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Sample records for dos clones gt

  1. Cystathionase: high-performance liquid chromatography. Molecular cloning in lambda gt11. Nonradioactive immunodetection of fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Shuster, A M; Kvashuk, O A; Chumakov, I; Prassolov, V S; Gabibov, A G

    1989-04-01

    A method of purification of rat liver cystathionase by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) utilizing non-ideal gel filtration method is proposed. Resolution factors-flow rate, pH values, ionic strength of the mobile phase-were optimized. Antibodies to the enzyme were purified using an immunosorbent synthesized on the basis of epoxylated Toyopearl-65. Radioimmunoassay and immunoblotting demonstrated antibody monospecificity towards cystathionase. These monospecific antibodies were utilized for detecting enzyme amounts (up to 30 pg) using the avidin-biotin system. Rat cDNA expression library in phage lambda gt11 was screened. The cystathionase cDNA clone was isolated, and the structure of the insert was determined.

  2. DOS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traven, Bill

    1988-01-01

    Discusses using the DOS PATH command (for MS-DOS) to enable the microcomputer user to move from directory to directory on a hard drive. Lists the commands to be programed, gives examples, and explains the use of each. (MVL)

  3. Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... copies of whole animals Therapeutic cloning, which creates embryonic stem cells. Researchers hope to use these cells to grow healthy tissue to replace injured or diseased tissues in the human body. NIH: National Human Genome Research Institute

  4. Characterization of recombinant amylopullulanase (gt-apu) and truncated amylopullulanase (gt-apuT) of the extreme thermophile Geobacillus thermoleovorans NP33 and their action in starch saccharification.

    PubMed

    Nisha, M; Satyanarayana, T

    2013-07-01

    A gene encoding amylopullulanase (gt-apu) of the extremely thermophilic Geobacillus thermoleovorans NP33 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene has an open reading frame of 4,965 bp that encodes a protein of 1,655 amino acids with molecular mass of 182 kDa. The six conserved regions, characteristic of GH13 family, have been detected in gt-apu. The recombinant enzyme has only one active site for α-amylase and pullulanase activities based on the enzyme kinetic analyses in a system that contains starch as well as pullulan as competing substrates and response to inhibitors. The end-product analysis confirmed that this is an endoacting enzyme. The specific enzyme activities for α-amylase and pullulanase of the truncated amylopullulanase (gt-apuT) are higher than gt-apu. Both enzymes exhibited similar temperature (60 °C) and pH (7.0) optima, although gt-apuT possessed a higher thermostability than gt-apu. The overall catalytic efficiency (K(cat)/K(m)) of gt-apuT is greater than that of gt-apu, with almost similar substrate specificities. The C-terminal region of gt-apu appeared to be non-essential, and furthermore, it negatively affects the substrate binding and stability of the enzyme. PMID:23132347

  5. Characterization of recombinant amylopullulanase (gt-apu) and truncated amylopullulanase (gt-apuT) of the extreme thermophile Geobacillus thermoleovorans NP33 and their action in starch saccharification.

    PubMed

    Nisha, M; Satyanarayana, T

    2013-07-01

    A gene encoding amylopullulanase (gt-apu) of the extremely thermophilic Geobacillus thermoleovorans NP33 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene has an open reading frame of 4,965 bp that encodes a protein of 1,655 amino acids with molecular mass of 182 kDa. The six conserved regions, characteristic of GH13 family, have been detected in gt-apu. The recombinant enzyme has only one active site for α-amylase and pullulanase activities based on the enzyme kinetic analyses in a system that contains starch as well as pullulan as competing substrates and response to inhibitors. The end-product analysis confirmed that this is an endoacting enzyme. The specific enzyme activities for α-amylase and pullulanase of the truncated amylopullulanase (gt-apuT) are higher than gt-apu. Both enzymes exhibited similar temperature (60 °C) and pH (7.0) optima, although gt-apuT possessed a higher thermostability than gt-apu. The overall catalytic efficiency (K(cat)/K(m)) of gt-apuT is greater than that of gt-apu, with almost similar substrate specificities. The C-terminal region of gt-apu appeared to be non-essential, and furthermore, it negatively affects the substrate binding and stability of the enzyme.

  6. Rice Glycosyltransferase (GT) Phylogenomic Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Ronald, Pamela

    The Ronald Laboratory staff at the University of California-Davis has a primary research focus on the genes of the rice plant. They study the role that genetics plays in the way rice plants respond to their environment. They created the Rice GT Database in order to integrate functional genomic information for putative rice Glycosyltransferases (GTs). This database contains information on nearly 800 putative rice GTs (gene models) identified by sequence similarity searches based on the Carbohydrate Active enZymes (CAZy) database. The Rice GT Database provides a platform to display user-selected functional genomic data on a phylogenetic tree. This includes sequence information, mutant line information, expression data, etc. An interactive chromosomal map shows the position of all rice GTs, and links to rice annotation databases are included. The format is intended to "facilitate the comparison of closely related GTs within different families, as well as perform global comparisons between sets of related families." [From http://ricephylogenomics.ucdavis.edu/cellwalls/gt/genInfo.shtml] See also the primary paper discussing this work: Peijian Cao, Laura E. Bartley, Ki-Hong Jung and Pamela C. Ronalda. Construction of a Rice Glycosyltransferase Phylogenomic Database and Identification of Rice-Diverged Glycosyltransferases. Molecular Plant, 2008, 1(5): 858-877.

  7. Registration of maize inbred line 'GT888'

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize (Zea mays L.) inbred line GT888 (PI 670116) was developed and released by the USDA-ARS in cooperation with the University of Georgia, and in participation with the USDA Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) project. GT888 was derived from GEM population DK888:N11 (GEMN-0177), which has 50% tro...

  8. Registration of maize inbred line GT603

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GT603 (Reg. No. xxxx, PI xxxxxx) is a yellow dent maize (Zea mays L.) inbred line developed and released by the USDA-ARS Crop Protection and Management Research Unit in cooperation with the University of Georgia Coastal Plain Experiment Station in 2010. GT603 was developed through seven generations ...

  9. Comparative analysis of GT14/GT14-like family genes in Arabidopsis, Oryza, Populus, Sorghum and Vitis

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Chuyu; Li, Ting; Tuskan, Gerald A; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Yang, Xiaohan

    2011-01-01

    Glycosyltransferase family14 (GT14) belongs to the glycosyltransferase (GT) superfamily that plays important roles in the biosynthesis of cell walls, the most abundant source of cellulosic biomass for bioethanol production. It has been hypothesized that DUF266 proteins are a new class of GTs related to GT14. In this study, we identified 62 GT14 and 106 DUF266 genes (named GT14-like herein) in Arabidopsis, Oryza, Populus, Sorghum and Vitis. Our phylogenetic analysis separated GT14 and GT14-like genes into two distinct clades, which were further divided into eight and five groups, respectively. Similarities in protein domain, 3D structure and gene expression were uncovered between the two phylogenetic clades, supporting the hypothesis that GT14 and GT14-like genes belong to one family. Therefore, we proposed a new family name, GT14/GT14-like family that combines both subfamilies. Variation in gene expression and protein subcellular localization within the GT14-like subfamily were greater than those within the GT14 subfamily. One-half of the Arabidopsis and Populus GT14/GT14-like genes were found to be preferentially expressed in stem/xylem, indicating that they are likely involved in cell wall biosynthesis. This study provided new insights into the evolution and functional diversification of the GT14/GT14-like family genes.

  10. GT Merge Process: Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, M P; Dodge, D; Myers, S C

    2008-06-10

    This document summarizes the process used to merge GT25 and better data between LANL and LLNL for use in a tomographic inversion for Pn velocity of Eurasia. The merge process is automated and includes extensive quality control operations at each step. Events in common between the labs are identified and resolved using GT level criteria. Arrivals in common between the labs are also resolved through the use of agreed upon arrival author rankings. Finally, baselined origin times are computed for all crustal events using either teleseismic P-arrivals and the iasp91 model or, in certain regions, regional P-arrivals and regional velocity models that are known to be consistent with teleseismic iasp91 P-wave predictions. We combine the core tables from each lab and first resolve unique and common GT events between LANL and LLNL. Phase names are then checked and possibly adjusted for consistency. Next, we merge at the pick level so that each distinct EVENT-STATION-PHASE tuple has a unique arrival. All BMEB (Bondar-Myers-Engdahl-Bergman) GT are evaluated for adherence to their criteria, and possibly re-calculated. Finally, new origin times are computed (baselining) for the merged GT events. In addition to the reconciliation of events and picks between LANL and LLNL, the merge process involves several quality control steps that are intended to remove outlier and irrelevant data from the final results.

  11. GT-Scan: identifying unique genomic targets

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Aidan; Bailey, Timothy L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: A number of technologies, including CRISPR/Cas, transcription activator-like effector nucleases and zinc-finger nucleases, allow the user to target a chosen locus for genome editing or regulatory interference. Specificity, however, is a major problem, and the targeted locus must be chosen with care to avoid inadvertently affecting other loci (‘off-targets’) in the genome. To address this we have created ‘Genome Target Scan’ (GT-Scan), a flexible web-based tool that ranks all potential targets in a user-selected region of a genome in terms of how many off-targets they have. GT-Scan gives the user flexibility to define the desired characteristics of targets and off-targets via a simple ‘target rule’, and its interactive output allows detailed inspection of each of the most promising candidate targets. GT-Scan can be used to identify optimal targets for CRISPR/Cas systems, but its flexibility gives it potential to be adapted to other genome-targeting technologies as well. Availability and implementation: GT-Scan can be run via the web at: http://gt-scan.braembl.org.au. Contact: t.bailey@uq.edu.au PMID:24860161

  12. GT Merge Process: Version 2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, M P; Dodge, D; Myers, S C

    2008-06-10

    This document summarizes the process used to merge GT25 and better data between LANL and LLNL. The merge also includes OUO arrivals provided by AFTAC for events in the merge. The merge process is mostly automated and includes extensive quality control operations at each step. Events in common between the labs are identified and resolved using GT level criteria. Arrivals in common between the labs are also resolved through the use of agreed upon arrival author rankings. Finally, baselined origin times are computed for all crustal events using either teleseismic P-arrivals and the iasp91 model or, in certain regions, regional P-arrivals and regional velocity models that are known to be consistent with teleseismic iasp91 P-wave predictions. We combine the core tables from each contributor and resolve unique and common GT events between contributors. Next, we merge at the pick level so that each distinct EVENT-STATION-PHASE tuple has a unique arrival. All BMEB (Bondar-Myers-Engdahl-Bergman) GT are recalculated and evaluated for adherence to their criteria. Finally, new origin times are computed (baselining) for the merged GT events. In addition to the reconciliation of events and picks between contributors, the merge process involves several quality control steps that are intended to remove outlier and irrelevant data from the final results. The process is described in the section entitled 'Merge Steps'.

  13. The Poplar GT8E and GT8F Glycosyltransferases are Functional Orthologs of Arabidopsis PARVUS Involved in Gulcuronoxylan Biosynthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The poplar GT8E and GT8F glycosyltransferases have previously been shown to be associated with wood formation, but their roles in the biosynthesis of wood components are not known. Here, we show that PoGT8E and PoGT8F are expressed in vessels and fibers during wood formation and ...

  14. Intermonitor variability of GT3X accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Santos-Lozano, A; Torres-Luque, G; Marín, P J; Ruiz, J R; Lucia, A; Garatachea, N

    2012-12-01

    The main purpose of this study was to assess the inter-monitor reliability of the tri-axial GT3X Actigraph accelerometer over a range of physical activities (PA). This device collects motion data on each of the vertical (Y), horizontal right-left (X), and horizontal front-back (Z) axes and also calculates the vector summed value √X(2)+Y(2)+Z(2) known as 'vector magnitude' (VM). 8 GT3X accelerometers were worn at the same time by the same participant. Accelerometers were placed back-to-front, all facing forward and in sets of 4 securely taped together, attached to a belt and allocating each block above either left or right hip at waist level. Inter-monitor reliability was assessed during 6 conditions: rest, walking (4 and 6 km·h(-1)), running (8 and 10 km·h(-1)) and repeated sit-to-stand (40 times·min(-1)). The intra-class correlation coefficients were high for X, Y and Z axes (i.e., all ≥ 0.925) and for VM (≥ 0.946). In conclusion, we found good inter-instrument reliability of the GT3X accelerometer across all planes, yet our results also suggest that the X and Z axes do not provide further benefits over the 'traditional' Y-axis to assess the movement in typical PA.

  15. The Wheat GT Factor TaGT2L1D Negatively Regulates Drought Tolerance and Plant Development

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xin; Liu, Haipei; Ji, Hongtao; Wang, Youning; Dong, Baodi; Qiao, Yunzhou; Liu, Mengyu; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    GT factors are trihelix transcription factors that specifically regulate plant development and stress responses. Recently, several GT factors have been characterized in different plant species; however, little is known about the role of GT factors in wheat. Here, we show that TaGT2L1A, TaGT2L1B, and TaGT2L1D are highly homologous in hexaploid wheat, and are localized to wheat chromosomes 2A, 2B, and 2D, respectively. These TaGT2L1 genes encode proteins containing two SANT domains and one central helix. All three homologs were ubiquitously expressed during wheat development and were responsive to osmotic stress. Functional analyses demonstrated that TaGT2L1D acts as a transcriptional repressor; it was able to suppress the expression of AtSDD1 in Arabidopsis by binding directly to the GT3 box in its promoter that negatively regulates drought tolerance. TaGT2L1D overexpression markedly increased the number of stomata and reduced drought tolerance in gtl1-3 plants. Notably, ectopic expression of TaGT2L1D also affected floral organ development and overall plant growth. These results demonstrate that TaGT2L1 is an ortholog of AtGTL1, and that it plays an evolutionarily conserved role in drought resistance by fine tuning stomatal density in wheat. Our data also highlight the role of TaGT2L1 in plant growth and development. PMID:27245096

  16. The Wheat GT Factor TaGT2L1D Negatively Regulates Drought Tolerance and Plant Development.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xin; Liu, Haipei; Ji, Hongtao; Wang, Youning; Dong, Baodi; Qiao, Yunzhou; Liu, Mengyu; Li, Xia

    2016-01-01

    GT factors are trihelix transcription factors that specifically regulate plant development and stress responses. Recently, several GT factors have been characterized in different plant species; however, little is known about the role of GT factors in wheat. Here, we show that TaGT2L1A, TaGT2L1B, and TaGT2L1D are highly homologous in hexaploid wheat, and are localized to wheat chromosomes 2A, 2B, and 2D, respectively. These TaGT2L1 genes encode proteins containing two SANT domains and one central helix. All three homologs were ubiquitously expressed during wheat development and were responsive to osmotic stress. Functional analyses demonstrated that TaGT2L1D acts as a transcriptional repressor; it was able to suppress the expression of AtSDD1 in Arabidopsis by binding directly to the GT3 box in its promoter that negatively regulates drought tolerance. TaGT2L1D overexpression markedly increased the number of stomata and reduced drought tolerance in gtl1-3 plants. Notably, ectopic expression of TaGT2L1D also affected floral organ development and overall plant growth. These results demonstrate that TaGT2L1 is an ortholog of AtGTL1, and that it plays an evolutionarily conserved role in drought resistance by fine tuning stomatal density in wheat. Our data also highlight the role of TaGT2L1 in plant growth and development. PMID:27245096

  17. Technical Reliability Assessment of the Actigraph GT1M Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Pedro; Mota, Jorge; Esliger, Dale; Welk, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the Actigraph GT1M (Pensacola, FL, USA) accelerometer activity count and step functions. Fifty GT1M accelerometers were initialized to collect simultaneous acceleration counts and steps data using 15-sec epochs. All reliability testing was completed using a mechanical shaker plate to…

  18. DOS basics

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, P.

    1994-09-01

    DOS is an acronym for Disk Operating System. It is actually a set of programs that allows you to control your personal computer. DOS offers the capabilities to create and manage files; organize and maintain information placed on disks; use application programs such as WordPerfect, Lotus 123, Excel, Windows, etc. In addition, DOS provides the basic utilities needed to copy files from one area to another, delete files and list files. The latest version of DOS also offers more advanced features that include hard disk compression and memory management. Basic DOS commands are discussed.

  19. Cloning cattle.

    PubMed

    Oback, B; Wells, D N

    2003-01-01

    Over the past six years, hundreds of apparently normal calves have been cloned worldwide from bovine somatic donor cells. However, these surviving animals represent less than 5% of all cloned embryos transferred into recipient cows. Most of the remaining 95% die at various stages of development from a predictable pattern of placental and fetal abnormalities, collectively referred to as the "cloning-syndrome." The low efficiency seriously limits commercial applicability and ethical acceptance of somatic cloning and enforces the development of improved cloning methods. In this paper, we describe our current standard operating procedure (SOP) for cattle cloning using zona-free nuclear transfer. Following this SOP, the output of viable and healthy calves at weaning is about 9% of embryos transferred. Better standardization of cloning protocols across and within research groups is needed to separate technical from biological factors underlying low cloning efficiency.

  20. Why Clone?

    MedlinePlus

    ... How might cloning be used in medicine? Cloning animal models of disease Much of what researchers learn about human disease comes from studying animal models such as mice. Often, animal models are ...

  1. [Cloning - controversies].

    PubMed

    Twardowski, T; Michalska, A

    2001-01-01

    Cloning of the human being is not only highly controversial; in the opinion of the authors it is impossible - we are not able to reproduce human behaviour and character traits. Reproduction through cloning is limited to personal genome resources. The more important is protection of genomic characteristics as private property and taking advantage of cloning for production of the human organs directly or through xenotransplants. In this paper we present the legislation related to cloning in Poland, in the European Union and other countries. We also indicate who and why is interested in cloning.

  2. Characterisation of Muta™Mouse λgt10-lacZ transgene: evidence for in vivo rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Shwed, Philip S.; Crosthwait, Jennifer; Douglas, George R.; Seligy, Vern L.

    2010-01-01

    The multicopy λgt10-lacZ transgene shuttle vector of Muta™Mouse serves as an important tool for genotoxicity studies. Here, we describe a model for λgt10-lacZ transgene molecular structure, based on characterisation of transgenes recovered from animals of our intramural breeding colony. Unique nucleotide sequences of the 47 513 bp monomer are reported with GenBank® assigned accession numbers. Besides defining ancestral mutations of the λgt10 used to construct the transgene and the Muta™Mouse precursor (strain 40.6), we validated the sequence integrity of key λ genes needed for the Escherichia coli host-based mutation reporting assay. Using three polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based chromosome scanning and cloning strategies, we found five distinct in vivo transgene rearrangements, which were common to both sexes, and involved copy fusions generating ∼10 defective copies per haplotype. The transgene haplotype was estimated by Southern hybridisation and real-time–polymerase chain reaction, which yielded 29.0 ± 4.0 copies based on spleen DNA of Muta™Mouse, and a reconstructed CD2F1 genome with variable λgt10-lacZ copies. Similar analysis of commercially prepared spleen DNA from Big Blue® mouse yielded a haplotype of 23.5 ± 3.1 copies. The latter DNA is used in calibrating a commercial in vitro packaging kit for E.coli host-based mutation assays of both transgenic systems. The model for λgt10-lacZ transgene organisation, and the PCR-based methods for assessing copy number, integrity and rearrangements, potentially extends the use of Muta™Mouse construct for direct, genomic-type assays that detect the effects of clastogens and aneugens, without depending on an E.coli host, for reporting effects. PMID:20724577

  3. Academic Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally negative practice.…

  4. HTGR-GT and electrical load integrated control

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, T.; Openshaw, F.; Pfremmer, D.

    1980-05-01

    A discussion of the control and operation of the HTGR-GT power plant is presented in terms of its closely coupled electrical load and core cooling functions. The system and its controls are briefly described and comparisons are made with more conventional plants. The results of analyses of selected transients are presented to illustrate the operation and control of the HTGR-GT. The events presented were specifically chosen to show the controllability of the plant and to highlight some of the unique characteristics inherent in this multiloop closed-cycle plant.

  5. GT-CATS: Tracking Operator Activities in Complex Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callantine, Todd J.; Mitchell, Christine M.; Palmer, Everett A.

    1999-01-01

    Human operators of complex dynamic systems can experience difficulties supervising advanced control automation. One remedy is to develop intelligent aiding systems that can provide operators with context-sensitive advice and reminders. The research reported herein proposes, implements, and evaluates a methodology for activity tracking, a form of intent inferencing that can supply the knowledge required for an intelligent aid by constructing and maintaining a representation of operator activities in real time. The methodology was implemented in the Georgia Tech Crew Activity Tracking System (GT-CATS), which predicts and interprets the actions performed by Boeing 757/767 pilots navigating using autopilot flight modes. This report first describes research on intent inferencing and complex modes of automation. It then provides a detailed description of the GT-CATS methodology, knowledge structures, and processing scheme. The results of an experimental evaluation using airline pilots are given. The results show that GT-CATS was effective in predicting and interpreting pilot actions in real time.

  6. Two cotton fiber-associated glycosyltransferases, GhGT43A1 and GhGT43C1, function in hemicellulose glucuronoxylan biosynthesis during plant development.

    PubMed

    Li, Long; Huang, Junfeng; Qin, Lixia; Huang, Yuying; Zeng, Wei; Rao, Yue; Li, Juan; Li, Xuebao; Xu, Wenliang

    2014-10-01

    Xylan is the major hemicellulosic constituent in dicot secondary cell walls. Cell wall composition of cotton fiber changes dynamically throughout development. Not only the amounts but also the molecular sizes of the hemicellulosic polysaccharides show substantial changes during cotton fiber development. However, none of the genes encoding glycosyltransferases (GTs) responsible for synthesizing xylan have been isolated and characterized in cotton fiber. In this study, we applied a bioinformatics approach and identified two putative GTs from cotton, designated GhGT43A1 and GhGT43C1, which belong to the CAZy GT43 family and are closely related to Arabidopsis IRX9 and IRX14, respectively. We show that GhGT43A1 is highly and preferentially expressed in 15 and 20 days post-anthesis (dpa) cotton fiber, whereas GhGT43C1 is ubiquitously expressed in most organs, with especially high expression in 15 dpa fiber and hypocotyl. Complementation analysis demonstrates that GhG43A1 and GhGT43C1 are orthologs of Arabidopsis IRX9 and IRX14, respectively. Furthermore, we show that overexpression of GhGT43A1 or GhGT43C1 in Arabidopsis results in increased xylan content. We also show that overexpression of GhGT43A1 or GhGT43C1 leads to more cellulose deposition. These findings suggest that GhGT43A1 and GhGT43C1 likely participate in xylan synthesis during fiber development.

  7. Domain analysis of the plant DNA-binding protein GT1a: requirement of four putative alpha-helices for DNA binding and identification of a novel oligomerization region.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, E

    1995-01-01

    Light is an important environmental signal that can influence diverse developmental processes in plants. Many plant nuclear genes respond to light at the level of transcription initiation. GT-1 and GT2 are nuclear factors which interact with DNA sequences in many light-responsive gene promoters. cDNA clones which encode proteins with sequence binding specificities similar to those of these two factors have been isolated. They show significant amino acid sequence similarities within three closely spaced, putative alpha-helices that were predicted by secondary structure analysis but do not show significant homologies with any other reported DNA-binding protein. In this work, N- and C-terminal deletions of tobacco GT1a were generated by in vitro transcription and translation, and their DNA-binding activities and subunit structures were studied. The results suggest that the C-terminal domain of GT1a is critical for protein oligomerization, while a region predicted to contain four closely spaced alpha-helices is required for DNA binding. Direct chemical cross-linking and gel filtration analyses of full-length and truncated derivatives of GT1a suggest that this factor can exist in solution as a homotetramer and that oligomerization is independent of DNA binding. This study thus establishes two independent functional domains in this class of eukaryotic trans-acting factors. Possible implications of the multimeric nature of GT1a in relation to the known characteristics of light-responsive promoter architecture are discussed. PMID:7823917

  8. A Glucurono(arabino)xylan Synthase Complex from Wheat Contains Members of the GT43, GT47, and GT75 Families and Functions Cooperatively1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wei; Jiang, Nan; Nadella, Ramya; Killen, Tara L.; Nadella, Vijayanand; Faik, Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    Glucuronoarabinoxylans (GAXs) are the major hemicelluloses in grass cell walls, but the proteins that synthesize them have previously been uncharacterized. The biosynthesis of GAXs would require at least three glycosyltransferases (GTs): xylosyltransferase (XylT), arabinosyltransferase (AraT), and glucuronosyltransferase (GlcAT). A combination of proteomics and transcriptomics analyses revealed three wheat (Triticum aestivum) glycosyltransferase (TaGT) proteins from the GT43, GT47, and GT75 families as promising candidates involved in GAX synthesis in wheat, namely TaGT43-4, TaGT47-13, and TaGT75-4. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments using specific antibodies produced against TaGT43-4 allowed the immunopurification of a complex containing these three GT proteins. The affinity-purified complex also showed GAX-XylT, GAX-AraT, and GAX-GlcAT activities that work in a cooperative manner. UDP Xyl strongly enhanced both AraT and GlcAT activities. However, while UDP arabinopyranose stimulated the XylT activity, it had only limited effect on GlcAT activity. Similarly, UDP GlcUA stimulated the XylT activity but had only limited effect on AraT activity. The [14C]GAX polymer synthesized by the affinity-purified complex contained Xyl, Ara, and GlcUA in a ratio of 45:12:1, respectively. When this product was digested with purified endoxylanase III and analyzed by high-pH anion-exchange chromatography, only two oligosaccharides were obtained, suggesting a regular structure. One of the two oligosaccharides has six Xyls and two Aras, and the second oligosaccharide contains Xyl, Ara, and GlcUA in a ratio of 40:8:1, respectively. Our results provide a direct link of the involvement of TaGT43-4, TaGT47-13, and TaGT75-4 proteins (as a core complex) in the synthesis of GAX polymer in wheat. PMID:20631319

  9. Bacteriophage lambda as a cloning vector.

    PubMed

    Chauthaiwale, V M; Therwath, A; Deshpande, V V

    1992-12-01

    Extensive research has been directed toward the development of multipurpose lambda vectors for cloning ever since the potential of using coliphage lambda as a cloning vector was recognized in the late 1970s. An understanding of the intrinsic molecular organization and of the genetic events which determine lysis or lysogeny in lambda has allowed investigators to modify it to suit the specific requirements of gene manipulations. Unwanted restriction sites have been altered and arranged together into suitable polylinkers. The development of a highly efficient in vitro packaging system has permitted the introduction of chimeric molecules into hosts. Biological containment of recombinants has been achieved by introducing amber mutations into the lambda genome and by using specific amber suppressor hosts. Taking advantage of the limited range of genome size (78 to 105% of the wild-type size) for its efficient packaging, an array of vectors has been devised to accommodate inserts of a wide size range, the limit being 24 kbp in Charon 40. The central dispensable fragment of the lambda genome can be replaced by a fragment of heterologous DNA, leading to the construction of replacement vectors such as Charon and EMBL. Alternatively, small DNA fragments can be inserted without removing the dispensable region of the lambda genome, as in lambda gt10 and lambda gt11 vectors. In addition, the introduction of many other desirable properties, such as NotI and SfiI sites in polylinkers (e.g., lambda gt22), T7 and T3 promoters for the in vitro transcription (e.g., lambda DASH), and the mechanism for in vivo excision of the intact insert (e.g., lambda ZAP), has facilitated both cloning and subsequent analysis. In most cases, the recombinants can be differentiated from the parental phages by their altered phenotype. Libraries constructed in lambda vectors are screened easily with antibody or nucleic acid probes since several thousand clones can be plated on a single petri dish. Besides

  10. Turbulent transport measurements in a model of GT-combustor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikishev, L. M.; Gobyzov, O. A.; Sharaborin, D. K.; Lobasov, A. S.; Dulin, V. M.; Markovich, D. M.; Tsatiashvili, V. V.

    2016-10-01

    To reduce NOx formation modern industrial power gas-turbines utilizes lean premixed combustion of natural gas. The uniform distribution of local fuel/air ratio in the combustion chamber plays one of the key roles in the field of lean combustion to prevent thermo-acoustic pulsations. Present paper reports on simultaneous Particle Image Velocimetry and acetone Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence measurements in a cold model of GT-combustor to investigate mixing processes which are relevant to the organization of lean premixed combustion. Velocity and passive admixture pulsations correlations were measured to verify gradient closer model, which is often used in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation of turbulent mixing.

  11. An in vitro comparison of torsional stress and cyclic fatigue resistance of ProFile GT and ProFile GT Series X rotary nickel-titanium files.

    PubMed

    Kramkowski, Thomas R; Bahcall, James

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the torsional stress and cyclic fatigue characteristics of ProFile GT (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK) and ProFile GT Series X (Dentsply Tulsa Dental). Files of 0.04 and 0.06 taper, 25 mm in length, and ISO sizes of 20 and 30 tips were compared (n = 25 per test group). Torque stress resistance was evaluated by measuring the torque in gram-centimeters (g-cm) and angle of deflection (degrees of rotation) required for instrument separation with use of a torsiometer instrument. Cyclic fatigue was determined by recording the time until breakage of a file rotating in a simulated canal with an applied 45 degrees or 60 degrees curve. The files were operated in a cyclic fatigue instrument that simulated clinical rotary file usage with a constant cyclical axial motion. There was no statistical difference (p > 0.05) when comparing the torque (g-cm) required to induce a torsional failure of ProFile GT and ProFile GT Series X files of identical file sizes. The angle of deflection (degrees of rotation) of ProFile GT was significantly greater (p < or = 0.001) before separation than ProFile GT Series X for all file sizes tested except 20/.04 (p > 0.05). There was no statistical difference (p > 0.05) in cyclic fatigue failure for ProFile GT and ProFile GT Series X in a canal with a curvature of 45 degrees . In the 60 degrees canal curvature, ProFile GT was found to be significantly more resistant (p = 0.005) to fracture because of cyclic fatigue than ProFile GT Series X for file size 30/.06 and significant (p < or = 0.001) for files sizes 20/.06 and 30/.04. There was no difference (p > 0.05) in cyclic fatigue resistance in the 60 degrees canal for ProFile GT and ProFile GT Series X for file size 20/.04.

  12. On classical cloning and no-cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, Nicholas J.

    2012-02-01

    It is part of information theory folklore that, while quantum theory prohibits the generic (or universal) cloning of states, such cloning is allowed by classical information theory. Indeed, many take the phenomenon of no-cloning to be one of the features that distinguishes quantum mechanics from classical mechanics. In this paper, we argue that pace conventional wisdom, in the case where one does not include a machine system, there is an analog of the no-cloning theorem for classical systems. However, upon adjoining a non-trivial machine system (or ancilla) one finds that, pace the quantum case, the obstruction to cloning disappears for pure states. We begin by discussing some conceptual points and category-theoretic generalities having to do with cloning, and proceed to discuss no-cloning in both the case of (non-statistical) classical mechanics and classical statistical mechanics.

  13. The Clone Factory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Beryl

    2005-01-01

    Have humans been cloned? Is it possible? Immediate interest is sparked when students are asked these questions. In response to their curiosity, the clone factory activity was developed to help them understand the process of cloning. In this activity, students reenact the cloning process, in a very simplified simulation. After completing the…

  14. Molecular cloning and amino acid sequence of human 5-lipoxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Funk, C.D.; Radmark, O.; Hoeoeg, J.O.; Joernvall, H.; Samuelsson, B.

    1988-01-01

    5-Lipoxygenase (EC 1.13.11.34), a Ca/sup 2 +/- and ATP-requiring enzyme, catalyzes the first two steps in the biosynthesis of the peptidoleukotrienes and the chemotactic factor leukotriene B/sub 4/. A cDNA clone corresponding to 5-lipoxygenase was isolated from a human lung lambda gt11 expression library by immunoscreening with a polyclonal antibody. Additional clones from a human placenta lambda gt11 cDNA library were obtained by plaque hybridization with the /sup 32/P-labeled lung cDNA clone. Sequence data obtained from several overlapping clones indicate that the composite DNAs contain the complete coding region for the enzyme. From the deduced primary structure, 5-lipoxygenase encodes a 673 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 77,839. Direct analysis of the native protein and its proteolytic fragments confirmed the deduced composition, the amino-terminal amino acid sequence, and the structure of many internal segments. 5-Lipoxygenase has no apparent sequence homology with leukotriene A/sub 4/ hydrolase or Ca/sup 2 +/-binding proteins. RNA blot analysis indicated substantial amounts of an mRNA species of approx. = 2700 nucleotides in leukocytes, lung, and placenta.

  15. Human cloning 2001.

    PubMed

    Healy, David L; Weston, Gareth; Pera, Martin F; Rombauts, Luk; Trounson, Alan O

    2002-05-01

    This review summaries human cloning from a clinical perspective. Natural human clones, that is, monozygotic twins, are increasing in the general community. Iatrogenic human clones have been produced for decades in infertile couples given fertility treatment such as ovulation induction. A clear distinction must be made between therapeutic cloning using embryonic stem cells and reproductive cloning attempts. Unlike the early clinical years of in vitro fertilization, with cloning there is no animal model that is safe and dependable. Until there is such a model, 'Dolly'-style human cloning is medically unacceptable.

  16. The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented (NRC/GT) Newsletter, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gubbins, E. Jean, Ed.; Siegle, Del, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    These two newsletters of The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented (NRC/GT) present articles concerned with research on the education of gifted and talented students. The articles are: "NRC/GT's Suggestions: Evaluating Your Programs and Services" (E. Jean Gubbins); "Professional Development Practices in Gifted Education: Results of a…

  17. The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented (NRC/GT) Newsletter, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gubbins, E. Jean, Ed.; Siegle, Del, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    These two newsletters of The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented (NRC/GT) present articles concerned with research on the education of gifted and talented students. The articles are: "NRC/GT: Research Should Inform Practice" (E. Jean Gubbins); "Building a Bridge: A Combined Effort between Gifted and Bilingual Education" (Valentina…

  18. The GT-MHR for destruction of weapons plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, A.M.; Neylan, A.J.

    1995-12-31

    The disposal of nearly 100 tonnes of weapons-grade plutonium (WG-Pu) made surplus by the disarmament treaties is receiving urgent attention, highlighted by the recent seizure in Germany of small quantities of weapons-useful plutonium. Unlike highly enriched uranium, simple denaturing cannot make this plutonium worthless for use in future weapons. The use of physical security and institutional barriers, including long-term storage in high-level waste repositories, to provide secure storage for centuries to come is questionable when considering government instability and the possibility of national recidivism. The Russian Ministry for Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and General Atomics have signed an agreement for the cooperative design of a gas turbine-modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) to burn the WG-Pu stockpile. A formal proposal for a joint U.S./Russian program for the development of this reactor has been submitted by MINATOM to Vice President Gore. The major benefit of this program is that the reactor would deplete the Russian surplus plutonium stockpile, provide jobs for technical specialists in the former weapons complex, and produce valuable electric power. It would also provide a mutually assured means of destroying the U.S. and Russian stockpiles.

  19. A photometric and orbital analysis of GT MUSCAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdoch, K. A.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Gilmore, A. C.

    1995-10-01

    GT Mus is a quadruple system comprising a long-period RS CVn-type binary (HD 101379) and a pair of eclipsing A dwarfs (HD 101380). Six and a half years of UBV (RI)_C photometry obtained at the Mt John University Observatory has enabled identification of four distinct types of photometric variability in this system. These are (1) a slowly changing mean magnitude, which probably arises from an activity-cycle-like effect in the active component of HD 101379, (2) a periodic variation (P_rot~64d), which is attributed to rotational modulation due to spots on the active star, (3) a periodic variation (P_eclipse=2.7546d) due to the eclipses of HD 101380, and (4) an excess in the I band, which occurs on a short time-scale (<1d) and is probably associated with HD 101379 activity. The evolution of the light curve of HD 101379 is fast with respect to the rotational period, suggesting rapid spot evolution for which we anticipate a possible model. The colours of HD 101379, even at maximum brightness, are excessively red for its spectral type, unless there is significant reddening by dust. Radial velocity measurements of HD 101379 are also presented, along with an improved determination of the orbit of this somewhat long-period (P_orb=61.448d) system.

  20. Event-specific plasmid standards and real-time PCR methods for transgenic Bt11, Bt176, and GA21 maize and transgenic GT73 canola.

    PubMed

    Taverniers, Isabel; Windels, Pieter; Vaïtilingom, Marc; Milcamps, Anne; Van Bockstaele, Erik; Van den Eede, Guy; De Loose, Marc

    2005-04-20

    Since the 18th of April 2004, two new regulations, EC/1829/2003 on genetically modified food and feed products and EC/1830/2003 on traceability and labeling of GMOs, are in force in the EU. This new, comprehensive regulatory framework emphasizes the need of an adequate tracing system. Unique identifiers, such as the transgene genome junction region or a specific rearrangement within the transgene DNA, should form the basis of such a tracing system. In this study, we describe the development of event-specific tracing systems for transgenic maize lines Bt11, Bt176, and GA21 and for canola event GT73. Molecular characterization of the transgene loci enabled us to clone an event-specific sequence into a plasmid vector, to be used as a marker, and to develop line-specific primers. Primer specificity was tested through qualitative PCRs and dissociation curve analysis in SYBR Green I real-time PCRs. The primers were then combined with event-specific TaqMan probes in quantitative real-time PCRs. Calibration curves were set up both with genomic DNA samples and the newly synthesized plasmid DNA markers. It is shown that cloned plasmid GMO target sequences are perfectly suitable as unique identifiers and quantitative calibrators. Together with an event-specific primer pair and a highly specific TaqMan probe, the plasmid markers form crucial components of a unique and straighforward tracing system for Bt11, Bt176, and GA21 maize and GT73 canola events.

  1. Molecular cloning and biochemical characterization of the UDP-glucose: flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase from Concord grape (Vitis labrusca).

    PubMed

    Hall, Dawn; Yuan, Xiao Xin; Murata, Jun; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2012-02-01

    Glucosylation of anthocyanidin substrates at the 3-O-position is crucial for the red pigmentation of grape berries and wine. The gene that encodes the enzyme involved in this reaction has been cloned from Vitis labrusca cv. Concord, heterologously expressed, and the recombinant enzyme (rVL3GT) was characterized. VL3GT has 96% amino acid sequence identity with Vitis vinifera VV3GT and groups phylogenetically with several other flavonoid 3-O-glycosyltransferases. In vitro substrate specificity studies and kinetic analyses of rVL3GT indicate that this enzyme preferentially glucosylates cyanidin as compared with quercetin. Crude protein extracts from several Concord grape tissues were assayed for glucosyltransferase activity with cyanidin and quercetin as acceptor substrates. A comparison of the VL3GT activities toward with these substrates showed that the 3GT enzyme activity is consistent with the expression of VL3GT in these tissues and is coincident with the biosynthesis of anthocyanins in both location and developmental stages. Enzyme activities in grape mesocarp, pre-veraison exocarp, leaf, flower bud, and flower tissues glucosylated quercetin but not cyanidin at high rates, suggesting the presence of additional enzymes which are able to glucosylate the 3-O-position of flavonols with higher specificity than anthocyanidins.

  2. Coordinated Time Resolved Spectrophotometry of Asteroid 163249 (2002 GT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Erin L.; Woodward, C.; Gordon, M.; Wagner, M. R.; Chesley, S.; Hicks, M.; Pittichova, J.; Pravec, P.

    2013-10-01

    The near-Earth asteroid 163249 (2002 GT), classified as a potentially hazardous asteroid (PHA), has been identified a potential rendezvous target for the NASA Deep Impact spacecraft on 4 Jan 2020. As part of a coordinated international effort to study this asteroid during its 2013 apparition (J. Pittichová et al. DPS 2013), we obtained simultaneous Sloan r-band photometry at the Steward Observatory Bok 2.3-m telescope (+90Prime) and optical spectroscopic observations covering a wavelength interval from ~5400 to ~8500 Angstrom at the MMT 6.5-m (+RedChannel spectrograph) on 2013 June 16 and 17 UT near close Earth approach (heliocentric distance ~1.07 AU; geocentric distance ~0.13 AU) at 180 sec intervals over the ~3.76 hr rotational period. Our objective was to obtain a temporal sequence of spectra to assess surface mineralogy (seeking to potentially detect the 0.7 micron absorption bands attributed to phylosilicate materials) and to determine whether variations in the spectral slope and/or surface mineralogy are evident as a function of rotational period. Here we present initial analysis of these datasets, describing the light-curve and the reflectance spectra as a function of rotational phase. These datasets will be incorporated into a larger compendium describing the characteristics of asteroid 163249. Acknowledgement: This research supported in part by NASA 12-PAST-12-0010 grant NNX13AJ11G , and an appointment (E.L.R.) to the NASA Postdoctoral Program at the Goddard Space Flight Center, administered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through a contract with NASA. Observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona. P.P. was supported by the Grant Agency of the Czech Republic, Grant P209/12/0229.

  3. Comparison of Raw Acceleration from the GENEA and ActiGraph™ GT3X+ Activity Monitors

    PubMed Central

    John, Dinesh; Sasaki, Jeffer; Staudenmayer, John; Mavilia, Marianna; Freedson, Patty S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare raw acceleration output of the ActiGraph™ GT3X+ and GENEA activity monitors. Methods: A GT3X+ and GENEA were oscillated in an orbital shaker at frequencies ranging from 0.7 to 4.0 Hz (ten 2-min trials/frequency) on a fixed radius of 5.08 cm. Additionally, 10 participants (age = 23.8 ± 5.4 years) wore the GT3X+ and GENEA on the dominant wrist and performed treadmill walking (2.0 and 3.5 mph) and running (5.5 and 7.5 mph) and simulated free-living activities (computer work, cleaning a room, vacuuming and throwing a ball) for 2-min each. A linear mixed model was used to compare the mean triaxial vector magnitude (VM) from the GT3X+ and GENEA at each oscillation frequency. For the human testing protocol, random forest machine-learning technique was used to develop two models using frequency domain (FD) and time domain (TD) features for each monitor. We compared activity type recognition accuracy between the GT3X+ and GENEA when the prediction model was fit using one monitor and then applied to the other. Z-statistics were used to compare the proportion of accurate predictions from the GT3X+ and GENEA for each model. Results: GENEA produced significantly higher (p < 0.05, 3.5 to 6.2%) mean VM than GT3X+ at all frequencies during shaker testing. Training the model using TD input features on the GENEA and applied to GT3X+ data yielded significantly lower (p < 0.05) prediction accuracy. Prediction accuracy was not compromised when interchangeably using FD models between monitors. Conclusions: It may be inappropriate to apply a model developed on the GENEA to predict activity type using GT3X+ data when input features are TD attributes of raw acceleration. PMID:24177727

  4. Multipartite asymmetric quantum cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Iblisdir, S.; Gisin, N.; Acin, A.; Cerf, N.J.; Filip, R.; Fiurasek, J.

    2005-10-15

    We investigate the optimal distribution of quantum information over multipartite systems in asymmetric settings. We introduce cloning transformations that take N identical replicas of a pure state in any dimension as input and yield a collection of clones with nonidentical fidelities. As an example, if the clones are partitioned into a set of M{sub A} clones with fidelity F{sup A} and another set of M{sub B} clones with fidelity F{sup B}, the trade-off between these fidelities is analyzed, and particular cases of optimal N{yields}M{sub A}+M{sub B} cloning machines are exhibited. We also present an optimal 1{yields}1+1+1 cloning machine, which is an example of a tripartite fully asymmetric cloner. Finally, it is shown how these cloning machines can be optically realized.

  5. Ethical issues in cloning.

    PubMed

    Satris, S

    2000-01-01

    There is great public concern with the ethics of human cloning. This paper briefly examines some of what I identify as pseudo-problems or myths associated with cloning, and some of the more substantial ethical concerns.

  6. The identity of clones.

    PubMed

    Evers, K

    1999-02-01

    A common concern with respect to cloning is based on the belief that cloning produces identical individuals. This is a fundamental misunderstanding of what type of identity-relation cloning involves. The concept "identity" is ambiguous, and the statement that cloning produces "identical" individuals is not meaningful unless the notion of identity is clarified. This paper distinguishes between numerical and qualitative; relational and intrinsic: logical and empirical identity, and discusses the empirical individuation of clones in terms of genetics, physiology, perception, cognition and personality. I argue that the only relation of identity cloning involves is qualitative, intrinsic and empirical: genetic indiscernibility, unlikely to include identity under other aspects mentioned. A popular argument against cloning claims our "right" to a "unique identity". This objection either implies (absurdly) the right not to be an identical twin, or assumes (incorrectly) that cloning involves identity other than genetic. Either way, the argument is untenable.

  7. Aristotle and headless clones.

    PubMed

    Mosteller, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Cloned organisms can be genetically altered so that they do not exhibit higher brain functioning. This form of therapeutic cloning allows for genetically identical organs and tissues to be harvested from the clone for the use of the organism that is cloned. "Spare parts" cloning promises many opportunities for future medical advances. What is the ontological and ethical status of spare parts, headless clones? This paper attempts to answer this question from the perspective of Aristotle's view of the soul. Aristotle's metaphysics as applied to his view of biological essences generates an ethic that can contribute to moral reasoning regarding the use of headless spare parts clones. The task of this paper is to show the implications that Aristotle's view of the soul, if it is true, would have on the ethics of headless, spare parts cloning. PMID:16180113

  8. Aristotle and headless clones.

    PubMed

    Mosteller, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Cloned organisms can be genetically altered so that they do not exhibit higher brain functioning. This form of therapeutic cloning allows for genetically identical organs and tissues to be harvested from the clone for the use of the organism that is cloned. "Spare parts" cloning promises many opportunities for future medical advances. What is the ontological and ethical status of spare parts, headless clones? This paper attempts to answer this question from the perspective of Aristotle's view of the soul. Aristotle's metaphysics as applied to his view of biological essences generates an ethic that can contribute to moral reasoning regarding the use of headless spare parts clones. The task of this paper is to show the implications that Aristotle's view of the soul, if it is true, would have on the ethics of headless, spare parts cloning.

  9. Molecular cloning of covalently closed circular DNA of bovine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Kashmiri, S V; Mehdi, R; Ferrer, J F

    1984-01-01

    The two species of covalently closed circular DNA molecules of bovine leukemia virus were cloned in the lambda phage vector lambda gtWES X lambda B. Of the nine independent recombinant lambda-bovine leukemia virus clones that were analyzed, three were derived from the small and six were derived from the large circular molecules carrying, respectively, one and two copies of the long terminal repeat sequences. Comprehensive restriction endonuclease mapping of the unintegrated bovine leukemia virus and the cloned DNA molecules showed that eight of the nine clones carried viral information without any detectable deletions or insertions of more than ca. 50 base pairs. One of the nine clones, which carries a retroviral insert with one copy of the long terminal repeat, had a deletion of ca. 150 base pairs. Images PMID:6319758

  10. Energy recuperation in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and gas turbine (GT) combined system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchonthara, Prapan; Bhattacharya, Sankar; Tsutsumi, Atsushi

    A combined power generation system consisting of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and a gas turbine (GT) with steam and heat recuperation (HR) was evaluated using a commercial process simulation tool, ASPEN Plus. The effect of steam recuperation (SR) on the overall efficiency of the combined system was investigated by comparing the SOFC-GT during heat and steam recuperation (HSR) against the system during only heat recuperation. At low turbine inlet temperatures (TITs), the overall efficiency of the SOFC-GT combined system with heat and steam recuperation improved by showing an increase in TIT and a reduction in pressure ratio (PR). On the other hand, at high TITs, the opposite trend was observed. The integration of steam recuperation was found to improve the overall efficiency and specific power of SOFC-GT combined systems with a relatively compact SOFC component.

  11. Cloning. Pigs is pigs.

    PubMed

    Prather, R S

    2000-09-15

    Since the first report of a cloned animal (Dolly the sheep) 3 years ago, cloning mammals has become something of a cottage industry. As Prather discusses in his Perspective, pigs can now be added to the august list of cloned animals, which includes cows, goats, and mice. This is a particularly spectacular achievement because pig cloning has turned out to be notoriously difficult. The pig is also a valuable domestic animal to have cloned because, being physiologically close to humans, its organs can be used in xenotransplantation.

  12. Cloning. Pigs is pigs.

    PubMed

    Prather, R S

    2000-09-15

    Since the first report of a cloned animal (Dolly the sheep) 3 years ago, cloning mammals has become something of a cottage industry. As Prather discusses in his Perspective, pigs can now be added to the august list of cloned animals, which includes cows, goats, and mice. This is a particularly spectacular achievement because pig cloning has turned out to be notoriously difficult. The pig is also a valuable domestic animal to have cloned because, being physiologically close to humans, its organs can be used in xenotransplantation. PMID:11012362

  13. Genetically modified flax expressing NAP-SsGT1 transgene: examination of anti-inflammatory action.

    PubMed

    Matusiewicz, Magdalena; Kosieradzka, Iwona; Zuk, Magdalena; Szopa, Jan

    2014-09-22

    The aim of the work was to define the influence of dietary supplementation with GM (genetically modified) GT#4 flaxseed cake enriched in polyphenols on inflammation development in mice liver. Mice were given ad libitum isoprotein diets: (1) standard diet; (2) high-fat diet rich in lard, high-fat diet enriched with 30% of (3) isogenic flax Linola seed cake; and (4) GM GT#4 flaxseed cake; for 96 days. Administration of transgenic and isogenic seed cake lowered body weight gain, of transgenic to the standard diet level. Serum total antioxidant status was statistically significantly improved in GT#4 flaxseed cake group and did not differ from Linola. Serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, lipid profile and the liver concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α were ameliorated by GM and isogenic flaxseed cake consumption. The level of pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ did not differ between mice obtaining GM GT#4 and non-GM flaxseed cakes. The C-reactive protein concentration was reduced in animals fed GT#4 flaxseed cake and did not differ from those fed non-GM flaxseed cake-based diet. Similarly, the liver structure of mice consuming diets enriched in flaxseed cake was improved. Dietetic enrichment with GM GT#4 and non-GM flaxseed cakes may be a promising solution for health problems resulting from improper diet.

  14. Differential screening of a human pancreatic adenocarcinoma lambda gt11 expression library has identified increased transcription of elongation factor EF-1 alpha in tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Grant, A G; Flomen, R M; Tizard, M L; Grant, D A

    1992-03-12

    A human pancreatic adenocarcinoma lambda gt11 expression library was differentially screened with mRNA derived from normal and cancerous pancreatic tissues. Five clones preferentially hybridized with pancreatic adenocarcinoma mRNA. cDNA inserts from 4 of these clones were amplified by PCR, labelled with alpha 32P and used in Northern blot analysis against mRNA prepared from a variety of tumour and normal tissues. lambda GER-4 identified a pancreas-associated mRNA (greater than 10 kb) with no homology with known sequences at either the nucleic or amino-acid level. lambda GER-2 identified a 1.7-kb mRNA transcript that was over-expressed in mRNA prepared from pancreas, colon, breast, lung and gastric tumours relative to normal tissues. Sequence analysis and restriction-enzyme mapping showed that this clone was completely homologous with the active form of human elongation factor EF-1 alpha. This high level of EF-1 alpha-mRNA expression in tumour tissues lends support to the increasing evidence that EF-1 alpha is an important regulator of the cell cycle. PMID:1544708

  15. [Construction of genomic library of L. interrogans serovar lai using lambda gt11 as the vector and a study of recombiant plasmid pDL121].

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Dai, B; Jing, B; Wu, W; Li, S; Fang, Z; Zhao, H; Ye, D; Yan, R; Liu, J; Song, S; Yang, Y; Zhang, Y; Liu, F; Tu, Y; Yang, H; Huang, Z; Liang, L; Hu, L; Zhao, M

    1997-03-01

    A genomic library of L. interrogans serovar lai strain 017 has been constructed using lambda gt11 as the vector. DNA was partially digested by two blunt-end restriction enzymes, then methylated with EcoR I methylase; after EcoR I linker was added to the DNA, the linker-ended DNA was ligated to the dephosphorylated EcoR I digested lambda gt11 arms. The recombined DNA was packaged in vitro, and used to transduct E. coli Y1090 for amplification. There were 2.1 x 10(6) recombinant bacteriophages as recognized by their ability to form white plaques plated on Lac host in the presence of both IPTG and X-Ga1. A positive clone, designated lambda DL12, was screened with a rabbit anti-serum against L. interrogans serovar lai from the genomic library. The DNA from lambda DL12 was subcloned into plasmid pUC18. A recombinant (designated as pDL121) was obtained. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that a 23 kd was expressed in E. coli JM 103 harboring pDL121. Western blotting analysis showed that a specific protein band molecular weight of 23 kd could be recognized by the rabbit antiserum against L. interrogans serovar lai strain 017. PMID:10684055

  16. A thermodynamic study of waste heat recovery from GT-MHR using organic Rankine cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yari, Mortaza; Mahmoudi, S. M. S.

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the utilization of waste heat from a gas turbine-modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) using different arrangements of organic Rankine cycles (ORCs) for power production. The considered organic Rankine cycles were: simple organic Rankine cycle (SORC), ORC with internal heat exchanger (HORC) and regenerative organic Rankine cycle (RORC). The performances of the combined cycles were studied from the point of view of first and second-laws of thermodynamics. Individual models were developed for each component and the effects of some important parameters such as compressor pressure ratio, turbine inlet temperature, and evaporator and environment temperatures on the efficiencies and on the exergy destruction rate were studied. Finally the combined cycles were optimized thermodynamically using the EES (Engineering Equation Solver) software. Based on the identical operating conditions for the GT-MHR cycle, a comparison between the three combined cycles and a simple GT-MHR cycle is also were made. This comparison was also carried out from the point of view of economics. The GT-MHR/SORC combined cycle proved to be the best among all the cycles from the point of view of both thermodynamics and economics. The efficiency of this cycle was about 10% higher than that of GT-MHR alone.

  17. Ganglioside GT1b protects human spermatozoa from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA and membrane damage.

    PubMed

    Gavella, Mirjana; Garaj-Vrhovac, Verica; Lipovac, Vaskresenija; Antica, Mariastefania; Gajski, Goran; Car, Nikica

    2010-06-01

    We have reported previously that various gangliosides, the sialic acid containing glycosphingolipids, provide protection against sperm injury caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we investigated the effect of treatment of human spermatozoa with ganglioside GT1b on hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced DNA fragmentation and plasma membrane damage. Single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay) used in the assessment of sperm DNA integrity showed that in vitro supplemented GT1b (100 microm) significantly reduced DNA damage induced by H(2)O(2) (200 microm) (p < 0.05). Measurements of Annexin V binding in combination with the propidium iodide vital dye labelling demonstrated that the spermatozoa pre-treated with GT1b exhibited a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the percentage of live cells with intact membrane and decreased phosphatidylserine translocation after exposure to H(2)O(2). Flow cytometry using the intracellular ROS-sensitive fluorescence dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate dye employed to investigate the transport of the extracellularly supplied H(2)O(2) into the cell interior revealed that ganglioside GT1b completely inhibited the passage of H(2)O(2) through the sperm membrane. These results suggest that ganglioside GT1b may protect human spermatozoa from H(2)O(2)-induced damage by rendering sperm membrane more hydrophobic, thus inhibiting the diffusion of H(2)O(2) across the membrane.

  18. Detection of restricted predominant epitopes of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus capsid proteins expressed in the lambda gt11 system: differential patterns of antibody reactivity among different mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Crane, M A; Jue, C; Mitchell, M; Lipton, H; Kim, B S

    1990-05-01

    Intracerebral injection of mice with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus results in chronic demyelination in susceptible strains, and serves as a model system for the study of multiple sclerosis. The role of individual epitopes in the disease process remains to be elucidated. Random fragments of DNA from the viral capsid protein genome covering the coding regions from VP1, VP2, and VP3 have been expressed in the lambda gt11 vector system. Fusion proteins from the clones were expressed and probed with antibodies from both resistant and susceptible strains of mice. Each strain displays a distinctive pattern with certain fusion proteins recognized by all of the strains and others recognized uniquely by either the susceptible or the resistant strains.

  19. CDNA CLONING OF FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) ESTROGEN AND ANDROGEN RECEPTORS FOR USE IN STEROID RECEPTOR EXTRAPOLATION STUDIES FOR ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    cDNA Cloning of Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) Estrogen and Androgen Receptors for Use in Steroid Receptor Extrapolation Studies for Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals.

    Wilson, V.S.1,, Korte, J.2, Hartig P. 1, Ankley, G.T.2, Gray, L.E., Jr 1, , and Welch, J.E.1. 1U.S...

  20. Method for cloning genes

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, S.M.; Pereira, D.; Sood, A.

    1988-04-19

    This patent describes a recombinant cloning vehicle comprising an inserted human gene, the improvement wherein the cloning vehicle is isolated from a recombinant clone which is isolated and identified by a process comprising the steps of: (a) effecting cDNA synthesis on a mixture of mRNAs containing a target mRNA coding for a major hisitocompatibility antigen, and isolating the resultant cDNA mixture; (b) inserting the resultant cDNA into recombinant cloning vehicles, and transforming hosts with the vehicles; and (c) separating the transformants and isolating and identifying a recombinant clone containing a DNA segment which is homologous over at least a portion thereof to at least one oligonucleotide probe specific for the DNA segment.

  1. LU60645GT and MA132843GT Catalogues of Lunar and Martian Impact Craters Developed Using a Crater Shape-based Interpolation Crater Detection Algorithm for Topography Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salamuniccar, Goran; Loncaric, Sven; Mazarico, Erwan Matias

    2012-01-01

    For Mars, 57,633 craters from the manually assembled catalogues and 72,668 additional craters identified using several crater detection algorithms (CDAs) have been merged into the MA130301GT catalogue. By contrast, for the Moon the most complete previous catalogue contains only 14,923 craters. Two recent missions provided higher-quality digital elevation maps (DEMs): SELENE (in 1/16° resolution) and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (we used up to 1/512°). This was the main motivation for work on the new Crater Shape-based interpolation module, which improves previous CDA as follows: (1) it decreases the number of false-detections for the required number of true detections; (2) it improves detection capabilities for very small craters; and (3) it provides more accurate automated measurements of craters' properties. The results are: (1) LU60645GT, which is currently the most complete (up to D>=8 km) catalogue of Lunar craters; and (2) MA132843GT catalogue of Martian craters complete up to D>=2 km, which is the extension of the previous MA130301GT catalogue. As previously achieved for Mars, LU60645GT provides all properties that were provided by the previous Lunar catalogues, plus: (1) correlation between morphological descriptors from used catalogues; (2) correlation between manually assigned attributes and automated measurements; (3) average errors and their standard deviations for manually and automatically assigned attributes such as position coordinates, diameter, depth/diameter ratio, etc; and (4) a review of positional accuracy of used datasets. Additionally, surface dating could potentially be improved with the exhaustiveness of this new catalogue. The accompanying results are: (1) the possibility of comparing a large number of Lunar and Martian craters, of e.g. depth/diameter ratio and 2D profiles; (2) utilisation of a method for re-projection of datasets and catalogues, which is very useful for craters that are very close to poles; and (3) the extension of the

  2. On cloning human beings.

    PubMed

    de Melo-Martin, Inmaculada

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show that arguments for and against cloning fail to make their case because of one or both of the following reasons: 1) they take for granted customary beliefs and assumptions that are far from being unquestionable; 2) they tend to ignore the context in which human cloning is developed. I will analyze some of the assumptions underlying the main arguments that have been offered for and against cloning. Once these assumptions are critically analyzed, arguments both rejecting and supporting human cloning seem to lose weight. I will first briefly present the main arguments that have been proposed against cloning and I will argue that they fail to establish their case. In the next section I will evaluate some of the positive arguments that have been offered supporting such technology. This analysis will show that the case for cloning also fails. Finally, I will maintain that because critics and especially supporters of this technology neglect the context in which human cloning is developed and might be implemented, their arguments are far from compelling.

  3. The "Invisible" Gifted and Talented Bilingual Students: A Current Report on Enrollment in GT Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esquierdo, J. Joy; Arreguin-Anderson, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The issue of underrepresentation in gifted and talented (GT) programs has developed into a critical educational concern. At the core are ambiguous identification assessment practices, especially for bilingual students. To illustrate, this article reports data from the last decade that supports the underrepresentation of gifted Hispanic bilingual…

  4. GT 70 Student Personnel Workshop (William Rainey Harper College, October 14-November 1, 1968).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Group 10 for the Seventies, Chicago Heights, IL.

    The papers read at the Student Personnel Workshop sponsored by the GT 70 Consortium of Junior Colleges are presented. The workshop, held at William Rainey Harper College, was attended by representatives from ten junior colleges from ten states. Presentations included: Exceptional Practices in Junior College Student Personnel Programs, A…

  5. MAXI/GSC detected a high state on an RS CVn star GT Mus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, R.; Nakamura, Y.; Tsuboi, Y.; Nakahira, S.; Negoro, H.; Ueno, S.; Tomida, H.; Nakahira, S.; Ishikawa, M.; Nakagawa, Y. E.; Sugawara, Y.; Mihara, T.; Sugizaki, M.; Serino, M.; Iwakiri, W.; Shidatsu, M.; Sugimoto, J.; Takagi, T.; Matsuoka, M.; Kawai, N.; Isobe, N.; Sugita, S.; Yoshii, T.; Tachibana, Y.; Ono, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Yoshida, A.; Sakamoto, T.; Kawakubo, Y.; Kitaoka, Y.; Tsunemi, H.; Shomura, R.; Nakajima, M.; Tanaka, K.; Masumitsu, T.; Kawase, T.; Ueda, Y.; Kawamuro, T.; Hori, T.; Tanimoto, A.; Yamauchi, M.; Furuya, K.; Yamaoka, K.

    2016-07-01

    At 2016-07-16 19:18 UT , the MAXI/GSC nova alert system triggered on a bright source at a position consistent with that of an RS CVn star GT Mus. The flux increased from 2016-07-16 13:08:30 UT to 2016-07-16 19:18 UT (the trigger time).

  6. Comparison of Yamax pedometer and GT3X accelerometer steps in a free-living sample

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to compare steps detected by the Yamax pedometer (PEDO) versus the GT3X accelerometer (ACCEL) in free-living adults. Daily PEDO and ACCEL steps were collected from a sample of 23 overweight and obese participants (18 females; mean +/- sd: age = 52.6 +/- 8.4 yr.; body mass index = 3...

  7. Genome-wide hydroxymethylation tested using the HELP-GT assay shows redistribution in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Yu, Yiting; Suzuki, Masako; Campbell, Nathaniel; Mazdo, Jozef; Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Bhagat, Tushar D.; Nischal, Sangeeta; Christopeit, Maximilian; Parekh, Samir; Steidl, Ulrich; Godley, Lucy; Maitra, Anirban; Greally, John M.; Verma, Amit

    2013-01-01

    5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) is a recently discovered epigenetic modification that is altered in cancers. Genome-wide assays for 5-hmC determination are needed as many of the techniques for 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) determination, including methyl-sensitive restriction digestion and bisulfite sequencing cannot distinguish between 5-mC and 5-hmC. Glycosylation of 5-hmC residues by beta-glucosyl transferase (β-GT) can make CCGG residues insensitive to digestion by MspI. Restriction digestion by HpaII, MspI or MspI after β-GT conversion, followed by adapter ligation, massive parallel sequencing and custom bioinformatic analysis allowed us determine distribution of 5-mC and 5-hmC at single base pair resolution at MspI restriction sites. The resulting HpaII tiny fragment Enrichment by Ligation-mediated PCR with β-GT (HELP-GT) assay identified 5-hmC loci that were validated at global level by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and the locus-specific level by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction of 5-hmC pull-down DNA. Hydroxymethylation at both promoter and intragenic locations correlated positively with gene expression. Analysis of pancreatic cancer samples revealed striking redistribution of 5-hmC sites in cancer cells and demonstrated enrichment of this modification at many oncogenic promoters such as GATA6. The HELP-GT assay allowed global determination of 5-hmC and 5-mC from low amounts of DNA and with the use of modest sequencing resources. Redistribution of 5-hmC seen in cancer highlights the importance of determination of this modification in conjugation with conventional methylome analysis. PMID:23861445

  8. Do Managers Clone Themselves?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    A recent questionnaire survey provides statistics on male managers' views of female managers. The author recommends that male managers break out of their cloning behavior and that the goal ought to be a plurality in management. (Author/WD)

  9. Statement on Human Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... form Search American Association for the Advancement of Science Statement on Human Cloning Print Email Tweet The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recognizes the intense debates within our society ...

  10. 78 FR 20386 - Notice of Receipt of Petition for Decision That Nonconforming 2012 Porsche GT3RS Passenger Cars...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78). How to... Nonconforming 2012 Porsche GT3RS Passenger Cars Are Eligible for Importation AGENCY: National Highway Traffic... Porsche GT3RS passenger cars that were not originally manufactured to comply with all applicable...

  11. The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented (NRC/GT) Newsletter, June 1991-Winter 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gubbins, E. Jean, Ed.; Siegle, Del L., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    These 15 newsletters from the National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented (NRC/GT) contain the following articles: (1) "National Research Needs Assessment Process" (Brian D. Reid); (2) "NRC/GT: Update of Year 2 Activities" (E. Jean Gubbins); (3) "Parents: Their Impact on Gifted Adolescents" (Julie L. Sherman); (4) "Cluster Grouping Fact…

  12. Twins: A cloning experience.

    PubMed

    Prainsack, Barbara; Spector, Tim D

    2006-11-01

    Drawing upon qualitative interviews with monozygotic (identical) twins sharing 100% of their genes, and with dizygotic (fraternal) twins and singletons as control groups, this paper explores what it means to be genetically identical. (The twins interviewed were from the TwinsUK register in London.) In the context of the ongoing debate on human reproductive cloning, it examines questions such as: To what extent do identical twins perceive their emotional and physical bond to be a result of their genetic makeup? What would they think if they had been deliberately created genetically identical? How would they feel about being genetically identical to a person who was born a few years earlier or later? First, our respondents ascribed no great significance to the role of genes in their understanding of what it means to be identical twins. Second, the opinion that human reproductive cloning would "interfere with nature", or "contradict God's will", was expressed by our respondents exclusively on the abstract level. The more our respondents were able to relate a particular invented cloning scenario to their own life-worlds, the lower the prevalence of the argument. Third, for all three groups of respondents, the scenario of having been born in one of the other groups was perceived as strange. Fourth, the aspect that our respondents disliked about cloning scenarios was the potential motives of the cloners. Without equating monozygotic twins directly with "clones", these results from "naturally" genetically identical individuals add a new dimension to what a future cloning situation could entail: The cloned person might possibly (a) perceive a close physical and emotional connection to the progenitor as a blessing; (b) suffer from preconceptions of people who regard physical likeness as a sign of incomplete individuality; and (c) perceive the idea of not having been born a clone of a particular person as unpleasant.

  13. GnIH plays a negative role in regulating GtH expression in the common carp, Cyprinus carpio L.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei; Cao, Mengxi; Chen, Ji; Li, Yongming; Wang, Yaping; Zhu, Zuoyan; Hu, Wei

    2016-09-01

    In birds and mammals, the gonadotrophin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) effectively inhibits the expression of gonadotrophin (GtH). In teleosts, the effects of GnIH are still unclear and under much debate. The aim of this study is to evaluate the functions of GnIH/receptors of gonadotrophin-inhibitory hormone (GnIHRs) system during reproduction in the common carp, Cyprinus carpio L. We cloned the full cDNA sequences of GnIH /GnIHRs. Real-time PCR results showed that GnIH/GnIHRs were distributed extensively across the whole hypothalamus-pituitary-gonad (HPG) axis. We also examined the changes of GnIH/GnIHRs in the HPG axis during reproduction. GnIH mRNA expression was decreased to the minimum value in Apr, the spawning month, and increased immediately after the completion of reproduction. Expression pattern of GnIH during reproduction was the opposite to those of Gonadotrophin release hormone 3 (GnRH3) and luteinizing hormone (LH). Expression patterns of GnIHRs were similar to that of GnIH in the hypothalamus. In the pituitary, GnIHR2/3 peaked in March before spawning. In the ovaries, the GnIHR1 decreased to the minimum value in April, but GnIHR2/3 increased. By injection and incubation with synthesized GnIH-III peptide, we confirmed the negative influence of GnIH on mRNAs of the follicle-stimulating hormone-β and LH-β subunits in the common carp. These results show that the GnIH/GnIHRs system is involved in the negative regulation of reproduction in HPG axis of the common carp. PMID:27263051

  14. Cloning and characterization of a glucosyltransferase from Crocus sativus stigmas involved in flavonoid glucosylation

    PubMed Central

    Moraga, Ángela Rubio; Mozos, Almudena Trapero; Ahrazem, Oussama; Gómez-Gómez, Lourdes

    2009-01-01

    Background Flavonol glucosides constitute the second group of secondary metabolites that accumulate in Crocus sativus stigmas. To date there are no reports of functionally characterized flavonoid glucosyltransferases in C. sativus, despite the importance of these compounds as antioxidant agents. Moreover, their bitter taste makes them excellent candidates for consideration as potential organoleptic agents of saffron spice, the dry stigmas of C. sativus. Results Using degenerate primers designed to match the plant secondary product glucosyltransferase (PSPG) box we cloned a full length cDNA encoding CsGT45 from C. sativus stigmas. This protein showed homology with flavonoid glucosyltransferases. In vitro reactions showed that CsGT45 catalyses the transfer of glucose from UDP_glucose to kaempferol and quercetin. Kaempferol is the unique flavonol present in C. sativus stigmas and the levels of its glucosides changed during stigma development, and these changes, are correlated with the expression levels of CsGT45 during these developmental stages. Conclusion Findings presented here suggest that CsGT45 is an active enzyme that plays a role in the formation of flavonoid glucosides in C. sativus. PMID:19695093

  15. Pathogen- and NaCl-induced expression of the SCaM-4 promoter is mediated in part by a GT-1 box that interacts with a GT-1-like transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Man Lyang; Kang, Yun Hwan; Jeon, Joo Mi; Yoo, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Min Chul; Park, Chan Young; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Moon, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Ju Huck; Yoon, Hae Won; Lee, Sung-Ho; Chung, Woo Sik; Lim, Chae Oh; Lee, Sang Yeol; Hong, Jong Chan; Cho, Moo Je

    2004-08-01

    The Ca(2+)-binding protein calmodulin mediates cellular Ca(2+) signals in response to a wide array of stimuli in higher eukaryotes. Plants express numerous CaM isoforms. Transcription of one soybean (Glycine max) CaM isoform, SCaM-4, is dramatically induced within 30 min of pathogen or NaCl stresses. To characterize the cis-acting element(s) of this gene, we isolated an approximately 2-kb promoter sequence of the gene. Deletion analysis of the promoter revealed that a 130-bp region located between nucleotide positions -858 and -728 is required for the stressors to induce expression of SCaM-4. A hexameric DNA sequence within this region, GAAAAA (GT-1 cis-element), was identified as a core cis-acting element for the induction of the SCaM-4 gene. The GT-1 cis-element interacts with an Arabidopsis GT-1-like transcription factor, AtGT-3b, in vitro and in a yeast selection system. Transcription of AtGT-3b is also rapidly induced within 30 min after pathogen and NaCl treatment. These results suggest that an interaction between a GT-1 cis-element and a GT-1-like transcription factor plays a role in pathogen- and salt-induced SCaM-4 gene expression in both soybean and Arabidopsis.

  16. Human cDNA clones for four species of G alpha s signal transduction protein.

    PubMed Central

    Bray, P; Carter, A; Simons, C; Guo, V; Puckett, C; Kamholz, J; Spiegel, A; Nirenberg, M

    1986-01-01

    lambda gt11 cDNA libraries derived from human brain were screened with oligonucleotide probes for recombinants that code for alpha subunits of G signal transduction proteins. Eleven alpha s clones were detected with both probes and characterized. Four types of alpha s cDNA were cloned that differ in nucleotide sequence in the region that corresponds to amino acid residues 71-88. The clones differ in the codon for alpha s amino acid residue 71 (glutamic acid or aspartic acid), the presence or absence of codons for the next 15 amino acid residues, and the presence or absence of an adjacent serine residue. S1 nuclease protection experiments revealed at least two forms of alpha s mRNA. A mechanism for generating four species of alpha s mRNA by alternative splicing of precursor RNA is proposed. Images PMID:3024154

  17. 2 kW (2  +  1) GT-wave fiber amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Huan; Wang, Yuying; Peng, Kun; Wang, Zhen; Ni, Li; Wang, Xiaolong; Wang, Jianjun; Jing, Feng; Lin, Aoxiang

    2016-04-01

    We report on a home-made 2 kW (2  +  1) GT-wave fiber, and demonstrated its use in the creation of a bidirectional pump amplifier. The constructed all-fiber master oscillator power amplifier system allowed for 2.65 kW aggregated pump power from four 976 nm-laser-diode ports simultaneously and generated a 2.02 kW laser output with optical-to-optical efficiency of 67.8% at 1064 nm. This bi-directional pump GT-wave fiber amplifier sytem showed excellent stability at 1.35 kW, and the laser beam quality factor M 2 was measured to be 2.8.

  18. Search for the Binary Companion of Deep Impact Target 2002 GT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesley, Steven

    2012-10-01

    The first evidence for a possible companion to 2002 GT was acquired in April 2013. The current apparition is the only opportunity to verify or constrain possibly binary configurations for this Near Earth Asteroid before the 2020 arrival of the retargeted Deep Impact spacecraft. Ground-based options for verification have been nearly exhausted at this point. Rapid action is needed before 2002 GT's increasing distance from the Earth precludes any chance of direct confirmation of the presence of a companion. The presence, or not, of a companion, is absolutely essential information for the success of the mission. We are requesting two orbits of HST time as soon as is practical in July 2013.

  19. Somatic c.34G>T KRAS mutation: a new prescreening test for MUTYH-associated polyposis?

    PubMed

    Aimé, Adeline; Coulet, Florence; Lefevre, Jeremie H; Colas, Chrystelle; Cervera, Pascale; Flejou, Jean-François; Lascols, Olivier; Soubrier, Florent; Parc, Yann

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the somatic c.34G>T KRAS transversion as a marker suggestive of MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP). We compared 86 adenomas and 19 colorectal cancers (CRCs) of 30 MAP patients to 135 adenomas and five CRCs of 47 familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients. The c.34G>T mutation was investigated by DNA sequencing. Secondly, the germline MUTYH gene sequence was analyzed in patients carrying c.34G>T in CRCs diagnosed between 2008 and 2012. The c.34G>T was present in 39.7% of MAP adenomas versus 1.6% of FAP adenomas (P < 0.01). Sensitivity and specificity for detecting MAP were 39.7% and 98%, respectively. Sensitivity increased with the number of adenomas tested (P = 0.039). KRAS exon 2 analysis was performed on 2239 CRC and 2.2% harbored the c.34G>T transversion. Among 28 carriers of the c.34G>T mutation, biallelic MUTYH mutations were detected in seven patients (25%). One patient did not have any polyp or family history and did not fulfill criteria for MUTYH testing. With high specificity, the c.34G>T mutation seems to be a useful and promising test for MAP. For polyposis, it may guide genetic testing toward APC or MUTYH. If routinely performed in CRC patients, it could help to diagnose MUTYH-mutation carriers, even when they don't fulfill genetic testing criteria. PMID:26056087

  20. Feasibility study for SOFC-GT hybrid locomotive power part II. System packaging and operating route simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Andrew S.; Brouwer, Jacob; Samuelsen, G. Scott

    2012-09-01

    This work assesses the feasibility of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell-Gas Turbine (SOFC-GT) hybrid power systems for use as the prime mover in freight locomotives. The available space in a diesel engine-powered locomotive is compared to that required for an SOFC-GT system, inclusive of fuel processing systems necessary for the SOFC-GT. The SOFC-GT space requirement is found to be similar to current diesel engines, without consideration of the electrical balance of plant. Preliminary design of the system layout within the locomotive is carried out for illustration. Recent advances in SOFC technology and implications of future improvements are discussed as well. A previously-developed FORTRAN model of an SOFC-GT system is then augmented to simulate the kinematics and power notching of a train and its locomotives. The operation of the SOFC-GT-powered train is investigated along a representative route in Southern California, with simulations presented for diesel reformate as well as natural gas reformate and hydrogen as fuels. Operational parameters and difficulties are explored as are comparisons of expected system performance to modern diesel engines. It is found that even in the diesel case, the SOFC-GT system provides significant savings in fuel and CO2 emissions, making it an attractive option for the rail industry.

  1. Observing Campaign for Potential Deep Impact Flyby Target 163249 (2002 GT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pittichova, Jana; Chesley, S. R.; Abell, P. A.; Benner, L. A. M.

    2012-01-01

    The Deep Impact spacecraft is currently on course for a Jan. 4, 2020 flyby of the sub-kilometer near-Earth asteroid 163249 (2002 GT). The re-targeting will be complete with a final small maneuver scheduled for Oct. 4, 2012. 2002 GT, which is also designated as a Potentially Hazardous Asteroid (PHA), has a well-determined orbit and is approx 800 m in diameter (H=18.3). Little more is known about the nature of this object, but in mid-2013 it will pass near the Earth, affording an exceptional opportunity for ground-based characterization. At this apparition 2002 GT will be in range of Arecibo. In addition to Doppler measurements, radar delay observations with precisions of a few microseconds are expected and have a good chance of revealing whether the system is binary or not. The asteroid will be brighter than 16th mag., which will facilitate a host of observations at a variety of wavelengths. Light curve measurements across a wide range of viewing perspectives will reveal the rotation rate and ultimately lead to strong constraints on the shape and pole orientation. Visible and infrared spectra will constrain the mineralogy, taxonomy, albedo and size. Along with the radar observations, optical astrometry will further constrain the orbit, both to facilitate terminal guidance operations and to potentially reveal nongravitational forces acting on the asteroid. Coordinating all of these observations will be a significant task and we encourage interested observers to collaborate in this effort. The 2013 apparition of 2002 GT represents a unique opportunity to characterize a potential flyby target, which will aid interpretation of the high-resolution flyby imagery and aid planning and development of the flyby imaging sequence. The knowledge gained from this flyby will be highly relevant to the human exploration program at NASA, which desires more information on the physical characteristics of sub-kilometer near-Earth asteroids.

  2. Upgrading the GT-2A aerogravimetric complex for airborne gravity measurements in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koneshov, V. N.; Klevtsov, V. V.; Solov'ev, V. N.

    2016-05-01

    The methodical solutions for improving the GT-2A aerogravimetric complexes by incorporating the Javad Quattro-G3D GPS receiver connected to four antennas spaced in two orthogonal planes are discussed. The operation features of the advanced aerogravimetric complex are described and the results of its application during the testing flight to 78° N latitude are presented. The anomalous gravity obtained in the testing flight is compared with the EGM2008 and EIGEN-6C models.

  3. Interaction between body weight status and walking speed in steps monitoring by GT3X accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Bélanger, Marie-Lyse; Kestens, Yan; Gilbert, Jo-Anne; Tremblay, Angelo; Mathieu, Marie-Eve

    2014-08-01

    The measurement error of the step count function of the ActiGraph GT3X accelerometer was assessed at different walking speeds in 12 obese and 16 nonobese individuals. In comparison with visual verification, the accelerometer step count function measurement error was larger for obese individuals walking at low speeds (2.5 km·h(-1)). This error equated to an approximate 50% underestimation at these speeds.

  4. Observing Campaign for Potential Deep Impact Flyby Target 163249 (2002 GT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittichova, Jana; Chesley, S. R.; Abell, P. A.; Benner, L. A. M.

    2012-10-01

    The Deep Impact spacecraft is currently on course for a proposed 2020-Jan-4 flyby of Potentially Hazardous Asteroid 163249 (2002 GT). The re-targeting will be complete with a final small maneuver scheduled for 2012-Oct-04. 2002 GT has a well-determined orbit and absolute magnitude 18.3 ( 800m diameter). Little more is known about the nature of this object, but in late June 2013 it will pass 0.012 AU from Earth, affording an exceptional opportunity for ground-based characterization. At this apparition 2002 GT will be in range of Arecibo, which should provide radar delay observations with precisions of a few microseconds, potentially revealing whether the system is binary or not. The asteroid will reach magnitude V=16.1 and will be brighter than V=18 for over two months, facilitating a host of observations at a variety of wavelengths. Light curve measurements across a wide range of viewing perspectives will reveal the rotation rate and ultimately lead to strong constraints on the shape and pole orientation. Visible and infrared spectra will constrain the mineralogy, taxonomy, albedo and size. Radar and optical astrometry will further constrain the orbit, both to facilitate terminal guidance operations and, when combined with spacecraft flyby data, to potentially reveal nongravitational forces acting on the asteroid. Coordinating all of these observations will be a significant task and we encourage interested observers to collaborate in this effort. The 2013 apparition will be the last time 2002 GT will be brighter than magnitude 18 until after the 2020 spacecraft flyby and thus represents a unique opportunity to characterize a potential flyby target, which will aid planning and development of the flyby imaging sequence and interpretation of flyby imagery. The knowledge gained from this proposed flyby will be highly relevant to NASA’s human exploration program, which desires more information on the characteristics of sub-kilometer near-Earth asteroids.

  5. Met-ase: Cloning and distinct chromosomal location of a serine protease preferentially expressed in human natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, M.J.; Trapani, J.A. ); Sayers, T.J.; Wiltrout, T. ); Powers, J.C. )

    1993-12-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a human NK serine protease was obtained by screening a [lambda]-gt10 library from the Lopez NK leukemia with the rat natural killer Met-ase (RNK-Met-1) cDNA clone. In Northern blot analysis human Met-ase (Hu-Met-1) cDNA hybridized with a 0.9-kb mRNA in two human NK leukemia cell lines, unstimulated human PBMC, and untreated purified CD3[sup [minus

  6. Oocyte-secreted factors in oocyte maturation media enhance subsequent development of bovine cloned embryos.

    PubMed

    Su, Jianmin; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Bo; Liu, Jun; Luo, Yan; Guo, Zekun; Quan, Fusheng; Zhang, Yong

    2014-04-01

    Successful in vitro maturation (IVM) and oocyte quality both affect the subsequent development of cloned embryos derived from somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Developmental competence is usually lower in oocytes matured in vitro compared with those that matured in vivo, possibly due to insufficient levels of oocyte-secreted factors (OSFs) and disrupted oocyte-cumulus communication. This study investigated the effects of OSFs secreted by denuded oocytes (DOs) during IVM on the subsequent developmental competence of cloned bovine embryos. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) from antral follicles of slaughtered-cow ovaries collected from an abattoir were divided into four groups: COCs co-cultured with and without DOs in maturation media used for SCNT, as well as COCs co-cultured with and without DOs in maturation media used for in vitro fertilization (IVF). Based on the developmental competence and embryo quality of bovine embryos generated from these four groups, we found that co-culturing the COCs with DOs enhanced the in vitro development of IVF and cloned bovine embryos, and potentially generated more high-quality cloned blastocysts that possessed locus-specific histone modifications at levels similar to in vitro-fertilized embryos. These results strongly suggest that co-culturing COCs with DOs enhances subsequent developmental competence of cloned bovine embryo.

  7. Extremal quantum cloning machines

    SciTech Connect

    Chiribella, G.; D'Ariano, G. M.; Perinotti, P.; Cerf, N.J.

    2005-10-15

    We investigate the problem of cloning a set of states that is invariant under the action of an irreducible group representation. We then characterize the cloners that are extremal in the convex set of group covariant cloning machines, among which one can restrict the search for optimal cloners. For a set of states that is invariant under the discrete Weyl-Heisenberg group, we show that all extremal cloners can be unitarily realized using the so-called double-Bell states, whence providing a general proof of the popular ansatz used in the literature for finding optimal cloners in a variety of settings. Our result can also be generalized to continuous-variable optimal cloning in infinite dimensions, where the covariance group is the customary Weyl-Heisenberg group of displacement000.

  8. Cloning the laboratory mouse.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, T; Yanagimachi, R

    1999-06-01

    A brief account is given of early attempts to clone mammals (mice) by transferring cells (nuclei) of preimplantation embryos into enucleated oocytes, zygotes or blastomeres of two-cell embryos. This is followed by a brief review of recent successes using adult somatic cells: mammary gland cells for sheep, muscle cells for cattle and cumulus cells for mice. We have developed a technique for cloning the laboratory mouse by transferring cumulus cell nuclei into enucleated oocytes. With this technique, we have produced a population of over 80 cloned animals, and have carried the process over four generations. Development and fertility of these appear normal. However, the yield is very low; only approximately 1% of injected oocytes are carried to term. The challenge is now to understand the reason for this high loss. Is it a problem of technique, genomic reprogramming, somatic mutation, imprinting or incompatible cell cycle phases?

  9. Nucleotide 1376 G-->T mutation in G6PD-deficient Chinese in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ainoon, O; Joyce, J; Boo, N Y; Cheong, S K; Hamidah, N H

    1995-12-01

    G6PD deficiency is the most common human enzymopathy and affects 200 million people worldwide. To date more than 400 biochemical variants and at least 60 different point mutations in the G6PD locus have been discovered. In Malaysia the overall incidence of G6PD deficiency among males is 3.1%, being more prevalent among the Chinese and Malays and less common among the Indians. As part of our initial effort to characterise G6PD deficiency in the Malaysian population, we investigated 18 G6PD deficient Chinese male neonates for the G6PD mutation G-->T at nt 1376, a common mutation seen among the Chinese in Taiwan and mainland China. The mutation was detected by a PCR-based technique using primers that artificially create a site for restriction enzyme Xho I. We found 61% (11 out of 18) of the Chinese G6PD deficient male neonates positive for this mutation. Study of enzyme electrophoretic mobility in 7 of the cases positive for this mutation revealed three different patterns of mobility. 107% (5 out of 7), 103% (1 out of 7) and 100% (1 out of 7). This study shows that mutation G-->T at nt 1376 is a common allele causing G6PD deficiency in Malaysians of Chinese origin. The finding of different patterns of electrophoretic mobility among the 7 cases positive for 1376 G-->T mutation supports the notion that diverse biochemical variants may share the same mutation. PMID:8935127

  10. HTGR-GT closed-cycle gas turbine: a plant concept with inherent cogeneration (power plus heat production) capability

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, C.F.

    1980-04-01

    The high-grade sensible heat rejection characteristic of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor-gas turbine (HTGR-GT) plant is ideally suited to cogeneration. Cogeneration in this nuclear closed-cycle plant could include (1) bottoming Rankine cycle, (2) hot water or process steam production, (3) desalination, and (4) urban and industrial district heating. This paper discusses the HTGR-GT plant thermodynamic cycles, design features, and potential applications for the cogeneration operation modes. This paper concludes that the HTGR-GT plant, which can potentially approach a 50% overall efficiency in a combined cycle mode, can significantly aid national energy goals, particularly resource conservation.

  11. Expression cloning of genes encoding human peroxisomal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Spathaky, J.M.; Tate, A.W.; Cox, T.M.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous metabolic disorders associated with diverse peroxisomal defects have been identified but their molecular characterization has been hampered by difficulties associated with the purification of proteins from this fragile organelle. We have utilized antibodies directed against the C-terminal tripeptide peroxisomal targeting signal to detect hitherto unknown peroxisomal proteins in tissue fractions and to isolate genes encoding peroxisonal proteins from human expression libraries. We immunized rabbits with a peptide conjugate encompassing the C-terminal nine amino acids of rat peroxisomal acyl CoA oxidase. Immunoprecipitation assays using radio-labelled peptide showed that the antibody specifically recognizes the terminal SKL motif as well as C-terminal SHL and SRL but not SHL at an internal position. Affinity-purified antibody was used to probe Western blots of crude and peroxisome-enriched monkey liver preparations and detected 8-10 proteins specifically in the peroxisome fractions. 100 positive clones were identified on screening a human liver cDNA expression library in {lambda}-gt11. Sequence analysis has confirmed the identity of cDNA clones for human acyl CoA oxidase and epoxide hydrolase. Four clones show no sequence identity and their putative role in the human peroxisome is being explored.

  12. Applications of quantum cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomarico, E.; Sanguinetti, B.; Sekatski, P.; Zbinden, H.; Gisin, N.

    2011-10-01

    Quantum Cloning Machines (QCMs) allow for the copying of information, within the limits imposed by quantum mechanics. These devices are particularly interesting in the high-gain regime, i.e., when one input qubit generates a state of many output qubits. In this regime, they allow for the study of certain aspects of the quantum to classical transition. The understanding of these aspects is the root of the two recent applications that we will review in this paper: the first one is the Quantum Cloning Radiometer, a device which is able to produce an absolute measure of spectral radiance. This device exploits the fact that in the quantum regime information can be copied with only finite fidelity, whereas when a state becomes macroscopic, this fidelity gradually increases to 1. Measuring the fidelity of the cloning operation then allows to precisely determine the absolute spectral radiance of the input optical source. We will then discuss whether a Quantum Cloning Machine could be used to produce a state visible by the naked human eye, and the possibility of a Bell Experiment with humans playing the role of detectors.

  13. The Cloning of America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, Judith E.; Dobson, Russell L.

    1981-01-01

    Proposes that the U.S. school system purports to prize human variability, but many educators are engaged in activities that seek to homogenize students. Describes these activities, including diagnosis, labeling, ability grouping, and positive reinforcement. Presents suggestions for counselors to combat sources of cloning and self-validation. (RC)

  14. Human therapeutic cloning.

    PubMed

    Lanza, R P; Cibelli, J B; West, M D

    1999-09-01

    Somatic cell nuclear 'reprogramming' in livestock species is now routine in many laboratories. Here, Robert Lanza, Jose Cibelli and Michael West discuss how these techniques may soon be used to clone genetically matched cells and tissues for transplantation into patients suffering from a wide range of disorders that result from tissue loss or dysfunction.

  15. [Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning].

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Ming; Lei, An-Min; Hua, Jin-Lian; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning have widespread and attractive prospects in animal agriculture and biomedical applications. We reviewed that the quality of oocytes and nuclear reprogramming of somatic donor cells were the main reasons of the common abnormalities in cloned animals and the low efficiency of cloning and showed the problems and outlets in therapeutic cloning, such as some basic problems in nuclear transfer affected clinical applications of therapeutic cloning. Study on isolation and culture of nuclear transfer embryonic stem (ntES) cells and specific differentiation of ntES cells into important functional cells should be emphasized and could enhance the efficiency. Adult stem cells could help to cure some great diseases, but could not replace therapeutic cloning. Ethics also impeded the development of therapeutic cloning. It is necessary to improve many techniques and reinforce the research of some basic theories, then somatic nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning may apply to agriculture reproduction and benefit to human life better.

  16. The First Human Cloned Embryo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cibelli, Jose B.; Lanza, Robert P.; West, Michael D.; Ezzell, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes a process known as parthenogenesis which produces cloned, early-stage embryos and human embryos generated only from eggs. Speculates that this technology puts therapeutic cloning within reach. (DDR)

  17. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  18. A technique for measurement of earth station antenna G/T by radio stars and Applications Technology Satellites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kochevar, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    A new technique has been developed to accurately measure the G/T of a small aperture antenna using geostationary satellites and the well established radio star method. A large aperture antenna having the capability of accurately measuring its G/T by using a radio star of known power density is used to obtain an accurate G/T to use as a reference. The CNR of both the large and small aperture antennas are then measured using an Applications Technology Satellite (ATS). After normalizing the two C/N ratios to the large antenna system noise temperature the G/T or the gain G of the small aperture antenna can then be determined.

  19. Probabilistic Cloning and Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ting; Yan, Feng-Li; Wang, Zhi-Xi

    2004-06-01

    We discuss the usefulness of quantum cloning and present examples of quantum computation tasks for which the cloning offers an advantage which cannot be matched by any approach that does not resort to quantum cloning. In these quantum computations, we need to distribute quantum information contained in the states about which we have some partial information. To perform quantum computations, we use a state-dependent probabilistic quantum cloning procedure to distribute quantum information in the middle of a quantum computation.

  20. Spacing between GT-1 binding sites within a light-responsive element is critical for transcriptional activity.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmartin, P M; Chua, N H

    1990-01-01

    Dissection of the light-responsive element (LRE) located between -166 and -50 of rbcS-3A from pea has revealed critical spacing requirements between the two GT-1 binding sites for light-responsive transcription. An increase in spacing between the two sites by as little as 2 bp reduces dramatically the rbcS-3A transcript levels in vivo. Mutation of the 10 bp between the binding sites leads to slightly lower transcript levels, as do deletions of either 3 bp or 8 bp. Deletions of 5 bp or 7 bp from between the GT-1 binding sites do not affect rbcS-3A transcript levels; however, a deletion of 10 bp virtually abolishes the activity of this element. These spacing changes within the light-responsive element similarly affect transcription of a divergently oriented and truncated nopaline synthase promoter. Most spacing changes between the two GT-1 binding sites, however, do not impair the binding of GT-1 to this element in vitro. Together with previous observations, these results suggest that the nuclear factor GT-1 may interact with the binding sites in either a productive or nonproductive manner and that GT-1 binding is necessary but not sufficient for light-responsive transcription. We also discuss our results in relation to the observed spacing of similar sequence elements present within other light-responsive promoters. PMID:2152170

  1. Recombinational Cloning Using Gateway and In-Fusion Cloning Schemes

    PubMed Central

    Throop, Andrea L.; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The comprehensive study of protein structure and function, or proteomics, depends on the obtainability of full-length cDNAs in species-specific expression vectors and subsequent functional analysis of the expressed protein. Recombinational cloning is a universal cloning technique based on site-specific recombination that is independent of the insert DNA sequence of interest, which differentiates this method from the classical restriction enzyme-based cloning methods. Recombinational cloning enables rapid and efficient parallel transfer of DNA inserts into multiple expression systems. This unit summarizes strategies for generating expression-ready clones using the most popular recombinational cloning technologies, including the commercially available Gateway® (Life Technologies) and In-Fusion® (Clontech) cloning technologies. PMID:25827088

  2. Temporally-Resolved UV/VIS Reflectance Spectra of Near-Earth Asteroid 163249 2002 GT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilas, Faith; Hendrix, A.

    2013-10-01

    The Deep Impact spacecraft has been targeted by NASA to image near-Earth asteroid 163249 2002 GT when it passes nearby in 2020. To place the images it will acquire in context, a campaign to observe 2002 GT was conducted during its last, brightest apparition before fly-by in spring 2013. As part of this campaign, the asteroid was observed using the MMT 6.5-m telescope with the facility Blue Channel spectrograph on UT June 19 (V ~ 16.2). Fifteen spectra covering a wavelength range of 320 - 640 nm were obtained across a 4.57-hr time interval, exceeding the 3.766-hr rotational period of the asteroid. Each exposure was 5 min. Additional UV/blue spectra were also obtained of other S-complex main-belt and near-Earth asteroids. We have previously shown that, in the inner Solar System, space weathering affects spectra of S-complex asteroids at UV/VIS wavelengths with a "bluing" of the spectral reflectance. This effect of space weathering is consistent with the addition of iron or iron-bearing opaque minerals. In the 150-450 nm range, we expect space-weathered surfaces consisting of iron-bearing opaques to be less spectrally red (bluing) and potentially brighter than non-weathered surfaces with lower amounts of iron-bearing minerals. Further, we expect to see the onset and effects of space weathering more rapidly in the UV/blue than at VNIR wavelengths, as short wavelengths are more sensitive to thin coatings on grains that could be the result of weathering processes. The preliminary examination of the temporally-resolved spectra of 2002 GT suggests some variation, indicating a slight difference in level of weathering across the asteroid's surface. We discuss all data collectively within this context.

  3. FSV experience in support of the GT-MHR reactor physics, fuel performance, and graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, A.M.; McEachern, D.; Hanson, D.L.; Vollman, R.E.

    1994-11-01

    The Fort St. Vrain (FSV) power plant was the most recent operating graphite-moderated, helium-cooled nuclear power plant in the United States. Many similarities exist between the FSV design and the current design of the GT-MHR. Both designs use graphite as the basic building blocks of the core, as structural material, in the reflectors, and as a neutron moderator. Both designs use hexagonal fuel elements containing cylindrical fuel rods with coated fuel particles. Helium is the coolant and the power densities vary by less than 5%. Since material and geometric properties of the GT-MHR core am very similar to the FSV core, it is logical to draw upon the FSV experience in support of the GT-MHR design. In the Physics area, testing at FSV during the first three cycles of operation has confirmed that the calculational models used for the core design were very successful in predicting the core nuclear performance from initial cold criticality through power operation and refueling. There was excellent agreement between predicted and measured initial core criticality and control rod positions during startup. Measured axial flux distributions were within 5% of the predicted value at the peak. The isothermal temperature coefficient at zero power was in agreement within 3%, and even the calculated temperature defect over the whole operating range for cycle 3 was within 8% of the measured defect. In the Fuel Performance area, fuel particle coating performance, and fission gas release predictions and an overall plateout analysis were performed for decommissioning purposes. A comparison between predicted and measured fission gas release histories of Kr-85m and Xe-138 and a similar comparison with specific circulator plateout data indicated good agreement between prediction and measured data. Only I-131 plateout data was overpredicted, while Cs-137 data was underpredicted.

  4. Cloning of Homo sapiens? No!

    PubMed

    McKinnell, Robert G

    2002-01-01

    Animal cloning by nuclear transplantation was first developed in the northern leopard frog, Rana pipiens. It was soon extended to other amphibian species and within time, to various mammalian species. The production of a cloned sheep (Dolly) from an adult nuclear donor reawakened interest in human cloning. Nuclear transfer for the production of animal clones has served experimental biology well. Nonetheless, the potential burden of developmental hazards, scientists and funds diverted from more needy causes, as well as the potential assault on the concept of family has led the author to oppose human cloning.

  5. Cloning of Homo sapiens? No!

    PubMed

    McKinnell, Robert G

    2002-01-01

    Animal cloning by nuclear transplantation was first developed in the northern leopard frog, Rana pipiens. It was soon extended to other amphibian species and within time, to various mammalian species. The production of a cloned sheep (Dolly) from an adult nuclear donor reawakened interest in human cloning. Nuclear transfer for the production of animal clones has served experimental biology well. Nonetheless, the potential burden of developmental hazards, scientists and funds diverted from more needy causes, as well as the potential assault on the concept of family has led the author to oppose human cloning. PMID:11841468

  6. Analysis of the U-B-V photoelectric light curves of the eclipsing binary GT CEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolini, C.; Bonifazi, A.; Milano, L.

    1984-03-01

    The authors analyse the UBV light curves of GT Cep with different methods of solution. Some difficulties arise from the peculiar morphology of the light curves. The authors discuss the set of results and finally adopt the solution they derived by the Wilson and Devinney direct method. The system results to be a semi-detached one and this fact partly justifies the observed peculiarities. Given their results, the authors question the physical reliability of different models representing the light curves of eclipsing binaries.

  7. [Media, cloning, and bioethics].

    PubMed

    Costa, S I; Diniz, D

    2000-01-01

    This article was based on an analysis of three hundred articles from mainstream Brazilian periodicals over a period of eighteen months, beginning with the announcement of the Dolly case in February 1997. There were two main objectives: to outline the moral constants in the press associated with the possibility of cloning human beings and to identify some of the moral assumptions concerning scientific research with non-human animals that were published carelessly by the media. The authors conclude that there was a haphazard spread of fear concerning the cloning of human beings rather than an ethical debate on the issue, and that there is a serious gap between bioethical reflections and the Brazilian media.

  8. Overlap extension PCR cloning.

    PubMed

    Bryksin, Anton; Matsumura, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Rising demand for recombinant proteins has motivated the development of efficient and reliable cloning methods. Here we show how a beginner can clone virtually any DNA insert into a plasmid of choice without the use of restriction endonucleases or T4 DNA ligase. Chimeric primers encoding plasmid sequence at the 5' ends and insert sequence at the 3' ends are designed and synthesized. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is utilized to amplify the desired insert by PCR. The double-stranded product is subsequently employed as a pair of mega-primers in a PCR-like reaction with circular plasmids. The original plasmids are then destroyed in restriction digests with Dpn I. The product of the overlap extension PCR is used to transform competent Escherichia coli cells. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is used for both the amplification and fusion reactions, so both steps can be monitored and optimized in the same way. PMID:23996437

  9. Probabilistic cloning of equidistant states

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, O.; Roa, Luis; Delgado, A.

    2010-08-15

    We study the probabilistic cloning of equidistant states. These states are such that the inner product between them is a complex constant or its conjugate. Thereby, it is possible to study their cloning in a simple way. In particular, we are interested in the behavior of the cloning probability as a function of the phase of the overlap among the involved states. We show that for certain families of equidistant states Duan and Guo's cloning machine leads to cloning probabilities lower than the optimal unambiguous discrimination probability of equidistant states. We propose an alternative cloning machine whose cloning probability is higher than or equal to the optimal unambiguous discrimination probability for any family of equidistant states. Both machines achieve the same probability for equidistant states whose inner product is a positive real number.

  10. Ethical issues in livestock cloning.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P B

    1999-01-01

    Although cloning may eventually become an important technology for livestock production, four ethical issues must be addressed before the practice becomes widespread. First, researchers must establish that the procedure is not detrimental to the health or well-being of affected animals. Second, animal research institutions should evaluate the net social benefits to livestock producers by weighing the benefits to producers against the opportunity cost of research capacity lost to biomedical projects. Third, scientists should consider the indirect effects of cloning research on the larger ethical issues surrounding human cloning. Finally, the market structure for products of cloned animals should protect individual choice, and should recognize that many individuals find the prospect of cloning (or consuming cloned animals) repugnant. Analysis of these four issues is complicated by spurious arguments alleging that cloning will have a negative impact on environment and genetic diversity.

  11. Ethical issues in livestock cloning.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P B

    1999-01-01

    Although cloning may eventually become an important technology for livestock production, four ethical issues must be addressed before the practice becomes widespread. First, researchers must establish that the procedure is not detrimental to the health or well-being of affected animals. Second, animal research institutions should evaluate the net social benefits to livestock producers by weighing the benefits to producers against the opportunity cost of research capacity lost to biomedical projects. Third, scientists should consider the indirect effects of cloning research on the larger ethical issues surrounding human cloning. Finally, the market structure for products of cloned animals should protect individual choice, and should recognize that many individuals find the prospect of cloning (or consuming cloned animals) repugnant. Analysis of these four issues is complicated by spurious arguments alleging that cloning will have a negative impact on environment and genetic diversity. PMID:15719505

  12. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism's chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  13. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  14. Cloning-free CRISPR

    PubMed Central

    Arbab, Mandana; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Geijsen, Niels; Sherwood, Richard I.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We present self-cloning CRISPR/Cas9 (scCRISPR), a technology that allows for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genomic mutation and site-specific knockin transgene creation within several hours by circumventing the need to clone a site-specific single-guide RNA (sgRNA) or knockin homology construct for each target locus. We introduce a self-cleaving palindromic sgRNA plasmid and a short double-stranded DNA sequence encoding the desired locus-specific sgRNA into target cells, allowing them to produce a locus-specific sgRNA plasmid through homologous recombination. scCRISPR enables efficient generation of gene knockouts (∼88% mutation rate) at approximately one-sixth the cost of plasmid-based sgRNA construction with only 2 hr of preparation for each targeted site. Additionally, we demonstrate efficient site-specific knockin of GFP transgenes without any plasmid cloning or genome-integrated selection cassette in mouse and human embryonic stem cells (2%–4% knockin rate) through PCR-based addition of short homology arms. scCRISPR substantially lowers the bar on mouse and human transgenesis. PMID:26527385

  15. Feasibility study for SOFC-GT hybrid locomotive power: Part I. Development of a dynamic 3.5 MW SOFC-GT FORTRAN model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Andrew S.; Brouwer, Jacob; Samuelsen, G. Scott

    2012-09-01

    This work presents the development of a dynamic SOFC-GT hybrid system model applied to a long-haul freight locomotive in operation. Given the expectations of the rail industry, the model is used to develop a preliminary analysis of the proposed system's operational capability on conventional diesel fuel as well as natural gas and hydrogen as potential fuels in the future. It is found that operation of the system on all three of these fuels is feasible with favorable efficiencies and reasonable dynamic response. The use of diesel fuel reformate in the SOFC presents a challenge to the electrochemistry, especially as it relates to control and optimization of the fuel utilization in the anode compartment. This is found to arise from the large amount of carbon monoxide in diesel reformate that is fed to the fuel cell, limiting the maximum fuel utilization possible. This presents an opportunity for further investigations into carbon monoxide electrochemical oxidation and/or system integration studies where the efficiency of the fuel reformer can be balanced against the needs of the SOFC.

  16. Regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion: insights from GT1 immortal GnRH neurons.

    PubMed

    Martínez de la Escalera, G; Clapp, C

    2001-01-01

    The study of the mammalian GnRH system has been greatly advanced by the development of immortalized cell lines. Of particular relevance are the so-called GT1 cells. Not only do they exhibit many of the known physiologic characteristics of GnRH neurons in situ, but in approximately one decade have yielded new insights regarding the intrinsic physiology of individual cells and networks of GnRH neurons, as well as the nature of central and peripheral signals that directly modulate their function. For instance, valuable information has been generated concerning intrinsic properties of the system such as the inherent pulsatile pattern of secretion displayed by networks of GT1 cells. Concepts regarding feedback regulation and autocrine feedback of GnRH neurons have been dramatically expanded. Likewise, the nature of the receptors and of the proximal and distal signal transduction mechanisms involved in the actions of multiple afferent signals has been identified. Understanding this neuronal system allows a better comprehension of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and of the regulatory influences that ultimately control reproductive competence.

  17. Structure–function relationships of membrane-associated GT-B glycosyltransferases†

    PubMed Central

    Albesa-Jové, David; Giganti, David; Jackson, Mary; Alzari, Pedro M; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-associated GT-B glycosyltransferases (GTs) comprise a large family of enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a sugar moiety from nucleotide-sugar donors to a wide range of membrane-associated acceptor substrates, mostly in the form of lipids and proteins. As a consequence, they generate a significant and diverse amount of glycoconjugates in biological membranes, which are particularly important in cell–cell, cell–matrix and host–pathogen recognition events. Membrane-associated GT-B enzymes display two “Rossmann-fold” domains separated by a deep cleft that includes the catalytic center. They associate permanently or temporarily to the phospholipid bilayer by a combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. They have the remarkable property to access both hydrophobic and hydrophilic substrates that reside within chemically distinct environments catalyzing their enzymatic transformations in an efficient manner. Here, we discuss the considerable progress that has been made in recent years in understanding the molecular mechanism that governs substrate and membrane recognition, and the impact of the conformational transitions undergone by these GTs during the catalytic cycle. PMID:24253765

  18. Designing Ground Antennas for Maximum G/T: Cassegrain or Gregorian?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, William A.

    2005-01-01

    For optimum performance, a ground antenna system must maximize the ratio of received signal to the receiving system noise power, defined as the ratio of antenna gain to system-noise temperature (G/T). The total system noise temperature is the linear combination of the receiver noise temperature (including the feed system losses) and the antenna noise contribution. Hence, for very low noise cryogenic receiver systems, antenna noise-temperature properties are very significant contributors to G/T.It is well known that, for dual reflector systems designed for maximum gain, the gain performance of the antenna system is the same for both Cassegrain and Gregorian configurations. For a12-meter antenna designed to be part of the large array based Deep Space Network, a Cassegrain configuration designed for maximum G/T at X-band was 0.7 dB higher than the equivalent Gregorian configuration. This study demonstrates that, for maximum GIT, the dual shaped Cassegrain design is always better than the Gregorian.

  19. Effects of noradrenaline on GnRH-secreting immortalized hypothalamic (GT1-7) neurons.

    PubMed

    Uemura, T; Nishimura, J; Yamaguchi, H; Hiruma, H; Kimura, F; Minaguchi, H

    1997-02-01

    Noradrenaline (NA) is one of the most important neurotransmitters involved in the regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion. In this study, the effects of NA on GnRH secretion, intracellular Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]i), and membrane potentials were investigated in immortalized hypothalamic neurons (GT1-7) to determine the direct effects of NA on GnRH cells. Cells were perfused in a plastic minicolumn, and GnRH concentrations of the effluents were measured. NA increased the release of GnRH in a dose-dependent manner. Cells were loaded with a 4 microM Fura 2-AM, and the ratio of the intensities of fluorescent emission at 510 nm with excitation at 340 and 380 nm was calculated at 100-ms intervals. NA increased the [Ca2+]i responses of single GnRH cells dose-dependently. The NA-induced [Ca2+]i increase was attenuated in the absence of extracellular calcium and was blocked by the beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol, but not by the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine. The cell membrane potential was recorded with a whole-cell patch clamp amplifier with glass-electrodes. NA induced membrane depolarization under current-clamp conditions. The depolarization was also inhibited by propranolol, but not by phentolamine. The results show that NA directly affects the membrane potential of GT1-7 cells via beta-adrenergic receptors and induces Ca2+ mobilization; these effects stimulate GnRH secretion.

  20. To clone or not to clone--a Jewish perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Lipschutz, J H

    1999-01-01

    Many new reproductive methods such as artificial insemination, in vitro fertilisation, freezing of human embryos, and surrogate motherhood were at first widely condemned but are now seen in Western society as not just ethically and morally acceptable, but beneficial in that they allow otherwise infertile couples to have children. The idea of human cloning was also quickly condemned but debate is now emerging. This article examines cloning from a Jewish perspective and finds evidence to support the view that there is nothing inherently wrong with the idea of human cloning. A hypothesis is also advanced suggesting that even if a body was cloned, the brain, which is the essence of humanity, would remain unique. This author suggests that the debate should be changed from "Is cloning wrong?" to "When is cloning wrong?". PMID:10226913

  1. Ethical issues in animal cloning.

    PubMed

    Fiester, Autumn

    2005-01-01

    The issue of human reproductive cloning has recently received a great deal attention in public discourse. Bioethicists, policy makers, and the media have been quick to identify the key ethical issues involved in human reproductive cloning and to argue, almost unanimously, for an international ban on such attempts. Meanwhile, scientists have proceeded with extensive research agendas in the cloning of animals. Despite this research, there has been little public discussion of the ethical issues raised by animal cloning projects. Polling data show that the public is decidedly against the cloning of animals. To understand the public's reaction and fill the void of reasoned debate about the issue, we need to review the possible objections to animal cloning and assess the merits of the anti-animal cloning stance. Some objections to animal cloning (e.g., the impact of cloning on the population of unwanted animals) can be easily addressed, while others (e.g., the health of cloned animals) require more serious attention by the public and policy makers.

  2. Gene cloning and protein expression of γ-glutamyltranspeptidases from Thermus thermophilus and Deinococcus radiodurans: comparison of molecular and structural properties with mesophilic counterparts.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Immacolata; Di Salle, Anna; Merlino, Antonello; Rossi, Mosè; La Cara, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    γ-Glutamyltranspeptidase (γ-GT) is an ubiquitous enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of γ-glutamyl bonds in glutathione and glutamine and the transfer of the released γ-glutamyl group to amino acids or short peptides. γ-GTs from extremophiles, bacteria adapted to live in hostile environments, were selected as model systems to study the molecular underpinnings of their adaptation to extreme conditions and to find out special properties of potential biotechnological interest. Here, we report the cloning, expression and purification of two members of γ-GT family from two different extremophilic species, Thermus thermophilus (TtGT) and Deinococcus radiodurans (DrGT); the first is an aerobic eubacterium, growing at high temperatures (50-82°C), the second is a polyextremophile, as it tolerates radiations, cold, dehydration, vacuum, and acid. TtGT and DrGT were both synthesized as precursor proteins of 59-60 kDa, undergoing an intramolecular auto-cleavage to yield two subunits of 40 and 19-20 kDa, respectively. However, like the γ-GT from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans, but differently from the other characterized bacterial and eukaryotic γ-GTs, the two new extremophilic enzymes displayed γ-glutamyl hydrolase, but not transpeptidase activity in the 37-50°C temperature range, pH 8.0. The comparison of sequences and structural models of these two proteins with experimental-determined structures of other known mesophilic γ-GTs suggests that the extremophilic members of this protein family have found a common strategy to adapt to different hostile environments. Moreover, a phylogenetic analysis suggests that γ-GTs displaying only γ-glutamyl hydrolase activity could represent the progenitors of the bacterial and eukaryotic counterparts.

  3. To clone or not to clone--whither the law?

    PubMed

    Lupton, M L

    1999-01-01

    The cloning of Dolly the lamb from adult cells by scientists at the Roslin Laboratories near Edinburgh in February 1997 has startled the world because it now opens the way to clone adult human beings. The reaction to Ian Wilmut's breakthrough has been instant and largely negative. Bills were rushed into both the US Senate and House of Representatives aimed at banning the cloning of human beings. Human cloning is premature at this stage, but there are many positive spin-offs of cloning in the field of genetic engineering, such as the production of human proteins such as blood clotting factors which aid in healing wounds. Progress by means of cloning can also be made into devising a cure for Parkinson's Disease amongst others. No lesser ethicist than John C. Fletcher of the University of Virginia foresees circumstances in which human cloning is acceptable e.g. to enable a couple to replace a dying child, to enable a couple, one of whom is infertile, to clone a child from either partner. Extensive regulation of cloning by the law is inevitable but, in doing so, the legislation should be careful not to outlaw research in this area which could be beneficial to mankind. PMID:10436743

  4. To clone or not to clone--whither the law?

    PubMed

    Lupton, M L

    1999-01-01

    The cloning of Dolly the lamb from adult cells by scientists at the Roslin Laboratories near Edinburgh in February 1997 has startled the world because it now opens the way to clone adult human beings. The reaction to Ian Wilmut's breakthrough has been instant and largely negative. Bills were rushed into both the US Senate and House of Representatives aimed at banning the cloning of human beings. Human cloning is premature at this stage, but there are many positive spin-offs of cloning in the field of genetic engineering, such as the production of human proteins such as blood clotting factors which aid in healing wounds. Progress by means of cloning can also be made into devising a cure for Parkinson's Disease amongst others. No lesser ethicist than John C. Fletcher of the University of Virginia foresees circumstances in which human cloning is acceptable e.g. to enable a couple to replace a dying child, to enable a couple, one of whom is infertile, to clone a child from either partner. Extensive regulation of cloning by the law is inevitable but, in doing so, the legislation should be careful not to outlaw research in this area which could be beneficial to mankind.

  5. Comparison of ActiGraph GT3X+ and StepWatch Step Count Accuracy in Geriatric Rehabilitation Patients.

    PubMed

    Webber, Sandra C; St John, Philip D

    2016-07-01

    Activity monitors may not accurately detect steps in hospitalized older adults who walk slowly. We compared ActiGraph GT3X+ step counts (hip and ankle locations, default and low frequency extension [LFE] analyses) to the StepWatch monitor (ankle) during a hallway walk in 38 geriatric rehabilitation patients (83.2 ± 7.1 years of age, 0.4 ± 0.2 m/s gait speed). Absolute percent error values were low (<3%) and did not differ for the StepWatch and the GT3X+ (ankle, LFE); however, error values were high (19-97%) when the GT3X+ was worn at the hip and/ or analyzed with the default filter. Although these finding suggest the GT3X+ (ankle, LFE) functions as well as the StepWatch in detecting steps during walking in older adults with slow gait speeds, further research is needed to determine whether the GT3X+ is also able to disregard other body movements (e.g., fidgeting) that occur when full day monitoring is utilized. PMID:26751505

  6. Lessons learned from cloning dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, M J; Oh, H J; Kim, G A; Park, J E; Park, E J; Jang, G; Ra, J C; Kang, S K; Lee, B C

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this article is to review dog cloning research and to suggest its applications based on a discussion about the normality of cloned dogs. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was successfully used for production of viable cloned puppies despite limited understanding of in vitro dog embryo production. Cloned dogs have similar growth characteristics to those born from natural fertilization, with no evidence of serious adverse effects. The offspring of cloned dogs also have similar growth performance and health to those of naturally bred puppies. Therefore, cloning in domestic dogs can be applied as an assisted reproductive technique to conserve endangered species, to treat sterile canids or aged dogs, to improve reproductive performance of valuable individuals and to generate disease model animals.

  7. Therapeutic cloning and reproductive liberty.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Robert

    2009-04-01

    Concern for "reproductive liberty" suggests that decisions about embryos should normally be made by the persons who would be the genetic parents of the child that would be brought into existence if the embryo were brought to term. Therapeutic cloning would involve creating and destroying an embryo, which, if brought to term, would be the offspring of the genetic parents of the person undergoing therapy. I argue that central arguments in debates about parenthood and genetics therefore suggest that therapeutic cloning would be prima facie unethical unless it occurred with the consent of the parents of the person being cloned. Alternatively, if therapeutic cloning is thought to be legitimate, this undermines the case for some uses of reproductive cloning by implying that the genetic relation it establishes between clones and DNA donors does not carry the same moral weight as it does in cases of normal reproduction.

  8. Cloning to reproduce desired genotypes.

    PubMed

    Westhusin, M E; Long, C R; Shin, T; Hill, J R; Looney, C R; Pryor, J H; Piedrahita, J A

    2001-01-01

    Cloned sheep, cattle, goats, pigs and mice have now been produced using somatic cells for nuclear transplantation. Animal cloning is still very inefficient with on average less than 10% of the cloned embryos transferred resulting in a live offspring. However successful cloning of a variety of different species and by a number of different laboratory groups has generated tremendous interest in reproducing desired genotypes. Some of these specific genotypes represent animal cell lines that have been genetically modified. In other cases there is a significant demand for cloning animals characterized by their inherent genetic value, for example prize livestock, household pets and rare or endangered species. A number of different variables may influence the ability to reproduce a specific genotype by cloning. These include species, source of recipient ova, cell type of nuclei donor, treatment of donor cells prior to nuclear transfer, and the techniques employed for nuclear transfer. At present, there is no solid evidence that suggests cloning will be limited to only a few specific animals, and in fact, most data collected to date suggests cloning will be applicable to a wide variety of different animals. The ability to reproduce any desired genotype by cloning will ultimately depend on the amount of time and resources invested in research.

  9. Human cloning and child welfare.

    PubMed Central

    Burley, J; Harris, J

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an objection to human cloning which appeals to the welfare of the child. This objection varies according to the sort of harm it is expected the clone will suffer. The three formulations of it that we will consider are: 1. Clones will be harmed by the fearful or prejudicial attitudes people may have about or towards them (H1); 2. Clones will be harmed by the demands and expectations of parents or genotype donors (H2); 3. Clones will be harmed by their own awareness of their origins, for example the knowledge that the genetic donor is a stranger (H3). We will show why these three versions of the child welfare objection do not necessarily supply compelling reasons to ban human reproductive cloning. The claim that we will develop and defend in the course of our discussion is that even if it is the case that a cloned child will suffer harms of the type H1-H3, it is none the less permissible to conceive by cloning so long as these cloning-induced welfare deficits are not such as to blight the existence of the resultant child, whoever this may be. PMID:10226914

  10. Therapeutic cloning: The ethical limits

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, Peter A. . E-mail: p.whittaker@lancaster.ac.uk

    2005-09-01

    A brief outline of stem cells, stem cell therapy and therapeutic cloning is given. The position of therapeutic cloning with regard to other embryonic manipulations - IVF-based reproduction, embryonic stem formation from IVF embryos and reproductive cloning - is indicated. The main ethically challenging stages in therapeutic cloning are considered to be the nuclear transfer process including the source of eggs for this and the destruction of an embryo to provide stem cells for therapeutic use. The extremely polarised nature of the debate regarding the status of an early human embryo is noted, and some potential alternative strategies for preparing immunocompatible pluripotent stem cells are indicated.

  11. Cloning and characterization of a female genital complex cDNA from the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed Central

    Zurita, M; Bieber, D; Ringold, G; Mansour, T E

    1987-01-01

    A cDNA clone whose RNA is abundant in the female genital complex of the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica has been isolated from a cDNA library in lambda gt10 by differential screening. The pattern of expression in different fluke tissues and at different stages of miracidium formation suggests that this gene is expressed in the F. hepatica vitelleria. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned cDNA was determined and the primary structure of the putative protein was deduced. The proposed protein is rich in glycine, lysine, and tyrosine and its overall amino acid composition agrees with that reported for the F. hepatica egg shell. The clone has homology with DNA from other trematodes; this homology is higher in organisms in which egg development is similar to that of F. hepatica and suggests that the protein is conserved in organisms in which miracidium formation occurs in fresh water. Images PMID:3470798

  12. Molecular cloning and characterization of human pyruvate dehydrogenase. beta. subunit gene

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Kichiko; Urata, Yoshishige; Koike, Masahiko )

    1990-08-01

    A genomic clone encompassing the entire gene for the human pyruvate dehydrogenase {beta} subunit (PDH{beta}) has been isolated by screening a leukocyte genomic library with a nick-translated human foreskin fibroblast PDH{beta} cDNA probe. The 18-kilobase clone was characterized by restriction enzyme analysis, extensive DNA sequencing, and primer-extension analysis. The PDH{beta} structural gene is composed of 10 exons and 9 introns. All intron-exon splice junctions follow the GT/AG rule. The Alu family was found in introns 2 and 8. The 5{prime} flanking region of the PDH{beta} gene contains a CAAT consensus promoter sequence but no TATA sequence. Primer-extension analysis indicated the PDH{beta} gene transcription start site is an adenine residue located 132 bases upstream from the initiation codon in exon 1.

  13. Self-Cloning CRISPR.

    PubMed

    Arbab, Mandana; Sherwood, Richard I

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9-gene editing has emerged as a revolutionary technology to easily modify specific genomic loci by designing complementary sgRNA sequences and introducing these into cells along with Cas9. Self-cloning CRISPR/Cas9 (scCRISPR) uses a self-cleaving palindromic sgRNA plasmid (sgPal) that recombines with short PCR-amplified site-specific sgRNA sequences within the target cell by homologous recombination to circumvent the process of sgRNA plasmid construction. Through this mechanism, scCRISPR enables gene editing within 2 hr once sgRNA oligos are available, with high efficiency equivalent to conventional sgRNA targeting: >90% gene knockout in both mouse and human embryonic stem cells and cancer cell lines. Furthermore, using PCR-based addition of short homology arms, we achieve efficient site-specific knock-in of transgenes such as GFP without traditional plasmid cloning or genome-integrated selection cassette (2% to 4% knock-in rate). The methods in this paper describe the most rapid and efficient means of CRISPR gene editing. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27532819

  14. Self-Cloning CRISPR.

    PubMed

    Arbab, Mandana; Sherwood, Richard I

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9-gene editing has emerged as a revolutionary technology to easily modify specific genomic loci by designing complementary sgRNA sequences and introducing these into cells along with Cas9. Self-cloning CRISPR/Cas9 (scCRISPR) uses a self-cleaving palindromic sgRNA plasmid (sgPal) that recombines with short PCR-amplified site-specific sgRNA sequences within the target cell by homologous recombination to circumvent the process of sgRNA plasmid construction. Through this mechanism, scCRISPR enables gene editing within 2 hr once sgRNA oligos are available, with high efficiency equivalent to conventional sgRNA targeting: >90% gene knockout in both mouse and human embryonic stem cells and cancer cell lines. Furthermore, using PCR-based addition of short homology arms, we achieve efficient site-specific knock-in of transgenes such as GFP without traditional plasmid cloning or genome-integrated selection cassette (2% to 4% knock-in rate). The methods in this paper describe the most rapid and efficient means of CRISPR gene editing. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. Hot corrosion and high temperature corrosion behavior of a new gas turbine material -- alloy 603GT

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, D.C.; Brill, U.; Klower, J.

    1998-12-31

    Salt deposits encountered in a variety of high temperature processes have caused premature failures in heat exchangers and superheater tubes in pulp and paper recovery boilers, waste incinerators and coal gasifiers. Molten salt corrosion studies in both land based and air craft turbines have been the subject of intense study by many researchers. This phenomenon referred to as ``hot corrosion`` has primarily been attributed to corrosion by alkali sulfates, and there is somewhat general agreement in the literature that this is caused by either basic or acidic dissolution (fluxing) of the protective metal oxide layers by complex salt deposits containing both sulfates and chlorides. This paper describes experimental studies conducted on the hot corrosion behavior of a new Ni-Cr-Al alloy 603GT (UNS N06603) in comparison to some commercially established alloys used in gas turbine components.

  16. Structural characterization of O- and C-glycosylating variants of the landomycin glycosyltransferase LanGT2.

    PubMed

    Tam, Heng Keat; Härle, Johannes; Gerhardt, Stefan; Rohr, Jürgen; Wang, Guojun; Thorson, Jon S; Bigot, Aurélien; Lutterbeck, Monika; Seiche, Wolfgang; Breit, Bernhard; Bechthold, Andreas; Einsle, Oliver

    2015-02-23

    The structures of the O-glycosyltransferase LanGT2 and the engineered, C-C bond-forming variant LanGT2S8Ac show how the replacement of a single loop can change the functionality of the enzyme. Crystal structures of the enzymes in complex with a nonhydrolyzable nucleotide-sugar analogue revealed that there is a conformational transition to create the binding sites for the aglycon substrate. This induced-fit transition was explored by molecular docking experiments with various aglycon substrates. PMID:25581707

  17. [The discrete horror of cloning].

    PubMed

    Guibourg, Ricardo A

    2009-01-01

    The author raises the topic of cloning after the decision of the Argentine government, which concerned for the "dignity of the human person", passed a decree of need and urgency, No. 200/97 (Annex), prohibiting cloning experiments with human beings. Therefore, considering that the topic is so terribly urgent and necessary, the author feels it is timely to consider it.

  18. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool.

    PubMed

    Henstock, Peter V; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow.

  19. Animal Cloning and Food Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... from clones and their offspring out of the food chain until CVM could further evaluate the issue. back to top FDA Studies Cloning For more than five years, CVM ... evaluate the safety of food from these animals. The resulting report, called a ...

  20. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool.

    PubMed

    Henstock, Peter V; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow. PMID:27459605

  1. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool

    PubMed Central

    Henstock, Peter V.; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow. PMID:27459605

  2. [The discrete horror of cloning].

    PubMed

    Guibourg, Ricardo A

    2009-01-01

    The author raises the topic of cloning after the decision of the Argentine government, which concerned for the "dignity of the human person", passed a decree of need and urgency, No. 200/97 (Annex), prohibiting cloning experiments with human beings. Therefore, considering that the topic is so terribly urgent and necessary, the author feels it is timely to consider it. PMID:19860340

  3. Cloning and expression of a rat brain. alpha. sub 2B -adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Flordellis, C.S.; Handy, D.E.; Bresnahan, M.R.; Zannis, V.I.; Gavras, H. )

    1991-02-01

    The authors isolated a cDNA clone (RB{alpha}{sub 2B}) and its homologous gene (GR{alpha}{sub 2B}) encoding an {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype by screening a rat brain cDNA and a rat genomic library. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that both clones code for a protein of 458 amino acids, which is 87% homologous to the human kidney glycosylated adrenergic receptor ({alpha}{sub 2}-C4) and divergent from the rat kidney nonglycosylated {alpha}{sub 2B} subtype (RNG{alpha}{sub 2}). Transient expression of RB{alpha}{sub 2B} in COS-7 cells resulted in high-affinity saturable binding for ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine and a high receptor number in the membranes of transfected COS-7 cells. Pharmacological analysis demonstrated that the expressed receptor bound adrenergic ligands with the following order of potency: rauwolscine {gt} yohimbine {gt} prazosin {gt} oxymetazoline, with a prazosin-to-oxymetazoline K{sub i} ratio of 0.34. This profile is characteristic of the {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype. Blotting analysis of rat brain mRNA gave one major and two minor mRNA species, and hybridization with strand-specific probes showed that both DNA strands of GR{alpha}{sub 2B} may be transcriptionally active. These findings show that rat brain expresses an {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype that is structurally different from the rat kidney nonglycosylated {alpha}{sub 2B} subtype. Thus the rat expresses at least two divergent {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptors.

  4. [Scientific ethics of human cloning].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Carlos Y

    2005-01-01

    True cloning is fission, budding or other types of asexual reproduction. In humans it occurs in monozygote twinning. This type of cloning is ethically and religiously good. Human cloning can be performed by twinning (TWClo) or nuclear transfer (NTClo). Both methods need a zygote or a nuclear transferred cell, obtained in vitro (IVTec). They are under the IVTec ethics. IVTecs use humans (zygotes, embryos) as drugs or things; increase the risk of malformations; increase development and size of abnormalities and may cause long-term changes. Cloning for preserving extinct (or almost extinct) animals or humans when sexual reproduction is not possible is ethically valid. The previous selection of a phenotype in human cloning violates some ethical principles. NTClo for reproductive or therapeutic purposes is dangerous since it increases the risk for nucleotide or chromosome mutations, de-programming or re-programming errors, aging or malignancy of the embryo cells thus obtained.

  5. Therapeutic cloning: promises and issues

    PubMed Central

    Kfoury, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    Advances in biotechnology necessitate both an understanding of scientific principles and ethical implications to be clinically applicable in medicine. In this regard, therapeutic cloning offers significant potential in regenerative medicine by circumventing immunorejection, and in the cure of genetic disorders when used in conjunction with gene therapy. Therapeutic cloning in the context of cell replacement therapy holds a huge potential for de novo organogenesis and the permanent treatment of Parkinson’s disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and diabetes mellitus as shown by in vivo studies. Scientific roadblocks impeding advancement in therapeutic cloning are tumorigenicity, epigenetic reprogramming, mitochondrial heteroplasmy, interspecies pathogen transfer, low oocyte availability. Therapeutic cloning is also often tied to ethical considerations concerning the source, destruction and moral status of IVF embryos based on the argument of potential. Legislative and funding issues are also addressed. Future considerations would include a distinction between therapeutic and reproductive cloning in legislative formulations. PMID:18523539

  6. Animal cloning: problems and prospects.

    PubMed

    Wells, D N

    2005-04-01

    An efficient animal cloning technology would provide many new opportunities for livestock agriculture, human medicine, and animal conservation. Nuclear cloning involves the production of animals that are genetically identical to the donor cells used in a technique known as nuclear transfer (NT). However, at present it is an inefficient process: in cattle, only around 6% of the embryos transferred to the reproductive tracts of recipient cows result in healthy, longterm surviving clones. Of concern are the high losses throughout gestation, during birth and in the post-natal period through to adulthood. Many of the pregnancy losses relate to failure of the placenta to develop and function correctly. Placental dysfunction may also have an adverse influence on postnatal health. These anomalies are probably due to incorrect epigenetic reprogramming of the donor genome following NT, leading to inappropriate patterns of gene expression during the development of clones. Whilst some physiological tests on surviving clones suggest normality, other reports indicate a variety of post-natal clone-associated abnormalities. This variability in outcome may reflect species-specific and/or cloning methodological differences. Importantly, to date it appears that these clone-associated phenotypes are not transmitted to offspring following sexual reproduction. This indicates that they represent epigenetic errors, rather than genetic errors, which are corrected during gametogenesis. Whilst this needs confirmation at the molecular level, it provides initial confidence in the first application of NT in agriculture, namely, the production of small numbers of cloned sires from genetically elite bulls, for natural mating, to effectively disseminate genetic gain. In addition to the animal welfare concerns with the technology, the underlying health of the animals and the consequential effect on food safety are critical aspects that require investigation to gain regulatory and consumer

  7. Human cloning: can it be made safe?

    PubMed

    Rhind, Susan M; Taylor, Jane E; De Sousa, Paul A; King, Tim J; McGarry, Michelle; Wilmut, Ian

    2003-11-01

    There are continued claims of attempts to clone humans using nuclear transfer, despite the serious problems that have been encountered in cloning other mammals. It is known that epigenetic and genetic mechanisms are involved in clone failure, but we still do not know exactly how. Human reproductive cloning is unethical, but the production of cells from cloned embryos could offer many potential benefits. So, can human cloning be made safe?

  8. Populus GT43 family members group into distinct sets required for primary and secondary wall xylan biosynthesis and include useful promoters for wood modification.

    PubMed

    Ratke, Christine; Pawar, Prashant Mohan-Anupama; Balasubramanian, Vimal K; Naumann, Marcel; Duncranz, Mathilda Lönnäs; Derba-Maceluch, Marta; Gorzsás, András; Endo, Satoshi; Ezcurra, Ines; Mellerowicz, Ewa J

    2015-01-01

    The plant GT43 protein family includes xylosyltransferases that are known to be required for xylan backbone biosynthesis, but have incompletely understood specificities. RT-qPCR and histochemical (GUS) analyses of expression patterns of GT43 members in hybrid aspen, reported here, revealed that three clades of the family have markedly differing specificity towards secondary wall-forming cells (wood and extraxylary fibres). Intriguingly, GT43A and B genes (corresponding to the Arabidopsis IRX9 clade) showed higher specificity for secondary-walled cells than GT43C and D genes (IRX14 clade), although both IRX9 and IRX14 are required for xylosyltransferase activity. The remaining genes, GT43E, F and G (IRX9-L clade), showed broad expression patterns. Transient transactivation analyses of GT43A and B reporters demonstrated that they are activated by PtxtMYB021 and PNAC085 (master secondary wall switches), mediated in PtxtMYB021 activation by an AC element. The high observed secondary cell wall specificity of GT43B expression prompted tests of the efficiency of its promoter (pGT43B), relative to the CaMV 35S (35S) promoter, for overexpressing a xylan acetyl esterase (CE5) or downregulating REDUCED WALL ACETYLATION (RWA) family genes and thus engineering wood acetylation. CE5 expression was weaker when driven by pGT43B, but it reduced wood acetyl content substantially more efficiently than the 35S promoter. RNAi silencing of the RWA family, which was ineffective using 35S, was achieved when using GT43B promoter. These results show the utility of the GT43B promoter for genetically engineering properties of wood and fibres.

  9. Validation of the Actigraph GT3X and ActivPAL Accelerometers for the Assessment of Sedentary Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Youngdeok; Barry, Vaughn W.; Kang, Minsoo

    2015-01-01

    This study examined (a) the validity of two accelerometers (ActiGraph GT3X [ActiGraph LLC, Pensacola, FL, USA] and activPAL [PAL Technologies Ltd., Glasgow, Scotland]) for the assessment of sedentary behavior; and (b) the variations in assessment accuracy by setting minimum sedentary bout durations against a proxy for direct observation using an…

  10. The Arabidopsis Family GT43 Glycosyltransferases Form Two Functionally Nonredundant Groups Essential for the Elongation of Glucuronoxylan Backbone

    EPA Science Inventory

    There exist four members of family GT43 glycosyltransferases in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome, and mutations of two of them, IRX9 and IRX14, have previously been shown to cause a defect in glucuronoxylan (GX) biosynthesis. However, it is currently unknown whether ...

  11. Genetic mapping and QTL analysis of disease resistance traits in peanut population Tifrunner x GT-C20

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genetic map of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) with 426 SSR markers was constructed using a population of 162 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from a cross between ‘Tifrunner’ and ‘GT-C20’. Linkage groups (LGs) were assigned to chromosomes using published peanut reference maps. The total length of the...

  12. Integration of a wave rotor to an ultra-micro gas turbine (UmuGT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iancu, Florin

    2005-12-01

    Wave rotor technology has shown a significant potential for performance improvement of thermodynamic cycles. The wave rotor is an unsteady flow machine that utilizes shock waves to transfer energy from a high energy fluid to a low energy fluid, increasing both the temperature and the pressure of the low energy fluid. Used initially as a high pressure stage for a gas turbine locomotive engine, the wave rotor was commercialized only as a supercharging device for internal combustion engines, but recently there is a stronger research effort on implementing wave rotors as topping units or pressure gain combustors for gas turbines. At the same time, Ultra Micro Gas Turbines (UmuGT) are expected to be a next generation of power source for applications from propulsion to power generation, from aerospace industry to electronic industry. Starting in 1995, with the MIT "Micro Gas Turbine" project, the mechanical engineering research world has explored more and more the idea of "Power MEMS". Microfabricated turbomachinery like turbines, compressors, pumps, but also electric generators, heat exchangers, internal combustion engines and rocket engines have been on the focus list of researchers for the past 10 years. The reason is simple: the output power is proportional to the mass flow rate of the working fluid through the engine, or the cross-sectional area while the mass or volume of the engine is proportional to the cube of the characteristic length, thus the power density tends to increase at small scales (Power/Mass=L -1). This is the so-called "cube square law". This work investigates the possibilities of incorporating a wave rotor to an UmuGT and discusses the advantages of wave rotor as topping units for gas turbines, especially at microscale. Based on documented wave rotor efficiencies at larger scale and subsidized by both, a gasdynamic model that includes wall friction, and a CFD model, the wave rotor compression efficiency at microfabrication scale could be estimated

  13. Wildlife conservation and reproductive cloning.

    PubMed

    Holt, William V; Pickard, Amanda R; Prather, Randall S

    2004-03-01

    Reproductive cloning, or the production of offspring by nuclear transfer, is often regarded as having potential for conserving endangered species of wildlife. Currently, however, low success rates for reproductive cloning limit the practical application of this technique to experimental use and proof of principle investigations. In this review, we consider how cloning may contribute to wildlife conservation strategies. The cloning of endangered mammals presents practical problems, many of which stem from the paucity of knowledge about their basic reproductive biology. However, situations may arise where resources could be targeted at recovering lost or under-represented genetic lines; these could then contribute to the future fitness of the population. Approaches of this type would be preferable to the indiscriminate generation of large numbers of identical individuals. Applying cloning technology to non-mammalian vertebrates may be more practical than attempting to use conventional reproductive technologies. As the scientific background to cloning technology was pioneered using amphibians, it may be possible to breed imminently threatened amphibians, or even restore extinct amphibian species, by the use of cloning. In this respect species with external embryonic development may have an advantage over mammals as developmental abnormalities associated with inappropriate embryonic reprogramming would not be relevant.

  14. Cloning and sequence analysis of cDNA for human argininosuccinate lyase.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, W E; McInnes, R; Kalumuck, K; Adcock, M

    1986-01-01

    Using antibodies specific for argininosuccinate lyase (EC 4.3.2.1), we isolated two cDNA clones by screening a human liver cDNA library constructed in the lambda gt11 expression vector. The identity of these isolates was confirmed by in vitro translation of plasmid-selected mRNA. One of these isolates was used to rescreen the cDNA library and a 1565-base-pair (bp) clone was identified. The entire nucleotide sequence of this clone was determined. An open reading frame was identified which encoded a protein of 463 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 51,663. The clone included 115 bp of 5' untranslated sequence and 46 bp of 3' untranslated sequence. A canonical poly(A) addition site was present in the 3' end, 16 bp from the beginning of the poly(A) tract. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the human enzyme with that of the yeast enzyme revealed a 56% homology, when conservative amino acid changes were taken into consideration. The yeast protein is also 463 amino acids long, with a molecular weight of 51,944. By use of a genomic DNA panel from human-Chinese hamster somatic cell hybrids, the human gene was mapped to chromosome 7. Another hybridizing region, corresponding to a portion of the 5' end of the cDNA, was found on chromosome 22. Images PMID:3463959

  15. Cloning and Expression of cDNA for Rat Heme Oxygenase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibahara, Shigeki; Muller, Rita; Taguchi, Hayao; Yoshida, Tadashi

    1985-12-01

    Two cDNA clones for rat heme oxygenase have been isolated from a rat spleen cDNA library in λ gt11 by immunological screening using a specific polyclonal antibody. One of these clones has an insert of 1530 nucleotides that contains the entire protein-coding region. To confirm that the isolated cDNA encodes heme oxygenase, we transfected monkey kidney cells (COS-7) with the cDNA carried in a simian virus 40 vector. The heme oxygenase was highly expressed in endoplasmic reticulum of transfected cells. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned cDNA was determined and the primary structure of heme oxygenase was deduced. Heme oxygenase is composed of 289 amino acids and has one hydrophobic segment at its carboxyl terminus, which is probably important for the insertion of heme oxygenase into endoplasmic reticulum. The cloned cDNA was used to analyze the induction of heme oxygenase in rat liver by treatment with CoCl2 or with hemin. RNA blot analysis showed that both CoCl2 and hemin increased the amount of hybridizable mRNA, suggesting that these substances may act at the transcriptional level to increase the amount of heme oxygenase.

  16. FEN1 −69G>A and +4150G>T polymorphisms and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Maryam; Hashemi, Mohammad; Sanaei, Sara; Mashhadi, Mohammad Ali; Hashemi, Seyed Mehdi; Bahari, Gholamreza; Taheri, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), a DNA repair protein, is important in preventing carcinogenesis. Two functional germ line variants −69G>A (rs174538) and +4150G>T (rs4246215) in the FEN1 gene have been associated with risk of various types of cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible impact of FEN1 polymorphisms on risk of breast cancer (BC) in a sample of Iranian subjects. The FEN1 −69G>A and +4150G>T polymorphisms were analyzed in a case-control study that included 266 BC patients and 225 healthy females. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to genotype the variants. The findings demonstrated that the FEN1 −69G>A and +4150G>T polymorphisms were not associated with BC risk in co-dominant, dominant and recessive inheritance models. The findings indicated that GG/GT, GA/GG and GA/TT genotypes significantly decreased the risk of BC when compared with −69GG/+4150GG. Furthermore, haplotype analysis indicated that −69G/+4150T as well as −69A/+4150G significantly decreased the risk of BC compared with −69G/+4150G. Thus, these findings demonstrated that haplotypes of FEN1 −69G>A and +4150G>T polymorphisms decreased the risk of BC in an Iranian population. Further studies with larger sample sizes and different ethnicities are required to validate the present findings. PMID:27699013

  17. Multi-physiopathological consequences of the c.1392G>T CFTR mutation revealed by clinical and cellular investigations.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Raed; El-Seedy, Ayman; El-Moussaoui, Kamal; Pasquet, Marie-Claude; Adolphe, Catherine; Bieth, Eric; Languepin, Jeanne; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Kitzis, Alain; Ladevèze, Véronique

    2015-02-01

    This study combines a clinical approach and multiple level cellular analyses to determine the physiopathological consequences of the c.1392G>T (p.Lys464Asn) CFTR exon 10 mutation, detected in a CF patient with a frameshift deletion in trans and a TG(11)T(5) in cis. Minigene experiment, with different TG(m)T(n) alleles, and nasal cell mRNA extracts were used to study the impact of c.1392G>T on splicing in both in cellulo and in vivo studies. The processing and localization of p.Lys464Asn protein were evaluated, in cellulo, by western blotting analyses and confocal microscopy. Clinical and channel exploration tests were performed on the patient to determine the exact CF phenotype profile and the CFTR chloride transport activity. c.1392G>T affects exon 10 splicing by inducing its complete deletion and encoding a frameshift transcript. The polymorphism TG(11)T(5) aggravates the effects of this mutation on aberrant splicing. Analysis of mRNA obtained from parental airway epithelial cells confirmed these in cellulo results. At the protein level the p.Lys464Asn protein showed neither maturated form nor membrane localization. Furthermore, the in vivo channel tests confirmed the absence of CFTR activity. Thus, the c.1392G>T mutation alone or in association with the TG repeats and the poly T tract revealed obvious impacts on splicing and CFTR protein processing and functionality. The c.[T(5); 1392G>T] complex allele contributes to the CF phenotype by affecting splicing and inducing a severe misprocessing defect. These results demonstrate that the classical CFTR mutations classification is not sufficient: in vivo and in cellulo studies of a possible complex allele in a patient are required to provide correct CFTR mutation classification, adequate medical counseling, and adapted therapeutic strategies.

  18. FEN1 −69G>A and +4150G>T polymorphisms and breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Rezaei, Maryam; Hashemi, Mohammad; Sanaei, Sara; Mashhadi, Mohammad Ali; Hashemi, Seyed Mehdi; Bahari, Gholamreza; Taheri, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), a DNA repair protein, is important in preventing carcinogenesis. Two functional germ line variants −69G>A (rs174538) and +4150G>T (rs4246215) in the FEN1 gene have been associated with risk of various types of cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible impact of FEN1 polymorphisms on risk of breast cancer (BC) in a sample of Iranian subjects. The FEN1 −69G>A and +4150G>T polymorphisms were analyzed in a case-control study that included 266 BC patients and 225 healthy females. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to genotype the variants. The findings demonstrated that the FEN1 −69G>A and +4150G>T polymorphisms were not associated with BC risk in co-dominant, dominant and recessive inheritance models. The findings indicated that GG/GT, GA/GG and GA/TT genotypes significantly decreased the risk of BC when compared with −69GG/+4150GG. Furthermore, haplotype analysis indicated that −69G/+4150T as well as −69A/+4150G significantly decreased the risk of BC compared with −69G/+4150G. Thus, these findings demonstrated that haplotypes of FEN1 −69G>A and +4150G>T polymorphisms decreased the risk of BC in an Iranian population. Further studies with larger sample sizes and different ethnicities are required to validate the present findings.

  19. Therapeutic cloning in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Mombaerts, Peter

    2003-09-30

    Nuclear transfer technology can be applied to produce autologous differentiated cells for therapeutic purposes, a concept termed therapeutic cloning. Countless articles have been published on the ethics and politics of human therapeutic cloning, reflecting the high expectations from this new opportunity for rejuvenation of the aging or diseased body. Yet the research literature on therapeutic cloning, strictly speaking, is comprised of only four articles, all in the mouse. The efficiency of derivation of embryonic stem cell lines via nuclear transfer is remarkably consistent among these reports. However, the efficiency is so low that, in its present form, the concept is unlikely to become widespread in clinical practice.

  20. Cloning: revisiting an old debate.

    PubMed

    Verhey, Allen D

    1994-09-01

    The debate about cloning that took place 25 years ago, although directed toward a different sort of cloning, elucidates fundamental issues currently at stake in reproductive technologies and research. Paul Ramsey and Joseph Fletcher were participants in this early debate. The differences between Ramsey and Fletcher about the meaning and sufficiency of freedom, the understanding and weighing of good and evil, the connection between embodiment and personhood, the relationship of humans with nature, and the meaning of parenthood suggest both a broader agenda for the debate about cloning and a cautious move forward in the development of embryo-splitting.

  1. Human therapeutic cloning (NTSC): applying research from mammalian reproductive cloning.

    PubMed

    French, Andrew J; Wood, Samuel H; Trounson, Alan O

    2006-01-01

    Human therapeutic cloning or nuclear transfer stem cells (NTSC) to produce patient-specific stem cells, holds considerable promise in the field of regenerative medicine. The recent withdrawal of the only scientific publications claiming the successful generation of NTSC lines afford an opportunity to review the available research in mammalian reproductive somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) with the goal of progressing human NTSC. The process of SCNT is prone to epigenetic abnormalities that contribute to very low success rates. Although there are high mortality rates in some species of cloned animals, most surviving clones have been shown to have normal phenotypic and physiological characteristics and to produce healthy offspring. This technology has been applied to an increasing number of mammals for utility in research, agriculture, conservation, and biomedicine. In contrast, attempts at SCNT to produce human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been disappointing. Only one group has published reliable evidence of success in deriving a cloned human blastocyst, using an undifferentiated hESC donor cell, and it failed to develop into a hESC line. When optimal conditions are present, it appears that in vitro development of cloned and parthenogenetic embryos, both of which may be utilized to produce hESCs, may be similar to in vitro fertilized embryos. The derivation of ESC lines from cloned embryos is substantially more efficient than the production of viable offspring. This review summarizes developments in mammalian reproductive cloning, cell-to-cell fusion alternatives, and strategies for oocyte procurement that may provide important clues facilitating progress in human therapeutic cloning leading to the successful application of cell-based therapies utilizing autologous hESC lines.

  2. Comparison of GT3X accelerometer and Yamax pedometer steps/day in a free-living sample of overweight and obese adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to compare steps/day detected by the YAMAX SW-200 pedometer versus the Actigraph GT3X accelerometer in free-living adults. Daily YAMAX and GT3X steps were collected from a sample of 23 overweight and obese participants (78% female; age = 52.6 +/- 8.4 yr.; BMI = 31.0 +/-...

  3. Methylotroph cloning vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Richard S.; Allen, Larry N.

    1989-04-25

    A cloning vehicle comprising: a replication determinant effective for replicating the vehicle in a non-C.sub.1 -utilizing host and in a C.sub.1 -utilizing host; DNA effective to allow the vehicle to be mobilized from the non-C.sub.1 -utilizing host to the C.sub.1 -utilizing host; DNA providing resistance to two antibiotics to which the wild-type C.sub.1 -utilizing host is susceptible, each of the antibiotic resistance markers having a recognition site for a restriction endonuclease; a cos site; and a means for preventing replication in the C.sub.1 -utilizing host. The vehicle is used for complementation mapping as follows. DNA comprising a gene from the C.sub.1 -utilizing organism is inserted at the restriction nuclease recognition site, inactivating the antibiotic resistance marker at that site. The vehicle can then be used to form a cosmid structure to infect the non-C.sub.1 -utilizing (e.g., E. coli) host, and then conjugated with a selected C.sub.1 -utilizing mutant. Resistance to the other antibiotic by the mutant is a marker of the conjugation. Other phenotypical changes in the mutant, e.g., loss of an auxotrophic trait, is attributed to the C.sub.1 gene. The vector is also used to inactivate genes whose protein products catalyze side reactions that divert compounds from a biosynthetic pathway to a desired product, thereby producing an organism that makes the desired product in higher yields.

  4. Impermanence of bacterial clones

    PubMed Central

    Bobay, Louis-Marie; Traverse, Charles C.; Ochman, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria reproduce asexually and pass on a single genome copied from the parent, a reproductive mode that assures the clonal descent of progeny; however, a truly clonal bacterial species is extremely rare. The signal of clonality can be interrupted by gene uptake and exchange, initiating homologous recombination that results in the unique sequence of one clone being incorporated into another. Because recombination occurs sporadically and on local scales, these events are often difficult to recognize, even when considering large samples of completely sequenced genomes. Moreover, several processes can produce the appearance of clonality in populations that undergo frequent recombination. The rates and consequences of recombination have been studied in Escherichia coli for over 40 y, and, during this time, there have been several shifting views of its clonal status, population structure, and rates of gene exchange. We reexamine the studies and retrace the evolution of the methods that have assessed the extent of DNA flux, largely focusing on its impact on the E. coli genome. PMID:26195749

  5. Evolution of the Power Conversion Unit Design of the GT-MHR

    SciTech Connect

    Baxi, C.B.; Perez, E.; Shenoy, A.; Kostin, V.I.; Kodochigov, N.G.; Vasyaev, A.V.; Belov, S.E.; Golovko, V.F.

    2006-07-01

    General Atomics in the USA and Experimental Design Bureau of Machine Building (OKBM) in the Russian Federation are jointly developing a gas turbine modular helium reactor (GT-MHR). The 600 MW(t) reactor is cooled by helium at a pressure of 7 MPa. The power conversion unit (PCU) uses the reactor outlet temperature of 850 deg C in a direct Brayton cycle to achieve an efficiency of about 48%. The PCU consists of a gas turbine, a recuperator, a pre-cooler, a low-pressure compressor, an inter-cooler, and a high-pressure compressor. The turbo machine (TM), including the generator, is mounted on a single vertical shaft. The TM rotates at a speed of 4400 rpm. The asynchronous generator is connected to the turbine by a flexible coupling. The required grid frequency is achieved by a converter. All PCU components are enclosed in a single vessel. TM uses radial and axial electromagnetic bearings (EMB) for support. Catcher bearings (CB) are provided as redundant support for the TM rotor in case of EMBs failure. These design features were determined after a comprehensive study carried out over the last 10 years. This paper describes the evolution of the current PCU design and justification for the choices. (authors)

  6. Single-level optimization of a hybrid SOFC-GT power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calise, F.; Dentice d'Accadia, M.; Vanoli, L.; von Spakovsky, M. R.

    The detailed synthesis/design optimization of a hybrid solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine (SOFC-GT) power plant is presented in this paper. In the first part of the paper, the bulk-flow model used to simulate the plant is discussed. The performance of the centrifugal compressors and radial turbine is determined using maps, properly scaled in order to match the values required for mass flow rate and pressure ratio. Compact heat exchangers are simulated using Colburn and friction factor correlations. For the SOFC, the cell voltage versus current density curves (i.e. polarization curves) are generated on the basis of the Nernst potential and overvoltages. Validation of the SOFC polarization curves is accomplished with data available from Siemens Westinghouse. Both the steam-methane pre-reforming and internal reforming processes are modeled assuming the water-gas shift reaction to be equilibrium-controlled and the demethanization reactions to be kinetically controlled. Finally, a thermoeconomic model is developed by introducing capital cost functions for each plant component. The whole plant is first simulated for a fixed configuration. Then, a synthesis/design optimization of the plant is carried out using a traditional single-level approach. The results of the optimization are presented and discussed.

  7. Alloy 603 GT -- A new improved cobalt-free alloy for gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, U.; Agarwal, D.C.

    1997-08-01

    Alloy 603 GT is a newly developed cobalt-free Ni-base alloy. The composition of the alloy guarantees excellent high temperature strength due to the high carbon content of 0.2--0.4 wt.-% resulting in primary precipitated chromium carbides. These carbides are homogeneously distributed and provide high thermal stability so that resolutioning during service cannot occur, thus preventing grain growth and maintaining the long term mechanical properties. Superior high temperature corrosion resistance up to 1,200 C (2,192 F) is provided by the formation of alumina scale due to the high aluminum content of 2.4--3.0 wt.-% in the alloy. Additions of yttrium up to 0.1 wt.-% improve the spallation resistance under thermal cycling by the formation of very thin and tight oxide layers. Working, machining and processing can easily be done using conventional techniques. Welding with the matching filler metal provides mechanical strength and oxidation resistance similar to the parent metal.

  8. A Clone of Your Own.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilodeau, Kirsten

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity used at the Washington Park Arboretum that helps students understand cloning through plant propagation. Students also learn how to make a pot from recycled newspapers and how to make soil that is appropriate for the plants. (DDR)

  9. Cloning of a quantum measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo; Sedlak, Michal

    2011-10-15

    We analyze quantum algorithms for cloning of a quantum measurement. Our aim is to mimic two uses of a device performing an unknown von Neumann measurement with a single use of the device. When the unknown device has to be used before the bipartite state to be measured is available we talk about 1{yields}2 learning of the measurement, otherwise the task is called 1{yields}2 cloning of a measurement. We perform the optimization for both learning and cloning for arbitrary dimension d of the Hilbert space. For 1{yields}2 cloning we also propose a simple quantum network that achieves the optimal fidelity. The optimal fidelity for 1{yields}2 learning just slightly outperforms the estimate and prepare strategy in which one first estimates the unknown measurement and depending on the result suitably prepares the duplicate.

  10. Human Cloning: Let's Discuss It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taras, Loretta; Stavroulakis, Anthea M.; Ortiz, Mary T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes experiences with holding discussions on cloning at a variety of levels in undergraduate biology courses. Discusses teaching methods used and student reactions to the discussions. Contains 12 references. (WRM)

  11. Human cloning and 'posthuman' society.

    PubMed

    Blackford, Russell

    2005-01-01

    Since early 1997, when the creation of Dolly the sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer was announced in Nature, numerous government reports, essays, articles and books have considered the ethical problems and policy issues surrounding human reproductive cloning. In this article, I consider what response a modern liberal society should give to the prospect of human cloning, if it became safe and practical. Some opponents of human cloning have argued that permitting it would place us on a slippery slope to a repugnant future society, comparable to that portrayed in Aldous Huxley's novel, Brave New World. I conclude that, leaving aside concerns about safety, none of the psychological or social considerations discussed in this article provides an adequate policy justification for invoking the state's coercive powers to prevent human cloning.

  12. Are cloned quantum states macroscopic?

    PubMed

    Fröwis, F; Dür, W

    2012-10-26

    We study quantum states produced by optimal phase covariant quantum cloners. We argue that cloned quantum superpositions are not macroscopic superpositions in the spirit of Schrödinger's cat, despite their large particle number. This is indicated by calculating several measures for macroscopic superpositions from the literature, as well as by investigating the distinguishability of the two superposed cloned states. The latter rapidly diminishes when considering imperfect detectors or noisy states and does not increase with the system size. In contrast, we find that cloned quantum states themselves are macroscopic, in the sense of both proposed measures and their usefulness in quantum metrology with an optimal scaling in system size. We investigate the applicability of cloned states for parameter estimation in the presence of different kinds of noise.

  13. Human cloning and 'posthuman' society.

    PubMed

    Blackford, Russell

    2005-01-01

    Since early 1997, when the creation of Dolly the sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer was announced in Nature, numerous government reports, essays, articles and books have considered the ethical problems and policy issues surrounding human reproductive cloning. In this article, I consider what response a modern liberal society should give to the prospect of human cloning, if it became safe and practical. Some opponents of human cloning have argued that permitting it would place us on a slippery slope to a repugnant future society, comparable to that portrayed in Aldous Huxley's novel, Brave New World. I conclude that, leaving aside concerns about safety, none of the psychological or social considerations discussed in this article provides an adequate policy justification for invoking the state's coercive powers to prevent human cloning. PMID:16007753

  14. Local cloning of entangled qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhary, Sujit K.; Kunkri, Samir; Rahaman, Ramij; Roy, Anirban

    2007-11-15

    We discuss the exact cloning of orthogonal but entangled qubits under local operations and classical communication. The amount of entanglement necessary in a blank copy is obtained for various cases. Surprisingly, this amount is more than 1 ebit for certain sets of two nonmaximal but equally entangled states of two qubits. To clone any three Bell states, at least log{sub 2} 3 ebit is necessary.

  15. Cloning: questions answered and unsolved.

    PubMed

    Latham, Keith E

    2004-02-01

    Cloning by the transfer of adult somatic cell nuclei to oocytes has produced viable offspring in a variety of mammalian species. The technology is still in its initial stages of development. Studies to date have answered several basic questions related to such issues as genome potency, life expectancy of clones, mitochondrial fates, and feasibility of inter-species nuclear transfer. They have also raised new questions related to the control of nuclear reprogramming and function. These questions are reviewed here.

  16. Artificial cloning of domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Keefer, Carol L

    2015-07-21

    Domestic animals can be cloned using techniques such as embryo splitting and nuclear transfer to produce genetically identical individuals. Although embryo splitting is limited to the production of only a few identical individuals, nuclear transfer of donor nuclei into recipient oocytes, whose own nuclear DNA has been removed, can result in large numbers of identical individuals. Moreover, clones can be produced using donor cells from sterile animals, such as steers and geldings, and, unlike their genetic source, these clones are fertile. In reality, due to low efficiencies and the high costs of cloning domestic species, only a limited number of identical individuals are generally produced, and these clones are primarily used as breed stock. In addition to providing a means of rescuing and propagating valuable genetics, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) research has contributed knowledge that has led to the direct reprogramming of cells (e.g., to induce pluripotent stem cells) and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation during embryonic development. In this review, I provide a broad overview of the historical development of cloning in domestic animals, of its application to the propagation of livestock and transgenic animal production, and of its scientific promise for advancing basic research.

  17. Artificial cloning of domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Keefer, Carol L

    2015-07-21

    Domestic animals can be cloned using techniques such as embryo splitting and nuclear transfer to produce genetically identical individuals. Although embryo splitting is limited to the production of only a few identical individuals, nuclear transfer of donor nuclei into recipient oocytes, whose own nuclear DNA has been removed, can result in large numbers of identical individuals. Moreover, clones can be produced using donor cells from sterile animals, such as steers and geldings, and, unlike their genetic source, these clones are fertile. In reality, due to low efficiencies and the high costs of cloning domestic species, only a limited number of identical individuals are generally produced, and these clones are primarily used as breed stock. In addition to providing a means of rescuing and propagating valuable genetics, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) research has contributed knowledge that has led to the direct reprogramming of cells (e.g., to induce pluripotent stem cells) and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation during embryonic development. In this review, I provide a broad overview of the historical development of cloning in domestic animals, of its application to the propagation of livestock and transgenic animal production, and of its scientific promise for advancing basic research. PMID:26195770

  18. Artificial cloning of domestic animals

    PubMed Central

    Keefer, Carol L.

    2015-01-01

    Domestic animals can be cloned using techniques such as embryo splitting and nuclear transfer to produce genetically identical individuals. Although embryo splitting is limited to the production of only a few identical individuals, nuclear transfer of donor nuclei into recipient oocytes, whose own nuclear DNA has been removed, can result in large numbers of identical individuals. Moreover, clones can be produced using donor cells from sterile animals, such as steers and geldings, and, unlike their genetic source, these clones are fertile. In reality, due to low efficiencies and the high costs of cloning domestic species, only a limited number of identical individuals are generally produced, and these clones are primarily used as breed stock. In addition to providing a means of rescuing and propagating valuable genetics, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) research has contributed knowledge that has led to the direct reprogramming of cells (e.g., to induce pluripotent stem cells) and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation during embryonic development. In this review, I provide a broad overview of the historical development of cloning in domestic animals, of its application to the propagation of livestock and transgenic animal production, and of its scientific promise for advancing basic research. PMID:26195770

  19. Cloning goes to the movies.

    PubMed

    Cormick, Craig

    2006-10-01

    Public attitude research conducted by Biotechnology Australia shows that one of the major sources of information on human reproductive cloning is movies. Traditionally, understanding of new and emerging technologies has come through the mass media but human cloning, being so widely addressed through the popular culture of movies, is more effectively defined by Hollywood than the news media or science media. But how well are the science and social issues of cloning portrayed in box office hits such as The Island, Multiplicity, Star Wars: Attack of the Clones and Jurassic Park? These movies have enormous reach and undoubted influence, and are therefore worth analyzing in some detail. This study looks at 33 movies made between 1971 and 2005 that address human reproductive cloning, and it categorizes the films based on their genre and potential influence. Yet rather than simply rating the quality of the science portrayed, the study compares the key messages in these movies with public attitudes towards cloning, to examine the correlations.

  20. Islamic perspectives on human cloning.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mahmoud

    2007-01-01

    The present paper seeks to assess various views from Islamic jurists relating to human cloning, which is one of the controversial topics in the recent past. Taking Islamic jurisprudence principles, such as the rule of necessity for self preservation and respect for human beings, the rule of la darar wa la dirar ('the necessity to refrain from causing harm to oneself and others') and the rule of usr wa haraj, one may indicate that if human cloning could not be prohibited, as such, it could still be opposed because it gives way to various harmful consequences, which include family disorder, chaos in the clone's family relationships, physical and mental diseases for clones and suffering of egg donors and surrogate mothers. However with due attention to the fact that the reasons behind the prohibition of abortion only restrict the destruction of human embryos in their post-implantation stages, human cloning for biomedical research and exploitation of stem cells from cloned embryos at the blastocyst stage for therapeutic purposes would be acceptable.

  1. Cloning goes to the movies.

    PubMed

    Cormick, Craig

    2006-10-01

    Public attitude research conducted by Biotechnology Australia shows that one of the major sources of information on human reproductive cloning is movies. Traditionally, understanding of new and emerging technologies has come through the mass media but human cloning, being so widely addressed through the popular culture of movies, is more effectively defined by Hollywood than the news media or science media. But how well are the science and social issues of cloning portrayed in box office hits such as The Island, Multiplicity, Star Wars: Attack of the Clones and Jurassic Park? These movies have enormous reach and undoubted influence, and are therefore worth analyzing in some detail. This study looks at 33 movies made between 1971 and 2005 that address human reproductive cloning, and it categorizes the films based on their genre and potential influence. Yet rather than simply rating the quality of the science portrayed, the study compares the key messages in these movies with public attitudes towards cloning, to examine the correlations. PMID:17214211

  2. Methylotroph cloning vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, R.S.; Allen, L.N.

    1989-04-25

    A cloning vehicle comprising: a replication determinant effective for replicating the vehicle in a non-C[sub 1]-utilizing host and in a C[sub 1]-utilizing host; DNA effective to allow the vehicle to be mobilized from the non-C[sub 1]-utilizing host to the C[sub 1]-utilizing host; DNA providing resistance to two antibiotics to which the wild-type C[sub 1]-utilizing host is susceptible, each of the antibiotic resistance markers having a recognition site for a restriction endonuclease; a cos site; and a means for preventing replication in the C[sub 1]-utilizing host. The vehicle is used for complementation mapping as follows. DNA comprising a gene from the C[sub 1]-utilizing organism is inserted at the restriction nuclease recognition site, inactivating the antibiotic resistance marker at that site. The vehicle can then be used to form a cosmid structure to infect the non-C[sub 1]-utilizing (e.g., E. coli) host, and then conjugated with a selected C[sub 1]-utilizing mutant. Resistance to the other antibiotic by the mutant is a marker of the conjugation. Other phenotypical changes in the mutant, e.g., loss of an auxotrophic trait, is attributed to the C[sub 1] gene. The vector is also used to inactivate genes whose protein products catalyze side reactions that divert compounds from a biosynthetic pathway to a desired product, thereby producing an organism that makes the desired product in higher yields. 3 figs.

  3. Imperfect Cloning Operations in Algebraic Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    No-cloning theorem says that there is no unitary operation that makes perfect clones of non-orthogonal quantum states. The objective of the present paper is to examine whether an imperfect cloning operation exists or not in a C*-algebraic framework. We define a universal -imperfect cloning operation which tolerates a finite loss of fidelity in the cloned state, and show that an individual system's algebra of observables is abelian if and only if there is a universal -imperfect cloning operation in the case where the loss of fidelity is less than . Therefore in this case no universal -imperfect cloning operation is possible in algebraic quantum theory.

  4. Local cloning of two product states

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Zhengfeng; Feng Yuan; Ying Mingsheng

    2005-09-15

    Local quantum operations and classical communication (LOCC) put considerable constraints on many quantum information processing tasks such as cloning and discrimination. Surprisingly, however, discrimination of any two pure states survives such constraints in some sense. We show that cloning is not that lucky; namely, probabilistic LOCC cloning of two product states is strictly less efficient than global cloning. We prove our result by giving explicitly the efficiency formula of local cloning of any two product states.

  5. Local cloning of entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Gheorghiu, Vlad; Yu Li; Cohen, Scott M.

    2010-08-15

    We investigate the conditions under which a set S of pure bipartite quantum states on a DxD system can be locally cloned deterministically by separable operations, when at least one of the states is full Schmidt rank. We allow for the possibility of cloning using a resource state that is less than maximally entangled. Our results include that: (i) all states in S must be full Schmidt rank and equally entangled under the G-concurrence measure, and (ii) the set S can be extended to a larger clonable set generated by a finite group G of order |G|=N, the number of states in the larger set. It is then shown that any local cloning apparatus is capable of cloning a number of states that divides D exactly. We provide a complete solution for two central problems in local cloning, giving necessary and sufficient conditions for (i) when a set of maximally entangled states can be locally cloned, valid for all D; and (ii) local cloning of entangled qubit states with nonvanishing entanglement. In both of these cases, we show that a maximally entangled resource is necessary and sufficient, and the states must be related to each other by local unitary 'shift' operations. These shifts are determined by the group structure, so need not be simple cyclic permutations. Assuming this shifted form and partially entangled states, then in D=3 we show that a maximally entangled resource is again necessary and sufficient, while for higher-dimensional systems, we find that the resource state must be strictly more entangled than the states in S. All of our necessary conditions for separable operations are also necessary conditions for local operations and classical communication (LOCC), since the latter is a proper subset of the former. In fact, all our results hold for LOCC, as our sufficient conditions are demonstrated for LOCC, directly.

  6. Comparison of T{sub z} = +-1->0 GT Transitions Studied in beta--decay and CE Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, F.; Rubio, B.; Fujita, Y.; Gelletly, W.

    2010-04-26

    Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions can be studied in both beta- decay and charge exchange(CE) reactions. If isospin is a good quantum number, then the T{sub z} = -1->0 and T{sub z} = +1->0 GT mirror transitions, are identical. Therefore, a comparison of the results from studies of beta decay and CE should shed light on this assumption. Accordingly we have studied the beta decay of the T{sub z} = -1 fp-shell nuclei, {sup 54}Ni, {sup 50}Fe, {sup 46}Cr, and {sup 42}Ti, produced in fragmentation and we have compared our results with the spectra from (3He, t) measurements on the mirror T{sub z} = +1 target nuclei studied in high resolution at RCNP, Osaka. The experiments were performed as part of the STOPPED beam RISING campaign at GSI.

  7. Effects of Huang Bai (Phellodendri Cortex) and Three Other Herbs on GnRH and GH Levels in GT1–7 and GH3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Haeng; Kwak, Sung Chul; Kim, Dong Kwan; Park, Sang Woug; Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Young-Sik; Lee, Donghun; Lee, Ju Won; Lee, Chang Gon; Lee, Hae Kyung; Cho, Sung-Min; Shin, Yu Jeong; Lee, Jin Yong; Kim, Hocheol; Chang, Gyu Tae

    2016-01-01

    The present study was to evaluate the effects of Huang Bai, Zhi Mu, Mai Ya, and Xia Ku Cao on hormone using the GT1–7 and GH3 cells. The GT1–7 and GH3 cell lines were incubated with DW; DMSO; and 30, 100, or 300 μg/mL of one of the four extract solutions in serum-free media for 24 hours. The MTT assay was performed to determine the cytotoxicity of the four herbs. The GT1–7 and GH3 cells were incubated in DW, estradiol (GT1–7 only), or noncytotoxic herb solutions in serum-free medium for 24 hours. A quantitative RT-PCR and western blot were performed to measure the GnRH expression in GT1–7 cells and GH expression in GH3 cells. Huang Bai, Zhi Mu, Xia Ku Cao, and Mai Ya inhibited the GnRH mRNA expression in GT1–7 cells, whereas Huang Bai enhanced GH mRNA expression in GH3 cells. Additionally, Xia Ku Cao inhibited GnRH protein expression in GT1–7 cells and Huang Bai promoted GH protein expression in GH3 cells. The findings suggest that Huang Bai can delay puberty by inhibiting GnRH synthesis in the hypothalamus while also accelerating growth by promoting GH synthesis and secretion in the pituitary. PMID:26925153

  8. Structures of complexes of a metal-independent glycosyltransferase GT6 from Bacteroides ovatus with UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine (UDP-GalNAc) and its hydrolysis products.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tram T K; Stinson, Brittany; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Lizotte-Waniewski, Michelle; Brew, Keith; Acharya, K Ravi

    2014-03-21

    Mammalian members of glycosyltransferase family 6 (GT6) of the CAZy database have a GT-A fold containing a conserved Asp-X-Asp (DXD) sequence that binds an essential metal cofactor. Bacteroides ovatus GT6a represents a GT6 clade found in more than 30 Gram-negative bacteria that is similar in sequence to the catalytic domains of mammalian GT6, but has an Asn(95)-Ala-Asn(97) (NXN) sequence substituted for the DXD motif and metal-independent catalytic activity. Co-crystals of a low activity mutant of BoGT6a (E192Q) with UDP-GalNAc contained protein complexes with intact UDP-GalNAc and two forms with hydrolysis products (UDP plus GalNAc) representing an initial closed complex and later open form primed for product release. Two cationic residues near the C terminus of BoGT6a, Lys(231) and Arg(243), interact with the diphosphate moiety of UDP-GalNAc, but only Lys(231) interacts with the UDP product and may function in leaving group stabilization. The amide group of Asn(95), the first Asn of the NXN motif, interacts with the ribose moiety of the substrate. This metal-independent GT6 resembles its metal-dependent homologs in undergoing conformational changes on binding UDP-GalNAc that arise from structuring the C terminus to cover this substrate. It appears that in the GT6 family, the metal cofactor functions specifically in binding the UDP moiety in the donor substrate and transition state, actions that can be efficiently performed by components of the polypeptide chain.

  9. Absorption, distribution and excretion of GT31-104, a novel bile acid sequestrant, in rats and dogs after acute and subchronic administration.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, D P; Petersen, J S; Ducharme, S; Markham, P; Goldberg, D I

    1997-05-01

    The absorption, distribution, and excretion of GT31-104, a novel bile acid sequestrant, was studied in rats and dogs after both acute and subchronic oral administration. The polyallylamine backbone of GT31-104 was labeled with tritium and one of the alkyl side chains was labeled with 14C. The mean blood and plasma concentration of [3H, 14C]GT31-104 in rats, in both treatment regimens, was negligible at all time points, with the highest amount observed being 0.69 microgram eq/g blood; in dogs the mean blood and plasma concentration of [3H, 14C]GT31-104 was below the limit of quantitation (< 0.001% total dose) at all time points. In both rats and dogs, the mean total urinary excretion of [3H, 14C]GT31-104 was approximately 0.06% of the total dose. The fecal excretion data indicates that both 3H- and 14C-derived radioactivity was excreted entirely in the feces. Mean total radioactivity excreted in the feces ranged from approximately 95 to 105% in the rats and 92 to 102% in the dogs. Across the different treatment regimens, in both species, tissue concentrations were negligible (< 0.01% total dose) and no differences in tissue profile were noted, indicating that there was no effect of pretreatment on [3H, 14C]GT31-104 absorption. GT31-104 was extracted with water, and the water-soluble portion contained radioactivity that would correlate to approximately 0.19% of the 3H dose and 0.41% of the 14C dose; this portion probably accounted for the negligible radioactivity observed systemically. Analysis of gastrointestinal (GI) tract tissues with contents indicated that GT31-104 is rapidly cleared from the GI tract. These data indicate that GT31-104 is not absorbed from the GI tract in rats and dogs.

  10. Internet and healthcare in Brazil: the role of the Working Group for Healthcare (GT Saúde).

    PubMed

    Tachinardi, U

    1998-09-01

    This paper introduces the GT Saúde initiative in Brazil. The group is part of the Brazilian Internet project, which goals are to depict how Internet can be useful to the society. The mission of the GT Saúde group is to foster Internet applications on the healthcare area. The main projects currently under development are presented: Multicom-21, using large bandwidth connections on telemedicine; the Unified Health Record, using Internet and smart-cards for a national minimum patient data set; the Brazilian Virtual Hospital, that presents a large amount of useful information and links for healthcare professionals and people in general; the National Healthcare Information Network (RNIS), that uses Internet as a medium for data exchange among the state secretaries and publishing statistics from the national healthcare system (SUS) for general public access; and finally the virtual university proposal, which uses Internet for education and is offering its first course on nutrition. The heterogeneity of the projects is meant and is part of the group's task, which is to cover the subject as widely as possible. Through this 'demonstration' projects the group is trying to prove the usefulness and benefits of using Internet technologies, even (or mainly) on a developing country with an inadequate healthcare situation. In its short existence the GT Saúde group has achieved several of its original goals. The most relevant accomplishments are: putting together different groups, eliciting synergy across the projects and encompassing a broad spectrum of applications (the 'demonstration factor').

  11. [Cloning and law in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Julesz, Máté

    2015-03-01

    Reproductive human cloning is prohibited in Hungary, as in many other countries. Therapeutic human cloning is not prohibited, just like in many other countries. Stem cell therapy is also allowed. Article III, paragraph (3) of the Hungarian basic law (constitution) strictly forbids total human cloning. Article 1 of the Additional Protocol to the Oviedo Convention, on the Prohibition of Cloning Human Beings (1998) stipulates that any intervention seeking to create a human being genetically identical to another human being, whether living or dead, is prohibited. In Hungary, according to Article 174 of the Criminal Code, total human cloning constitutes a crime. Article 180, paragraph (3) of the Hungarian Act on Health declares that embryos shall not be brought about for research purposes; research shall be conducted only on embryos brought about for reproductive purposes when this is authorized by the persons entitled to decide upon its disposal, or when the embryo is damaged. Article 180, paragraph (5) of the Hungarian Act on Health stipulates that multiple individuals who genetically conform to one another shall not be brought about. According to Article 181, paragraph (1) of the Hungarian Act on Health, an embryo used for research shall be kept alive for not longer than 14 days, not counting the time it was frozen for storage and the time period of research.

  12. [Mystery and problems of cloning].

    PubMed

    Nikitin, V A

    2010-01-01

    The attention of investigators is attracted to the fact that, in spite of great efforts in mammalian cloning, advances that have been made in this area of research are not great, and cloned animals have developmental pathologies often incompatible with life and/or reproduction ability. It is yet not clear what technical or biological factors underlie this, and how they are connected or interact with each other, which is more realistic strategically. There is a great number of articles dealing with the influence of cloning with the nuclear transfer on genetic and epigenetic reprogramming of donor cells. At the same time we can see the practical absence of analytical investigations concerning the technology of cloning as such, its weak points, and possible sources of cellular trauma in the course of microsurgery of nuclear transfer or twinning. This article discusses step by step several nuclear transfer techniques and the methods of dividing early preimplanted embryos for twinning with the aim to reveal possible sources of cell damage during micromanipulation that may have negative influence on the development of cloned organisms. Several new author's technologies based on the study of cell biophysical characteristics are described, which allow one to avoid cellular trauma during manipulation and minimize the possibility of cell damage at any rate.

  13. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding the cytosolic copper/zinc-superoxide dismutase from sweet potato tuberous root.

    PubMed

    Lin, C T; Yeh, K W; Kao, M C; Shaw, J F

    1993-11-01

    A full-length cDNA clone encoding a putative copper/zinc-superoxide dismutase (SOD) of sweet potato, Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. cv Tainong 57, was isolated from a cDNA library constructed in lambda gt10 from tuber root mRNA. Nucleotide sequence analysis of this cDNA clone revealed that it comprises a complete open reading frame coding for 152 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence showed higher homology (78-86%) with the sequence of the cytosolic SOD than that of the chloroplast SOD from other plant species. The residues required for coordinating copper and zinc are conserved as they are among all reported Cu/Zn-SOD sequences. In addition, it lacks recognizable plastic or mitochondrial targeting sequences. These data suggest that the isolated sweet potato clone encodes a cytosolic Cu/Zn-SOD.

  14. Improvement of cloning efficiency in minipigs using post-thawed donor cells treated with roscovitine.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seongsoo; Oh, Keon Bong; Kwon, Dae-Jin; Ock, Sun-A; Lee, Jeong-Woong; Im, Gi-Sun; Lee, Sung-Soo; Lee, Kichoon; Park, Jin-Ki

    2013-11-01

    Massachusetts General Hospital miniature pigs (MGH minipigs) have been established for organ transplantation studies across the homozygous major histocompatibility complex, but cloning efficiency of MGH minipigs is extremely low. This study was designed to increase the productivity of MGH minipigs by nuclear transfer of post-thaw donor cells after 1 h co-incubation with roscovitine. The MGH minipig cells were genetically modified with GT KO (alpha1,3-galactosyltransferase knock-out) and hCD46 KI (human CD46 knock-in) and used as donor cells. The GT KO/hCD46 KI donor cells were cultured for either 3 days (control group) or 1 h after thawing with 15 μM roscovitine (experimental group) prior to the nuclear transfer. The relative percentage of the transgenic donor cells that entered into G0/G1 was 93.7 % (±2.54). This was different from the donor cells cultured for 1 h with the roscovitine-treated group (84.6 % ±4.6) (P < 0.05) and without roscovitine (78.6 % ±5.5) (P < 0.01), respectively. The pregnancy rate and delivery rate in the roscovitine group (8/12 and 6/8, respectively) were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than those in the control group (6/19 and 3/6, respectively). In the experimental group, 12 GT KO/hCD46 KI transgenic minipigs were successfully generated, and five minipigs among them survived for more than 6 months so far. The recipient-based individual cloning efficiency ranged from 0.74 to 2.54 %. In conclusion, gene-modified donor cells can be used for cloning of MGH minipigs if the cells are post-thawed and treated with roscovitine for 1 h prior to nuclear transfer.

  15. Isolation and characterization of two cDNA clones of anaerobically induced lactate dehydrogenase from barley roots

    SciTech Connect

    Hondred, D.; Hanson, A.D. )

    1990-05-01

    In barley roots during hypoxia, five lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isozymes accumulate with a concomitant increase in enzyme activity ({approximately}20-fold). These isozymes are thought to be tetramers resulting from the random association of the products of two Ldh loci. To investigate this system, cDNA clones of LDH have been isolated from a {lambda}gt11 library using antiserum raised against barley LDH purified {approximately}3,000-fold and using nucleic acid probes synthesized by the polymerase chain reaction. Two cDNA clones were obtained (1,305 and 1,166 bp). The deduced amino acid sequences of the two barley LDHs are 96% identical to each other, and 50% and 40% identical to vertebrate and bacterial LDHs, respectively. Northern blots identified a single mRNA band ({approximately}1.5 kb) whose level rose 8-fold during hypoxia.

  16. Cloning and genomic nucleotide sequence of the matrix attachment region binding protein from the halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng-Ju; Wang, Tian-Yun; Wang, Ya-Feng; Yang, Rui; Li, Zhao-Xi

    2013-07-01

    In our previous study, the sequence of a matrix attachment region binding protein (MBP) cDNA was cloned from the unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina. However, the nucleotide sequence of this gene has not been reported so far. In this paper, the nucleotide sequence of MBP was cloned and characterized, and its gene copy number was determined. The MBP nucleotide sequence is 5641 bp long, and interrupted by 12 introns ranging from 132 to 562 bp. All the introns in the D. salina MBP gene have orthodox splice sites, exhibiting GT at the 5' end and AG at the 3' end. Southern blot analysis showed that MBP only has one copy in the D. salina genome. PMID:22961592

  17. Cloning and genomic nucleotide sequence of the matrix attachment region binding protein from the halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng-Ju; Wang, Tian-Yun; Wang, Ya-Feng; Yang, Rui; Li, Zhao-Xi

    2013-07-01

    In our previous study, the sequence of a matrix attachment region binding protein (MBP) cDNA was cloned from the unicellular green alga Dunaliella salina. However, the nucleotide sequence of this gene has not been reported so far. In this paper, the nucleotide sequence of MBP was cloned and characterized, and its gene copy number was determined. The MBP nucleotide sequence is 5641 bp long, and interrupted by 12 introns ranging from 132 to 562 bp. All the introns in the D. salina MBP gene have orthodox splice sites, exhibiting GT at the 5' end and AG at the 3' end. Southern blot analysis showed that MBP only has one copy in the D. salina genome.

  18. GT-MSOCC - A domain for research on human-computer interaction and decision aiding in supervisory control systems. [Georgia Tech - Multisatellite Operations Control Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1987-01-01

    The Georgia Tech-Multisatellite Operations Control Center (GT-MSOCC), a real-time interactive simulation of the operator interface to a NASA ground control system for unmanned earth-orbiting satellites, is described. The GT-MSOCC program for investigating a range of modeling, decision aiding, and workstation design issues related to the human-computer interaction is discussed. A GT-MSOCC operator function model is described in which operator actions, both cognitive and manual, are represented as the lowest level discrete control network nodes, and operator action nodes are linked to information needs or system reconfiguration commands.

  19. A DOS Primer for Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beecher, Henry

    1989-01-01

    Presents a basic orientation to the functions and capabilities of disk operating systems (DOS), aimed at the nontechnically oriented user of IBM personal computers and compatible microcomputers. Areas discussed include booting up, the use of floppy and hard disks, file storage and manipulation, and directories. Further readings are provided. (CLB)

  20. The topsy-turvy cloning law.

    PubMed

    Brassington, Iain; Oultram, Stuart

    2011-03-01

    In debates about human cloning, a distinction is frequently drawn between therapeutic and reproductive uses of the technology. Naturally enough, this distinction influences the way that the law is framed. The general consensus is that therapeutic cloning is less morally problematic than reproductive cloning--one can hold this position while holding that both are morally unacceptable--and the law frequently leaves the way open for some cloning for the sake of research into new therapeutic techniques while banning it for reproductive purposes. We claim that the position adopted by the law has things the wrong way around: if we accept a moral distinction between therapeutic and reproductive cloning, there are actually more reasons to be morally worried about therapeutic cloning than about reproductive cloning. If cloning is the proper object of legal scrutiny, then, we ought to make sure that we are scrutinising the right kind of clone.

  1. Cloning and sequencing of the gene for human. beta. -casein

    SciTech Connect

    Loennerdal, B.; Bergstroem, S.; Andersson, Y.; Hialmarsson, K.; Sundgyist, A.; Hernell, O. )

    1990-02-26

    Human {beta}-casein is a major protein in human milk. This protein is part of the casein micelle and has been suggested to have several physiological functions in the newborn. Since there is limited information on {beta}casein and the factors that affect its concentration in human milk, the authors have isolated and sequenced the gene for this protein. A human mammary gland cDNA library (Clontech) in gt 11 was screened by plaque hy-hybridization using a 42-mer synthetic {sup 32}p-labelled oligo-nucleotide. Positive clones were identified and isolated, DNA was prepared and the gene isolated by cleavage with EcoR1. Following subcloning (PUC18), restriction mapping and Southern blotting, DNA for sequencing was prepared. The gene was sequenced by the dideoxy method. Human {beta}-casein has 212 amino acids and the amino acid sequence deducted from the nucleotide sequence is to 91% identical to the published sequence for human {beta}-casein show a high degree of conservation at the leader peptide and the highly phosphorylated sequences, but also deletions and divergence at several positions. These results provide insight into the structure of the human {beta}-casein gene and will facilitate studies on factors affecting its expression.

  2. Cloning and expression of a putative alcohol dehydrogenase gene of Entamoeba histolytica and its application to immunological examination.

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, A; Hara, Y; Kimoto, T; Okuno, Y; Minekawa, Y; Nakabayashi, T

    1996-01-01

    To clone and express the genes encoding major antigens of Entamoeba histolytica, we constructed a lambda gt11 cDNA library for E. histolytica HM1:IMSS and screened it with pooled sera from patients with amoebiasis. A 1,223-bp cDNA was cloned (clone 1223), and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The amino acid sequence predicted to be encoded by the open reading frame of clone 1223 consisted of 396 residues and showed 32.5 and 32.3% homology to the NADH-dependent butanol dehydrogenases I and II (bdhA and bdhB) of Clostridium acetobutylicum, respectively. In addition, 29 of the 34 consensus positions of bdhA and bdhB were also well conserved in clone 1223. The recombinant protein expressed from clone 1223 had an estimated molecular mass of 43.5 kDa as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The antigenicity and specificity of the recombinant protein were evaluated by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using sera obtained from two clinical groups of patients with amoebiasis and a group of healthy controls. The recombinant protein had potent and specific antigenicity. In all, 53 serum samples (88.3%) from 60 patients with amoebiasis were positive for immunoglobulin G antibody against the recombinant protein, with a mean optical density value of 0.42. In contrast, 53 of 54 healthy control serum samples were negative, with only 1 positive serum sample showing the lower optical density value. These results suggested that clone 1223 is promising in terms of providing a useful antigen for the accurate serodiagnosis of amoebiasis and that the gene encodes a putative alcohol dehydrogenase of E. histolytica. PMID:8705667

  3. Mammalian cloning: possibilities and threats.

    PubMed

    Mitalipov, S M; Wolf, D P

    2000-10-01

    The cloning of mammals originated with the production of limited numbers of genetically identical offspring by blastomere separation or embryo splitting. In the past few years, remarkable progress has been reported in cloning by nuclear transfer (NT) with donor nuclei recovered from embryonic, fetal or adult cells. Factors that contribute to the successful reprogramming of the transferred nucleus and the normal term development of the newly reconstructed embryo include the cell cycle stage of both the donor nucleus and recipient cytoplast, the timing of fusion and cytoplast activation, and the source of donor nuclei. The possibility of producing live offspring by somatic cell NT carries potential applications in animal husbandry, biotechnology, transgenic and pharmaceutical production, biomedical research, and the preservation of endangered species. However, the low efficiencies of cloning by NT coupled with high embryonic, fetal and neonatal losses may restrict immediate commercial applications in agriculture. These limitations notwithstanding, the greatest benefits and practical implications of this new technology could be in transplantation medicine and therapeutic cloning.

  4. Clone Poems and the Microcomputer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irizarry, Estelle

    1989-01-01

    Describes how students can use the computer to study and create clone poems (altering original Spanish-language poems by substituting words and expressions), and how students can gain a deeper appreciation of the original poem's poetic structure and semantics. (CB)

  5. Healthy ageing of cloned sheep

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, K. D.; Corr, S. A.; Gutierrez, C. G.; Fisher, P. A.; Lee, J.-H.; Rathbone, A. J.; Choi, I.; Campbell, K. H. S.; Gardner, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    The health of cloned animals generated by somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been of concern since its inception; however, there are no detailed assessments of late-onset, non-communicable diseases. Here we report that SCNT has no obvious detrimental long-term health effects in a cohort of 13 cloned sheep. We perform musculoskeletal assessments, metabolic tests and blood pressure measurements in 13 aged (7–9 years old) cloned sheep, including four derived from the cell line that gave rise to Dolly. We also perform radiological examinations of all main joints, including the knees, the joint most affected by osteoarthritis in Dolly, and compare all health parameters to groups of 5-and 6-year-old sheep, and published reference ranges. Despite their advanced age, these clones are euglycaemic, insulin sensitive and normotensive. Importantly, we observe no clinical signs of degenerative joint disease apart from mild, or in one case moderate, osteoarthritis in some animals. Our study is the first to assess the long-term health outcomes of SCNT in large animals. PMID:27459299

  6. Healthy ageing of cloned sheep.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, K D; Corr, S A; Gutierrez, C G; Fisher, P A; Lee, J-H; Rathbone, A J; Choi, I; Campbell, K H S; Gardner, D S

    2016-01-01

    The health of cloned animals generated by somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been of concern since its inception; however, there are no detailed assessments of late-onset, non-communicable diseases. Here we report that SCNT has no obvious detrimental long-term health effects in a cohort of 13 cloned sheep. We perform musculoskeletal assessments, metabolic tests and blood pressure measurements in 13 aged (7-9 years old) cloned sheep, including four derived from the cell line that gave rise to Dolly. We also perform radiological examinations of all main joints, including the knees, the joint most affected by osteoarthritis in Dolly, and compare all health parameters to groups of 5-and 6-year-old sheep, and published reference ranges. Despite their advanced age, these clones are euglycaemic, insulin sensitive and normotensive. Importantly, we observe no clinical signs of degenerative joint disease apart from mild, or in one case moderate, osteoarthritis in some animals. Our study is the first to assess the long-term health outcomes of SCNT in large animals.

  7. Healthy ageing of cloned sheep.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, K D; Corr, S A; Gutierrez, C G; Fisher, P A; Lee, J-H; Rathbone, A J; Choi, I; Campbell, K H S; Gardner, D S

    2016-01-01

    The health of cloned animals generated by somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been of concern since its inception; however, there are no detailed assessments of late-onset, non-communicable diseases. Here we report that SCNT has no obvious detrimental long-term health effects in a cohort of 13 cloned sheep. We perform musculoskeletal assessments, metabolic tests and blood pressure measurements in 13 aged (7-9 years old) cloned sheep, including four derived from the cell line that gave rise to Dolly. We also perform radiological examinations of all main joints, including the knees, the joint most affected by osteoarthritis in Dolly, and compare all health parameters to groups of 5-and 6-year-old sheep, and published reference ranges. Despite their advanced age, these clones are euglycaemic, insulin sensitive and normotensive. Importantly, we observe no clinical signs of degenerative joint disease apart from mild, or in one case moderate, osteoarthritis in some animals. Our study is the first to assess the long-term health outcomes of SCNT in large animals. PMID:27459299

  8. Human reproductive cloning: a conflict of liberties.

    PubMed

    Havstad, Joyce C

    2010-02-01

    Proponents of human reproductive cloning do not dispute that cloning may lead to violations of clones' right to self-determination, or that these violations could cause psychological harms. But they proceed with their endorsement of human reproductive cloning by dismissing these psychological harms, mainly in two ways. The first tactic is to point out that to commit the genetic fallacy is indeed a mistake; the second is to invoke Parfit's non-identity problem. The argument of this paper is that neither approach succeeds in removing our moral responsibility to consider and to prevent psychological harms to cloned individuals. In fact, the same commitment to personal liberty that generates the right to reproduce by means of cloning also creates the need to limit that right appropriately. Discussion of human reproductive cloning ought to involve a careful and balanced consideration of both the relevant aspects of personal liberty - the parents' right to reproductive freedom and the cloned child's right to self-determination.

  9. Energy values of nine Populus clones

    SciTech Connect

    Strong, T.F.

    1980-01-01

    This paper compares calorific values for components of nine Populus clones. The components include stem wood, stem bark, and branches. Also compared are calorific values for clones of balsam poplar and black cottonwood parentages.

  10. Race quickens for the first human clone.

    PubMed

    Gross, M

    2001-04-01

    The dazzling creation of Dolly, the cloned sheep, led many states to legislate against the possibility of using similar technology to create human clones. But for some, this prize is proving too tempting to ignore. Michael Gross reports. PMID:11413008

  11. Association of Anti-GT1a Antibodies with an Outbreak of Guillain-Barré Syndrome and Analysis of Ganglioside Mimicry in an Associated Campylobacter jejuni Strain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Maojun; Gilbert, Michel; Yuki, Nobuhiro; Cao, Fangfang; Li, Jianjun; Liu, Hongying; Li, Qun; Meng, Fanliang; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    An outbreak of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), subsequent to Campylobacter jejuni enteritis, occurred in China in 2007. Serum anti-ganglioside antibodies were measured in GBS patients and controls. Genome sequencing was used to determine the phylogenetic relationship among three C. jejuni strains from a patient with GBS (ICDCCJ07001), a patient with gastroenteritis (ICDCCJ07002) and a healthy carrier (ICDCCJ07004), which were all associated with the outbreak. The ganglioside-like structures of the lipo-oligosaccharides of these strains were determined by mass spectrometry. Seventeen (53%) of the GBS patients had anti-GT1a IgG antibodies. GT1a mimicry was found in the lipo-oligosaccharides of strain ICDCCJ07002 and ICDCCJ07004; but a combination of GM3/GD3 mimics was observed in ICDCCJ07001, although this patient had anti-GT1a IgG antibodies. A single-base deletion in a glycosyltransferase gene caused the absence of GT1a mimicry in ICDCCJ07001. The phylogenetic tree showed that ICDCCJ07002 and ICDCCJ07004 were genetically closer to each other than to ICDCCJ07001. C. jejuni, bearing a GT1a-like lipo-oligosaccharide, might have caused the GBS outbreak and the loss of GT1a mimicry may have helped ICDCCJ07001 to survive in the host.

  12. Association of Anti-GT1a Antibodies with an Outbreak of Guillain-Barré Syndrome and Analysis of Ganglioside Mimicry in an Associated Campylobacter jejuni Strain

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Fangfang; Li, Jianjun; Liu, Hongying; Li, Qun; Meng, Fanliang; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    An outbreak of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), subsequent to Campylobacter jejuni enteritis, occurred in China in 2007. Serum anti-ganglioside antibodies were measured in GBS patients and controls. Genome sequencing was used to determine the phylogenetic relationship among three C. jejuni strains from a patient with GBS (ICDCCJ07001), a patient with gastroenteritis (ICDCCJ07002) and a healthy carrier (ICDCCJ07004), which were all associated with the outbreak. The ganglioside-like structures of the lipo-oligosaccharides of these strains were determined by mass spectrometry. Seventeen (53%) of the GBS patients had anti-GT1a IgG antibodies. GT1a mimicry was found in the lipo-oligosaccharides of strain ICDCCJ07002 and ICDCCJ07004; but a combination of GM3/GD3 mimics was observed in ICDCCJ07001, although this patient had anti-GT1a IgG antibodies. A single-base deletion in a glycosyltransferase gene caused the absence of GT1a mimicry in ICDCCJ07001. The phylogenetic tree showed that ICDCCJ07002 and ICDCCJ07004 were genetically closer to each other than to ICDCCJ07001. C. jejuni, bearing a GT1a-like lipo-oligosaccharide, might have caused the GBS outbreak and the loss of GT1a mimicry may have helped ICDCCJ07001 to survive in the host. PMID:26197476

  13. Association of Anti-GT1a Antibodies with an Outbreak of Guillain-Barré Syndrome and Analysis of Ganglioside Mimicry in an Associated Campylobacter jejuni Strain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Maojun; Gilbert, Michel; Yuki, Nobuhiro; Cao, Fangfang; Li, Jianjun; Liu, Hongying; Li, Qun; Meng, Fanliang; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    An outbreak of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), subsequent to Campylobacter jejuni enteritis, occurred in China in 2007. Serum anti-ganglioside antibodies were measured in GBS patients and controls. Genome sequencing was used to determine the phylogenetic relationship among three C. jejuni strains from a patient with GBS (ICDCCJ07001), a patient with gastroenteritis (ICDCCJ07002) and a healthy carrier (ICDCCJ07004), which were all associated with the outbreak. The ganglioside-like structures of the lipo-oligosaccharides of these strains were determined by mass spectrometry. Seventeen (53%) of the GBS patients had anti-GT1a IgG antibodies. GT1a mimicry was found in the lipo-oligosaccharides of strain ICDCCJ07002 and ICDCCJ07004; but a combination of GM3/GD3 mimics was observed in ICDCCJ07001, although this patient had anti-GT1a IgG antibodies. A single-base deletion in a glycosyltransferase gene caused the absence of GT1a mimicry in ICDCCJ07001. The phylogenetic tree showed that ICDCCJ07002 and ICDCCJ07004 were genetically closer to each other than to ICDCCJ07001. C. jejuni, bearing a GT1a-like lipo-oligosaccharide, might have caused the GBS outbreak and the loss of GT1a mimicry may have helped ICDCCJ07001 to survive in the host. PMID:26197476

  14. Probabilistic cloning of three symmetric states

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, O.; Bergou, J.; Delgado, A.

    2010-12-15

    We study the probabilistic cloning of three symmetric states. These states are defined by a single complex quantity, the inner product among them. We show that three different probabilistic cloning machines are necessary to optimally clone all possible families of three symmetric states. We also show that the optimal cloning probability of generating M copies out of one original can be cast as the quotient between the success probability of unambiguously discriminating one and M copies of symmetric states.

  15. Phase-covariant quantum cloning of qudits

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Heng; Imai, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Keiji; Wang, Xiang-Bin

    2003-02-01

    We study the phase-covariant quantum cloning machine for qudits, i.e., the input states in a d-level quantum system have complex coefficients with arbitrary phase but constant module. A cloning unitary transformation is proposed. After optimizing the fidelity between input state and single qudit reduced density operator of output state, we obtain the optimal fidelity for 1 to 2 phase-covariant quantum cloning of qudits and the corresponding cloning transformation.

  16. [Cloning: reproductive medicine or breeding program?].

    PubMed

    Zülicke, F

    1998-01-01

    The presentation of clone-sheep Dolly in February 1997 which was the result of a long and costly research process by Ian Wilmut's team at Roslin Institute near Edinburgh brought world-wide headlines and a continuous debate. But neither cloning and cloning experiments nor the debates about it and the possible application on humans are as new as it is shown in the media. The following article gives some facts and arguments to the field of cloning.

  17. Economical phase-covariant cloning of qudits

    SciTech Connect

    Buscemi, Francesco; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Macchiavello, Chiara

    2005-04-01

    We derive the optimal N{yields}M phase-covariant quantum cloning for equatorial states in dimension d with M=kd+N, k integer. The cloning maps are optimal for both global and single-qudit fidelity. The map is achieved by an 'economical' cloning machine, which works without ancilla.

  18. Local cloning of arbitrarily entangled multipartite states

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, Alastair; Ericsson, Marie

    2006-01-15

    We examine the perfect cloning of nonlocal, orthogonal states using only local operations and classical communication. We provide a complete characterisation of the states that can be cloned under these restrictions, and their relation to distinguishability. We also consider the case of catalytic cloning, which we show provides no enhancement to the set of clonable states.

  19. The APOE -219G/T and +113G/C polymorphisms affect insulin resistance among Turks.

    PubMed

    Komurcu-Bayrak, Evrim; Onat, Altan; Yuzbasiogullari, Berna; Mononen, Nina; Laaksonen, Reijo; Kähönen, Mika; Hergenc, Gulay; Lehtimäki, Terho; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan

    2011-05-01

    The -219G/T (rs405509) and +113G/C (rs440446) polymorphisms within the regulatory region of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene have been related to the transcriptional activity of the gene. We examined the effect of the stated polymorphisms and their construct haplotypes with the APOE ɛ2/ɛ3/ɛ4 polymorphism on lipid levels and insulin resistance in the Turkish Adult Risk Factor Study. Randomly selected 1774 adults (mean age, 55.0 ± 11.7 years; 51.2% women) participating in the population-based Turkish Adult Risk Factor Study were cross-sectionally analyzed for the -219G/T, +113G/C, and ɛ2/ɛ3/ɛ4 polymorphisms as well as their haplotypes. Insulin resistance was defined as the 70th percentile in the sample (>2.51) of the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA). The frequencies of the -219T and +113C alleles were 0.477 and 0.423, respectively; and those of haplotype 1 (GGɛ3) and haplotype 2 (TCɛ3) were 44.1% and 41.9%, respectively. The -219G/T and +113G/C genotypes (both P < .04) and diplotypes of haplotype 2 (TCɛ3) (P < .014) were inversely related to serum fasting insulin and the HOMA index, even after controlling for 8 relevant covariates, but not to serum lipids. Within the APOE3 group, haplotype 2 (TC-/TC+) heterozygotes had an odds ratio of 0.66 (95% confidence interval, 0.42-0.99) for HOMA of insulin resistance after adjusting for 8 covariates. APOE promoter polymorphisms and their diplotypes are independently related with serum fasting insulin levels and HOMA index among Turks.

  20. Cytotoxic effects of oxysterols produced during ozonolysis of cholesterol in murine GT1-7 hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Sathishkumar, K; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Uppu, Rao M

    2007-01-01

    Ozone present in the photochemical smog or generated at the inflammatory sites is known to oxidize cholesterol and its 3-acyl esters. The oxidation results in the formation of multiple "ozone-specific" oxysterols, some of which are known to cause abnormalities in the metabolism of cholesterol and exert cytotoxicity. The ozone-specific oxysterols have been shown to favor the formation of atherosclerotic plaques and amyloid fibrils involving pro-oxidant processes. In the present communication, cultured murine GT1-7 hypothalamic neurons were studied in the context of cholesterol metabolism, formation of reactive oxygen species, intracellular Ca2 + levels and cytotoxicity using two most commonly occurring cholesterol ozonolysis products, 3beta- hydroxy-5-oxo-5,6-secocholestan-6-al (ChSeco) and 5beta, 6beta-epoxy-cholesterol (ChEpo). It was found that ChSeco elicited cytotoxicity at lower concentration (IC50 = 21 +/- 2.4 microM) than did ChEpo (IC50 = 43 +/- 3.7 microM). When tested at their IC50 concentrations in GT1-7 cells, both ChSeco and ChEpo resulted in the generation of ROS, the magnitude of which was comparable. N-acetyl-l-cysteine and Trolox attenuated the cytotoxic effects of ChSeco and ChEpo. The intracellular Ca2 + levels were not altered by either ChSeco or ChEpo. Methyl-beta-cyclodextrins, which cause depletion of cellular cholesterol, prevented ChSeco- but not ChEpo-induced cytotoxicity. The cell death caused by ChEpo, but not ChSeco, was prevented by exogenous cholesterol. Although oxidative stress plays a significant role, the results of the present study indicate differences in the pathways of cell death induced by ChSeco and ChEpo in murine GT1-7 hypothalamic neurons. PMID:17164181

  1. Genotyping-in-Thousands by sequencing (GT-seq): A cost effective SNP genotyping method based on custom amplicon sequencing.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Nathan R; Harmon, Stephanie A; Narum, Shawn R

    2015-07-01

    Genotyping-in-Thousands by sequencing (GT-seq) is a method that uses next-generation sequencing of multiplexed PCR products to generate genotypes from relatively small panels (50-500) of targeted single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for thousands of individuals in a single Illumina HiSeq lane. This method uses only unlabelled oligos and PCR master mix in two thermal cycling steps for amplification of targeted SNP loci. During this process, sequencing adapters and dual barcode sequence tags are incorporated into the amplicons enabling thousands of individuals to be pooled into a single sequencing library. Post sequencing, reads from individual samples are split into individual files using their unique combination of barcode sequences. Genotyping is performed with a simple perl script which counts amplicon-specific sequences for each allele, and allele ratios are used to determine the genotypes. We demonstrate this technique by genotyping 2068 individual steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) samples with a set of 192 SNP markers in a single library sequenced in a single Illumina HiSeq lane. Genotype data were 99.9% concordant to previously collected TaqMan(™) genotypes at the same 192 loci, but call rates were slightly lower with GT-seq (96.4%) relative to Taqman (99.0%). Of the 192 SNPs, 187 were genotyped in ≥90% of the individual samples and only 3 SNPs were genotyped in <70% of samples. This study demonstrates amplicon sequencing with GT-seq greatly reduces the cost of genotyping hundreds of targeted SNPs relative to existing methods by utilizing a simple library preparation method and massive efficiency of scale.

  2. Colletotrilactam A-D, novel lactams from Colletotrichum gloeosporioides GT-7, a fungal endophyte of Uncaria rhynchophylla.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bo; Yang, Zhong-Duo; Chen, Xiao-Wei; Zhou, Shuang-Yan; Yu, Hai-Tao; Sun, Jing-Yun; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Yong-Gang; Xue, Hong-Yan

    2016-09-01

    Four novel lactams, colletotrilactam A-D (1-4), along with six known compounds (5-10) were isolated from the culture broth of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides GT-7, a fungal endophyte of Uncaria rhynchophylla. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by comprehensive NMR spectroscopy. Isolates were tested for monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitory activity and compound 9 showed potent MAO inhibitory activity with IC50 value of 8.93±0.34μg/mL, when the IC50 value of iproniazid as a standard was 1.80±0.5μg/mL. PMID:27520493

  3. Cloning humans, cloning literature: genetics and the imagination deficit.

    PubMed

    Van Dijck, J

    1999-01-01

    After the birth of Dolly, media stories on cloning were replete with references to well-known science fiction plots. This essay criticizes the 'imagination deficit' of scientists and journalists, first by problematizing the uncritical adoption of attentuated science fiction plots in the media coverage of Dolly, and second, by proposing to look at more expansive science fiction novels that carefully examine issues such as uniqueness and identity in relation to the new genetics.

  4. Molecular cloning, expression, and primary sequence of outer membrane protein P2 of Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    PubMed Central

    Munson, R; Tolan, R W

    1989-01-01

    The structural gene for the porin of Haemophilus influenzae type b, designated outer membrane protein P2, was cloned, and the DNA sequence was determined. An oligonucleotide probe generated by reverse translation of N-terminal amino acid sequence data from the purified protein was used to screen genomic DNA. The probe detected a single EcoRI fragment of approximately 1,700 base pairs which was cloned to lambda gt11 and then into M13 and partially sequenced. The derived amino acid sequence indicated that we had cloned the N-terminal portion of the P2 gene. An overlapping approximately 1,600-base-pair PvuII genomic fragment was cloned into M13, and the sequence of the remainder of the P2 gene was determined. The gene for P2 was then reconstructed under the control of the T7 promoter and expressed in Escherichia coli. The N-terminal sequence of the purified protein corresponds to residues 21 through 34 of the derived amino acid sequence. Thus, the protein is synthesized with a 20-amino-acid leader peptide. The Mr of the processed protein is 37,782, in good agreement with the estimate of 37,000 from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Images PMID:2535836

  5. Predators induce cloning in echinoderm larvae.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Dawn; Strathmann, Richard R

    2008-03-14

    Asexual propagation (cloning) is a widespread reproductive strategy of plants and animals. Although larval cloning is well documented in echinoderms, identified stimuli for cloning are limited to those associated with conditions favorable for growth and reproduction. Our research shows that larvae of the sand dollar Dendraster excentricus also clone in response to cues from predators. Predator-induced clones were smaller than uncloned larvae, suggesting an advantage against visual predators. Our results offer another ecological context for asexual reproduction: rapid size reduction as a defense.

  6. Probabilistic cloning of three nonorthogonal states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen; Rui, Pinshu; Yang, Qun; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Ziyun

    2015-04-01

    We study the probabilistic cloning of three nonorthogonal states with equal success probabilities. For simplicity, we assume that the three states belong to a special set. Analytical form of the maximal success probability for probabilistic cloning is calculated. With the maximal success probability, we deduce the explicit form of probabilistic quantum cloning machine. In the case of cloning, we get the unambiguous form of the unitary operation. It is demonstrated that the upper bound for probabilistic quantum cloning machine in (Qiu in J Phys A 35:6931, 2002) can be reached only if the three states are equidistant.

  7. Optimal quantum cloning via spin networks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qing; Cheng Jianhua; Wang Kelin; Du Jiangfeng

    2006-09-15

    In this paper we demonstrate that optimal 1{yields}M phase-covariant cloning quantum cloning is available via free dynamical evolution of spin networks. By properly designing the network and the couplings between spins, we show that optimal 1{yields}M phase-covariant cloning can be achieved if the initial state is prepared as a specific symmetric state. Especially, when M is an odd number, the optimal phase-covariant cloning can be achieved without ancillas. Moreover, we demonstrate that the same framework is capable for optimal 1{yields}2 universal cloning.

  8. No-cloning theorem on quantum logics

    SciTech Connect

    Miyadera, Takayuki; Imai, Hideki

    2009-10-15

    This paper discusses the no-cloning theorem in a logicoalgebraic approach. In this approach, an orthoalgebra is considered as a general structure for propositions in a physical theory. We proved that an orthoalgebra admits cloning operation if and only if it is a Boolean algebra. That is, only classical theory admits the cloning of states. If unsharp propositions are to be included in the theory, then a notion of effect algebra is considered. We proved that an atomic Archimedean effect algebra admitting cloning operation is a Boolean algebra. This paper also presents a partial result, indicating a relation between the cloning on effect algebras and hidden variables.

  9. Therapeutic and reproductive cloning: a critique.

    PubMed

    Bowring, Finn

    2004-01-01

    This article is a critical examination of the science and ethics of human cloning. It summarises the key scientific milestones in the development of nuclear transplantation, explains the importance of cloning to research into the medical potential of embryonic stem cells, and discusses the well-worn distinction between 'therapeutic' and 'reproductive' cloning. Suggesting that this distinction will be impossible to police, it goes on to consider the ethics of full human cloning. It is concluded that it represents an unacceptable form of parental despotism, and that the genetic engineering and cloning of future human beings will fracture the foundations of modern humanism.

  10. Chromatin remodeling in nuclear cloning.

    PubMed

    Wade, Paul A; Kikyo, Nobuaki

    2002-05-01

    Nuclear cloning is a procedure to create new animals by injecting somatic nuclei into unfertilized oocytes. Recent successes in mammalian cloning with differentiated adult nuclei strongly indicate that oocyte cytoplasm contains unidentified remarkable reprogramming activities with the capacity to erase the previous memory of cell differentiation. At the heart of this nuclear reprogramming lies chromatin remodeling as chromatin structure and function define cell differentiation through regulation of the transcriptional activities of the cells. Studies involving the modification of chromatin elements such as selective uptake or release of binding proteins, covalent histone modifications including acetylation and methylation, and DNA methylation should provide significant insight into the molecular mechanisms of nuclear dedifferentiation and redifferentiation in oocyte cytoplasm.

  11. Cloning Expeditions: Risky but Rewarding

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In the 1980s, a good part of my laboratory was using the then-new recombinant DNA techniques to clone and characterize many important cell surface membrane proteins: GLUT1 (the red cell glucose transporter) and then GLUT2 and GLUT4, the red cell anion exchange protein (Band 3), asialoglycoprotein receptor subunits, sucrase-isomaltase, the erythropoietin receptor, and two of the subunits of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor. These cloned genes opened many new fields of basic research, including membrane insertion and trafficking of transmembrane proteins, signal transduction by many members of the cytokine and TGF-β families of receptors, and the cellular physiology of glucose and anion transport. They also led to many insights into the molecular biology of several cancers, hematopoietic disorders, and diabetes. This work was done by an exceptional group of postdocs and students who took exceptionally large risks in developing and using novel cloning technologies. Unsurprisingly, all have gone on to become leaders in the fields of molecular cell biology and molecular medicine. PMID:24061478

  12. Cloning expeditions: risky but rewarding.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Harvey

    2013-12-01

    In the 1980s, a good part of my laboratory was using the then-new recombinant DNA techniques to clone and characterize many important cell surface membrane proteins: GLUT1 (the red cell glucose transporter) and then GLUT2 and GLUT4, the red cell anion exchange protein (Band 3), asialoglycoprotein receptor subunits, sucrase-isomaltase, the erythropoietin receptor, and two of the subunits of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor. These cloned genes opened many new fields of basic research, including membrane insertion and trafficking of transmembrane proteins, signal transduction by many members of the cytokine and TGF-β families of receptors, and the cellular physiology of glucose and anion transport. They also led to many insights into the molecular biology of several cancers, hematopoietic disorders, and diabetes. This work was done by an exceptional group of postdocs and students who took exceptionally large risks in developing and using novel cloning technologies. Unsurprisingly, all have gone on to become leaders in the fields of molecular cell biology and molecular medicine.

  13. GtRNAdb 2.0: an expanded database of transfer RNA genes identified in complete and draft genomes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Patricia P; Lowe, Todd M

    2016-01-01

    Transfer RNAs represent the largest, most ubiquitous class of non-protein coding RNA genes found in all living organisms. The tRNAscan-SE search tool has become the de facto standard for annotating tRNA genes in genomes, and the Genomic tRNA Database (GtRNAdb) was created as a portal for interactive exploration of these gene predictions. Since its published description in 2009, the GtRNAdb has steadily grown in content, and remains the most commonly cited web-based source of tRNA gene information. In this update, we describe not only a major increase in the number of tRNA predictions (>367000) and genomes analyzed (>4370), but more importantly, the integration of new analytic and functional data to improve the quality and biological context of tRNA gene predictions. New information drawn from other sources includes tRNA modification data, epigenetic data, single nucleotide polymorphisms, gene expression and evolutionary conservation. A richer set of analytic data is also presented, including better tRNA functional prediction, non-canonical features, predicted structural impacts from sequence variants and minimum free energy structural predictions. Views of tRNA genes in genomic context are provided via direct links to the UCSC genome browsers. The database can be searched by sequence or gene features, and is available at http://gtrnadb.ucsc.edu/.

  14. Serotonin directly stimulates luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone release from GT1 cells via 5-HT7 receptors.

    PubMed

    Héry, M; François-Bellan, A M; Héry, F; Deprez, P; Becquet, D

    1997-10-01

    Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH release, which serves as the primary drive to the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis, is controlled by many neuromediators. Serotonin has been implicated in this regulation. However, it is unclear whether the central effect of serotonin on LHRH secretion is exerted directly on LHRH neurosecretory neurons or indirectly via multisynaptic pathways. The present studies were undertaken in order to examine whether LHRH secretion from immortalized LHRH cell lines is directly regulated by serotonin and, if so, to identify the receptor subtype involved. 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), a 5-HT1A/7 receptor agonist, stimulated LHRH release from GT1-1 cells. This effect was blocked by ritanserin, a 5-HT2/7 receptor antagonist, but not by SDZ-216-525, a 5-HT1A antagonist. Basal LHRH release was not affected by the 5-HT2 agonist DOI. Reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction technique (RT-PCR) was used in order to identify 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor mRNA in immortalized LHRH cell lines. GT1-1 cells express mRNA for the 5-HT7, but not the 5-HT1A receptor subtypes. These results demonstrate a direct stimulatory effect of serotonin on LHRH release via 5-HT7 receptor.

  15. Analysis of systematic errors of the ASM/RXTE monitor and GT-48 γ-ray telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidelis, V. V.

    2011-06-01

    The observational data concerning variations of light curves of supernovae remnants—the Crab Nebula, Cassiopeia A, Tycho Brahe, and pulsar Vela—over 14 days scale that may be attributed to systematic errors of the ASM/RXTE monitor are presented. The experimental systematic errors of the GT-48 γ-ray telescope in the mono mode of operation were also determined. For this the observational data of TeV J2032 + 4130 (Cyg γ-2, according to the Crimean version) were used and the stationary nature of its γ-ray emission was confirmed by long-term observations performed with HEGRA and MAGIC. The results of research allow us to draw the following conclusions: (1) light curves of supernovae remnants averaged for long observing periods have false statistically significant flux variations, (2) the level of systematic errors is proportional to the registered flux and decreases with increasing temporal scale of averaging, (3) the light curves of sources may be modulated by the year period, and (4) the systematic errors of the GT-48 γ-ray telescope, in the amount caused by observations in the mono mode and data processing with the stereo-algorithm come to 0.12 min-1.

  16. A novel promoter mutation (HBB: c.-75G>T) was identified as a cause of β(+)-thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Zeyong; Li, Lei; Yao, Yachao; Li, Nan; Li, Yahong; Zhang, Zhen; Yan, Fang; Qiu, Houkuang; Wu, Chunyan; Zhang, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel β-globin gene promoter mutation in a Chinese family identified using fluorescence resolution melting curve analysis and gene sequencing. The proband, who showed the phenotype of β-thalassemia intermedia (β-TI), was found to be a compound heterozygote for the novel mutation -25 (G>T) (HBB: c.-75G>T) and a codon 17 (HBB: c.52A>T) mutation. Moreover, conservation analysis using phyloP and phastCons indicated that the mutated base in the proband was conserved. This novel point mutation on the β-globin gene is in close proximity to the conserved ATAA sequence located at position -25 relative to the mRNA Cap site. We performed a further comparative analysis of the clinical phenotypes and hematological parameters in this pedigree and found that the father was a carrier of the novel point mutation and showed low levels of hemoglobin (Hb), mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and mean corpuscular Hb (MCH). Thus, the available evidence suggests that this novel mutation, -25, results in β(+)-thalassemia (β(+)-thal).

  17. Computational Assessment of the GT-MHR Graphite Core Support Structural Integrity in Air-Ingress Accident Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Jong B. Lim; Eung S. Kim; Chang H. Oh; Richard R. Schultz; David A. Petti

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this project was to perform stress analysis for graphite support structures of the General Atomics’ 600 MWth GT-MHR prismatic core design using ABAQUS ® (ver. 6.75) to assess their structural integrity in air-ingress accident conditions where the structure weakens over time due to oxidation damages. The graphite support structures of prismatic type GT-MHR was analyzed based on the change of temperature, burn-off and corrosion depth during the accident period predicted by GAMMA, a multi-dimensional gas multi-component mixture analysis code developed in the Republic of Korea (ROK)/United States (US) International –Nuclear Engineering Research Initiative (I-NERI) project. Both the loading and thermal stresses were analyzed, but the thermal stress was not significant, leaving the loading stress to be the major factor. The mechanical strengths are exceeded between 11 to 11.5 days after loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA), corresponding to 5.5 to 6 days after the start of natural convection.

  18. Molecular cloning and bacterial expression of cDNA encoding a plant cysteine synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Saito, K; Miura, N; Yamazaki, M; Hirano, H; Murakoshi, I

    1992-01-01

    Cysteine synthase (CSase) [O-acetyl-L-serine acetate-lyase (adding hydrogen sulfide), EC 4.2.99.8] catalyzes the formation of L-cysteine, the key step in sulfur assimilation in plants, from O-acetyl-L-serine and hydrogen sulfide. We report here the isolation and characterization of cDNA clones encoding cysteine synthase from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). Internal peptide sequences were obtained from V8 protease-digested fragments of purified CSase. A lambda gt10 cDNA library was constructed from poly(A)+ RNA of young green leaves of spinach. Screening with two synthetic mixed nucleotides encoding the partial peptide sequences revealed 19 positively hybridized clones among 2 x 10(5) clones. Nucleotide sequence analysis of two independent cDNA clones revealed a continuous open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 325 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 34,185 Da. Sequence comparison of the deduced amino acids revealed 53% identity with CSases of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium. Sequence homology was also observed with other metabolic enzymes for amino acids in bacteria and yeast and with rat hemoprotein H-450. A bacterial expression vector was constructed and could genetically complement an E. coli auxotroph that lacks CSases. The accumulation of functionally active spinach CSase in E. coli was also demonstrated by immunoblotting and assaying enzymatic activity. Southern hybridization analysis showed the presence of two to three copies of the cDNA sequence in the genome of spinach. RNA blot hybridization suggested constitutive expression in leaves and roots of spinach. Images PMID:1518833

  19. High-level expression of soluble rat hsc70 in Escherichia coli: purification and characterization of the cloned enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C; Lee, M R

    1993-01-01

    We have cloned the cDNA of rat hsc70 (clathrin-uncoating ATPase) into a T7 expression system and have expressed this enzyme in Escherichia coli. The recombinant clathrin-uncoating ATPase is in the cytosolic fraction of the bacterium and is soluble. It was purified to homogeneity by DEAE-cellulose and ATP-agarose column chromatography. From 1 litre of bacterial culture (0.3-0.4 g of proteins), 5-20 mg of pure recombinant clathrin-uncoating ATPase was routinely obtained. The cloned enzyme is capable of dissociating clathrin from bovine coated vesicle. Furthermore, it is not methylated on basic amino acid residues and is not blocked at the N-terminus, indicating that these modifications on hsc70 are not essential for uncoating of clathrin. Binding of [alpha-32P]ATP by purified recombinant hsc70 was analysed by Scatchard plot. The results indicate that there one high-affinity binding component with a Kd (dissociation constant) of 0.2-0.3 microM. The peptide-stimulated ATPase activities of recombinant hsc70 at 37 degrees C with respect to S-peptide peptides P3a and GT4 at a concentration of 1.2 mM are 142 +/- 6, 214 +/- 8 and 362 +/- 5 pmol/h per micrograms of hsc70 protein respectively. The EC50 values of hsc70 ATPase for S-peptide, peptides P3a and GT4 are 2, 0.67 and 0.17 mM respectively. On the other hand, the dissociation constants of S-peptide, peptides P3a and GT4 for recombinant hsc70 are 7.6, 13 and 100 microM respectively. Thus peptide GT4 is the only peptide examined for which the binding constant is comparable with the EC50 for stimulation ATPase activity, albeit it has the lowest affinity for hsc70. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:8363588

  20. Crystal Structure of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type a in Complex With the Cell Surface Co-Receptor GT1b-Insight Into the Toxin-Neuron Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stenmark, P.; Dupuy, J.; Inamura, A.; Kiso, M.; Stevens, R.C.

    2009-05-26

    Botulinum neurotoxins have a very high affinity and specificity for their target cells requiring two different co-receptors located on the neuronal cell surface. Different toxin serotypes have different protein receptors; yet, most share a common ganglioside co-receptor, GT1b. We determined the crystal structure of the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A binding domain (residues 873-1297) alone and in complex with a GT1b analog at 1.7 A and 1.6 A, respectively. The ganglioside GT1b forms several key hydrogen bonds to conserved residues and binds in a shallow groove lined by Tryptophan 1266. GT1b binding does not induce any large structural changes in the toxin; therefore, it is unlikely that allosteric effects play a major role in the dual receptor recognition. Together with the previously published structures of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B in complex with its protein co-receptor, we can now generate a detailed model of botulinum neurotoxin's interaction with the neuronal cell surface. The two branches of the GT1b polysaccharide, together with the protein receptor site, impose strict geometric constraints on the mode of interaction with the membrane surface and strongly support a model where one end of the 100 A long translocation domain helix bundle swing into contact with the membrane, initiating the membrane anchoring event.

  1. Agro-economic impact of cattle cloning.

    PubMed

    Faber, D C; Ferre, L B; Metzger, J; Robl, J M; Kasinathan, P

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the economic and social implications of cloned cattle, their products, and their offspring as related to production agriculture. Cloning technology in cattle has several applications outside of traditional production agriculture. These applications can include bio-medical applications, such as the production of pharmaceuticals in the blood or milk of transgenic cattle. Cloning may also be useful in the production of research models. These models may or may not include genetic modifications. Uses in agriculture include many applications of the technology. These include making genetic copies of elite seed stock and prize winning show cattle. Other purposes may range from "insurance" to making copies of cattle that have sentimental value, similar to cloning of pets. Increased selection opportunities available with cloning may provide for improvement in genetic gain. The ultimate goal of cloning has often been envisioned as a system for producing quantity and uniformity of the perfect dairy cow. However, only if heritability were 100%, would clone mates have complete uniformity. Changes in the environment may have significant impact on the productivity and longevity of the resulting clones. Changes in consumer preferences and economic input costs may all change the definition of the perfect cow. The cost of producing such animals via cloning must be economically feasible to meet the intended applications. Present inefficiencies limit cloning opportunities to highly valued animals. Improvements are necessary to move the applications toward commercial application. Cloning has additional obstacles to conquer. Social and regulatory acceptance of cloning is paramount to its utilization in production agriculture. Regulatory acceptance will need to address the animal, its products, and its offspring. In summary, cloning is another tool in the animal biotechnology toolbox, which includes artificial insemination, sexing of semen, embryo

  2. Agro-economic impact of cattle cloning.

    PubMed

    Faber, D C; Ferre, L B; Metzger, J; Robl, J M; Kasinathan, P

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the economic and social implications of cloned cattle, their products, and their offspring as related to production agriculture. Cloning technology in cattle has several applications outside of traditional production agriculture. These applications can include bio-medical applications, such as the production of pharmaceuticals in the blood or milk of transgenic cattle. Cloning may also be useful in the production of research models. These models may or may not include genetic modifications. Uses in agriculture include many applications of the technology. These include making genetic copies of elite seed stock and prize winning show cattle. Other purposes may range from "insurance" to making copies of cattle that have sentimental value, similar to cloning of pets. Increased selection opportunities available with cloning may provide for improvement in genetic gain. The ultimate goal of cloning has often been envisioned as a system for producing quantity and uniformity of the perfect dairy cow. However, only if heritability were 100%, would clone mates have complete uniformity. Changes in the environment may have significant impact on the productivity and longevity of the resulting clones. Changes in consumer preferences and economic input costs may all change the definition of the perfect cow. The cost of producing such animals via cloning must be economically feasible to meet the intended applications. Present inefficiencies limit cloning opportunities to highly valued animals. Improvements are necessary to move the applications toward commercial application. Cloning has additional obstacles to conquer. Social and regulatory acceptance of cloning is paramount to its utilization in production agriculture. Regulatory acceptance will need to address the animal, its products, and its offspring. In summary, cloning is another tool in the animal biotechnology toolbox, which includes artificial insemination, sexing of semen, embryo

  3. Cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding betanidin 5-O-glucosyltransferase, a betanidin- and flavonoid-specific enzyme with high homology to inducible glucosyltransferases from the Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Vogt, T; Grimm, R; Strack, D

    1999-09-01

    Based on protein sequence data and RT-PCR, a full length cDNA encoding betanidin 5-O-glucosyltransferase (5-GT) was obtained from a cDNA library of Dorotheanthus bellidiformis (Burm.f.) N.E.Br. (Aizoaceae). 5-GT catalyses the transfer of glucose from UDP-glucose to the 5-hydroxyl group of the chromogenic betanidin. Betanidin and its conjugates, referred to as betacyanins, are characteristic fruit and flower pigments in most members of the Caryophyllales, which fail to synthesise anthocyanins. The 5-GT cDNA displayed homology to previously published glucosyltransferase sequences and exhibited high identity to sequences of several inducible glucosyltransferases of tobacco and tomato (Solanaceae). The open reading frame encodes a polypeptide of 489 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 55.24 kDa. The corresponding cDNA was expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein displayed identical substrate specificity compared to the native enzyme purified from D. bellidiformis cell suspension cultures. In addition to the natural substrate betanidin, ortho-dihydroxylated flavonols and flavones were glycosylated preferentially at the B-ring 4'-hydroxyl group. 5-GT is the first enzyme of betalain biosynthesis in plants, of which the corresponding cDNA has been cloned and expressed. The results are discussed in relation to molecular evolution of plant glucosyl- transferases. PMID:10504573

  4. Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... mammals. These twins are produced when a fertilized egg splits, creating two or more embryos that carry ... of the donor animal's somatic cell into an egg cell, or oocyte, that has had its own ...

  5. GT0 Explosion Sources for IMS Infrasound Calibration: Charge Design and Yield Estimation from Near-source Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitterman, Y.; Hofstetter, R.

    2014-03-01

    Three large-scale on-surface explosions were conducted by the Geophysical Institute of Israel (GII) at the Sayarim Military Range, Negev desert, Israel: about 82 tons of strong high explosives in August 2009, and two explosions of about 10 and 100 tons of ANFO explosives in January 2011. It was a collaborative effort between Israel, CTBTO, USA and several European countries, with the main goal to provide fully controlled ground truth (GT0) infrasound sources, monitored by extensive observations, for calibration of International Monitoring System (IMS) infrasound stations in Europe, Middle East and Asia. In all shots, the explosives were assembled like a pyramid/hemisphere on dry desert alluvium, with a complicated explosion design, different from the ideal homogenous hemisphere used in similar experiments in the past. Strong boosters and an upward charge detonation scheme were applied to provide more energy radiated to the atmosphere. Under these conditions the evaluation of the actual explosion yield, an important source parameter, is crucial for the GT0 calibration experiment. Audio-visual, air-shock and acoustic records were utilized for interpretation of observed unique blast effects, and for determination of blast wave parameters suited for yield estimation and the associated relationships. High-pressure gauges were deployed at 100-600 m to record air-blast properties, evaluate the efficiency of the charge design and energy generation, and provide a reliable estimation of the charge yield. The yield estimators, based on empirical scaled relations for well-known basic air-blast parameters—the peak pressure, impulse and positive phase duration, as well as on the crater dimensions and seismic magnitudes, were analyzed. A novel empirical scaled relationship for the little-known secondary shock delay was developed, consistent for broad ranges of ANFO charges and distances, which facilitates using this stable and reliable air-blast parameter as a new potential

  6. Detectability of Plasmodium falciparum clones

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In areas of high transmission people often harbour multiple clones of Plasmodium falciparum, but even PCR-based diagnostic methods can only detect a fraction (the detectability, q) of all clones present in a host. Accurate measurements of detectability are desirable since it affects estimates of multiplicity of infection, prevalence, and frequency of breakthrough infections in clinical drug trials. Detectability can be estimated by typing repeated samples from the same host but it has been unclear what should be the time interval between the samples and how the data should be analysed. Methods A longitudinal molecular study was conducted in the Kassena-Nankana district in northern Ghana. From each of the 80 participants, four finger prick samples were collected over a period of 8 days, and tested for presence of different Merozoite Surface Protein (msp) 2 genotypes. Implications for estimating q were derived from these data by comparing the fit of statistical models of serial dependence and over-dispersion. Results The distribution of the frequencies of detection for msp2 genotypes was close to binomial if the time span between consecutive blood samples was at least 7 days. For shorter intervals the probabilities of detection were positively correlated, i.e. the shorter the interval between two blood collections, the more likely the diagnostic results matched for a particular genotype. Estimates of q were rather insensitive to the statistical model fitted. Conclusions A simple algorithm based on analysing blood samples collected 7 days apart is justified for generating robust estimates of detectability. The finding of positive correlation of detection probabilities for short time intervals argues against imperfect detection being directly linked to the 48-hour periodicity of P. falciparum. The results suggest that the detectability of a given parasite clone changes over time, at an unknown rate, but fast enough to regard blood samples taken one week

  7. Cloning cattle: the methods in the madness.

    PubMed

    Oback, Björn; Wells, David N

    2007-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is much more widely and efficiently practiced in cattle than in any other species, making this arguably the most important mammal cloned to date. While the initial objective behind cattle cloning was commercially driven--in particular to multiply genetically superior animals with desired phenotypic traits and to produce genetically modified animals-researchers have now started to use bovine SCNT as a tool to address diverse questions in developmental and cell biology. In this paper, we review current cattle cloning methodologies and their potential technical or biological pitfalls at any step of the procedure. In doing so, we focus on one methodological parameter, namely donor cell selection. We emphasize the impact of epigenetic and genetic differences between embryonic, germ, and somatic donor cell types on cloning efficiency. Lastly, we discuss adult phenotypes and fitness of cloned cattle and their offspring and illustrate some of the more imminent commercial cattle cloning applications.

  8. Unified universal quantum cloning machine and fidelities

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yinan; Shi Handuo; Xiong Zhaoxi; Jing Li; Mu Liangzhu; Ren Xijun; Fan Heng

    2011-09-15

    We present a unified universal quantum cloning machine, which combines several different existing universal cloning machines together, including the asymmetric case. In this unified framework, the identical pure states are projected equally into each copy initially constituted by input and one half of the maximally entangled states. We show explicitly that the output states of those universal cloning machines are the same. One importance of this unified cloning machine is that the cloning procession is always the symmetric projection, which reduces dramatically the difficulties for implementation. Also, it is found that this unified cloning machine can be directly modified to the general asymmetric case. Besides the global fidelity and the single-copy fidelity, we also present all possible arbitrary-copy fidelities.

  9. Nuclear transfer technology in mammalian cloning.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D P; Mitalipov, S; Norgren, R B

    2001-01-01

    The past several years have witnessed remarkable progress in mammalian cloning using nuclear transfer (NT). Until 1997 and the announcement of the successful cloning of sheep from adult mammary gland or fetal fibroblast cells, our working assumption was that cloning by NT could only be accomplished with relatively undifferentiated embryonic cells. Indeed, live offspring were first produced by NT over 15 years ago from totipotent, embryonic blastomeres derived from early cleavage-stage embryos. However, once begun, the progression to somatic cell cloning or NT employing differentiated cells as the source of donor nuclei was meteoric, initially involving differentiated embryonic cell cultures in sheep in 1996 and quickly thereafter, fetal or adult somatic cells in sheep, cow, mouse, goat, and pig. Several recent reviews provide a background for and discussion of these successes. Here we will focus on the potential uses of reproductive cloning along with recent activities in the field and a discussion concerning current interests in human reproductive and therapeutic cloning.

  10. Determination of occupancies of the SPH and GT-IIC transcription factor binding motifs in SV40: evidence for two forms of transcription elongation complex.

    PubMed

    Eadara, J K; Lutter, L C

    1996-09-01

    Occupancies of the SPH and GT-IIC sequence motifs in the native SV40 late transcription elongation complex were determined by assessing blockage to restriction enzyme cleavage. Cleavages specific to the transcription elongation complex were quantified by radioactive extension labeling and polymerase run-off analysis. The SPH motif was assayed by Sphl digestion and found to be unoccupied. In contrast, digestion with Pvull at the GT-IIC site was blocked in 36% of the complexes, indicating that approximately a third of the complexes are occupied by factor. This fractional occupancy indicates that there are at least two forms of SV40 late transcription elongation complexes, one form with the GT-IIC site occupied by a factor and another with the site vacant.

  11. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA clone of UDP-galactose: flavonoid 3-O-galactosyltransferase (UF3GaT) expressed in Vigna mungo seedlings.

    PubMed

    Mato, M; Ozeki, Y; Itoh, Y; Higeta, D; Yoshitama, K; Teramoto, S; Aida, R; Ishikura, N; Shibata, M

    1998-11-01

    Four cDNA clones were isolated from Vigna mungo seedlings by the screening with cDNA encoding UDP-glucose:flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UF3GT) of Antirrhinum majus as a probe; the product of the gene corresponding to one cDNA was more highly expressed in the first simple leaves than in stems. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed 1,691 bp (including 326 bp non-reading) containing an open reading frame of 455 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 42% and 23% identity with those of A. majus UDP-glucose:flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UF3GT) and Petunia hybrida UDP-rhamnose:anthocyanidin 3-O-glucoside rhamnosyltransferase (RT), respectively. One region of the cDNA (amino acids 325 to 387) showed similarity to ceramide UDP-galactosyltransferases of mice, rats and humans. A crude extract from Escherichia coli, in which the protein was expressed from the cDNA, showed high UF3GaT activity but low UF3GT activity, and was similar in K(m), optimal pH and substrate specificity to UF3GaT from V. mungo. We conclude that we have obtained UDP-galactose:flavonoid 3-O-galactosyltransferase (UF3GaT) cDNA from V. mungo.

  12. No human cloning: a social ethics perspective.

    PubMed

    Cahill, L S

    1999-01-01

    This Essay addresses the negative impact of human cloning on the family, and argues further that market incentives to develop and implement cloning techniques exploit and exacerbate socioeconomic inequities. It suggests that cloning should be prohibited internationally and examines possible routes to that aim. To begin with, it offers some reflections on the nature of moral argument, and on the role of religion in public debate. PMID:12650145

  13. Cloning: pathways to a pluripotent future.

    PubMed

    McLaren, A

    2000-06-01

    In this month's essay, Anne McLaren traces the winding and pitted pathways that connect the early days of the cell theory of biology in the 1830s to the new and unfolding era of cloning science and technology that came to worldwide attention in 1997 with the announcement of the birth of Dolly, the Scottish cloned sheep. The possibilities, including the potential for new medical treatments and perhaps even human cloning, are fantastic ... and ethically charged.

  14. Telomeres and the ethics of human cloning.

    PubMed

    Allhoff, Fritz

    2004-01-01

    In search of a potential problem with cloning, I investigate the phenomenon of telomere shortening which is caused by cell replication; clones created from somatic cells will have shortened telomeres and therefore reach a state of senescence more rapidly. While genetic intervention might fix this problem at some point in the future, I ask whether, absent technological advances, this biological phenomenon undermines the moral permissibility of cloning.

  15. Cloning: pathways to a pluripotent future.

    PubMed

    McLaren, A

    2000-06-01

    In this month's essay, Anne McLaren traces the winding and pitted pathways that connect the early days of the cell theory of biology in the 1830s to the new and unfolding era of cloning science and technology that came to worldwide attention in 1997 with the announcement of the birth of Dolly, the Scottish cloned sheep. The possibilities, including the potential for new medical treatments and perhaps even human cloning, are fantastic ... and ethically charged. PMID:10877698

  16. Melatonin elicits protein kinase C-mediated calcium response in immortalized GT1-7 GnRH neurons.

    PubMed

    Kelestimur, Haluk; Ozcan, Mete; Kacar, Emine; Alcin, Ergul; Yılmaz, Bayram; Ayar, Ahmet

    2012-01-30

    Melatonin is suggested to have effects on hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. The pulsatile pattern of GnRH release, which results in the intermittent release of gonadotropic hormones from the pituitary, has a critical importance for reproductive function but the factors responsible from this release pattern are not known. Calcium is a second messenger involved in hormone release. Therefore, investigation of the effects of melatonin on intracellular free calcium levels ([Ca(2+)](i)) would provide critical information on hormone release in immortalized GnRH neurons. The pattern of melatonin-induced intracellular calcium signaling was investigated by fluorescence calcium imaging using the immortalized GnRH-secreting GT1-7 hypothalamic neurons. Melatonin caused a significant increase in [Ca(2+)](i,) which was greatly blocked by luzindole, a melatonin antagonist, or attenuated by pre-treatment with protein kinase C inhibitor. This study suggests that melatonin seems to have a direct effect on GnRH neurons.

  17. BCL-2 delay apoptosis and PARP cleavage induced by NO donors in GT1-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Bonfoco, E; Zhivotovsky, B; Rossi, A D; Aguilar-Santelises, M; Orrenius, S; Lipton, S A; Nicotera, P

    1996-12-20

    BCL-2 is a negative regulator of cell death in several systems. Here we report that bcl-2 expression protects against apoptosis induced by nitric oxide (NO) donors in GT1-7 hypothalamic cells. BCL-2 significantly inhibited neuronal death caused by 200 microM S-nitroso-cysteine (SNOC), 200 microM S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP), or 1 mM 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1). To explore further the protective mechanism(s) elicited by bcl-2 expression, we investigated whether BCL-2 could prevent NO-induced cleavage of poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase (PARP), which is a substrate for interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme (ICE)-like proteases in apoptosis. Formation of 85 and 25 kDa PARP fragments elicited by NO donors was inhibited in cells over-expressing bcl-2. PMID:9051794

  18. Detailed Characterization of AR Coatings on Si Solar Cells: A New Application of GT-FabScan 6000; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.; Butterfield, B.; Amieva, J.

    2004-08-01

    We have developed a new application of GT-FabScan for rapid mapping of AR coatings on Si solar cells. The system generates an image of the AR thickness and presents it in a color format using false colors. This measurement is made in less than 100 ms. The development of this application enables the system to generate thickness maps of the AR coating to determine the repeatability of the deposition system, as well as to ensure that downstream processing can be controlled. These data can also be used to determine the average thickness of the coating. Downstream processing is an important issue in current solar cell technology. This paper describes its importance to the PV industry and discusses the principles and method of this measurement.

  19. Cloning and sequence analysis of the muramidase-2 gene from Enterococcus hirae.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, C P; Kariyama, R; Daneo-Moore, L; Shockman, G D

    1992-01-01

    Extracellular muramidase-2 of Enterococcus hirae ATCC 9790 was purified to homogeneity by substrate binding, guanidine-HCl extraction, and reversed-phase chromatography. A monoclonal antibody, 2F8, which specifically recognizes muramidase-2, was used to screen a genomic library of E. hirae ATCC 9790 DNA in bacteriophage lambda gt11. A positive phage clone containing a 4.5-kb DNA insert was isolated and analyzed. The EcoRI-digested 4.5-kb fragment was cut into 2.3-, 1.0-, and 1.5-kb pieces by using restriction enzymes KpnI, Sau3AI, and PstI, and each fragment was subcloned into plasmid pJDC9 or pUC19. The nucleotide sequence of each subclone was determined. The sequence data indicated an open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 666 amino acid residues, with a calculated molecular mass of 70,678 Da. The first 24 N-terminal amino acids of purified extracellular muramidase-2 were in very good agreement with the deduced amino acid sequence after a 49-amino-acid putative signal sequence. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence showed the presence at the C-terminal region of the protein of six highly homologous repeat units separated by nonhomologous intervening sequences that are highly enriched in serine and threonine. The overall sequence showed a high degree of homology with a recently cloned Streptococcus faecalis autolysin. Images PMID:1347040

  20. Human type VII collagen: cDNA cloning and chromosomal mapping of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Parente, M.G.; Chung, L.C.; Ryynaenen, J.; Monli Chu; Uitto, J. ); Woodley, D.T.; Wynn, K.C.; Bauer, E.A. ); Mattei, M.G. )

    1991-08-15

    A human keratinocyte cDNA expression library in bacteriophage {lambda}gt11 was screened with the purified IgG fraction of serum from a patient with epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, which had a high titer of anti-type VII collagen antibodies. Screening of {approx}3 {times} 10{sup 5} plaques identified 8 positive clones, the largest one (K-131) being {approx}1.9 kilobases in size. Dideoxynucleotide sequencing of K-131 indicated that it consisted of 1875 base pairs and contained an open reading frame coding for a putative N-terminal noncollagenous domain of 439 amino acids and a collagenous domain was characterized by repeating Gly-Xaa-Yaa sequences that were interrupted in several positions by insertions or deletions of 1-3 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence also revealed a peptide segment that had a high degree of identity with a published type VII collagen protein sequence. The results mapped the COL7A1 to the locus 3p21. The cDNA clones characterized in this study will be valuable for understanding the protein structure and gene expression of type VII collagen present in anchoring fibrils and its aberrations in the dystrophic forms of heritable epidermolysis bullosa.

  1. Cloning, sequencing, gene organization, and localization of the human ribosomal protein RPL23A gene

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Wufang; Christensen, M.; Eichler, E.

    1997-12-01

    The intron-containing gene for human ribosomal protein RPL23A has been cloned, sequenced, and localized. The gene is approximately 4.0 kb in length and contains five exons and four introns. All splice sites exactly match the AG/GT consensus rule. The transcript is about 0.6 kb and is detected in all tissues examined. In adult tissues, the RPL23A transcript is dramatically more abundant in pancreas, skeletal muscle, and heart, while much less abundant in kidney, brain, placenta, lung, and liver. A full-length cDNA clone of 576 nt was identified, and the nucleotide sequence was found to match the exon sequence precisely. The open reading frame encodes a polypeptide of 156 amino acids, which is absolutely conserved with the rat RPL23A protein. In the 5{prime} flanking region of the gene, a canonical TATA sequence and a defined CAAT box were found for the first time in a mammalian ribosomal protein gene. The intron-containing RPL23A gene was mapped to cytogenetic band 17q11 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Cloning of spin-coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Demkowicz-Dobrzanski, Rafal; Kus, Marek; Wodkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2004-01-01

    We consider optimal cloning of the spin coherent states in Hilbert spaces of different dimensionality d. We give explicit form of optimal cloning transformation for spin coherent states in the three-dimensional space, analytical results for the fidelity of the optimal cloning in d=3 and d=4 as well as numerical results for higher dimensions. In the low-dimensional case we construct the corresponding completely positive maps and exhibit their structure with the help of Jamiolkowski isomorphism. This allows us to formulate some conjectures about the form of optimal coherent cloning completely positive maps in arbitrary dimension.

  3. Quantum cloning disturbed by thermal Davies environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dajka, Jerzy; Łuczka, Jerzy

    2016-06-01

    A network of quantum gates designed to implement universal quantum cloning machine is studied. We analyze how thermal environment coupled to auxiliary qubits, `blank paper' and `toner' required at the preparation stage of copying, modifies an output fidelity of the cloner. Thermal environment is described in terms of the Markovian Davies theory. We show that such a cloning machine is not universal any more but its output is independent of at least a part of parameters of the environment. As a case study, we consider cloning of states in a six-state cryptography's protocol. We also briefly discuss cloning of arbitrary input states.

  4. Species-specific challenges in dog cloning.

    PubMed

    Kim, G A; Oh, H J; Park, J E; Kim, M J; Park, E J; Jo, Y K; Jang, G; Kim, M K; Kim, H J; Lee, B C

    2012-12-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is now an established procedure used in cloning of several species. SCNT in dogs involves multiple steps including the removal of the nuclear material, injection of a donor cell, fusion, activation of the reconstructed oocytes and finally transfer to a synchronized female recipient. There are therefore many factors that contribute to cloning efficiency. By performing a retrospective analysis of 2005-2012 published papers regarding dog cloning, we define the optimum procedure and summarize the specific feature for dog cloning.

  5. Human cloning: Eastern Mediterranean Region perspective.

    PubMed

    Abdur Rab, M; Khayat, M H

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in genomics and biotechnology have ushered in a new era in health development. Therapeutic cloning possesses enormous potential for revolutionizing medical and therapeutic techniques. Cloning technology, however, is perceived as having the potential for reproductive cloning, which raises serious ethical and moral concerns. It is important that the Islamic countries come to a consensus on this vital issue. Developing science and technology for better health is a religious and moral obligation. There is an urgent need for Muslim scholars to discuss the issue of stem cell research and cloning rationally; such dialogue will not only consider the scientific merits but also the moral, ethical and legal implications.

  6. [Human cloning: judicial and legislative framework].

    PubMed

    Shenfield, F

    2000-09-01

    The application, either theoretical or fantastical, of the somatic cloning which resulted in the birth of Dolly the sheep to human reproduction has led to international uproar. A paragraph specifically banning reproductive cloning (defined as "any intervention seeking to produce genetically identical human individuals in the sense of individuals sharing the same nuclear gene set") was added to the Council of Europe Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine in January 1998. In several responses both at national and international level, reproductive cloning is banned either directly or indirectly. The challenge for the future is the consideration of integrating therapeutic cloning in legislations both nationally and in international declarations.

  7. No end in sight to cloning debate.

    PubMed

    Graumann, Sigrid; Poltermann, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Since last August, Great Britain has allowed the cloning for research purposes. This fact has re-generated an existing debate, taking into account the prohibition of cloning of the UN, the States are debating whether cloning should be prohibited or in the contrary, it should also be admitted for reproductive purposes. This situation has generated an international uneasiness due to the lack of a universal consensus. This article analyses this situation, bringing the reader closer to the very controversial texts, such as the European Constitution and the UN Convention on Cloning.

  8. Cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Fulka, J; First, N L; Loi, P; Moor, R M

    1998-10-01

    The birth of the first cloned mammals, produced by the introduction of somatic cell nuclei into enucleated oocytes, was an impressive and surprising development. Although the ethical debate has been intense, the important scientific questions raised by this work have been inadequately discussed and are still unresolved. In this essay we address three questions about nuclear transplantation in the eggs of mice and domestic animals. First, why were the recent experiments on somatic cell cloning successful, when so many others have failed? Second, were these exceptional cases, or is somatic cloning now open to all? Third, what are the future possibilities for increasing the efficiency and wider applicability of the cloning process?

  9. [Human cloning: judicial and legislative framework].

    PubMed

    Shenfield, F

    2000-09-01

    The application, either theoretical or fantastical, of the somatic cloning which resulted in the birth of Dolly the sheep to human reproduction has led to international uproar. A paragraph specifically banning reproductive cloning (defined as "any intervention seeking to produce genetically identical human individuals in the sense of individuals sharing the same nuclear gene set") was added to the Council of Europe Convention on Human Rights and Biomedicine in January 1998. In several responses both at national and international level, reproductive cloning is banned either directly or indirectly. The challenge for the future is the consideration of integrating therapeutic cloning in legislations both nationally and in international declarations. PMID:11075502

  10. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated repression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone promoter activity in GT1 hypothalamic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chandran, U R; Attardi, B; Friedman, R; Dong, K W; Roberts, J L; DeFranco, D B

    1994-03-01

    The synthesis and release of GnRH within a specific subset of neurons in the hypothalamus, which serves as the primary drive to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, is subject to various levels of control. Although a number of direct synaptic connections to GnRH-containing neurons have been identified, which presumably provide some regulatory inputs, the mechanisms responsible for hormonal regulation of GnRH synthesis and release mediated by either cell surface or intracellular receptors remain controversial. The recent demonstration that a subset of GnRH-containing neurons in the rat hypothalamus possesses immunoreactive glucocorticoid receptors (GR) implies that this class of steroid hormones could exert a direct effect to regulate the functioning of these neurons and perhaps the HPG axis. We used the GT1-3 and GT1-7 cell lines of immortalized GnRH-secreting hypothalamic neurons as a model to study the direct effects of glucocorticoids on GnRH gene expression. We demonstrated that these cell lines possess GR that bind the synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, in vitro with high affinity (Kd = 2-3 nM). These receptors are functional, as indicated by their ability to activate transcription from exogenously introduced heterologous glucocorticoid-responsive promoters. Furthermore, dexamethasone represses both the endogenous mouse GnRH gene, decreasing steady state levels of GnRH mRNA, and the transcriptional activity of transfected rat GnRH promoter-reporter gene vectors. Glucocorticoid repression of rat GnRH promoter activity appears to be mediated by sequences contained within the promoter proximal 459 basepairs and not be influenced by the relative basal activity of the GnRH promoter. Thus, our results provide the first direct demonstration of glucocorticoid repression of transcription in a hypothalamic cell line and suggest that GR acting directly within GnRH neurons could be at least partly responsible for negative regulation of the HPG axis by

  11. Physical mapping of the herpes simplex virus type 2 nuc- lesion affecting alkaline exonuclease activity by using herpes simplex virus type 1 deletion clones.

    PubMed

    Wathen, M W; Hay, J

    1984-07-01

    The nuc- lesion affecting alkaline exonuclease activity in the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) mutant ts1348 had previously been mapped to the EcoRI-D restriction enzyme fragment of HSV-1. Eight clones with deletions representing most of HSV-1 EcoRI fragment D were selected with lambda gtWES hybrids. These clones were tested for their ability to rescue the alkaline exonuclease activity of HSV-2 nuc- ts1348 virus. The sequences colinear with the HSV-2 nuc- lesion were found to map between 0.169 and 0.174 map units on the HSV-1 Patton genome, representing an 0.8-kilobase-pair region that is 12.9 to 13.7 kilobase pairs from the left end of HSV-1 EcoRI fragment D.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in cloned cattle produced by fetal and adult cell cloning.

    PubMed

    Steinborn, R; Schinogl, P; Zakhartchenko, V; Achmann, R; Schernthaner, W; Stojkovic, M; Wolf, E; Müller, M; Brem, G

    2000-07-01

    Mammals have been cloned from adult donor cells. Here we report the first cases of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) heteroplasmy in adult mammalian clones generated from fetal and adult donor cells. The heteroplasmic clones included a healthy cattle equivalent of the sheep Dolly, for which a lack of heteroplasmy was reported.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in cloned cattle produced by fetal and adult cell cloning.

    PubMed

    Steinborn, R; Schinogl, P; Zakhartchenko, V; Achmann, R; Schernthaner, W; Stojkovic, M; Wolf, E; Müller, M; Brem, G

    2000-07-01

    Mammals have been cloned from adult donor cells. Here we report the first cases of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) heteroplasmy in adult mammalian clones generated from fetal and adult donor cells. The heteroplasmic clones included a healthy cattle equivalent of the sheep Dolly, for which a lack of heteroplasmy was reported. PMID:10888867

  14. STRU-cloning: a fast, inexpensive and efficient cloning procedure applicable to both small scale and structural genomics size cloning.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Dom; Fordham-Skelton, Anthony P; Papiz, Miroslav Z

    2011-05-01

    We have developed a Single-Tube Restriction-based Ultrafiltration (STRU) cloning procedure that updates traditional ligation-dependent cloning to challenge the newer, faster and more efficient ligation-free techniques and could make it the method of choice. STRU-cloning employs centrifugal filter units with membrane of suitable cut off to remove small unwanted DNA fragments created during restriction of plasmids or PCR products. Heat inactivation, of restriction enzymes, followed by DNA ligation is then performed on the filtrate. By removing the agarose gel electrophoresis DNA purification step from the traditional protocol, which is time consuming and is known to be the cause of ligation problems, STRU-cloning becomes fast, very efficient, inexpensive and offers the highest degree of cloning flexibility by using restriction sites and can be performed in a single tube. This novel agarose gel-free cloning procedure provides benefits for both small and large scale cloning projects. Unlike traditional cloning it can be easily implemented as a fully automated process at very low costs. PMID:21052867

  15. cDNA cloning and analysis of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, a salt inducible enzyme in sugar beet

    SciTech Connect

    McCue, K.F.; Hanson, A.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Betaine accumulates and serves as a compatible osmolyte in some plants subjected to drought or salinity stress. The last enzyme in the betaine biosynthetic pathway is betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). The activity of BADH increases in response to increasing salinity levels. This increase in activity corresponds to an increase in protein detectable by immunoblotting, and to an increase in the translatable BADH mRNA. BADH was cloned from a cDNA library constructed in {lambda}gt10 using poly(A){sup +} RNA from sugar beets salinized to 500 mM NaCl. cDNAs were size selected (>1kb) before ligation into the vector, and the library was screened with a spinach BADH cDNA probe. Three nearly full length clones obtained were confirmed as BADH by their nucleotide and deduced amino acid homology to spinach BADH. Clones averaged 1.8 kb and contained open reading frames of 500 amino acids at 80% identity with spinach BADH. RNA gel blot analysis of poly(A){sup +} RNA indicated that salinization to 500 mM NaCl resulted in a 5-fold increase of BADH mRNA level.

  16. Molecular cloning of a plant betaine-aldehyde dehydrogenase, an enzyme implicated in adaptation to salinity and drought.

    PubMed Central

    Weretilnyk, E A; Hanson, A D

    1990-01-01

    Many plants, as well as other organisms, accumulate betaine (N,N,N-trimethylglycine) as a nontoxic or protective osmolyte under saline or dry conditions. In plants, the last step in betaine synthesis is catalyzed by betaine-aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH, EC 1.2.1.8), a nuclear-encoded chloroplastic enzyme. A cDNA clone for BADH (1812 base pairs) was selected from a lambda gt10 cDNA library derived from leaves of salt-stressed spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). The library was screened with oligonucleotide probes corresponding to amino acid sequences of two peptides prepared from purified BADH. The authenticity of the clone was confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis; this analysis demonstrated the presence of a 1491-base-pair open reading frame that contained sequences encoding 12 peptide fragments of BADH. The clone hybridized to a 1.9-kilobase mRNA from spinach leaves; this mRNA was more abundant in salt-stressed plants, consistent with the known salt induction of BADH activity. The amino acid sequence deduced from the BADH cDNA sequence showed substantial similarities to those for nonspecific aldehyde dehydrogenases (EC 1.2.1.3 and EC 1.2.1.5) from several sources, including absolute conservation of a decapeptide in the probable active site. Comparison of deduced and determined amino acid sequences indicated that the transit peptide may comprise only 7 or 8 residues, which is atypically short for precursors to stromal proteins. Images PMID:2320587

  17. Positional Cloning by Linkage Disequilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Maniatis, Nikolas; Collins, Andrew; Gibson, Jane; Zhang, Weihua; Tapper, William; Morton, Newton E.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, metric linkage disequilibrium (LD) maps that assign an LD unit (LDU) location for each marker have been developed (Maniatis et al. 2002). Here we present a multiple pairwise method for positional cloning by LD within a composite likelihood framework and investigate the operating characteristics of maps in physical units (kb) and LDU for two bodies of data (Daly et al. 2001; Jeffreys et al. 2001) on which current ideas of blocks are based. False-negative indications of a disease locus (type II error) were examined by selecting one single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at a time as causal and taking its allelic count (0, 1, or 2, for the three genotypes) as a pseudophenotype, Y. By use of regression and correlation, association between every pseudophenotype and the allelic count of each SNP locus (X) was based on an adaptation of the Malecot model, which includes a parameter for location of the putative gene. By expressing locations in kb or LDU, greater power for localization was observed when the LDU map was fitted. The efficiency of the kb map, relative to the LDU map, to describe LD varied from a maximum of 0.87 to a minimum of 0.36, with a mean of 0.62. False-positive indications of a disease locus (type I error) were examined by simulating an unlinked causal SNP and the allele count was used as a pseudophenotype. The type I error was in good agreement with Wald’s likelihood theorem for both metrics and all models that were tested. Unlike tests that select only the most significant marker, haplotype, or haploset, these methods are robust to large numbers of markers in a candidate region. Contrary to predictions from tagging SNPs that retain haplotype diversity, the sample with smaller size but greater SNP density gave less error. The locations of causal SNPs were estimated with the same precision in blocks and steps, suggesting that block definition may be less useful than anticipated for mapping a causal SNP. These results provide a guide to

  18. Isolation and characterization of human cDNA clones encoding the. alpha. and the. alpha. prime subunits of casein kinase II

    SciTech Connect

    Lozeman, F.J.; Litchfield, D.W.; Piening, C.; Takio, Koji; Walsh, K.A.; Krebs E.G. )

    1990-09-11

    Casein kinase II is a widely distributed protein serine/threonine kinase. The holoenzyme appears to be a tetramer, containing two {alpha} or {alpha}{prime} subunits (or one of each) and two {beta} subunits. Complementary DNA clones encoding the subunits of casein kinase II were isolated from a human T-cell {lambda}gt 10 library using cDNA clones isolated from Drosophila melanogasten. One of the human cDNA clones (hT4.1) was 2.2 kb long, including a coding region of 1176 bp preceded by 156 bp (5{prime} untranslated region) and followed by 871 bp (3{prime} untranslated region). The hT4.1 close was nearly identical in size and sequence with a cDNA clone from HepG2 human hepatoma cultured cells. Another of the human T-cell cDNA clones (hT9.1) was 1.8 kb long, containing a coding region of 1053 bp preceded by 171 by (5{prime} untranslated region) and followed by 550 bp (3{prime} untranslated region). Amino acid sequences deduced from these two cDNA clones were about 85% identical. Most of the difference between the two encoded polypeptides was in the carboxy-terminal region, but heterogeneity was distributed throughout the molecules. Partial amino acid sequence was determined in a mixture of {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} subunits from bovine lung casein kinase II. The bovine sequences aligned with the 2 human cDNA-encoded polypeptides with only 2 discrepancies out of 535 amino acid positions. This confirmed that the two human T-cell cDNA clones encoded the {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} subunits of casein kinase II. These studies show that there are two distinct catalytic subunits for casein II ({alpha} and {alpha}{prime}) and that the sequence of these subunits is largely conserved between the bovine and the human.

  19. Reversibility of continuous-variable quantum cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Filip, Radim; Marek, Petr; Fiurasek, Jaromir

    2004-01-01

    We analyze a reversibility of optimal Gaussian 1{yields}2 quantum cloning of a coherent state using only local operations on the clones and classical communication between them and propose a feasible experimental test of this feature. Performing Bell-type homodyne measurement on one clone and anticlone, an arbitrary unknown input state (not only a coherent state) can be restored in the other clone by applying appropriate local unitary displacement operation. We generalize this concept to a partial reversal of the cloning using only local operations and classical communication (LOCC) and we show that this procedure converts the symmetric cloner to an asymmetric cloner. Further, we discuss a distributed LOCC reversal in optimal 1{yields}M Gaussian cloning of coherent states which transforms it to optimal 1{yields}M{sup '} cloning for M{sup '}cloning as a possible eavesdropping attack on quantum communication link, the reversibility can be utilized to improve the security of the link even after the attack.

  20. Cloning of endangered mammalian species: any progress?

    PubMed

    Loi, Pasqualino; Galli, Cesare; Ptak, Grazyna

    2007-05-01

    Attempts through somatic cell nuclear transfer to expand wild populations that have shrunk to critical numbers is a logical extension of the successful cloning of mammals. However, although the first mammal was cloned 10 years ago, nuclear reprogramming remains phenomenological, with abnormal gene expression and epigenetic deregulation being associated with the cloning process. In addition, although cloning of wild animals using host oocytes from different species has been successful, little is known about the implication of partial or total mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in cloned embryos, fetuses and offspring. Finally, there is a need for suitable foster mothers for inter-intra specific cloned embryos. Considering these issues, the limited success achieved in cloning endangered animals is not surprising. However, optimism comes from the rapid gain in the understanding of the molecular clues underlying nuclear reprogramming. If it is possible to achieve a controlled reversal of the differentiated state of a cell then it is probable that other issues that impair the cloning of endangered animals, such as the inter-intra species oocyte or womb donor, will be overcome in the medium term.

  1. Impact of cloning on cattle breeding systems.

    PubMed

    McClintock, A E

    1998-01-01

    The concept of clone-family testing is compared with existing progeny testing systems. The critical factors that will decide how cloning is utilized are the potential size of cloned families, and the cost per embryo (or per calf born). If family sizes of 100,000 become routinely achievable (cheaply), then clone testing becomes viable. In rough figures, cloned embryos costing $30 with a 50% calving rate would be attractive to farmers and would be cheap enough that farmers would buy more (crossbred) embryos in order to breed further replacement cows. At $300 per embryo, farmers would be more inclined to buy a number of cloned pure-bred female embryos and then to use conventional artificial insemination to breed further replacements from these superior cows. At $3000 per embryo, farmers would probably only be interested in very small numbers of cloned animals, most of which would be males. The relative importance of adult versus fetal cloning is discussed. The need for gene banks to preserve genetic variation is emphasized; both gametes and somatic tissue cultures should be considered.

  2. The ethics of human reproductive cloning.

    PubMed

    Strong, Carson

    2005-03-01

    This article addresses the question of whether human reproductive cloning could be ethically justifiable in at least some cases involving infertile couples who would choose cloning as a way to have a genetically related child. At present, the risk of congenital anomalies constitutes a compelling argument against human reproductive cloning. The article explores whether reproductive cloning could be ethically justifiable if, at some future time, cloning becomes possible without an elevated risk of anomalies. It is argued that freedom to use cloning is a form of procreative freedom and, as such, deserves respect. All of the objections that have been raised against human reproductive cloning fall under three main categories: those that appeal to the interests of the child, those based on consequences for society, and those arising from teleological views. Objections that appeal to the child's interests are, in turn, of two main kinds: consequentialist and deontological. All of these types of objections are examined, and it is found that each involves serious problems that prevent it from being a reasonable objection in the context of the infertility cases considered. It is concluded that human reproductive cloning would be ethically justifiable in at least some cases involving infertile couples, provided that it could be performed without an elevated risk of anomalies.

  3. Cloning pigs: advances and applications.

    PubMed

    Polejaeva, I A

    2001-01-01

    Although mouse embryonic stem cells have been used widely for over a decade as an important tool for introducing precise genetic modification into the genome, demonstrating the great value of this technology in a range of biomedical applications, similar technology does not exist for domestic animals. However, the development of somatic cell nuclear transfer has bypassed the need for embryonic stem cells from livestock. The production of offspring from differentiated cell nuclei provides information and opportunities in a number of areas including cellular differentiation, early development and ageing. However, the primary significance of cloning is probably in the opportunities that this technology brings to genetic manipulation. Potential applications of gene targeting in livestock species are described with particular emphasis on the generation of pigs that can be used for xenotransplantation, and the production of improved models for human physiology and disease. The development of techniques for somatic cell nuclear transfer in pigs and the challenges associated with this technology are also reviewed.

  4. Future and applications of cloning.

    PubMed

    Trounson, Alan O

    2006-01-01

    The birth of viable offspring from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in mammals caused a major re-examination of the understanding of the commitment of cells to specific tissue lineages during differentiation. The questions of whether cells undergo dedifferentiation or transdifferentiation during the development of offspring and how these changes are controlled is a source of ongoing debate that is yet to be resolved. Irrespective of the outcome of this debate, it is clear that cloning using SCNT has a place and purpose in the future of research and animal breeding. The future uses of SCNT could include the production of transgenic mice, the production of transgenic livestock and assisting with the re-establishment of endangered species. Human medicine also would benefit from future use of SCNT because it would allow the production of patient-specific embryonic stem cells.

  5. Cloning and Sequencing of the cDNA Encoding the Rubber Elongation Factor of Hevea brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Goyvaerts, Elisabeth; Dennis, Mark; Light, David; Chua, Nam-Hai

    1991-01-01

    In Hevea brasiliensis, the rubber particle in the laticiferous vessel is the site of rubber (cis-1-4-polyisoprene) biosynthesis. A 14 kilodalton protein, rubber elongation factor (REF), is associated with the rubber particle in a ratio of one REF to one rubber molecule (Dennis M, Henzel W, Bell J, Kohr W, Light D [1989] J Biol Chem 264: 18618-18628; Dennis M, Light D [1989] J Biol Chem 264: 18608-18617). To obtain more information concerning the function of REF and its synthesis and assembly in the rubber particle, we isolated cDNA clones encoding REF. We used antibodies to REF to screen a Hevea leaf γgt11 cDNA expression library and obtained several positive clones. Sequence analysis of the REF cDNA clones showed that the REF mRNA contains 121 nucleotides of 5′-nontranslated sequences and a 205 nucleotide 3′-nontranslated region. The open reading frame encodes the entire 14 kilodalton REF protein without any extra amino acids (Dennis M, Henzel W, Bell J, Kohr W, Light D [1989] J Biol Chem 264: 18618-18628). The REF cDNA was subcloned in pGEM-3Z/-4Z and expressed in vitro. The translation product is a 14 kilodalton protein that can be immunoprecipitated with antibodies to REF. Addition of microsomal membranes to the in vitro translation product did not alter the mobility of the REF protein. This, and the sequence data, indicate that REF is not made as a preprotein. Our results suggest that REF is synthesized on free polysomes in the laticifer cytoplasm and that assembly of the rubber particles is likely to occur in the cytosol. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:16668388

  6. Hypoxically inducible barley lactate dehydrogenase: cDNA cloning and molecular analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hondred, D. ); Hanson, A.D. Univ. de Montreal, Quebec )

    1990-09-01

    In the roots of barley and other cereals, hypoxia induces a set of five isozymes of L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; (S)-lactate:NADH oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.27). Biochemical and genetic data indicate that the five LDH isozymes are tetramers that arise from random association of the products of two Ldh loci. To investigate this system, cDNA clones of LDH were isolated from a {lambda}gt11 cDNA library derived from hypoxically treated barley roots. The library was screened with antiserum raised against barley LDH purified {approx}3,000-fold by an improved three-step procedure. Immunopositive clones were rescreened with a cDNA probe synthesized by the polymerase chain reaction using primers modeled from the amino acid sequences of two tryptic LDH peptides. Two types of LDH clones were found. Nucleotide sequence analysis of one representative insert of each type (respectively, 1,305 and 1,166 base pairs) revealed open reading framed encoding 10 peptide fragments of LDH. The 1,305-base-pair insert included the entire coding region of a 356-residue LDH monomer. The nucleotide sequences of the two LDH cDNAs were 92% identical in the coding region, but highly divergent in the 3{prime} noncoding region, and thus probably correspond to the two postulated Ldh loci. The deduced amino acid sequences of the two barley LDHs were 96% identical to each other and very similar to those from vertebrate and bacterial LDHs. RNA blot hybridization showed a single mRNA band of 1.5 kilobases whose level rose about 8-fold in roots during hypoxic induction, as did the level of translatable LDH message.

  7. Meat and milk compositions of bovine clones.

    PubMed

    Tian, X Cindy; Kubota, Chikara; Sakashita, Kunihito; Izaike, Yoshiaki; Okano, Ryoichi; Tabara, Norio; Curchoe, Carol; Jacob, Lavina; Zhang, Yuqin; Smith, Sadie; Bormann, Charles; Xu, Jie; Sato, Masumi; Andrew, Sheila; Yang, Xiangzhong

    2005-05-01

    The technology is now available for commercial cloning of farm animals for food production, but is the food safe for consumers? Here, we provide data on >100 parameters that compare the composition of meat and milk from beef and dairy cattle derived from cloning to those of genetic- and breed-matched control animals from conventional reproduction. The cloned animals and the comparators were managed under the same conditions and received the same diet. The composition of the meat and milk from the clones were largely not statistically different from those of matched comparators, and all parameters examined were within the normal industry standards or previously reported values. The data generated from our match-controlled experiments provide science-based information desired by regulatory agencies to address public concerns about the safety of meat and milk from somatic animal clones.

  8. [Human clone or a delayed twin?].

    PubMed

    Szybalski, W

    2001-01-01

    Cloning is a natural mode of asexual reproduction for many organisms, which results in nearly identical copies of cells or organisms. In animals, including humans, identical twins are an example of natural cloning. In the case of sheep, scientists succeeded to produce the "delayed" identical twin. Dolly, of a mature animal by a rather complex and inefficient procedure. However, if this procedure is perfected, it will be useful to clone beloved pets and important laboratory animals. It will be much less suited for making (cloning) "delayed twin" of mature persons because of high costs together with present experimental uncertainties. The only required regulation for human cloning is that somebody must be legally, including financially, responsible for the results of such novel reproductive technique.

  9. [Human cloning in Muslim and Arab law].

    PubMed

    Aldeeb Abu-Sahlieh, Sami A

    2009-01-01

    Cloning is a modern medical procedure that Muslim religious authorities treat en resorting to the general principles established by classical Muslim law based on the Koran and the Sunnah of Muhhamad as the messenger of God. In this regard, human beings are not capable of deciding what is or what is not lawful without resorting to divine norms. Cloning clashes with several principles. Firstly, the principle of the respect for life in relation to surpernumeraries, but Muslim authors are not in unanimous agreement on the determination of the moment at which life begins. Secondly, is the respect of progeny: cloning could only take place between a married couple. But even if these two principles are respected, cloning poses two major problems: the diversity of species expounded by the Koran and the Sunnah and a lack of interest. Which explains the quasi-unanimous opposition of Muslim writings regarding cloning.

  10. "Goodbye Dolly?" The ethics of human cloning.

    PubMed

    Harris, J

    1997-12-01

    The ethical implications of human clones have been much alluded to, but have seldom been examined with any rigour. This paper examines the possible uses and abuses of human cloning and draws out the principal ethical dimensions, both of what might be done and its meaning. The paper examines some of the major public and official responses to cloning by authorities such as President Clinton, the World Health Organisation, the European parliament, UNESCO, and others and reveals their inadequacies as foundations for a coherent public policy on human cloning. The paper ends by defending a conception of reproductive rights of "procreative autonomy" which shows human cloning to be not inconsistent with human rights and dignity.

  11. Chorioallantoic placenta defects in cloned mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wakisaka-Saito, Noriko; Kohda, Takashi . E-mail: tkhoda.epgn@tmd.ac.jp; Inoue, Kimiko; Ogonuki, Narumi; Miki, Hiromi; Hikichi, Takafusa; Mizutani, Eiji; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ogura, Atsuo; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2006-10-13

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer technology has been applied to produce live clones successfully in several mammalian species, but the success rates are very low. In mice, about half of the nuclear transfer embryos undergo implantation, but very few survive to term. We undertook detailed histological analyses of placentas from cloned mouse embryos generated from cumulus cells at 10.5 dpc of pregnancy, by which stage most clones have terminated their development. At 10.5 dpc, the extraembryonic tissues displayed several defined histological patterns, each reflecting their stage of developmental arrest. The most notable abnormality was the poor development of the spongiotrophoblast layer of diploid cells. This is in contrast to the placental hyperplasia frequently observed in somatic clones at 12.5 dpc or later stages. A variety of structural abnormalities were also observed in the embryos. Both placental and embryonic defects likely contribute to the low success rate of the mouse clones.

  12. "Goodbye Dolly?" The ethics of human cloning.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J

    1997-01-01

    The ethical implications of human clones have been much alluded to, but have seldom been examined with any rigour. This paper examines the possible uses and abuses of human cloning and draws out the principal ethical dimensions, both of what might be done and its meaning. The paper examines some of the major public and official responses to cloning by authorities such as President Clinton, the World Health Organisation, the European parliament, UNESCO, and others and reveals their inadequacies as foundations for a coherent public policy on human cloning. The paper ends by defending a conception of reproductive rights of "procreative autonomy" which shows human cloning to be not inconsistent with human rights and dignity. PMID:9451604

  13. Normal telomere lengths found in cloned cattle.

    PubMed

    Tian, X C; Xu, J; Yang, X

    2000-11-01

    Success of cloning using adult somatic cells has been reported in sheep, mice and cattle. The report that 'Dolly' the sheep, the first clone from an adult mammal, inherited shortened telomeres from her cell donor and that her telomeres were further shortened by the brief culture of donor cells has raised serious scientific and public concerns about the 'genetic age' and potential developmental problems of cloned animals. This observation was challenged by a recent report that showed calves cloned from fetal cells have longer telomeres than their age-matched controls. The question remains whether Dolly's short telomeres were an exception or a general fact, which would differ from the telomeres of fetal-derived clones. PMID:11062462

  14. [Human clone or a delayed twin?].

    PubMed

    Szybalski, W

    2001-01-01

    Cloning is a natural mode of asexual reproduction for many organisms, which results in nearly identical copies of cells or organisms. In animals, including humans, identical twins are an example of natural cloning. In the case of sheep, scientists succeeded to produce the "delayed" identical twin. Dolly, of a mature animal by a rather complex and inefficient procedure. However, if this procedure is perfected, it will be useful to clone beloved pets and important laboratory animals. It will be much less suited for making (cloning) "delayed twin" of mature persons because of high costs together with present experimental uncertainties. The only required regulation for human cloning is that somebody must be legally, including financially, responsible for the results of such novel reproductive technique. PMID:11684762

  15. Sensitive detection of the c-KIT c.1430G>T mutation by mutant-specific polymerase chain reaction in feline mast cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Takanosu, M; Sato, M; Kagawa, Y

    2014-06-01

    Here, we describe the establishment of mutant-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of a c-KIT c.1430G>T mutation in feline mast cell tumours. Several mutations in feline c-KIT have been identified, with the c.1430G>T mutation accounting for a significant portion of feline mast cell tumour mutations. The c.1430G>T mutation in c-KIT exon 9 was detected in 15.7% (11 of 70) of samples by mutant-specific PCR but in only 7.1% (5 of 70) by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) in the genomic DNA isolated from 70 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections or cells collected by fine needle aspiration. Mutant-specific PCR showed remarkably higher detection rate than did PCR-RFLP. DNA sequence analysis did not always yield identical results to those of mutant-specific PCR, suggesting heterogeneity of tumour cells. Mutant-specific PCR is a valid and efficient screening tool for detection of the c-KIT c.1430G>T point mutation in feline mast cell tumours compared with PCR-RFLP and sequencing analysis.

  16. Metabolic Thresholds and Validated Accelerometer Cutoff Points for the Actigraph GT1M in Young Children Based on Measurements of Locomotion and Play Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimmy, Gerda; Dossegger, Alain; Seiler, Roland; Mader, Urs

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine metabolic thresholds and subsequent activity intensity cutoff points for the ActiGraph GT1M with various epochs spanning from 5 to 60 sec in young children. Twenty-two children, aged 4 to 9 years, performed 10 different activities including locomotion and play activities. Energy expenditure was…

  17. Identification and characterisation of F3GT1 and F3GGT1, two glycosyltransferases responsible for anthocyanin biosynthesis in red-fleshed kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis).

    PubMed

    Montefiori, Mirco; Espley, Richard V; Stevenson, David; Cooney, Janine; Datson, Paul M; Saiz, Anna; Atkinson, Ross G; Hellens, Roger P; Allan, Andrew C

    2011-01-01

    Much of the diversity of anthocyanins is due to the action of glycosyltransferases, which add sugar moieties to anthocyanidins. We identified two glycosyltransferases, F3GT1 and F3GGT1, from red-fleshed kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis) that perform sequential glycosylation steps. Red-fleshed genotypes of kiwifruit accumulate anthocyanins mainly in the form of cyanidin 3-O-xylo-galactoside. Genes in the anthocyanin and flavonoid biosynthetic pathway were identified and shown to be expressed in fruit tissue. However, only the expression of the glycosyltransferase F3GT1 was correlated with anthocyanin accumulation in red tissues. Recombinant enzyme assays in vitro and in vivo RNA interference (RNAi) demonstrated the role of F3GT1 in the production of cyanidin 3-O-galactoside. F3GGT1 was shown to further glycosylate the sugar moiety of the anthocyanins. This second glycosylation can affect the solubility and stability of the pigments and modify their colour. We show that recombinant F3GGT1 can catalyse the addition of UDP-xylose to cyanidin 3-galactoside. While F3GGT1 is responsible for the end-product of the pathway, F3GT1 is likely to be the key enzyme regulating the accumulation of anthocyanin in red-fleshed kiwifruit varieties.

  18. AQUA Cloning: A Versatile and Simple Enzyme-Free Cloning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Hannes M.; Gonschorek, Patrick; Samodelov, Sophia L.; Meier, Matthias; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly cloning is increasingly replacing conventional restriction enzyme and DNA-ligase-dependent cloning methods for reasons of efficiency and performance. Here, we describe AQUA (advanced quick assembly), a simple and versatile seamless assembly cloning approach. We demonstrate the applicability and versatility of AQUA Cloning in selected proof-of-principle applications including targeted insertion-, deletion- and site-directed point-mutagenesis, and combinatorial cloning. Furthermore, we show the one pot de novo assembly of multiple DNA fragments into a single circular plasmid encoding a complex light- and chemically-regulated Boolean A NIMPLY B logic operation. AQUA Cloning harnesses intrinsic in vivo processing of linear DNA fragments with short regions of homology of 16 to 32 bp mediated by Escherichia coli. It does not require any kits, enzymes or preparations of reagents and is the simplest assembly cloning protocol to date. PMID:26360249

  19. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of 16S rRNA gene clones (Clone-FISH) for probe validation and screening of clone libraries.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Andreas; Fuchs, Bernhard M; Nielsen, Jeppe L; Tonolla, Mauro; Stahl, David A

    2002-11-01

    A method is presented for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of 16S rRNA gene clones targeting in vivo transcribed plasmid inserts (Clone-FISH). Several different cloning approaches and treatments to generate target-rRNA in the clones were compared. Highest signal intensities of Clone-FISH were obtained using plasmids with a T7 RNA polymerase promoter and host cells with an IPTG-inducible T7 RNA polymerase. Combined IPTG-induction and chloramphenicol treatment of those clones resulted in FISH signals up to 2.8-fold higher than signals of FISH with probe EUB338 to cells of Escherichia coli. Probe dissociation curves for three oligonucleotide probes were compared for reference cells containing native (FISH) or cloned (Clone-FISH) target sequences. Melting behaviour and calculated T(d) values were virtually identical for clones and cells, providing a format to use 16S rRNA gene clones instead of pure cultures for probe validation and optimization of hybridization conditions. The optimized Clone-FISH protocol was also used to screen an environmental clone library for insert sequences of interest. In this application format, 13 out of 82 clones examined were identified to contain sulphate-reducing bacterial rRNA genes. In summary, Clone-FISH is a simple and fast technique, compatible with a wide variety of cloning vectors and hosts, that should have general utility for probe validation and screening of clone libraries. PMID:12460279

  20. Melatonin receptor activation regulates GnRH gene expression and secretion in GT1-7 GnRH neurons. Signal transduction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Roy, Deboleena; Belsham, Denise D

    2002-01-01

    Melatonin plays a significant role in the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Using the GT1-7 cell line, an in vitro model of GnRH-secreting neurons of the hypothalamus, we examined the potential signal transduction pathways activated by melatonin directly at the level of the GT1-7 neuron. We found that melatonin inhibits forskolin-stimulated adenosine 3'-, 5'-cyclic monophosphate accumulation in GT1-7 cells through an inhibitory G protein. Melatonin induced protein kinase C activity by 1.65-fold over basal levels, increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 proteins, and activated c-fos and junB mRNA expression in GT1-7 cells. Using the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89, the protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor PD98059, we found that the melatonin-mediated cyclical regulation of GnRH mRNA expression may involve the protein kinase C and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 pathways, but not the protein kinase A pathway. We found that melatonin suppresses GnRH secretion by approximately 45% in the GT1-7 neurons. However, in the presence of the inhibitors H-89, bisindolylmaleimide, and PD98059 melatonin was unable to suppress GnRH secretion. These results provide insights into the potential signal transduction mechanisms involved in the control of GnRH gene expression and secretion by melatonin.

  1. Studies of cholesterol and bile acid metabolism, and early atherogenesis in hamsters fed GT16-239, a novel bile acid sequestrant (BAS).

    PubMed

    Wilson, T A; Nicolosi, R J; Rogers, E J; Sacchiero, R; Goldberg, D J

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of GT16-239, an alkylated, cross-linked poly(allylamine) bile acid sequestrant with cholestyramine on cholesterol and bile acid metabolism, and early aortic atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic male F1B Golden Syrian hamsters. In this controlled study, 42 hamsters were divided into six groups and were fed a chow-based hypercholesterolemic diet supplemented with a 10% oil blend (55% coconut/45% corn), 0.1% cholesterol (w/w) (control) and either 0.9 or 1.2% cholestyramine or 0.2, 0.4 or 0.6% GT16-239 for 13 weeks. Laboratory analyses included evaluating plasma lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, hepatic HMG-CoA reductase and 7 alpha-hydroxylase activities, fecal excretion of bile acids and neutral sterols, hepatic cholesterol concentrations, and early atherosclerosis (aortic fatty streak area). Relative to the control diet, the 0.6% GT16-239 versus the 1.2% cholestyramine significantly inhibited the elevation of plasma lipoprotein total cholesterol (TC) (-69% vs -40%), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) (-49% vs -30%), and non-HDL-C (-81 vs -48%) concentrations; increased the activities of both HMG-CoA reductase (1492% vs 62%) and 7 alpha-hydroxylase (175% vs 86%); lowered the concentration of hepatic cholesteryl ester (-94% vs -59%); increased fecal cholesterol concentration (+28% vs -10%); and decreased aortic fatty streak area (-100% vs -86%). Unexpected findings of this comparison were increased fecal concentrations of cholic acid (533%) and chenodeoxycholic acid (400%) and the reduction in lithocholic acid (-50%) in the 0.6% GT16-239 compared to the 1.2% cholestyramine group. In summary, GT16-239 had a greater impact on cholesterol metabolism and early atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic hamsters than cholestyramine.

  2. GT-repeat polymorphism in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter is associated with cardiovascular mortality risk in an arsenic-exposed population in northeastern Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Meei-Maan; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chi-Ling; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Lien, Li-Ming; Lee, Te-Chang; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2010-11-01

    Inorganic arsenic has been associated with increased risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease and mortality in humans. A functional GT-repeat polymorphism in the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene promoter is inversely correlated with the development of coronary artery disease and restenosis after clinical angioplasty. The relationship of HO-1 genotype with arsenic-associated cardiovascular disease has not been studied. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between the HO-1 GT-repeat polymorphism and cardiovascular mortality in an arsenic-exposed population. A total of 504 study participants were followed up for a median of 10.7 years for occurrence of cardiovascular deaths (coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral arterial disease). Cardiovascular risk factors and DNA samples for determination of HO-1 GT repeats were obtained at recruitment. GT repeats variants were grouped into the S (< 27 repeats) or L allele ({>=} 27 repeats). Relative mortality risk was estimated using Cox regression analysis, adjusted for competing risk of cancer and other causes. For the L/L, L/S, and S/S genotype groups, the crude mortalities for cardiovascular disease were 8.42, 3.10, and 2.85 cases/1000 person-years, respectively. After adjusting for conventional cardiovascular risk factors and competing risk of cancer and other causes, carriers with class S allele (L/S or S/S genotypes) had a significantly reduced risk of cardiovascular mortality compared to non-carriers (L/L genotype) [OR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.16-0.90]. In contrast, no significant association was observed between HO-1 genotype and cancer mortality or mortality from other causes. Shorter (GT)n repeats in the HO-1 gene promoter may confer protective effects against cardiovascular mortality related to arsenic exposure.

  3. Evaluation of rs62527607 [GT] single nucleotide polymorphism located in BAALC gene in children with acute leukemia using mismatch PCR-RFLP.

    PubMed

    Nadimi, Motahareh; Rahgozar, Soheila; Moafi, Alireza; Tavassoli, Manoochehr; Mesrian Tanha, Hamzeh

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children and involves several factors that contribute to the development of multidrug resistance and treatment failure. According to our recent studies, the BAALC gene is identified to have high mRNA expression levels in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and those with multidrug resistance. Several polymorphisms are associated with the expression of this gene. To date, there has been no study on the rs62527607 [GT] single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of BAALC gene and its link with childhood acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemia (AML). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of this polymorphism in pediatric acute leukemia, as well as its relationship with prognosis. DNA samples were extracted from bone marrow slides of 129 children with ALL and 16 children with AML. The rs62527607 [GT] SNP was evaluated using mismatch polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP)-based analysis. The association between the SNP alleles and patient disease-free survival was then assessed. The prevalence of the T-allele of rs62527607 [GT] SNP in childhood T-ALL and pre-B-ALL was 28.3% and 11.2%, respectively. In the pre-B-ALL patients, 3 year disease free survival was associated with the GG genotype. Results showed a robust association between the rs62527607 SNP and the risk of relapse in ALL, but not AML, patients. T-ALL patients with the GT genotype had an 8.75 fold higher risk of relapse. The current study demonstrates a significant association between the genotype GT and the polymorphic allele G424T, and introduces this SNP as a negative prognostic factor in children with ALL.

  4. Serial cloning of pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer: restoration of phenotypic normality during serial cloning.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seong-Keun; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Park, Jong-Yi; Choi, Yun-Jung; Bang, Jae-Il; Hwang, Kyu-Chan; Cho, Eun-Jeong; Sohn, Sea-Hwan; Uhm, Sang Jun; Koo, Deog-Bon; Lee, Kyung-Kwang; Kim, Teoan; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2007-12-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (scNT) is a useful way to create cloned animals. However, scNT clones exhibit high levels of phenotypic instability. This instability may be due to epigenetic reprogramming and/or genomic damage in the donor cells. To test this, we produced transgenic pig fibroblasts harboring the truncated human thrombopoietin (hTPO) gene and used them as donor cells in scNT to produce first-generation (G1) cloned piglets. In this study, 2,818 scNT embryos were transferred to 11 recipients and five G1 piglets were obtained. Among them, a clone had a dimorphic facial appearance with severe hypertelorism and a broad prominent nasal bridge. The other clones looked normal. Second-generation (G2) scNT piglets were then produced using ear cells from a G1 piglet that had an abnormal nose phenotype. We reasoned that, if the phenotypic abnormality of the G1 clone was not present in the G2 and third-generation (G3) clones, or was absent in the G2 clones but reappeared in the G3 clones, the phenotypic instability of the G1 clone could be attributed to faulty epigenetic reprogramming rather than to inherent/accidental genomic damage to the donor cells. Blastocyst rates, cell numbers in blastocyst, pregnancy rates, term placenta weight and ponderal index, and birth weight between G1 and G2 clones did not differ, but were significantly (P < 0.05) lower than control age- and sex-matched piglets. Next, we analyzed global methylation changes during development of the preimplantation embryos reconstructed by donor cells used for the production of G1 and G2 clones and could not find any significant differences in the methylation patterns between G1 and G2 clones. Indeed, we failed to detect the phenotypic abnormality in the G2 and G3 clones. Thus, the phenotypic abnormality of the G1 clone is likely to be due to epigenetic dysregulation. Additional observations then suggested that expression of the hTPO gene in the transgenic clones did not appear to be the cause of the

  5. Economical quantum cloning in any dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Durt, Thomas; Fiurasek, Jaromir; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2005-11-15

    The possibility of cloning a d-dimensional quantum system without an ancilla is explored, extending on the economical phase-covariant cloning machine for qubits found in Phys. Rev. A 60, 2764 (1999). We prove the impossibility of constructing an economical version of the optimal universal 1{yields}2 cloning machine in any dimension. We also show, using an ansatz on the generic form of cloning machines, that the d-dimensional 1{yields}2 phase-covariant cloner, which optimally clones all balanced superpositions with arbitrary phases, can be realized economically only in dimension d=2. The used ansatz is supported by numerical evidence up to d=7. An economical phase-covariant cloner can nevertheless be constructed for d>2, albeit with a slightly lower fidelity than that of the optimal cloner requiring an ancilla. Finally, using again an ansatz on cloning machines, we show that an economical version of the 1{yields}2 Fourier-covariant cloner, which optimally clones the computational basis and its Fourier transform, is also possible only in dimension d=2.

  6. Who is the parent in cloning?

    PubMed

    Elster, N

    1999-01-01

    In July 1996, a sheep named Dolly was born in Scotland. What makes Dolly's birth noteworthy is that she is the result of the first successful cloning attempt using the nucleus of an adult cell. The technique that led to Dolly's birth involved transferring the nucleus of a mammary cell from an adult sheep to the enucleated egg cell of an unrelated sheep with gestation occurring in a third sheep. The possibility of applying this technique to human reproduction raised concerns worldwide with several countries moving for an immediate bans on human cloning. In the United States, President Clinton requested that the National Bioethics Advisory Commission ("NBAC"), a multidisciplinary group composed of scientists, lawyers, educators, theologians, and ethicists study the implications of cloning and issue recommendations. The Commission consulted other scientists, ethicists, theologians, lawyers, and citizens with interests in this advancing technology and concluded that, "at this time it is morally unacceptable for anyone in the public or private sector, whether in a research or clinical setting, to attempt to create a child using somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning." This Article was included in a larger work prepared at the request of, and submitted to the Commission by, law professor Lori B. Andrews. Cloning through nuclear transfer will change the way we create and define families. This Article explores how existing law relating to parentage, surrogacy, egg donation, and artificial insemination may apply in the cloning context to clarify the parent-child relationship established through cloning.

  7. Human embryo cloning prohibited in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Liu, Athena

    2005-12-01

    Since the birth of Dolly (the cloned sheep) in 1997, debates have arisen on the ethical and legal questions of cloning-for-biomedical-research (more commonly termed "therapeutic cloning") and of reproductive cloning using human gametes. Hong Kong enacted the Human Reproductive Technology Ordinance (Cap 561) in 2000. Section 15(1)(e) of this Ordinance prohibits the "replacing of the nucleus of a cell of an embryo with a nucleus taken from any other cell," i.e., nucleus substitution. Section 15(1)(f) prohibits the cloning of any embryo. The scope of the latter, therefore, is arguably the widest, prohibiting all cloning techniques such as cell nucleus replacement, embryo splitting, parthenogenesis, and cloning using stem cell lines. Although the Human Reproductive Technology Ordinance is not yet fully operative, this article examines how these prohibitions may adversely impact on basic research and the vision of the Hong Kong scientific community. It concludes that in light of recent scientific developments, it is time to review if the law offers a coherent set of policies in this area.

  8. Who is the parent in cloning?

    PubMed

    Elster, N

    1999-01-01

    In July 1996, a sheep named Dolly was born in Scotland. What makes Dolly's birth noteworthy is that she is the result of the first successful cloning attempt using the nucleus of an adult cell. The technique that led to Dolly's birth involved transferring the nucleus of a mammary cell from an adult sheep to the enucleated egg cell of an unrelated sheep with gestation occurring in a third sheep. The possibility of applying this technique to human reproduction raised concerns worldwide with several countries moving for an immediate bans on human cloning. In the United States, President Clinton requested that the National Bioethics Advisory Commission ("NBAC"), a multidisciplinary group composed of scientists, lawyers, educators, theologians, and ethicists study the implications of cloning and issue recommendations. The Commission consulted other scientists, ethicists, theologians, lawyers, and citizens with interests in this advancing technology and concluded that, "at this time it is morally unacceptable for anyone in the public or private sector, whether in a research or clinical setting, to attempt to create a child using somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning." This Article was included in a larger work prepared at the request of, and submitted to the Commission by, law professor Lori B. Andrews. Cloning through nuclear transfer will change the way we create and define families. This Article explores how existing law relating to parentage, surrogacy, egg donation, and artificial insemination may apply in the cloning context to clarify the parent-child relationship established through cloning. PMID:12650149

  9. Human embryo cloning prohibited in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Liu, Athena

    2005-12-01

    Since the birth of Dolly (the cloned sheep) in 1997, debates have arisen on the ethical and legal questions of cloning-for-biomedical-research (more commonly termed "therapeutic cloning") and of reproductive cloning using human gametes. Hong Kong enacted the Human Reproductive Technology Ordinance (Cap 561) in 2000. Section 15(1)(e) of this Ordinance prohibits the "replacing of the nucleus of a cell of an embryo with a nucleus taken from any other cell," i.e., nucleus substitution. Section 15(1)(f) prohibits the cloning of any embryo. The scope of the latter, therefore, is arguably the widest, prohibiting all cloning techniques such as cell nucleus replacement, embryo splitting, parthenogenesis, and cloning using stem cell lines. Although the Human Reproductive Technology Ordinance is not yet fully operative, this article examines how these prohibitions may adversely impact on basic research and the vision of the Hong Kong scientific community. It concludes that in light of recent scientific developments, it is time to review if the law offers a coherent set of policies in this area. PMID:16331533

  10. FX cloning: a simple and robust high-throughput cloning method for protein expression.

    PubMed

    Geertsma, Eric R

    2014-01-01

    The immense amount of gene sequences available nowadays allows scientist to screen broadly for extraordinary proteins. Reliable cloning tools that allow the parallel processing of many targets are vital for the success of this strategy. The FX cloning procedure detailed here is such a straightforward and efficient tool. It is dedicated to the cloning of open reading frames (ORFs) with the final aim of expressing the corresponding proteins. FX cloning combines attractive features of established high-throughput cloning methods that were thus far not unified in one single method. It facilitates the subcloning of a sequence-verified ORF to a variety of expression vectors, but is sufficiently versatile to accept PCR products as well. Moreover, the common, but undesirable feature of extending target ORFs with long cloning-related sequences is avoided. It leads to the addition of only one amino acid to each side of the protein. As a consequence, only one primer pair or PCR product suffices to generate expression vectors for both N- and C-terminal translational fusions. FX cloning is highly efficient and economical in its use. The method is suited for high-throughput cloning projects and also for everyday cloning of single targets. FX cloning is based on the use of type IIS restriction enzymes and negative selection markers. The full procedure takes place in one pot in less than 3 h and does not require intermediate purification steps nor extensive handling. The method has proven to be very robust and suitable for all common expression systems.

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of interferon alpha/beta response element binding factors of the murine (2'-5')oligoadenylate synthetase ME-12 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Yan, C; Tamm, I

    1991-01-01

    Seven clones encoding interferon response element binding factors have been isolated from a mouse fibroblast lambda gt11 cDNA library by using a 32P end-labeled tandem trimer of the mouse (2'-5')oligoadenylate synthetase gene interferon response element as a probe. Clone 16 shares strong similarity (95%) at both DNA and amino acid level with YB-1, a human major histocompatibility complex class II Y-box DNA-binding protein, and with dbpB, a human epidermal growth factor receptor gene enhancer region binding protein. The product of the gene represented by clone 16 may represent a factor that regulates multiple genes by binding to a variety of 5' regulatory elements. Clone 25 is a 2407-base-pair-long cDNA and contains a putative 311-amino acid open reading frame corresponding to an estimated mass of 35.5 kDa. This putative protein, designated as interferon response element binding factor 1 (IREBF-1), contains an acidic domain, three heptad repeat leucine arrays, and a region that shares similarity with the yeast transcriptional factor GAL4 DNA-binding domain. Furthermore, the C terminus of IREBF-1 shows an unusual amphipathic property: within a 79-amino acid range, one side of the alpha-helical region contains a preponderance of hydrophobic amino acids and the other side contains hydrophilic amino acids. This type of structure provides a strong hydrophobic force for protein-protein interaction. Images PMID:1986360

  12. Kisspeptin-10 elicits triphasic cytosolic calcium responses in immortalized GT1-7 GnRH neurones.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mete; Alcin, Ergul; Ayar, Ahmet; Yilmaz, Bayram; Sandal, Suleyman; Kelestimur, Haluk

    2011-03-29

    Kisspeptins, which are alternatively called as metastin since they were originally identified as products of metastasis suppressor gene KiSS-1, are the natural ligands for the G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54). Kisspeptins are the most potent activators of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis reported to date. The pulsatile pattern of GnRH release, which results in the intermittent release of gonadotropic hormones from the pituitary, has a critical importance for reproductive function but the factors responsible from this release pattern are not known. Therefore, the pattern of kisspeptin-induced intracellular signaling and the role of PKC in the intracellular signaling cascade were investigated by fluorescence calcium imaging using the immortalized GnRH-secreting GT1-7 hypothalamic neurons. Kisspeptin-10 caused a triphasic change characterized by an initial small increase followed by a significant decrease and increase in intracellular free calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)). The changes in [Ca(2+)](i) were significantly attenuated by pre-treatment with protein kinase C inhibitor. The compatibility of appeared mirrored-patterns of kisspeptin-10-induced changes in [Ca(2+)](i) concentrations in these neurons and GnRH secretion confirm the importance of intracellular calcium flux downstream from GPR54 through PKC signaling pathway.

  13. Temperatures and heat flow in INEL-GT1 and WO-2 boreholes, Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, D.D.

    1990-11-01

    The researchers have logged temperatures in the deep geothermal test at the INEL test site on the eastern Snake River Plains in Idaho (INEL-GT1) three times over a period of 8 years. The first logging was on 8/20/82 when they reached a depth of 2100 m. They were unable to get past the casing shoe at that depth. In 1983 (7/25/83) they relogged the well with a centralizer on the temperature tool and got past the casing hanger to the end of their cable at 2870 m. In both cases the logs were made at a 0.5 m recording interval. In 1990 the researchers relogged the well for a third time and for the first time reached the bottom of the well at 3130 m. In this log the temperatures were measured at 0.2 m intervals. The temperature-depth plots for the last two logs are compared and the gradient logs for the three logs are compared. The differences in temperature are almost too small to see on the plot. The only significant differences are in the depth interval 700 to 1850 m, a section of the hole with a number of fluid disturbances.

  14. Alloy 2100 GT: A new Ta-fortified Ni-Cr-Al-alloy for land based gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, U.; Agarwal, D.C.

    1999-11-01

    Alloy 2100 GT has been developed for use in the combustors of gas turbines. The improved high-temperature properties of the alloy should allow the metal temperature of the combustion chamber to be increased, which would provide the opportunity of increasing the efficiency, lowering emissions, and decreasing fuel consumption. This alloy is a cobalt, tungsten, and molybdenum-free Ni-base superalloy. It contains as major alloying elements 25 wt.% chromium, 8 wt.% tantalum, 3 wt.% aluminium, 0.3 wt.% carbon and 0.1 wt.% yttrium. High-temperature strength is achieved by solid solution strengthening by tantalum, carbide hardening due to the formation of primary precipitated tantalum carbides and {gamma}{prime}-precipitation hardening by aluminium and tantalum. In spite of the small grain size creep rupture strength and stress to produce 0.1 % creep is significantly increased in comparison to superalloys being in use today. Superior oxidation resistance up to 1200 C and corrosion behavior under deposits of sulfates up to 850 C is given by the formation of a very thin and tightly adherent alumina scale due to an aluminium content of approximately 3.0 wt.%, which is remarkably high for a wrought alloy, and additions of yttrium to improve spallation resistance under cycling conditions. Welding can easily be accomplished. The matching filler metal is recommended because it provides mechanical strength and oxidation resistance similar to the parent metal.

  15. K-FIX(GT): A computer program for modeling the expansion phase of steam explosions within complex three dimensional cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, M.L.; Farawila, Y.M.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.; Halvorson, P.J.

    1992-05-01

    In the development of the Severe Accident Analysis Program for the Savannah River production reactors, it was recognized that certain accidents have the potential for causing damaging steam explosions. The massive SRS reactor buildings are likely to withstand any imaginable steam explosion. However, reactor components and building structures including hatches, ventilation ducts, etc., could be at risk if such an explosion occurred. No tools were available to estimate the effects of such explosions on actual structures. To meet this need, the Savannah River Laboratory contracted with the Georgia Institute of Technology Research Institute for development of a computer-based calculational tool for estimating the effects of steam explosions. The goal for this study was to develop a computer code that could be used parametrically to predict the effects of various steam explosions on their surroundings. This would be able to predict whether a steam explosion of a given magnitude would be likely to fail a particular structure. This would require, of course, that the magnitude of the explosion be specified through some combination of judgment and calculation. The requested code, identified as the K-FIX(GT) code, was developed and delivered by the contractor, along with extensive documentation. The several individual reports that constitute the documentation are each being issued as a separate WSRC report. Documentation includes several model calculations, and representation of these in graphic form. This report gives detailed instructions for the use of the code, including identification of all input parameters required.

  16. Structure of A197 from Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus: a Crenarchaeal Viral Glycosyltransferase Exhibiting the GT-A Fold

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric T.; Reiter, Dirk; Young, Mark; Lawrence, C. Martin

    2006-01-01

    Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) was the first icosahedral virus characterized from an archaeal host. It infects Sulfolobus species that thrive in the acidic hot springs (pH 2.9 to 3.9 and 72 to 92°C) of Yellowstone National Park. The overall capsid architecture and the structure of its major capsid protein are very similar to those of the bacteriophage PRD1 and eukaryotic viruses Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus 1 and adenovirus, suggesting a viral lineage that predates the three domains of life. The 17,663-base-pair, circular, double-stranded DNA genome contains 36 potential open reading frames, whose sequences generally show little similarity to other genes in the sequence databases. However, functional and evolutionary information may be suggested by a protein's three-dimensional structure. To this end, we have undertaken structural studies of the STIV proteome. Here we report our work on A197, the product of an STIV open reading frame. The structure of A197 reveals a GT-A fold that is common to many members of the glycosyltransferase superfamily. A197 possesses a canonical DXD motif and a putative catalytic base that are hallmarks of this family of enzymes, strongly suggesting a glycosyltransferase activity for A197. Potential roles for the putative glycosyltransferase activity of A197 and their evolutionary implications are discussed. PMID:16840342

  17. (New hosts and vectors for genome cloning)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The main goal of our project remains the development of new bacterial hosts and vectors for the stable propagation of human DNA clones in E. coli. During the past six months of our current budget period, we have (1) continued to develop new hosts that permit the stable maintenance of unstable features of human DNA, and (2) developed a series of vectors for (a) cloning large DNA inserts, (b) assessing the frequency of human sequences that are lethal to the growth of E. coli, and (c) assessing the stability of human sequences cloned in M13 for large-scale sequencing projects.

  18. A DOS Primer for Librarians: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beecher, Henry

    1990-01-01

    Provides an introduction to DOS commands and strategies for the effective organization and use of hard disks. Functions discussed include the creation of directories and subdirectories, enhanced copying, the assignment of disk drives, and backing up the hard disk. (CLB)

  19. DOS Batch Files As Control Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dyk, David A.

    1991-01-01

    Computer-programming technique circumvents maximum of 640K imposed on random-access memory (RAM) by DOS (Disk Operating System) software. Involves breaking application program into smaller programs. Each resulting subprogram, when compiled and linked, must be small enough to fit within 640K of RAM. Retrieved from storage on disk as needed. In terms of DOS software, each subprogram ".EXE" file executed in "stand-alone" manner.

  20. The POR rs1057868–rs2868177 GC-GT diplotype is associated with high tacrolimus concentrations in early post-renal transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shu; Chen, Rong-xin; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Xue-ding; Fu, Qian; Chen, Ling-yan; Liu, Xiao-man; Huang, Hong-bing; Huang, Min; Wang, Chang-xi; Li, Jia-li

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is the only flavoprotein that donates electrons to all microsomal P450 enzymes (CYP), and several POR SNPs have been shown to be important contributors to altered CYP activity or CYP-mediated drug metabolism. In this study we examined the association between 6 POR SNPs and tacrolimus concentrations in Chinese renal transplant recipients. Methods: A total of 154 renal transplant recipients were enrolled. Genotyping of CYP3A5*3 and 6 POR SNPs was performed. All patients received a triple immunosuppressive regimen comprising tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisone. Dose-adjusted tacrolimus trough concentrations were obtained on d 7 (C0D7/D) after transplantation when steady-state concentration of tacrolimus was achieved (dosage had been unchanged for more than 3 d). Results: Tacrolimus C0D7/D in CYP3A5*3/*3/ POR rs1057868–rs2868177 GC-GT diplotype carriers was 1.62- and 2.72-fold higher than those in CYP3A5*3/*3/ POR rs1057868–rs2868177 GC-GT diplotype non-carriers and CYP3A5*1 carriers (220.17±48.09 vs 135.69±6.86 and 80.84±5.27 ng/mL/mg/kg, respectively, P<0.0001). Of CYP3A5*3/*3/ POR rs1057868-rs2868177GC-GT diplotype carriers, 85.71% exceeded the upper limit of the target range (8 ng/mL), which was also significantly higher compared with the latter two groups (14.29% and 0.00%, respectively, P<0.0001). The CYP3A5*3 and POR rs1057868–rs2868177 GC-GT diplotype explained 31.7% and 5.7%, respectively, of the inter-individual variability of tacrolimus C0D7/D, whereas the POR rs1057868–rs2868177 GC-GT diplotype could explain 10.9% of the inter-individual variability of tacrolimus C0D7/D in CYP3A5 non-expressers. Conclusion: The CYP3A5*3 and POR rs1057868–rs2868177 GC-GT diplotype accounted for the inter-individual variation of tacrolimus C0D7/D. Genotyping of POR rs1057868–rs2868177 diplotypes would help to differentiate initial tacrolimus dose requirements and to achieve early target C0 ranges in Chinese

  1. Optimal cloning of mixed Gaussian states

    SciTech Connect

    Guta, Madalin; Matsumoto, Keiji

    2006-09-15

    We construct the optimal one to two cloning transformation for the family of displaced thermal equilibrium states of a harmonic oscillator, with a fixed and known temperature. The transformation is Gaussian and it is optimal with respect to the figure of merit based on the joint output state and norm distance. The proof of the result is based on the equivalence between the optimal cloning problem and that of optimal amplification of Gaussian states which is then reduced to an optimization problem for diagonal states of a quantum oscillator. A key concept in finding the optimum is that of stochastic ordering which plays a similar role in the purely classical problem of Gaussian cloning. The result is then extended to the case of n to m cloning of mixed Gaussian states.

  2. Generation of phase-covariant quantum cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Karimipour, V.; Rezakhani, A.T.

    2002-11-01

    It is known that in phase-covariant quantum cloning, the equatorial states on the Bloch sphere can be cloned with a fidelity higher than the optimal bound established for universal quantum cloning. We generalize this concept to include other states on the Bloch sphere with a definite z component of spin. It is shown that once we know the z component, we can always clone a state with a fidelity higher than the universal value and that of equatorial states. We also make a detailed study of the entanglement properties of the output copies and show that the equatorial states are the only states that give rise to a separable density matrix for the outputs.

  3. Dolly, the so-called clone.

    PubMed

    Mittwoch, Ursula

    2003-02-01

    The word 'clone' is in the forefront of scientific terms that are familiar to the general public. But what exactly does it mean? Suprisingly, there is no simple answer, for different scientists are using the term for different entities.

  4. Cloning and characterization of new bioluminescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szent-Gyorgyi, Christopher; Ballou, Byron T.; Dagnal, Erich; Bryan, Bruce

    1999-07-01

    Over the past two years Prolume has undertaken a comprehensive program to clone luciferases and associated 'green fluorescent proteins' (GFPs) from marine animals that use coelenterazine as the luciferin. To data we have cloned several bioluminescent proteins, including two novel copepod luciferases and two anthozoan GFPs. These four proteins have sequences that differ greatly form previously cloned analogous proteins; the sequence diversity apparently is due to independent evolutionary origins and unusual evolutionary constraints. Thus coelenterazine-based bioluminescent systems may also manifest a variety of useful properties. We discuss form this taxonomic perspective the initial biochemical and spectral characterization of our cloned proteins. Emphasis is placed on the anthozoan luciferase-GFP systems, whose efficient resonance energy transfer has elicited much current interest.

  5. Nuclear cloning, epigenetic reprogramming and cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Jaenisch, Rudolf; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Eggan, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    The full-term development of sheep, cows, goats, pigs and mice has been achieved through the transfer of somatic cell nuclei into enucleated oocytes. Despite these successes, mammalian cloning remains an inefficient process, with a preponderance of reconstructed embryos failing at early- to mid-gestation stages of development. The small percentage of conceptuses that survive to term are characterized by a high mortality rate and frequently display grossly increased placental and birth weights. It is likely that inappropriate expression of key developmental genes may contribute to lethality of cloned embryos. One of the most interesting issues of nuclear cloning is the question of genomic reprogramming, i.e. whether successful cloning requires the resetting of epigenetic modifications which are characteristic of the adult donor nucleus. Processes such as X-inactivation and genomic imprinting are known to depend on epigenetic modifications of the genome. The classical nuclear transfer experiments with frogs have suggested that the source of the donor nucleus affects the phenotype of the clone. We have, using expression profiling, compared gene expression in clones derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells and from somatic donor cell nuclei and find substantial gene dysregulation. Our results suggest that faulty reprogramming is caused by the nuclear cloning procedure itself. In addition, the type of donor nucleus contributes to the abnormal expression pattern seen in cloned animals. One of the major unresolved issues has been whether nuclei of terminally differentiated cells can be reprogrammed by transfer into the oocyte. To address this question we have derived monoclonal mice from B and T cells and used the genetic rearrangements of the immunoglobulin and T cell receptor genes to retrospectively verify the differentiation state of the donor nucleus. Finally, we discuss our recent studies on the reprogramming of nuclei from terminally differentiated neurons and from

  6. Cloning in America: constitutional rights and limits.

    PubMed

    Erwin, C

    2000-01-01

    As readers of science fiction are well aware, the term "clone" refers to asexually produced offspring, that is, produced by a process of cell-division which does not begin with the union of two sex cells. A clone would be the genetic twin of the cell donor. Propagation of plants by this method is, of course, commonplace, but mammalian reproduction in this fashion would be indeed a revolutionary accomplishment, with profound and disturbing implications. PMID:14627028

  7. Reproductive cloning combined with genetic modification.

    PubMed

    Strong, C

    2005-11-01

    Although there is widespread opposition to reproductive cloning, some have argued that its use by infertile couples to have genetically related children would be ethically justifiable. Others have suggested that lesbian or gay couples might wish to use cloning to have genetically related children. Most of the main objections to human reproductive cloning are based on the child's lack of unique nuclear DNA. In the future, it may be possible safely to create children using cloning combined with genetic modifications, so that they have unique nuclear DNA. The genetic modifications could be aimed at giving such children genetic characteristics of both members of the couple concerned. Thus, cloning combined with genetic modification could be appealing to infertile, lesbian, or gay couples who seek genetically related children who have genetic characteristics of both members. In such scenarios, the various objections to human reproductive cloning that are based on the lack of genetic uniqueness would no longer be applicable. The author argues that it would be ethically justifiable for such couples to create children in this manner, assuming these techniques could be used safely.

  8. Cloning: Past, Present, and the Exciting Future. Breakthroughs in Bioscience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Berardino, Marie A.

    This document explores the history of cloning by focusing on Dolly the Sheep, one of the first large animal clonings. The disadvantages and advantages of transgenic clones are discussed as well as the future implications of cloning from the perspective of human health. (Contains 10 resources.) (YDS)

  9. Cloning the entanglement of a pair of quantum bits

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoureux, Louis-Philippe; Navez, Patrick; Cerf, Nicolas J.; Fiurasek, Jaromir

    2004-04-01

    It is shown that any quantum operation that perfectly clones the entanglement of all maximally entangled qubit pairs cannot preserve separability. This 'entanglement no-cloning' principle naturally suggests that some approximate cloning of entanglement is nevertheless allowed by quantum mechanics. We investigate a separability-preserving optimal cloning machine that duplicates all maximally entangled states of two qubits, resulting in 0.285 bits of entanglement per clone, while a local cloning machine only yields 0.060 bits of entanglement per clone.

  10. [Ethical considerations on human cloning. A psychoanalytic perspective].

    PubMed

    Alvarez, A

    2000-01-01

    A brief review of ethical issues related to two types of human cloning is presented: cloning embryonic cells not intended to culminate in the birth of a new individual and cloning human beings. Advantages and objections related to both types of human cloning are analyzed from an ethical point of view. Repercussions on individuals born by the technique of cloning are discussed from a psychoanalytical perspective. It can be concluded that cloning embryonic cells could be admissible, while not cloning considered as a reproductive option.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of UDP-glucuronic acid:flavonol-3-O-glucuronosyltransferase (VvGT5) from the grapevine Vitis vinifera

    PubMed Central

    Mizohata, Eiichi; Okuda, Takuma; Hatanaka, Seika; Nakayama, Taisuke; Horikawa, Manabu; Nakayama, Toru; Ono, Eiichiro; Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Grapevine (Vitis vinifera) glycosyltransferase 5 (VvGT5) is a UDP-glucuronic acid:flavonol-3-O-glucuronosyltransferase that catalyses the 3-O-specific glucuronosylation of flavonols using UDP-glucuronic acid as a sugar donor to produce flavonol 3-O-glucosides, which are important bioactive phytochemicals. Recombinant VvGT5 expressed in Escherichia coli cells was purified and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. A full set of X-ray diffraction data was collected to 2.2 Å Bragg spacing from a single crystal using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystal was hexagonal, belonging to space group P6122, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 102.70, c = 535.92 Å. The initial phases were determined by the molecular-replacement method. PMID:23295490

  12. Effect of nitrous oxide on intracellular events of GT1-7 GnRH-secreting neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Q.; Rosenberg, M.; Kugel, G.; Agarwal, R. K.; Phillips, J.; Kumar, M. S. A.

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to nitrous oxide (N2O) may result in decreased fertility and other reproductive problems in women working in dental offices. This study explored direct effects of N2O on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons involved in pituitary-gonadal function. An immortalized GnRH-secreting GT1-7 cell line was used to evaluate the effects of 60% N2O exposure for 24 hours on pro-GnRH mRNA levels, KCl-stimulated GnRH levels, and certain signaling pathways. N2O exposure for 24 hours decreased pro-GnRH mRNA levels by approximately 80% without affecting cell viability or intracellular GnRH levels. The ability of KCl to release GnRH stores was also significantly reduced. Western blot analyses of ERK1/2, and p38 phosphorylation and IkappaB did not indicate any change in phosphorylation, although p63 tyrosine phosphorylation was increased after short-term N2O exposure. Levels of c-fos, a nuclear transcription factor, were not changed by N2O exposure. These results indicate that N2O significantly decreases evoked release of GnRH as well as GnRH mRNA levels either by decreased synthesis or by mRNA stability. These results may be important in understanding adverse effects of N2O on female workers in dental practice where the gas is not scavenged. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:12866801

  13. Hydrogen Fueled Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell-Gas Turbine (SOFC-GT) System for Long-Haul Rail Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Justin Jeff

    Freight movement of goods is the artery for America's economic health. Long-haul rail is the premier mode of transport on a ton-mile basis. Concerns regarding greenhouse gas and criteria pollutant emissions, however, have motivated the creation of annually increasing locomotive emissions standards. Health issues from diesel particulate matter, especially near rail yards, have also been on the rise. These factors and the potential to raise conventional diesel-electric locomotive performance warrants the investigation of using future fuels in a more efficient system for locomotive application. This research evaluates the dynamic performance of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell-Gas Turbine (SOFC-GT) Hybrid system operating on hydrogen fuel to power a locomotive over a rail path starting from the Port of Los Angeles and ending in the City of Barstow. Physical constraints, representative locomotive operation logic, and basic design are used from a previous feasibility study and simulations are performed in the MATLAB Simulink environment. In-house controls are adapted to and expanded upon. Results indicate high fuel-to-electricity efficiencies of at least 54% compared to a conventional diesel-electric locomotive efficiency of 35%. Incorporation of properly calibrated feedback and feed-forward controls enables substantial load following of difficult transients that result from train kinematics while maintaining turbomachinery operating requirements and suppressing thermal stresses in the fuel cell stack. The power split between the SOFC and gas turbine is deduced to be a deterministic factor in the balance between capital and operational costs. Using hydrogen results in no emissions if renewable and offers a potential of 24.2% fuel energy savings for the rail industry.

  14. Association between FEN1 Polymorphisms -69G>A and 4150G>T with Susceptibility in Human Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    YING, Nanjiao; WANG, Shuo; XU, Hong; WANG, Yanyi

    2015-01-01

    Background: As a DNA repair protein, flap endonuclease 1 is a key enzyme in maintaining genomic instability and preventing carcinogenesis. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), -69G>A and 4150G>T are associated with DNA damage. This meta-analysis is to evaluate the genetic effects of FEN1 gene SNPs (-69G/A and 4150G/T) and the susceptibility to diseases, including glioma risk, breast cancer, lung cancer, keratoconus (KC) and fuchs’ endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD). Methods: A literature search of PubMed and Embase was conducted to identify all eligible published studies. Five case-control studies were included with a total of 5612 cases and 6703 controls in this meta-analysis. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with their corresponding confidence intervals (95%CI) were used to assess the strength of the association. Results: The FEN1 -69G/A and 4150G/T polymorphisms were significantly associated with the disease risk. Our meta-analysis showed the FEN1 -69GG genotype was correlated to increase risk for the contained diseases compared with the -69AG genotype (OR=0.77, 95%CI=0.71∼0.83). Moreover, the FEN1 4150GG genotype could increase diseases risk compared with the 4150TG genotype (OR=0.81, 95%CI=0.75∼0.87). Conclusion: The variant genotypes of the FEN1 -69G/A and FEN1 4150G/T polymorphisms may be associated with diseases susceptibility. However, more studies are needed to detect the disease risk in different ethnic populations. PMID:26811808

  15. STAT4 rs7574865 G/T and PTPN22 rs2488457 G/C Polymorphisms Influence the Risk of Developing Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in Han Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhi-Dan; Wang, Fei-Fei; Huang, Hui; Huang, Na; Ma, Hui-Hui; Guo, Yi-Hong; Zhang, Ya-Yuan; Qian, Xiao-Qing; Yu, Hai-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a common autoimmune disease characterized by environmental influences along with several predisposing genes in the pathogenesis. The protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor 22 (PTPN22) and signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 4 (STAT4) have been recognized as susceptibility genes for numerous autoimmune diseases. Associations of STAT4 rs7574865 G/T and PTPN22 (rs2488457 G/C and rs2476601 C/T) polymorphisms with JIA have repeatedly been replicated in several Caucasian populations. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of three polymorphisms mentioned above on the risk of developing JIA in Han Chinese patients. Genotyping was performed on a total of 137 Chinese patients with JIA (JIA group) and 150 sex and age frequency-matched healthy volunteers (Control group). The single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were determined by using direct sequencing of PCR-amplified products. There were significant differences of PTPN22 rs2488457 G/C and STAT4 rs7574865 G/T polymorphisms between both groups. However, no significant difference was observed in distribution frequencies of PTPN22 rs2476601 polymorphism. The association with the PTPN22 rs2488457 G/C polymorphism remained significant in the stratifications by age at onset, ANA status, splenomegaly, lymphadenectasis and involvement joints. As with the STAT4 rs7574865 G/T polymorphisms, the enthesitis-related arthritis and presence of hepatomegaly had strong effect on the association. Our data strengthen STAT4 rs7574865 G/T and PTPN22 rs2488457 G/C polymorphisms as susceptibility factors for JIA. PMID:25781893

  16. Association of two Common Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (+45T/G and +276G/T) of ADIPOQ Gene with Coronary Artery Disease in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadzadeh, Ghorban; Ghaffari, Mohammad-Ali; Heibar, Habib; Bazyar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Adiponectin, an adipocyte-secreted hormone, is known to have anti-atherogenic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-diabetic properties. In the present study, the association between two common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (+45T/G and +276G/T) of ADIOPQ gene and coronary artery disease (CAD) was assessed in the subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods: Genotypes of two SNPs were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism in 200 subjects with T2DM (100 subjects with CAD and 100 without CAD). Results: The frequency of TT genotype of +276G/T was significantly elevated in CAD compared to controls (χ2=7.967, P=0.019). A similar difference was found in the allele frequency of +276G/T between two groups (χ2=3.895, P=0.048). The increased risk of CAD was associated with +276 TT genotype when compared to reference GG genotype (OR=5.158; 95% CI=1.016-26.182, P=0.048). However, no similar difference was found in genotype and allele frequencies of SNP +45T/G between two groups. There was a CAD protective haplotype combination of +276 wild-type and +45 mutant-type allele (276G-45G) (OR=0.37, 95% CI=0.16-0.86, P=0.022) in the subject population. Conclusion: Our findings indicated that T allele of SNP +276G/T is more associated with the increased risk of CAD in subjects with T2DM. Also, a haplotype combination of +45G/+276G of these two SNPs has a protective effect on the risk of CAD. PMID:26781170

  17. The Arabidopsis Family GT43 Glycosyltransferases Form Two Functionally Nonredundant Groups Essential for the Elongation of Glucuronoxylan Backbone1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chanhui; Teng, Quincy; Huang, Wenlin; Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2010-01-01

    There exist four members of family GT43 glycosyltransferases in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome, and mutations of two of them, IRX9 and IRX14, have previously been shown to cause a defect in glucuronoxylan (GX) biosynthesis. However, it is currently unknown whether IRX9 and IRX14 perform the same biochemical function and whether the other two GT43 members are also involved in GX biosynthesis. In this report, we performed comprehensive genetic analysis of the functional roles of the four Arabidopsis GT43 members in GX biosynthesis. The I9H (IRX9 homolog) and I14H (IRX14 homolog) genes were shown to be specifically expressed in cells undergoing secondary wall thickening, and their encoded proteins were targeted to the Golgi, where GX is synthesized. Overexpression of I9H but not IRX14 or I14H rescued the GX defects conferred by the irx9 mutation, whereas overexpression of I14H but not IRX9 or I9H complemented the GX defects caused by the irx14 mutation. Double mutant analyses revealed that I9H functioned redundantly with IRX9 and that I14H was redundant with IRX14 in their functions. In addition, double mutations of IRX9 and IRX14 were shown to cause a loss of secondary wall thickening in fibers and a much more severe reduction in GX amount than their single mutants. Together, these results provide genetic evidence demonstrating that all four Arabidopsis GT43 members are involved in GX biosynthesis and suggest that they form two functionally nonredundant groups essential for the normal elongation of GX backbone. PMID:20335400

  18. Validity of GT3X and Actiheart to estimate sedentary time and breaks using ActivPAL as the reference in free-living conditions.

    PubMed

    Júdice, Pedro B; Santos, Diana A; Hamilton, Marc T; Sardinha, Luís B; Silva, Analiza M

    2015-05-01

    Sedentary time, specifically sitting/reclining, is a risk factor for many non-communicable diseases and premature mortality. Inclinometers have been used as a valid measurement of sedentary time and its patterns; however, there is a lack of information regarding the validity of alternative accelerometry and heart rate methods. The validity of GT3X and Actiheart in estimating changes in daily sedentary time and breaks, during free-living settings, using ActivPAL as the reference was examined. A crossover randomized control trial of an intervention that aimed to reduce ∼3 h/day of sitting time included 10 overweight/obese adults (37-65 years). Participants had a total of 74 valid days for the three devices (29 controls; 45 interventions). For ActivPAL, sedentary time was measured directly based upon posture (sitting/reclining); Actiheart, the presumed MET cutpoint for sedentary time (<1.5 METs) based on accelerometry+heart rate; GT3X, the traditional <100countsmin(-1). A break in sedentary time was defined as when the participants were above the aforementioned cutoffs. GT3X overestimated and Actiheart underestimated sedentary time (bias=135min; bias=-156min, respectively) and both methods overestimated breaks in sedentary time (bias=78; bias=235 breaks, respectively). The GT3X method was in better agreement with the ActivPAL sedentary time (r2=0.70; concordance correlation coefficient (CCC)=0.56) than the Actiheart (r2=0.24; CCC=0.31). The present results highlight the magnitude of potential errors in estimating sedentary time and breaks from common alternative methods other than ActivPAL. Because misclassification errors from the commonly used surrogates are potentially large, this raises concern that alternative methods used in many epidemiological observations may have underestimated the true effects caused by too much sitting (ClinicalTrials.govID:NCT02007681).

  19. Meta-analysis of associations between functional prolactin -1149 G/T polymorphism and susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ho; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Song, Gwan Gyu

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the prolactin -1149 G/T polymorphism confers susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A meta-analysis was conducted for examining the associations between prolactin -1149 G/T polymorphism and susceptibility to SLE or RA using allele contrast, recessive and dominant models, and homozygote contrast. A total of 10 comparative studies, consisting of 4 SLE and 6 RA studies, involving 4252 patients and 4949 controls, were included in the meta-analysis. No association between the prolactin -1149 G allele and SLE was found when all study subjects were considered together (OR = 1.019, 95 % CI = 1.841-1.236, p = 0.845). Stratification by ethnicity also indicated no association between the prolactin G allele and SLE in either Caucasian or Latin American populations. In contrast, a significant association was observed between the prolactin G allele and RA in all subjects (OR = 1.123, 95 % CI = 1.052-1.198, p = 4.6 × 10(-5)). After stratification by ethnicity, the G allele was found to be significantly associated with RA in Caucasians (OR = 1.112, 95 % CI = 1.041-1.189, p = 0.002). Furthermore, the prolactin -1149 G/T polymorphism was found to be associated with RA in Caucasians under the dominant model and under homozygote contrast. This meta-analysis demonstrates that the prolactin -1149 G/T polymorphism is associated with susceptibility to RA, but not SLE, in Caucasians.

  20. Experimental study on the characteristic of the NS-GT cut quartz crystal resonator oscillating in the sub-resonant frequency.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, S; Kawashima, H

    1999-01-01

    We previously reported that the dynamic photo-elastic method was a very effective measuring technique for the stress distribution of vibrating quartz crystal resonators. The existence of a twisted asymmetrical vibration mode has been verified experimentally when the NS-GT cut quartz crystal resonator was vibrating in the main resonant frequency (MRF). A MRF and a sub-resonant frequency (SRF) of the NS-GT cut quartz resonator were defined as follows. If a mechanical standing wave was in the x' or y' direction of the resonator, the former was MRF vibration and the latter was SRF vibration, respectively. In this paper, stress distributions of two samples of the NS-GT cut quartz crystal resonator, one of which had a thickness of 80 mum and the other 150 mum, were measured by the dynamic photo-elastic method when the resonators were vibrating in each SRF. Thereafter, vibration modes of those resonators were estimated by the experimental data of stress distributions. We find that the vibration mode of the 80-mum resonator had a simple mechanical standing wave on the y' direction and the vibration mode of the 150-mum resonator was combined with a shearing mode in the SRF vibration. From the experiment, we decided that vibration modes of the NS-GT cut quartz crystal resonator were composed of the longitudinal stress T(3)' belonging to the z' direction of the plate and of the shearing stress T(5)' when the plate thickness was thickened and the resonator was oscillating in the SRF. PMID:18244311

  1. Nonlocal quantum cloning via quantum dots trapped in distant cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tao; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2012-05-01

    A scheme for implementing nonlocal quantum cloning via quantum dots trapped in cavities is proposed. By modulating the parameters of the system, the optimal 1 → 2 universal quantum cloning machine, 1 → 2 phase-covariant cloning machine, and 1 → 3 economical phase-covariant cloning machine are constructed. The present scheme, which is attainable with current technology, saves two qubits compared with previous cloning machines.

  2. GT3X+ accelerometer, Yamax pedometer and SC-StepMX pedometer step count accuracy in community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Webber, Sandra C; Magill, Sheila M; Schafer, Jenessa L; Wilson, Kaylie C S

    2014-07-01

    The purpose was to compare step count accuracy of an accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X+), a mechanical pedometer (Yamax SW200), and a piezoelectric pedometer (SC-StepMX). Older adults (n = 13 with walking aids, n = 22 without; M = 81.5 years old, SD = 5.0) walked 100 m wearing the devices. Device-detected steps were compared with manually counted steps. We found no significant differences among monitors for those who walked without aids (p = .063). However, individuals who used walking aids exhibited slower gait speeds (M = 0.83 m/s, SD = 0.2) than non-walking aid users (M = 1.21 m/s, SD = 0.2, p < .001), and for them the SC-StepMX demonstrated a significantly lower percentage of error (Mdn = 1.0, interquartile range [IQR] = 0.5-2.0) than the other devices (Yamax SW200, Mdn = 68.9, IQR = 35.9-89.3; left GT3X+, Mdn = 52.0, IQR = 37.1-58.9; right GT3X+, Mdn = 51.0, IQR = 32.3-66.5; p < .05). These results support using a piezoelectric pedometer for measuring steps in older adults who use walking aids and who walk slowly.

  3. DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B -579G>T) promotor polymorphism and the susceptibility to pediatric immune thrombocytopenic purpura in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Khorshied, Mervat Mamdooh; El-Ghamrawy, Mona Kamal

    2012-12-10

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by increased platelet destruction. Although the etiology of ITP remains unclear, it is accepted that both environmental and genetic factors play an important role in the development of the disease. The present study aimed at exploring a novel molecular determinant that may influence the susceptibility and course of ITP in Egyptian children. To achieve our aim, genotyping of DNMT3B -579G>T promotor polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. The current study was conducted on 140 ITP patients and 150 age and gender matched healthy controls. The results obtained revealed that DNMT3B -579 TT homotype was significantly higher in ITP patients and conferred almost three fold increased risk of ITP (OR=3.16, 95%CI=1.73-5.79). There was no statistically significant difference between ITP patients with wild or mutant genotypes as regards their clinical or laboratory data. Furthermore, there was no statistical difference in the distribution of DNMT3B -579G>T genotypes between acute and chronic ITP patients. In conclusion, DNMT3B -579G>T promotor polymorphism represents a novel genetic risk factor for ITP but not a predictor for tendency to chronicity in pediatric ITP in Egypt.

  4. Update on the First Cloned Dog and Outlook for Canine Cloning.

    PubMed

    Jang, Goo; Lee, ByeongChun

    2015-10-01

    As man's best friend, dogs have an important position in human society. Ten years ago, we reported the first cloned dog, and his birth has raised various scientific issues, such as those related to health, reproduction, and life span. He has developed without any unique health issues. In this article, we summarize and present perspectives on canine cloning.

  5. Cloning mice and men: prohibiting the use of iPS cells for human reproductive cloning.

    PubMed

    Lo, Bernard; Parham, Lindsay; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Cedars, Marcelle; Conklin, Bruce; Fisher, Susan; Gates, Elena; Giudice, Linda; Halme, Dina Gould; Hershon, William; Kriegstein, Arnold; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Wagner, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The use of iPSCs and tetraploid complementation for human reproductive cloning would raise profound ethical objections. Professional standards and laws that ban human reproductive cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer should be revised to also forbid it by other methods, such as iPSCs via tetraploid complementation.

  6. Cloning adult animals - what is the genetic age of the clones?

    PubMed

    Yang, X; Tian, X C

    2000-01-01

    The rapid progress in cloning research along with its many ramifications will soon have a significant beneficial impact on basic research, agriculture, and biomedicine. However, for the nuclear transfer technology to reach its fullest potential, it is important to understand whether the cloning procedure can reverse cellular aging and generate clones with normal genetic and physiological age, similar to those produced from natural reproduction. Telomere shortening is believed to correlate with cellular aging both in vitro and in vivo. Telomere lengths in cells of cloned individuals thus may reflect their genetic age. However, controversies have developed over whether the eroded telomere in somatic cells used for nuclear transfer can be restored during the cloning process.

  7. Cloning of a cuticular antigen that contains multiple tandem repeats from the filarial parasite Dirofilaria immitis.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, C B; Grandea, A G; Maina, C V; Jenkins, R E; Selkirk, M E; McReynolds, L A

    1992-01-01

    An unusual antigen composed of tandemly repeated protein units was cloned from the filarial parasite Dirofilaria immitis. The antigen was initially identified by screening a lambda gt11 cDNA library with serum from dogs immunized with irradiated D. immitis third-stage larvae. DNA sequence analysis of the cDNA clone, Di5, revealed a continuous open reading frame composed of two 399-base-pair repeats arranged in tandem. Southern blot analysis of genomic D. immitis DNA showed that the gene coding for Di5 is composed of a tandem array of 25-50 copies of this same 399-base-pair repeat. Antiserum raised against recombinant Di5 protein detected a protein "ladder," from about 14 to greater than 200 kDa with steps approximately 15 kDa apart, on immunoblots of D. immitis extract. Metabolic labeling of adult parasites with [35S]methionine showed that Di5 is synthesized as a large precursor that is subsequently cleaved to produce the ladder-like array. These results suggest that the characteristic ladder is created by proteolytic cleavage of the precursor at the same site in each monomer. The Di5 antigen was localized to the cuticle and hypodermis of adult D. immitis by immunoelectron microscopy. Both male and female parasites were found to release Di5 when cultured in vitro. DNA hybridization analysis demonstrated that Di5 is a member of a gene family present in many filarial parasites that infect both animal and human populations. Images PMID:1631084

  8. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of human holocarboxylase synthetase, a gene responsible for biotin dependency

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Y.; Aoki, Y.; Ishida, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS) catalyzes biotin incorporation into various carboxylases that require biotin as a prosthetic group. They are acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid synthesis; pyruvate carboxylase, a key enzyme of gluconeogenesis; propionyl-CoA carboxylase and 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase, enzymes involved in amino acid catabolism. HCS is therefore involved in various metabolic processes and is a key enzyme for biotin utilization by mammalian cells. Deficiency of HCS in man is known to cause biotin-responsive multiple carboxylase deficiency. Isolation of cDNA clones for the enzyme is essential to understand HCS and its deficiency at the molecular level. We purified bovine liver HCS and sequenced its proteolytic peptides. Degenerative oligonucleotide primers were synthesized from the two peptide sequences and used to amplify a putative HCS cDNA fragment from human liver by PCR. Using the amplified DNA fragment as a probe, we screened {lambda}gt10 human liver cDNA library and isolated 12 positive clones. The isolated cDNAs encoded a protein of 726 amino acids with molecular mass of 80,759. The protein contained several sequences identical or similar to those of peptides derived from the bovine liver HCS. The predicted protein had a homologous region with BirA which acts as both a biotin-[acetyl-CoA-carboxylase] ligase and a biotin repressor in E. coli, suggesting a functional relationship between the two proteins. We expressed the protein using pET3 a vector in E. coli (BL21 strain) and raised antiserum against the expressed protein. The antiserum immunoprecipitated HCS activities of human lymphoblasts and bovine liver. A one-base deletion and a missense mutation were found in cells from siblings with HCS deficiency. The human HCS gene was assigned to chromosome 21, region 21q22.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis.

  9. Developmental expression and molecular cloning of REMP, a novel retinal epithelial membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Philp, N; Chu, P; Pan, T C; Zhang, R Z; Chu, M L; Stark, K; Boettiger, D; Yoon, H; Kieber-Emmons, T

    1995-07-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), like other transport epithelia, has a polarized distribution of membrane and cytoskeletal proteins. The establishment of a polarized phenotype is an essential step in the differentiation of the RPE and the development and maintenance of visual function. Using a monoclonal antibody (MAb 3C4) we have identified a novel membrane protein that is uniquely expressed in chick RPE. We have referred to this protein as REMP for retinal epithelial membrane protein. In these studies we characterized the expression and distribution of this protein during embryonic development and determined its primary structure by cDNA cloning. The developmental expression of REMP was examined by immunocytochemical localization. REMP was first detected in the chick RPE at Embryonic Day 5 (E5) in both apical and basolateral membranes. By E14 the distribution of REMP was restricted to the basolateral surface of the RPE cells. Biochemical fractionation and surface labeling of RPE cells suggested that REMP was an integral protein. The gene encoding REMP was isolated from an E15 chick RPE cDNA library, cloned into lambda gt11, and screened with MAb 3C4. The cDNA was sequenced and found to contain one 1350-bp open reading frame encoding for a 450-amino-acid protein. The deduced amino-acid sequence of REMP shares 32.9% identity with MCT1, a monocarboxylate transporter (Garcia, Goldstein, Pathak, Anderson, and Brown, Cell, 76, 865-873, 1994). By Northern blot analysis, REMP mRNA was detected only in RPE cells. There was an increase in the expression REMP transcript during development but when RPE cells were grown in primary culture the expression of REMP was turned off. The unique expression of REMP in the RPE in vivo would suggest a role for this protein in development and maintenance of normal retinal function.

  10. Pre-weaning performance and health of pigs born to cloned (fetal cell derived) swine versus non-cloned swine.

    PubMed

    Martin, M; Adams, C; Wiseman, B

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the pre-weaning performance of pigs derived from cloned versus non-cloned parents. Five cloned gilts and one cloned boar were used to produce five litters of pigs. One of five cloned females and the cloned boar were derived from two genetically unmanipulated fetal fibroblast cell lines. The remaining female clones were derived from a fetal fibroblast cell line in which random insertion of a alpha-1,3-galactosyltransferase gene targeting construct had occurred. Fetal cell lines had similar genetic backgrounds and were derived from three different fetuses in three different litters. Five litters of pigs were also generated from matings between two non-cloned boars and five non-cloned gilts. The mean gestation length, mean litter size, mean birth and weaning weights for male and female pigs were similar for litters derived from cloned parents versus non-cloned parents. The proportions of pigs born live and pigs that survived to weaning were also similar for pigs born to cloned as compared to non-cloned parents. In summary, matings between cloned swine derived from fetal fibroblast cell lines yielded litters of pigs that were similar in the number born, piglet birth weight and perinatal and pre-weaning mortality to litters produced by non-cloned swine.

  11. Benefits and problems with cloning animals.

    PubMed

    Smith, L C; Bordignon, V; Babkine, M; Fecteau, G; Keefer, C

    2000-12-01

    Animal cloning is becoming a useful technique for producing transgenic farm animals and is likely to be used to produce clones from valuable adults. Other applications will also undoubtedly be discovered in the near future, such as for preserving endangered breeds and species. Although cloning promises great advantages for commerce and research alike, its outcome is not always certain due to high pregnancy losses and high morbidity and mortality during the neonatal period. Research into the mechanisms involved in the reprogramming of the nucleus is being conducted throughout the world in an attempt to better understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in correcting these problems. Although the cause of these anomalies remains mostly unknown, similar phenotypes have been observed in calves derived through in vitro fertilization, suggesting that culture conditions are involved in these phenomena. In the meantime, veterinarians and theriogenologists have an important role to play in improving the efficiency of cloning by finding treatments to assure normal gestation to term and to develop preventative and curative care for cloned neonates.

  12. Tissue-specific expression and cDNA cloning of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-associated polypeptide N

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, G.; Amara, S.G.; Lerner, M.R. )

    1988-07-01

    Sera from some patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other autoimmune diseases have antibodies against nuclear antigens. An example is anti-Sm sera, which recognize proteins associated with small nuclear RNA molecules (small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) particles). In this paper anti-Sm sera were used to probe immunoblots of various rat tissues. A previously unidentified M{sub r} 28,000 polypeptide was recognized by these anti-Sm sera. This polypeptide, referred to as N, is expressed in a tissue-specific manner, being most abundant in rat brain, less so in heart, and undetectable in the other tissues examined. Immunoprecipitation experiments using antibodies directed against the cap structure of small nuclear RNAs have demonstrated that N is a snRNP-associated polypeptide. Anti-Sm serum was also used to isolate a partial cDNA clone ({lambda}rb91) from a rat brain phage {lambda}gt11 cDNA expression library. A longer cDNA clone was obtained by rescreening the library with {lambda}rb91. In vitro transcription and subsequent translation of this subcloned, longer insert (pGMA2) resulted in a protein product with the same electrophoretic and immunological properties as N, confirming that pGMA2 encodes N. The tissue distribution of N and the involvement of snRNP particles in nuclear pre-mRNA processing may imply a role for N in tissue-specific pre-mRNA splicing.

  13. Molecular cloning, encoding sequence, and expression of vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J F; Kahn, J S; Esteban, M

    1986-01-01

    A rabbit poxvirus genomic library contained within the expression vector lambda gt11 was screened with polyclonal antiserum prepared against vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase)-I enzyme. Five positive phage clones containing from 0.72- to 2.5-kilobase-pair (kbp) inserts expressed a beta-galactosidase fusion protein that was reactive by immunoblotting with the NTPase-I antibody. Hybridization analysis allowed the location of this gene within the vaccinia HindIIID restriction fragment. From the known nucleotide sequence of the 16-kbp vaccinia HindIIID fragment, we identified a region that contains a 1896-base open reading frame coding for a 631-amino acid protein. Analysis of the complete sequence revealed a highly basic protein, with hydrophilic COOH and NH2 termini, various hydrophobic domains, and no significant homology to other known proteins. Translational studies demonstrate that NTPase-I belongs to a late class of viral genes. This protein is highly conserved among Orthopoxviruses. Images PMID:3025846

  14. Cloning and substrate specificity of a human phenol UDP-glucuronosyltransferase expressed in COS-7 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Harding, D; Fournel-Gigleux, S; Jackson, M R; Burchell, B

    1988-01-01

    A rat kidney phenol UDP-glucuronosyltransferase cDNA was used to isolate a human liver phenol UDP-glucuronosyltransferase cDNA by screening of a human liver cDNA library in the expression vector lambda gt11. The 2.4-kilobase cDNA contained an open reading frame of 1593 base pairs coding for a protein of 531 residues. The human liver cDNA was subcloned into the vector pKCRH2. Transfection of this recombinant plasmid into COS-7 cells allowed the expression of a protein of approximately 55 kDa. The enzyme synthesized was a glycoprotein, as indicated by a reduction in molecular mass of approximately 3 kDa after biosynthesis in the presence of tunicamycin. The expressed enzyme rapidly catalyzed the glucuronidation of 1-naphthol, 4-methylumbelliferone, and 4-nitrophenol. The use of a related series of simple phenols provided an outline description of the substituent restrictions imposed upon the phenolic structures accepted as substrates. The glucuronidation of testosterone, androsterone, and estrone was not catalyzed by this cloned UDP-glucuronosyltransferase. Images PMID:3141926

  15. Cloning and sequencing of a calcium-binding protein regulated by cyclic AMP in the thyroid.

    PubMed Central

    Lefort, A; Lecocq, R; Libert, F; Lamy, F; Swillens, S; Vassart, G; Dumont, J E

    1989-01-01

    p24 is a thyroid protein (Mr 24,000) identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis on the basis that its synthesis and phosphorylation are up-regulated by thyrotropin and cyclic AMP agonists. p24 cDNA was cloned from a lambda gt11 cDNA library using a polyclonal antibody raised against the protein recovered from a Western blot spot. The encoded polypeptide (189 residues) displays a putative target-site for phosphorylation by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase and belongs to the superfamily of proteins binding Ca2+ through 'EF hand' domains. It presents four such domains of which two agree closely with the consensus. The ability of p24 to bind Ca2+ has been directly confirmed on Western blots. p24 was detected in many tissues including the salivary glands, the lung and the brain. The ubiquitous nature of p24, together with its regulatory and sequence characteristics suggest that it constitutes an important target common to the cyclic AMP and Ca2+-phosphatidylinositol cascades. Images PMID:2540953

  16. Cloning and sequence analysis of candidate human natural killer-enhancing factor genes

    SciTech Connect

    Shau, H.; Butterfield, L.H.; Chiu, R.; Kim, A.

    1994-12-31

    A cytosol factor from human red blood cells enhances natural killer (NK) activity. This factor, termed NK-enhancing factor (NKEF), is a protein of 44000 M{sub r} consisting of two subunits of equal size linked by disulfide bonds. NKEF is expressed in the NK-sensitive erythroleukemic cell line K562. Using an antibody specific for NKEF as a probe for immunoblot screening, we isolated several clones from a {lambda}gt11 cDNA library of K562. Additional subcloning and sequencing revealed that the candidate NKEF cDNAs fell into one of two categories of closely related but non-identical genes, referred to as NKEF A and B. They are 88% identical in amino acid sequence and 71% identical in nucleotide sequence. Southern blot analysis suggests that there are two to three NKEF family members in the genome. Analysis of predicted amino acid sequences indicates that both NKEF A and B are cytosol proteins with several phosphorylation sites each, but that they have no glycosylation sites. They are significantly homologous to several other proteins from a wide variety of organisms ranging from prokaryotes to mammals, especially with regard to several well-conserved motifs within the amino acid sequences. The biological functions of these proteins in other species are mostly unknown, but some of them were reported to be induced by oxidative stress. Therefore, as well as for immunoregulation of NK activity, NKEF may be important for cells in coping with oxidative insults. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Cloning and characterization of a potato StAN11 gene involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis regulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wang; Wang, Bing; Wang, Man; Chen, Min; Yin, Jing-Ming; Kaleri, Ghullam Murtaza; Zhang, Rui-Jie; Zuo, Tie-Niu; You, Xiong; Yang, Qing

    2014-04-01

    Anthocyanins are a class of products of plant secondary metabolism and are responsible for tubers color in potato. The biosynthesis of anthocyanins is a complex biological process, in which multiple genes are involved including structural genes and regulatory genes. In this study, StAN11, a WD40-repeat gene, was cloned from potato cultivar Chieftain (Solanum tuberosum L.). StAN11 (HQ599506) contained no intron and its open reading frame (ORF) was 1,029 bp long, encoding a putative protein of 342 amino acids. In order to verify its role in anthocyanin biosynthesis, StAN11 was inserted behind the CaMV-35S promoter of pCMBIA1304 and the recombination vector was introduced into the potato cultivar Désirée plants by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The color of transgenic tuber skin was significantly deepened, compared to the wild-type control, which was highly consistent with the accumulation of anthocyanin and expression of StAN11 in transgenic lines tuber skin. Further analysis on the expression of Flavonone-3-hydroxylase (F3H), Dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR), Anthocyanidin synthase (ANS), and Flavonoid 3-O-glucosyl transferase (3GT) in transgenic plants revealed that only DFR was upregulated. This result suggested that StAN11 regulated anthocyanin biosynthesis in potato by controlling DFR expression and accumulation of anthocyanin could be increased through overexpression of StAN11 in the tubers with the genetic background of anthocyanin biosynthesis. PMID:24304603

  18. Molecular cloning, encoding sequence, and expression of vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase gene.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J F; Kahn, J S; Esteban, M

    1986-12-01

    A rabbit poxvirus genomic library contained within the expression vector lambda gt11 was screened with polyclonal antiserum prepared against vaccinia virus nucleic acid-dependent nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase)-I enzyme. Five positive phage clones containing from 0.72- to 2.5-kilobase-pair (kbp) inserts expressed a beta-galactosidase fusion protein that was reactive by immunoblotting with the NTPase-I antibody. Hybridization analysis allowed the location of this gene within the vaccinia HindIIID restriction fragment. From the known nucleotide sequence of the 16-kbp vaccinia HindIIID fragment, we identified a region that contains a 1896-base open reading frame coding for a 631-amino acid protein. Analysis of the complete sequence revealed a highly basic protein, with hydrophilic COOH and NH2 termini, various hydrophobic domains, and no significant homology to other known proteins. Translational studies demonstrate that NTPase-I belongs to a late class of viral genes. This protein is highly conserved among Orthopoxviruses.

  19. Cloning quantum entanglement in arbitrary dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Karpov, E.; Navez, P.; Cerf, N.J.

    2005-10-15

    We have found a quantum cloning machine that optimally duplicates the entanglement of a pair of d-dimensional quantum systems prepared in an arbitrary isotropic state. It maximizes the entanglement of formation contained in the two copies of any maximally entangled input state, while preserving the separability of unentangled input states. Moreover, it cannot increase the entanglement of formation of isotropic states. For large d, the entanglement of formation of each clone tends to one-half the entanglement of the input state, which corresponds to a classical behavior. Finally, we investigate a local entanglement cloner, which yields entangled clones with one-fourth the input entanglement in the large-d limit.

  20. Bounds for state-dependent quantum cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Han Yongjian; Zhang Yongsheng; Guo Guangcan

    2002-11-01

    Due to the no-cloning theorem, the unknown quantum state can only be cloned approximately or exactly with some probability. There are two types of cloners: universal and state-dependent cloner. The optimal universal cloner has been found and can be viewed as a special state-dependent quantum cloner that has no information about the states. In this paper, we investigate the state-dependent cloning when the state set contains more than two states. We get some bounds of the global fidelity for these processes. This method is not dependent on the number of the states contained in the state set. It is also independent of the numbers of copying.

  1. Human reproductive cloning and reasons for deprivation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, D A

    2008-08-01

    Human reproductive cloning provides the possibility of genetically related children for persons for whom present technologies are ineffective. I argue that the desire for genetically related children is not, by itself, a sufficient reason to engage in human reproductive cloning. I show this by arguing that the value underlying the desire for genetically related children implies a tension between the parent and the future child. This tension stems from an instance of a deprivation and violates a general principle of reasons for deprivation. Alternative considerations, such as a right to procreative autonomy, do not appear helpful in making the case for human reproductive cloning merely on the basis of the desire for genetically related children.

  2. Bac clones generated from sheared dna

    SciTech Connect

    Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Vessere, Gery M.; Shu, Chung Li; Hoskins,Roger A.; Abad, Jose P.; de Pablos, Beatriz; Villasante, Alfredo; deJong, Pieter J.

    2006-08-09

    BAC libraries generated from restriction-digested genomic DNA display representational bias and lack some sequences. To facilitate completion of genome projects, procedures have been developed to create BACs from DNA physically sheared to create fragments extending up to 200kb. The DNA fragments were repaired to create blunt ends and ligated to a new BAC vector. This approach has been tested by generating BAC libraries from Drosophila DNA, with insert lengths of 50 kb to 150 kb. The libraries lack chimeric clone problems as determined by mapping paired BAC-end sequences of one library to the D. melanogaster genome sequence. The utility of ''sheared'' libraries was demonstrated by closure of a previous clone gap and by isolation of clones from telomeric regions, which were notably absent from previous Drosophila BAC libraries.

  3. Therapeutic cloning: from consequences to contradiction.

    PubMed

    Coors, Marilyn

    2002-06-01

    The British Parliament legalized therapeutic cloning in December 2000 despite opposition from the European Union. The watershed event in Parliament's move was the active and unprecedented government support for the generation and destruction of human embryonic life merely as a means of medical advancement. This article contends that the utilitarian analysis of this procedure is necessary to identify the real world risks of therapeutic cloning but insufficient to identify the breach of defensible ethical limits that this procedure represents. A value-oriented approach to Kantian ethics demonstrates that the utilitarian endorsement of therapeutic cloning entails a contradiction of the necessity of human vulnerability and a faulty valuation of the human embryo. The concern is that a narrow utilitarian focus ultimately commodifies human embryonic life and preferences outcomes as the sole determinant of moral value.

  4. Human cloning: three mistakes and an alternative.

    PubMed

    Baylis, Françoise

    2002-06-01

    The current debate on the ethics of cloning humans is both uninspired and uninspiring. In large measure this is because of mistakes that permeate the discourse, including the mistake of thinking that cloning technology is strictly a reproductive technology when it is used to create whole beings. As a result, the challenge this technology represents regarding our understanding of ourselves and the species to which we belong typically is inappropriately downplayed or exaggerated. This has meant that important (albeit disquieting) societal issues and species-type concerns have not been fully explored. This paper, intended as a corrective, suggests that we take an alternate view of human cloning as both an enhancement and a reproductive technology. This proposed shift in the framework for analysis counters the current narrow framing of the issues and introduces new questions about the prospect of modifying the species.

  5. Cloning for human reproduction: one American perspective.

    PubMed

    Chester, R

    2001-09-01

    The author, an American law professor, believes that whole-body cloning of adult humans will be possible in the near future. He does not believe the procedure should be banned when used as a form of assisted reproduction, but that it should be regulated by the government to ensure proper testing and application. After raising a number of scientific, ethical, religious and legal issues, Professor Chester addresses parentage in light of both old and new concepts of the 'family.' Finally, he focuses on the problem of women as surrogate mothers of clones, arguing in the process that the surrogate, having no real genetic tie to the clone, would have less of a claim to parentage than at least some of the surrogates currently gestating foetuses.

  6. 27 CFR 9.175 - Dos Rios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.175 Dos Rios. (a... is located in northern Mendocino County, California, at the confluence of the Eel River and the Middle Fork of the Eel River. The area's boundaries are defined as follows— (1) Beginning in...

  7. "DOS for Managers." Management Training Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marion County Schools, Fairmont, WV.

    A plan is provided for a lesson on disk operating systems (DOS) for managers. Twenty-five lesson objectives are listed, followed by suggestions for learning activities and special resources. In the presentation section, key points and content are provided for 25 instructional topics that correspond to the 25 lesson objectives. The topics are as…

  8. Cloning and chromosomal assignment of a human cDNA encoding a T cell- and natural killer cell-specific trypsin-like serine protease.

    PubMed Central

    Gershenfeld, H K; Hershberger, R J; Shows, T B; Weissman, I L

    1988-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a human T cell- and natural killer cell-specific serine protease was obtained by screening a phage lambda gt10 cDNA library from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes with the mouse Hanukah factor cDNA clone. In an RNA blot-hybridization analysis, this human Hanukah factor cDNA hybridized with a 1.3-kilobase band in allogeneic-stimulated cytotoxic T cells and the Jurkat cell line, but this transcript was not detectable in normal muscle, liver, tonsil, or thymus. By dot-blot hybridization, this cDNA hybridized with RNA from three cytolytic T-cell clones and three noncytolytic T-cell clones grown in vitro as well as with purified CD16+ natural killer cells and CD3+, CD16- T-cell large granular lymphocytes from peripheral blood lymphocytes (CD = cluster designation). The nucleotide sequence of this cDNA clone encodes a predicted serine protease of 262 amino acids. The predicted protein has a 22-amino acid presegment, a 6-amino acid prosegment, and an active enzyme of 234 amino acids with a calculated unglycosylated molecular weight of 25,820. The active enzyme is 71% and 77% similar to the mouse sequence at the amino acid and DNA level, respectively. The human and mouse sequences conserve the active site residues of serine proteases--the trypsin-specific Asp-189 and all 10 cysteine residues. The gene for the human Hanukah factor serine protease is located on human chromosome 5. We propose that this trypsin-like serine protease may function as a common component necessary for lysis of target cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Images PMID:3257574

  9. [MRSA clones identified in outpatient dermatology clinics].

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Shino; Ito, Teruyo; Misawa, Shigeki; Yoshiike, Takashi; Oguri, Toyoko; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    To know the characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains disseminating through the Japanese community, we have determined types of Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements, Multi-Locus Sequence Typing (MLST), and carriages of four exotoxin genes (toxic-shock syndrome toxin, Panton-Valentine Leukocidine, and exfoliative toxins a and b) using 54 MRSA strains isolated from outpatients attending dermatology clinics at the four university hospitals of Juntendo University. Ten clonal complexes and 12 SCCmec types have been identified. As a result, more than 15 MRSA clones that were defined by the combination of genotype and SCCmec type, were identified. Among them, Clonal Complex (CC) 5-type IIa SCCmec strains were the most major (16 strains). In contrast to the fact that CC5- type IIa SCCmec strains known as a hospital-associated MRSA clone in Japan carried toxic-shock syndrome toxin gene (tst), only 2 of 16 strains have been shown to carry tst. Thirty-eight (70.4%) of isolates belonged to the clones distinct from the CC5-type IIa SCCmec strains. Among them, CC8 strains were major (12 strains), which contained 9 tst-positive CC8-type IVl SCCmec clones and a CC8-type IVa SCCmec strain carrying the Panton Valentine Leukocidin gene (lukS, F-PV). Clones related to impetigo were also identified: 7 exfoliative toxin b (etb) -positive clones, CC89-type IIa SCCmec and CC89-type V SCCmec strains; and 2 exfoliative toxin a (eta) -positive CC121-type V SCCmec strains. Other clones were as follows: CC1-type IVa SCCmec, CC8-type I SCCmec, CC81-type IVg SCCmec, CC97-type IVc SCCmec, CC91-type IVa SCCmec, CC59-type IVg SCCmec, CC45-type IIn SCCmec, CC89-SCCmec nontypeable, and CC8-type IVm, novel subtype of type IV SCCmec were identified in this study. Our data showed that many novel MRSA clones have emerged in the community. PMID:25764806

  10. (New hosts and vectors for genome cloning)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-28

    The main goal of our project has been to develop new bacterial hosts and vectors for cloning human DNA in the bacterium E. coli. Because human DNA is both A+T-rich and highly repetitive, many human sequences are unstable as inserts in vectors that are propagated in bacteria. During the past eight months, we have (1) assessed what fraction of human DNA inserts in cosmid vectors is unstable, (2) developed new host strains that help stabilize unstable sequence features of human DNA, and (3) begun the development of a new generation of cloning vectors that should permit the more stable maintenance and more facile analysis of large human DNA inserts.

  11. Cloning of Gaussian states by linear optics

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares, Stefano; Paris, Matteo G. A.; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2006-06-15

    We analyze in details a scheme for cloning of Gaussian states based on linear optical components and homodyne detection recently demonstrated by Andersen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 240503 (2005)]. The input-output fidelity is evaluated for a generic (pure or mixed) Gaussian state taking into account the effect of nonunit quantum efficiency and unbalanced mode mixing. In addition, since in most quantum information protocols the covariance matrix of the set of input states is not perfectly known, we evaluate the average cloning fidelity for classes of Gaussian states with the degree of squeezing and the number of thermal photons being only partially known.

  12. Cloning of the complete Mycoplasma pneumoniae genome.

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, R; Herrmann, R

    1989-01-01

    The complete genome of Mycoplasma pneumoniae was cloned in an ordered library consisting of 34 overlapping or adjacent cosmids, one plasmid and two lambda phages. The genome size was determined by adding up the sizes of either the individual unique EcoRI restriction fragments of the gene bank or of the XhoI fragments of genomic M. pneumoniae DNA. The values from these calculations, 835 and 849 kbp, are in good agreement. An XhoI restriction map was constructed by identifying adjacent DNA fragments by probing with selected cosmid clones. Images PMID:2506532

  13. Photonic Programmable Tele-Cloning Network.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Chen, Ming-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The concept of quantum teleportation allows an unknown quantum states to be broadcasted and processed in a distributed quantum network. The quantum information injected into the network can be diluted to distant multi-copies by quantum cloning and processed by arbitrary quantum logic gates which were programed in advance in the network quantum state. A quantum network combines simultaneously these fundamental quantum functions could lead to new intriguing applications. Here we propose a photonic programmable telecloning network based on a four-photon interferometer. The photonic network serves as quantum gate, quantum cloning and quantum teleportation and features experimental advantage of high brightness by photon recycling. PMID:27353838

  14. Photonic Programmable Tele-Cloning Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Chen, Ming-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    The concept of quantum teleportation allows an unknown quantum states to be broadcasted and processed in a distributed quantum network. The quantum information injected into the network can be diluted to distant multi-copies by quantum cloning and processed by arbitrary quantum logic gates which were programed in advance in the network quantum state. A quantum network combines simultaneously these fundamental quantum functions could lead to new intriguing applications. Here we propose a photonic programmable telecloning network based on a four-photon interferometer. The photonic network serves as quantum gate, quantum cloning and quantum teleportation and features experimental advantage of high brightness by photon recycling.

  15. Photonic Programmable Tele-Cloning Network.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Chen, Ming-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The concept of quantum teleportation allows an unknown quantum states to be broadcasted and processed in a distributed quantum network. The quantum information injected into the network can be diluted to distant multi-copies by quantum cloning and processed by arbitrary quantum logic gates which were programed in advance in the network quantum state. A quantum network combines simultaneously these fundamental quantum functions could lead to new intriguing applications. Here we propose a photonic programmable telecloning network based on a four-photon interferometer. The photonic network serves as quantum gate, quantum cloning and quantum teleportation and features experimental advantage of high brightness by photon recycling.

  16. Photonic Programmable Tele-Cloning Network

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Chen, Ming-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The concept of quantum teleportation allows an unknown quantum states to be broadcasted and processed in a distributed quantum network. The quantum information injected into the network can be diluted to distant multi-copies by quantum cloning and processed by arbitrary quantum logic gates which were programed in advance in the network quantum state. A quantum network combines simultaneously these fundamental quantum functions could lead to new intriguing applications. Here we propose a photonic programmable telecloning network based on a four-photon interferometer. The photonic network serves as quantum gate, quantum cloning and quantum teleportation and features experimental advantage of high brightness by photon recycling. PMID:27353838

  17. Whole genome comparison of donor and cloned dogs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak-Min; Cho, Yun Sung; Kim, Hyunmin; Jho, Sungwoong; Son, Bongjun; Choi, Joung Yoon; Kim, Sangsoo; Lee, Byeong Chun; Bhak, Jong; Jang, Goo

    2013-01-01

    Cloning is a process that produces genetically identical organisms. However, the genomic degree of genetic resemblance in clones needs to be determined. In this report, the genomes of a cloned dog and its donor were compared. Compared with a human monozygotic twin, the genome of the cloned dog showed little difference from the genome of the nuclear donor dog in terms of single nucleotide variations, chromosomal instability, and telomere lengths. These findings suggest that cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer produced an almost identical genome. The whole genome sequence data of donor and cloned dogs can provide a resource for further investigations on epigenetic contributions in phenotypic differences. PMID:24141358

  18. Whole genome comparison of donor and cloned dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak-Min; Cho, Yun Sung; Kim, Hyunmin; Jho, Sungwoong; Son, Bongjun; Choi, Joung Yoon; Kim, Sangsoo; Lee, Byeong Chun; Bhak, Jong; Jang, Goo

    2013-01-01

    Cloning is a process that produces genetically identical organisms. However, the genomic degree of genetic resemblance in clones needs to be determined. In this report, the genomes of a cloned dog and its donor were compared. Compared with a human monozygotic twin, the genome of the cloned dog showed little difference from the genome of the nuclear donor dog in terms of single nucleotide variations, chromosomal instability, and telomere lengths. These findings suggest that cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer produced an almost identical genome. The whole genome sequence data of donor and cloned dogs can provide a resource for further investigations on epigenetic contributions in phenotypic differences. PMID:24141358

  19. Cloning and characterization of a highly reiterated 5.8-kilobase pair nucleolar EcoRI DNA fragment found in Novikoff hepatoma ascites cells.

    PubMed

    Parker, D L; Busch, H; Rothblum, L I

    1981-02-17

    The DNA of Novikoff hepatoma ascites cells was found to contain a 3.6-megadalton EcoRI restriction fragment, referred to as EcoRI fragment A (Parker et al., 1979). C0t analyses demonstrated an enrichment of fragment A sequences in Novikoff hepatoma genome relative to normal rat liver DNA. This fragment was cloned in lambda gtWES to determine its molecular structure and sequence organization. The DNA from a positive clone was labeled by nick translation and hybridized to a Southern blot of EcoRI digested Novikoff DNA. Distinct hybrids formed with the region corresponding to fragment A. The greater degree of hybridization to the nucleolar fraction suggested a nucleolar enrichment of fragment A. Fragment A has a PstI site approximately 300 base pairs from one terminus which was used to generate mono-5'-32P-labeled fragments. The larger PStI subfragment, 5500 base pairs, labeled at a single terminus, was used to evolve a restriction enzyme map. The 300 base pair fragment was partially sequenced, revealing the presence of a repetitive sequence "island", TT(GTCT)8(GAAT)5G-. C0t analysis, utilizing the purified clone as a probe, confirmed the enrichment of fragment A sequences in the tumor relative to the normal rat liver control.

  20. Social behavior and kin discrimination in a mixed group of cloned and non cloned heifers (Bos taurus).

    PubMed

    Coulon, M; Baudoin, C; Abdi, H; Heyman, Y; Deputte, B L

    2010-12-01

    For more than ten years, reproductive biotechnologies using somatic cell nuclear transfer have made possible the production of cloned animals in various domestic and laboratory species. The influence of the cloning process on offspring characteristics has been studied in various developmental aspects, however, it has not yet been documented in detail for behavioral traits. Behavioral studies of cloned animals have failed to show clear inter-individual differences associated with the cloning process. Preliminary results showed that clones favor each other's company. Preferential social interactions were observed among cloned heifers from the same donor in a mixed herd that also included cloned heifers and control heifers produced by artificial insemination (AI). These results suggest behavioral differences between cloned and non-cloned animals and similarities between clones from the same donor. The aim of the present study was to replicate and to extend these previous results and to study behavioral and cognitive mechanisms of this preferential grouping. We studied a group composed of five cloned heifers derived from the same donor cow, two cloned heifers derived from another donor cow, and AI heifers. Cloned heifers from the same donor were more spatially associated and interacted more between themselves than with heifers derived from another donor or with the AI individuals. This pattern indicates a possible kin discrimination in clones. To study this process, we performed an experiment (using an instrumental conditioning procedure with food reward) of visual discrimination between images of heads of familiar heifers, either related to the subjects or not. The results showed that all subjects (AI and cloned heifers) discriminated between images of familiar cloned heifers produced from the same donor and images of familiar unrelated heifers. Cattle discriminated well between images and used morphological similarities characteristic of cloned related heifers. Our

  1. Cloning: can it be good for us? An overview of cloning technology and its moral implications.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, K

    2001-01-01

    Adequate answers to moral questions about cloning require a working knowledge of the science and technology involved, both present and anticipated. This essay presents an overview of the current state of somatic cell nuclear transfer technology (SCNT), the type of cloning that now permits whole organism reproduction from adult DNA. This essay explains the basic science and technology of SCNT and explores its potential uses. Next, this essay notes remaining scientific obstacles and unanswered moral questions that must be resolved before SCNT can be used for human reproduction. Attention is given to aspects related to cloning for therapeutic and research purposes.

  2. Comparing quantum cloning: A Fisher-information perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hongting; Luo, Shunlong; Li, Nan; Chang, Lina

    2013-10-01

    Perfect cloning of an unknown quantum state is impossible. Approximate cloning, which is optimal in various senses, has been found in many cases. Paradigmatic examples are Wootters-Zurek cloning and universal cloning. These cloning machines aim at optimal cloning of the full quantum states. However, in practice, what is important and relevant may only involve partial information in quantum states, rather than quantum states themselves. For example, signals are often encoded as parameters in quantum states, whose information content is well synthesized by quantum Fisher information. This raises the basic issue of evaluating the information transferring capability (e.g., distributing quantum Fisher information) of quantum cloning. We assess and compare Wootters-Zurek cloning and universal cloning from this perspective and show that, on average, Wootters-Zurek cloning performs better than universal cloning for the phase (as well as amplitude) parameter, although they are incomparable individually, and universal cloning has many advantages over Wootters-Zurek cloning in other contexts. Physical insights and related issues are further discussed.

  3. Molecular cloning of cDNA for the B beta subunit of Xenopus fibrinogen, the product of a coordinately-regulated gene family.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, A; Shepard, A R; Moser, D R; Roberts, L R; Holland, L J

    1991-02-01

    Fibrinogen, the principal blood-clotting protein, is made up of three different subunits synthesized in the liver. In vitro administration of glucocorticoids to liver cells from the frog Xenopus laevis causes a dramatic increase in fibrinogen synthesis. Investigations of molecular mechanisms underlying this hormonal stimulation at the mRNA level require cDNA clones complementary to the mRNAs coding for the three fibrinogen subunits, called A alpha, B beta, and gamma. We describe here the isolation and characterization of cDNA clones for the B beta subunit of Xenopus fibrinogen. cDNA libraries in both plasmid (pBR322) and phage (lambda gt10) cloning vectors were constructed from frog liver mRNA and screened with a rat B beta cDNA. Clones thus isolated hybridized to two Xenopus liver mRNAs 2500 and 1800 bases long, the previously-determined sizes for B beta mRNAs. The identity of the plasmid clone B beta-27 was confirmed by hybridization-selection of complementary mRNA which translated in vitro into the B beta polypeptide, as determined by size and susceptibility to thrombin cleavage. lambda/B beta 10, a clone representing nearly all of the 2500-base B beta mRNA, was isolated from the phage cDNA library. The 3'-end of this clone includes a polyadenylation signal about 20 residues upstream of a stretch of 34 adenosine residues, which probably represents the 3'-poly(A) tail of the messenger RNA. lambda/B beta 10 lacks only 20 nucleotides of full-length B beta mRNA at the 5'-end and there is one major start site of transcription. The 2500-base B beta mRNA has a 700-base extension at the 3'-end that is not present in the 1800-base mRNA. The Xenopus laevis genome contains two or three genes for the B beta fibrinogen subunit. Using the cDNA clone as a probe, B beta mRNA was shown to be induced at least 20-fold by glucocorticoid treatment of purified parenchymal cells of Xenopus liver maintained in primary culture. PMID:2050271

  4. Isolation and expression of a cDNA clone encoding an Alternaria alternata Alt a 1 subunit.

    PubMed

    De Vouge, M W; Thaker, A J; Curran, I H; Zhang, L; Muradia, G; Rode, H; Vijay, H M

    1996-12-01

    Alternaria alternata is recognized as an important source of fungal aeroallergens. Alt a 1, the major allergen of this mold, is a dimer of disulfide-linked subunits that migrate in SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions at apparent M(r)s of 14,500 and 16,000. IgE antibodies to this protein are present in the sera of >90% of A. alternata-sensitive individuals. Previous studies from this laboratory showed that the N-termini twenty amino acids of the purified subunits are nearly identical. We now report the isolation of clones from an A. alternata (strain 34-016) cDNA library constructed in lambda(gt)11, using rabbit IgG antiserum against partially purified Alt a 1. One of nineteen clones selected from screens totalling 305,000 pfu (rb51) was sequenced, and determined to harbor an insert of 660 bp. An in-frame open reading frame within the cloned insert encodes a peptide of M(r) 16,960 that bears no significant homology to known allergens or proteins. The size of the rb51 transcript was determined to be approximately 0.7 kb by Northern analysis of A. alternata total RNA. The largely hydrophobic N-terminal region of the peptide contains an alpha-helical domain and other features characteristic of membrane targeting or secretory signals. The peptide sequence downstream of this region matches previously sequenced Alt a 1 N-terminal from two independent sources at 17 of 20, and 24 of 26 positions. Recombinant Alt a 1 expressed as a secreted protein in Pichia pastoris exists as a dimer in conditioned medium, as shown by immunoblotting under nonreducing conditions. Recombinant Alt a 1, like the natural allergen in A. alternata extracts, is also reactive with serum IgE from A. alternata-sensitive individuals.

  5. Computerized Adaptive Testing with Item Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glas, Cees A. W.; van der Linden, Wim J.

    2003-01-01

    Developed a multilevel item response (IRT) model that allows for differences between the distributions of item parameters of families of item clones. Results from simulation studies based on an item pool from the Law School Admission Test illustrate the accuracy of the item pool calibration and adaptive testing procedures based on the model. (SLD)

  6. Cloning: Learning to Replay the Genetic Tape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, David J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes how plants can be produced by cloning by using tissue culture methods to mass-produce rare native prairie plants and trying to transfer some of the genetic characteristics of native grasses into cultivated cereals. The experiment was conducted at South Dakota State University. (HM)

  7. Genetic Crossing vs Cloning by Computer Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Subinay

    We perform Monte Carlo simulation using Penna's bit string model, and compare the process of asexual reproduction by cloning with that by genetic crossover. We find them to be comparable as regards survival of a species, and also if a natural disaster is simulated.

  8. Experimental eavesdropping based on optimal quantum cloning.

    PubMed

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Lemr, Karel; Cernoch, Antonín; Soubusta, Jan; Miranowicz, Adam

    2013-04-26

    The security of quantum cryptography is guaranteed by the no-cloning theorem, which implies that an eavesdropper copying transmitted qubits in unknown states causes their disturbance. Nevertheless, in real cryptographic systems some level of disturbance has to be allowed to cover, e.g., transmission losses. An eavesdropper can attack such systems by replacing a noisy channel by a better one and by performing approximate cloning of transmitted qubits which disturb them but below the noise level assumed by legitimate users. We experimentally demonstrate such symmetric individual eavesdropping on the quantum key distribution protocols of Bennett and Brassard (BB84) and the trine-state spherical code of Renes (R04) with two-level probes prepared using a recently developed photonic multifunctional quantum cloner [Lemr et al., Phys. Rev. A 85, 050307(R) (2012)]. We demonstrated that our optimal cloning device with high-success rate makes the eavesdropping possible by hiding it in usual transmission losses. We believe that this experiment can stimulate the quest for other operational applications of quantum cloning.

  9. Experimental eavesdropping based on optimal quantum cloning.

    PubMed

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Lemr, Karel; Cernoch, Antonín; Soubusta, Jan; Miranowicz, Adam

    2013-04-26

    The security of quantum cryptography is guaranteed by the no-cloning theorem, which implies that an eavesdropper copying transmitted qubits in unknown states causes their disturbance. Nevertheless, in real cryptographic systems some level of disturbance has to be allowed to cover, e.g., transmission losses. An eavesdropper can attack such systems by replacing a noisy channel by a better one and by performing approximate cloning of transmitted qubits which disturb them but below the noise level assumed by legitimate users. We experimentally demonstrate such symmetric individual eavesdropping on the quantum key distribution protocols of Bennett and Brassard (BB84) and the trine-state spherical code of Renes (R04) with two-level probes prepared using a recently developed photonic multifunctional quantum cloner [Lemr et al., Phys. Rev. A 85, 050307(R) (2012)]. We demonstrated that our optimal cloning device with high-success rate makes the eavesdropping possible by hiding it in usual transmission losses. We believe that this experiment can stimulate the quest for other operational applications of quantum cloning. PMID:23679725

  10. Robert Koch: the grandfather of cloning?

    PubMed

    Weiss, Robin A

    2005-11-18

    This year marks the centenary of Robert Koch's Nobel Prize for discovering the cause of tuberculosis. Koch was also the first scientist to isolate the anthrax and cholera microbes. Yet perhaps one of his greatest contributions to biology is the least appreciated: his method for propagating individual colonies of bacteria on plates, a technique that came to be called cloning.

  11. Implications of cloning technique for reproductive medicine.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Takumi; Palermo, Gianpiero D

    2004-05-01

    The birth of Dolly following the transfer of mammary gland nuclei into enucleated eggs established cloning as a feasible technique in mammals, but the moral implications and high incidence of developmental abnormalities associated with cloning have induced the majority of countries to legislate against its use with human gametes. Because of such negative connotations, restrictive political reactions could jeopardize the therapeutic and scientific promise that certain types of cloning may present. For example, in addition to its proposed use as a way of generating stem cells, the basic technique of nuclear transplantation has proven useful in other ways, including its application to immature eggs as a new approach to the prevention of the aneuploidy common in older women, and for some recent advances in preimplantation genetic diagnosis. Thus, while attempts at reproductive cloning in man would seem premature and even dangerous at present, this field will require rational rather than emotional reactions as a basis for legislation if the therapeutic promise of stem cell research and the experimental potential of nuclear transplantation techniques are to be fully realized.

  12. Introduction to cloning by nuclear transplantation.

    PubMed

    Galli, Cesare; Lagutina, Irina; Lazzari, Giovanna

    2003-01-01

    Despite its long history, the cloning of animals by nuclear transplantation is going through a "renaissance" after the birth of Dolly. The amount of work and achievements obtained in the last seven years are probably greater than those obtained in half a century of research. However, the principal obstacles outlined years ago with the work on somatic cell cloning in amphybia, are all still there in mammals. The importance of somatic cell nuclear transfer is, without any doubt, beyond the scope of replicating superior animal genotypes. It is an invaluable experimental tool to address fundamental scientific issues such as nuclear potency, cell de-differentiation, chromatin structure and function, epigenetics, and genome manipulation. For these reasons the importance of cloning is not for what it can achieve but for the technical support it can provide to biomedical research and in particular to the study of epigenetics, cancer and stem cell biology, cell therapy and regenerative medicine. In this introductory paper we will summarize the intellectual and technical framework of cloning animals by nuclear transfer that still remains the only absolute way of judging the success of the procedure. Together with the achievements of the recent past we will mention the very last developments and the many questions that still remain open. Current research efforts are expected to provide some answers and certainly new questions.

  13. Death of Dolly marks cloning milestone.

    PubMed

    Williams, Nigel

    2003-03-18

    Dolly the cloned sheep marked both an icon of scientific possibility and a potential ethical nightmare. Researchers in related fields of stem cell research need to learn the lessons and the right vocabulary if they are to make progress in their fields.

  14. [Placental developmental defects in cloned mammalian animals].

    PubMed

    Ao, Zheng; Liu, Dewu; Cai, Gengyuan; Wu, Zhenfang; Li, Zicong

    2016-05-01

    The cloning technique, also called somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), has been successfully established and gradually applied to various mammalian species. However, the developmental rate of SCNT mammalian embryos is very low, usually at 1% to 5%, which limits the application of SCNT. Placental developmental defects are considered as the main cause of SCNT embryo development inhibition. Almost all of SCNT-derived mammalian placentas exhibit various abnormalities, such as placental hyperplasia, vascular defects and umbilical cord malformation. Mechanistically, these abnormalities result from failure of establishment of correct epigenetic modification in the trophectoderm genome, which leads to erroneous expression of important genes for placenta development-related, particularly imprinted genes. Consequently, aberrant imprinted gene expression gives rise to placental morphologic abnormalities and functional defects, therefore decreases developmental competence of cloned embryos. Currently, although numerous methods that can improve the developmental ability of SCNT-derived embryos have been reported, most of them are unable to substantially enhance the success rate of SCNT due to failure to eliminate the placental development defects. In this review, we summarize placental abnormalities and imprinted gene expression in mammalian cloning, and propose directions for the future research aiming to improve the cloning efficiency. PMID:27232488

  15. Genetic crossing vs cloning by computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, S.

    1997-06-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulation using Penna`s bit string model, and compare the process of asexual reproduction by cloning with that by genetic crossover. We find them to be comparable as regards survival of a species, and also if a natural disaster is simulated.

  16. Cloned mice derived from somatic cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, K; Ohi, S; Ando, A; Kobayashi, M; Sato, K

    2000-12-01

    In 1997, a cloned sheep "Dolly" was produced by nuclear transfer of somatic cell. The first birth of cloned mice derived from some somatic cells were succeeded in 1998. At present, it is shown that somatic cells, cumulus cells, fibroblasts and Sertoli cells can be used to the study of cloned animal as nuclear donor. In this study investigation was designed to compare with efficiency on the production of cloned embryos by using the microinjection and the electrofusion methods for nuclear transfer. Oocyte enucleation was performed with a micromanipulator. The oocyte was held by holding pipette, and was enucleated using a beveled pipette. Microinjection method: Cell's nucleus injection was carried out by piezo-micromanipulator. Cytochalasin B treated cumulus cell was aspirated into a injection pipette, and was broken its plasma membrane using the injection pipette. Then, the cumulus cell was injected into the enucleated ooplasm directly. Electrofusion method: The cell was aspirated into a beveled pipette, and then an aspirated cell was inserted into perivitelline space. Then, the pair of enucleated oocyte and cell was fused using electrical cell fusion apparatus. The reconstituted embryos were activated after nuclear transfer using St2+. Reconstituted embryos had been produced by the microinjection showed the embryonic development to over 8-cell stages. But, the rate of fragmentation of reconstituted embryos by the microinjection showed a little high rate in comparison with the electrofusion. When some reconstituted embryos by the microinjection were transplanted to pseudopregnant females' oviduct, 9 fetuses were observed at 14 days post coitum. PMID:11329940

  17. Death of Dolly marks cloning milestone.

    PubMed

    Williams, Nigel

    2003-03-18

    Dolly the cloned sheep marked both an icon of scientific possibility and a potential ethical nightmare. Researchers in related fields of stem cell research need to learn the lessons and the right vocabulary if they are to make progress in their fields. PMID:12646139

  18. Dolly, the so-called clone.

    PubMed

    Mittwoch, Ursula

    2003-02-01

    The word 'clone' is in the forefront of scientific terms that are familiar to the general public. But what exactly does it mean? Suprisingly, there is no simple answer, for different scientists are using the term for different entities. PMID:12586944

  19. Cloning of the gene for the surface array protein of Aeromonas salmonicida and evidence linking loss of expression with genetic deletion.

    PubMed Central

    Belland, R J; Trust, T J

    1987-01-01

    A gene bank of DNA from the fish pathogenic bacterium Aeromonas salmonicida was constructed in the bacteriophage lambda gt11. Phage lambda gt11/10G, a recombinant carrying a 4.0-kilobase fragment of A. salmonicida DNA, was found to express the surface array protein (A protein) in Escherichia coli. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that the protein expressed from the cloned gene had a subunit molecular weight of 49,000, which was identical to that of subunits in the native assembled A layer. Genomic Southern analysis showed that the gene coding for this predominant cellular protein was in a single copy on the chromosome and was conserved among a wide range of A. salmonicida strains with different phenotypic characteristics and isolated from diverse geographic locations, fish species, and means of pathogenesis. Results of genomic blotting experiments also showed that loss of expression of the A layer resulting from growth at 30 degrees C was accompanied by genetic rearrangement in which N-terminal sequences of the gene for A protein were lost by deletion. Images PMID:3040676

  20. A 3D Tomographic Model of Asia Based on Pn and P Travel Times from GT Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. J.; Begnaud, M. L.; Ballard, S.; Phillips, W. S.; Hipp, J. R.; Steck, L. K.; Rowe, C. A.; Chang, M. C.

    2008-12-01

    the major discontinuities. Due to the highly non-linear nature of our ray tracer, we are forced to substantially damp the inversion in order to converge on a reasonable model. We apply both horizontal and vertical regularization to produce smooth models with velocity feature scale lengths that are consistent with established conventions for mantle velocity structure. To investigate the importance of using true 3D rays for the inversion, as opposed to proxy rays through a reference model, we compare our model and ray paths with the model and ray paths resulting from inverting the same data set using rays traced through a 1D reference model. Finally, we validate the model by performing several inversions with random portions of the data set omitted and then testing the predictive capability of the model against those portions compared with AK135. We test the location performance of the model by relocating the GT events using our model and using AK135. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04- 94AL85000.

  1. Melanocortin-induced PKA activation inhibits AMPK activity via ERK-1/2 and LKB-1 in hypothalamic GT1-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Damm, Ellen; Buech, Thomas R H; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH)-induced activation of the melanocortin-4 receptor in hypothalamic neurons increases energy expenditure and inhibits food intake. Active hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently been reported to enhance food intake, and in vivo experiments suggested that intrahypothalamic injection of melanocortins decreased food intake due to the inhibition of AMPK activity. However, it is not clear whether α-MSH affects AMPK via direct intracellular signaling cascades or if the release of paracrine factors is involved. Here, we used a murine, hypothalamic cell line (GT1-7 cells) and monitored AMPK phosphorylation at Thr(172), which has been suggested to increase AMPK activity. We found that α-MSH dephosphorylated AMPK at Thr(172) and consequently decreased phosphorylation of the established AMPK substrate acetyl-coenzyme A-carboxylase at Ser(79). Inhibitory effects of α-MSH on AMPK were blocked by specific inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA) or ERK-1/2, pointing to an important role of both kinases in this process. Because α-MSH-induced activation of ERK-1/2 was blunted by PKA inhibitors, we propose that ERK-1/2 serves as a link between PKA and AMPK in GT1-7 cells. Furthermore, down-regulation of liver kinase B-1, but not inhibition of calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase-β or TGFβ-activated kinase-1 decreased basal phosphorylation of AMPK and its dephosphorylation induced by α-MSH. Thus, we propose that α-MSH inhibits AMPK activity via a linear pathway, including PKA, ERK-1/2, and liver kinase B-1 in GT1-7 cells. Given the importance of the melanocortin system in the formation of adipositas, detailed knowledge about this pathway might help to develop drugs targeting obesity.

  2. Kisspeptin induces expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor in GnRH-producing GT1-7 cells overexpressing G protein-coupled receptor 54.

    PubMed

    Sukhbaatar, Unurjargal; Kanasaki, Haruhiko; Mijiddorj, Tselmeg; Oride, Aki; Miyazaki, Kohji

    2013-12-01

    Kisspeptin signaling through its receptor is crucial for many reproductive functions. However, the molecular mechanisms and biomedical significance of the regulation of GnRH neurons by kisspeptin have not been adequately elucidated. In the present study, we found that kisspeptin increases GnRH receptor (GnRHR) expression in a GnRH-producing cell line (GT1-7). Because cellular activity of G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) and GnRHR was limited in GT1-7 cells, we overexpressed these receptors to clarify receptor function. Using luciferase reporter constructs, the activity of both the serum response element (Sre) promoter, a target for extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) response element (Cre) promoter were increased by kisspeptin. Although GnRH increased Sre promoter activity, the Cre promoter was not significantly activated by GnRH. Kisspeptin, but not GnRH, increased cAMP accumulation in these cells. Kisspeptin also increased the transcriptional activity of GnRHR; however, the effect of GnRH on the GnRHR promoter was limited and not significant. Transfection of GT1-7 cells with constitutively active MEK kinase (MEKK) and protein kinase A (PKA) increased GnRHR expression. In addition, GnRHR expression was further increased by co-overexpression of MEKK and PKA. The Cre promoter, but not the Sre promoter, was also further activated by co-overexpression of MEKK and PKA. GnRH significantly increased the activity of the GnRHR promoter in the presence of cAMP. The present findings suggest that kisspeptin is a potent stimulator of GnRHR expression in GnRH-producing neurons in association with ERK and the cAMP/PKA pathways. PMID:24055558

  3. A novel NF1 frame-shift mutation (c.702_703delGT) in a Chinese family with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Cai, S P; Fan, N; Chen, J; Xia, Z L; Wang, Y; Zhou, X M; Yin, Y; Wen, T L; Xia, Q J; Liu, X Y; Wang, H Y

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the clinical features of a Chinese pedigree with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and to identify mutations in the NF1 gene. In this three-generation family containing 8 members, 5 had been diagnosed with NF1 and the others were asymptomatic. All members of the family underwent complete medical examinations. Molecular genetic analyses were performed on all subjects included in the study. All exons of NF1 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction, sequenced, and compared with a reference database. Possible changes in function of the protein induced by amino acid variants were predicted by bioinformatic analysis. In this family, the 5 patients presented different clinical phenotypes, but all manifested typical café-au-lait macules. One novel frame-shift mutation, c.702_703delGT, in exon 7 of NF1 was identified in all affected family members, but not in the unaffected family members or in 102 normal controls. This mutation generates a premature stop codon at amino acid position 720. Additionally, a synonymous mutation c.702 G>A was found in 3 family members, including 2 affected and 1 normal individuals. In conclusion, our study suggests that a novel c.702_703delGT frame-shift mutation in NF1 is likely to be responsible for the pathogenesis of NF1 in this family. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that a c.702_703delGT mutation has been identified in a family with neurofibromatosis type 1.

  4. High-power ({gt}0.9 W cw) diffraction-limited semiconductor laser based on a fiber Bragg grating external cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Cornwell, D.M. , Jr.; Thomas, H.J.

    1997-02-01

    We have developed a high-power ({gt}0.9 W cw) diffraction-limited semiconductor laser based on a tapered semiconductor optical amplifier using a fiber Bragg grating in an external cavity configuration. Frequency-selective feedback from the fiber grating is injected into the amplifier via direct butt coupling through a single mode fiber, resulting in a spectrally stable and narrow ({lt}0.3 nm) high-power laser for solid-state laser pumping, laser remote sensing, and optical communications. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. GT-repeat polymorphism in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter and the risk of carotid atherosclerosis related to arsenic exposure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Arsenic is a strong stimulus of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression in experimental studies in response to oxidative stress caused by a stimulus. A functional GT-repeat polymorphism in the HO-1 gene promoter was inversely correlated to the development of coronary artery disease in diabetics and development of restenosis following angioplasty in patients. The role of this potential vascular protective factor in carotid atherosclerosis remains unclear. We previously reported a graded association of arsenic exposure in drinking water with an increased risk of carotid atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the relationship between HO-1 genetic polymorphism and the risk of atherosclerosis related to arsenic. Methods Three-hundred and sixty-seven participants with an indication of carotid atherosclerosis and an additional 420 participants without the indication, which served as the controls, from two arsenic exposure areas in Taiwan, a low arsenic-exposed Lanyang cohort and a high arsenic-exposed LMN cohort, were studied. Carotid atherosclerosis was evaluated using a duplex ultrasonographic assessment of the extracranial carotid arteries. Allelic variants of (GT)n repeats in the 5'-flanking region of the HO-1 gene were identified and grouped into a short (S) allele (< 27 repeats) and long (L) allele (≥ 27 repeats). The association of atherosclerosis and the HO-1 genetic variants was assessed by a logistic regression analysis, adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors. Results Analysis results showed that arsenic's effect on carotid atherosclerosis differed between carriers of the class S allele (OR 1.39; 95% CI 0.86-2.25; p = 0.181) and non-carriers (OR 2.65; 95% CI 1.03-6.82; p = 0.044) in the high-exposure LMN cohort. At arsenic exposure levels exceeding 750 μg/L, difference in OR estimates between class S allele carriers and non-carriers was borderline significant (p = 0.051). In contrast, no such results were found in the low-exposure Lanyang

  6. Comparison of computer codes (CE-THERM, FRAP-T5, GT3-FLECHT, and TRUMP-FLECHT) with data from the NRU-LOCA thermal hydraulic tests

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, C.L.; Rausch, W.N.; Hesson, G.M.

    1981-07-01

    The LOCA Simulation Program in the NRU reactor is the first set of experiments to provide data on the behavior of full-length, nuclear-heated PWR fuel bundles during the heatup, reflood, and quench phases of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). This paper compares the temperature time histories of 4 experimental test cases with 4 computer codes: CE-THERM, FRAP-T5, GT3-FLECHT, and TRUMP-FLECHT. The preliminary comparisons between prediction and experiment show that the state-of-the art fuel codes have large uncertainties and are not necessarily conservative in predicting peak temperatures, turn around times, and bundle quench times.

  7. Molecular cloning of a cDNA from Brassica napus L. for a homologue of acyl-CoA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Hills, M J; Dann, R; Lydiate, D; Sharpe, A

    1994-08-01

    A cDNA encoding an acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) homologue has been cloned from a lambda gt11 library made from mRNA isolated from developing seeds of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.). The derived amino acid sequence reveals a protein 92 amino acids in length which is highly conserved when compared with ACBP sequences from yeast, cow, man and fruit fly. Southern blot analysis of Brassica napus genomic DNA revealed the presence of 6 genes, 3 derived from the Brassica rapa parent and 3 from Brassica oleracea. Northern blot analysis showed that ACBP genes are expressed strongly in developing embryo, flowers and cotyledons of seedlings and to a lesser extent in leaves and roots.

  8. Generalization of continuous-variable quantum cloning with linear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Zehui; Guo, Juan; Gao, Jiangrui

    2006-05-01

    We propose an asymmetric quantum cloning scheme. Based on the proposal and experiment by Andersen [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 240503 (2005)], we generalize it to two asymmetric cases: quantum cloning with asymmetry between output clones and between quadrature variables. These optical implementations also employ linear elements and homodyne detection only. Finally, we also compare the utility of symmetric and asymmetric cloning in an analysis of a squeezed-state quantum key distribution protocol and find that the asymmetric one is more advantageous.

  9. Creating humans: an ethical study of human cloning.

    PubMed

    Haman, K H

    2001-01-01

    What does it mean to clone an individual? A clone is created directly from the cells of one individual through several different mechanisms. The most popular of these mechanisms, which created Dolly, is Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer. It is this type that is predicted to accomplish the feat of cloning a human. With the increasing amount of technology readily available the ethical questions regarding human cloning must be addressed.

  10. Molecular cloning of the flavin-containing monooxygenase (form II) cDNA from adult human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Lomri, N; Gu, Q; Cashman, J R

    1992-01-01

    Complementary DNA (cDNA) clones encoding the adult human liver flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO; dimethylaniline N-oxidase, EC 1.14.13.8) were isolated from lambda gt10 and lambda gt11 libraries. The cDNA libraries were screened with three synthetic 36-mer oligonucleotide probes derived from the nucleic acid sequence of the pig liver FMO cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence for the adult human liver FMO was quite distinct from the pig liver FMO, and adult human liver FMO was designated form II (HLFMO II). The full-length cDNA sequence of HLFMO II [2119 base pairs (bp)] had an open reading frame of 1599 nucleotides, which encoded a 533-amino acid protein of Mr 59,179, a 5'-noncoding region of 136 nucleotides and a 3'-noncoding region of 369 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) tail. The deduced amino acid sequence of HLFMO II had 80% similarity with the rabbit liver FMO II but only a 52%, 55%, and 53% amino acid similarity with the rabbit liver (form I), the pig liver (form I), and fetal human liver (form I) FMOs, respectively. RNA analysis of adult human liver RNA showed that there was one HLFMO II mRNA species. Analysis of genomic DNA indicated that HLFMO II was the product of a single gene. These results indicated that the deduced amino acid sequence for HLFMO II contained highly conserved residues and suggested that FMO enzymes were closely related and, undoubtedly, derived from the same ancestral gene. Images PMID:1542660

  11. IVA cloning: A single-tube universal cloning system exploiting bacterial In Vivo Assembly.

    PubMed

    García-Nafría, Javier; Watson, Jake F; Greger, Ingo H

    2016-06-06

    In vivo homologous recombination holds the potential for optimal molecular cloning, however, current strategies require specialised bacterial strains or laborious protocols. Here, we exploit a recA-independent recombination pathway, present in widespread laboratory E.coli strains, to develop IVA (In Vivo Assembly) cloning. This system eliminates the need for enzymatic assembly and reduces all molecular cloning procedures to a single-tube, single-step PCR, performed in <2 hours from setup to transformation. Unlike other methods, IVA is a complete system, and offers significant advantages over alternative methods for all cloning procedures (insertions, deletions, site-directed mutagenesis and sub-cloning). Significantly, IVA allows unprecedented simplification of complex cloning procedures: five simultaneous modifications of any kind, multi-fragment assembly and library construction are performed in approximately half the time of current protocols, still in a single-step fashion. This system is efficient, seamless and sequence-independent, and requires no special kits, enzymes or proprietary bacteria, which will allow its immediate adoption by the academic and industrial molecular biology community.

  12. Comparison of cloned and non-cloned Holstein heifers in muscle contractile and metabolic characteristics.

    PubMed

    Jurie, C; Picard, B; Heyman, Y; Cassar-Malek, I; Chavatte-Palmer, P; Richard, C; Hocquette, J F

    2009-02-01

    Muscle contractile and metabolic characteristics were studied on nine cloned and eight non-cloned (control) heifers. The animals were submitted to repeated biopsies of the semitendinosus (ST) muscle at the ages of 8, 12, 18 and 24 months. The contractile type was determined from the proportion of the different myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms separated by electrophoresis. Glycolytic metabolism was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, and oxidative metabolism was assessed by isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), cytochrome-c oxidase (COX) and β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD) activities. In cloned heifers at 8 months of age, there was a greater proportion of MyHC I (slow oxidative isoform) and MyHC IIa (fast oxido-glycolytic isoform), a lower proportion of MyHC IIx (fast glycolytic isoform), greater COX and HAD activity and a lower LDH/ICDH ratio compared with control heifers. Thus, young cloned heifers had slower muscle types associated with a more oxidative muscular metabolism than control heifers. From 12 months of age onwards, no significant differences were observed between cloned and control heifers. A delay in muscle differentiation and maturation in cloned heifers is hypothesised and discussed.

  13. IVA cloning: A single-tube universal cloning system exploiting bacterial In Vivo Assembly

    PubMed Central

    García-Nafría, Javier; Watson, Jake F.; Greger, Ingo H.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo homologous recombination holds the potential for optimal molecular cloning, however, current strategies require specialised bacterial strains or laborious protocols. Here, we exploit a recA-independent recombination pathway, present in widespread laboratory E.coli strains, to develop IVA (In Vivo Assembly) cloning. This system eliminates the need for enzymatic assembly and reduces all molecular cloning procedures to a single-tube, single-step PCR, performed in <2 hours from setup to transformation. Unlike other methods, IVA is a complete system, and offers significant advantages over alternative methods for all cloning procedures (insertions, deletions, site-directed mutagenesis and sub-cloning). Significantly, IVA allows unprecedented simplification of complex cloning procedures: five simultaneous modifications of any kind, multi-fragment assembly and library construction are performed in approximately half the time of current protocols, still in a single-step fashion. This system is efficient, seamless and sequence-independent, and requires no special kits, enzymes or proprietary bacteria, which will allow its immediate adoption by the academic and industrial molecular biology community. PMID:27264908

  14. IVA cloning: A single-tube universal cloning system exploiting bacterial In Vivo Assembly.

    PubMed

    García-Nafría, Javier; Watson, Jake F; Greger, Ingo H

    2016-01-01

    In vivo homologous recombination holds the potential for optimal molecular cloning, however, current strategies require specialised bacterial strains or laborious protocols. Here, we exploit a recA-independent recombination pathway, present in widespread laboratory E.coli strains, to develop IVA (In Vivo Assembly) cloning. This system eliminates the need for enzymatic assembly and reduces all molecular cloning procedures to a single-tube, single-step PCR, performed in <2 hours from setup to transformation. Unlike other methods, IVA is a complete system, and offers significant advantages over alternative methods for all cloning procedures (insertions, deletions, site-directed mutagenesis and sub-cloning). Significantly, IVA allows unprecedented simplification of complex cloning procedures: five simultaneous modifications of any kind, multi-fragment assembly and library construction are performed in approximately half the time of current protocols, still in a single-step fashion. This system is efficient, seamless and sequence-independent, and requires no special kits, enzymes or proprietary bacteria, which will allow its immediate adoption by the academic and industrial molecular biology community. PMID:27264908

  15. DOS: the discrete-ordinates system. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoades, W. A.; Emmett, M. B.

    1982-09-01

    The Discrete Ordinates System determines the flux of neutrons or photons due either to fixed sources specified by the user or to sources generated by particle interaction with the problem materials. It also determines numerous secondary results which depend upon flux. Criticality searches can be performed. Numerous input, output, and file manipulation facilities are provided. The DOS driver program reads the problem specification from an input file and calls various program modules into execution as specified by the input file.

  16. DIGLIB. PC-DOS Graphics Subroutine Library

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, H.R.

    1989-02-01

    DIGLIB is a collection of general graphics subroutines. It was designed to be small, reasonably fast, device-independent, and compatible with DEC-supplied operating systems for VAXes, PDP-11s, and LSI-11s, and the DOS operating system for IBM PCs and IBM-compatible machines. DIGLIB/VMS runs on the VAX and MicroVAX series of computers under VMS. The software is readily usable by casual programmers for two-dimensional plotting.

  17. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences—1990 update

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1991-01-01

    An updated list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome over the past year (1990) is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising both gene and pseudogene sequences. PMID:2041801

  18. Distribution of quantum Fisher information in asymmetric cloning machines

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xing; Yao, Yao; Zhou, Lei-Ming; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2014-01-01

    An unknown quantum state cannot be copied and broadcast freely due to the no-cloning theorem. Approximate cloning schemes have been proposed to achieve the optimal cloning characterized by the maximal fidelity between the original and its copies. Here, from the perspective of quantum Fisher information (QFI), we investigate the distribution of QFI in asymmetric cloning machines which produce two nonidentical copies. As one might expect, improving the QFI of one copy results in decreasing the QFI of the other copy. It is perhaps also unsurprising that asymmetric phase-covariant cloning outperforms universal cloning in distributing QFI since a priori information of the input state has been utilized. However, interesting results appear when we compare the distributabilities of fidelity (which quantifies the full information of quantum states), and QFI (which only captures the information of relevant parameters) in asymmetric cloning machines. Unlike the results of fidelity, where the distributability of symmetric cloning is always optimal for any d-dimensional cloning, we find that any asymmetric cloning outperforms symmetric cloning on the distribution of QFI for d ≤ 18, whereas some but not all asymmetric cloning strategies could be worse than symmetric ones when d > 18. PMID:25484234

  19. Optimal cloning for finite distributions of coherent states

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, P.T.; Ralph, T.C.; Dolinska, A.

    2004-04-01

    We derive optimal cloning limits for finite Gaussian distributions of coherent states and describe techniques for achieving them. We discuss the relation of these limits to state estimation and the no-cloning limit in teleportation. A qualitatively different cloning limit is derived for a single-quadrature Gaussian quantum cloner.

  20. Technological Literacy and Human Cloning. Resources in Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how technology educators can deal with advances in human genetics, specifically, cloning. Includes a definition and history of cloning, discusses its benefits, and looks at social concerns and arguments for and against human cloning. Includes classroom activities and websites. (Contains 10 references.) (JOW)

  1. Phenotype of cloned mice: development, behavior, and physiology.

    PubMed

    Tamashiro, Kellie L K; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Akutsu, Hidenori; Woods, Stephen C; Kondo, Sylvia; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo; Sakai, Randall R

    2003-11-01

    Cloning technology has potential to be a valuable tool in basic research, clinical medicine, and agriculture. However, it is critical to determine the consequences of this technique in resulting offspring before widespread use of the technology. Mammalian cloning using somatic cells was first demonstrated in sheep in 1997 and since then has been extended to a number of other species. We examined development, behavior, physiology, and longevity in B6C3F1 female mice cloned from adult cumulus cells. Control mice were naturally fertilized embryos subjected to the same in vitro manipulation and culture conditions as clone embryos. Clones attained developmental milestones similar to controls. Activity level, motor ability and coordination, and learning and memory skills of cloned mice were comparable with controls. Interestingly, clones gained more body weight than controls during adulthood. Increased body weight was attributable to higher body fat and was associated with hyperleptinemia and hyperinsulinemia indicating that cloned mice are obese. Cloned mice were not hyperphagic as adults and had hypersensitive leptin and melanocortin signaling systems. Longevity of cloned mice was comparable with that reported by the National Institute on Aging and the causes of death were typical for this strain of mouse. These studies represent the first comprehensive set of data to characterize cloned mice and provide critical information about the long-term effects of somatic cell cloning. PMID:14610260

  2. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1988-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:3368330

  3. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1989-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:2654889

  4. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1990-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:2333227

  5. A comprehensive list of cloned human DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Schmidtke, Jörg; Cooper, David N.

    1987-01-01

    A list of DNA sequences cloned from the human genome is presented. Intended as a guide to clone availability, this list includes published reports of cDNA, genomic and synthetic clones comprising gene and pseudogene sequences, uncharacterised DNA segments and repetitive DNA elements. PMID:3575113

  6. From DOS to UNIX: An independent's experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hepguler, G.; Meehan, D.N.

    1993-06-01

    Union Pacific Resources Co. (UPRC) is a large independent operator with about 100 petroleum engineers. UPRC has a reasonably sophisticated PC network with many hundreds of PC's connected by several local area network (LAN) servers. Essentially all engineers have a 386-based PC on their desks with access to a host of software packages, peripheral devices, and mainframe computers, Many engineers have acquired 486-based PC's. UPRC's solution has involved migrating from a DOS-based platform on individual users' desks to UNIX workstations. Dozens of UNIX workstations are networked; some are on the desk', while others are located in central locations. Reservoir simulation, geostatistical modeling, image processing, and log analysis are now done exclusively on the UNIX workstations. Numerous DOS-based programs, however, have not yet been migrated into the UNIX environment. This paper describes the topography of both PC DOS and UNIX workstations networks in UPRC and examines the flow of information in each network configuration to identify differences. The successes and failures of various techniques for providing access to both platforms are presented.

  7. Comparison of milk produced by cows cloned by nuclear transfer with milk from non-cloned cows.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Marie K; Lucey, John A; Govindasamy-Lucey, Selvarani; Pace, Marvin M; Bishop, Michael D

    2003-01-01

    Cloning technologies, including embryo splitting and nuclear transfer, were introduced into dairy cattle breeding in the early 1980s. With the recent worldwide attention on the cloning of sheep ("Dolly") and cows ("Gene"), the potential food safety concerns for food products derived from cloned animals needs to be addressed. There has been no study of the composition of milk produced by cloned cows. In this preliminary study, we evaluated the composition of milk from 15 lactating non-embryonic cell cloned cows and six non-cloned lactating cows over a single season. The cloned cows came from five unique genetic lines and three distinct breeds. Milk samples were analyzed for total solids, fat, fatty acid profile, lactose, protein and compared to non-cloned and literature values. Gross chemical composition of milk from cloned cows was similar to that of the non-cloned cows and literature values. Our results lead us to conclude that there are no obvious differences in milk composition produced from cloned cows compared to non-cloned cows. PMID:14588139

  8. Beta 1-adrenergic regulation of the GT1 gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal cell lines: stimulation of GnRH release via receptors positively coupled to adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Martínez de la Escalera, G; Choi, A L; Weiner, R I

    1992-09-01

    The release of GnRH evoked by norepinephrine (NE) was studied in GT1 GnRH neuronal cell lines in superfusion and static cultures. GnRH release from static cultured GT1-7 cells was stimulated by NE in a dose-dependent fashion. This effect was mimicked by the nonsubtype-selective beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol and blocked by the beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol and the beta 1-adrenergic subtype-specific antagonist CGP 20712A. However, the stimulation of GnRH release by NE was not affected by the beta 2-, alpha-, alpha 1-, or alpha 2-adrenergic antagonists ICI 118.551, phentolamine, prazosin, or yohimbine, respectively. Superfusion of GT1-1 cells with NE for 60-100 min resulted in rapid and sustained increases in GnRH secretion. The NE-stimulated GnRH release showed a higher amplitude and longer duration than the spontaneous GnRH pulses characteristic of GT1-1 cells. In parallel to the stimulation of GnRH release, NE also rapidly increased (first observed at 60 sec) the intracellular concentration of cAMP in isobutylmethylxanthine-pretreated GT1-1 and GT1-7 cells in a dose-dependent fashion. The stimulation of intracellular cAMP concentration was also mimicked by isoproterenol and blocked by propranolol and CGP 20712A. In addition, GT1 cells express beta 1- but not beta 2-adrenergic receptor mRNA, as probed by Northern blot analysis. These results demonstrate a direct stimulatory effect of NE on GnRH neurons. The pharmacological evidence and the mRNA analysis are consistent with NE acting through a beta 1-adrenergic receptor positively coupled to adenylate cyclase.

  9. A germline mutation of HRPT2/CDC73 (70 G>T) in an adolescent female with parathyroid carcinoma: first case report and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Gonzalez, Monica; Shay, Sophie; Austin, Juliana; Maceri, Dennis R; Pitukcheewanont, Pisit

    2016-09-01

    Parathyroid carcinoma is a rare cause of primary hyperparathyroidism amongst children, with only nine previously reported cases. The objective of the study was to present the first pediatric case with a germline CDC73 (formerly known as HRPT2) mutation, and to review the literature. A 14-year-old girl presented with pathologic slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). The patient was noted to have an elevated calcium level of 3.4 mmol/L (13.4 mg/dL), a parathyroid hormone (PTH) level of 1013 ng/L (1013 pg/mL), and a 3-cm palpable neck mass. Ultrasound and 99mTc-Sestamibi confirmed the suspicion of a parathyroid mass. Intraoperative findings and pathology confirmed the diagnosis of parathyroid carcinoma. Post-operative PTH decreased to 14 ng/L (14 pg/mL). Genetic testing showed a germline 70 G>T HRPT2/CDC73 mutation. This is the first case documenting a germline 70 G>T HRPT2/CDC73 gene mutation in a pediatric parathyroid carcinoma. Patients with sporadic parathyroid carcinoma may benefit from HRPT2/CDC73 gene mutation screening. PMID:27544721

  10. Cloning and joint measurements of incompatible components of spin

    SciTech Connect

    Brougham, Thomas; Andersson, Erika; Barnett, Stephen M.

    2006-06-15

    A joint measurement of two observables is a simultaneous measurement of both quantities upon the same quantum system. When two quantum-mechanical observables do not commute, then a joint measurement of these observables cannot be accomplished directly by projective measurements alone. In this paper we shall discuss the use of quantum cloning to perform a joint measurement of two components of spin associated with a qubit system. We introduce cloning schemes which are optimal with respect to this task. The cloning schemes may be thought to work by cloning two components of spin onto their outputs. We compare the proposed cloning machines to existing cloners.

  11. Conditional implementation of an asymmetrical universal quantum cloning machine

    SciTech Connect

    Filip, Radim

    2004-03-01

    We propose two feasible experimental implementations of an optimal asymmetric 1{yields}2 quantum cloning of a polarization state of photon. Both implementations are based on a partial and optimal reverse of recent conditional symmetrical quantum cloning experiments. The reversion procedure is performed only by a local measurement of one from the clones and ancilla followed by a local operation on the other clone. The local measurement consists only of a single unbalanced beam splitter followed in one output by a single-photon detector and the asymmetry of fidelities in the cloning is controlled by a reflectivity of the beam splitter.

  12. Keeping up with the cloneses--issues in human cloning.

    PubMed

    Rollin, B E

    1999-01-01

    The advent of cloning animals has created a maelstrom of social concern about the "ethical issues" associated with the possibility of cloning humans. When the "ethical concerns" are clearly examined, however, many of them turn out to be less matters of rational ethics than knee-jerk emotion, religious bias, or fear of that which is not understood. Three categories of real and spurious ethical concerns are presented and discussed: 1) that cloning is intrinsically wrong, 2) that cloning must lead to bad consequences, and 3) that cloning harms the organism generated. The need for a rational ethical framework for discussing biotechnological advances is presented and defended.

  13. Philosophical arguments for and against human reproductive cloning.

    PubMed

    Hayry, Matti

    2003-10-01

    Can philosophers come up with persuasive reasons to allow or ban human reproductive cloning? Yes. Can philosophers agree, locally and temporarily, which practices related to cloning should be condoned and which should be rejected? Some of them can. Can philosophers reproduce universally convincing arguments for or against different kinds of human cloning? No. This paper analyses some of the main arguments presented by philosophers in the cloning debate, and some of the most important objections against them. The clashes between the schools of thought suggest that philosophers cannot be trusted to provide the public authorities, or the general public, a unified, universally applicable view of the morality of human reproductive cloning.

  14. Recent progress and problems in animal cloning.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Y; Kato, Y

    2002-01-01

    It is remarkable that mammalian somatic cell nuclei can form whole individuals if they are transferred to enucleated oocytes. Advancements in nuclear transfer technology can now be applied for genetic improvement and increase of farm animals, rescue of endangered species, and assisted reproduction and tissue engineering in humans. Since July 1998, more than 200 calves have been produced by nuclear transfer of somatic cell nuclei in Japan, but half of them were stillborn or died within several months of parturition. Morphologic abnormalities have also been observed in cloned calves and embryonic stem cell-derived mice. In this review, we discuss the present situation and problems with animal cloning and the possibility for its application to human medicine.

  15. [Human cloning, as ideological construction of technology].

    PubMed

    Swolkien, O

    2001-01-01

    The article treats the issue of cloning as a part of the dominant ideology of the so-called technical progress. The author shows that the notion of "technical progress" is an ideological construction full of hidden valuation. The whole class of technicians is simply materially interested in disseminating this ideology. According to the author the so-called technical progress doesn't improve the quality of life as far as psychological satisfaction is concerned. The cult of technology is rooted in the crisis of humanistic values and civilization. It implies avoiding serious existential questions and civilization challenges. Technology itself appears in this statement only as a result of concrete conditions in concrete historical moment, but not as an independent process. Cloning can be only the contemporary answer to the collapse of the art of breeding and educating consecutive generations. It can be only the next step of the fall of western civilization or the so-called revolt of the masses.

  16. Neisseria meningitidis; clones, carriage, and disease.

    PubMed

    Read, R C

    2014-05-01

    Neisseria meningitidis, the cause of meningococcal disease, has been the subject of sophisticated molecular epidemiological investigation as a consequence of the significant public health threat posed by this organism. The use of multilocus sequence typing and whole genome sequencing classifies the organism into clonal complexes. Extensive phenotypic, genotypic and epidemiological information is available on the PubMLST website. The human nasopharynx is the sole ecological niche of this species, and carrier isolates show extensive genetic diversity as compared with hyperinvasive lineages. Horizontal gene exchange and recombinant events within the meningococcal genome during residence in the human nasopharynx result in antigenic diversity even within clonal complexes, so that individual clones may express, for example, more than one capsular polysaccharide (serogroup). Successful clones are capable of wide global dissemination, and may be associated with explosive epidemics of invasive disease. PMID:24766477

  17. Therapeutic cloning applications for organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koh, Chester J; Atala, Anthony

    2004-04-01

    A severe shortage of donor organs available for transplantation in the United States leaves patients suffering from diseased and injured organs with few treatment options. Scientists in the field of tissue engineering apply the principles of cell transplantation, material science, and engineering to construct biological substitutes that will restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. Therapeutic cloning, where the nucleus from a donor cell is transferred into an enucleated oocyte in order to extract pluripotent embryonic stem cells, offers a potentially limitless source of cells for tissue engineering applications. The present chapter reviews recent advances that have occurred in therapeutic cloning and tissue engineering and describes applications of these new technologies that may offer novel therapies for patients with end-stage organ failure. PMID:15157913

  18. U.S. consumers attitudes toward farm animal cloning.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Kathleen R; Lusk, Jayson L

    2011-10-01

    In January 2008, the United States Food and Drug Administration concluded "meat and milk from cattle, swine, and goat clones or their offspring are as safe to eat as food we eat from those species now" (U.S. FDA, 2010). However, cloning remains a very controversial topic. A web-based survey administered by Knowledge Networks was used to determine U.S. consumers' awareness of and attitudes toward meat and milk from cloned cattle. Findings reveal consumers do not differentiate much between products from cloned animals and products from non-cloned animals. Overall consumers are concerned that animal cloning is an unnatural process and that it will lead to human cloning.

  19. Ethical issues regarding human cloning: a nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Dinç, Leyla

    2003-05-01

    Advances in cloning technology and successful cloning experiments in animals raised concerns about the possibility of human cloning in recent years. Despite many objections, this is not only a possibility but also a reality. Human cloning is a scientific revolution. However, it also introduces the potential for physical and psychosocial harm to human beings. From this point of view, it raises profound ethical, social and health related concerns. Human cloning would have an impact on the practice of nursing because it could result in the creation of new physiological and psychosocial conditions that would require nursing care. The nursing profession must therefore evaluate the ethics of human cloning, in particular the potential role of nurses. This article reviews the ethical considerations of reproductive human cloning, discusses the main reasons for concern, and reflects a nursing perspective regarding this issue.

  20. Quantum partial teleportation as optimal cloning at a distance

    SciTech Connect

    Filip, Radim

    2004-05-01

    We propose a feasible scheme of conditional quantum partial teleportation of a qubit as optimal asymmetric cloning at a distance. In this scheme, Alice preserves one imperfect clone whereas other clone is teleported to Bob. Fidelities of the clones can be simply controlled by an asymmetry in Bell-state measurement. The optimality means that tightest inequality for the fidelities in the asymmetric cloning is saturated. Further we design a conditional teleportation as symmetric optimal N{yields}N+1 cloning from N Alice's replicas on single distant clone. We shortly discussed two feasible experimental implementations, first one for teleportation of polarization state of a photon and second one for teleportation of a time-bin qubit.

  1. Developing a code of ethics for human cloning.

    PubMed

    Collmann, J; Graber, G

    2000-01-01

    Under what conditions might the cloning of human beings constitute an ethical practice? A tendency exists to analyze human cloning merely as a technical procedure. As with all revolutionary technological developments, however, human cloning potentially exists in a broad social context that will both shape and be shaped by the biological techniques. Although human cloning must be subjected to technical analysis that addresses fundamental ethical questions such as its safety and efficacy, questions exist that focus our attention on broader issues. Asserting that cloning inevitably leads to undesirable consequences commits the fallacy of technological determinism and untenably separates technological and ethical evaluation. Drawing from the Report of the National Bioethics Advisory Committee and Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, we offer a draft "Code of Ethics for Human Cloning" in order to stimulate discussion about the ethics of the broader ramifications of human cloning as well as its particular technological properties.

  2. Keith's MAGIC: Cloning and the Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Wells, D N

    2013-10-01

    Abstract Professor Keith Campbell's critical contribution to the discovery that a somatic cell from an adult animal can be fully reprogrammed by oocyte factors to form a cloned individual following nuclear transfer (NT)(Wilmut et al., 1997 ) overturned a dogma concerning the reversibility of cell fate that many scientists had considered to be biologically impossible. This seminal experiment proved the totipotency of adult somatic nuclei and finally confirmed that adult cells could differentiate without irreversible changes to the genetic material.

  3. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning.

    PubMed

    2012-10-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning)," last published in Fertil Steril 2000;74:873-6.

  4. Clone history shapes Populus drought responses.

    PubMed

    Raj, Sherosha; Bräutigam, Katharina; Hamanishi, Erin T; Wilkins, Olivia; Thomas, Barb R; Schroeder, William; Mansfield, Shawn D; Plant, Aine L; Campbell, Malcolm M

    2011-07-26

    Just as animal monozygotic twins can experience different environmental conditions by being reared apart, individual genetically identical trees of the genus Populus can also be exposed to contrasting environmental conditions by being grown in different locations. As such, clonally propagated Populus trees provide an opportunity to interrogate the impact of individual environmental history on current response to environmental stimuli. To test the hypothesis that current responses to an environmental stimulus, drought, are contingent on environmental history, the transcriptome- level drought responses of three economically important hybrid genotypes-DN34 (Populus deltoides × Populus nigra), Walker [P. deltoides var. occidentalis × (Populus laurifolia × P. nigra)], and Okanese [Walker × (P. laurifolia × P. nigra)]-derived from two different locations were compared. Strikingly, differences in transcript abundance patterns in response to drought were based on differences in geographic origin of clones for two of the three genotypes. This observation was most pronounced for the genotypes with the longest time since establishment and last common propagation. Differences in genome-wide DNA methylation paralleled the transcriptome level trends, whereby the clones with the most divergent transcriptomes and clone history had the most marked differences in the extent of total DNA methylation, suggesting an epigenomic basis for the clone history-dependent transcriptome divergence. The data provide insights into the interplay between genotype and environment in the ecologically and economically important Populus genus, with implications for the industrial application of Populus trees and the evolution and persistence of these important tree species and their associated hybrids. PMID:21746919

  5. [Eros, Thanatos and a cloned child].

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, K

    2001-01-01

    The paper discusses and confirms the opinion that modern Western European culture is characterised by a high level of fear of death, which shows all features of a thanatic crisis. This is a consequence of wearing-out of culture-made means used to alleviate the fear induced by human finity. In this situation, modern societies put more and more hope in supported procreation and cloning of Homo sapiens as methods of reducing thanatic fears. PMID:11684774

  6. [Eros, Thanatos and a cloned child].

    PubMed

    Szewczyk, K

    2001-01-01

    The paper discusses and confirms the opinion that modern Western European culture is characterised by a high level of fear of death, which shows all features of a thanatic crisis. This is a consequence of wearing-out of culture-made means used to alleviate the fear induced by human finity. In this situation, modern societies put more and more hope in supported procreation and cloning of Homo sapiens as methods of reducing thanatic fears.

  7. Cloning humans? Biological, ethical, and social considerations

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    There are, in mankind, two kinds of heredity: biological and cultural. Cultural inheritance makes possible for humans what no other organism can accomplish: the cumulative transmission of experience from generation to generation. In turn, cultural inheritance leads to cultural evolution, the prevailing mode of human adaptation. For the last few millennia, humans have been adapting the environments to their genes more often than their genes to the environments. Nevertheless, natural selection persists in modern humans, both as differential mortality and as differential fertility, although its intensity may decrease in the future. More than 2,000 human diseases and abnormalities have a genetic causation. Health care and the increasing feasibility of genetic therapy will, although slowly, augment the future incidence of hereditary ailments. Germ-line gene therapy could halt this increase, but at present, it is not technically feasible. The proposal to enhance the human genetic endowment by genetic cloning of eminent individuals is not warranted. Genomes can be cloned; individuals cannot. In the future, therapeutic cloning will bring enhanced possibilities for organ transplantation, nerve cells and tissue healing, and other health benefits. PMID:26195738

  8. Emergence of clones in sexual populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neher, Richard A.; Vucelja, Marija; Mezard, Mark; Shraiman, Boris I.

    2013-01-01

    In sexual population, recombination reshuffles genetic variation and produces novel combinations of existing alleles, while selection amplifies the fittest genotypes in the population. If recombination is more rapid than selection, populations consist of a diverse mixture of many genotypes, as is observed in many populations. In the opposite regime, which is realized for example in the facultatively sexual populations that outcross in only a fraction of reproductive cycles, selection can amplify individual genotypes into large clones. Such clones emerge when the fitness advantage of some of the genotypes is large enough that they grow to a significant fraction of the population despite being broken down by recombination. The occurrence of this ‘clonal condensation’ depends, in addition to the outcrossing rate, on the heritability of fitness. Clonal condensation leads to a strong genetic heterogeneity of the population which is not adequately described by traditional population genetics measures, such as linkage disequilibrium. Here we point out the similarity between clonal condensation and the freezing transition in the random energy model of spin glasses. Guided by this analogy we explicitly calculate the probability, Y, that two individuals are genetically identical as a function of the key parameters of the model. While Y is the analog of the spin-glass order parameter, it is also closely related to rate of coalescence in population genetics: two individuals that are part of the same clone have a recent common ancestor.

  9. Handmade somatic cell cloning in cattle.

    PubMed

    Vajta, Gàbor; Lewis, Ian M; Tecirlioglu, R Tayfur

    2006-01-01

    Apart from the biological and ethical problems, technical difficulties also hamper the improvement and widespread application of somatic cell nuclear transfer (NT). Recently introduced zona-free procedures may offer a solution for the latter problem. The most radical approach of these techniques is the so-called handmade cloning (HMC). It does not require micromanipulators because the manipulations required for both enucleation and nucleus transfer are performed by hand. The HMC technique includes manual bisection of zona-free oocytes, selection of cytoplasts by staining, and the simultaneous fusion of the somatic cell with two cytoplasts to produce a cloned embryo. HMC is a rapid and efficient technique that suits large-scale NT programs. It requires less expertise and time than traditional NT methods and the cost of equipment is significantly less. Production efficiency is high and embryo quality, in terms of pregnancy rates and live births, is not compromised. Although HMC has been developed particularly for bovine NT, the technique is applicable to other species. The method may become a useful tool for both experimental and commercial somatic cell cloning because it allows for standardization of procedures and provides the possibility of automation.

  10. Cloning humans? Biological, ethical, and social considerations.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Francisco J

    2015-07-21

    There are, in mankind, two kinds of heredity: biological and cultural. Cultural inheritance makes possible for humans what no other organism can accomplish: the cumulative transmission of experience from generation to generation. In turn, cultural inheritance leads to cultural evolution, the prevailing mode of human adaptation. For the last few millennia, humans have been adapting the environments to their genes more often than their genes to the environments. Nevertheless, natural selection persists in modern humans, both as differential mortality and as differential fertility, although its intensity may decrease in the future. More than 2,000 human diseases and abnormalities have a genetic causation. Health care and the increasing feasibility of genetic therapy will, although slowly, augment the future incidence of hereditary ailments. Germ-line gene therapy could halt this increase, but at present, it is not technically feasible. The proposal to enhance the human genetic endowment by genetic cloning of eminent individuals is not warranted. Genomes can be cloned; individuals cannot. In the future, therapeutic cloning will bring enhanced possibilities for organ transplantation, nerve cells and tissue healing, and other health benefits.

  11. Tumor clone dynamics in lethal prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Suzanne; Romanel, Alessandro; Goodall, Jane; Grist, Emily; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Miranda, Susana; Prandi, Davide; Lorente, David; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Pezaro, Carmel; Omlin, Aurelius; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Flohr, Penelope; Tunariu, Nina; S de Bono, Johann; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2014-09-17

    It is unclear whether a single clone metastasizes and remains dominant over the course of lethal prostate cancer. We describe the clonal architectural heterogeneity at different stages of disease progression by sequencing serial plasma and tumor samples from 16 ERG-positive patients. By characterizing the clonality of commonly occurring deletions at 21q22, 8p21, and 10q23, we identified multiple independent clones in metastatic disease that are differentially represented in tissue and circulation. To exemplify the clinical utility of our studies, we then showed a temporal association between clinical progression and emergence of androgen receptor (AR) mutations activated by glucocorticoids in about 20% of patients progressing on abiraterone and prednisolone or dexamethasone. Resistant clones showed a complex dynamic with temporal and spatial heterogeneity, suggesting distinct mechanisms of resistance at different sites that emerged and regressed depending on treatment selection pressure. This introduces a management paradigm requiring sequential monitoring of advanced prostate cancer patients with plasma and tumor biopsies to ensure early discontinuation of agents when they become potential disease drivers.

  12. Cloning humans? Biological, ethical, and social considerations.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Francisco J

    2015-07-21

    There are, in mankind, two kinds of heredity: biological and cultural. Cultural inheritance makes possible for humans what no other organism can accomplish: the cumulative transmission of experience from generation to generation. In turn, cultural inheritance leads to cultural evolution, the prevailing mode of human adaptation. For the last few millennia, humans have been adapting the environments to their genes more often than their genes to the environments. Nevertheless, natural selection persists in modern humans, both as differential mortality and as differential fertility, although its intensity may decrease in the future. More than 2,000 human diseases and abnormalities have a genetic causation. Health care and the increasing feasibility of genetic therapy will, although slowly, augment the future incidence of hereditary ailments. Germ-line gene therapy could halt this increase, but at present, it is not technically feasible. The proposal to enhance the human genetic endowment by genetic cloning of eminent individuals is not warranted. Genomes can be cloned; individuals cannot. In the future, therapeutic cloning will bring enhanced possibilities for organ transplantation, nerve cells and tissue healing, and other health benefits. PMID:26195738

  13. Mapping genomic library clones using oligonucleotide arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Sapolsky, R.J.; Lipshutz, R.J.

    1996-05-01

    We have developed a high-density DNA probe array and accompanying biochemical and informatic methods to order clones from genomic libraries. This approach involves a series of enzymatic steps for capturing a set of short dispersed sequence markers scattered throughout a high-molecular-weight DNA. By this process, all the ambiguous sequences lying adjacent to a given Type IIS restriction site are ligated between two DNA adaptors. These markers, once amplified and labeled by PCR, can be hybridized and detected on a high-density olligonucleotide array bearing probes complementary to all possible markers. The array is synthesized using light-directed combinatorial chemistry. For each clone in a genomic library, a characteristic set of sequence markers can be determined. On the basis of the similarity between the marker sets for each pair of clones, their relative overlap can be measured. The library can be sequentially ordered into a contig map using this overlap information. This new methodology does not require gel-based methods or prior sequence information and involves manipulations that should allow for easy adaptation to automated processing and data collection. 28 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA clone encoding calreticulin from Haemaphysalis qinghaiensis (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinliang; Luo, Jianxun; Fan, Ruiquan; Fingerle, Volker; Guan, Guiquan; Liu, Zhijie; Li, Youquan; Zhao, Haiping; Ma, Miling; Liu, Junlong; Liu, Aihong; Ren, Qiaoyun; Dang, Zhisheng; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Yin, Hong

    2008-03-01

    The application of anti-tick vaccine has been shown to be the most promising alternative strategy compared to the current use of acaricides that suffer from a number of serious limitations. The success of this method is dependent upon identification and cloning of potential tick vaccine antigens. Previously, we have cloned 21 positive clones (named from Hq02 to Hq22) by immunoscreening complimentary DNA (cDNA) libraries of Haemaphysalis qinghaiensis; however, some of those clones did not contain open reading frames (ORF). In this study, we amplified the entire sequence of Hq07 by using rapid amplification of the cDNA ends. Hq07 contains an ORF of 1,233 bp that encodes for 410 amino acid residues with a coding capacity of 47 kDa. Search of the cloned sequences against GenBank revealed that Hq07 is a calreticulin (CRT)-similar clone and designated HqCRT. Expression analysis by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that this gene is ubiquitously expressed at different developmental stages and in different tissues of H. qinghaiensis. The gene was expressed as glutathione S-transferase-fused proteins in a prokaryotic system. Western blot analysis revealed that native HqCRT was secreted into their hosts by ticks during blood sucking. Vaccination of sheep with rHqCRT conferred protective immunity against ticks, resulting in 54.3% mortality in adult ticks, compared to the 38.7% death rate in the control group. These results demonstrated that rHqCRT might be a useful vaccine candidate antigen for biological control of H. qinghaiensis.

  15. Procreative liberty, enhancement and commodification in the human cloning debate.

    PubMed

    Shapshay, Sandra

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to scrutinize a contemporary standoff in the American debate over the moral permissibility of human reproductive cloning in its prospective use as a eugenic enhancement technology. I shall argue that there is some significant and under-appreciated common ground between the defenders and opponents of human cloning. Champions of the moral and legal permissibility of cloning support the technology based on the right to procreative liberty provided it were to become as safe as in vitro fertilization and that it be used only by adults who seek to rear their clone children. However, even champions of procreative liberty oppose the commodification of cloned embryos, and, by extension, the resulting commodification of the cloned children who would be produced via such embryos. I suggest that a Kantian moral argument against the use of cloning as an enhancement technology can be shown to be already implicitly accepted to some extent by champions of procreative liberty on the matter of commodification of cloned embryos. It is in this argument against commodification that the most vocal critics of cloning such as Leon Kass and defenders of cloning such as John Robertson can find greater common ground. Thus, I endeavor to advance the debate by revealing a greater degree of moral agreement on some fundamental premises than hitherto recognized.

  16. Human cloning: category, dignity, and the role of bioethics.

    PubMed

    Shuster, Evelyne

    2003-10-01

    Human cloning has been simultaneously a running joke for massive worldwide publicity of fringe groups like the Raelians, and the core issue of an international movement at the United Nations in support of a treaty to ban the use of cloning techniques to produce a child (so called reproductive cloning). Yet, even though debates on human cloning have greatly increased since the birth of Dolly, the clone sheep, in 1997, we continue to wonder whether cloning is after all any different from other methods of medically assisted reproduction, and what exactly makes cloning an 'affront to the dignity of humans.' Categories we adopt matter mightily as they inform but can also misinform and lead to mistaken and unproductive decisions. And thus bioethicists have a responsibility to ensure that the proper categories are used in the cloning debates and denounce those who try to win the ethical debate through well-crafted labels rather than well-reasoned argumentations. But it is as important for bioethicists to take a position on broad issues such as human cloning and species altering interventions. One 'natural question' would be, for example, should there be an international treaty to ban human reproductive cloning?

  17. Procreative liberty, enhancement and commodification in the human cloning debate.

    PubMed

    Shapshay, Sandra

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to scrutinize a contemporary standoff in the American debate over the moral permissibility of human reproductive cloning in its prospective use as a eugenic enhancement technology. I shall argue that there is some significant and under-appreciated common ground between the defenders and opponents of human cloning. Champions of the moral and legal permissibility of cloning support the technology based on the right to procreative liberty provided it were to become as safe as in vitro fertilization and that it be used only by adults who seek to rear their clone children. However, even champions of procreative liberty oppose the commodification of cloned embryos, and, by extension, the resulting commodification of the cloned children who would be produced via such embryos. I suggest that a Kantian moral argument against the use of cloning as an enhancement technology can be shown to be already implicitly accepted to some extent by champions of procreative liberty on the matter of commodification of cloned embryos. It is in this argument against commodification that the most vocal critics of cloning such as Leon Kass and defenders of cloning such as John Robertson can find greater common ground. Thus, I endeavor to advance the debate by revealing a greater degree of moral agreement on some fundamental premises than hitherto recognized. PMID:22983766

  18. Functional heterogeneity among cytotoxic clones derived from natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Moore, M

    1987-01-01

    Clones were obtained from highly purified populations of human peripheral blood natural killer (NK) cells propagated in the presence of interleukin-2 and phytohaemagglutinin. Almost all clones were cytotoxic against standard NK targets and many were also able to kill the B lymphoblastoid cell line BSM. This latter property was not necessarily a result of the incorporation of this cell line into the feeder mixture used to derive the clones. In most cloning experiments there was a high degree of concordance between the killing of the NK targets K562 and Molt 4 by panels of clones. In some cases this extended to the killing of BSM targets but in other instances there was no relationship or even an inverse correlation between killing of BSM and other targets. In a single cloning experiment there was no relationship between killing of BSM and Raji targets. In some cases a panel of clones could be divided into two or more distinct groups based on their differential activity towards BSM and K562. Such differences were not solely due to inter-donor variation. These findings were extended by cold target inhibition experiments in which at least three types of clone were identified. In one group of clones, which was nonreactive towards BSM, cold BSM significantly enhanced the killing of K562 in a dose-dependent fashion. These experiments provide evidence for a limited degree of functional heterogeneity among clones derived from human peripheral blood NK cells.

  19. Human cloning: category, dignity, and the role of bioethics.

    PubMed

    Shuster, Evelyne

    2003-10-01

    Human cloning has been simultaneously a running joke for massive worldwide publicity of fringe groups like the Raelians, and the core issue of an international movement at the United Nations in support of a treaty to ban the use of cloning techniques to produce a child (so called reproductive cloning). Yet, even though debates on human cloning have greatly increased since the birth of Dolly, the clone sheep, in 1997, we continue to wonder whether cloning is after all any different from other methods of medically assisted reproduction, and what exactly makes cloning an 'affront to the dignity of humans.' Categories we adopt matter mightily as they inform but can also misinform and lead to mistaken and unproductive decisions. And thus bioethicists have a responsibility to ensure that the proper categories are used in the cloning debates and denounce those who try to win the ethical debate through well-crafted labels rather than well-reasoned argumentations. But it is as important for bioethicists to take a position on broad issues such as human cloning and species altering interventions. One 'natural question' would be, for example, should there be an international treaty to ban human reproductive cloning? PMID:14959720

  20. Should we clone human beings? Cloning as a source of tissue for transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Savulescu, J

    1999-01-01

    The most publicly justifiable application of human cloning, if there is one at all, is to provide self-compatible cells or tissues for medical use, especially transplantation. Some have argued that this raises no new ethical issues above those raised by any form of embryo experimentation. I argue that this research is less morally problematic than other embryo research. Indeed, it is not merely morally permissible but morally required that we employ cloning to produce embryos or fetuses for the sake of providing cells, tissues or even organs for therapy, followed by abortion of the embryo or fetus. PMID:10226910

  1. Should we clone human beings? Cloning as a source of tissue for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Savulescu, J

    1999-04-01

    The most publicly justifiable application of human cloning, if there is one at all, is to provide self-compatible cells or tissues for medical use, especially transplantation. Some have argued that this raises no new ethical issues above those raised by any form of embryo experimentation. I argue that this research is less morally problematic than other embryo research. Indeed, it is not merely morally permissible but morally required that we employ cloning to produce embryos or fetuses for the sake of providing cells, tissues or even organs for therapy, followed by abortion of the embryo or fetus.

  2. Effects of donor fibroblast cell type and transferred cloned embryo number on the efficiency of pig cloning.

    PubMed

    Li, Zicong; Shi, Junsong; Liu, Dewu; Zhou, Rong; Zeng, Haiyu; Zhou, Xiu; Mai, Ranbiao; Zeng, Shaofen; Luo, Lvhua; Yu, Wanxian; Zhang, Shouquan; Wu, Zhenfang

    2013-02-01

    Currently, cloning efficiency in pigs is very low. Donor cell type and number of cloned embryos transferred to an individual surrogate are two major factors that affect the successful rate of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in pigs. This study aimed to compare the influence of different donor fibroblast cell types and different transferred embryo numbers on recipients' pregnancy rate and delivery rate, the average number of total clones born, clones born alive and clones born healthy per litter, and the birth rate of healthy clones (=total number of healthy cloned piglets born /total number of transferred cloned embryos). Three types of donor fibroblasts were tested in large-scale production of cloned pigs, including fetal fibroblasts (FFBs) from four genetically similar Western swine breeds of Pietrain (P), Duroc (D), Landrace (L), and Yorkshire (Y), which are referred to as P,D,LY-FFBs, adult fibroblasts (AFBs) from the same four breeds, which are designated P,D,L,Y-AFBs, and AFBs from a Chinese pig breed of Laiwu (LW), which is referred to as LW-AFBs. Within each donor fibroblast cell type group, five transferred cloned embryo number groups were tested. In each embryo number group, 150-199, 200-249, 250-299, 300-349, or 350-450 cloned embryos were transferred to each individual recipient sow. For the entire experiment, 92,005 cloned embryos were generated from nearly 115,000 matured oocytes and transferred to 328 recipients; in total, 488 cloned piglets were produced. The results showed that the mean clones born healthy per litter resulted from transfer of embryos cloned from LW-AFBs (2.53 ± 0.34) was similar with that associated with P,D,L,Y-FFBs (2.72 ± 0.29), but was significantly higher than that resulted from P,D,L,Y-AFBs (1.47 ± 0.18). Use of LW-AFBs as donor cells for SCNT resulted in a significantly higher pregnancy rate (72.00% vs. 59.30% and 48.11%) and delivery rate (60.00% vs. 45.93% and 35.85%) for cloned embryo recipients, and a

  3. TbGT8 is a bifunctional glycosyltransferase that elaborates N-linked glycans on a protein phosphatase AcP115 and a GPI-anchor modifying glycan in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Masayuki; Karasudani, Moe; Shiraishi, Takahiro; Hashida, Kazunori; Hino, Mami; Ferguson, Michael A J; Nomoto, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    The procyclic form of Trypanosoma brucei expresses procyclin surface glycoproteins with unusual glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchor side chain structures that contain branched N-acetyllactosamine and lacto-N-biose units. The glycosyltransferase TbGT8 is involved in the synthesis of the branched side chain through its UDP-GlcNAc: βGal β1-3N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase activity. Here, we explored the role of TbGT8 in the mammalian bloodstream form of the parasite with a tetracycline-inducible conditional null T. brucei mutant for TbGT8. Under non-permissive conditions, the mutant showed significantly reduced binding to tomato lectin, which recognizes poly-N-acetyllactosamine-containing glycans. Lectin pull-down assays revealed differences between the wild type and TbGT8 null-mutant T. brucei, notably the absence of a broad protein band with an approximate molecular weight of 110 kDa in the mutant lysate. Proteomic analysis revealed that the band contained several glycoproteins, including the acidic ecto-protein phosphatase AcP115, a stage-specific glycoprotein in the bloodstream form of T. brucei. Western blotting with an anti-AcP115 antibody revealed that AcP115 was approximately 10kDa smaller in the mutant. Enzymatic de-N-glycosylation demonstrated that the underlying protein cores were the same, suggesting that the 10-kDa difference was due to differences in N-linked glycans. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed the colocalization of hemagglutinin epitope-tagged TbGT8 and the Golgi-associated protein GRASP. These data suggest that TbGT8 is involved in the construction of complex poly-N-acetyllactosamine-containing type N-linked and GPI-linked glycans in the Golgi of the bloodstream and procyclic parasite forms, respectively. PMID:24508870

  4. GT1-7 cell-based cytoxicity screening assay on 96-well microplates as a platform for the safety assessment of genetically modified Gerbera hybrida extracts.

    PubMed

    Fallarero, Adyary; Ainasoja, Miia; Sandberg, Malena; Teeri, Teemu H; Vuorela, Pia M

    2009-01-01

    In this investigation, a GT1-7 cell-based cytotoxicity screening assay in 96-well microplates was set up. The assay, using propidium iodide fluorescence, was proven to be reliable, with good quality (Z' = 0.51) and low plate-to-plate and day-to-day variations. Further on, a library containing extracts from 227 genetic modification (GM) Gerbera hybrida and 42 Gerbera varieties was screened; however, no differences between them were found. Based on these findings, we propose the use of the current assay within the first-tier screening studies of large collections. Also, these results provide valuable information for GM Gerbera risk-assessment purposes and offer a model for the toxicity cell-based screening of GM crops.

  5. Consumers' attitudes toward consumption of cloned beef. The impact of exposure to technological information about animal cloning.

    PubMed

    Aizaki, Hideo; Sawada, Manabu; Sato, Kazuo

    2011-10-01

    Novel food technologies, such as cloning, have been introduced into the meat production sector; however, their use is not widely supported by many consumers. This study was designed to assess whether Japanese consumers' attitudes toward consumption of cloned beef (specifically, beef derived from bovine embryo and somatic cell-cloned cattle) would change after they were provided with technological information on animal cloning through a web-based survey. The results revealed that most respondents did not discriminate between their attitudes toward the consumption of the two types of cloned beef, and that most respondents did not change their attitudes toward cloned beef after receiving the technological information. The respondents' individual characteristics, including their knowledge about the food safety of cloned beef and their basic knowledge about animal cloning, influenced the likelihood of a change in their attitudes after they received the information. In conclusion, some consumers might become less uncomfortable about the consumption of cloned beef by the straightforward provision of technological information about animal cloning; however, most consumers are likely to maintain their attitudes.

  6. Consumers' attitudes toward consumption of cloned beef. The impact of exposure to technological information about animal cloning.

    PubMed

    Aizaki, Hideo; Sawada, Manabu; Sato, Kazuo

    2011-10-01

    Novel food technologies, such as cloning, have been introduced into the meat production sector; however, their use is not widely supported by many consumers. This study was designed to assess whether Japanese consumers' attitudes toward consumption of cloned beef (specifically, beef derived from bovine embryo and somatic cell-cloned cattle) would change after they were provided with technological information on animal cloning through a web-based survey. The results revealed that most respondents did not discriminate between their attitudes toward the consumption of the two types of cloned beef, and that most respondents did not change their attitudes toward cloned beef after receiving the technological information. The respondents' individual characteristics, including their knowledge about the food safety of cloned beef and their basic knowledge about animal cloning, influenced the likelihood of a change in their attitudes after they received the information. In conclusion, some consumers might become less uncomfortable about the consumption of cloned beef by the straightforward provision of technological information about animal cloning; however, most consumers are likely to maintain their attitudes. PMID:21723894

  7. Association of COMT val158met and DRD2 G>T genetic polymorphisms with individual differences in motor learning and performance in female young adults.

    PubMed

    Noohi, Fatemeh; Boyden, Nate B; Kwak, Youngbin; Humfleet, Jennifer; Burke, David T; Müller, Martijn L T M; Bohnen, Nico I; Seidler, Rachael D

    2014-02-01

    Individuals learn new skills at different rates. Given the involvement of corticostriatal pathways in some types of learning, variations in dopaminergic transmission may contribute to these individual differences. Genetic polymorphisms of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) enzyme and dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) genes partially determine cortical and striatal dopamine availability, respectively. Individuals who are homozygous for the COMT methionine (met) allele show reduced cortical COMT enzymatic activity, resulting in increased dopamine levels in the prefrontal cortex as opposed to individuals who are carriers of the valine (val) allele. DRD2 G-allele homozygotes benefit from a higher striatal dopamine level compared with T-allele carriers. We hypothesized that individuals who are homozygous for COMT met and DRD2 G alleles would show higher rates of motor learning. Seventy-two young healthy females (20 ± 1.9 yr) performed a sensorimotor adaptation task and a motor sequence learning task. A nonparametric mixed model ANOVA revealed that the COMT val-val group demonstrated poorer performance in the sequence learning task compared with the met-met group and showed a learning deficit in the visuomotor adaptation task compared with both met-met and val-met groups. The DRD2 TT group showed poorer performance in the sequence learning task compared with the GT group, but there was no difference between DRD2 genotype groups in adaptation rate. Although these results did not entirely come out as one might predict based on the known contribution of corticostriatal pathways to motor sequence learning, they support the role of genetic polymorphisms of COMT val158met (rs4680) and DRD2 G>T (rs 1076560) in explaining individual differences in motor performance and motor learning, dependent on task type. PMID:24225542

  8. Association of COMT val158met and DRD2 G>T genetic polymorphisms with individual differences in motor learning and performance in female young adults

    PubMed Central

    Boyden, Nate B.; Kwak, Youngbin; Humfleet, Jennifer; Burke, David T.; Müller, Martijn L. T. M.; Bohnen, Nico I.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2013-01-01

    Individuals learn new skills at different rates. Given the involvement of corticostriatal pathways in some types of learning, variations in dopaminergic transmission may contribute to these individual differences. Genetic polymorphisms of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) enzyme and dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) genes partially determine cortical and striatal dopamine availability, respectively. Individuals who are homozygous for the COMT methionine (met) allele show reduced cortical COMT enzymatic activity, resulting in increased dopamine levels in the prefrontal cortex as opposed to individuals who are carriers of the valine (val) allele. DRD2 G-allele homozygotes benefit from a higher striatal dopamine level compared with T-allele carriers. We hypothesized that individuals who are homozygous for COMT met and DRD2 G alleles would show higher rates of motor learning. Seventy-two young healthy females (20 ± 1.9 yr) performed a sensorimotor adaptation task and a motor sequence learning task. A nonparametric mixed model ANOVA revealed that the COMT val-val group demonstrated poorer performance in the sequence learning task compared with the met-met group and showed a learning deficit in the visuomotor adaptation task compared with both met-met and val-met groups. The DRD2 TT group showed poorer performance in the sequence learning task compared with the GT group, but there was no difference between DRD2 genotype groups in adaptation rate. Although these results did not entirely come out as one might predict based on the known contribution of corticostriatal pathways to motor sequence learning, they support the role of genetic polymorphisms of COMT val158met (rs4680) and DRD2 G>T (rs 1076560) in explaining individual differences in motor performance and motor learning, dependent on task type. PMID:24225542

  9. A game theory-reinforcement learning (GT-RL) method to develop optimal operation policies for multi-operator reservoir systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani, Kaveh; Hooshyar, Milad

    2014-11-01

    Reservoir systems with multiple operators can benefit from coordination of operation policies. To maximize the total benefit of these systems the literature has normally used the social planner's approach. Based on this approach operation decisions are optimized using a multi-objective optimization model with a compound system's objective. While the utility of the system can be increased this way, fair allocation of benefits among the operators remains challenging for the social planner who has to assign controversial weights to the system's beneficiaries and their objectives. Cooperative game theory provides an alternative framework for fair and efficient allocation of the incremental benefits of cooperation. To determine the fair and efficient utility shares of the beneficiaries, cooperative game theory solution methods consider the gains of each party in the status quo (non-cooperation) as well as what can be gained through the grand coalition (social planner's solution or full cooperation) and partial coalitions. Nevertheless, estimation of the benefits of different coalitions can be challenging in complex multi-beneficiary systems. Reinforcement learning can be used to address this challenge and determine the gains of the beneficiaries for different levels of cooperation, i.e., non-cooperation, partial cooperation, and full cooperation, providing the essential input for allocation based on cooperative game theory. This paper develops a game theory-reinforcement learning (GT-RL) method for determining the optimal operation policies in multi-operator multi-reservoir systems with respect to fairness and efficiency criteria. As the first step to underline the utility of the GT-RL method in solving complex multi-agent multi-reservoir problems without a need for developing compound objectives and weight assignment, the proposed method is applied to a hypothetical three-agent three-reservoir system.

  10. Neurokinin B Causes Acute GnRH Secretion and Repression of GnRH Transcription in GT1–7 GnRH Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Glidewell-Kenney, Christine A.; Shao, Paul P.; Iyer, Anita K.; Grove, Anna M. H.; Meadows, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic studies in human patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) identified mutations in the genes that encode neurokinin B (NKB) and the neurokinin 3 receptor (NK3R). However, determining the mechanism whereby NKB regulates gonadotropin secretion has been difficult because of conflicting results from in vivo studies investigating the luteinizing hormone (LH) response to senktide, a NK3R agonist. NK3R is expressed in a subset of GnRH neurons and in kisspeptin neurons that are known to regulate GnRH secretion. Thus, one potential source of inconsistency is that NKB could produce opposing direct and indirect effects on GnRH secretion. Here, we employ the GT1-7 cell model to elucidate the direct effects of NKB on GnRH neuron function. We find that GT1-7 cells express NK3R and respond to acute senktide treatment with c-Fos induction and increased GnRH secretion. In contrast, long-term senktide treatment decreased GnRH secretion. Next, we focus on the examination of the mechanism underlying the long-term decrease in secretion and determine that senktide treatment represses transcription of GnRH. We further show that this repression of GnRH transcription may involve enhanced c-Fos protein binding at novel activator protein-1 (AP-1) half-sites identified in enhancer 1 and the promoter, as well as chromatin remodeling at the promoter of the GnRH gene. These data indicate that NKB could directly regulate secretion from NK3R-expressing GnRH neurons. Furthermore, whether the response is inhibitory or stimulatory toward GnRH secretion could depend on the history or length of exposure to NKB because of a repressive effect on GnRH transcription. PMID:23393128

  11. Hybrid method for crater detection based on topography reconstruction from optical images and the new LU78287GT catalogue of Lunar impact craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamunićcar, Goran; Lončarić, Sven; Grumpe, Arne; Wöhler, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Impact craters are ubiquitous and well-studied structures of high geological relevance on the surfaces of the Earth's Moon, the terrestrial planets, the asteroids and the satellites of the outer planets. Therefore, it is not surprising that crater detection algorithms (CDAs) are one of the most studied subjects of image processing and analysis in lunar and planetary science. In this paper we are proposing a Hybrid CDA: a modified DEM (digital elevation map) reconstruction method used as a step in an existing CDA based on Hough transform. The new Hybrid CDA consists of: (1) reconstruction of topography from optical images using a shape from shading approach; (2) utilization of the DEM-based CDA; (3) correction of brightness and contrast of optical images used in order to be more suitable for evaluation of detections. An additional result of this work is a new method for evaluation of topography reconstruction algorithms, using a DEM-based CDA and an earlier approach for evaluation of CDAs. The new Hybrid CDA was tested using two Chandrayaan-1 Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) images and two excerpts of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) global optical image mosaic. As a result, the number of craters inside these four regions increased considerably from 1754 (as available in the previous LU60645GT catalogue) to 19 396 craters (as available in the resulting new LU78287GT catalogue). This confirmed the practical applicability of the new Hybrid CDA, which can be used in order to considerably extend current crater catalogues.

  12. Association of COMT val158met and DRD2 G>T genetic polymorphisms with individual differences in motor learning and performance in female young adults.

    PubMed

    Noohi, Fatemeh; Boyden, Nate B; Kwak, Youngbin; Humfleet, Jennifer; Burke, David T; Müller, Martijn L T M; Bohnen, Nico I; Seidler, Rachael D

    2014-02-01

    Individuals learn new skills at different rates. Given the involvement of corticostriatal pathways in some types of learning, variations in dopaminergic transmission may contribute to these individual differences. Genetic polymorphisms of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) enzyme and dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) genes partially determine cortical and striatal dopamine availability, respectively. Individuals who are homozygous for the COMT methionine (met) allele show reduced cortical COMT enzymatic activity, resulting in increased dopamine levels in the prefrontal cortex as opposed to individuals who are carriers of the valine (val) allele. DRD2 G-allele homozygotes benefit from a higher striatal dopamine level compared with T-allele carriers. We hypothesized that individuals who are homozygous for COMT met and DRD2 G alleles would show higher rates of motor learning. Seventy-two young healthy females (20 ± 1.9 yr) performed a sensorimotor adaptation task and a motor sequence learning task. A nonparametric mixed model ANOVA revealed that the COMT val-val group demonstrated poorer performance in the sequence learning task compared with the met-met group and showed a learning deficit in the visuomotor adaptation task compared with both met-met and val-met groups. The DRD2 TT group showed poorer performance in the sequence learning task compared with the GT group, but there was no difference between DRD2 genotype groups in adaptation rate. Although these results did not entirely come out as one might predict based on the known contribution of corticostriatal pathways to motor sequence learning, they support the role of genetic polymorphisms of COMT val158met (rs4680) and DRD2 G>T (rs 1076560) in explaining individual differences in motor performance and motor learning, dependent on task type.

  13. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and transcriptional analyses of the gene encoding a ferredoxin from Methanosarcina thermophila.

    PubMed Central

    Clements, A P; Ferry, J G

    1992-01-01

    A mixed 17-mer oligonucleotide deduced from the N terminus of a ferredoxin isolated from Methanosarcina thermophila was used to probe a lambda gt11 library prepared from M. thermophila genomic DNA; positive clones contained either a 5.7- or 2.1-kbp EcoRI insert. An open reading frame (fdxA) located within the 5.7-kbp insert had a deduced amino acid sequence that was identical to the first 26 N-terminal residues reported for the ferredoxin isolated from M. thermophila, with the exception of the initiator methionine. fdxA had the coding capacity for a 6,230-Da protein which contained eight cysteines with spacings typical of 2[4Fe-4S] ferredoxins. An open reading frame (ORF1) located within the 2.1-kbp EcoRI fragment also had the potential to encode a 2[4Fe-4S] bacterial-type ferredoxin (5,850 Da). fdxA and ORF1 were present as single copies in the genome, and each was transcribed on a monocistronic mRNA. While the fdxA- and ORF1-specific mRNAs were detected in cells grown on methanol and trimethylamine, only the fdxA-specific transcript was present in acetate-grown cells. The apparent transcriptional start sites of fdxA and ORF1, as determined by primer extension analyses, lay 21 to 28 bases downstream of sequences with high identity to the consensus methanogen promoter. Images PMID:1379583

  14. Bovine and rodent tamm-horsfall protein (THP) genes: cloning, structural analysis, and promoter identification.

    PubMed

    Yu, H; Papa, F; Sukhatme, V P

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated bovine and rodent cDNA and genomic clones encoding the kidney-specific Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP). In both species the gene contains 11 exons, the first of which is noncoding. Exon/intron junctions were analyzed and all were shown to follow the AG/GT rule. A kidney-specific DNase I hypersensitive site was mapped onto a rodent genomic fragment for which the sequence is highly conserved in three species (rat, cow, and human) over a stretch of 350 base pairs. Primer extension and RNase protection analysis identified a transcription start site at the 3' end of this conserved region. A TATA box is located at 32 nucleotides upstream of the start site in the bovine gene and 34 nucleotides upstream in the rodent gene. An inverted CCAAT motif occurs at 65 and 66 nucleotides upstream of the start site in the bovine and rodent genes, respectively. Other highly conserved regions were noted in this 350 bp region and these are likely to be binding sites for transcription factors. A functional assay based on an in vitro transcription system confirmed that the conserved region is an RNA Pol II promoter. The in vitro system accurately initiated transcription from the in vivo start site and was highly sensitive to inhibition by alpha-amanitin at a concentration of 2.5 micrograms/ml. These studies set the stage for the further definition of cis-acting sequences and trans-factors regulating expression of the THP gene, a model for kidney-specific gene expression.

  15. [Product safety analysis of somatic cell cloned bovine].

    PubMed

    Hua, Song; Lan, Jie; Song, Yongli; Lu, Chenglong; Zhang, Yong

    2010-05-01

    Somatic cell cloning (nuclear transfer) is a technique through which the nucleus (DNA) of a somatic cell is transferred into an enucleated oocyte for the generation of a new individual, genetically identical to the somatic cell donor. It could be applied for the enhancement of reproduction rate and the improvement of food products involving quality, yield and nutrition. In recent years, the United States, Japan and Europe as well as other countries announced that meat and milk products made from cloned cattle are safe for human consumption. Yet, cloned animals are faced with a wide range of health problems, with a high death rate and a high incidence of disease. The precise causal mechanisms for the low efficiency of cloning remain unclear. Is it safe that any products from cloned animals were allowed into the food supply? This review focuses on the security of meat, milk and products from cloned cattle based on the available data.

  16. Gaussian cloning of coherent states with known phases

    SciTech Connect

    Alexanian, Moorad

    2006-04-15

    The fidelity for cloning coherent states is improved over that provided by optimal Gaussian and non-Gaussian cloners for the subset of coherent states that are prepared with known phases. Gaussian quantum cloning duplicates all coherent states with an optimal fidelity of 2/3. Non-Gaussian cloners give optimal single-clone fidelity for a symmetric 1-to-2 cloner of 0.6826. Coherent states that have known phases can be cloned with a fidelity of 4/5. The latter is realized by a combination of two beam splitters and a four-wave mixer operated in the nonlinear regime, all of which are realized by interaction Hamiltonians that are quadratic in the photon operators. Therefore, the known Gaussian devices for cloning coherent states are extended when cloning coherent states with known phases by considering a nonbalanced beam splitter at the input side of the amplifier.

  17. Selective cloning of Gaussian states by linear optics

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares, Stefano

    2007-08-15

    We investigate the performance of a selective cloning machine based on linear optical elements and Gaussian measurements, which allows one to clone at will one of the two incoming input states. This machine is a complete generalization of a 1{yields}2 cloning scheme demonstrated by Andersen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 240503 (2005)]. The input-output fidelity is studied for a generic Gaussian input state, and the effect of nonunit quantum efficiency is also taken into account. We show that, if the states to be cloned are squeezed states with known squeezing parameter, then the fidelity can be enhanced using a third suitable squeezed state during the final stage of the cloning process. A binary communication protocol based on the selective cloning machine is also discussed.

  18. Cloning animals by somatic cell nuclear transfer--biological factors.

    PubMed

    Tian, X Cindy; Kubota, Chikara; Enright, Brian; Yang, Xiangzhong

    2003-11-13

    Cloning by nuclear transfer using mammalian somatic cells has enormous potential application. However, somatic cloning has been inefficient in all species in which live clones have been produced. High abortion and fetal mortality rates are commonly observed. These developmental defects have been attributed to incomplete reprogramming of the somatic nuclei by the cloning process. Various strategies have been used to improve the efficiency of nuclear transfer, however, significant breakthroughs are yet to happen. In this review we will discuss studies conducted, in our laboratories and those of others, to gain a better understanding of nuclear reprogramming. Because cattle are a species widely used for nuclear transfer studies, and more laboratories have succeeded in cloning cattle than any other species, this review will be focused on somatic cell cloning of cattle.

  19. Stability of the JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Haubek, D; Ennibi, O-K; Vaeth, M; Poulsen, S; Poulsen, K

    2009-09-01

    The JP2 clone of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is strongly associated with aggressive periodontitis. To obtain information about colonization dynamics of the JP2 clone, we used PCR to examine its presence in 365 Moroccan juveniles from whom periodontal plaque samples were collected at baseline and after one and two years. Periodontal attachment loss was measured at baseline and at the two-year follow-up. At baseline, 43 (12%) carriers of the JP2 clone were found. Nearly half (44 %) of these were persistently colonized with the clone. The relative risk for the development of aggressive periodontitis, adjusted for the concomitant presence of other genotypes of A. actinomycetemcomitans, was highest for individuals continuously infected by the JP2 clone (RR = 13.9; 95% CI, 9.0 to 21.4), indicating a relationship between infectious dose and disease, which further substantiates the evidence for the JP2 clone as a causal factor in aggressive periodontitis.

  20. To what extent can the law control human cloning?

    PubMed

    Wood, P G

    1999-01-01

    This paper explores the legal ramifications of human reproductive cloning in response to 'Dolly'--the first animal cloned from an adult cell. No attempt is made to address the complex moral and ethical dilemmas that will inevitably be consequential on future successes in human reproductive cloning. Some of the potential benefits of cloning are briefly summarized but discussion is focused primarily on the current state of the law in the UK and some other European jurisdictions. Attempts to legislate on human cloning in the US, the emerging role of the EU and amendments to the European Convention on Human Rights are outlined. The potential problems likely to be encountered in the enforcement of any global treaties or international regulations are highlighted. It is argued that attempting to control human cloning by imposing legal prohibition is futile and a pragmatic solution to this impending problem is required forthwith.

  1. Demecolcine-assisted enucleation for bovine cloning.

    PubMed

    Tani, Tetsuya; Shimada, Hiroaki; Kato, Yoko; Tsunoda, Yukio

    2006-01-01

    The present study demonstrated that demecolcine treatment for at least 30 min produces a membrane protrusion in metaphase II-stage bovine oocytes. The maternal chromosome mass is condensed within the protrusion, which makes it easy to remove the maternal chromosomes for nuclear transfer (NT). Maturation promoting factor activity, but not mitogen-activated protein kinase activity, increased up to 30% in oocytes during demecolcine treatment. One normal healthy calf was obtained after transfer of four NT blastocysts produced following demecolcine treatment. Demecolcine treatment did not increase the potential of NT oocytes to develop into blastocysts. The present study demonstrated that chemically-assisted removal of chromosomes is effective for bovine cloning.

  2. Genetic epidemiology, genetic maps and positional cloning.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Newton E

    2003-01-01

    Genetic epidemiology developed in the middle of the last century, focused on inherited causes of disease but with methods and results applicable to other traits and even forensics. Early success with linkage led to the localization of genes contributing to disease, and ultimately to the Human Genome Project. The discovery of millions of DNA markers has encouraged more efficient positional cloning by linkage disequilibrium (LD), using LD maps and haplotypes in ways that are rapidly evolving. This has led to large international programmes, some promising and others alarming, with laws about DNA patenting and ethical guidelines for responsible research still struggling to be born. PMID:14561327

  3. Cloning simulation in the cage environment.

    PubMed Central

    Douthart, R J; Thomas, J J; Rosier, S D; Schmaltz, J E; West, J W

    1986-01-01

    The CAGE/GEM(TM) software toolkit for genetic engineering is briefly described. The system functionally uses color graphics and is menu driven. It integrates genetics and features information ("Overlays") with information based on sequence analysis ("Representations"). The system is structured around CAD (Computer Aided Design) principles. The CAGE (Computer Aided Genetic Engineering) aspects of the software are emphasized and illustrated by a simulated cloning of the hepatitis B core antigen gene into the BAMHI site of plasmid pBR322. Images PMID:3003674

  4. The Human Cloning Prohibition Act of 2001: vagueness and federalism.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Jonathan S

    2002-01-01

    On July 31, 2001, the U.S. House of Representatives passed The Human Cloning Prohibition Act of 2001. The legislation proposes a complete ban on somatic cell nuclear transfer to create cloned human embryos; it threatens transgressors with criminal punishment and civil fines. House Bill 2505 is the first human cloning prohibition to pass either chamber of Congress. This note argues that the bill is unconstitutionally vague and inconsistent with the Supreme Court's recent Commerce Clause jurisprudence.

  5. Gene cloned for enzyme used to make cheese

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-15

    Scientists at Collaborative Research in Waltham, Mass., working under a contract with Dow Chemical, Midland, Mich. are reported to have cloned the gene rennin, an enzyme used in the production of cheese. The gene was cloned in both yeast and the bacterium Escherichia coli using standard recombinant DNA techniques. Rennin is the first enzyme of industrial importance to be cloned and it is hoped that rennin will be commercially available by the mid-1980's.

  6. Cloned Cauliflower Mosaic Virus DNA Infects Turnips (Brassica rapa).

    PubMed

    Howell, S H; Walker, L L; Dudley, R K

    1980-06-13

    Cauliflower mosaic virus DNA cloned in the Sal I site of bacterial plasmid pBR322 infects turnip plants. The cloned viral DNA must be excised from the recombinant plasmid to infect, but need not be circularized and ligated in vitro. The cloned viral DNA lacks site-specific single-strand breaks found in DNA obtained directly from the virus. However, these breaks are reintroduced into the viral genome during multiplication of the virus in the plant host.

  7. Cavity coherent-state cloning via Raman scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Alexanian, Moorad

    2003-03-01

    The Raman interaction of atoms singly traversing a two-mode cavity constitutes a quantum-cloning machine for coherent states. The quality of the two identical output coherent states is independent of the initial, albeit different, coherent state, initially present inside the cavity. The cloning of nonorthogonal states indicates that the entanglement of the output states for an arbitrary initial state is the essence of the no-cloning theorem.

  8. Towards an understanding of British public attitudes concerning human cloning.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Richard; Barnett, Julie; Cooper, Helen; Coyle, Adrian; Moran-Ellis, Jo; Senior, Victoria; Walton, Chris

    2007-07-01

    The ability of scientists to apply cloning technology to humans has provoked public discussion and media coverage. The present paper reports on a series of studies examining public attitudes to human cloning in the UK, bringing together a range of quantitative and qualitative methods to address this question. These included a nationally representative survey, an experimental vignette study, focus groups and analyses of media coverage. Overall the research presents a complex picture of attitude to and constructions of human cloning. In all of the analyses, therapeutic cloning was viewed more favourably than reproductive cloning. However, while participants in the focus groups were generally negative about both forms of cloning, and this was also reflected in the media analyses, quantitative results showed more positive responses. In the quantitative research, therapeutic cloning was generally accepted when the benefits of such procedures were clear, and although reproductive cloning was less accepted there was still substantial support. Participants in the focus groups only differentiated between therapeutic and reproductive cloning after the issue of therapeutic cloning was explicitly raised; initially they saw cloning as being reproductive cloning and saw no real benefits. Attitudes were shown to be associated with underlying values associated with scientific progress rather than with age, gender or education, and although there were a few differences in the quantitative data based on religious affiliation, these tended to be small effects. Likewise in the focus groups there was little direct appeal to religion, but the main themes were 'interfering with nature' and the 'status of the embryo', with the latter being used more effectively to try to close down further discussion. In general there was a close correspondence between the media analysis and focus group responses, possibly demonstrating the importance of media as a resource, or that the media reflect

  9. Therapeutic cloning and the constitution--a Canadian perspective.

    PubMed

    Muscati, S A

    2001-08-01

    Recent developments in the field of therapeutic cloning have been welcomed by many in the medical community as important breakthroughs that may help provide a better understanding of a variety of human diseases. Nevertheless, research in this field appears to have struck a sensitive nerve in society. A large amount of social debate has been generated regarding the validity of therapeutic cloning, and there are many seeking legislation to have the practice restricted. It is unclear, however, whether such restrictions can be legally justified. Analysing cloning in such a social and legal context raises a number of questions. What scientific procedures are behind therapeutic cloning? What is the legal status of the cultured or unimplanted embryo? Can cloning be considered an aspect of reproductive liberty as protected by the constitution? What medical advances might therapeutic cloning further? What social benefits and harms might arise from its promotion or restriction? Such questions, and the broader debate surrounding human therapeutic cloning, are addressed in this paper in three parts. Part 1 presents an overview of the basic biological principles behind cloning and the science behind the therapeutic cloning of specific cells and tissues. Part 2 analyses ss. 7, 2, 15(1) and 1 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and how they may be implicated by legal incursions into the field of human cloning. Several Charter-based arguments, both for and against the practice, are presented. Finally, Part 3 assesses some recent scientific developments in cloning technology, and how they affect the debate over the constitutionality of human therapeutic cloning.

  10. Factors influencing the commercialisation of cloning in the pork industry.

    PubMed

    Pratt, S L; Sherrer, E S; Reeves, D E; Stice, S L

    2006-01-01

    Production of cloned pigs using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a repeatable and predictable procedure and multiple labs around the world have generated cloned pigs and genetically modified cloned pigs. Due to the integrated nature of the pork production industry, pork producers are the most likely to benefit and are in the best position to introduce cloning in to production systems. Cloning can be used to amplify superior genetics or be used in conjunction with genetic modifications to produce animals with superior economic traits. Though unproven, cloning could add value by reducing pig-to-pig variability in economically significant traits such as growth rate, feed efficiency, and carcass characteristics. However, cloning efficiencies using SCNT are low, but predictable. The inefficiencies are due to the intrusive nature of the procedure, the quality of oocytes and/or the somatic cells used in the procedure, the quality of the nuclear transfer embryos transferred into recipients, pregnancy rates of the recipients, and neonatal survival of the clones. Furthermore, in commercial animal agriculture, clones produced must be able to grow and thrive under normal management conditions, which include attainment of puberty and subsequent capability to reproduce. To integrate SCNT into the pork industry, inefficiencies at each step of the procedure must be overcome. In addition, it is likely that non-surgical embryo transfer will be required to deliver cloned embryos, and/or additional methods to generate high health clones will need to be developed. This review will focus on the state-of-the-art for SCNT in pigs and the steps required for practical implementation of pig cloning in animal agriculture.

  11. [Telomere lengthening by trichostatin A treatment in cloned pigs].

    PubMed

    Xie, Bing-Teng; Ji, Guang-Zhen; Kong, Qing-Ran; Mao, Jian; Shi, Yong-Qian; Liu, Shi-Chao; Wu, Mei-Ling; Wang, Juan; Liu, Lin; Liu, Zhong-Hua

    2012-12-01

    Telomeres are repeated GC rich sequences at the end of chromosomes, and shorten with each cell division due to DNA end replication problem. Previously, reprogrammed somatic cells of cloned animals display variable telomere elongation. However, it was reported that the cloned animals including Dolly do not reset telomeres and show premature aging. In this study, we investigated telomere function in cloned or transgenic cloned pigs, including the cloned Northeast Min pigs, eGFP, Mx, and PGC1α transgenic cloned pigs, and found that the telomere lengths of cloned pigs were significantly shorter than the nuclear donor adult fibroblasts and age-matched noncloned pigs (P<0.05), indicating that nuclear reprogramming did not restore cellular age of donor cells after somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Trichostatin A (TSA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, has proven to enhance the efficiency of nuclear reprogramming in several species. In order to test whether TSA also can effectively enhance reprogramming of telomeres, TSA (40 nmol/L) was used to treat porcine cloned embryos at 1-cell stage for 24 h. Consistent with previous reports, the developmental rate of SCNT embryos to the blastocyst stage was significantly increased compared with those of the control group (16.35% vs. 27.09%, 21.60% vs. 34.90%, P<0.05). Notably, the telomere length of cloned porcine blastocysts was also significantly elongated (P<0.05). Although TSA did not improve the cloning efficiency (1.3% vs. 1.7%, TSA vs. control), the telomere lengths of cloned pig-lets were significantly longer compared with those of the control group and the donor fibroblasts (P<0.05). In conclusion, telomeres have not been effectively restored by SCNT in pigs but TSA can effectively lengthen the telomere lengths of cloned pigs.

  12. [Telomere lengthening by trichostatin A treatment in cloned pigs].

    PubMed

    Xie, Bing-Teng; Ji, Guang-Zhen; Kong, Qing-Ran; Mao, Jian; Shi, Yong-Qian; Liu, Shi-Chao; Wu, Mei-Ling; Wang, Juan; Liu, Lin; Liu, Zhong-Hua

    2012-12-01

    Telomeres are repeated GC rich sequences at the end of chromosomes, and shorten with each cell division due to DNA end replication problem. Previously, reprogrammed somatic cells of cloned animals display variable telomere elongation. However, it was reported that the cloned animals including Dolly do not reset telomeres and show premature aging. In this study, we investigated telomere function in cloned or transgenic cloned pigs, including the cloned Northeast Min pigs, eGFP, Mx, and PGC1α transgenic cloned pigs, and found that the telomere lengths of cloned pigs were significantly shorter than the nuclear donor adult fibroblasts and age-matched noncloned pigs (P<0.05), indicating that nuclear reprogramming did not restore cellular age of donor cells after somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Trichostatin A (TSA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, has proven to enhance the efficiency of nuclear reprogramming in several species. In order to test whether TSA also can effectively enhance reprogramming of telomeres, TSA (40 nmol/L) was used to treat porcine cloned embryos at 1-cell stage for 24 h. Consistent with previous reports, the developmental rate of SCNT embryos to the blastocyst stage was significantly increased compared with those of the control group (16.35% vs. 27.09%, 21.60% vs. 34.90%, P<0.05). Notably, the telomere length of cloned porcine blastocysts was also significantly elongated (P<0.05). Although TSA did not improve the cloning efficiency (1.3% vs. 1.7%, TSA vs. control), the telomere lengths of cloned pig-lets were significantly longer compared with those of the control group and the donor fibroblasts (P<0.05). In conclusion, telomeres have not been effectively restored by SCNT in pigs but TSA can effectively lengthen the telomere lengths of cloned pigs. PMID:23262106

  13. Transposon-containing DNA cloning vector and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Berg, Claire M.; Berg, Douglas E.; Wang, Gan

    1997-01-01

    The present invention discloses a rapid method of restriction mapping, sequencing or localizing genetic features in a segment of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that is up to 42 kb in size. The method in part comprises cloning of the DNA segment in a specialized cloning vector and then isolating nested deletions in either direction in vivo by intramolecular transposition into the cloned DNA. A plasmid has been prepared and disclosed.

  14. Transposon-containing DNA cloning vector and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Berg, C.M.; Berg, D.E.; Wang, G.

    1997-07-08

    The present invention discloses a rapid method of restriction mapping, sequencing or localizing genetic features in a segment of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that is up to 42 kb in size. The method in part comprises cloning of the DNA segment in a specialized cloning vector and then isolating nested deletions in either direction in vivo by intramolecular transposition into the cloned DNA. A plasmid has been prepared and disclosed. 4 figs.

  15. Nuclear reprogramming of cloned embryos and its implications for therapeutic cloning.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiangzhong; Smith, Sadie L; Tian, X Cindy; Lewin, Harris A; Renard, Jean-Paul; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2007-03-01

    Therapeutic cloning, whereby somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is used to generate patient-specific embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from blastocysts cloned by nuclear transfer (ntESCs), holds great promise for the treatment of many human diseases. ntESCs have been derived in mice and cattle, but thus far there are no credible reports of human ntESCs. Here we review the recent literature on nuclear reprogramming by SCNT, including studies of gene expression, DNA methylation, chromatin remodeling, genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation. Reprogramming of genes expressed in the inner cell mass, from which ntESCs are derived, seems to be highly efficient. Defects in the extraembryonic lineage are probably the major cause of the low success rate of reproductive cloning but are not expected to affect the derivation of ntESCs. We remain optimistic that human therapeutic cloning is achievable and that the derivation of patient-specific ntESC lines will have great potential for regenerative medicine.

  16. Compositional analysis of dairy products derived from clones and cloned transgenic cattle.

    PubMed

    Laible, Götz; Brophy, Brigid; Knighton, Derek; Wells, David N

    2007-01-01

    Cloning technology is an emerging biotechnological tool that could provide commercial opportunities for livestock agriculture. However, the process is very inefficient and the molecular events underlying the technology are poorly understood. The resulting uncertainties are causing concerns regarding the safety of food products derived from cloned livestock. There are similar concerns for livestock produced by biotechnologies which enable the purposeful introduction of genetic modifications. To increase the knowledge about food products from animals generated by these modern biotechnologies, we assessed compositional differences associated with milk and cheese derived from cloned and transgenic cows. Based on gross composition, fatty acid and amino acid profiles and mineral and vitamin contents, milk produced by clones and conventional cattle were essentially similar and consistent with reference values from dairy cows farmed in the same region under similar conditions. Whereas colostrum produced by transgenic cows with additional casein genes had similar IgG secretion levels and kinetics to control cows, milk from the transgenic cows had a distinct yellow appearance, in contrast to the white color of milk from control cows. Processing of milk into cheese resulted in differences in the gross composition and amino acid profiles; 'transgenic' cheese had lower fat and higher salt contents and small but characteristic differences in the amino acid profile compared to control cheese.

  17. Cloning and characterization of cDNAs that code for Na(+)-channel-blocking toxins of the scorpion Centruroides noxius Hoffmann.

    PubMed

    Becerril, B; Vázquez, A; García, C; Corona, M; Bolivar, F; Possani, L D

    1993-06-30

    With the purpose of studying the organization and characteristics of the genes that code for toxins present in the venom of the Mexican scorpion, Centruroides noxius Hoffmann (CnH), we prepared a lambda gt11 cDNA library from the venom glands. Using specific oligodeoxyribonucleotides (oligos) designed according to known amino acid (aa) sequences of CnH toxins (STox), we detected several positive clones, determined their nucleotide (nt) sequences and deduced their aa sequences. A comparative analysis of these sequences with previously reported STox revealed that CnH cDNAs code for a family of very similar STox. The cDNA coding for a known STox, II-10, was cloned. Additionally, three other complete (new) nt sequences were obtained for cDNAs encoding peptides similar to STox 1 from CnH or variants 2 and 3 from Centruroides sculpturatus Ewing. Southern blot genomic DNA analysis showed a minimum size of approximately 600 bp as EcoRI fragments for elements of this family. PCR amplifications of CnH genomic DNA and hybridization of PCR products with specific probes indicated that the genomic structural regions that code for these genes do not contain introns, or at least not large introns.

  18. Implementing of Quantum Cloning with Spatially Separated Quantum Dot Spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jing-Ji; Yeon, Kyu-Hwang; Du, Xin; Lv, Jia; Wang, Ming; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Shou

    2016-07-01

    We propose some schemes for implementing optimal symmetric (asymmetric) 1 → 2 universal quantum cloning, optimal symmetric (asymmetric) 1 → 2 phase-covariant cloning, optimal symmetric 1 → 3 economical phase-covariant cloning and optimal symmetric 1 → 3 economical real state cloning with spatially separated quantum dot spins by choosing the single-qubit rotation angles appropriately. The decoherences of the spontaneous emission of QDs, cavity decay and fiber loss are suppressed since the effective long-distance off-resonant interaction between two distant QDs is mediated by the vacuum fields of the fiber and cavity, and during the whole process no system is excited.

  19. Economical Gaussian cloning of coherent states with known phase

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Yuli; Zou Xubo; Guo Guangcan; Li Shangbin

    2007-07-15

    We investigate the economical Gaussian cloning of coherent states with the known phase, which produces M copies from N input replica and can be implemented with degenerate parametric amplifiers and beam splitters.The achievable fidelity of single copy is given by 2M{radical}(N)/[{radical}(N)(M-1)+{radical}((1+N)(M{sup 2}+N))], which is bigger than the optimal fidelity of the universal Gaussian cloning. The cloning machine presented here works without ancillary optical modes and can be regarded as the continuous variable generalization of the economical cloning machine for qudits.

  20. Generalization of continuous-variable quantum cloning with linear optics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai Zehui; Guo Juan; Gao Jiangrui

    2006-05-15

    We propose an asymmetric quantum cloning scheme. Based on the proposal and experiment by Andersen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 240503 (2005)], we generalize it to two asymmetric cases: quantum cloning with asymmetry between output clones and between quadrature variables. These optical implementations also employ linear elements and homodyne detection only. Finally, we also compare the utility of symmetric and asymmetric cloning in an analysis of a squeezed-state quantum key distribution protocol and find that the asymmetric one is more advantageous.