment.

  20. Keeping up with the cloneses--issues in human cloning.

    PubMed

    Rollin, B E

    1999-01-01

    The advent of cloning animals has created a maelstrom of social concern about the "ethical issues" associated with the possibility of cloning humans. When the "ethical concerns" are clearly examined, however, many of them turn out to be less matters of rational ethics than knee-jerk emotion, religious bias, or fear of that which is not understood. Three categories of real and spurious ethical concerns are presented and discussed: 1) that cloning is intrinsically wrong, 2) that cloning must lead to bad consequences, and 3) that cloning harms the organism generated. The need for a rational ethical framework for discussing biotechnological advances is presented and defended.

  1. Conditional implementation of an asymmetrical universal quantum cloning machine

    SciTech Connect

    Filip, Radim

    2004-03-01

    We propose two feasible experimental implementations of an optimal asymmetric 1{yields}2 quantum cloning of a polarization state of photon. Both implementations are based on a partial and optimal reverse of recent conditional symmetrical quantum cloning experiments. The reversion procedure is performed only by a local measurement of one from the clones and ancilla followed by a local operation on the other clone. The local measurement consists only of a single unbalanced beam splitter followed in one output by a single-photon detector and the asymmetry of fidelities in the cloning is controlled by a reflectivity of the beam splitter.

  2. Cloning and joint measurements of incompatible components of spin

    SciTech Connect

    Brougham, Thomas; Andersson, Erika; Barnett, Stephen M.

    2006-06-15

    A joint measurement of two observables is a simultaneous measurement of both quantities upon the same quantum system. When two quantum-mechanical observables do not commute, then a joint measurement of these observables cannot be accomplished directly by projective measurements alone. In this paper we shall discuss the use of quantum cloning to perform a joint measurement of two components of spin associated with a qubit system. We introduce cloning schemes which are optimal with respect to this task. The cloning schemes may be thought to work by cloning two components of spin onto their outputs. We compare the proposed cloning machines to existing cloners.

  3. Philosophical arguments for and against human reproductive cloning.

    PubMed

    Hayry, Matti

    2003-10-01

    Can philosophers come up with persuasive reasons to allow or ban human reproductive cloning? Yes. Can philosophers agree, locally and temporarily, which practices related to cloning should be condoned and which should be rejected? Some of them can. Can philosophers reproduce universally convincing arguments for or against different kinds of human cloning? No. This paper analyses some of the main arguments presented by philosophers in the cloning debate, and some of the most important objections against them. The clashes between the schools of thought suggest that philosophers cannot be trusted to provide the public authorities, or the general public, a unified, universally applicable view of the morality of human reproductive cloning.

  4. Expression systems for cloned xenobiotic transporters

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchard, John B.

    2005-05-01

    One challenge of modern biology is to be able to match genes and their encoded proteins with events at the molecular, cellular, tissue, and organism levels, and thus, provide a multi-level understanding of gene function and dysfunction. How well this can be done for xenobiotic transporters depends on a knowledge of the genes expressed in the tissue, the cellular locations of the gene products (do they function for uptake or efflux?), and our ability to match substrates with transporters using information obtained from cloned transporters functioning in heterologous expression systems. Clearly, making a rational choice of expression system to use for the characterization and study of cloned xenobiotic transporters is a critical part of study design. This choice requires well-defined goals, as well as an understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of candidate expression systems.

  5. Reproductive cloning and arguments from potential.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Justin

    2006-01-01

    The possibility of human reproductive cloning has led some bioethicists to suggest that potentiality-based arguments for fetal moral status become untenable, as such arguments would be committed to making the implausible claim that any adult somatic cell is itself a potential person. In this article I defend potentiality-based arguments for fetal moral status against such a reductio. Starting from the widely-held claim that the maintenance of numerical identity throughout successive changes places constraints on what a given entity can plausibly be said to have the potential to become, I argue that the cell reprogramming that takes place in reproductive cloning is such that it produces a new individual, and so adult somatic cells cannot be potential persons.

  6. Recent progress and problems in animal cloning.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Y; Kato, Y

    2002-01-01

    It is remarkable that mammalian somatic cell nuclei can form whole individuals if they are transferred to enucleated oocytes. Advancements in nuclear transfer technology can now be applied for genetic improvement and increase of farm animals, rescue of endangered species, and assisted reproduction and tissue engineering in humans. Since July 1998, more than 200 calves have been produced by nuclear transfer of somatic cell nuclei in Japan, but half of them were stillborn or died within several months of parturition. Morphologic abnormalities have also been observed in cloned calves and embryonic stem cell-derived mice. In this review, we discuss the present situation and problems with animal cloning and the possibility for its application to human medicine.

  7. Clone history shapes Populus drought responses

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Sherosha; Bräutigam, Katharina; Hamanishi, Erin T.; Wilkins, Olivia; Thomas, Barb R.; Schroeder, William; Mansfield, Shawn D.; Plant, Aine L.; Campbell, Malcolm M.

    2011-01-01

    Just as animal monozygotic twins can experience different environmental conditions by being reared apart, individual genetically identical trees of the genus Populus can also be exposed to contrasting environmental conditions by being grown in different locations. As such, clonally propagated Populus trees provide an opportunity to interrogate the impact of individual environmental history on current response to environmental stimuli. To test the hypothesis that current responses to an environmental stimulus, drought, are contingent on environmental history, the transcriptome- level drought responses of three economically important hybrid genotypes—DN34 (Populus deltoides × Populus nigra), Walker [P. deltoides var. occidentalis × (Populus laurifolia × P. nigra)], and Okanese [Walker × (P. laurifolia × P. nigra)]—derived from two different locations were compared. Strikingly, differences in transcript abundance patterns in response to drought were based on differences in geographic origin of clones for two of the three genotypes. This observation was most pronounced for the genotypes with the longest time since establishment and last common propagation. Differences in genome-wide DNA methylation paralleled the transcriptome level trends, whereby the clones with the most divergent transcriptomes and clone history had the most marked differences in the extent of total DNA methylation, suggesting an epigenomic basis for the clone history-dependent transcriptome divergence. The data provide insights into the interplay between genotype and environment in the ecologically and economically important Populus genus, with implications for the industrial application of Populus trees and the evolution and persistence of these important tree species and their associated hybrids. PMID:21746919

  8. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning.

    PubMed

    2012-10-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning)," last published in Fertil Steril 2000;74:873-6.

  9. [Comparative analysis of rotatory (GT) and manual root canal preparation and association of both techniques in instrumentation of flattened root canals].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Silvana Beltrami; Brosco, Viviane Haiub; Bramante, Clovis Monteiro

    2003-03-01

    Root canal preparation has been considered one of the most important steps in root canal therapy, thus many techniques and instruments have been developed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cleaning of the root canal through three different instrumentation techniques. Thirty mandibular incisors were selected and submitted to lingual access cavities. Afterwards, the canals were filled with India ink dye previously stored in carpules, which was inserted into the root canal by means of anesthetic syringe and anesthetic needles. After 48 hours, during which the dye was allowed to dry inside the root canal, the teeth were divided in three groups: G1- GT rotatory instrumentation; G2- manual instrumentation; G3- association of both. After instrumentation, the teeth were longitudinally sectioned. The cleaning process accomplished through the different instrumentation techniques was evidenced by dye removal at the cervical, middle and apical thirds of the root canal. The results of this study showed that were not statistically significant differences between these three instrumentation techniques for all three thirds of the root canal.

  10. A novel homozygous mutation IVS6+5G>T in CYP11B1 gene in a Vietnamese patient with 11β-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Phuong Mai; Nguyen, Thu Hien; Ngo, Diem Ngoc; Vu, Chi Dung; Nguyen, Thi Kim Lien; Nong, Van Hai; Nguyen, Huy Hoang

    2015-07-10

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is an autosomal recessive disease which is characterized by a deficiency of one of the enzymes involved in the synthesis of cortisol from cholesterol by the adrenal cortex. CAH cases arising from impaired 11β-hydroxylase are the second most common form. Mutations in the CYP11B1 gene are the cause of 11β-hydroxylase deficiency. This study was performed on a patient with congenital adrenal hyperplasia and with premature development such as enlarged penis, muscle development, high blood pressure, and bone age equivalent of 5 years old at 2 years of chronological age. Biochemical tests for steroids confirmed the diagnosis of CAH. We used PCR and sequencing to screen for mutations in CYP11B1 gene. Results showed that the patient has a novel homozygous mutation of guanine (G) to thymine (T) in intron 6 (IVS6+5G>T). The analysis of this mutation by MaxEntScan boundary software indicated that this mutant could affect the gene splicing during transcription.

  11. SenseWearMini and Actigraph GT3X Accelerometer Classification of Observed Sedentary and Light-Intensity Physical Activities in a Laboratory Setting.

    PubMed

    Feehan, Lynne M; Goldsmith, Charles H; Leung, April Y F; Li, Linda C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the ability of SenseWear Mini (SWm) and Actigraph GT3X (AG3) accelerometers to differentiate between healthy adults' observed sedentary and light activities in a laboratory setting. Methods: The 22 participants (15 women, 7 men), ages 19 to 72 years, wore SWm and AG3 monitors and performed five sedentary and four light activities for 5 minutes each while observed in a laboratory setting. Performance was examined through comparisons of accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and positive and negative likelihood ratios. Correct identification of both types of activities was examined using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results: Both monitors demonstrated excellent ability to identify sedentary activities (sensitivity>0.89). The SWm monitor was better at identifying light activities (specificity 0.61-0.71) than the AG3 monitor (specificity 0.27-0.47) and thus also showed a greater ability to correctly identify both sedentary and light activities (SWm AUC 0.84; AG3 AUC 0.62-0.73). Conclusions: SWm may be a more suitable monitor for detecting time spent in sedentary and light-intensity activities. This finding has clinical and research relevance for evaluation of time spent in lower intensity physical activities by sedentary adults.

  12. Pb2+-induced toxicity is associated with p53-independent apoptosis and enhanced by glutamate in GT1-7 neurons.

    PubMed

    Loikkanen, Jarkko; Chvalova, Katerina; Naarala, Jonne; Vähäkangas, Kirsi H; Savolainen, Kai M

    2003-09-30

    Recent studies indicate that the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system is involved in neurotoxicity caused by inorganic lead (Pb2+). We studied the role of apoptosis in the effects induced by Pb2+ (0.01-100 microM) and glutamate (0.1 and 1 mM) in mouse hypothalamic GT1-7 neurons. Although glutamate alone had no effect on cell viability, it enhanced neuronal cell death induced by Pb2+ (1-100 microM) within 72 h. Glutamate alone neither induced caspase-3-like protease activity nor promoted internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, both biochemical hallmarks of apoptosis. However, concurrent exposure to Pb2+ (10 or 100 microM) and glutamate (1 mM) resulted in more prominent cleavage of the fluorogenic caspase-3 substrate (Ac-DEVD-AMC) than caused by the same Pb2+ concentrations alone at 24-72 h. The highest caspase-3-like protease activities were measured at 48 h. Internucleosomal DNA fragmentation caused by Pb2+ (10 or 100 microM) alone or together with glutamate (1 mM) was evident at 96 h, less clear at 72 h and absent at 48 h. Immunoblotting did not reveal any changes in p53 protein levels in cells exposed to Pb2+, glutamate or their combination at any studied time point (3-72 h). Our results suggest that Pb2+-induced neurotoxicity may partially be mediated through p53-independent apoptosis and enhanced by glutamate.

  13. Detection of feral GT73 transgenic oilseed rape (Brassica napus) along railway lines on entry routes to oilseed factories in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Mirco; Oehen, Bernadette; Schulze, Jürg; Brodmann, Peter; Bagutti, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    To obtain a reference status prior to cultivation of genetically modified oilseed rape (OSR, Brassica napus L.) in Switzerland, the occurrence of feral OSR was monitored along transportation routes and at processing sites. The focus was set on the detection of (transgenic) OSR along railway lines from the Swiss borders with Italy and France to the respective oilseed processing factories in Southern and Northern Switzerland (Ticino and region of Basel). A monitoring concept was developed to identify sites of largest risk of escape of genetically modified plants into the environment in Switzerland. Transport spillage of OSR seeds from railway goods cars particularly at risk hot spots such as switch yards and (un)loading points but also incidental and continuous spillage were considered. All OSR plants, including their hybridization partners which were collected at the respective monitoring sites were analyzed for the presence of transgenes by real-time PCR. On sampling lengths each of 4.2 and 5.7 km, respectively, 461 and 1,574 plants were sampled in Ticino and the region of Basel. OSR plants were found most frequently along the routes to the oilseed facilities, and in larger amounts on risk hot spots compared to sites of random sampling. At three locations in both monitored regions, transgenic B. napus line GT73 carrying the glyphosate resistance transgenes gox and CP4 epsps were detected (Ticino, 22 plants; in the region of Basel, 159).

  14. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (-786T>C) and Endothelin-1 (5665G>T) Gene Polymorphisms as Vascular Dysfunction Risk Factors in Sickle Cell Anemia.

    PubMed

    Vilas-Boas, Wendell; Figueiredo, Camylla V B; Pitanga, Thassila N; Carvalho, Magda O S; Santiago, Rayra P; Santana, Sânzio S; Guarda, Caroline C; Zanette, Angela M D; Cerqueira, Bruno A V; Gonçalves, Marilda S

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients have vascular complications, and polymorphisms in endothelin-1 (ET-1) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) genes were associated with ET-1 and nitric oxide disturbance. We investigate the association of ET-1 5665G>T and eNOS -786T>C polymorphisms with soluble adhesion molecules (sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1), biochemical markers, and medical history. We studied 101 SCA patients; carriers of eNOS minor allele (C) had the highest levels of sVCAM-1, and carriers of ET-1 minor allele had more occurrence of acute chest syndrome (ACS). The multivariate analysis suggested the influence of the ET-1 gene on ACS outcome and an association of the eNOS gene with upper respiratory tract infection. We suggest that eNOS and ET-1 gene polymorphisms can influence SCA pathophysiology and that eNOS variant in SCA patients might be important to nitric oxide activity and vascular alteration. We found an association of the ET-1 minor allele in ACS, showing the importance of genetic screening in SCA.

  15. An In Vitro System Comprising Immortalized Hypothalamic Neuronal Cells (GT1–7 Cells) for Evaluation of the Neuroendocrine Effects of Essential Oils

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Dai; Konoha-Mizuno, Keiko; Mori, Miwako; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Haneda, Toshihiro; Koyama, Hironari; Kawahara, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Aromatherapy and plant-based essential oils are widely used as complementary and alternative therapies for symptoms including anxiety. Furthermore, it was reportedly effective for the care of several diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and depressive illness. To investigate the pharmacological effects of essential oils, we developed an in vitro assay system using immortalized hypothalamic neuronal cells (GT1–7 cells). In this study, we evaluated the effects of essential oils on neuronal death induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), aluminum, zinc, or the antagonist of estrogen receptor (tamoxifen). Among tests of various essential oils, we found that H2O2-induced neuronal death was attenuated by the essential oils of damask rose, eucalyptus, fennel, geranium, ginger, kabosu, mandarin, myrrh, and neroli. Damask rose oil had protective effects against aluminum-induced neurotoxicity, while geranium and rosemary oil showed protective activity against zinc-induced neurotoxicity. In contrast, geranium oil and ginger oil enhanced the neurotoxicity of tamoxifen. Our in vitro assay system could be useful for the neuropharmacological and endocrine pharmacological studies of essential oils. PMID:26576190

  16. Serotonin stimulates GnRH secretion through the c-Src-PLC gamma1 pathway in GT1-7 hypothalamic cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon Soo; Yumkham, Sanatombi; Choi, Jang Hyun; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2006-09-01

    Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. To date, however, the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of serotonin in hormone secretion have remained largely unclear. In this study, we report that serotonin activates phospholipase C (PLC) gamma1 in an Src-dependent manner in hypothalamic GT1-7 cells, and that pretreatment with either 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl) pyrazole [3, 4-d] pyrimidine, an Src-kinase inhibitor, or U73122, a PLC inhibitor, attenuates the serotonin-induced increase in calcium levels. Also, PLC gamma1 binds to c-Src through the Src-homology (SH) 223 domain upon serotonin treatment. Moreover, calcium increase is alleviated in the cells transientlyexpressing SH223 domain-deleted PLC gamma1 or lipase inactive mutant PLC gamma1, as compared with cells transfected with wild-type PLC gamma1. Furthermore, the inhibition of the activities of either PLC or Src results in a significant diminution of the serotonin-induced release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). In addition, the results of our small-interfering RNA experiment confirm that endogenous PLC gamma1 is a prerequisite for serotonin-mediated signaling pathways. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that serotonin stimulates the release of GnRH through the Src-PLC gamma1 pathway, via the modulation of intracellular calcium levels.

  17. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (−786T>C) and Endothelin-1 (5665G>T) Gene Polymorphisms as Vascular Dysfunction Risk Factors in Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Vilas-Boas, Wendell; Figueiredo, Camylla V. B.; Pitanga, Thassila N.; Carvalho, Magda O. S.; Santiago, Rayra P.; Santana, Sânzio S.; Guarda, Caroline C.; Zanette, Angela M. D.; Cerqueira, Bruno A. V.; Gonçalves, Marilda S.

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients have vascular complications, and polymorphisms in endothelin-1 (ET-1) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) genes were associated with ET-1 and nitric oxide disturbance. We investigate the association of ET-1 5665G>T and eNOS −786T>C polymorphisms with soluble adhesion molecules (sVCAM-1 and sICAM-1), biochemical markers, and medical history. We studied 101 SCA patients; carriers of eNOS minor allele (C) had the highest levels of sVCAM-1, and carriers of ET-1 minor allele had more occurrence of acute chest syndrome (ACS). The multivariate analysis suggested the influence of the ET-1 gene on ACS outcome and an association of the eNOS gene with upper respiratory tract infection. We suggest that eNOS and ET-1 gene polymorphisms can influence SCA pathophysiology and that eNOS variant in SCA patients might be important to nitric oxide activity and vascular alteration. We found an association of the ET-1 minor allele in ACS, showing the importance of genetic screening in SCA. PMID:27486304

  18. Cloned mouse cells with natural killer function and cloned suppressor T cells express ultrastructural and biochemical features not shared by cloned inducer T cells

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    We have examined the morphology, cytochemistry, and biochemistry of mouse leukocyte subsets by analyzing cloned leukocyte populations specialized to perform different immunologic functions. Cloned cells expressing high-affinity plasma membrane receptors for IgE and mediating natural killer (NK) lysis and cloned antigen-specific suppressor T cells contained prominent osmiophilic cytoplasmic granules similar by ultrastructure to those of mouse basophils. Both clones also incorporated 35SO4 into granule-associated sulfated glycosaminoglycans, expressed a characteristic ultrastructural pattern of nonspecific esterase activity, incorporated exogenous [3H]5-hydroxytryptamine, and contained cytoplasmic deposits of particulate glycogen. By contrast, cloned inducer T cells lacked cytoplasmic granules and glycogen, incorporated neither 35SO4 nor [3H]5-hydroxytryptamine, and differed from the other clones in pattern of nonspecific esterase activity. These findings establish that certain cloned cells with NK activity and cloned suppressor T cells express morphologic and biochemical characteristics heretofore associated with basophilic granulocytes. However, these clones differ in surface glycoprotein expression and immunologic function, and the full extent of the similarities and differences among these populations and basophils remains to be determined. PMID:6220105

  19. Quantum partial teleportation as optimal cloning at a distance

    SciTech Connect

    Filip, Radim

    2004-05-01

    We propose a feasible scheme of conditional quantum partial teleportation of a qubit as optimal asymmetric cloning at a distance. In this scheme, Alice preserves one imperfect clone whereas other clone is teleported to Bob. Fidelities of the clones can be simply controlled by an asymmetry in Bell-state measurement. The optimality means that tightest inequality for the fidelities in the asymmetric cloning is saturated. Further we design a conditional teleportation as symmetric optimal N{yields}N+1 cloning from N Alice's replicas on single distant clone. We shortly discussed two feasible experimental implementations, first one for teleportation of polarization state of a photon and second one for teleportation of a time-bin qubit.

  20. Developing a code of ethics for human cloning.

    PubMed

    Collmann, J; Graber, G

    2000-01-01

    Under what conditions might the cloning of human beings constitute an ethical practice? A tendency exists to analyze human cloning merely as a technical procedure. As with all revolutionary technological developments, however, human cloning potentially exists in a broad social context that will both shape and be shaped by the biological techniques. Although human cloning must be subjected to technical analysis that addresses fundamental ethical questions such as its safety and efficacy, questions exist that focus our attention on broader issues. Asserting that cloning inevitably leads to undesirable consequences commits the fallacy of technological determinism and untenably separates technological and ethical evaluation. Drawing from the Report of the National Bioethics Advisory Committee and Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, we offer a draft "Code of Ethics for Human Cloning" in order to stimulate discussion about the ethics of the broader ramifications of human cloning as well as its particular technological properties.

  1. U.S. consumers attitudes toward farm animal cloning.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Kathleen R; Lusk, Jayson L

    2011-10-01

    In January 2008, the United States Food and Drug Administration concluded "meat and milk from cattle, swine, and goat clones or their offspring are as safe to eat as food we eat from those species now" (U.S. FDA, 2010). However, cloning remains a very controversial topic. A web-based survey administered by Knowledge Networks was used to determine U.S. consumers' awareness of and attitudes toward meat and milk from cloned cattle. Findings reveal consumers do not differentiate much between products from cloned animals and products from non-cloned animals. Overall consumers are concerned that animal cloning is an unnatural process and that it will lead to human cloning.

  2. Ethical issues regarding human cloning: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Dinç, Leyla

    2003-05-01

    Advances in cloning technology and successful cloning experiments in animals raised concerns about the possibility of human cloning in recent years. Despite many objections, this is not only a possibility but also a reality. Human cloning is a scientific revolution. However, it also introduces the potential for physical and psychosocial harm to human beings. From this point of view, it raises profound ethical, social and health related concerns. Human cloning would have an impact on the practice of nursing because it could result in the creation of new physiological and psychosocial conditions that would require nursing care. The nursing profession must therefore evaluate the ethics of human cloning, in particular the potential role of nurses. This article reviews the ethical considerations of reproductive human cloning, discusses the main reasons for concern, and reflects a nursing perspective regarding this issue.

  3. Tumor clone dynamics in lethal prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Suzanne; Romanel, Alessandro; Goodall, Jane; Grist, Emily; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Miranda, Susana; Prandi, Davide; Lorente, David; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Pezaro, Carmel; Omlin, Aurelius; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Flohr, Penelope; Tunariu, Nina; S de Bono, Johann; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2014-09-17

    It is unclear whether a single clone metastasizes and remains dominant over the course of lethal prostate cancer. We describe the clonal architectural heterogeneity at different stages of disease progression by sequencing serial plasma and tumor samples from 16 ERG-positive patients. By characterizing the clonality of commonly occurring deletions at 21q22, 8p21, and 10q23, we identified multiple independent clones in metastatic disease that are differentially represented in tissue and circulation. To exemplify the clinical utility of our studies, we then showed a temporal association between clinical progression and emergence of androgen receptor (AR) mutations activated by glucocorticoids in about 20% of patients progressing on abiraterone and prednisolone or dexamethasone. Resistant clones showed a complex dynamic with temporal and spatial heterogeneity, suggesting distinct mechanisms of resistance at different sites that emerged and regressed depending on treatment selection pressure. This introduces a management paradigm requiring sequential monitoring of advanced prostate cancer patients with plasma and tumor biopsies to ensure early discontinuation of agents when they become potential disease drivers.

  4. Cloning humans? Biological, ethical, and social considerations.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Francisco J

    2015-07-21

    There are, in mankind, two kinds of heredity: biological and cultural. Cultural inheritance makes possible for humans what no other organism can accomplish: the cumulative transmission of experience from generation to generation. In turn, cultural inheritance leads to cultural evolution, the prevailing mode of human adaptation. For the last few millennia, humans have been adapting the environments to their genes more often than their genes to the environments. Nevertheless, natural selection persists in modern humans, both as differential mortality and as differential fertility, although its intensity may decrease in the future. More than 2,000 human diseases and abnormalities have a genetic causation. Health care and the increasing feasibility of genetic therapy will, although slowly, augment the future incidence of hereditary ailments. Germ-line gene therapy could halt this increase, but at present, it is not technically feasible. The proposal to enhance the human genetic endowment by genetic cloning of eminent individuals is not warranted. Genomes can be cloned; individuals cannot. In the future, therapeutic cloning will bring enhanced possibilities for organ transplantation, nerve cells and tissue healing, and other health benefits.

  5. Tumor clone dynamics in lethal prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Suzanne; Romanel, Alessandro; Goodall, Jane; Grist, Emily; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Miranda, Susana; Prandi, Davide; Lorente, David; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Pezaro, Carmel; Omlin, Aurelius; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Flohr, Penelope; Tunariu, Nina; de Bono, Johann S.; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear whether a single clone metastasizes and remains dominant over the course of lethal prostate cancer. We describe the clonal architectural heterogeneity at different stages of disease progression by sequencing serial plasma and tumor samples from 16 ERG-positive patients. By characterizing the clonality of commonly occurring deletions at 21q22, 8p21, and 10q23, we identified multiple independent clones in metastatic disease that are differentially represented in tissue and circulation. To exemplify the clinical utility of our studies, we then showed a temporal association between clinical progression and emergence of androgen receptor (AR) mutations activated by glucocorticoids in about 20% of patients progressing on abiraterone and prednisolone or dexamethasone. Resistant clones showed a complex dynamic with temporal and spatial heterogeneity, suggesting distinct mechanisms of resistance at different sites that emerged and regressed depending on treatment selection pressure. This introduces a management paradigm requiring sequential monitoring of advanced prostate cancer patients with plasma and tumor biopsies to ensure early discontinuation of agents when they become potential disease drivers. PMID:25232177

  6. Cloning humans? Biological, ethical, and social considerations

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    There are, in mankind, two kinds of heredity: biological and cultural. Cultural inheritance makes possible for humans what no other organism can accomplish: the cumulative transmission of experience from generation to generation. In turn, cultural inheritance leads to cultural evolution, the prevailing mode of human adaptation. For the last few millennia, humans have been adapting the environments to their genes more often than their genes to the environments. Nevertheless, natural selection persists in modern humans, both as differential mortality and as differential fertility, although its intensity may decrease in the future. More than 2,000 human diseases and abnormalities have a genetic causation. Health care and the increasing feasibility of genetic therapy will, although slowly, augment the future incidence of hereditary ailments. Germ-line gene therapy could halt this increase, but at present, it is not technically feasible. The proposal to enhance the human genetic endowment by genetic cloning of eminent individuals is not warranted. Genomes can be cloned; individuals cannot. In the future, therapeutic cloning will bring enhanced possibilities for organ transplantation, nerve cells and tissue healing, and other health benefits. PMID:26195738

  7. Survival of skin graft between transgenic cloned dogs and non-transgenic cloned dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Geon A; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Jo, Young Kwang; Choi, Jin; Park, Jung Eun; Park, Eun Jung; Lim, Sang Hyun; Yoon, Byung Il; Kang, Sung Keun; Jang, Goo; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2014-01-01

    Whereas it has been assumed that genetically modified tissues or cells derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) should be accepted by a host of the same species, their immune compatibility has not been extensively explored. To identify acceptance of SCNT-derived cells or tissues, skin grafts were performed between cloned dogs that were identical except for their mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes and foreign gene. We showed here that differences in mtDNA haplotypes and genetic modification did not elicit immune responses in these dogs: 1) skin tissues from genetically-modified cloned dogs were successfully transplanted into genetically-modified cloned dogs with different mtDNA haplotype under three successive grafts over 63 days; and 2) non-transgenic cloned tissues were accepted into transgenic cloned syngeneic recipients with different mtDNA haplotypes and vice versa under two successive grafts over 63 days. In addition, expression of the inserted gene was maintained, being functional without eliciting graft rejection. In conclusion, these results show that transplanting genetically-modified tissues into normal, syngeneic or genetically-modified recipient dogs with different mtDNA haplotypes do not elicit skin graft rejection or affect expression of the inserted gene. Therefore, therapeutically valuable tissue derived from SCNT with genetic modification might be used safely in clinical applications for patients with diseased tissues.

  8. [Genetic polymorphism of clones and their seed progeny in the scotch pine clone plantation].

    PubMed

    Korshikov, I I; Demkovich, A E

    2010-01-01

    Genetic variation at 12 allozyme loci (10 of them being polymorphic ones) has been studied in the archive-clone plantation of 23 Pinus sylvestris plus-trees and their seed progeny in the south-east of Ukraine. More than a half of clones had 4-8 heterozygous loci, whereas their seed progeny was marked by a lower variation than maternal trees. Seed progeny was obtained at a high outcrossing rate (t(m) = 95%). The clone progeny was characterized by a high percentage of abnormal allele segregation in megagametophytes. There was also a high frequency of significant deviation in distribution of seed embryo genotypes from the theoretically expected one according to the Hardy-Weinberg law.

  9. Molecular cloning and structural characterization of the human histidase gene (HAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Suchi, Mariko; Sano, Hirofumi; Mizuno, Haruo; Wada, Yoshiro

    1995-09-01

    Histidase (EC 4.3.1.3) is a cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the nonoxidative determination of histidine to urocanic acid. Histidinemia, resulting from reduced histidase activity as reported in Cambridge stock his/her mice and in humans, is the most frequent inborn metabolic error in Japan. The histidase chromosomal gene (HAL) was isolated from a {lambda}EMBL-3 human genomic library using the human histidase cDNA as a probe. Restriction mapping and Southern blot analysis of the isolated clones reveal a single-copy gene spanning approximately 25 kb and consisting of 21 exons. Exon 1 encodes only 5{prime} untranslated sequence of liver histidase mRNA, with protein coding beginning in exon 2. A rarely observed 5{prime}GC, similar to that reported in the human P-450(SCC) gene, is present in intron 20. All other splicing junctions adhere to the canonical GT/AG rule. A TATA box sequence is located 25 bp upstream of the liver histidase transcription initiation site determined by S1 nuclease protection analysis. Several liver- and epidermis-specific transcription factor binding sites, including C/EBP, NFIL6, HNF5, AP2/ KER1, MNF, and others, are also identified in the 5{prime} flanking region. Consistent with the hepatic and epidermal expression of histidase, this finding suggests that histidase transcription may be regulated by these factors. We further identify a polymorphism (A to G transition) in the histidase coding region of exon 16. The human histidase genomic structure presented here should facilitate the molecular investigation of symptomatic and asymptomatic forms of histidinemia. 69 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Cloning and characterization of laccase DNA from the Royal Sun medicinal mushroom, Agaricus brasiliensis (higher Basidiomycetes).

    PubMed

    Matsumoto-Akanuma, Akiko; Akanuma, Satoshi; Motoi, Masuro; Yamagishi, Akihiko; Ohno, Naohito

    2014-01-01

    Laccase isozymes have been identified in several fungi. We report the cloning of 4 laccase genes from the medicinal mushroom Agaricus brasiliensis. The lac1 gene contained a 1560-base pair (bp) open reading frame (ORF) encoding 520 amino acids that was interrupted with 14 introns in genomic DNA. The deduced amino acid sequence indicated a multicopper oxidase signature 1 and 2 multicopper oxidase signature 2. The lac2 gene contained a 1566-bp ORF encoding 522 amino acids that was interrupted with 13 introns in genomic DNA. A number of different nucleotides were observed in whole regions containing the substitution of amino acid residues (lac2a and lac2b). The partial DNA fragments of lac3 and lac4 genes were subcloned using the semi-random two-step polymerase chain reaction method. The lac3 and lac4 genes contained coding sequences with a 1575-bp ORF encoding 525 amino acids and a 1584-bp ORF encoding 528 amino acids, respectively. However, the whole complementary DNA fragment of both laccases could not be amplified with polymerase chain reaction against the complementary DNA library; therefore, introns were deduced based on the GT-AG rule and multiple alignment of laccases from other fungi, which showed high identity. All laccases from A. brasiliensis conserved the fungal laccase signature sequence and suggest 2 subfamilies according to the location of introns and phylogenetic analysis. The genes lac2 and lac4 had a high degree of identity, and the lac2a gene was located upstream of the lac4 gene.

  11. High-dimensional quantum cloning and applications to quantum hacking

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Frédéric; Fickler, Robert; Boyd, Robert W.; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2017-01-01

    Attempts at cloning a quantum system result in the introduction of imperfections in the state of the copies. This is a consequence of the no-cloning theorem, which is a fundamental law of quantum physics and the backbone of security for quantum communications. Although perfect copies are prohibited, a quantum state may be copied with maximal accuracy via various optimal cloning schemes. Optimal quantum cloning, which lies at the border of the physical limit imposed by the no-signaling theorem and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, has been experimentally realized for low-dimensional photonic states. However, an increase in the dimensionality of quantum systems is greatly beneficial to quantum computation and communication protocols. Nonetheless, no experimental demonstration of optimal cloning machines has hitherto been shown for high-dimensional quantum systems. We perform optimal cloning of high-dimensional photonic states by means of the symmetrization method. We show the universality of our technique by conducting cloning of numerous arbitrary input states and fully characterize our cloning machine by performing quantum state tomography on cloned photons. In addition, a cloning attack on a Bennett and Brassard (BB84) quantum key distribution protocol is experimentally demonstrated to reveal the robustness of high-dimensional states in quantum cryptography. PMID:28168219

  12. Human cloning: category, dignity, and the role of bioethics.

    PubMed

    Shuster, Evelyne

    2003-10-01

    Human cloning has been simultaneously a running joke for massive worldwide publicity of fringe groups like the Raelians, and the core issue of an international movement at the United Nations in support of a treaty to ban the use of cloning techniques to produce a child (so called reproductive cloning). Yet, even though debates on human cloning have greatly increased since the birth of Dolly, the clone sheep, in 1997, we continue to wonder whether cloning is after all any different from other methods of medically assisted reproduction, and what exactly makes cloning an 'affront to the dignity of humans.' Categories we adopt matter mightily as they inform but can also misinform and lead to mistaken and unproductive decisions. And thus bioethicists have a responsibility to ensure that the proper categories are used in the cloning debates and denounce those who try to win the ethical debate through well-crafted labels rather than well-reasoned argumentations. But it is as important for bioethicists to take a position on broad issues such as human cloning and species altering interventions. One 'natural question' would be, for example, should there be an international treaty to ban human reproductive cloning?

  13. High-dimensional quantum cloning and applications to quantum hacking.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Frédéric; Fickler, Robert; Boyd, Robert W; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2017-02-01

    Attempts at cloning a quantum system result in the introduction of imperfections in the state of the copies. This is a consequence of the no-cloning theorem, which is a fundamental law of quantum physics and the backbone of security for quantum communications. Although perfect copies are prohibited, a quantum state may be copied with maximal accuracy via various optimal cloning schemes. Optimal quantum cloning, which lies at the border of the physical limit imposed by the no-signaling theorem and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, has been experimentally realized for low-dimensional photonic states. However, an increase in the dimensionality of quantum systems is greatly beneficial to quantum computation and communication protocols. Nonetheless, no experimental demonstration of optimal cloning machines has hitherto been shown for high-dimensional quantum systems. We perform optimal cloning of high-dimensional photonic states by means of the symmetrization method. We show the universality of our technique by conducting cloning of numerous arbitrary input states and fully characterize our cloning machine by performing quantum state tomography on cloned photons. In addition, a cloning attack on a Bennett and Brassard (BB84) quantum key distribution protocol is experimentally demonstrated to reveal the robustness of high-dimensional states in quantum cryptography.

  14. Procreative liberty, enhancement and commodification in the human cloning debate.

    PubMed

    Shapshay, Sandra

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to scrutinize a contemporary standoff in the American debate over the moral permissibility of human reproductive cloning in its prospective use as a eugenic enhancement technology. I shall argue that there is some significant and under-appreciated common ground between the defenders and opponents of human cloning. Champions of the moral and legal permissibility of cloning support the technology based on the right to procreative liberty provided it were to become as safe as in vitro fertilization and that it be used only by adults who seek to rear their clone children. However, even champions of procreative liberty oppose the commodification of cloned embryos, and, by extension, the resulting commodification of the cloned children who would be produced via such embryos. I suggest that a Kantian moral argument against the use of cloning as an enhancement technology can be shown to be already implicitly accepted to some extent by champions of procreative liberty on the matter of commodification of cloned embryos. It is in this argument against commodification that the most vocal critics of cloning such as Leon Kass and defenders of cloning such as John Robertson can find greater common ground. Thus, I endeavor to advance the debate by revealing a greater degree of moral agreement on some fundamental premises than hitherto recognized.

  15. "DOS for Managers." Management Training Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion County Schools, Fairmont, WV.

    A plan is provided for a lesson on disk operating systems (DOS) for managers. Twenty-five lesson objectives are listed, followed by suggestions for learning activities and special resources. In the presentation section, key points and content are provided for 25 instructional topics that correspond to the 25 lesson objectives. The topics are as…

  16. 27 CFR 9.175 - Dos Rios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... is located in northern Mendocino County, California, at the confluence of the Eel River and the Middle Fork of the Eel River. The area's boundaries are defined as follows— (1) Beginning in the... the Middle Fork of the Eel River, to the southeast corner of section 11, T21N, R13W (Dos...

  17. Effects of donor fibroblast cell type and transferred cloned embryo number on the efficiency of pig cloning.

    PubMed

    Li, Zicong; Shi, Junsong; Liu, Dewu; Zhou, Rong; Zeng, Haiyu; Zhou, Xiu; Mai, Ranbiao; Zeng, Shaofen; Luo, Lvhua; Yu, Wanxian; Zhang, Shouquan; Wu, Zhenfang

    2013-02-01

    Currently, cloning efficiency in pigs is very low. Donor cell type and number of cloned embryos transferred to an individual surrogate are two major factors that affect the successful rate of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in pigs. This study aimed to compare the influence of different donor fibroblast cell types and different transferred embryo numbers on recipients' pregnancy rate and delivery rate, the average number of total clones born, clones born alive and clones born healthy per litter, and the birth rate of healthy clones (=total number of healthy cloned piglets born /total number of transferred cloned embryos). Three types of donor fibroblasts were tested in large-scale production of cloned pigs, including fetal fibroblasts (FFBs) from four genetically similar Western swine breeds of Pietrain (P), Duroc (D), Landrace (L), and Yorkshire (Y), which are referred to as P,D,LY-FFBs, adult fibroblasts (AFBs) from the same four breeds, which are designated P,D,L,Y-AFBs, and AFBs from a Chinese pig breed of Laiwu (LW), which is referred to as LW-AFBs. Within each donor fibroblast cell type group, five transferred cloned embryo number groups were tested. In each embryo number group, 150-199, 200-249, 250-299, 300-349, or 350-450 cloned embryos were transferred to each individual recipient sow. For the entire experiment, 92,005 cloned embryos were generated from nearly 115,000 matured oocytes and transferred to 328 recipients; in total, 488 cloned piglets were produced. The results showed that the mean clones born healthy per litter resulted from transfer of embryos cloned from LW-AFBs (2.53 ± 0.34) was similar with that associated with P,D,L,Y-FFBs (2.72 ± 0.29), but was significantly higher than that resulted from P,D,L,Y-AFBs (1.47 ± 0.18). Use of LW-AFBs as donor cells for SCNT resulted in a significantly higher pregnancy rate (72.00% vs. 59.30% and 48.11%) and delivery rate (60.00% vs. 45.93% and 35.85%) for cloned embryo recipients, and a

  18. Integrated method for crater detection from topography and optical images and the new PH9224GT catalogue of Phobos impact craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamunićcar, Goran; Lončarić, Sven; Pina, Pedro; Bandeira, Lourenço; Saraiva, José

    2014-06-01

    In a large majority of lunar and planetary surface images, impact craters are the most abundant geological features. Therefore, it is not surprising that crater detection algorithms (CDAs) are one of the most studied subjects of image processing and analysis in lunar and planetary science. In this work we are proposing an Integrated CDA, consisting of: (1) utilization of DEM (digital elevation map)-based CDA; (2) utilization of an optical-based CDA; (3) re-projection of used datasets and crater coordinates from normal to rotated view and back; (4) correction of the brightness and contrast of a used optical image; and (5) tile generation for the optical-based CDA and an assembling of results with an elimination of multiple detections, in combination with a pyramid approach down to the resolution of the available DEM image; and (6) a final integration of the results of DEM-based and optical-based CDAs, including a removal of duplicates. The proposed CDA is applied to one specific asteroid-like body, the small Martian moon Phobos. The experimental evaluation of the proposed CDA is done by a manual verification of crater-candidates and a search for uncatalogued craters. The evaluation has shown that the proposed CDA was used successfully for cataloging Phobos craters. The major result of this paper is the PH9224GT - currently the most complete global catalogue of the 9224 Phobos craters. The possible applications of the new catalogue are: (1) age estimations for any selected location; and (2) comparison/evaluation of the different chronology and production functions for Phobos. This confirms the practical applicability of the new Integrated CDA - an additional result of this paper, which can be used in order to considerably extend the current crater catalogues.

  19. Cell death mechanisms in GT1-7 GnRH cells exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls PCB74, PCB118, and PCB153

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, Sarah M.; Guevara, Esperanza; Woller, Michael J.; Gore, Andrea C.

    2009-06-01

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) causes functional deficits in neuroendocrine systems. We used an immortalized hypothalamic GT1-7 cell line, which synthesizes the neuroendocrine peptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), to examine the neurotoxic and endocrine disrupting effects of PCBs and their mechanisms of action. Cells were treated for 1, 4, 8, or 24 h with a range of doses of a representative PCB from each of three classes: coplanar (2,4,4',5-tetrachlorobiphenyl: PCB74), dioxin-like coplanar (2',3,4,4',5' pentachlorobiphenyl: PCB118), non-coplanar (2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl: PCB153), or their combination. GnRH peptide concentrations, cell viability, apoptotic and necrotic cell death, and caspase activation were quantified. In general, GnRH peptide levels were suppressed by high doses and longer durations of PCBs, and elevated at low doses and shorter timepoints. The suppression of GnRH peptide levels was partially reversed in cultures co-treated with the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780. All PCBs reduced viability and increased both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Although the effects for the three classes of PCBs were often similar, subtle differences in responses, together with evidence that the combination of PCBs acted slightly different from individual PCBs, suggest that the three tested PCB compounds may act via slightly different or more than one mechanism. These results provide evidence that PCB congeners have endocrine disrupting and/or neurotoxic effects on the hypothalamic GnRH cell line, a finding that has implications for environmental endocrine disruption in animals.

  20. In-Silico Analysis of Binding Site Features and Substrate Selectivity in Plant Flavonoid-3-O Glycosyltransferases (F3GT) through Molecular Modeling, Docking and Dynamics Simulation Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ranu; Panigrahi, Priyabrata; Suresh, C.G.

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids are a class of plant secondary metabolites that act as storage molecules, chemical messengers, as well as participate in homeostasis and defense processes. They possess pharmaceutical properties important for cancer treatment such as antioxidant and anti-tumor activities. The drug-related properties of flavonoids can be improved by glycosylation. The enzymes glycosyltransferases (GTs) glycosylate acceptor molecules in a regiospecific manner with the help of nucleotide sugar donor molecules. Several plant GTs have been characterized and their amino acid sequences determined. However, three-dimensional structures of only a few are reported. Here, phylogenetic analysis using amino acid sequences have identified a group of GTs with the same regiospecific activity. The structures of these closely related GTs were modeled using homologous GT structures. Their substrate binding sites were elaborated by docking flavonoid acceptor and UDP-sugar donor molecules in the modeled structures. Eight regions near the acceptor binding site in the N- and C- terminal domain of GTs have been identified that bind and specifically glycosylate the 3-OH group of acceptor flavonoids. Similarly, a conserved motif in the C-terminal domain is known to bind a sugar donor substrate. In certain GTs, the substitution of a specific glutamine by histidine in this domain changes the preference of sugar from glucose to galactose as a result of changed pattern of interactions. The molecular modeling, docking, and molecular dynamics simulation studies have revealed the chemical and topological features of the binding site and thus provided insights into the basis of acceptor and donor recognition by GTs. PMID:24667893

  1. G/T Substitution in Intron 1 of the UNC13B Gene Is Associated With Increased Risk of Nephropathy in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Trégouet, David-Alexandre; Groop, Per-Henrik; McGinn, Steven; Forsblom, Carol; Hadjadj, Samy; Marre, Michel; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Tarnow, Lise; Telgmann, Ralph; Godefroy, Tiphaine; Nicaud, Viviane; Rousseau, Rachel; Parkkonen, Maikki; Hoverfält, Anna; Gut, Ivo; Heath, Simon; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Cox, Roger; Kazeem, Gbenga; Farrall, Martin; Gauguier, Dominique; Brand-Herrmann, Stefan-Martin; Cambien, François; Lathrop, Mark; Vionnet, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE— Genetic and environmental factors modulate the susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy, as initiating and/or progression factors. The objective of the European Rational Approach for the Genetics of Diabetic Complications (EURAGEDIC) study is to identify nephropathy susceptibility genes. We report molecular genetic studies for 127 candidate genes for nephropathy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS— Polymorphisms were identified through sequencing of promoter, exon, and flanking intron gene regions and a database search. A total of 344 nonredundant SNPs and nonsynonymous variants were tested for association with diabetic nephropathy (persistent albuminuria ≥300 mg/24 h) in a large type 1 diabetes case/control (1,176/1,323) study from three European populations. RESULTS— Only one SNP, rs2281999, located in the UNC13B gene, was significantly associated with nephropathy after correction for multiple testing. Analyses of 21 additional markers fully characterizing the haplotypic variability of the UNC13B gene showed consistent association of SNP rs13293564 (G/T) located in intron 1 of the gene with nephropathy in the three populations. The odds ratio (OR) for nephropathy associated with the TT genotype was 1.68 (95% CI 1.29–2.19) (P = 1.0 × 10−4). This association was replicated in an independent population of 412 case subjects and 614 control subjects (combined OR of 1.63 [95% CI 1.30–2.05], P = 2.3 × 10−5). CONCLUSIONS— We identified a polymorphism in the UNC13B gene associated with nephropathy. UNC13B mediates apopotosis in glomerular cells in the presence of hyperglycemia, an event occurring early in the development of nephropathy. We propose that this polymorphism could be a marker for the initiation of nephropathy. However, further studies are needed to clarify the role of UNC13B in nephropathy. PMID:18633107

  2. Molecular cloning of the cDNA for the human U2 snRNA-specific A' protein.

    PubMed Central

    Sillekens, P T; Beijer, R P; Habets, W J; van Verooij, W J

    1989-01-01

    The A' polypeptide is one of the protein constituents of the U2 snRNP particle. A potentially full-length cDNA clone containing the complete coding sequence for this U2 snRNP-specific protein was isolated by screening of a human lambda gt11 expression vector library with an autoimmune anti-(U1,U2)RNP serum. Monospecific antibodies, eluted from the 140-150 kD fusion protein of this cDNA recombinant, specifically recognized the A' protein on immunoblots and immunoprecipitated U2 snRNP particles from nuclear extracts. The identity of the clone was confirmed by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected mRNA or an RNA transcript synthesized from the cDNA insert. RNA blot analysis showed strong hybridization to a single polyadenylated transcript of 1.3 kb in human cells. The nucleotide sequence of the 1054 bp cDNA contains an open reading frame of 756 bp encoding a polypeptide of 255 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 28,444 D. The coding sequence is preceded by a 49 bp 5'-untranslated region and followed by a 226 bp 3'-untranslated region containing a single polyadenylation signal. Most striking feature of the deduced primary structure for the A' protein is a leucine-rich region in the amino-terminal half of the polypeptide. In contrast to the other U2 snRNP-specific protein B", the A' protein does not contain segments homologous to the RNP consensus sequences RNP1 and RNP2, common amino acid motifs found in several RNA-binding proteins. In the A' protein, however, the extremely hydrophilic carboxy terminus may constitute an RNA-binding moiety. Images PMID:2928112

  3. Cloning and functional validation of early inducible Magnaporthe oryzae responsive CYP76M7 promoter from rice

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, Joshitha; Devanna, B. N.; Singh, Nagendra K.; Sharma, Tilak R.

    2015-01-01

    Cloning and functional characterization of plant pathogen inducible promoters is of great significance for their use in the effective management of plant diseases. The rice gene CYP76M7 was up regulated at 24, 48, and 72 hours post inoculation (hpi) with two isolates of Magnaporthe oryzae Mo-ei-11 and Mo-ni-25. In this study, the promoter of CYP76M7 gene was cloned from rice cultivar HR-12, characterized and functionally validated. The Transcription Start Site of CYP76M7 was mapped at 45 bases upstream of the initiation codon. To functionally validate the promoter, 5′ deletion analysis of the promoter sequences was performed and the deletion fragments fused with the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene were used for generating stable transgenic Arabidopsis plants as well as for transient expression in rice. The spatial and temporal expression pattern of GUS in transgenic Arabidopsis plants and also in transiently expressed rice leaves revealed that the promoter of CYP76M7 gene was induced by M. oryzae. The induction of CYP76M7 promoter was observed at 24 hpi with M. oryzae. We report that, sequences spanning -222 bp to -520 bp, with the cluster of three W-boxes, two ASF1 motifs and a single GT-1 element may contribute to the M. oryzae inducible nature of CYP76M7 promoter. The promoter characterized in this study would be an ideal candidate for the overexpression of defense genes in rice for developing durable blast resistance rice lines. PMID:26052337

  4. Cloning of three human tyrosine phosphatases reveals a multigene family of receptor-linked protein-tyrosine-phosphatases expressed in brain.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, R; Morse, B; Huebner, K; Croce, C; Howk, R; Ravera, M; Ricca, G; Jaye, M; Schlessinger, J

    1990-01-01

    A human brainstem cDNA library in bacteriophage lambda gt11 was screened under conditions of reduced hybridization stringency with a leukocyte common antigen (LCA) probe that spanned both conserved cytoplasmic domains. cDNA encoding a receptor-linked protein-tyrosine-phosphatase (protein-tyrosine-phosphate phosphohydrolase, EC 3.1.3.48), RPTPase alpha, has been cloned and sequenced. Human RPTPase alpha consists of 802 amino acids. The extracellular domain of 150 residues includes a hydrophobic signal peptide and eight potential N-glycosylation sites. This is followed by a transmembrane region and two tandemly repeated conserved domains characteristic of all RPTPases identified thus far. The gene for RPTPase alpha has been localized to human chromosome region 20pter-20q12 by analysis of its segregation pattern in rodent-human somatic cell hybrids. Northern blot analysis revealed the presence of two major transcripts of 4.3 and 6.3 kilobases. In addition to RPTPase alpha, two other RPTPases (beta and gamma), identified in the same screen, have been partially cloned and sequenced. Analysis of sequence comparisons among LCA, the LCA-related protein LAR, and RPTPases alpha, beta, and gamma reveals the existence of a multigene family encoding different RPTPases, each containing a distinct extracellular domain, a single hydrophobic transmembrane region, and two tandemly repeated conserved cytoplasmic domains. Images PMID:2169617

  5. Antibody to a human DNA repair protein allows for cloning of a Drosophila cDNA that encodes an apurinic endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, M.R. ); Venugopal, S.; Harless, J.; Deutsch, W.A. . Dept. of Biochemistry)

    1989-03-01

    The cDNA of a Drosophila DNA repair gene, AP3, was cloned by screening an embryonic lambda gt11 expression library with an antibody that was originally prepared against a purified human apurinicapyrimidine (AP) endonuclease. The 1.2-kilobase (kb) AP3 cDNA mapped to a region on the third chromosome where a number of mutagen-sensitive alleles were located. The cDNA clone yielded an in vitro translation product of 35,000 daltons, in agreement with the predicted size of the translation product of the only open reading frame of AP3, and identical to the molecular size of an AP endonuclease activity recovered following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrymalide gel electrophoresis of Drosophilia extracts. The C-terminal portion of the predicted protein contained regions of presumptive DNA-binding domains, while the DNA sequence at the amino end of AP3 showed similarity to the Escherichia coli recA gene. AP3 is expressed as an abundant 1.3-kb mRNA that is detected throughout the life cycle of Drosophila melanogaster. Another 3.5-klb mRNA also hybridized to the AP3 cDNA, but species was restricted to the early stages of development.

  6. Pathogenicity of molecularly cloned bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Rovnak, J; Boyd, A L; Casey, J W; Gonda, M A; Jensen, W A; Cockerell, G L

    1993-01-01

    To delineate the mechanisms of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) pathogenesis, four full-length BLV clones, 1, 8, 9, and 13, derived from the transformed cell line FLK-BLV and a clone construct, pBLV913, were introduced into bovine spleen cells by microinjection. Microinjected cells exhibited cytopathic effects and produced BLV p24 and gp51 antigens and infectious virus. The construct, pBLV913, was selected for infection of two sheep by inoculation of microinjected cells. After 15 months, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these sheep served as inocula for the transfer of infection to four additional sheep. All six infected sheep seroconverted to BLV and had detectable BLV DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells after amplification by polymerase chain reaction. Four of the six sheep developed altered B/T-lymphocyte ratios between 33 and 53 months postinfection. One sheep died of unrelated causes, and one remained hematologically normal. Two of the affected sheep developed B lymphocytosis comparable to that observed in animals inoculated with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from BLV-infected cattle. This expanded B-lymphocyte population was characterized by elevated expression of B-cell surface markers, spontaneous blastogenesis, virus expression in vitro, and increased, polyclonally integrated provirus. One of these two sheep developed lymphocytic leukemia-lymphoma at 57 months postinfection. Leukemic cells had the same phenotype and harbored a single, monoclonally integrated provirus but produced no virus after in vitro cultivation. The range in clinical response to in vivo infection with cloned BLV suggests an important role for host immune response in the progression of virus replication and pathogenesis. Images PMID:8230433

  7. Consumers' attitudes toward consumption of cloned beef. The impact of exposure to technological information about animal cloning.

    PubMed

    Aizaki, Hideo; Sawada, Manabu; Sato, Kazuo

    2011-10-01

    Novel food technologies, such as cloning, have been introduced into the meat production sector; however, their use is not widely supported by many consumers. This study was designed to assess whether Japanese consumers' attitudes toward consumption of cloned beef (specifically, beef derived from bovine embryo and somatic cell-cloned cattle) would change after they were provided with technological information on animal cloning through a web-based survey. The results revealed that most respondents did not discriminate between their attitudes toward the consumption of the two types of cloned beef, and that most respondents did not change their attitudes toward cloned beef after receiving the technological information. The respondents' individual characteristics, including their knowledge about the food safety of cloned beef and their basic knowledge about animal cloning, influenced the likelihood of a change in their attitudes after they received the information. In conclusion, some consumers might become less uncomfortable about the consumption of cloned beef by the straightforward provision of technological information about animal cloning; however, most consumers are likely to maintain their attitudes.

  8. Genetic epidemiology, genetic maps and positional cloning.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Newton E

    2003-01-01

    Genetic epidemiology developed in the middle of the last century, focused on inherited causes of disease but with methods and results applicable to other traits and even forensics. Early success with linkage led to the localization of genes contributing to disease, and ultimately to the Human Genome Project. The discovery of millions of DNA markers has encouraged more efficient positional cloning by linkage disequilibrium (LD), using LD maps and haplotypes in ways that are rapidly evolving. This has led to large international programmes, some promising and others alarming, with laws about DNA patenting and ethical guidelines for responsible research still struggling to be born. PMID:14561327

  9. Cell phoney: human cloning after Quintavalle.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Derek; Ford, Mary

    2004-12-01

    Reproductive cloning has thrown up new scientific possibilities, ethical conundrums, and legal challenges. An initial question, considered by the English courts in 2003, was whether the technique presently available, that of cell nucleus replacement, falls outside the provisions of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990. If it does, the creation and use, including use in research protocols, of human embryos would be unregulated, disclosing a need to consider remedial legislation. The resolution by the courts of this legal question dramatically engages them in a resolution of fundamental ethical dilemmas, and discloses the possibilities and limitation of negotiating science policy through the processes of litigation.

  10. Development of an in vitro cloning method for Cowdria ruminantium.

    PubMed Central

    Perez, J M; Martinez, D; Debus, A; Sheikboudou, C; Bensaid, A

    1997-01-01

    Cowdria ruminantium is a tick-borne rickettsia which causes severe disease in ruminants. All studies with C. ruminantium reported so far were carried out with stocks consisting of infective blood collected from reacting animals or from the same stocks propagated in vitro. Cloned isolates are needed to conduct studies on immune response of the host, on genetic diversity of the parasite, and on mechanisms of attenuation and the development of vaccines. A method of cloning based on the particular chlamydia life cycle of Cowdria was developed. Instead of cloning extracellular elementary bodies, it appeared more convenient to clone endothelial cells infected by one morula resulting from the infection of the cell by one elementary body of Cowdria. Two hundred and sixteen clones were obtained by limiting dilution of infected cells. The method was experimentally validated by comparing randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprints from individual clones obtained from endothelial cell cultures coinfected with two different stocks of C. ruminantium. PMID:9302217

  11. Stability of the JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Haubek, D; Ennibi, O-K; Vaeth, M; Poulsen, S; Poulsen, K

    2009-09-01

    The JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is strongly associated with aggressive periodontitis. To obtain information about colonization dynamics of the JP2 clone, we used PCR to examine its presence in 365 Moroccan juveniles from whom periodontal plaque samples were collected at baseline and after one and two years. Periodontal attachment loss was measured at baseline and at the two-year follow-up. At baseline, 43 (12%) carriers of the JP2 clone were found. Nearly half (44 %) of these were persistently colonized with the clone. The relative risk for the development of aggressive periodontitis, adjusted for the concomitant presence of other genotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans, was highest for individuals continuously infected by the JP2 clone (RR = 13.9; 95% CI, 9.0 to 21.4), indicating a relationship between infectious dose and disease, which further substantiates the evidence for the JP2 clone as a causal factor in aggressive periodontitis.

  12. Hierarchical phenotypic and epigenetic variation in cloned swine.

    PubMed

    Archer, Greg S; Dindot, Scott; Friend, Ted H; Walker, Shawn; Zaunbrecher, Gretchen; Lawhorn, Bruce; Piedrahita, Jorge A

    2003-08-01

    Cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer can result in the birth of animals with phenotypic and gene expression abnormalities. We compared adult cloned pigs and adult pigs from naturally bred control females using a series of physiological and genetic parameters, including detailed methylation profiles of selected genomic regions. Phenotypic and genetic analyses indicated that there are two classes of traits, one in which the cloned pigs have less variation than controls and another characterized by variation that is equally high in cloned and control pigs. Although cloning creates animals within the normal phenotypic range, it increases the variability associated with some traits. This finding is contrary to the expectation that cloning can be used to reduce the size of groups involved in animal experimentation and to reproduce an animal, including a pet, with a homogenous set of desired traits.

  13. Selective cloning of Gaussian states by linear optics

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares, Stefano

    2007-08-15

    We investigate the performance of a selective cloning machine based on linear optical elements and Gaussian measurements, which allows one to clone at will one of the two incoming input states. This machine is a complete generalization of a 1{yields}2 cloning scheme demonstrated by Andersen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 240503 (2005)]. The input-output fidelity is studied for a generic Gaussian input state, and the effect of nonunit quantum efficiency is also taken into account. We show that, if the states to be cloned are squeezed states with known squeezing parameter, then the fidelity can be enhanced using a third suitable squeezed state during the final stage of the cloning process. A binary communication protocol based on the selective cloning machine is also discussed.

  14. Gaussian cloning of coherent states with known phases

    SciTech Connect

    Alexanian, Moorad

    2006-04-15

    The fidelity for cloning coherent states is improved over that provided by optimal Gaussian and non-Gaussian cloners for the subset of coherent states that are prepared with known phases. Gaussian quantum cloning duplicates all coherent states with an optimal fidelity of 2/3. Non-Gaussian cloners give optimal single-clone fidelity for a symmetric 1-to-2 cloner of 0.6826. Coherent states that have known phases can be cloned with a fidelity of 4/5. The latter is realized by a combination of two beam splitters and a four-wave mixer operated in the nonlinear regime, all of which are realized by interaction Hamiltonians that are quadratic in the photon operators. Therefore, the known Gaussian devices for cloning coherent states are extended when cloning coherent states with known phases by considering a nonbalanced beam splitter at the input side of the amplifier.

  15. Immunological crossreactivity between a cloned antigen of Onchocerca volvulus and a component of the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Onchocerciasis (river blindness) is a major blinding disease in Africa, Central America, and South America. Loss of vision can be due to corneal change, optic atrophy, or chorioretinal disease. It has been suggested that autoimmunological reactions resulting from crossreactivity between parasite antigens and components of eye tissues contribute to development of ocular pathology. Using sera collected from onchocerciasis patients as a screening reagent, a cDNA clone (Ov39) has been isolated from a lambda gt11 expression library of Onchocerca volvulus. This antigen exhibits immunological crossreactivity with a component of retinal pigment epithelium cells (RPE). Antiserum raised against this recombinant peptide immunoprecipitates a 22,000 Mr antigen of adult O. volvulus and recognizes a 44,000 Mr component of bovine RPE by Western blotting. A 44,000 Mr antigen of cultured human RPE metabolically labeled with 35S- methionine can be immunoprecipitated with the same antiserum. An antigen of the same size is recognized by a rabbit antiserum raised against whole O. volvulus extract. Immunocytochemical studies on cryostat sections of the bovine eye using the antirecombinant sera localizes this antigen to the RPE. PMID:2056276

  16. Molecular cloning of cDNA for rat argininosuccinate lyase and its expression in rat hepatoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, M A; Simard, L R; Ray, P N; McInnes, R R

    1986-01-01

    Using antibody and plaque hybridization screening, we isolated rat argininosuccinate lyase (AS lyase) cDNA clones from a liver cDNA library prepared in the phage expression vector lambda gt11. Five overlapping cDNAs covering 1.7 kilobases of the estimated 2.0-kilobase AS lyase mRNA were characterized and confirmed as AS lyase sequences by hybrid selection. We examined the differential expression of AS lyase in rat liver and four rat hepatoma cell lines (7800C1, H4, HTC, and MH1C1). These cells exhibited a 60-fold range of AS lyase enzyme activity, with a direct correlation between activity, amount of AS lyase immunoreactive protein, and quantity of specific AS lyase mRNA. These observations suggest that the differences in AS lyase expression between rat liver and the hepatoma cell lines result from variations in AS lyase transcriptional activity or alterations in nuclear processing of AS lyase RNA. Images PMID:3785176

  17. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene coding for an antigenic 120-kilodalton protein of Rickettsia conorii.

    PubMed Central

    Schuenke, K W; Walker, D H

    1994-01-01

    Several high-molecular-mass (above 100 kDa) antigens are recognized by sera from humans infected with spotted fever group rickettsiae and may be important stimulators of the host immune response. Molecular cloning techniques were used to make genomic Rickettsia conorii (Malish 7 strain) libraries in expression vector lambda gt11. The 120-kDa R. conorii antigen was identified by monospecific antibodies to the recombinant protein expressed on construct lambda 4-7. The entire gene DNA sequence was obtained by using this construct and two other overlapping constructs. An open reading frame of 3,068 bp with a calculated molecular mass of approximately 112 kDa was identified. Promoters and a ribosome-binding site were identified on the basis of their DNA sequence homology to other rickettsial genes and their relative positions in the sequence. The DNA coding region shares no significant homology with other spotted fever group rickettsial antigen genes (i.e., the R. rickettsii 190-, 135-, and 17-kDa antigen-encoding genes). The PCR technique was used to amplify the gene from eight species of spotted fever group rickettsiae. A 75-kDa portion of the 120-kDa antigen was overexpressed in and purified from Escherichia coli. This polypeptide was recognized by antirickettsial antibodies and may be a useful diagnostic reagent for spotted fever group rickettsioses. Images PMID:8112862

  18. Compositional analysis of dairy products derived from clones and cloned transgenic cattle.

    PubMed

    Laible, Götz; Brophy, Brigid; Knighton, Derek; Wells, David N

    2007-01-01

    Cloning technology is an emerging biotechnological tool that could provide commercial opportunities for livestock agriculture. However, the process is very inefficient and the molecular events underlying the technology are poorly understood. The resulting uncertainties are causing concerns regarding the safety of food products derived from cloned livestock. There are similar concerns for livestock produced by biotechnologies which enable the purposeful introduction of genetic modifications. To increase the knowledge about food products from animals generated by these modern biotechnologies, we assessed compositional differences associated with milk and cheese derived from cloned and transgenic cows. Based on gross composition, fatty acid and amino acid profiles and mineral and vitamin contents, milk produced by clones and conventional cattle were essentially similar and consistent with reference values from dairy cows farmed in the same region under similar conditions. Whereas colostrum produced by transgenic cows with additional casein genes had similar IgG secretion levels and kinetics to control cows, milk from the transgenic cows had a distinct yellow appearance, in contrast to the white color of milk from control cows. Processing of milk into cheese resulted in differences in the gross composition and amino acid profiles; 'transgenic' cheese had lower fat and higher salt contents and small but characteristic differences in the amino acid profile compared to control cheese.

  19. [Human cloning and the protection of women's interests].

    PubMed

    Canabes, Marcela Ahumada

    2008-01-01

    The Human Cloning, both therapeutic and full birth cloning, involves and affects women in a special way. The United Nation's Declaration on the Cloning of Human Beings includes a special clause referred to them. Also the Spanish law does it. This works pretend to analyse the meaning of the inclusion of women's interests in this document. At the same time, I will consider the foundations and the importance of the reference to the women.

  20. The Human Cloning Prohibition Act of 2001: vagueness and federalism.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Jonathan S

    2002-01-01

    On July 31, 2001, the U.S. House of Representatives passed The Human Cloning Prohibition Act of 2001. The legislation proposes a complete ban on somatic cell nuclear transfer to create cloned human embryos; it threatens transgressors with criminal punishment and civil fines. House Bill 2505 is the first human cloning prohibition to pass either chamber of Congress. This note argues that the bill is unconstitutionally vague and inconsistent with the Supreme Court's recent Commerce Clause jurisprudence.

  1. Transposon-containing DNA cloning vector and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Berg, Claire M.; Berg, Douglas E.; Wang, Gan

    1997-01-01

    The present invention discloses a rapid method of restriction mapping, sequencing or localizing genetic features in a segment of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that is up to 42 kb in size. The method in part comprises cloning of the DNA segment in a specialized cloning vector and then isolating nested deletions in either direction in vivo by intramolecular transposition into the cloned DNA. A plasmid has been prepared and disclosed.

  2. Transposon-containing DNA cloning vector and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Berg, C.M.; Berg, D.E.; Wang, G.

    1997-07-08

    The present invention discloses a rapid method of restriction mapping, sequencing or localizing genetic features in a segment of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that is up to 42 kb in size. The method in part comprises cloning of the DNA segment in a specialized cloning vector and then isolating nested deletions in either direction in vivo by intramolecular transposition into the cloned DNA. A plasmid has been prepared and disclosed. 4 figs.

  3. Therapeutic cloning and the constitution--a Canadian perspective.

    PubMed

    Muscati, S A

    2001-08-01

    Recent developments in the field of therapeutic cloning have been welcomed by many in the medical community as important breakthroughs that may help provide a better understanding of a variety of human diseases. Nevertheless, research in this field appears to have struck a sensitive nerve in society. A large amount of social debate has been generated regarding the validity of therapeutic cloning, and there are many seeking legislation to have the practice restricted. It is unclear, however, whether such restrictions can be legally justified. Analysing cloning in such a social and legal context raises a number of questions. What scientific procedures are behind therapeutic cloning? What is the legal status of the cultured or unimplanted embryo? Can cloning be considered an aspect of reproductive liberty as protected by the constitution? What medical advances might therapeutic cloning further? What social benefits and harms might arise from its promotion or restriction? Such questions, and the broader debate surrounding human therapeutic cloning, are addressed in this paper in three parts. Part 1 presents an overview of the basic biological principles behind cloning and the science behind the therapeutic cloning of specific cells and tissues. Part 2 analyses ss. 7, 2, 15(1) and 1 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and how they may be implicated by legal incursions into the field of human cloning. Several Charter-based arguments, both for and against the practice, are presented. Finally, Part 3 assesses some recent scientific developments in cloning technology, and how they affect the debate over the constitutionality of human therapeutic cloning.

  4. Towards an understanding of British public attitudes concerning human cloning.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Richard; Barnett, Julie; Cooper, Helen; Coyle, Adrian; Moran-Ellis, Jo; Senior, Victoria; Walton, Chris

    2007-07-01

    The ability of scientists to apply cloning technology to humans has provoked public discussion and media coverage. The present paper reports on a series of studies examining public attitudes to human cloning in the UK, bringing together a range of quantitative and qualitative methods to address this question. These included a nationally representative survey, an experimental vignette study, focus groups and analyses of media coverage. Overall the research presents a complex picture of attitude to and constructions of human cloning. In all of the analyses, therapeutic cloning was viewed more favourably than reproductive cloning. However, while participants in the focus groups were generally negative about both forms of cloning, and this was also reflected in the media analyses, quantitative results showed more positive responses. In the quantitative research, therapeutic cloning was generally accepted when the benefits of such procedures were clear, and although reproductive cloning was less accepted there was still substantial support. Participants in the focus groups only differentiated between therapeutic and reproductive cloning after the issue of therapeutic cloning was explicitly raised; initially they saw cloning as being reproductive cloning and saw no real benefits. Attitudes were shown to be associated with underlying values associated with scientific progress rather than with age, gender or education, and although there were a few differences in the quantitative data based on religious affiliation, these tended to be small effects. Likewise in the focus groups there was little direct appeal to religion, but the main themes were 'interfering with nature' and the 'status of the embryo', with the latter being used more effectively to try to close down further discussion. In general there was a close correspondence between the media analysis and focus group responses, possibly demonstrating the importance of media as a resource, or that the media reflect

  5. Knowledge and attitudes toward human cloning in Israel.

    PubMed

    Barnoy, Sivia; Ehrenfeld, Malka; Sharon, Rina; Tabak, Nili

    2006-04-01

    The success of mammal cloning in 1997 has brought the issue of human cloning into public discussion. Human cloning has several aspects and potential applications for use in both reproductive and non-reproductive matters. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and attitudes toward human cloning in Israel. Data from 120 respondents (68 health professionals and 52 non-health professionals), all Jewish, Hebrew speaking with at least 15 years of education each, were collected using two questionnaires that dealt with knowledge and attitudes toward human cloning. Results showed that although health professionals had significantly more knowledge that non-health professionals, all respondents had poor knowledge about cloning. No difference in attitudes was found between the groups. Most respondents opposed human cloning, but more positive attitudes toward non-reproductive cloning were found. The results are discussed in the context of the deficit model. The findings indicate a need to provide information about human cloning to allow people to form their attitudes based on factual knowledge.

  6. pELMO, an optimised in-house cloning vector.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Andrea E; Muñoz, Marina; Moreno-Pérez, Darwin A; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2017-12-01

    DNA cloning is an essential tool regarding DNA recombinant technology as it allows the replication of foreign DNA fragments within a cell. pELMO was here constructed as an in-house cloning vector for rapid and low-cost PCR product propagation; it is an optimally designed vector containing the ccdB killer gene from the pDONR 221 plasmid, cloned into the pUC18 vector's multiple cloning site (Thermo Scientific). The ccdB killer gene has a cleavage site (CCC/GGG) for the SmaI restriction enzyme which is used for vector linearisation and cloning blunt-ended products. pELMO transformation efficiency was evaluated with different sized inserts and its cloning efficiency was compared to that of the pGEM-T Easy commercial vector. The highest pELMO transformation efficiency was observed for ~500 bp DNA fragments; pELMO vector had higher cloning efficiency for all insert sizes tested. In-house and commercial vector cloned insert reads after sequencing were similar thus highlighting that sequencing primers were designed and localised appropriately. pELMO is thus proposed as a practical alternative for in-house cloning of PCR products in molecular biology laboratories.

  7. Much ado about cloning in the public square.

    PubMed

    McLean, M R

    2001-01-01

    The dawnings of the age of human cloning and genetics is shaping lives, ideologies, and social structures. How will we--as individuals and as communities--respond to the possibilities, challenges, and changes of the clone age? This essay invites engagement in communal moral deliberation through broadening conversations about serious matters, including human cloning. A framework that includes important moral markers for significant "kitchen table talk" is offered. Clone age justice is also discussed. Attention is paid to the renewed role of religious voices in the public square.

  8. The inadequacies of absolute prohibition of reproductive cloning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Martin Lishexian

    2004-02-01

    This study reviews debates on human cloning and its benefits, considers international and domestic laws, and argues that the choice of reproductive means is a human right. In exercise of this right, a balanced approach should be adopted, in order to benefit human society while protecting human dignity adequately. The immaturity of cloning techniques indicates that at the present time human reproductive cloning is too risky. Thus a temporary ban on such cloning is appropriate, but the ban on relevant scientific research and animal experimentation is inappropriate as it denies the spirit of freedom of scientific inquiry, and hinders making the benefits of scientific advancement available to human society as a whole.

  9. Photosynthesis and leaf water relations in four American sycamore clones

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Z.; Land, S.B. Jr.

    1995-11-01

    Photosynthesis, transpiration, stomatal conductance, and xylem pressure potential were studied to examine clonal variation and clone-by-season interactions in rooted cuttings of four sycamore clones (Platanus occidentalis L.). These physiological parameters were measured during June through November of the second and third growing seasons in the field. Stomatal conductance, xylem pressure potential, and photosynthesis were higher in June-July than in August-November. The four clones did not differ significantly in yearly average photosynthetic rates, but clone 11 tended to have higher rates early in each growing season (June-July) than did the other three clones. Dry periods during August-September of the second season and during October of the third season apparently caused clone 11 to close its stomata more than clone 17, as indicated by significant clone-by-season interactions for reductions in stomatal conductance and transpiration late in the morning. Clone 17 was generally able to maintain high xylem pressure potential, stomatal conductance, and transpiration throughout the growing season, probably because of its large root system. 36 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Economical Gaussian cloning of coherent states with known phase

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Yuli; Zou Xubo; Guo Guangcan; Li Shangbin

    2007-07-15

    We investigate the economical Gaussian cloning of coherent states with the known phase, which produces M copies from N input replica and can be implemented with degenerate parametric amplifiers and beam splitters.The achievable fidelity of single copy is given by 2M{radical}(N)/[{radical}(N)(M-1)+{radical}((1+N)(M{sup 2}+N))], which is bigger than the optimal fidelity of the universal Gaussian cloning. The cloning machine presented here works without ancillary optical modes and can be regarded as the continuous variable generalization of the economical cloning machine for qudits.

  11. Implementing of Quantum Cloning with Spatially Separated Quantum Dot Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jing-Ji; Yeon, Kyu-Hwang; Du, Xin; Lv, Jia; Wang, Ming; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Shou

    2016-07-01

    We propose some schemes for implementing optimal symmetric (asymmetric) 1 → 2 universal quantum cloning, optimal symmetric (asymmetric) 1 → 2 phase-covariant cloning, optimal symmetric 1 → 3 economical phase-covariant cloning and optimal symmetric 1 → 3 economical real state cloning with spatially separated quantum dot spins by choosing the single-qubit rotation angles appropriately. The decoherences of the spontaneous emission of QDs, cavity decay and fiber loss are suppressed since the effective long-distance off-resonant interaction between two distant QDs is mediated by the vacuum fields of the fiber and cavity, and during the whole process no system is excited.

  12. Generalization of continuous-variable quantum cloning with linear optics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai Zehui; Guo Juan; Gao Jiangrui

    2006-05-15

    We propose an asymmetric quantum cloning scheme. Based on the proposal and experiment by Andersen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 240503 (2005)], we generalize it to two asymmetric cases: quantum cloning with asymmetry between output clones and between quadrature variables. These optical implementations also employ linear elements and homodyne detection only. Finally, we also compare the utility of symmetric and asymmetric cloning in an analysis of a squeezed-state quantum key distribution protocol and find that the asymmetric one is more advantageous.

  13. Novel cloning vectors for Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Baum, J A; Coyle, D M; Gilbert, M P; Jany, C S; Gawron-Burke, C

    1990-11-01

    Seven replication origins from resident plasmids of Bacillus thuringienis subsp. kurstaki HD263 and HD73 were cloned in Escherichia coli. Three of these replication origins, originating from plasmids of 43, 44, and 60 MDa, were used to construct a set of compatible shuttle vectors that exhibit structural and segregational stability in the Cry- strain B. thuringiensis HD73-26. These shuttle vectors, pEG597, pEG853, and pEG854, were designed with rare restriction sites that permit various adaptations, including the construction of small recombinant plasmids lacking antibiotic resistance genes. The cryIA(c) and cryIIA insecticidal crystal protein genes were inserted into these vectors to demonstrate crystal protein production in B. thuringiensis. Introduction of a cloned cryIA(c) gene from strain HD263 into a B. thuringiensis subsp. aizawai strain exhibiting good insecticidal activity against Spodoptera exigua resulted in a recombinant strain with an improved spectrum of insecticidal activity. Shuttle vectors of this sort should be valuable in future genetic studies of B. thuringiensis as well as in the development of B. thuringiensis strains for use as microbial pesticides.

  14. Novel cloning vectors for Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed Central

    Baum, J A; Coyle, D M; Gilbert, M P; Jany, C S; Gawron-Burke, C

    1990-01-01

    Seven replication origins from resident plasmids of Bacillus thuringienis subsp. kurstaki HD263 and HD73 were cloned in Escherichia coli. Three of these replication origins, originating from plasmids of 43, 44, and 60 MDa, were used to construct a set of compatible shuttle vectors that exhibit structural and segregational stability in the Cry- strain B. thuringiensis HD73-26. These shuttle vectors, pEG597, pEG853, and pEG854, were designed with rare restriction sites that permit various adaptations, including the construction of small recombinant plasmids lacking antibiotic resistance genes. The cryIA(c) and cryIIA insecticidal crystal protein genes were inserted into these vectors to demonstrate crystal protein production in B. thuringiensis. Introduction of a cloned cryIA(c) gene from strain HD263 into a B. thuringiensis subsp. aizawai strain exhibiting good insecticidal activity against Spodoptera exigua resulted in a recombinant strain with an improved spectrum of insecticidal activity. Shuttle vectors of this sort should be valuable in future genetic studies of B. thuringiensis as well as in the development of B. thuringiensis strains for use as microbial pesticides. Images PMID:2268153

  15. Expression cloning of human B cell immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Wardemann, Hedda; Kofer, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    The majority of lymphomas originate from B cells at the germinal center stage or beyond. Preferential selection of B cell clones by a limited set of antigens has been suggested to drive lymphoma development. However, little is known about the specificity of the antibodies expressed by lymphoma cells, and the role of antibody-specificity in lymphomagenesis remains elusive. Here, we describe a strategy to characterize the antibody reactivity of human B cells. The approach allows the unbiased characterization of the human antibody repertoire on a single cell level through the generation of recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single primary human B cells of defined origin. This protocol offers a detailed description of the method starting from the flow cytometric isolation of single human B cells, to the RT-PCR-based amplification of the expressed Igh, Igκ, and Igλ chain genes, and Ig gene expression vector cloning for the in vitro production of monoclonal antibodies. The strategy may be used to obtain information on the clonal evolution of B cell lymphomas by single cell Ig gene sequencing and on the antibody reactivity of human lymphoma B cells.

  16. Developmental and epigenetic anomalies in cloned cattle.

    PubMed

    Smith, L C; Suzuki, J; Goff, A K; Filion, F; Therrien, J; Murphy, B D; Kohan-Ghadr, H R; Lefebvre, R; Brisville, A C; Buczinski, S; Fecteau, G; Perecin, F; Meirelles, F V

    2012-08-01

    Many of the developmental anomalies observed in cloned animals are related to foetal and placental overgrowth, a phenomenon known as the 'large offspring syndrome' (LOS) in ruminants. It has been hypothesized that the epigenetic control of imprinted genes, that is, genes that are expressed in a parental-specific manner, is at the root of LOS. Our recent research has focused on understanding epigenetic alterations to imprinted genes that are associated with assisted reproductive technologies (ART), such as early embryo in vitro culture (IVC) and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in cattle. We have sought and identified single nucleotide polymorphisms in Bos indicus DNA useful for the analysis of parental-specific alleles and their respective transcripts in tissues from hybrid embryos derived by crossing Bos indicus and Bos taurus cattle. By analysing differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of imprinted genes SNRPN, H19 and the IGF2R in cattle, we demonstrated that there is a generalized hypomethylation of the imprinted allele and the biallelic expression of embryos produced by SCNT when compared to the methylation patterns observed in vivo (artificially inseminated). Together, these results indicate that imprinting marks are erased during the reprogramming of the somatic cell nucleus during early development, indicating that such epigenetic anomalies may play a key role in mortality and morbidity of cloned animals.

  17. [Cloning: necessary reflections on the imaginary].

    PubMed

    Minahim, María Auxiliadora

    2009-01-01

    The article covers the innumerable reasons given for using cloning for therapeutic and reproductive purposes. The most commonly used argument in favour of the procedure has been that of preserving human dignity, which would include the wide exercising of personal autonomy without restrictions of an ethical nature. This view is countered by questions relating to the use of the technique, namely self-determination and the loss of the integrity of the species, which would include the transformation of a generation through the production of human beings and tissues. It must also be made clear that therapeutic cloning (which is carried out through the use of stem cells) is not yet a reality in the scientific world, with the result that the procedure that is supposedly necessary, which argues in favour of the destruction of the young embryo is misleading, as are also certain discourses used to refer to the theme and the science. Criminal law, on prohibiting this practice is anticipating it becoming a reality, protecting legal rights that affect supra-individual interests, such as the destruction of the young embryo, one of the issues of concern to ADIN (Acción Directa de Inconstitucionalidad en Brasil - Direct Action on Unconstitutionality in Brazil) 3510-0.

  18. Construction of an infectious plasmid clone of Muscovy duck parvovirus by TA cloning and creation of a partially attenuated strain.

    PubMed

    Yen, T-Y; Li, K-P; Ou, S-C; Shien, J-H; Lu, H-M; Chang, P-C

    2015-01-01

    Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV) infection is a highly contagious and fatal disease of Muscovy ducklings. The infectious clone methodology is a valuable tool to study the pathogenic mechanisms of viruses, but no infectious clone of MDPV is yet available. In this study, a plasmid clone containing the full-length genome of MDPV was constructed using the TA cloning methodology. This MDPV clone was found to be infectious after transfection of primary Muscovy duck embryo fibroblast cells and passage in embryonated Muscovy duck eggs. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that the K75N mutation in the VP1 protein of MDPV resulted in the partial attenuation of the virus. The availability of an MDPV infectious clone can facilitate investigation of the pathogenic mechanisms of MDPV and development of vaccines against diseases caused by MDPV.

  19. DOS: the discrete-ordinates system. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoades, W. A.; Emmett, M. B.

    1982-09-01

    The Discrete Ordinates System determines the flux of neutrons or photons due either to fixed sources specified by the user or to sources generated by particle interaction with the problem materials. It also determines numerous secondary results which depend upon flux. Criticality searches can be performed. Numerous input, output, and file manipulation facilities are provided. The DOS driver program reads the problem specification from an input file and calls various program modules into execution as specified by the input file.

  20. DIGLIB. PC-DOS Graphics Subroutine Library

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, H.R.

    1989-02-01

    DIGLIB is a collection of general graphics subroutines. It was designed to be small, reasonably fast, device-independent, and compatible with DEC-supplied operating systems for VAXes, PDP-11s, and LSI-11s, and the DOS operating system for IBM PCs and IBM-compatible machines. DIGLIB/VMS runs on the VAX and MicroVAX series of computers under VMS. The software is readily usable by casual programmers for two-dimensional plotting.

  1. The mtDNA nt7778 G/T polymorphism augments formation of lymphocytic foci but does not aggravate cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sarah; Krüger, Burkhard; Lange, Falko; Bock, Cristin N; Nizze, Horst; Glass, Änne; Ibrahim, Saleh M; Jaster, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A polymorphism in the ATP synthase 8 (ATP8) gene of the murine mitochondrial genome, G-to-T transversion at position 7778, has been suggested to increase susceptibility to multiple autoimmune diseases, including autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). The polymorphism also induces mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation, secretory dysfunction and β-cell mass adaptation. Here, we have used two conplastic mouse strains, C57BL/6N-mtAKR/J (B6-mtAKR; nt7778 G; control) and C57BL/6N-mtFVB/N (B6-mtFVB; nt7778 T), to address the question if the polymorphism also affects the course of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Therefore, two age groups of mice (3 and 12-month-old, respectively) were subjected to up to 7 injections of the secretagogue cerulein (50 µg/kg body weight) at hourly intervals. Disease severity was assessed at time points from 3 hours to 7 days based on pancreatic histopathology, serum levels of α-amylase and activities of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in lung tissue. A comparison of cerulein-induced pancreatic tissue damage and increases of α-amylase and MPO activities showed no differences between the age-matched groups of both strains. Interestingly, histological evaluation of pancreatic tissue of both untreated and cerulein-treated B6-mtAKR and B6-mtFVB mice also revealed the presence of infiltrates of immune cells surrounding ducts and vessels; a finding that is compatible with an early stage of AIP. After recovery from cerulein-induced pancreatitis (day 7 after the injections), 12-month-old B6-mtFVB mice but not B6-mtAKR mice displayed aggravated lymphocytic lesions. A comparison of 12-month-old mice with other age groups of both strains revealed that lymphocytic foci were largely absent in 3-month-old mice, while 24-month-old mice were more affected. Together, our data suggest that the mtDNA nt7778 G/T polymorphism does not aggravate cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Autoimmune-like lesions, however, may progress faster if additional tissue

  2. Calibration and Cross-Validation of the ActiGraph wGT3X+ Accelerometer for the Estimation of Physical Activity Intensity in Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    McGarty, Arlene M.; Penpraze, Victoria; Melville, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Valid objective measurement is integral to increasing our understanding of physical activity and sedentary behaviours. However, no population-specific cut points have been calibrated for children with intellectual disabilities. Therefore, this study aimed to calibrate and cross-validate the first population-specific accelerometer intensity cut points for children with intellectual disabilities. Methods Fifty children with intellectual disabilities were randomly assigned to the calibration (n = 36; boys = 28, 9.53±1.08yrs) or cross-validation (n = 14; boys = 9, 9.57±1.16yrs) group. Participants completed a semi-structured school-based activity session, which included various activities ranging from sedentary to vigorous intensity. Direct observation (SOFIT tool) was used to calibrate the ActiGraph wGT3X+, which participants wore on the right hip. Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analyses determined the optimal cut points for sedentary, moderate, and vigorous intensity activity for the vertical axis and vector magnitude. Classification agreement was investigated using sensitivity, specificity, total agreement, and Cohen’s kappa scores against the criterion measure of SOFIT. Results The optimal (AUC = .87−.94) vertical axis cut points (cpm) were ≤507 (sedentary), 1008−2300 (moderate), and ≥2301 (vigorous), which demonstrated high sensitivity (81−88%) and specificity (81−85%). The optimal (AUC = .86−.92) vector magnitude cut points (cpm) of ≤1863 (sedentary), 2610−4214 (moderate), and ≥4215 (vigorous) demonstrated comparable, albeit marginally lower, accuracy than the vertical axis cut points (sensitivity = 80−86%; specificity = 77−82%). Classification agreement ranged from moderate to almost perfect (κ = .51−.85) with high sensitivity and specificity, and confirmed the trend that accuracy increased with intensity, and vertical axis cut points provide higher classification agreement than vector magnitude cut points

  3. Effects of PSCA rs2294008 (C/T) and c-MYC rs9642880 (G/T) polymorphisms on bladder cancer: evidence from a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Yang, Peng-Tao; Diao, Yan; Kang, Hua-Feng; Zhao, Yang; Lin, Shuai; Wang, Zi-Ming; Wang, Meng; Wang, Xi-Jing; Dai, Zhi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated the associations between the two polymorphisms (prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) rs2294008 C/T and c-MYC rs9642880 G/T) and bladder cancer (BC) risk. However, the results are inconsistent. We therefore carried out a meta-analysis to estimate the relationship between PSCA/c-MYC polymorphisms and BC risk. We searched PubMed up to November 2014 to identify potentially eligible literatures. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to estimate the strength of the associations, the data were further stratified by ethnicity. Heterogeneity was evaluated by Q test and I2 statistics. Begg’s funnel plot and Egger’s test were used to assess the publication bias. 11 studies from 9 articles were identified, including a total of 16,814 cancer cases and 52,868 case-free controls. We found a significant association between PSCA rs2294008 polymorphism and BC risk (the allele contrast model: OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.11-1.18; homozygote comparison: OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.20-1.37; heterozygote comparison: OR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.17-1.30; dominant model: OR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.19-1.31 and recessive model: OR = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.07-1.20). Moreover, a significant increased risk of BC was confirmed both in Caucasian and in Asians. For c-MYC rs9642880 polymorphism, significant increased BC risk was detected under the following genetic models (the allele contrast model: OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.13-1.27; homozygote comparison: OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.21-1.55; heterozygote comparison: OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.09-1.32; dominant model: OR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.14-1.37 and recessive model: OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.13-1.40). Further stratified analysis by ethnicity also observed the same results. This meta-analysis suggested that PSCA rs2294008 and c-MYC rs9642880 polymorphisms may increase the BC risk. Further studies are needed to clarify the effects. PMID:25932146

  4. Human autoantibody to a novel protein of the nuclear coiled body: immunological characterization and cDNA cloning of p80-coilin

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Antibodies producing an unusual immunofluorescent pattern were identified in the sera of patients with diverse autoimmune features. This pattern was characterized by the presence of up to six round discrete nuclear bodies in interphase cell nuclei. Immunoblotting analysis showed that these sera recognized an 80-kD nuclear protein, and affinity-purified anti-p80 antibody from the protein band reproduced the fluorescent staining of nuclear bodies. Colloidal gold immunoelectron microscopy showed that the affinity-purified anti-p80 antibody recognized the coiled body, an ultramicroscopic nuclear structure probably first described by the Spanish cytologist Ramon y Cajal. Five cDNA clones were isolated from a MOLT-4 cell lambda gt-11 expression library using human antibody and oligonucleotide probes. The longest cDNA insert was 2.1 kb and had an open reading frame of 405 amino acids. A clone encoding a 14-kD COOH-terminal region of the protein was used for expression of a beta-galactosidase fusion protein. An epitope was present in this COOH-terminal 14-kD region, which was recognized by 18 of 20 sera with anti-p80 reactivity, and affinity- purified antibody from the recombinant protein also reacted in immunofluorescence to show specific staining of the coiled body. This is the first demonstration and molecular cloning of a protein that appears to have particular identification with the coiled body, and it was designated p80-coilin. Autoantibody to p80-coilin may be useful for the elucidation of the structure and function of the coiled body, and the availability of a cDNA sequence could be helpful in further studies to clarify the clinical significance of this autoantibody response. PMID:2033369

  5. Molecular cloning of the cDNA encoding the Epstein-Barr virus/C3d receptor (complement receptor type 2) of human B lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.D.; Cooper, N.R.; Tack, B.F.; Nemerow, G.R.

    1987-12-01

    Complementary DNA clones for complement receptor type 2 (CR2), the B-lymphocyte membrane protein that serves as the receptor for Epstein-Barr virus and the C3d complement fragment, were obtained by screening a lambda gt11 library generated from Raji B lymphoblastoid cell mRNA. A 4.2-kilobase (kb) clone, representing the entire coding sequence of the protein plus untranslated 5' and 3' nucleotide sequences was obtained and sequenced. The 4.2-kb clone, which contains all but about 500 base pairs (bp) of the 5' untranslated region of the full-length CR2 mRNA, consists of 63 bp of 5' untranslated nucleotide sequence followed successively by a start codon, a 20-amino acid hydrophobic signal peptide, 1005 amino acids having a repeating motif, a 28-amino acid probable transmembrane domain, and a 34-amino acid cytoplasmic tail. The deduced amino acid sequence of the protein indicates that the extracellular domain consists entirely of 16 tandemly arranged repeating elements, each 60-75 amino acids in length, which are identified by multiple conserved residues. This repeating motif also occurs in the C3b/C4b receptor, several complement proteins, and a number of noncomplement proteins. In CR2, the 16 repeats occur in four clusters of four repeats each. Approximately 10% of the deduced amino acid sequence, including the amino and carboxyl termini, was confirmed by amino acid sequencing of tryptic peptides derived from purified CR2. The nucleotide and derived amino acid sequence of CR2 and related studies are presented here.

  6. Testing of Willow Clones for Biomass Production in Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect

    Kubiske, Marke E.

    2005-01-01

    A core experiment with 31 willow clones and 8 standard poplar clones was established at the Harshaw Experimental Farm, Rhinelander, WI in 1997. Data analysis is continuing for survival, growth, and biomass data for all willow test sites in this project.

  7. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences—1991 update

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1992-01-01

    An updated list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome over the past year (1991) is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic probes comprising both gene and pseudogene sequences. PMID:1598240

  8. Infectious Maize rayado fino virus from cloned cDNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize rayado fino virus (MRFV) is the type member of the marafiviruses within the family Tymoviridae. A cDNA clone from which infectious RNA can be transcribed was produced from a US isolate of MRFV (MRFV-US). Infectivity of transcripts derived from cDNA clones was demonstrated by infection of mai...

  9. Molecular Cloning of Actinomyces Bacteriophage DNA in E. Coli.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    recombinant clones revealed the presence of the expected phi63 DNA fragments that were used in the subcloning and they were stably maintained in E . coli . Further...feasibility of cloning of Actinomyces phage DNA fragments onto an E . coli expression vector.

  10. Nuclear reprogramming of cloned embryos produced in vitro.

    PubMed

    Han, Y M; Kang, Y K; Koo, D B; Lee, K K

    2003-01-01

    Despite the fact that cloned animals derived from somatic cells have been successfully generated in a variety of mammalian species, there are still many unsolved problems with current cloning technology. Somatic cell nuclear transfer has shown several developmental aberrancies, including a high rate of abortion during early gestation and increased perinatal death. One cause of these developmental failures of cloned embryos may reside in the epigenetic reprogramming of somatic donor genome. In mammals, DNA methylation is an essential process in the regulation of transcription during embryonic development and is generally associated with gene silencing. A genome-wide demethylation may be a prerequisite for the formation of pluripotent stem cells that are important for later development. We analyzed methylation patterns in cloned bovine embryos to monitor the epigenetic reprogramming process of donor genomic DNA. Aberrant methylation profiles of cloned bovine embryos were observed in various genomic regions, except in single-copy gene sequences. The overall genomic methylation status of cloned embryos was quite different from that of normal embryos produced in vitro or in vivo. These results suggest that the developmental failures of cloned embryos may be due to incomplete epigenetic reprogramming of donor genomic DNA. We expect that advances in understanding the molecular events for reprogramming of donor genome will contribute to clarify the developmental defects of cloned embryos.

  11. Computerized Adaptive Testing with Item Clones. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glas, Cees A. W.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    To reduce the cost of item writing and to enhance the flexibility of item presentation, items can be generated by item-cloning techniques. An important consequence of cloning is that it may cause variability on the item parameters. Therefore, a multilevel item response model is presented in which it is assumed that the item parameters of a…

  12. Novel Epidemic Clones of Listeria monocytogenes, United States, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Lomonaco, Sara; Verghese, Bindhu; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Tarr, Cheryl; Gladney, Lori; Joseph, Lavin; Katz, Lee; Turnsek, Maryann; Frace, Michael; Chen, Yi; Brown, Eric; Meinersmann, Richard; Berrang, Mark

    2013-01-01

    We identified a novel serotype 1/2a outbreak strain and 2 novel epidemic clones of Listeria monocytogenes while investigating a foodborne outbreak of listeriosis associated with consumption of cantaloupe during 2011 in the United States. Comparative analyses of strains worldwide are essential to identification of novel outbreak strains and epidemic clones. PMID:23260778

  13. Streptomyces phospholipase D cloning and production.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Yozo

    2012-01-01

    The transphosphatidylation catalytic ability of phospholipase D (PLD, EC 3.1.4.4) is a powerful biochemical tool for the acquisition of rare phospholipids (PLs), e.g., phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and phosphatidylserine (PS), and artificial phospholipids, which do not occur in nature. Specifically, actinomycete PLD recognizes not only the alcohols (i.e., glycerol or serine) corresponding to the polar head groups of natural PLs, but also secondary alcohols, aromatic alcohols, saccharides, N-heterocyclic alcohols, and vitamins as acceptors. Therefore, actinomycete PLD is a valuable enzyme in food, cosmetics, fine chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Here, we describe a protocol for the screening for PLD-producing microorganisms, several PLD assays and methods of PLD production-purification and the strategy of cloning of the Streptomyces PLD gene.

  14. Computational analysis of small RNA cloning data.

    PubMed

    Berninger, Philipp; Gaidatzis, Dimos; van Nimwegen, Erik; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2008-01-01

    Cloning and sequencing is the method of choice for small regulatory RNA identification. Using deep sequencing technologies one can now obtain up to a billion nucleotides--and tens of millions of small RNAs--from a single library. Careful computational analyses of such libraries enabled the discovery of miRNAs, rasiRNAs, piRNAs, and 21U RNAs. Given the large number of sequences that can be obtained from each individual sample, deep sequencing may soon become an alternative to oligonucleotide microarray technology for mRNA expression profiling. In this report we present the methods that we developed for the annotation and expression profiling of small RNAs obtained through large-scale sequencing. These include a fast algorithm for finding nearly perfect matches of small RNAs in sequence databases, a web-accessible software system for the annotation of small RNA libraries, and a Bayesian method for comparing small RNA expression across samples.

  15. Cloning and Sequencing the First HLA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Bertrand R.

    2010-01-01

    This Perspectives article recounts the isolation and sequencing of the first human histocompatibility gene (HLA) in 1980–1981. At the time, general knowledge of the molecules of the immune system was already fairly extensive, and gene rearrangements in the immunoglobulin complex (discovered in 1976) had generated much excitement: HLA was quite obviously the next frontier. The author was able to use a homologous murine H-2 cDNA to identify putative human HLA genomic clones in a λ-phage library and thus to isolate and sequence the first human histocompatibility gene. This personal account relates the steps that led to this result, describes the highly competitive international environment, and highlights the role of location, connections, and sheer luck in such an achievement. It also puts this work in perspective with a short description of the current knowledge of histocompatibility genes and, finally, presents some reflections on the meaning of “discovery.” PMID:20457890

  16. A Heideggerian defense of therapeutic cloning.

    PubMed

    Svenaeus, Fredrik

    2007-01-01

    Debates about the legitimacy of embryonic stem-cell research have largely focused on the type of ethical value that should be accorded to the human embryo in vitro. In this paper, I try to show that, to broaden the scope of these debates, one needs to articulate an ontology that does not limit itself to biological accounts, but that instead focuses on the embryo's place in a totality of relevance surrounding and guiding a human practice. Instead of attempting to substantiate the ethical value of the embryo exclusively by pointing out that it has potentiality for personhood, one should examine the types of practices in which the embryo occurs and focus on the ends inherent to these practices. With this emphasis on context, it becomes apparent that the embryo's ethical significance can only be understood by elucidating the attitudes that are established towards it in the course of specific activities. The distinction between fertilized embryos and cloned embryos proves to be important in this contextual analysis, since, from the point of view of practice, the two types of embryos appear to belong to different human practices: (assisted) procreation and medical research, respectively. In my arguments, I highlight the concepts of practice, technology, and nature, as they have been analyzed in the phenomenological tradition, particularly by Martin Heidegger. I come to the conclusion that therapeutic cloning should be allowed, provided that it turns out to be a project that benefits medical science in its aim to battle diseases. Important precautions have to be taken, however, in order to safeguard the practice of procreation from becoming perverted by the aims and attitudes of medical science when the two practices intersect. The threat in question needs to be taken seriously, since it concerns the structure and goal of practices which are central to our very self understanding as human beings.

  17. Visual clone identification of Penicillium commune isolates.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Michael Edberg; Lund, Flemming; Carstensen, Jens Michael

    2003-02-01

    A method for visual clone identification of Penicillium commune isolates was developed. The method is based on images of fungal colonies acquired after growth on a standard medium and involves a high degree of objectivity, which in future studies will make it possible for non-experts to perform a qualified identification of different species as well as clones within a species. A total of 77 P. commune isolates from a cheese dairy were 3-point inoculated on Yeast Extract Sucrose (YES) agar and incubated for 7 days at 25 degrees C. After incubation, the isolates were classified into groups containing the same genotype determined by DNA fingerprinting (AFLP). Each genotype also has a specific phenotype such as different colony colours. By careful image acquisition, colours were measured in a reproducible way. Prior to image analysis, each image was corrected with respect to colour, geometry and self-illumination, thereby gaining a set of directly comparable images. A method for automatic extraction of a given number of concentric regions was used. Using the positions of the regions, a number of relevant features--capturing colour and colour-texture from the surface of the fungal colonies--was extracted for further analysis. We introduced the Jeffreys-Matusitas (JM) distance between the feature distributions to express the similarity between regions in two colonies, and to evaluate the overall (weighted) similarity. The nearest neighbour (NN) classification rule was used. On a dataset from 137 isolates, we obtained a "leave-one-out" cross-validation identification rate of approximately 93-98% compared with the result of DNA fingerprinting.

  18. Cloning of Plasmodium falciparum by single-cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jun; Li, Xiaolian; Cui, Liwang

    2010-10-01

    Malaria parasite cloning is traditionally carried out mainly by using the limiting dilution method, which is laborious, imprecise, and unable to distinguish multiply-infected RBCs. In this study, we used a parasite engineered to express green fluorescent protein (GFP) to evaluate a single-cell sorting method for rapidly cloning Plasmodium falciparum. By dividing a two-dimensional scattergram from a cell sorter into 17 gates, we determined the parameters for isolating singly-infected erythrocytes and sorted them into individual cultures. Pre-gating of the engineered parasites for GFP allowed the isolation of almost 100% GFP-positive clones. Compared with the limiting dilution method, the number of parasite clones obtained by single-cell sorting was much higher. Molecular analyses showed that parasite isolates obtained by single-cell sorting were highly homogenous. This highly efficient single-cell sorting method should prove very useful for cloning both P. falciparum laboratory populations from genetic manipulation experiments and clinical samples.

  19. Positional cloning in maize (Zea mays subsp. mays, Poaceae)1

    PubMed Central

    Gallavotti, Andrea; Whipple, Clinton J.

    2015-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Positional (or map-based) cloning is a common approach to identify the molecular lesions causing mutant phenotypes. Despite its large and complex genome, positional cloning has been recently shown to be feasible in maize, opening up a diverse collection of mutants to molecular characterization. • Methods and Results: Here we outline a general protocol for positional cloning in maize. While the general strategy is similar to that used in other plant species, we focus on the unique resources and approaches that should be considered when applied to maize mutants. • Conclusions: Positional cloning approaches are appropriate for maize mutants and quantitative traits, opening up to molecular characterization the large array of genetic diversity in this agronomically important species. The cloning approach described should be broadly applicable to other species as more plant genomes become available. PMID:25606355

  20. Transplantation and differentiation of donor cells in the cloned pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Arata; Tomii, Ryo; Kano, Koichiro; Nagashima, Hiroshi . E-mail: hnagas@isc.meiji.ac.jp

    2006-06-02

    The application of nuclear transfer technology is an interesting approach to investigate stem and progenitor cell transplantation therapy. If stem cells are used as a nuclear donor, donor cells can engraft into cloned animals without histocompatible problems. However, it is still uncertain whether donor cells can engraft to cloned animal and differentiate in vivo. To address this problem, we transplanted donor cells to dermal tissues of cloned pigs developed by using preadipocytes as donor cells. Preadipocytes are adipocytic progenitor which can differentiate to mature adipocytes in vitro. We showed that the donor preadipocytes were successfully transplanted into the cloned pigs without immune rejection and they differentiated into mature adipocytes in vivo 3 weeks after transplantation. In contrast, allogenic control preadipocytes, which can differentiate in vitro, did not differentiate in vivo. These results indicate that donor progenitor cells can differentiate in cloned animal.

  1. The ethics of therapeutic and reproductive human cloning.

    PubMed

    Burley, J

    1999-06-01

    Neither therapeutic cloning nor reproductive cloning necessarily pose insurmountable ethical obstacles. Two defences of therapeutic cloning are considered. The first defence, the argument from property, is rejected because it entails morally counter-intuitive consequences. We should prefer a 'balance of reasons' defence which leaves room for the view that human life has intrinsic value. Reproductive cloning is best defended by an appeal to the right to procreative autonomy. The sorts of harms it is feared clones will suffer are also suffered by children conceived through natural means, even when these harms were preventable. The right to reproductive autonomy disallows state control of any form of reproduction for the reasons of child welfare discussed.

  2. [Human cloning in the activities of the European Union].

    PubMed

    Mik, C

    2001-01-01

    The European Union has been concerned with human cloning since the late 80. It resulted from inclusion of biotechnology into the sphere of European integration. The attitude of the European Union in the domain of human cloning was shaped, in principle in the second part of the 90. As the Community law stands at present, the European Union is not able to regulate all aspects of the cloning of human beings. It has no general power to decide in that sphere, especially, as far as bioethic aspects are concerned. The cloning of human beings in the European Union is understood as a process aiming at producing new human being, genetically identical with another live or dead human being. Thus the notion of human cloning is reduced to reproductive cloning. Three instruments are at the disposal of the European Union in the domain of human cloning. The first is prohibition of reproductive cloning as a general principle of Community law. However, that principle is not the result of judicial activity of the European Court of Justice (as general principles normally are), but the logical consequence of views formally expressed by the European Parliament, the Council of the Europe as well as the Commission. The principle was finally included in the Charter of fundamental rights of the European Union. The second instrument is an imperative prohibition of patent granting to biotechnological inventions on human reproductive cloning. Last, but not least, the Union applies a prohibition of financing scientific research connected with human cloning from the budget of the European Communities within the V Framework Programme in the field of research and technological development.

  3. Duration of gestation in pregnant dogs carrying cloned fetuses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Kim, Geon A; Park, Eun Jung; Jo, Young Kwang; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2013-01-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate gestation duration and the physiologic characteristics of pregnant dogs bearing cloned fetuses, especially in the prepartum period. A retrospective study was performed to compare gestation duration in females pregnant with cloned (somatic cell nuclear transfer) fetuses (cloned group) with those bearing noncloned fetuses (control group), and effects of litter size, birth weight, and breed of somatic cell donors on gestation duration in the cloned group were evaluated. Clinical delivery onset signs associated with serum progesterone concentration and rectal temperature were also compared in both groups. The gestation duration calculated from day of ovulation was significantly longer in the cloned (62.8 ± 0.3 days) versus the control group (60.9 ± 0.5 days; P < 0.001). There was a negative correlation between litter size and gestation duration including both groups (r = -0.59; P < 0.01), but there were no differences between birth weights or breed of cell donors and gestation duration in the cloned group. Even though the basal rectal temperature in the prepartum period was not different between control and cloned groups (36.9 ± 0.1 °C and 37.2 ± 0.1 °C, respectively), serum progesterone concentration on delivery day was significantly higher in the cloned group (2.2 ± 0.4 ng/ml) compared with the control group (0.5 ± 0.1 ng/ml; P < 0.05). The longer gestation duration of pregnant dogs bearing cloned fetuses might be because of the smaller litter size in this group. Also, the weaker drop in serum progesterone levels in the prepartum period in cloned dog pregnancies indicates that the parturition signaling process might be altered resulting in longer gestation periods.

  4. Cloning and characterization of the lectin cDNA clones from onion, shallot and leek.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Smeets, K; Engelborghs, I; Aelbers, H; Balzarini, J; Pusztai, A; van Leuven, F; Goldstein, I J; Peumans, W J

    1993-10-01

    Characterization of the lectins from onion (Allium cepa), shallot (A. ascalonicum) and leek (A. porrum) has shown that these lectins differ from previously isolated Alliaceae lectins not only in their molecular structure but also in their ability to inhibit retrovirus infection of target cells. cDNA libraries constructed from poly(A)-rich RNA isolated from young shoots of onion, shallot and leek were screened for lectin cDNA clones using colony hybridization. Sequence analysis of the lectin cDNA clones from these three species revealed a high degree of sequence similarity both at the nucleotide and at the amino acid level. Apparently the onion, shallot and leek lectins are translated from mRNAs of ca. 800 nucleotides. The primary translation products are preproproteins (ca. 19 kDa) which are converted into the mature lectin polypeptides (12.5-13 kDa) after post-translational modifications. Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA has shown that the lectins are most probably encoded by a family of closely related genes which is in good agreement with the sequence heterogeneity found between different lectin cDNA clones of one species.

  5. Reproductive cloning in humans and therapeutic cloning in primates: is the ethical debate catching up with the recent scientific advances?

    PubMed

    Camporesi, S; Bortolotti, L

    2008-09-01

    After years of failure, in November 2007 primate embryonic stem cells were derived by somatic cellular nuclear transfer, also known as therapeutic cloning. The first embryo transfer for human reproductive cloning purposes was also attempted in 2006, albeit with negative results. These two events force us to think carefully about the possibility of human cloning which is now much closer to becoming a reality. In this paper we tackle this issue from two sides, first summarising what scientists have achieved so far, then discussing some of the ethical arguments in favour and against human cloning which are debated in the context of policy making and public consultation. Therapeutic cloning as a means to improve and save lives has uncontroversial moral value. As to human reproductive cloning, we consider and assess some common objections and failing to see them as conclusive. We do recognise, though, that there will be problems at the level of policy and regulation that might either impair the implementation of human reproductive cloning or make its accessibility restricted in a way that could become difficult to justify on moral grounds. We suggest using the time still available before human reproductive cloning is attempted successfully to create policies and institutions that can offer clear directives on its legitimate applications on the basis of solid arguments, coherent moral principles, and extensive public consultation.

  6. Genome of Reticuloendotheliosis Virus: Characterization by Use of Cloned Proviral DNA

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Nancy R.; Hiebsch, Ronald R.; Gonda, Matthew A.; Bose, Henry R.; Gilden, Raymond V.

    1982-01-01

    Reticuloendotheliosis virus is an avian type C retrovirus that is capable of transforming fibroblasts and hematopoietic cells both in vivo and in vitro. This virus is highly related to the three other members of the reticuloendotheliosis virus group, including spleen necrosis virus, but it is apparently unrelated to the avian leukosis-sarcoma virus family. Previous studies have shown that it consists of a replication-competent helper virus (designated REV-A) and a defective component (designated REV) that is responsible for transformation. In this study we used restriction endonuclease mapping and heteroduplex analysis to characterize the proviral DNAs of REV-A and REV. Both producer and nonproducer transformed chicken spleen cells were used as sources of REV proviral DNA; this genome was mapped in detail, and fragments of it were cloned in λgtWES·λB. The infected canine thymus line Cf2Th(REV-A) was used as a source of REV-A proviral DNA. The restriction maps and heteroduplexes of the REV and REV-A genomes showed that (proceeding from 5′ to 3′) (i) REV contains a large fraction of the REV-A gag gene (assuming a gene order of gag-pol-env and gene sizes similar to those of other type C viruses), for the two genomes are very similar over a distance of 2.1 kilobases beginning at their 5′ termini; (ii) most or all of REV-A pol is deleted in REV; (iii) REV contains a 1.1 kilobase segment derived from the 3′ end of REV-A pol or the 5′ end of env or both; (iv) this env region in REV is followed by a 1.9-kilobase segment which is unrelated to REV-A; and (v) the helper-unrelated segment of REV extends essentially all of the way to the beginning of the 3′ long terminal repeat. Therefore, like avian myeloblastosis virus but unlike the other avian acute leukemia viruses and most mammalian and avian sarcoma viruses, REV appears to be an env gene recombinant. We also found that the REV-specific segment is derived from avian DNA, for a cloned REV fragment was able

  7. Comparison between Mother, ActiGraph wGT3X-BT, and a hand tally for measuring steps at various walking speeds under controlled conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rathleff, Camilla Rams; Kalstrup, Pernille Møller; Madsen, Niels Kragh; Pedersen, Elena Selmar; Pape-Haugaard, Louise Bilenberg; Villumsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Walking is endorsed as health enhancing and is the most common type of physical activity among older adults. Accelerometers are superior to self-reports when measuring steps, however, if they are to be used by clinicians the validity is of great importance. The aim of this study was to investigate the criterion validity of Mother and ActiGraph wGT3X-BT in measuring steps by comparing the devices to a hand tally under controlled conditions in healthy participants. Methods Thirty healthy participants were fitted with a belt containing the sensor of Mother (Motion Cookie) and ActiGraph. Participants walked on a treadmill for two minutes at each of the following speeds; 3.2, 4.8, and 6.4 km/h. The treadmill walking was video recorded and actual steps were subsequently determined by using a hand tally. Wilcoxon’s signed ranks test was used to determine whether Mother and ActiGraph measured an identical number of steps compared to the hand tally. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to determine the relationship and Root Mean Square error was calculated to investigate the average error between the devices and the hand tally. Percent differences (PD) were calculated for between-instrument agreement (Mother vs. the hand tally and ActiGraph vs. the hand tally) and PDs below 3% were interpreted as acceptable and clinically irrelevant. Results Mother and ActiGraph under-counted steps significantly compared to the hand tally at all walking speeds (p < 0.001). Mother had a median of total differences of 9.5 steps (IQR = 10) and ActiGraph 59 steps (IQR = 77). Mother had smaller PDs at all speeds especially at 3.2 km/h (2.5% compared to 26.7%). Mother showed excellent ICC values ≥0.88 (0.51–0.96) at all speeds whilst ActiGraph had poor and fair to good ICC values ranging from 0.03 (−0.09–0.21) at a speed of 3.2 km/h to 0.64 (0.16–0.84) at a speed of 6.4 km/h. Conclusion Mother provides valid measures of steps at walking speeds of 3.2, 4

  8. Mutagenesis of 8-oxoguanine adjacent to an abasic site in simian kidney cells: tandem mutations and enhancement of G-->T transversions.

    PubMed

    Kalam, M Abul; Basu, Ashis K

    2005-08-01

    Clustered DNA damages are well-established characteristics of ionizing radiation. As a model clustered lesion in the same strand of DNA, we have evaluated the mutagenic potential of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) adjacent to a uracil in simian kidney cells using a phagemid vector. The uracil residue would be excised by the enzyme uracil DNA glycosylase in vivo generating an abasic site (AP site). A solitary uracil in either GUGTC or GTGUC sequence context provided >60% progeny containing GTGTC indicating that dAMP incorporation opposite the AP site or uracil occurred, but a >30% population showed replacement of U by A, C, or G, which suggests that dTMP, dGMP, or dCMP incorporation also occurred, respectively, opposite the AP site. While the preference for targeted base substitutions at the GUG site was T > C > A > G, the same at the GUC site was T > A > C > G. We conclude that base incorporation opposite an AP site is sequence-dependent. For 8-oxoG, as compared to 23-24% G-->T mutants from a single 8-oxoG in a TG(8-oxo)T sequence context, the tandem lesions UG(8-oxo)T and TG(8-oxo)U generated approximately 60 and >85% progeny, respectively, that did not contain the TGT sequence. A significant fraction of tandem mutations were detected when uracil was adjacent to 8-oxoG. What we found most interesting is that the total targeted G(8-oxo)-->T transversions that included both single and tandem mutations at the TG(8-oxo)U site was nearly 60% relative to about 30% at the UG(8-oxo)T site. A higher mutational frequency at the TG(8-oxo)U sequence may arise from a change in DNA polymerase that is more error prone. Thermal melting experiments showed that the Tm for the 8-oxoG:C pair in the TG(8-oxo)(AP*) sequence in a 12-mer was lower than the same in a (AP*)G(8-oxo)T 12-mer with deltadeltaG 0.8 kcal/mol (where AP* represents tetrahydrofuran, the model abasic site). When the 8-oxoG:C pair in each sequence was compared with a 8-oxoG:A pair, the former was found to be more stable than

  9. Epigenetic regulation of genetic integrity is reprogrammed during cloning.

    PubMed

    Murphey, Patricia; Yamazaki, Yukiko; McMahan, C Alex; Walter, Christi A; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo; McCarrey, John R

    2009-03-24

    Cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) circumvents processes that normally function during gametogenesis to prepare the gamete genomes to support development of new progeny following fertilization. One such process is enhanced maintenance of genetic integrity in germ cells, such that germ cells typically carry fewer spontaneously acquired mutations than somatic cells in the same individual. Thus, embryos produced from somatic cells by SCNT could directly inherit more mutations than naturally conceived embryos. Alternatively, they could inherit epigenetic programming that predisposes more rapid accumulation of de novo mutations during development. We used a transgenic mouse system to test these possibilities by producing cloned midgestation mouse fetuses from three different donor somatic cell types carrying significantly different initial frequencies of spontaneous mutations. We found that on an individual locus basis, mutations acquired spontaneously in a population of donor somatic cells are not likely to be propagated to cloned embryos by SCNT. In addition, we found that the rate of accumulation of spontaneous mutations was similar in fetuses produced by either natural conception or cloning, indicating that cloned fetuses do not acquire mutations more rapidly than naturally conceived fetuses. These results represent the first direct demonstration that the process of cloning by SCNT does not lead to an increase in the frequency of point mutations. These results also demonstrate that epigenetic mechanisms normally contribute to the regulation of genetic integrity in a tissue-specific manner, and that these mechanisms are subject to reprogramming during cloning.

  10. Network cloning unfolds the effect of clustering on dynamical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faqeeh, Ali; Melnik, Sergey; Gleeson, James P.

    2015-05-01

    We introduce network L -cloning, a technique for creating ensembles of random networks from any given real-world or artificial network. Each member of the ensemble is an L -cloned network constructed from L copies of the original network. The degree distribution of an L -cloned network and, more importantly, the degree-degree correlation between and beyond nearest neighbors are identical to those of the original network. The density of triangles in an L -cloned network, and hence its clustering coefficient, is reduced by a factor of L compared to those of the original network. Furthermore, the density of loops of any fixed length approaches zero for sufficiently large values of L . Other variants of L -cloning allow us to keep intact the short loops of certain lengths. As an application, we employ these network cloning methods to investigate the effect of short loops on dynamical processes running on networks and to inspect the accuracy of corresponding tree-based theories. We demonstrate that dynamics on L -cloned networks (with sufficiently large L ) are accurately described by the so-called adjacency tree-based theories, examples of which include the message passing technique, some pair approximation methods, and the belief propagation algorithm used respectively to study bond percolation, SI epidemics, and the Ising model.

  11. Evidence for a human-specific Escherichia coli clone.

    PubMed

    Clermont, Olivier; Lescat, Mathilde; O'Brien, Claire L; Gordon, David M; Tenaillon, Olivier; Denamur, Erick

    2008-04-01

    Escherichia coli is a widespread commensal of the vertebrate intestinal tract. Until recently, no strong association between a particular clone and a given host species has been found. However, members of the B2 subgroup VIII clone with an O81 serotype appear to be human host specific. To determine the degree of host specificity exhibited by this clone, a PCR-based assay was used to screen 723 faecal and clinical isolates from humans, and 904 faecal isolates from animals. This clone was not detected among the animal isolates, but was discovered in people living in Africa, Europe and South America. The clone is rarely isolated from people suffering from intestinal or extraintestinal disease and is avirulent in a mouse model of extraintestinal infection. Fine-scale epidemiological analysis suggests that this clone is competitively dominant relative to other members of the B2 phylogenetic group and that it has increased in frequency over the past 20 years. This clone appears to be a good candidate for use as a probiotic, and may be suitable as an indicator of human faecal contamination in microbial source tracking studies.

  12. [Construction of directional T vector for gene cloning and expression].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xing; Zhai, Chao; Chen, Liang; Yu, Xiaolan; Jiang, Sijing; Yan, Hong; Yang, Dengxiang; Ma, Lixin

    2013-04-01

    Traditional T vector cloning method requires onerous procedures for identifying recombinant, and directional cloning was impossible. In order to overcome these problems, we have devised a directional T vector pETG based on pET-23a(+). For gene cloning, 7 bp partial LacO sequence was introduced into DNA fragment to reconstitute a full length LacO with Bfu I digested T vector. After transformation, blue colonies were selected on LB plate supplemented with X-gal. Restriction enzyme digestion and PCR identification showed that all blue colonies contained the directionally inserted recombinants and the recombinant efficiency was nearly 100%. We have successfully cloned 103 genes from human liver cDNA; in the study complicated procedures for screening of recombinant were not required. Eight pETG clones were picked for protein expression, and all the clones successfully produced corresponding proteins. We demonstrated that the directional T vector was successfully constructed, and it was very suitable for gene cloning and expression.

  13. Aberrant DNA methylation imprints in aborted bovine clones.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-He; Yin, Shen; Xiong, Bo; Hou, Yi; Chen, Da-Yuan; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2008-04-01

    Genomic imprinting plays a very important role during development and its abnormality may heavily undermine the developmental potential of bovine embryos. Because of limited resources of the cow genome, bovine genomic imprinting, both in normal development and in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning, is not well documented. DNA methylation is thought to be a major factor for the establishment of genomic imprinting. In our study, we determined the methylation status of differential methylated regions (DMRs) of four imprinted genes in four spontaneously aborted SCNT-cloned fetuses (AF). Firstly, abnormal methylation imprints were observed in each individual to different extents. In particular, Peg3 and MAOA were either seriously demethylated or showed aberrant methylation patterns in four aborted clones we tested, but Xist and Peg10 exhibited relatively better maintained methylation status in AF1 and AF4. Secondly, two aborted fetuses, AF2 and AF3 exhibited severe aberrant methylation imprints of four imprinted genes. Finally, MAOA showed strong heterogeneous methylation patterns of its DMR in normal somatic adult tissue, but largely variable methylation levels and relatively homogeneous methylation patterns in aborted cloned fetuses. Our data indicate that the aborted cloned fetuses exhibited abnormal methylation imprints, to different extent, in aborted clones, which partially account for the higher abortion and developmental abnormalities during bovine cloning.

  14. Somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning: practical applications and current legislation.

    PubMed

    Niemann, H; Lucas-Hahn, A

    2012-08-01

    Somatic cloning is emerging as a new biotechnology by which the opportunities arising from the advances in molecular genetics and genome analysis can be implemented in animal breeding. Significant improvements have been made in SCNT protocols in the past years which now allow to embarking on practical applications. The main areas of application of SCNT are: Reproductive cloning, therapeutic cloning and basic research. A great application potential of SCNT based cloning is the production of genetically modified (transgenic) animals. Somatic cell nuclear transfer based transgenic animal production has significant advances over the previously employed microinjection of foreign DNA into pronuclei of zygotes. This cell based transgenesis is compatible with gene targeting and allows both, the addition of a specific gene and the deletion of an endogenous gene. Efficient transgenic animal production provides numerous opportunities for agriculture and biomedicine. Regulatory agencies around the world have agreed that food derived from cloned animals and their offspring is safe and there is no scientific basis for questioning this. Commercial application of somatic cloning within the EU is via the Novel Food regulation EC No. 258/97. Somatic cloning raises novel questions regarding the ethical and moral status of animals and their welfare which has prompted a controversial discussion in Europe which has not yet been resolved.

  15. A strategy for clone selection under different production conditions.

    PubMed

    Legmann, Rachel; Benoit, Brian; Fedechko, Ronald W; Deppeler, Cynthia L; Srinivasan, Sriram; Robins, Russell H; McCormick, Ellen L; Ferrick, David A; Rodgers, Seth T; Russo, A Peter

    2011-01-01

    Top performing clones have failed at the manufacturing scale while the true best performer may have been rejected early in the screening process. Therefore, the ability to screen multiple clones in complex fed-batch processes using multiple process variations can be used to assess robustness and to identify critical factors. This dynamic ranking of clones' strategy requires the execution of many parallel experiments than traditional approaches. Therefore, this approach is best suited for micro-bioreactor models which can perform hundreds of experiments quickly and efficiently. In this study, a fully monitored and controlled small scale platform was used to screen eight CHO clones producing a recombinant monoclonal antibody across several process variations, including different feeding strategies, temperature shifts and pH control profiles. The first screen utilized 240 micro-bioreactors were run for two weeks for this assessment of the scale-down model as a high-throughput tool for clone evaluation. The richness of the outcome data enable to clearly identify the best and worst clone as well as process in term of maximum monoclonal antibody titer. The follow-up comparison study utilized 180 micro-bioreactors in a full factorial design and a subset of 12 clone/process combinations was selected to be run parallel in duplicate shake flasks. Good correlation between the micro-bioreactor predictions and those made in shake flasks with a Pearson correlation value of 0.94. The results also demonstrate that this micro-scale system can perform clone screening and process optimization for gaining significant titer improvements simultaneously. This dynamic ranking strategy can support better choices of production clones.

  16. Defective Chromatin Structure in Somatic Cell Cloned Mouse Embryos*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miao; Wang, Fengchao; Kou, Zhaohui; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Shaorong

    2009-01-01

    Epigenetic reprogramming plays a central role in the development of cloned embryos generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer, and it is believed that aberrant reprogramming leads to the abnormal development of most cloned embryos. Recent studies show that trimethylation of H3K27 (H3K27me3) contributes to the maintenance of embryonic stem cell pluripotency because the differentiation genes are always occupied by nucleosomes trimethylated at H3K27, which represses gene expression. Here, we provide evidence that differential H3K27me3 modification exists between normal fertilization-produced blastocysts and somatic cell nuclear transfer cloned blastocysts; H3K27me3 was specifically found in cells of the inner cell mass (ICM) of normal blastocysts, whereas there was no modification of H3K27me3 in the ICM of cloned blastocysts. Subsequently, we demonstrated that the differentiation-related genes, which are marked by H3K27me3 in embryonic stem cells, were expressed at significantly higher levels in cloned embryos than in normal embryos. The polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) component genes (Eed, Ezh2, and Suz12), which are responsible for the generation of H3K27me3, were expressed at lower levels in the cloned embryos. Our results suggest that reduced expression of PRC2 component genes in cloned embryos results in defective modification of H3K27me3 to the differentiation-related genes in pluripotent ICM cells. This results in premature expression of developmental genes and death of somatic cloned embryos shortly after implantation. Taken together, these studies suggest that H3K27me3 might be an important epigenetic marker with which to evaluate the developmental potential of cloned embryos. PMID:19602512

  17. Characterization of rat T-cell clones with bacterial specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Eastcott, J W; Yamashita, K; Taubman, M A; Smith, D J

    1990-01-01

    We have isolated 10 rat T-cell clones from the spleen or lymph nodes of seven different donors. These rats were immunized with 2-5 x 10(8) killed Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) bacteria, injected either subcutaneously (s.c.) in complete Freund's adjuvant or intraperitoneally (i.p.) in saline. Clones studied to date have demonstrated a T-helper (Th) phenotype W3/13+, W3/25+, OX8- and OX22-. Clones were not stimulated in vitro by purified Aa-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or heterologous Gram-negative bacteria, but proliferated when stimulated by bacteria representative of each of the three serological groups of Actinobacillus, indicating specificity for an Actinobacillus-common antigen other than LPS. One clone (A4) proliferated vigorously when stimulated with concanavalin A (Con A) in vitro, produced interleukin-2 (IL-2) and was provisionally classified as a Th1 type. This appears to be one of the few Th1-type rat clones reported. All other clones tested did not produce IL-2, exhibited B-cell help to some extent, did not induce delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) when injected into the footpads of naive rats along with the specific antigen, and were classified as Th2 type. Adoptive transfer of 10(6) cells of one Th2-type Aa-specific clone into syngeneic recipients resulted in a specific splenocyte in vitro response to Aa 12-14 weeks after cell transfer, indicating survival of cloned cells in recipient animals. The use of such clones in studies of experimental periodontal disease is discussed. PMID:1698711

  18. Semen and reproductive profiles of genetically identical cloned bulls.

    PubMed

    Tecirlioglu, R Tayfur; Cooney, Melissa A; Korfiatis, Natasha A; Hodgson, Renee; Williamson, Mark; Downie, Shara; Galloway, David B; French, Andrew J

    2006-06-01

    In this comparative study, reproductive parameters and semen characteristics of cloned bulls (n = 3) derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) were compared to their original cell donor Holstein-Friesian (n = 2) bulls from the same enterprise to assess the differences in reproductive potential between a donor bull and its clones. The parameters evaluated included motility of fresh, frozen-thawed and Percoll-treated frozen-thawed spermatozoa, as well as in vitro fertilization (IVF) ability, embryo quality, birth and survival of calves following IVF and embryo transfer with frozen-thawed semen. With fresh semen, spermatozoa from one cloned bull had lower motility than its donor. Cloned bulls had higher velocity parameters in fresh semen, but those effects were not obvious in frozen-thawed or frozen-thawed semen selected with a Percoll gradient. Semen collected from cloned bulls had significantly higher IVF rates compared to donors; however, embryo development per cleaved embryo or quality of blastocysts did not differ between donors and cloned bulls. Pregnancy and live offspring rates from one donor and its cloned bull did not differ between fresh (40%, 16/40 versus 46%, 17/37) and vitrified/thawed (13%, 2/16 versus 25%, 4/16) embryo transfer following IVF. A total of 26 calves were obtained from genotypically identical donor and cloned bulls with no signs of phenotypical abnormalities. These preliminary results suggested that the physiology of surviving postpubertal cloned bulls and quality of collected semen had equivalent reproductive potential to their original cell donor, with no evidence of any deleterious effects in their progeny.

  19. Analysis of aberrant splicing and nonsense-mediated decay of the stop codon mutations c.109G>T and c.504_505delCT in 7 patients with HMG-CoA lyase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Puisac, Beatriz; Teresa-Rodrigo, María Esperanza; Arnedo, María; Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepción; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Ribes, Antonia; Pié, Angeles; Bueno, Gloria; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Pié, Juan

    2013-04-01

    Eukaryotic cells can be protected against mutations that generate stop codons by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and/or nonsense-associated altered splicing (NAS). However, the processes are only partially understood and do not always occur. In this work, we study these phenomena in the stop codon mutations c.109G>T (p.Glu37*) and c.504_505delCT; the second and third most frequent mutations in HMG-CoA lyase deficiency (MIM #246450). The deficiency affects the synthesis of ketone bodies and produces severe disorders during early childhood. We used a minigene approach, real-time quantitative PCR and the inhibition of NMD by puromycin treatment, to study the effect of stop codons on splicing (NAS) and NMD in seven patients. Surprisingly, none of the stop codons studied appears to be the direct cause of aberrant splicing. In the mutation c.109G>T, the splicing is due to the base change G>T at position 109, which is critical and cannot be explained by disruption of exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) elements, by the appearance of exonic splicing silencer (ESS) elements which were predicted by bioinformatic tools or by the stop codons. Moreover, the mutation c.504_505delCT produces two mRNA transcripts both with stop codons that generate simultaneous NMD phenomena. The effects of the mutations studied on splicing seemed to be similar in all the patients. Furthermore, we report a Spanish patient with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria and a novel missense mutation: c.825C>G (p.Asn275Lys).

  20. Lack of association between interleukin 28B gene polymorphisms (rs8099917G/T, rs12979860 C/T) and susceptibility to chronic hepatitis C virus infection, Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Karkhane, Maryam; Mohebbi, Seyed Reza; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Saeedi Niasar, Mahsa; Sarbazi, Mohamad Reza; Sharifian, Afsaneh; Alizadeh, Afshin Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Chronic Hepatitis C infection is a critical health problem worldwide, which caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV). Interleukin 28B (IL28B) is a determinant factor in disease progression and also susceptibility to chronic HCV infection. Background: The most significant aim of this study is to analyze the association between IL28B gene polymorphisms with susceptibility to chronic HCV infection in Iranian population. Methods: This study follows a case- control study design, in which, 288 patients with chronic hepatitis C and 250 healthy individuals were genotyped for IL28B polymorphisms (rs12979860 C/T and rs8099917 G/T). Studied population collected from Taleghani Haospital, Tehran. Genotyping of IL28B gene polymorphisms were performed using PCR-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. 10 percent of the studied population was sequenced to validate the results. Results: rs8099917 G/T and rs12979860 C/T were differently distributed in hepatitis C patients and healthy controls in the female gender. TT, TG and GG genotypes distribution in the female gender were 56.7%, 39.8% and 4.5% in cases and 67%, 31.6% and 1.4% in controls (p=0.54). Also CC, CT and TT genotypes distribution were 31.8%, 61.4% and 6.8% in cases and 51.7%, 44.9% and 3.4% in controls (p=0.2). However, there was no significant difference in the allelic frequency and genotype distribution of rs12979860 C/T and rs8099917 T/G in both HCV patients with genotype 1a and 3a. Conclusion: It seems that rs8099917 G/T polymorphism plays a significant role in susceptibility to chronic HCV infection in Iranian population. On the other hand, no association was found between rs12979860 C/T polymorphisms and chronic hepatitis C. PMID:28224025

  1. 17beta-estradiol at physiological concentrations augments Ca(2+) -activated K+ currents via estrogen receptor beta in the gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuronal cell line GT1-7.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Ichiro; Ui-Tei, Kumiko; Saigo, Kaoru; Ishii, Hirotaka; Sakuma, Yasuo; Kato, Masakatsu

    2008-02-01

    Estrogens play essential roles in the neuroendocrine control of reproduction. In the present study, we focused on the effects of 17beta-estradiol (E2) on the K(+) currents that regulate neuronal cell excitability and carried out perforated patch-clamp experiments with the GnRH-secreting neuronal cell line GT1-7. We revealed that a 3-d incubation with E2 at physiological concentrations (100 pm to 1 nm) augmented Ca(2+)-activated K(+) [K(Ca)] currents without influencing Ca(2+)-insensitive voltage-gated K(+) currents in GT1-7 cells. Acute application of E2 (1 nm) had no effect on the either type of K(+) current. The augmentation was completely blocked by an estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist, ICI-182,780. An ERbeta-selective agonist, 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile, augmented the K(Ca) currents, although an ERalpha-selective agonist, 4,4',4''-[4-propyl-(1H)-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl]tris-phenol, had no effect. Knockdown of ERbeta by means of RNA interference blocked the effect of E2 on the K(Ca) currents. Furthermore, semiquantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the levels of BK channel subunit mRNAs for alpha and beta4 were significantly increased by incubating cells with 300 pm E2 for 3 d. In conclusion, E2 at physiological concentrations augments K(Ca) currents through ERbeta in the GT1-7 GnRH neuronal cell line and increases the expression of the BK channel subunit mRNAs, alpha and beta4.

  2. Probabilistically Perfect Cloning of Two Pure States: Geometric Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerokhin, V.; Shehu, A.; Feldman, E.; Bagan, E.; Bergou, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    We solve the long-standing problem of making n perfect clones from m copies of one of two known pure states with minimum failure probability in the general case where the known states have arbitrary a priori probabilities. The solution emerges from a geometric formulation of the problem. This formulation reveals that cloning converges to state discrimination followed by state preparation as the number of clones goes to infinity. The convergence exhibits a phenomenon analogous to a second-order symmetry-breaking phase transition.

  3. Characteristics of cloned repeated DNA sequences in the barley genome

    SciTech Connect

    Anan'ev, E.V.; Bochkanov, S.S.; Ryzhik, M.V.; Sonina, N.V.; Chernyshev, A.I.; Shchipkova, N.I.; Yakovleva, E.Yu.

    1986-12-01

    A partial clone library of barley DNA fragments based on plasmid pBR325 was created. The cloned EcoRI-fragments of chromosomal DNA are from 2 to 14 kbp in length. More than 95% of the barley DNA inserts comprise repeated sequences of different complexity and copy number. Certain of these DNA sequences are from families comprising at least 1% of the barley genome. A significant proportion of the clones hybridize with numerous sets of restriction fragments of genome DNA and they are dispersed throughout the barley chromosomes.

  4. Cloning for therapeutic purposes: ethical and policy considerations.

    PubMed

    Hanson, M J

    2001-01-01

    This essay reviews how cloning techniques may be used for therapeutic purposes, analyzes ethical implications, and makes recommendations for public policy discourse. Although cloning may bring many potential benefits, they remain uncertain. Furthermore, human embryo research is morally problematic. Therefore, alternatives to human cloning for therapeutic aims should be sought at present. In addition to central ethical issues, public discourse should maintain an emphasis on the value of the human embryo over scientific expediency, the relativity of health, and the principle of justice. Society should support the laudable mission of medical research, while also attending to the moral concerns often threatened by the promises of scientific progress.

  5. Molecular genetics: DNA analysis of a putative dog clone.

    PubMed

    Parker, Heidi G; Kruglyak, Leonid; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2006-03-09

    In August 2005, Lee et al. reported the first cloning of a domestic dog from adult somatic cells. This putative dog clone was the result of somatic-cell nuclear transfer from a fibroblast cell of a three-year-old male Afghan hound into a donor oocyte provided by a dog of mixed breed. In light of recent concerns regarding the creation of cloned human cell lines from the same institution, we have undertaken an independent test to determine the validity of the claims made by Lee et al..

  6. Creating Fido's twin: can pet cloning be ethically justified?

    PubMed

    Fiester, Autumn

    2005-01-01

    Taken at face value, pet cloning may seem at best a frivolous practice, costly both to the cloned pet's health and its owner's pocket. At worst, its critics say, it is misguided and unhealthy--a way of exploiting grief to the detriment of the animal, its owner, and perhaps even animal welfare in general. But if the great pains we are willing to take to clone Fido raise the status of companion animals in the public eye, then the practice might be defensible.

  7. Realization of the optimal phase-covariant quantum cloning machine

    SciTech Connect

    Sciarrino, Fabio; De Martini, Francesco

    2005-12-15

    In several quantum information (QI) phenomena of large technological importance the information is carried by the phase of the quantum superposition states, or qubits. The phase-covariant cloning machine (PQCM) addresses precisely the problem of optimally copying these qubits with the largest attainable 'fidelity'. We present a general scheme which realizes the 1{yields}3 phase covariant cloning process by a combination of three different QI processes: the universal cloning, the NOT gate, and the projection over the symmetric subspace of the output qubits. The experimental implementation of a PQCM for polarization encoded qubits, the first ever realized with photons, is reported.

  8. Efficient preparation of shuffled DNA libraries through recombination (Gateway) cloning.

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, Soili I; Taskinen, Barbara; Ojala, Elina; Kukkurainen, Sampo; Rahikainen, Rolle; Riihimäki, Tiina A; Laitinen, Olli H; Kulomaa, Markku S; Hytönen, Vesa P

    2015-01-01

    Efficient and robust subcloning is essential for the construction of high-diversity DNA libraries in the field of directed evolution. We have developed a more efficient method for the subcloning of DNA-shuffled libraries by employing recombination cloning (Gateway). The Gateway cloning procedure was performed directly after the gene reassembly reaction, without additional purification and amplification steps, thus simplifying the conventional DNA shuffling protocols. Recombination-based cloning, directly from the heterologous reassembly reaction, conserved the high quality of the library and reduced the time required for the library construction. The described method is generally compatible for the construction of DNA-shuffled gene libraries.

  9. Cloning mice and ES cells by nuclear transfer from somatic stem cells and fully differentiated cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongde

    2011-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer (NT) has been successful in several mammalian species. In addition to cloning live animals (reproductive cloning), this technique has also been used in several species to establish cloned embryonic stem (ntES) cell lines from somatic cells. It is the latter application of this technique that has been heralded as being the potential means to produce isogenic embryonic stem cells from patients for cell therapy (therapeutic cloning). These two types of cloning differ only in the steps after cloned embryos are produced: for reproductive cloning the cloned embryos are transferred to surrogate mothers to allow them to develop to full term and for therapeutic cloning the cloned embryos are used to derive ntES cells. In this chapter, a detailed NT protocol in mouse by using somatic stem cells (neuron and skin stem cells) and fully differentiated somatic cells (cumulus cells and fibroblast cells) as nuclear donors is described.

  10. Rescue of measles viruses from cloned DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Radecke, F; Spielhofer, P; Schneider, H; Kaelin, K; Huber, M; Dötsch, C; Christiansen, G; Billeter, M A

    1995-01-01

    A system has been established allowing the rescue of replicating measles viruses (MVs) from cloned DNA. On one hand, plasmids were constructed from which MV antigenomic RNAs with the correct termini are transcribed by phage T7 RNA polymerase. On the other hand, helper cells derived from the human embryonic kidney 293 cell line were generated constitutively expressing T7 RNA polymerase together with MV nucleocapsid protein and phosphoprotein. Simultaneous transfection of the helper cells with the MV antigenomic plasmid and with a plasmid encoding the MV polymerase under direction of a T7 promoter led to formation of syncytia from which MVs were easily recovered. A genetic tag comprising three nucleotide changes was present in the progeny virus. As a first application of reverse genetics, a segment of 504 nucleotides from the 5' non-coding region of the fusion gene was deleted, leading to an MV variant whose replication behaviour in Vero cells was indistinguishable from that of the laboratory Edmonston B strain. Since no helper virus is involved, this system, in principle, should be applicable to the rescue of any member of the large virus order Mononegavirales, i.e. viruses with a nonsegmented negative-strand RNA genome. Images PMID:8846771

  11. Cloning systems for Rhodococcus and related bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Finnerty, W.R.; Singer, M.E.

    1990-08-28

    A plasmid transformation system for Rhodococcus was developed using an Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle plasmid. Rhodococcus sp. H13-A contains three cryptic indigenous plasmids, designated pMVS100, pMVS200 and pMVS300, of 75, 19.5 and 13.4 kilobases (Kb), respectively. A 3.8 Kb restriction fragment of pMVS300 was cloned into pIJ30, a 6.3 Kb pBR322 derivative, containing the E. coli origin of replication (ori) and ampicillin resistance determinant (bla) as well as a Streptomyces gene for thiostrepton resistance, tsr. The resulting 10.1 Kb recombinant plasmid, designated pMVS301, was isolated from E. coli DH1 (pMVS301) and transformed into Rhodococcus sp. AS-50, a derivative of strain H13-A, by polyethylene glycol-assisted transformation of Rhodococcus protoplasts and selection for thiostrepton-resistant transformants. This strain was deposited with the ATCC on Feb. 1, 1988 and assigned ATCC 53719. The plasmid contains the Rhodococcus origin of replication. The plasmid and derivatives thereof can therefore be used to introduce nucleic acid sequences to and from Rhodococcus for subsequent expression and translation into protein. The isolated origin of replication can also be used in the construction of new vectors. 2 figs.

  12. Cloning systems for Rhodococcus and related bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Finnerty, William R.; Singer, Mary E.

    1990-01-01

    A plasmid transformation system for Rhodococcus was developed using an Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle plasmid. Rhodococcus sp. H13-A contains three cryptic indigenous plasmids, designated pMVS100, pMVS200 and pMVS300, of 75, 19.5 and 13.4 kilobases (Kb), respectively. A 3.8 Kb restriction fragment of pMVS300 was cloned into pIJ30, a 6.3 Kb pBR322 derivative, containing the E. coli origin of replication (ori) and ampicillin resistance determinant (bla) as well as a Streptomyces gene for thiostrepton resistance, tsr. The resulting 10.1 Kb recombinant plasmid, designated pMVS301, was isolated from E. coli DH1 (pMVS301) and transformed into Rhodococcus sp. AS-50, a derivative of strain H13-A, by polyethylene glycol-assisted transformation of Rhodococcus protoplasts and selection for thiostrepton-resistant transformants. This strain was deposited with the ATCC on Feb. 1, 1988 and assigned ATCC 53719. The plasmid contains the Rhodococcus origin of replication. The plasmid and derivatives thereof can therefore be used to introduce nucleic acid sequences to and from Rhodococcus for subsequent expression and translation into protein. The isolated origin of replication can also be used in the construction of new vectors.

  13. Molecular cloning and in vitro expression of a cDNA clone for human cellular tumor antigen p53.

    PubMed Central

    Harlow, E; Williamson, N M; Ralston, R; Helfman, D M; Adams, T E

    1985-01-01

    Three clones for the human tumor antigen p53 were isolated from a cDNA library prepared from A431 cells. One of these clones, pR4-2, contains the entire coding region for human p53. This clone directs the synthesis of a polypeptide with the correct molecular weight and immunological epitopes of an authentic p53 molecule in an in vitro transcription-translation reaction. Although the pR4-2 clone contains the coding region for p53, it is not a full-length copy of the human p53 mRNA. Northern analysis showed that the p53 mRNA is approximately 2,500 nucleotides long, whereas the pR4-2 insert is only 1,760 base pairs in length. Analysis of the DNA sequence of this clone suggests that the human p53 polypeptide has 393 amino acids. We compared the predicted amino acid sequence of the pR4-2 clone with similar clones for the mouse p53 and found long regions of amino acid homology between these two molecules. Images PMID:3894933

  14. Ultra-sensitive detection of rare T cell clones.

    PubMed

    Robins, Harlan; Desmarais, Cindy; Matthis, Jessica; Livingston, Robert; Andriesen, Jessica; Reijonen, Helena; Carlson, Christopher; Nepom, Gerold; Yee, Cassian; Cerosaletti, Karen

    2012-01-31

    Advances in high-throughput sequencing have enabled technologies that probe the adaptive immune system with unprecedented depth. We have developed a multiplex PCR method to sequence tens of millions of T cell receptors (TCRs) from a single sample in a few days. A method is presented to test the precision, accuracy, and sensitivity of this assay. T cell clones, each with one fixed productive TCR rearrangement, are doped into complex blood cell samples. TCRs from a total of eleven samples are sequenced, with the doped T cell clones ranging from 10% of the total sample to 0.001% (one cell in 100,000). The assay is able to detect even the rarest clones. The precision of the assay is demonstrated across five orders of magnitude. The accuracy for each clone is within an overall factor of three across the 100,000 fold dynamic range. Additionally, the assay is shown to be highly repeatable.

  15. Proteomic analysis of pancreas derived from adult cloned pig

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Jung-Il; Cho, Young Keun; Cho, Seong-Keun; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Han, Yong-Mahn; Koo, Deog-Bon Lee, Kyung-Kwang

    2008-02-08

    The potential medical applications of animal cloning include xenotransplantation, but the complex molecular cascades that control porcine organ development are not fully understood. Still, it has become apparent that organs derived from cloned pigs may be suitable for transplantation into humans. In this study, we examined the pancreas of an adult cloned pig developed through somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and Western blotting. Proteomic analysis revealed 69 differentially regulated proteins, including such apoptosis-related species as annexins, lamins, and heat shock proteins, which were unanimously upregulated in the SCNT sample. Among the downregulated proteins in SCNT pancreas were peroxiredoxins and catalase. Western blot results indicate that several antioxidant enzymes and the anti-apoptotic protein were downregulated in SCNT pancreas, whereas several caspases were upregulated. Together, these data suggest that the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pancreas of an adult cloned pig leads to apoptosis.

  16. Flux Cloning Anomalities in Josephson Nano-Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Hanaa Farhan; Kusmartsev, Feo V.

    2010-12-01

    The propagation of single flux quanta in T-shaped Josephson junctions gives rise to the flux cloning phenomenon. We have studied numerically the dynamics of flux cloning in cases of extended Josephson junctions. The changing thicknesses of T-junctions lead to new and interesting effects in terms of their dynamics. We have found out that when an additional Josephson transmission line is larger than the main Josephson transmission line, numerical simulations do not show the cloning phenomenon and soliton is reflected when it approaches the T junction. This strange result may be happened because the soliton losses more energy in the sharp edge. Although the vortex is moving very highly and it has huge energy but it still does not give birth to a new vortex. We have investigated conditions at which flux cloning occurs when both widths, W and W0, are changing.

  17. Flux Cloning Anomalities in Josephson Nano-Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Hanaa Farhan; Kusmartsev, Feo V.

    The propagation of single flux quanta in T-shaped Josephson junctions gives rise to the flux cloning phenomenon. We have studied numerically the dynamics of flux cloning in cases of extended Josephson junctions. The changing thicknesses of T-junctions lead to new and interesting effects in terms of their dynamics. We have found out that when an additional Josephson transmission line is larger than the main Josephson transmission line, numerical simulations do not show the cloning phenomenon and soliton is reflected when it approaches the T junction. This strange result may be happened because the soliton losses more energy in the sharp edge. Although the vortex is moving very highly and it has huge energy but it still does not give birth to a new vortex. We have investigated conditions at which flux cloning occurs when both widths, W and W0, are changing.

  18. Learning, memory and exploratory similarities in genetically identical cloned dogs

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Chi Won; Kim, Geon A; Park, Won Jun; Park, Kwan Yong; Jeon, Jeong Min; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min Jung

    2016-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer allows generation of genetically identical animals using donor cells derived from animals with particular traits. To date, few studies have investigated whether or not these cloned dogs will show identical behavior patterns. To address this question, learning, memory and exploratory patterns were examined using six cloned dogs with identical nuclear genomes. The variance of total incorrect choice number in the Y-maze test among cloned dogs was significantly lower than that of the control dogs. There was also a significant decrease in variance in the level of exploratory activity in the open fields test compared to age-matched control dogs. These results indicate that cloned dogs show similar cognitive and exploratory patterns, suggesting that these behavioral phenotypes are related to the genotypes of the individuals. PMID:27030191

  19. Analysis of chromosome 21 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones

    SciTech Connect

    Tassone, F. A. Gemelli School of Medicine, Rome ); Cheng, S.; Gardiner, K. )

    1992-12-01

    Chromosome 21 contains genes relevant to several important diseases. Yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones, because they span >100 kbp, will provide attractive material for initiating searches for such genes. Twenty-two YAC clones, each of which maps to a region of potential relevance either to aspects of the Down syndrome phenotype or to one of the other chromosome 21-associated genetic diseases, have been analyzed in detail. Clones total [approximately]6,000 kb and derive from all parts of the long arm. Rare restriction-site maps have been constructed for each clone and have been used to determine regional variations in clonability, methylation frequency, CpG island density, and CpG island frequency versus gene density. This information will be useful for the isolation and mapping of new genes to chromosome 21 and for walking in YAC libraries. 48 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Sex-reversed somatic cell cloning in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kimiko; Ogonuki, Narumi; Mekada, Kazuyuki; Yoshiki, Atsushi; Sado, Takashi; Ogura, Atsuo

    2009-10-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer has many potential applications in the fields of basic and applied sciences. However, it has a disadvantage that can never be overcome technically-the inflexibility of the sex of the offspring. Here, we report an accidental birth of a female mouse following nuclear transfer using an immature Sertoli cell. We produced a batch of 27 clones in a nuclear transfer experiment using Sertoli cells collected from neonatal male mice. Among them, one pup was female. This "male-derived female" clone grew into a normal adult and produced offspring by natural mating with a littermate. Chromosomal analysis revealed that the female clone had a 39,X karyotype, indicating that the Y chromosome had been deleted in the donor cell or at some early step during nuclear transfer. This finding suggests the possibility of resuming sexual reproduction after a single male is cloned, which should be especially useful for reviving extinct or endangered species.

  1. Analysis of chromosome 21 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones.

    PubMed Central

    Tassone, F; Cheng, S; Gardiner, K

    1992-01-01

    Chromosome 21 contains genes relevant to several important diseases. Yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) clones, because they span > 100 kbp, will provide attractive material for initiating searches for such genes. Twenty-two YAC clones, each of which maps to a region of potential relevance either to aspects of the Down syndrome phenotype or to one of the other chromosome 21-associated genetic diseases, have been analyzed in detail. Clones total approximately 6,000 kb and derive from all parts of the long arm. Rare restriction-site maps have been constructed for each clone and have been used to determine regional variations in clonability, methylation frequency, CpG island density, and CpG island frequency versus gene density. This information will be useful for the isolation and mapping of new genes to chromosome 21 and for walking in YAC libraries. Images Figure 2 Figure 1 PMID:1463009

  2. Islamic perspective on human cloning and stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Larijani, B; Zahedi, F

    2004-12-01

    Recent advances in the field of cloning and stem cell research have introduced new hope for treatment of serious diseases. But this promise has been accompanied by enormous questions. Currently, cloning is a matter of public discussion. It is rare that a field of science causes debate and challenge not only among scientists but also among ethicists, religious scholars, governments, and politicians. One important concern is religious arguments. Various religions have different attitudes toward the morality of these subjects; even within a particular religious tradition there is a diversity of opinions. The following article briefly reviews Islamic perspectives about reproductive/therapeutic cloning and stem cell research. The majority of Muslim jurists distinguish between reproductive and therapeutic cloning. The moral status of the human embryo, the most sensitive and disputed point in this debate, is also discussed according to Holy Quran teachings.

  3. A review of Greek law on human cloning.

    PubMed

    Mavroforou, Anna; Giannoukas, Athanasios; Michalodimitrakis, Emmanuel

    2003-01-01

    The creation of Dolly, a cloned lamb from adult cells was a major scientific breakthrough, which opened new avenues for many research fields such as reproductive medicine, transplantation and biotechnology. However this achievement brought to public attention the theoretical possibility of human reproductive cloning. Inevitably heated debate occurred on several ethical and legal consequences of the prospect of human cloning. At the present time there is no legal framework in any country to respond to this challenge in a pragmatic way in order to protect human rights and at the same time to allow science to work for the best interests of mankind. Greece is a European Union country with its own traditions, history, culture and beliefs but without political and legislative experience in the handling of medical and biotechnological matters. This paper aims to discuss the legal issues likely to be raised by the prospect of human reproductive cloning in relation to the current state of the Greek legal system.

  4. Recent advancements in cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Atsuo; Inoue, Kimiko; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is the sole reproductive engineering technology that endows the somatic cell genome with totipotency. Since the first report on the birth of a cloned sheep from adult somatic cells in 1997, many technical improvements in SCNT have been made by using different epigenetic approaches, including enhancement of the levels of histone acetylation in the chromatin of the reconstructed embryos. Although it will take a considerable time before we fully understand the nature of genomic programming and totipotency, we may expect that somatic cell cloning technology will soon become broadly applicable to practical purposes, including medicine, pharmaceutical manufacturing and agriculture. Here we review recent progress in somatic cell cloning, with a special emphasis on epigenetic studies using the laboratory mouse as a model. PMID:23166393

  5. Learning, memory and exploratory similarities in genetically identical cloned dogs.

    PubMed

    Shin, Chi Won; Kim, Geon A; Park, Won Jun; Park, Kwan Yong; Jeon, Jeong Min; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2016-12-30

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer allows generation of genetically identical animals using donor cells derived from animals with particular traits. To date, few studies have investigated whether or not these cloned dogs will show identical behavior patterns. To address this question, learning, memory and exploratory patterns were examined using six cloned dogs with identical nuclear genomes. The variance of total incorrect choice number in the Y-maze test among cloned dogs was significantly lower than that of the control dogs. There was also a significant decrease in variance in the level of exploratory activity in the open fields test compared to age-matched control dogs. These results indicate that cloned dogs show similar cognitive and exploratory patterns, suggesting that these behavioral phenotypes are related to the genotypes of the individuals.

  6. Quantum cloning attacks against PUF-based quantum authentication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Gao, Ming; Li, Mo; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    With the advent of physical unclonable functions (PUFs), PUF-based quantum authentication systems have been proposed for security purposes, and recently, proof-of-principle experiment has been demonstrated. As a further step toward completing the security analysis, we investigate quantum cloning attacks against PUF-based quantum authentication systems and prove that quantum cloning attacks outperform the so-called challenge-estimation attacks. We present the analytical expression of the false-accept probability by use of the corresponding optimal quantum cloning machines and extend the previous results in the literature. In light of these findings, an explicit comparison is made between PUF-based quantum authentication systems and quantum key distribution protocols in the context of cloning attacks. Moreover, from an experimental perspective, a trade-off between the average photon number and the detection efficiency is discussed in detail.

  7. Recent advancements in cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Atsuo; Inoue, Kimiko; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-05

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is the sole reproductive engineering technology that endows the somatic cell genome with totipotency. Since the first report on the birth of a cloned sheep from adult somatic cells in 1997, many technical improvements in SCNT have been made by using different epigenetic approaches, including enhancement of the levels of histone acetylation in the chromatin of the reconstructed embryos. Although it will take a considerable time before we fully understand the nature of genomic programming and totipotency, we may expect that somatic cell cloning technology will soon become broadly applicable to practical purposes, including medicine, pharmaceutical manufacturing and agriculture. Here we review recent progress in somatic cell cloning, with a special emphasis on epigenetic studies using the laboratory mouse as a model.

  8. Optimal multicopy asymmetric Gaussian cloning of coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Fiurasek, Jaromir; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2007-05-15

    We investigate the asymmetric Gaussian cloning of coherent states which produces M copies from N input replicas in such a way that the fidelity of each copy may be different. We show that the optimal asymmetric Gaussian cloning can be performed with a single phase-insensitive amplifier and an array of beam splitters. We obtain a simple analytical expression characterizing the set of optimal asymmetric Gaussian cloning machines and prove the optimality of these cloners using the formalism of Gaussian completely positive maps and semidefinite programming techniques. We also present an alternative implementation of the asymmetric cloning machine where the phase-insensitive amplifier is replaced with a beam splitter, heterodyne detector, and feedforward.

  9. Variation among matsutake ectomycorrhizae in four clones of Pinus sylvestris.

    PubMed

    Vaario, Lu-Min; Lu, Jinrong; Koistinen, Arto; Tervahauta, Arja; Aronen, Tuija

    2015-04-01

    Tricholoma matsutake is an ectomycorrhizal fungus that forms commercially important mushrooms in coniferous forests. In this study, we explored the ability of T. matsutake to form mycorrhizae with Pinus sylvestris by inoculating emblings produced through somatic embryogenesis (SE) in an aseptic culture system. Two months after inoculation, clones with less phenolic compounds in the tissue culture phase formed mycorrhizae with T. matsutake, while clones containing more phenols did not. Effects of inoculation on embling growth varied among clones; two of the four tested showed a significant increase in biomass and two had a significant increase in root density. In addition, results suggest that clones forming well-developed mycorrhizae absorbed more Al, Fe, Na, P, and Zn after 8 weeks of inoculation. This study illustrates the value of SE materials in experimental work concerning T. matsutake as well as the role played by phenolic compounds in host plant response to infection by mycorrhizal fungi.

  10. Expression Cloning of the High Affinity Choline Transporter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-05

    clones. It encodes a GABA transporter that we found to be localized to the glial cells of the purely cholinergic electromotor nucleus of Torpedo. In a...expression cloning approach employing frog oocytes and mRNA from Torpedo C.B. Gundersen electromotor nucleus to isolate a choline transporter cDNA...The rationale for this is that the electromotor neurons should harbor one of the highest abundances of choline transporter mRNA in the animal kingdom

  11. Cloning of a hemolysin gene from Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo.

    PubMed Central

    del Real, G; Segers, R P; van der Zeijst, B A; Gaastra, W

    1989-01-01

    A DNA fragment encoding both hemolysin and sphingomyelinase C activity was cloned from the pathogenic bacterium Leptospira interrogans serovar hardjo. Initial clones were obtained by screening a genomic library in EMBL3 for hemolytic activity. Both hemolytic and sphingomyelinase C activities were coded for by a 3.9-kilobase BamHI fragment. The hemolysin was expressed from its own promoter in Escherichia coli K-12. Similar DNA sequences were also present in the serovars tarassovi and ballum. Images PMID:2744864

  12. The global governance of human cloning: the case of UNESCO

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, Adèle

    2017-01-01

    Since Dolly the Sheep was cloned in 1996, the question of whether human reproductive cloning should be banned or pursued has been the subject of international debate. Feelings run strong on both sides. In 2005, the United Nations adopted its Declaration on Human Cloning to try to deal with the issue. The declaration is ambiguously worded, prohibiting “all forms of human cloning inasmuch as they are incompatible with human dignity and the protection of human life”. It received only ambivalent support from UN member states. Given this unsatisfactory outcome, in 2008 UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) set up a Working Group to investigate the possibility of a legally binding convention to ban human reproductive cloning. The Working Group was made up of members of the International Bioethics Committee, established in 1993 as part of UNESCO’s Bioethics Programme. It found that the lack of clarity in international law is unhelpful for those states yet to formulate national regulations or policies on human cloning. Despite this, member states of UNESCO resisted the idea of a convention for several years. This changed in 2015, but there has been no practical progress on the issue. Drawing on official records and first-hand observations at bioethics meetings, this article examines the human cloning debate at UNESCO from 2008 onwards, thus building on and advancing current scholarship by applying recent ideas on global governance to an empirical case. It concludes that, although human reproductive cloning is a challenging subject, establishing a robust global governance framework in this area may be possible via an alternative deliberative format, based on knowledge sharing and feasibility testing rather than the interest-based bargaining that is common to intergovernmental organizations and involving a wide range of stakeholders. This article is published as part of a collection on global governance. PMID:28382210

  13. The global governance of human cloning: the case of UNESCO.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Adèle

    2017-03-21

    Since Dolly the Sheep was cloned in 1996, the question of whether human reproductive cloning should be banned or pursued has been the subject of international debate. Feelings run strong on both sides. In 2005, the United Nations adopted its Declaration on Human Cloning to try to deal with the issue. The declaration is ambiguously worded, prohibiting "all forms of human cloning inasmuch as they are incompatible with human dignity and the protection of human life". It received only ambivalent support from UN member states. Given this unsatisfactory outcome, in 2008 UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) set up a Working Group to investigate the possibility of a legally binding convention to ban human reproductive cloning. The Working Group was made up of members of the International Bioethics Committee, established in 1993 as part of UNESCO's Bioethics Programme. It found that the lack of clarity in international law is unhelpful for those states yet to formulate national regulations or policies on human cloning. Despite this, member states of UNESCO resisted the idea of a convention for several years. This changed in 2015, but there has been no practical progress on the issue. Drawing on official records and first-hand observations at bioethics meetings, this article examines the human cloning debate at UNESCO from 2008 onwards, thus building on and advancing current scholarship by applying recent ideas on global governance to an empirical case. It concludes that, although human reproductive cloning is a challenging subject, establishing a robust global governance framework in this area may be possible via an alternative deliberative format, based on knowledge sharing and feasibility testing rather than the interest-based bargaining that is common to intergovernmental organizations and involving a wide range of stakeholders. This article is published as part of a collection on global governance.

  14. Cloning and Structure of Different Types of Spider Silk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-10

    December 1, 1988 RESEARCH OBJECTIVES: Clone, sequence and express dragline silk protein from Nephila Clavipes and compare the sequence to clones of the...studies was to obtain sufficient quantities of a single pure type of silk. Spiders were obtained from Florida( Nephila clavipes) or collected locally...and on each different batch of silk. The compositions were similar in every case to those published for that species( Nephila ) or for a closely

  15. Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with Lentivirus Expression Libraries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with Lentivirus Expression Libraries PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Daniel J. Lindner, M.D., Ph.D...YYYY) 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 201 31 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones...vitro and engrafted in the marrow of SG3, but not NSG mice. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Myelodysplastic syndrome , lentivirus, cDNA libraries

  16. Cloning of the cytotoxin-hemolysin gene of Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, A C; Morris, J G; Maneval, D R; Richardson, K; Kaper, J B

    1985-01-01

    Genes encoding the cytotoxin-hemolysin of Vibrio vulnificus were cloned in Escherichia coli by using the lytic cloning vector, lambda 1059. Subcloning in plasmid pBR325 resulted in the isolation of a 3.2-kilobase DNA fragment containing the cytotoxin gene. By using this fragment as a DNA probe, homologous gene sequences were detected in all 54 V. vulnificus strains studied; homologous sequences were present in none of 96 isolates from 29 other bacterial species. PMID:4066036

  17. A first generation physical map of the medaka genome in BACs essential for positional cloning and clone-by-clone based genomic sequencing.

    PubMed

    Khorasani, Maryam Zadeh; Hennig, Steffen; Imre, Gabriele; Asakawa, Shuichi; Palczewski, Stefanie; Berger, Anja; Hori, Hiroshi; Naruse, Kiyoshi; Mitani, Hiroshi; Shima, Akihiro; Lehrach, Hans; Wittbrodt, Jochen; Kondoh, Hisato; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Himmelbauer, Heinz

    2004-07-01

    In order to realize the full potential of the medaka as a model system for developmental biology and genetics, characterized genomic resources need to be established, culminating in the sequence of the medaka genome. To facilitate the map-based cloning of genes underlying induced mutations and to provide templates for clone-based genomic sequencing, we have created a first-generation physical map of the medaka genome in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones. In particular, we exploited the synteny to the closely related genome of the pufferfish, Takifugu rubripes, by marker content mapping. As a first step, we clustered 103,144 public medaka EST sequences to obtain a set of 21,121 non-redundant sequence entities. Avoiding oversampling of gene-dense regions, 11,254 of EST clusters were successfully matched against the draft sequence of the fugu genome, and 2363 genes were selected for the BAC map project. We designed 35mer oligonucleotide probes from the selected genes and hybridized them against 64,500 BAC clones of strains Cab and Hd-rR, representing 14-fold coverage of the medaka genome. Our data set is further supplemented with 437 results generated from PCR-amplified inserts of medaka cDNA clones and BAC end-fragment markers. Our current, edited, first generation medaka BAC map consists of 902 map segments that cover about 74% of the medaka genome. The map contains 2721 markers. Of these, 2534 are from expressed sequences, equivalent to a non-redundant set of 2328 loci. The 934 markers (724 different) are anchored to the medaka genetic map. Thus, genetic map assignments provide immediate access to underlying clones and contigs, simplifying molecular access to candidate gene regions and their characterization.

  18. Random cloning of genes from mouse chromosome 17.

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, M; Figueroa, F; Klein, J

    1987-01-01

    We describe a method for isolating cosmid clones randomly from mouse chromosome 17. A cosmid library was constructed from the mouse-Chinese hamster cell line R4 4-1 that contains a limited amount of mouse DNA (chromosomes 17 and 18 and some other unidentified material) on a Chinese hamster background. The library was screened with the murine repetitive sequence probe pMBA14, which selectively hybridizes with mouse DNA. The mouse-derived cosmid clones thus identified were individually hybridized with DNA from the mouse-Syrian hamster cell line JS17 containing all mouse chromosomes except chromosome 17 on a Syrian hamster background. We deduced that the cosmid clones that contained sequences absent in JS17 were derived from mouse chromosome 17. One of the chromosome 17-derived cosmid clones, 3-4-1 (located proximal to the T122/T66C segment) was found to be highly polymorphic among European wild-mouse populations and may be a useful probe to elucidate the evolution and migration of Mus species. The randomly isolated mouse-derived cosmid clones can also be screened for the presence of functional genes. Using testicular cDNA as a probe, a testis-specific gene was cloned from mouse chromosome 17. Images PMID:3472212

  19. Cloning and expression of the leukotoxin gene from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodrubetz, D; Dailey, T; Ebersole, J; Kraig, E

    1989-01-01

    The leukotoxin produced by Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans has been implicated in the etiology of juvenile periodontitis. To initiate a genetic analysis of the role of this protein in disease, we have cloned the leukotoxin gene in Escherichia coli. Recombinant colonies carrying toxin gene sequences were isolated by screening a genomic A. actinomycetemcomitans library with a DNA probe for the leukotoxin gene from a related bacterium, Pasteurella haemolytica. To demonstrate that the cloned A. actinomycetemcomitans DNA contained a functional leukotoxin gene, protein extracts of E. coli containing the A. actinomycetemcomitans clone were tested directly for leukotoxic activity against human cell lines in chromium release assays. A construct containing the entire cloned region produced a functional toxin. No cytotoxicity was seen when extracts from cells containing plasmids with deletions in the putative coding region were used. Furthermore, the toxin produced by the cloned gene has the same target cell specificity as the leukotoxin extracted directly from A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results indicate that sequences encoding a functional leukotoxin have been cloned and are expressed in E. coli. Southern blot analysis of DNA from leukotoxin-producing (Lkt+) and non-leukotoxin-producing (Lkt-) strains indicated that the Lkt- strain also contained a copy of the gene. Images PMID:2707855

  20. How to improve the success rate of mouse cloning technology.

    PubMed

    Thuan, Nguyen Van; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2010-02-01

    It has now been 13 years since the first cloned mammal Dolly the sheep was generated from somatic cells using nuclear transfer (SCNT). Since then, this technique has been considered an important tool not only for animal reproduction but also for regenerative medicine. However, the success rate is still very low and the mechanisms involved in genomic reprogramming are not yet clear. Moreover, the NT technique requires donated fresh oocyte, which raises ethical problems for production of human cloned embryo. For this reason, the use of induced pluripotent stem cells for genomic reprogramming and for regenerative medicine is currently a hot topic in this field. However, we believe that the NT approach remains the only valid way for the study of reproduction and basic biology. For example, only the NT approach can reveal dynamic and global modifications in the epigenome without using genetic modification, and it can generate offspring from a single cell or even a frozen dead body. Thanks to much hard work by many groups, cloning success rates are increasing slightly year by year, and NT cloning is now becoming a more applicable method. This review describes how to improve the efficiency of cloning, the establishment of clone-derived embryonic stem cells and further applications.