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Sample records for dose chemotherapy significantly

  1. Effects of tumor type, degree of obesity, and chemotherapy regimen on chemotherapy dose intensity in obese cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, T; Mochinaga, S; Kimura, S; Aragane, N; Yakabe, T; Morita, S; Okudaira, K; Fujito, H

    2013-01-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology recently published a Clinical Practice Guideline entitled "Appropriate Chemotherapy Dosing for Obesity Adult Patients with Cancer." The panel recommended that full weight (actual weight)-based cytotoxic chemotherapy doses are used to treat obese patients with cancer, particularly when the goal of treatment is cure. However, no study has examined dosage calculation methods used for obese cancer patients in Japan. Here, we retrospectively studied the relationships between chemotherapy dose intensity, the occurrence of adverse events, and treatment outcomes in obese patients undergoing chemotherapy. Patients were divided into two groups: the actual BW group (BWg) was composed of patients receiving dosage amounts calculated using their actual BW (n = 64), and the ideal BWg was composed of patients receiving dosage amounts calculated using their ideal BW (n = 41). There were significant differences in the incidence of Grade 3/4 hematological toxicity in the actual and ideal BWg in solid tumor patients, but not in patients with hematological malignancies. In solid tumor patients with ≥30 body mass index (BMI), the incidence of Grade 3/4 hematological toxicity was significantly lower in the ideal BWg than in the actual BWg. Particularly, in patients with complications, incidence of Grade 4 hematological toxicity was significantly higher in the actual BWg than in the ideal BWg. These results suggest that the tumor type, degree of obesity, complications, and choice of chemotherapy regimen should be considered when determining chemotherapy dosage for obese patients.

  2. Relevance of high-dose chemotherapy in solid tumours.

    PubMed

    Nieboer, P; de Vries, E G E; Mulder, N H; van der Graaf, W T A

    2005-05-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem in the treatment of solid tumours. Based on a steep dose-response relationship for especially alkylating agents on tumour cell survival, high-dose chemotherapy was considered of interest for the treatment of solid tumours. Results of phase 1 and 2 studies with high-dose chemotherapy in a variety of tumour types showed good response rates. Nowadays, several phase 3 studies are available especially in metastatic and high-risk breast cancer patients. The high expectations of high-dose chemotherapy did not come true. This review analyses results of randomised studies and comments on the discrepancy between findings in patients versus those in tissue culture. Potential factors involved are the presence of tumour stem cells with different characteristics from more mature tumour cells, limitations in drug escalation in the clinic, transplant mortality, trial design and tumour cell contamination of the haematopoietic stem cell transplant. Maturation of the results from recent studies indicating a more modest benefit in, e.g., adjuvant breast cancer balanced versus long-term side effects will ultimately determine the role of high-dose chemotherapy in certain solid tumours. In case of well-defined indications for high-dose chemotherapy, further selection of patients based on patient and tumour characteristics as well as the introduction of new agents will most likely play a role.

  3. Anti-angiogenic treatment of breast cancer using metronomic low-dose chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Raquel; Shaked, Yuval; Bertolini, Francesco; Emmenegger, Urban; Man, Shan; Kerbel, Robert S

    2005-12-01

    We have been studying the molecular and cellular basis of chronic low-dose, frequently administered, metronomic chemotherapy regimens for the treatment of cancer in a variety of preclinical models, including human breast cancer xenografts. The advantages of metronomic-maintenance-type chemotherapy regimens include significantly reduced host toxicity, potentially reduced costs, increased convenience for patients when oral chemotherapy drugs are used, and the possibility of adopting chronic combination therapies involving conventional chemotherapy drugs and cytostatic molecularly targeted therapies. However, a disadvantage is the empiricism associated with determining the optimal biologic dose (OBD). Recently, we have developed a surrogate biomarker approach involving measurement of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEPs) in peripheral blood to help determine the OBD of anti-angiogenic drugs or treatments, including metronomic chemotherapy. Using this approach we determined the OBD for different metronomic chemotherapy regimens and then tested the effect of such drugs for the treatment of established, advanced (high volume) and widespread human breast cancer metastases in immunodeficient mice. This treatment strategy, which was maintained for over 6 months, with no breaks, resulted in marked prolongation of survival and was devoid of overt toxicity. These results suggest the possibility of using metronomic chemotherapy regimens as an adjuvant therapy for early-stage disease, including breast cancer, as was demonstrated recently using long-term daily low-dose UFT for the treatment of early-stage resected non-small cell lung cancer or UFT in combination for early stage breast cancer combined with tamoxifen.

  4. Stress Encountered by Significant Others of Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Kay

    1987-01-01

    Attempts to identify and describe perceived stress and coping responses of family and nonfamily significant others of cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Significant others were asked to identify stressful events related to treatment factors, relationship factors, and perception of the patient's condition. Coping responses were categorized in…

  5. High-Dose Chemotherapy With Autologous Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation in Metastatic Breast Cancer: Overview of Six Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Donald A.; Ueno, Naoto T.; Johnson, Marcella M.; Lei, Xiudong; Caputo, Jean; Smith, Dori A.; Yancey, Linda J.; Crump, Michael; Stadtmauer, Edward A.; Biron, Pierre; Crown, John P.; Schmid, Peter; Lotz, Jean-Pierre; Rosti, Giovanni; Bregni, Marco; Demirer, Taner

    2011-01-01

    Purpose High doses of effective chemotherapy are compelling if they can be delivered safely. Substantial interest in supporting high-dose chemotherapy with bone marrow or autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation in the 1980s and 1990s led to the initiation of randomized trials to evaluate its effect in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. Methods We identified six randomized trials in metastatic breast cancer that evaluated high doses of chemotherapy with transplant support versus a control regimen without stem-cell support. We assembled a single database containing individual patient information from these trials. The primary analysis of overall survival was a log-rank test comparing high dose versus control. We also used Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusting for known covariates. We addressed potential treatment differences within subsets of patients. Results The effect of high-dose chemotherapy on overall survival was not statistically different (median, 2.16 v 2.02 years; P = .08). A statistically significant advantage in progression-free survival (median, 0.91 v 0.69 years) did not translate into survival benefit. Subset analyses found little evidence that there are groups of patients who might benefit from high-dose chemotherapy with hematopoietic support. Conclusion Overall survival of patients with metastatic breast cancer in the six randomized trials was not significantly improved by high-dose chemotherapy; any benefit from high doses was small. No identifiable subset of patients seems to benefit from high-dose chemotherapy. PMID:21768454

  6. [High-dose chemotherapy as a strategy to overcome drug resistance in solid tumors].

    PubMed

    Selle, Frédéric; Gligorov, Joseph; Soares, Daniele G; Lotz, Jean-Pierre

    2016-10-01

    The concept of high-doses chemotherapy was developed in the 1980s based on in vitro scientific observations. Exposure of tumor cells to increasing concentrations of alkylating agents resulted in increased cell death in a strong dose-response manner. Moreover, the acquired resistance of tumor cells could be overcome by dose intensification. In clinic, dose intensification of alkylating agents resulted in increased therapeutic responses, however associated with significant hematological toxicity. Following the development of autologous stem cells transplantation harvesting from peripheral blood, the high-doses of chemotherapy, initially associated with marked toxic effects, could be more easily tolerated. As a result, the approach was evaluated in different types of solid tumors, including breast, ovarian and germ cell tumors, small cell lung carcinoma, soft tissue sarcomas and Ewing sarcoma. To date, high-doses chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cells support is only used as a salvage therapy to treat poor prognosis germ cell tumors patients with chemo-sensitive disease. Regarding breast and ovarian cancer, high-doses chemotherapy should be considered only in the context of clinical trials. However, intensive therapy as an approach to overcome resistance to standard treatments is still relevant. Numerous efforts are still ongoing to identify novel therapeutic combinations and active treatments to improve patients' responses.

  7. From total empiricism to a rational design of metronomic chemotherapy phase I dosing trials.

    PubMed

    Lam, Thomas; Hetherington, John W; Greenman, John; Maraveyas, Anthony

    2006-02-01

    'Metronomic chemotherapy' represents a novel anti-angiogenic strategy whereby low-dose chemotherapy is utilized in a continuous fashion in order to target tumor endothelium. There are many potential advantages of this strategy and clinical trials are already underway. However, although the scheduling of metronomic chemotherapy is relatively unequivocal, metronomic dosing principles are at present poorly defined. Arbitrarily, 10-33% of the maximum tolerated dose comprises 'the dose range'. We argue that this is too empirical and propose a set of phase I metronomic chemotherapy dosing strategies based on a principled approach which may help to reduce the problem of empiricism in dosing for metronomic chemotherapy trials.

  8. Efficacy and Toxicity of Low-Dose versus Conventional-Dose Chemotherapy for Malignant Tumors: a Meta-Analysis of 6 Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed

    Xie, Xianhe; Wu, Yupeng; Luo, Shuimei; Yang, Haitao; Li, Lina; Zhou, Sijing; Shen, Ruifen; Lin, Heng

    2017-02-01

    Low-dose chemotherapy has emerged as a new strategy for control of cancer. However, there is a controversy as to whether low-dose chemotherapy is an effective way to manage many human malignancies. To shed light on this controversy, we performed a meta-analysis of relative merits between low-dose and conventional-dose chemotherapy in different carcinomas. Studies published before February 29, 2016 were reviewed for the meta-analysis and selected according to defined criteria. The effect levels of low-dose chemotherapy regarding overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and severe adverse events (SAEs) (Grade≥3) were calculated as risk ratios (ORs) or adjusted hazard ratios (HRs). Six randomized controlled studies (RCTs) have provided data for low-dose chemotherapy versus conventional-dose chemotherapy for 838 cases and 833 cases, respectively. Interestingly, low-dose chemotherapy achieved the same desired potency as conventional-dose chemotherapy, with no differences in pooled ORR (RR=1.00, 95%CI [0.89, 1.13]; (P=0.97), OS (HR=1.07, 95%CI [0.90, 1.26]; P=0.44) and PFS (HR=1.02, 95%CI [0.84, 1.23]; P=0.87) values. Furthermore, pooled data for common SAEs showed that, compared with conventional-dose chemotherapy regimen, low-dose chemotherapy regimen resulted in significant less mucositis (P<0.0001), thrombocytopenia (P<0.00001), anemia (P=0.0001) and febrile neutropenia (P=0.004). At the same time, no statistically significant differences were observed with regard to treatment-related death (P=0.36), diarrhea (P=0.49), leucopenia (P=0.11), neutropenia (P=0.74) and nausea/vomiting (ʺPʺ=0.21). Publication bias was assessed by Egger’s test and the funnel plot. In conclusion, the meta-analysis seems to support the idea that low-dose chemotherapy may play an important role in achieving the same desired potency as conventional-dose chemotherapy in managing malignant tumors. Moreover, low-dose regimen seems to possess positive advantages of lower

  9. Optimal Treatment for Intracranial Germinoma: Can We Lower Radiation Dose Without Chemotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Sang-Hue; Chen, Yi-Wei; Huang, Pin-I

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: To review the effectiveness of reduced-dose and restricted-volume radiation-only therapy in the treatment of intracranial germinoma and to assess the feasibility of reducing or eliminating the use of chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 1996 and March 2007, a retrospective analysis was performed that included 38 patients who received either reduced radiation alone (30 Gy for 26 patients) or reduced radiation with chemotherapy (n = 12 patients). All 38 patients received extended focal (including whole-ventricle) irradiation and were followed up until February 2008. Overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) rates were calculated. Variables associated with survival were evaluated by univariate Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: Median follow-up was 62.4 months (range, 10.1-142.5 months). The total 5-year OS rate was 93.7%. The 5-year OS and RFS rates for patients receiving radiation only were 100% and 96.2%, respectively. The rates for those receiving radiation plus chemotherapy were 83.3 % and 91.7%, respectively (not statistically significant). No predictive factor was significantly associated with the OS or RFS rate. Chemotherapy had no significant effect on survival but was associated with a higher incidence of treatment-related toxicity. Conclusions: A further decrease in the radiation dose to 30 Gy with whole-ventricle irradiation is sufficient to treat selected patients with intracranial germinoma. Wide-field irradiation or chemotherapy should be avoided as these methods are unnecessary. Thus, reduction of the radiation dose to 30 Gy may be feasible, even without chemotherapy.

  10. High-dose Helical Tomotherapy With Concurrent Full-dose Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jee Suk; Wang, Michael L.C.; Koom, Woong Sub; Yoon, Hong In; Chung, Yoonsun; Song, Si Young; Seong, Jinsil

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To improve poor therapeutic outcome of current practice of chemoradiotherapy (CRT), high-dose helical tomotherapy (HT) with concurrent full-dose chemotherapy has been performed on patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), and the results were analyzed. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 39 patients with LAPC treated with radiotherapy using HT (median, 58.4 Gy; range, 50.8-59.9 Gy) and concomitant chemotherapy between 2006 and 2009. Radiotherapy was directed to the primary tumor with a 0.5-cm margin without prophylactic nodal coverage. Twenty-nine patients (79%) received full-dose (1000 mg/m{sup 2}) gemcitabine-based chemotherapy during HT. After completion of CRT, maintenance chemotherapy was administered to 37 patients (95%). Results: The median follow-up was 15.5 months (range, 3.4-43.9) for the entire cohort, and 22.5 months (range, 12.0-43.9) for the surviving patients. The 1- and 2-year local progression-free survival rates were 82.1% and 77.3%, respectively. Eight patients (21%) were converted to resectable status, including 1 with a pathological complete response. The median overall survival and progression-free survival were 21.2 and 14.0 months, respectively. Acute toxicities were acceptable with no gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity higher than Grade 3. Severe late GI toxicity ({>=}Grade 3) occurred in 10 patients (26%); 1 treatment-related death from GI bleeding was observed. Conclusion: High-dose helical tomotherapy with concurrent full-dose chemotherapy resulted in improved local control and long-term survival in patients with LAPC. Future studies are needed to widen the therapeutic window by minimizing late GI toxicity.

  11. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cancer cells. This is called palliative chemotherapy. Chemotherapy for conditions other than cancer Some chemotherapy drugs ... you'll receive. Side effects that occur during chemotherapy treatment Common side effects of chemotherapy drugs include: ...

  12. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer chemotherapy; Cancer drug therapy; Cytotoxic chemotherapy ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 179. National Cancer Institute. Chemotherapy and you: support for people who have cancer. ...

  13. Combined chemoradiation for the management of nasal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma: elucidating the significance of systemic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ye; Lu, Jiade J; Ma, Xuejun; Wang, Biyun; Hong, Xiaonan; Li, Xiaoqiu; Li, Jin

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the efficacy and treatment outcome of CHOP and CHOP combined with nitrosourea chemotherapy in natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma of the nasal cavity. Sixty-three patients with NK/T-cell lymphoma of the nasal cavity were treated with CHOP or CHOP combined with oral nitrosourea chemotherapy between January 1997 and June 2005. By the Ann Arbor Lymphoma Staging Classification, 57 patients (90%) had Stage IE or IIE disease and six patients (10%) had Stage III or IV disease. All patients with Stage IE or IIE disease were intended to be treated curatively with combined chemoradiation; and patients who had Stage III or IV disease were treated with chemotherapy alone with curative intention. Chemotherapy consisted of: (1) up to six cycles of the standard CHOP based regimen, or (2) up to six cycles of the standard CHOP based regimen with oral Semustine dosed at 120 mg (or Lomustine dosed at 100mg) on day 1 of each chemotherapy cycle. External beam radiation therapy was delivered by daily conventional fractionation by Co-60 or 6MVx linear accelerator for patients with Stage IE or IIE disease. The radiation dose to the tumor bed was between 36 and 50 Gy with a median dose of 45 Gy. Fifty-three patients received chemotherapy prior to radiation, and four patients were treated with involved field radiation before chemotherapy. The median follow up for all 44 surviving patients was 31 months (range: 6-104 months). The 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 60% and 70%, respectively. The PFS and OS of patients who were treated with or without oral nitrosourea in addition to CHOP were 73% vs. 44% (P=0.035) and 75% vs. 64% (P=0.276), respectively. Nine patients with Stage IE or IIE diseases developed disease progression during their planned treatment and died within 10 months after the initiation of treatment; Six patients who achieved complete response (CR) after planned chemoradiation developed

  14. [High dose cinobufocini in attenuation and treatment of infection and granulocytopenia during combined chemotherapy of malignant blood diseases].

    PubMed

    Yue, B B

    1992-03-01

    The use of high dose Cinobufocini in attenuation and treatment of infection and granulocytopenia during combined chemotherapy was observed in patients with malignant blood diseases. The study was designed in such a way that each patient served as self control. The patients, 18 males and 12 females, aged 16-66 (average 34), 62 experiments in 20 patients with acute leukemia, 8 with malignant lymphoma and 2 with multiple myeloma were observed. In patients with the treatment of high dose Cinobufocini, infection was significantly decreased and the number of granulocytes was not markedly changed before and after the treatment. The observation demonstrated that high dose Cinobufocini can significantly reduce the risk of infection and degree and duration of granulocytopenia associated with chemotherapy of patients with malignant blood diseases. The use of high dose Cinobufocini is simple and convenient and with very little side effects.

  15. Low-dose docetaxel, estramustine and prednisolone combination chemotherapy for castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    NAKANO, MAYURA; SHOJI, SUNAO; HIGURE, TARO; KAWAKAMI, MASAYOSHI; TOMONAGA, TETSURO; TERACHI, TOSHIRO; UCHIDA, TOYOAKI

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to report our experience with weekly low-dose docetaxel (DOC) chemotherapy for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). From 2007 to 2014, 39 consecutive patients received weekly low-dose DOC; the oncological effectiveness, side effects and tolerability were prospectively analyzed. The median patient age, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level and Gleason score at diagnosis of prostate cancer were 71 years (range, 55–83 years), 187 ng/ml (range, 2.0–1711 ng/ml) and 8 (range, 5–10), respectively. The median number of cycles of DOC was 7 (range, 1–45 cycles). Of the 39 patients, the PSA level decreased by >50% in 13 (33%). In the multivariate analysis of prediction of patient overall survival, a decrease of the PSA level to <50% was a significant predictor (hazard ratio = 6.913; 95% confidence interval: 1.147–41.669; P=0.035). The median cancer-specific overall survival from the diagnosis of CRPC was 16.7 months (range, 2–54 months). Grade 3 toxicities were observed in 5 patients (13%); specifically, limb edema, nausea and hepatic disorders were detected in 2 (5%), 2 (5%) and 1 patient (3%), respectively. Treatment-related death (grade 5) occurred in 1 patient due to interstitial pneumonia after two courses of chemotherapy. The chemotherapy was completed in the majority of the patients (n=37, 94.8%) in the outpatient department, without interruption. These findings suggest that weekly low-dose DOC is feasible and safe for selected patients with CRPC, without treament with novel agents, such as abiraterone, enzalutamide and cabazitaxel. PMID:27284427

  16. High dose intensity combination chemotherapy for advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma: results of a pilot study.

    PubMed Central

    Sweetenham, J. W.; McKendrick, J. J.; Jones, D. H.; Whitehouse, J. M.; Williams, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    Retrospective studies have recently demonstrated a significant correlation between dose intensity of chemotherapy and response rates and survival in various diseases including epithelial ovarian carcinoma. As part of a proposed randomised trial to assess the effect of dose intensity on outcome in ovarian carcinoma, a pilot study has been undertaken to determine the toxicity and efficacy of the high intensity therapy. Nineteen patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma received initial treatment with cisplatin 120 mg m-2 i.v. day 1, and cyclophosphamide 1,000 mg-2 i.v. day 1, given at 21-day intervals for six cycles. The average relative dose intensity of this therapy is 1.14 when compared with the CHAP regimen. Severe toxicity was experienced by most patients. The median received average relative dose intensity was 0.90, with only one patient receiving treatment to the proposed intensity. Randomised studies of the effect of dose intensity in ovarian carcinoma are essential, but an initial step must be to assess whether the proposed high dose treatment can be delivered. PMID:2155645

  17. Hepatocellular carcinoma stem cell-like cells are enriched following low-dose 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yongqiang; Mou, Lisha; Cheng, Kangwen; Wang, Chengyou; Deng, Xuesong; Chen, Junren; Fan, Zhibing; Ni, Yong

    2016-10-01

    It has been proposed that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are involved in tumor resistance to chemotherapy and tumor relapse. The goal of the present study was to determine the effect of low-dose 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) on enriched hepatocellular CSC-like cells. Increased cell motility and epithelial-mesenchymal transition were observed by migration assay in human hepatoblastoma PLC/RAF/5 cells following 5-Fu treatment, as well as a significant enhancement in their sphere-forming abilities. CSC-like cells were identified by side population cell analysis. The percentage of CSC-like cells in the surviving cells was greatly increased in response to 5-Fu. These findings indicate that low-dose 5-Fu treatment may efficiently enrich the CSC-like cell population in PLC/RAF/5 cells.

  18. A safe and effective dose of cisplatin in hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Akihiko; Suda, Takeshi; Kamimura, Kenya; Tsuchiya, Atsunori; Tamura, Yasushi; Takamura, Masaaki; Igarashi, Masato; Kawai, Hirokazu; Yamagiwa, Satoshi; Aoyagi, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) is an anticancer agent that is commonly used in hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study aimed to clarify the safe and effective dose of CDDP in HAI for HCC. The hypervascular area was measured in 42 HCCs before and after HAI with CDDP. Serum platinum concentration was quantified in the peripheral and/or middle hepatic veins by atomic absorption spectrometry. The relation between the HCC response and CDDP dose was statistically analyzed. The multiple HCC nodules in an individual case generally demonstrated the same response to CDDP. The free-platinum concentration stayed relatively constant in the hepatic vein during HAI followed by a rapid decline, while total-platinum gradually increased then slowly disappeared over several days. After CDDP-HAI, 15 HCCs shrunk and 27 HCCs grew. The reduction rate in the shrunken nodules was tended to be correlated with CDDP dose after standardization with the target liver volume. On the other hand, the growth rate of the enlarged HCCs was significantly correlated with CDDP dose after normalization with creatinine clearance. These data support a recommendation of CDDP-HAI infusion where the amount of CDDP (mg) administered is less than patient creatinine clearance (mL/min/1.73 m2) upon an assumption of HCC doubling time of 90 days, and the targeted liver is smaller than 200 times the CDDP dose (mg). A further analysis is required to define appropriate injection speeds. PMID:24133631

  19. Chemotherapy

    Cancer.gov

    Chemotherapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses drugs to kill cancer cells. Learn how chemotherapy works against cancer, why it causes side effects, and how it is used with other cancer treatments.

  20. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know Central Venous Catheters Track Your Chemotherapy Side Effects [PDF] Common Concerns About Chemotherapy Get information about common concerns people have when getting chemotherapy, and learn more about related topics. Is It Safe to Keep My Pet While I’m Being Treated for ... Drug Use ...

  1. Optimal biologic dose of metronomic chemotherapy regimens is associated with maximum antiangiogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Shaked, Yuval; Emmenegger, Urban; Man, Shan; Cervi, Dave; Bertolini, Francesco; Ben-David, Yaacov; Kerbel, Robert S

    2005-11-01

    Low-dose metronomic chemotherapy is a promising therapeutic cancer treatment strategy thought to have an antiangiogenic basis. However, the advantages of reduced toxicity, increased efficacy in some cases, and ability to combine chemotherapy administered long term in this way with targeted therapies can be compromised by the empiricism associated with determining the optimum biologic dose (OBD). Using 4 distinct metronomic chemotherapy regimens in 4 different preclinical tumor models, including a hematologic malignancy, we established the OBD by determining the maximum efficacy associated with minimum or no toxicity. We then found each OBD to be strikingly correlated with the maximum reduction in viable peripheral blood circulating vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-positive (VEGFR-2+) endothelial precursors (CEPs). These results suggest that CEPs may serve as a pharmacodynamic biomarker to determine the OBD of metronomic chemotherapy regimens.

  2. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging After High-Dose Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Childhood Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Spreafico, Filippo Gandola, Lorenza; Marchiano, Alfonso; Simonetti, Fabio; Poggi, Geraldina; Adduci, Anna; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Luksch, Roberto; Biassoni, Veronica; Meazza, Cristina; Catania, Serena; Terenziani, Monica; Musumeci, Renato; Fossati-Bellani, Franca; Massimino, Maura

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Brain necrosis or other subacute iatrogenic reactions has been recognized as a potential complication of radiotherapy (RT), although the possible synergistic effects of high-dose chemotherapy and RT might have been underestimated. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the clinical and radiologic data of 49 consecutive children with malignant brain tumors treated with high-dose thiotepa and autologous hematopoietic stem cell rescue, preceded or followed by RT. The patients were assessed for neurocognitive tests to identify any correlation with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) anomalies. Results: Of the 49 children, 18 (6 of 25 with high-grade gliomas and 12 of 24 with primitive neuroectodermal tumors) had abnormal brain MRI findings occurring a median of 8 months (range, 2-39 months) after RT and beginning to regress a median of 13 months (range, 2-26 months) after onset. The most common lesion pattern involved multiple pseudonodular, millimeter-size, T{sub 1}-weighted unevenly enhancing, and T{sub 2}-weighted hyperintense foci. Four patients with primitive neuroectodermal tumors also had subdural fluid leaks, with meningeal enhancement over the effusion. One-half of the patients had symptoms relating to the new radiographic findings. The MRI lesion-free survival rate was 74% {+-} 6% at 1 year and 57% {+-} 8% at 2 years. The number of marrow ablative courses correlated significantly to the incidence of radiographic anomalies. No significant difference was found in intelligent quotient scores between children with and without radiographic changes. Conclusion: Multiple enhancing cerebral lesions were frequently seen on MRI scans soon after high-dose chemotherapy and RT. Such findings pose a major diagnostic challenge in terms of their differential diagnosis vis-a-vis recurrent tumor. Their correlation with neurocognitive results deserves further investigation.

  3. Comparing two lower-dose cisplatin programs for radio-chemotherapy of locally advanced head-and-neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Rades, Dirk; Seidl, Daniel; Janssen, Stefan; Strojan, Primoz; Karner, Katarina; Bajrovic, Amira; Hakim, Samer G; Wollenberg, Barbara; Schild, Steven E

    2017-02-01

    Radio-chemotherapy is a common treatment for locally advanced squamous cell head-and-neck cancers (LA-SCCHN). Cisplatin (100 mg/m(2)) every 3 weeks is very common but associated with considerable toxicity. Therefore, cisplatin programs with lower daily doses were introduced. There is a lack of studies comparing lower-dose programs. In this study, 85 patients receiving radio-chemotherapy with 20 mg/m(2) cisplatin on 5 days every 4 weeks (group A) were retrospectively compared to 85 patients receiving radio-chemotherapy with 30-40 mg/m(2) cisplatin weekly (group B). Groups were matched for nine factors including age, gender, performance score, tumor site, T-/N-category, surgery, hemoglobin before radio-chemotherapy, and radiation technique. One- and 3-year loco-regional control rates were 83 and 69 % in group A versus 74 and 63 % in group B (p = 0.12). One- and 3-year survival rates were 93 % and 73 % in group A versus 91 and 49 % in group B (p = 0.011). On multivariate analysis, survival was significantly better for group A (HR 1.17; p = 0.002). In groups A and B, 12 and 28 % of patients, respectively, did not receive a cumulative cisplatin dose ≥180 mg/m(2) (p = 0.016). Toxicity rates were not significantly different. On subgroup analyses, group A patients had better loco-regional control (p = 0.040) and survival (p = 0.005) than group B patients after definitive radio-chemotherapy. In patients receiving adjuvant radio-chemotherapy, outcomes were not significantly different. Thus, 20 mg/m(2) cisplatin on 5 days every 4 weeks resulted in better loco-regional control and survival in patients receiving definitive radio-chemotherapy and may be preferable for these patients. Confirmation of these results in a randomized trial is warranted.

  4. Monitoring and Treatment of Acute Kidney Injury in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia After High Dose Methotrexate Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cong-Ping

    2016-01-01

    To investigate acute kidney injury (AKI) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who received high dose methotrexate (MTX) chemotherapy and explore the corresponding treatment. Methods 180 children who received high dose MTX chemotherapy were observed with serum MTX concentration and serum creatinine. Patients with AKI of stage 3 or poor response to conventional treatment were performed on hemodialysis and assessed the treatment outcome. Results 9 patients (5%) have appeared AKI, including 7 cases of AKI of stage 3. However, there were not any significant correlation between age, gender, serum MTX concentration and AKI, respectively. Compared with normal serum MTX concentration, the patients with high serum MTX concentration easily were developed to AKI, the MTX and serum creatinine concentration had been significantly decreased in 9 patients after hemodialysis. Conclusion AKI has appeared in some children with ALL who receive high dose MTX chemotherapy, and this may due to increase of serum MTX concentration. The monitoring of serum MTX concentration and AKI index could help to find out AKI, and even to prevent the occurrence of it. Furthermore, once AKI is present, those patients with AKI stage 3 or poor response to conventional treatment should be performed on hemodialysis treatment. PMID:28243295

  5. Hypofractionated Dose-Painting Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Chemotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Bakst, Richard L.; Lee, Nancy; Pfister, David G.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Hunt, Margie A.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of dose-painting intensity-modulated radiation therapy (DP-IMRT) with a hypofractionated regimen to treat nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) with concomitant toxicity reduction. Methods and Materials: From October 2002 through April 2007, 25 newly diagnosed NPC patients were enrolled in a prospective trial. DP-IMRT was prescribed to deliver 70.2 Gy using 2.34-Gy fractions to the gross tumor volume for the primary and nodal sites while simultaneously delivering 54 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to regions at risk of microscopic disease. Patients received concurrent and adjuvant platin-based chemotherapy similar to the Intergroup 0099 trial. Results: Patient and disease characteristics are as follows: median age, 46; 44% Asian; 68% male; 76% World Health Organization III; 20% T1, 52% T2, 16% T3, 12% T4; 20% N0, 36% N1, 36% N2, 8% N3. With median follow-up of 33 months, 3-year local control was 91%, regional control was 91%, freedom from distant metastases was 91%, and overall survival was 89%. The average mean dose to each cochlea was 43 Gy. With median audiogram follow-up of 14 months, only one patient had clinically significant (Grade 3) hearing loss. Twelve percent of patients developed temporal lobe necrosis; one patient required surgical resection. Conclusions: Preliminary findings using a hypofractionated DP-IMRT regimen demonstrated that local control, freedom from distant metastases, and overall survival compared favorably with other series of IMRT and chemotherapy. The highly conformal boost to the tumor bed resulted low rates of severe ototoxicity (Grade 3-4). However, the incidence of in-field brain radiation necrosis indicates that 2.34 Gy per fraction is not safe in this setting.

  6. Does High-Dose Antimicrobial Chemotherapy Prevent the Evolution of Resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Day, Troy; Read, Andrew F.

    2016-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy has long been advocated as a means of controlling drug resistance in infectious diseases but recent empirical studies have begun to challenge this view. We develop a very general framework for modeling and understanding resistance emergence based on principles from evolutionary biology. We use this framework to show how high-dose chemotherapy engenders opposing evolutionary processes involving the mutational input of resistant strains and their release from ecological competition. Whether such therapy provides the best approach for controlling resistance therefore depends on the relative strengths of these processes. These opposing processes typically lead to a unimodal relationship between drug pressure and resistance emergence. As a result, the optimal drug dose lies at either end of the therapeutic window of clinically acceptable concentrations. We illustrate our findings with a simple model that shows how a seemingly minor change in parameter values can alter the outcome from one where high-dose chemotherapy is optimal to one where using the smallest clinically effective dose is best. A review of the available empirical evidence provides broad support for these general conclusions. Our analysis opens up treatment options not currently considered as resistance management strategies, and it also simplifies the experiments required to determine the drug doses which best retard resistance emergence in patients. PMID:26820986

  7. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... needs plenty of rest to recover from chemotherapy. Scale back on strenuous stuff, and make time to ... teeth very gently to avoid bleeding. Once you've finished chemo, it's still important to visit the ...

  8. Roles of Radiation Dose and Chemotherapy in the Etiology of Stomach Cancer as a Second Malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Belt-Dusebout, Alexandra W. van den; Aleman, Berthe M.P.; Besseling, Gijs; Bruin, Marie L. de; Hauptmann, Michael; Veer, Mars B. van't; Wit, Ronald de; Ribot, Jacques G.; Noordijk, Evert M.; Kerst, J. Martijn; Gietema, Jourik A.; Leeuwen, Flora E. van

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the roles of radiation dose, chemotherapy, and other factors in the etiology of stomach cancer in long-term survivors of testicular cancer or Hodgkin lymphoma. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cohort study in 5,142 survivors of testicular cancer or Hodgkin lymphoma treated in the Netherlands between 1965 and 1995. In a nested case-control study, detailed information on treatment, smoking, gastrointestinal diseases, and family history was collected for 42 patients with stomach cancer and 126 matched controls. For each subject, the mean radiation dose to the stomach was estimated. Relative risks (RRs) of stomach cancer and the radiation-related excess relative risk (ERR) per gray were calculated by conditional logistic regression analysis. Results: The risk of stomach cancer was 3.4-fold increased compared with the general population. The risk increased with increasing mean stomach dose (p for trend, <0.001), at an ERR of 0.84 per Gy (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.12-15.6). Mean stomach doses of more than 20 Gy were associated with a RR of 9.9 (95% CI, 3.2-31.2) compared with doses below 11 Gy. The risk was 1.8-fold (95% CI, 0.8-4.4) increased after chemotherapy and 5.4-fold (95% CI, 1.2-23.9) increased after high doses of procarbazine (>=13,000 mg) vs. <10,000 mg. The RR of smoking more than 10 cigarettes per day vs. no smoking was 1.6 (95% CI, 0.6-4.2). Conclusions: Stomach cancer risk is strongly radiation dose dependent. The role of chemotherapy, particularly of procarbazine and related agents, needs further study, because of the relatively small numbers of chemotherapy-treated subjects.

  9. High-dose treatment with autologous stem cell transplantation versus sequential chemotherapy: the GELA experience.

    PubMed

    Bosly, A; Haioun, C; Gisselbrecht, C; Reyes, F; Coiffier, B

    2001-07-01

    Autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) has permitted to deliver high-dose therapy (HDT). In aggressive lymphomas, the GELA group conducted prospective and retrospective studies comparing HDT + ASCT to conventional sequential chemotherapy. In relapsing patients and in partial remission, retrospective studies showed a survival advantage for HDT + ASCT over sequential chemotherapy. In complete response, advantage for HDT + ASCT was demonstrated in a prospective trial only for patients with high intermediate or high risk in the IPI score. The attainment of a maximal reduction of the tumoral mass before going HDT is very important either in first line or in relapsing patients.

  10. Treatment of permanent chemotherapy-induced alopecia with low dose oral minoxidil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinyi; Thai, Keng-Ee

    2015-05-13

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is a well-established cause of major distress to patients. Permanent chemotherapy-induced alopecia (PCIA) is the absence of or incomplete hair regrowth lasting longer than 6 months after the cessation of chemotherapy and it does not respond to standard treatments of scalp cooling or topical minoxidil. The increasing numbers of reports of PCIA highlight the need for research into an effective treatment. We report a case of a 39 year-old woman with cosmetically significant regrowth after continuous therapy with oral minoxidil.

  11. A randomised phase III study comparing high-dose chemotherapy to conventionally dosed chemotherapy for stage III ovarian cancer: the Finnish Ovarian Cancer (FINOVA) study.

    PubMed

    Grénman, Seija; Wiklund, Tom; Jalkanen, Jyrki; Kuoppala, Tapio; Mäenpää, Johanna; Kuronen, Arja; Leminen, Arto; Puistola, Ulla; Vuolo-Merilä, Päivi; Salmi, Tuula; Vuento, Maarit; Yliskoski, Merja; Itälä, Maija; Helenius, Hans; Joensuu, Heikki; Lehtovirta, Pentti

    2006-09-01

    Women with stage III ovarian cancer and with < or = 2 cm residual tumour were randomly assigned to receive either conventionally dosed chemotherapy (group A) or HDCT (group B). Patients allocated to group A received 6 cycles of paclitaxel (T) 135 mg/m2 and cisplatin (P) 75 mg/m2 every 3 weeks, and those allocated to HDCT received 3 TP cycles followed by peripheral blood stem cell mobilisation with cyclophosphamide (C) 3000 mg/m2 and T 175 mg/m2, and subsequently HDCT with carboplatin 1500 mg/m2, C 120 mg/kg, and mitoxantrone 75 mg/m2. The trial was closed early after 42 patients were entered due to slow accrual. The median follow-up time of patients who were alive was 81 months. The median progression-free survival time was 15.9 and 16.6 months (hazard ratio, HR 0.83; 95% CI 0.41-1.69, P = 0.61) and the median overall survival time was 43.7 and 64.3 months (HR, 0.74; 95% CI 0.34-1.61, P = 0.44) in groups A and B, respectively. Although one patient died of HDCT-related toxicity, the regimen was otherwise relatively well tolerated. We conclude that the HDCT regimen used was feasible, but did not result in significantly improved survival in this prematurely closed trial. A clinically important survival benefit cannot be excluded due to the small sample size.

  12. Tandem High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Ki Woong; Lim, Do Hoon; Yi, Eun Sang; Choi, Young Bae; Lee, Ji Won; Yoo, Keon Hee; Koo, Hong Hoe; Kim, Ji Hye; Suh, Yeon-Lim; Joung, Yoo Sook; Shin, Hyung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We prospectively evaluated the effectiveness of tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDCT/auto-SCT) in improving the survival of patients with atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors while reducing the risks of late adverse effects from radiotherapy (RT). Materials and Methods For young children (< 3 years old), tandem HDCT/auto-SCT was administered after six cycles of induction chemotherapy. RT was deferred until after 3 years of age unless the tumor showed relapse or progression. For older patients (> 3 years old), RT including reduced-dose craniospinal RT (23.4 or 30.6 Gy) was administered either after two cycles of induction chemotherapy or after surgery, and tandem HDCT/auto-SCT was administered after six cycles of induction chemotherapy. Results A total of 13 patients (five young and eight older) were enrolled from November 2004 to June 2012. Eight patients, including all five young patients, had metastatic disease at diagnosis. Six patients (four young and two older) experienced progression before initiation of RT, and seven were able to proceed to HDCT/auto-SCT without progression during induction treatment. Three of six patients who experienced progression during induction treatment underwent HDCT/auto-SCT as salvage treatment. All five young patients died from disease progression. However, four of the eight older patients remain progression-freewith a median follow-up period of 64 months (range, 39 to 108 months). Treatment-related late toxicities were acceptable. Conclusion The required dose of craniospinal RT might be reduced in older patients if the intensity of chemotherapy is increased. However, early administration of RT should be considered to prevent early progression in young patients. PMID:27034140

  13. No Salvage Using High-Dose Chemotherapy Plus/Minus Reirradiation for Relapsing Previously Irradiated Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Massimino, Maura Gandola, Lorenza; Spreafico, Filippo; Biassoni, Veronica; Luksch, Roberto; Collini, Paola; Solero, Carlo N.; Simonetti, Fabio; Pignoli, Emanuele; Cefalo, Graziella; Poggi, Geraldina; Modena, Piergiorgio Ph.D.; Mariani, Luigi; Potepan, Paolo; Podda, Marta; Casanova, Michela; Pecori, Emilia; Acerno, Stefania; Ferrari, Andrea; Terenziani, Monica

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: Myeloablative regimens were frequently used for medulloblastoma relapsing after craniospinal irradiation (CSI): in 1997-2002, we used repeated surgery, standard-dose and myeloablative chemotherapy, and reirradiation. Methods and Materials: In 10 patients, reinduction included sequential high-dose etoposide, high-dose cyclophosphamide/vincristine, and high-dose carboplatin/vincristine, then two myeloablative courses with high-dose thiotepa ({+-} carboplatin); 6 other patients received two of four courses of cisplatin/etoposide. Hematopoietic precursor mobilization followed high-dose etoposide or high-dose cyclophosphamide or cisplatin/etoposide therapy. After the overall chemotherapy program, reirradiation was prescribed when possible. Results: Seventeen patients were treated: previous treatment included CSI of 19.5-36 Gy with posterior fossa/tumor boost and chemotherapy in 16 patients. Fifteen patients were in their first and 2 in their second and third relapses, respectively. First progression-free survival had lasted a median of 26 months. Relapse sites included leptomeninges in 9 patients, spine in 4 patients, posterior fossa in 3 patients, and brain in 1 patient. Three patients underwent complete resection of recurrence, and 10 underwent reirradiation. Twelve of 14 patients with assessable tumor had an objective response after reinduction; 2 experienced progression and were not given the myeloablative courses. Remission lasted a median of 16 months. Additional relapses appeared in 13 patients continuing the treatment. Fifteen patients died of progression and 1 died of pneumonia 13 months after relapse. The only survivor at 93 months had a single spinal metastasis that was excised and irradiated. Survival for the series as a whole was 11-93 months, with a median of 41 months. Conclusions: Despite responses being obtained and ample use of surgery and reirradiation, second-line therapy with myeloablative schedules was not curative, barring a few

  14. Spatial distribution of Schistosoma mansoni infection before and after chemotherapy with two praziquantel doses in a community of Pernambuco, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Galvão, Aline F; Favre, Tereza C; Guimarães, Ricardo J P S; Pereira, Ana P B; Zani, Luciana C; Felipe, Katariny T; Domingues, Ana Lúcia C; Carvalho, Omar S; Barbosa, Constança S; Pieri, Otávio S

    2010-07-01

    Praziquantel chemotherapy has been the focus of the Schistosomiasis Control Program in Brazil for the past two decades. Nevertheless, information on the impact of selective chemotherapy against Schistosoma mansoni infection under the conditions confronted by the health teams in endemic municipalities remains scarce. This paper compares the spatial pattern of infection before and after treatment with either a 40 mg/kg or 60 mg/kg dose of praziquantel by determining the intensity of spatial cluster among patients at 180 and 360 days after treatment. The spatial-temporal distribution of egg-positive patients was analysed in a Geographic Information System using the kernel smoothing technique. While all patients became egg-negative after 21 days, 17.9% and 30.9% reverted to an egg-positive condition after 180 and 360 days, respectively. Both the prevalence and intensity of infection after treatment were significantly lower in the 60 mg/kg than in the 40 mg/kg treatment group. The higher intensity of the kernel in the 40 mg/kg group compared to the 60 mg/kg group, at both 180 and 360 days, reflects the higher number of reverted cases in the lower dose group. Auxiliary, preventive measures to control transmission should be integrated with chemotherapy to achieve a more enduring impact.

  15. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell death (apoptosis). Types There are two main types of chemotherapy drugs: Cytostatic: These drugs prevent cells from reproducing. They include: Anti-angiogenesis agents/Angiogenesis inhibitors—These drugs prevent the development of blood vessels around the tumor that provide it with ...

  16. Use of high-dose chemotherapy in front-line therapy of childhood malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Massimino, Maura; Biassoni, Veronica

    2006-05-01

    Brain tumors are the second most common cancer in pediatric patients and the main cause from death of malignant tumors in this age group. High-grade or malignant glioma, among which anaplastic astrocytomas and glioblastoma are the most prevalent histotypes, represent 10% of pediatric brain tumors and, taken as a whole, are the second most frequent malignant histotype after medulloblastoma. Apart from complete excision followed by full-dose local radiotherapy, chemotherapy appears to provide some benefit to the final outcome. Different trials have explored the role of high-dose chemotherapy that, theoretically, could give an advantage to these patients by overcoming the blood-brain barrier, cell chemoresistance and inducing a wider number of responses. However, it is still doubtful if more responses translate into better outcome and it is not fully understood which patients can experience a true benefit from this treatment strategy. New protocols under evaluation include new agents with specific biological targets, multiple cycles of high-dose chemotherapy, and vaccination, as an immunotherapeutic approach.

  17. Predictors of adherence to different types and doses of supervised exercise during breast cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise is beneficial for breast cancer patients during chemotherapy but adherence to different types and doses of exercise is a challenge. The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of adherence to different types and doses of exercise during breast cancer chemotherapy in a multicenter randomized controlled trial. Methods Breast cancer patients in Edmonton, Vancouver, and Ottawa, Canada receiving chemotherapy (N = 301) were randomized to a standard dose of 25–30 minutes of aerobic exercise (STAN), a higher dose of 50–60 minutes of aerobic exercise (HIGH), or a higher dose of 50–60 minutes of combined aerobic and resistance exercise (COMB). Predictors included demographic, medical, fitness, and quality of life variables. Exercise adherence was measured as the percentage of supervised exercise sessions completed. Results Overall adherence to the supervised exercise sessions was 73% (SD = 24%). In a multivariate regression model, six independent predictors explained 26.4% (p < 0.001) of the variance in exercise adherence. Higher exercise adherence was achieved by breast cancer patients in Vancouver (p < 0.001), with fewer endocrine symptoms (p = 0.009), randomized to STAN (p = 0.009), with fewer exercise limitations (p = 0.009), receiving shorter chemotherapy protocols (p = 0.015), and with higher VO2peak (p = 0.017). Disease stage (p for interaction = 0.015) and body mass index (p for interaction = 0.030) interacted with group assignment to predict adherence. For disease stage, patients with stage I/IIa disease adhered equally well to all three exercise interventions whereas patients with stage IIb/III disease adhered better to the STAN intervention than the two higher dose exercise interventions. For body mass index, healthy weight patients adhered equally well to all three exercise interventions whereas overweight patients adhered best to STAN and worst to COMB; and obese patients adhered best

  18. Impressive Response to Dose-Dense Chemotherapy in a Patient with NUT Midline Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maur, Michela; Toss, Angela; Dominici, Massimo; Frassoldati, Antonio; Corradini, Paolo; Maiorana, Antonio; Fontana, Annalisa; Conte, Pierfranco

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 21 Final Diagnosis: NUT midline carcinoma Symptoms: Fatigue • fever • pain Medication: Romidepsin Clinical Procedure: Chemotherapy Specialty: Oncology Objective: Rare disease Background: NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) is a rare, highly lethal malignancy that results from a chromosome translocation and mostly arises in the midline organs. To date, no treatment has been established. Most patients receive combinations of chemotherapy regimens and radiation, and occasionally subsequent resection; nevertheless, patients have an average survival hardly exceeding 7 months. Case Report: A 21-year-old patient was admitted to our division with a large mediastinal mass with lung nodules, multiple vertebral metastases, and massive nodal involvement. In a few days, the patient developed a superior vena cava syndrome and an acute respiratory failure. Due to the rapid course of the disease, based on preliminary histology of poorly differentiated carcinoma, a dose-dense biweekly chemotherapy with paclitaxel, ifosfamide, and cisplatin was started. In the meantime, the diagnosis of NMC was confirmed. A surprising clinical benefit was obtained after the first cycle of chemotherapy, and after 6 cycles a PET-CT scan showed a very good response. At this point, radiotherapy was started but the disease progressed outside of the radiation field. The patient entered into a compassionate use protocol with Romidepsin, but a PET/CT scan after the first course showed disease progression with peritoneal and retroperitoneal carcinosis. A treatment with Pemetrexed was then started but the patient eventually died with rapid progressive disease. Conclusions: Our case history adds some interesting findings to available knowledge: NMC can be chemosensitive and radiosensitive. This opens the possibility to study more aggressive treatments, including high-dose consolidation chemotherapy and to evaluate the role of biological agents as maintenance treatments. PMID:26140332

  19. Treatment of small cell carcinoma of lung with combined high dose mediastinal irradiation, whole brain prophylaxis and chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shank, B.; Natale, R.B.; Hilaris, B.S.; Wittes, R.E.

    1981-04-01

    Survival of patients with small cell carcinoma of lung, treated on a new combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy protocol, compares favorably with other regimens in the literature and our own previous combined approaches. Radiation, given after induction chemotherapy, consisted of whole brain prophylaxis in all 44 evaluable patients. Patients with limited disease were also treated to the primary and mediastinum to a high dose (5000 rad equivalent) using multiple fields. The new chemotherapy regimen consisted of induction with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and vincristine alternated with cis-platinum and VP-16 (an epipodophyllotoxin) for two cycles, followed by consolidation with low dose cyclophosphamide and vincristine concurrent with irradiation. Patients with limited disease who achieved less than complete response, and all patients with extensive disease were not continued on maintenance chemotherapy. Out of 24 evaluable patients with limited disease, there was 73% survival at 1 year by life-table analysis, measured from treatment initiation. After induction, 16/24 of these limited disease patients were CR (complete responders): 20/24 were CR at completion of their irradiation. Out of 20 evaluable patients with extensive disease, there was 59% survival at 1 year by life-table analysis. Only 4/44 (9%) brain parenchymal relapses occurred, one at 3 months and one at 6 months after local failure and two in patients who did not become CRs, implicating a possible re-seeding mechanism. Five patients had central nervous system relapses outside of brain parenchyma (spinal epidural and leptomeningeal); in three patients this was the initial site of failure. Significant complications included leukopenia (50%) and thrombocytopenia (24%) primarily during induction, and chronic pulmonary fibrosis (25%), possibly contributing to two deaths.

  20. Dose-Dense Chemotherapy in Nonmetastatic Breast Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, Luisa; Ben-Aharon, Irit; Vidal, Liat; Gafter-Gvili, Anat; Leibovici, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    Background Dose-dense chemotherapy has become a mainstay regimen in the adjuvant setting for women with high-risk breast cancer. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the existing data from randomized controlled trials regarding the efficacy and toxicity of the dose-dense chemotherapy approach in nonmetastatic breast cancer. Methods Randomized controlled trials that compared a dose-dense chemotherapy protocol with a standard chemotherapy schedule in the neoadjuvant or adjuvant setting in adult women older than 18 years with breast cancer were identified by searching The Cochrane Cancer Network register of trials, The Cochrane Library, and LILACS and MEDLINE databases (from January 1966 to January 2010). Hazard ratios (HRs) of death and recurrence and relative risks of adverse events were estimated and pooled. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Ten trials met the inclusion criteria and were classified into two categories based on trial methodology. Three trials enrolling 3337 patients compared dose-dense chemotherapy with a conventional chemotherapy schedule (similar agents). Patients who received dose-dense chemotherapy had better overall survival (HR of death = 0.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.72 to 0.98, P = .03) and better disease-free survival (HR of recurrence or death = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.73 to 0.94, P = .005) than those on the conventional schedule. No benefit was observed in patients with hormone receptor–positive tumors. Seven trials enrolling 8652 patients compared dose-dense chemotherapy with regimens that use standard intervals but with different agents and/or dosages in the treatment arms. Similar results were obtained for these trials with respect to overall survival (HR of death = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.75 to 0.96, P = .01) and disease-free survival (HR of recurrence or death = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.73 to 0.88, P < .001). The rate of nonhematological adverse events was higher in the dose-dense chemotherapy arms than in the

  1. Primary central nervous system lymphoma: implication of high-dose chemotherapy followed by auto-SCT.

    PubMed

    Reddy, N; Savani, B N

    2012-10-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma is a rare and distinct subtype of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that is sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy. Decisions regarding the initial therapeutic approach are influenced by age and risk of therapy-related neurotoxicity. Despite several albeit small phase II studies, and the acknowledged need for larger prospective trials, there is supporting evidence to consider auto-SCT following induction chemotherapy in patients with good performance status. The international extranodal lymphoma study group is conducting a randomized phase II study comparing consolidative radiation therapy to high-dose therapy. Novel therapeutic options including early aggressive approach with upfront auto-SCT and strategies to prevent relapse following transplantation is an area of focus.

  2. Prognostic significance of chemotherapy-induced necrosis in osteosarcoma patients receiving pasteurized autografts

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Min Wook; Kang, Yong Koo; Yoo, Chang-Young; Cha, Sung Ho

    2017-01-01

    Background Among various reconstruction methods after wide excision for osteosarcoma, pasteurized autograft is often preferred. While the whole area of the tumor can be assessed for chemotherapy-induced necrosis, one of the important prognostic factors, in other reconstructive techniques, only a portion removed from a wide-resection specimen is available when using pasteurized autograft method. The assessment, therefore, may be unreliable. We analyzed the prognostic significance of the chemotherapy-induced necrosis in osteosarcoma patients who underwent reconstruction with pasteurized autografts. Patients and methods We reviewed the records of osteosarcoma patients who underwent treatment in our institution from 1998 to 2013. Cases of reconstruction with pasteurized autografts were defined as the patient group, and the same number of patients who underwent other reconstruction methods served as controls. Chemotherapy-induced necrosis was evaluated for removed extra-osseous and curetted intramedullary tumor tissues. Results A total of 22 patients were identified; the median age was 15.5 years, and there were 12 males. The most common tumor location was the distal femur. The most common histological subtype was osteoblastic. Median size was 8.1 cm. Disease status was stage IIB in 13 patients and IIA in 9. Median follow-up was 76 months. No differences between the patient and control groups were observed in potential prognostic factors, overall survival, metastasis-free survival, or recurrence-free survival. Univariate analyses demonstrated that histological response was a significant prognostic factor for metastasis-free survival and also significant for recurrence-free survival. Conclusion Chemotherapy-induced necrosis grading, using only available tumor tissues, could be a prognostic factor for osteosarcoma patients receiving pasteurized autografts for reconstructive surgery. PMID:28196121

  3. Evaluating the efficacies of Maximum Tolerated Dose and metronomic chemotherapies: A mathematical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiraldello, Rafael T.; Martins, Marcelo L.; Mancera, Paulo F. A.

    2016-08-01

    We present a mathematical model based on partial differential equations that is applied to understand tumor development and its response to chemotherapy. Our primary aim is to evaluate comparatively the efficacies of two chemotherapeutic protocols, Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD) and metronomic, as well as two methods of drug delivery. Concerning therapeutic outcomes, the metronomic protocol proves more effective in prolonging the patient's life than MTD. Moreover, a uniform drug delivery method combined with the metronomic protocol is the most efficient strategy to reduce tumor density.

  4. Development of an oral solid dispersion formulation for use in low-dose metronomic chemotherapy of paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Moes, Johannes; Koolen, Stijn; Huitema, Alwin; Schellens, Jan; Beijnen, Jos; Nuijen, Bastiaan

    2013-01-01

    For the clinical development of low-dose metronomic (LDM) chemotherapy of paclitaxel, oral administration is vital. However, the development of an oral formulation is difficult due to paclitaxel's low oral bioavailability, caused by its low permeability and low solubility. We increased the oral bioavailability of paclitaxel by combining a pharmacokinetic booster, ritonavir, with a new oral solid dispersion formulation of paclitaxel. The combined use of Hansen solubility parameters and dissolution experiments resulted in the development of a solid dispersion formulation containing 1/11 w/w paclitaxel, 9/11 w/w polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) K30, and 1/11 w/w sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS). Analysis of the solid dispersion formulation by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and modulated differential scanning calorimetry (mDSC) confirmed the amorphous nature of paclitaxel and the fine dispersion of paclitaxel in the matrix of PVP-K30 and SLS. Furthermore, in vitro tests showed a major increase in the apparent solubility and dissolution rate of paclitaxel. To test the clinical significance of these findings, the solid dispersion formulation of paclitaxel (ModraPac001 10mg capsule) was compared to the paclitaxel premix solution in four patients with advanced cancer. Although the mean systemic exposure to paclitaxel after oral administration of the solid dispersion formulation was slightly lower compared to the paclitaxel premix solution (190±63.1ng/mLh for vs. 247±100ng/mLh), the systemic exposure to paclitaxel is clinically relevant [1,2]. In addition to this, the favorable pharmaceutical characteristics, for example, neutral taste, dosing accuracy, and the 2-year ambient shelf life, make the ModraPac001 10mg capsule an attractive candidate for oral paclitaxel chemotherapy. Currently, the ModraPac001 formulation is applied in the first clinical trial with oral LDM chemotherapy of paclitaxel.

  5. The use of low-dose metronomic chemotherapy in dogs-insight into a modern cancer field.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, T B; Henriques, J; Marconato, L; Queiroga, F L

    2017-03-20

    The era of chemotherapy, which started in the middle of the last century, has been ruled by the routine use of dose-intense protocols, based on the "maximum-tolerated dose" concept. By promoting a balance between patient's quality of life and the goal of rapidly killing as many tumour cells as possible, these protocols still play a prominent role in veterinary oncology. However, with the opening of a new millennium, metronomic chemotherapy (MC) started to be considered a possible alternative to traditional dose-intense chemotherapy. Characterized by a long-term daily administration of lower doses of cytotoxic drugs, this new modality stands out for its unique combination of effects, namely on neovascularization, immune response and tumour dormancy. This article reviews the rationale for treatment with MC, its mechanism of action and the main studies conducted in veterinary medicine, and discusses the key challenges yet to be solved.

  6. Response of osteosarcoma to preoperative intravenous high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Mail, J.T.; Cohen, M.D.; Mirkin, L.D.; Provisor, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    The histologic response of an osteosarcoma to preamputation high-dose methotrexate therapy can be used to determine the optimum maintenance chemotherapy regimen to be administered after amputation. This study evaluates computed tomography (CT) as a method of assessing the response of the tumor to the methotrexate therapy. Nine patients with nonmetastatic osteosarcoma of an extremity had a CT scan of the tumor at initial presentation. This was compared with a second CT scan after four courses of high-dose intravenous methotrexate. Each set of scans was evaluated for changes in bony destruction, soft-tissue mass, pattern of calcification, and extent of tumor involvement of the marrow cavity. These findings were correlated with the histologic response of the tumor as measured by the degree of tumor necrosis. The changes seen on CT correlated well with the degree of the histologic response in seven of the nine patients.

  7. Definitive high-dose radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Kim, Eun Seok; Yeo, Seung-Gu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Standard management for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) involves preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and radical surgery. However, this level of treatment may be unnecessary for a subgroup of LARC patients. Previous reports have shown that approximately 20% of LARC patients experience a complete tumor response to preoperative CRT. Post-CRT nonoperative management of these patients may prevent morbidities associated with radical surgery. To our knowledge, this case report firstly presents the favorable long-term outcomes of a LARC patient who underwent definitive aim CRT. Methods: The patient was 73 years’ old, and staging workups revealed T3N2bM0 rectal adenocarcinoma. He agreed to receive CRT, but refused surgery. A radiotherapy (RT) dose of 64.8 Gy was prescribed, which was higher than conventional (50.4 Gy) preoperative aim RT. The regimen of concurrent chemotherapy was the same as that used in preoperative aim CRT: 2 cycles of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin. Results: Three months after CRT completion, a complete tumor response was identified clinically. Colonoscopic biopsy after 1 year showed no tumor cells. This patient is alive after 4 years with no evidence of recurrence or severe toxicity. Conclusion: The long-term outcomes of this case indicate the feasibility of definitive high-dose RT with concurrent chemotherapy for LARC. PMID:27749573

  8. Marked transient hypercholesterolemia caused by low-dose mitotane as adjuvant chemotherapy for adrenocortical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tada, Hayato; Nohara, Atsushi; Kawashiri, Masa-Aki; Inazu, Akihiro; Mabuchi, Hiroshi; Yamagishi, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    We herein report a case of marked transient hypercholesterolemia in a man receiving low-dose mitotane as adjuvant chemotherapy for adrenocortical carcinoma.A 58-year-old man without any clinical symptoms or history of hypercholesterolemia was admitted to our hospital to treat an adrenocortical carcinoma detected on general screening using computed tomography. He reported no chest symptom and did not exhibit any established risk factors for coronary artery disease, such as diabetes, obesity, hypertension or relevant family history, with the exception of current smoking, on admission. A stress electrocardiogram showed negative findings. The left adrenal tumor as well as left kidney, spleen and distal portion of the pancreas were subsequently resected using radical surgery. The histopathological findings confirmed the preoperative diagnosis of adrenocortical carcinoma. After the operation, treatment with low-dose mitotane (1g/day) was introduced as adjuvant chemotherapy. Interestingly, the patient developed marked hyper-LDL cholesterolemia at a level equivalent to that of familial hypercholesterolemia (LDL cholesterol level ~ 300 mg/dL) following the introduction of mitotane, without evidence of primary or secondary hypercholesterolemia due to other causes. A coronary angiogram performed to assess the new-onset angina revealed three-vessel disease, which was later revascularized via percutaneous coronary intervention eight months after the start of mitotane therapy. The cholesterol level normalized with the suspension of mitotane. This case suggests that mitotane can cause severe hypercholesterolemia, potentially resulting in coronary atherosclerosis.

  9. The Role of High-Dose Chemotherapy Supported by Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Anna Liza; Tariman, Joseph D.; Enecio, Toreend; Estrella, Stella Marie

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM), a neoplastic proliferation of plasma cells originating from the B-cell line, is associated with deleterious complications and poor outcomes. The failure of conventional combination chemotherapies to improve the overall survival of patients with MM has led to the use of high-dose chemotherapy supported by stem cell transplantation (SCT). Although several novel therapies have emerged since the late 1990s, their survival benefits are undetermined. High-dose chemotherapy with SCT provides better response rates compared to conventional chemotherapy and yields a trend toward greater survival benefits, especially with the use of a tandem (two successive) transplantation strategy. This article discusses standard SCT in patients with MM and some of the new transplantation strategies, including tandem autologous SCTs and reduced-intensity nonmyeloablative allogeneic SCT, and their implications for nursing. PMID:17723970

  10. Use of Concept of Chemotherapy-Equivalent Biologically Effective Dose to Provide Quantitative Evaluation of Contribution of Chemotherapy to Local Tumor Control in Chemoradiotherapy Cervical Cancer Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Plataniotis, George A. Dale, Roger G.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To express the magnitude of the contribution of chemotherapy to local tumor control in chemoradiotherapy cervical cancer trials in terms of the concept of the biologically effective dose. Methods and Materials: The local control rates of both arms of each study (radiotherapy vs. radiotherapy plus chemotherapy) reported from randomized controlled trials of concurrent chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer were reviewed and expressed using the Poisson model for tumor control probability (TCP) as TCP = exp(-exp E), where E is the logarithm of cell kill. By combining the two TCP values from each study, we calculated the chemotherapy-related log cell kill as Ec = ln[(lnTCP{sub Radiotherapy})/(lnTCP{sub Chemoradiotherapy})]. Assuming a range of radiosensitivities ({alpha} = 0.1-0.5 Gy{sup -1}) and taking the calculated log cell kill, we calculated the chemotherapy-BED, and using the linear quadratic model, the number of 2-Gy fractions corresponding to each BED. The effect of a range of tumor volumes and radiosensitivities ({alpha} Gy{sup -1}) on the TCP was also explored. Results: The chemotherapy-equivalent number of 2-Gy fractions range was 0.2-4 and was greater in tumors with lower radiosensitivity. In those tumors with intermediate radiosensitivity ({alpha} = 0.3 Gy{sup -1}), the equivalent number of 2-Gy fractions was 0.6-1.3, corresponding to 120-260 cGy of extra dose. The opportunities for clinically detectable improvement are only available in tumors with intermediate radiosensitivity with {alpha} = 0.22-0.28 Gy{sup -1}. The dependence of TCP on the tumor volume decreases as the radiosensitivity increases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the contribution of chemotherapy to the TCP in cervical cancer is expected to be clinically detectable in larger and less-radiosensitive tumors.

  11. Estimation of Radiobiologic Parameters and Equivalent Radiation Dose of Cytotoxic Chemotherapy in Malignant Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Bleddyn . E-mail: b.jones.1@bham.ac.uk; Sanghera, Paul

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the radiobiologic parameters for high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The biologic effective dose concept is used to estimate the {alpha}/{beta} ratio and K (dose equivalent for tumor repopulation/d) for high-grade glioma patients treated in a randomized fractionation trial. The equivalent radiation dose of temozolomide (Temodar) chemotherapy was estimated from another randomized study. The method assumes that the radiotherapy biologic effective dose is proportional to the adjusted radiotherapy survival duration of high-grade glioma patients. Results: The median tumor {alpha}/{beta} and K estimate is 9.32 Gy and 0.23 Gy/d, respectively. Using the published surviving fraction after 2-Gy exposure (SF{sub 2}) data, and the above {alpha}/{beta} ratio, the estimated median {alpha} value was 0.077 Gy{sup -1}, {beta} was 0.009 Gy{sup -2}, and the cellular doubling time was 39.5 days. The median equivalent biologic effective dose of temozolomide was 11.03 Gy{sub 9.3} (equivalent to a radiation dose of 9.1 Gy given in 2-Gy fractions). Random sampling trial simulations based on a cure threshold of 70 Gy in high-grade gliomas have shown the potential increase in tumor cure with dose escalation. Partial elimination of hypoxic cells (by chemical hypoxic cell sensitizers or carbon ion therapy) has suggested that considerable gains in tumor control, which are further supplemented by temozolomide, are achievable. Conclusion: The radiobiologic parameters for human high-grade gliomas can be estimated from clinical trials and could be used to inform future clinical trials, particularly combined modality treatments with newer forms of radiotherapy. Other incurable cancers should be studied using similar radiobiologic analysis.

  12. Consolidation Radiotherapy in Primary Central Nervous System Lymphomas: Impact on Outcome of Different Fields and Doses in Patients in Complete Remission After Upfront Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreri, Andres Jose Maria; Verona, Chiara; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Chiara, Anna; Perna, Lucia; Villa, Eugenio; Reni, Michele

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Avoidance radiotherapy or reduction of irradiation doses in patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) in complete remission (CR) after high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX)-based chemotherapy has been proposed to minimize the neurotoxicity risk. Nevertheless, no study has focused on the survival impact of radiation parameters, as far as we know, and the optimal radiation schedule remains to be defined. Methods and Materials: The impact on outcome and neurologic performance of different radiation fields and doses was assessed in 33 patients with PCNSL who achieved CR after MTX-containing chemotherapy and were referred to consolidation whole-brain irradiation (WBRT). Patterns of relapse were analyzed on computed tomography-guided treatment planning, and neurologic impairment was assessed by the Mini Mental Status Examination. Results: At a median follow-up of 50 months, 21 patients are relapse-free (5-year failure-free survival [FFS], 51%). WBRT doses {>=}40 Gy were not associated with improved disease control in comparison with a WBRT dose of 30 to 36 Gy (relapse rate, 46% vs. 30%; 5-year FFS, 51% vs. 50%; p = 0.26). Disease control was not significantly different between patients irradiated to the tumor bed with 45 to 54 Gy or with 36 to 44 Gy, with a 5-year FFS of 35% and 44% (p = 0.43), respectively. Twenty patients are alive (5-year overall survival, 54%); WB and tumor bed doses did not have an impact on survival. Impairment as assessed by the Mini Mental Status Examination was significantly more common in patients treated with a WBRT dose {>=}40 Gy. Conclusion: Consolidation with WBRT 36 Gy is advisable in patients with PCNSL in CR after HD-MTX-based chemotherapy. Higher doses do not change the outcome and could increase the risk of neurotoxicity.

  13. Modification of the effects of continuous low dose rate irradiation by concurrent chemotherapy infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, K.K.; Rayner, P.A.; Lam, K.N.

    1984-08-01

    The combined effects of continuous low dose rate irradiation (CLDRI) and concurrent infusion of bleomycin, cyclophosphamide, cis-platinum, 5-fluorouracil, actinomycin D, and mitomycin C were studied in the SCC VII/SF tumor, a squamous cell carcinoma and the jejunal crypt cells in the mouse. For the SCC VII/SF tumor, enhanced cell killing was seen with each of the six drugs when infused concurrently with CLDRI; the greatest enhancement was seen with mitomycin C and cis-platinum. For the jejunal crypt cells, enhanced cell killing was seen primarily with bleomycin. The authors results suggest a therapeutic gain with concurrent CLDRI and chemotherapy infusion for five of the six chemotherapeutic drugs studied with the exception of bleomycin.

  14. Profile of netupitant/palonosetron (NEPA) fixed dose combination and its potential in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV)

    PubMed Central

    Navari, Rudolph M

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is associated with a significant deterioration in quality of life. The emetogenicity of the chemotherapeutic agents, repeated chemotherapy cycles, and patient risk factors significantly influence CINV. The use of a combination of a 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, dexamethasone, and a neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor antagonist has significantly improved the control of acute and delayed emesis in single-day chemotherapy. Palonosetron, a second generation 5-HT3 receptor antagonist with a different half-life, different binding capacity, and a different mechanism of action than the first generation 5-HT3 receptor antagonists, appears to be the most effective agent in its class. Netupitant, is a new NK-1 receptor antagonist with a high binding affinity, a long half-life of 90 hours, is metabolized by CYP3A4, and is an inhibitor of CYP3A4. NEPA is an oral fixed-dose combination of netupitant and palonosetron which has recently been employed in Phase II and Phase III clinical trials for the prevention of CINV in patients receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC and HEC). The clinical trials demonstrated that NEPA (300 mg of netupitant plus 0.50 mg of palonosetron) significantly improved the prevention of CINV compared to the use of palonosetron alone in patients receiving either HEC or MEC. The clinical efficacy was maintained over multiple cycles of chemotherapy. NEPA (Akynzeo®) has recently been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat nausea and vomiting in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25552904

  15. Subgroup effects in a randomised trial of different types and doses of exercise during breast cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Courneya, K S; McKenzie, D C; Mackey, J R; Gelmon, K; Friedenreich, C M; Yasui, Y; Reid, R D; Vallerand, J R; Adams, S C; Proulx, C; Dolan, L B; Wooding, E; Segal, R J

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Combined Aerobic and Resistance Exercise Trial tested different types and doses of exercise in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Here, we explore potential moderators of the exercise training responses. Methods: Breast cancer patients initiating chemotherapy (N=301) were randomly assigned to three times a week, supervised exercise of a standard dose of 25–30 min of aerobic exercise, a higher dose of 50–60 min of aerobic exercise, or a higher dose of 50–60 min of combined aerobic and resistance exercise. Outcomes were patient-reported symptoms and health-related fitness. Moderators were baseline demographic, exercise/fitness, and cancer variables. Results: Body mass index moderated the effects of the exercise interventions on bodily pain (P for interaction=0.038), endocrine symptoms (P for interaction=0.029), taxane/neuropathy symptoms (P for interaction=0.013), aerobic fitness (P for interaction=0.041), muscular strength (P for interaction=0.007), and fat mass (P for interaction=0.005). In general, healthy weight patients responded better to the higher-dose exercise interventions than overweight/obese patients. Menopausal status, age, and baseline fitness moderated the effects on patient-reported symptoms. Premenopausal, younger, and fitter patients achieved greater benefits from the higher-dose exercise interventions. Conclusions: Healthy weight, fitter, and premenopausal/younger breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy are more likely to benefit from higher-dose exercise interventions. PMID:25144625

  16. An open-label, randomized, multicenter dose-finding study of once-per-cycle pegfilgrastim versus daily filgrastim in Chinese breast cancer patients receiving TAC chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Zhiwei; Wang, Ling; Li, Chanjuan; Xia, Jielai

    2015-05-01

    A chemotherapy regimen of docetaxel, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (TAC) has been accepted as a standard care because of their superior clinical benefit in early-stage breast cancer patients, but with a higher risk of neutropenia. Pegfilgrastim is a once-per-cycle therapy for prophylactic neutrophil support and neutropenia prevention. There was still a lack of direct evidences for finding an optimal fixed dose of pegfilgrastim in Chinese breast cancer patients receiving TAC regimen. An open-label, randomized, phase II study was designed to compare the effects of pegfilgrastim with filgrastim. Eighteen centers in China enrolled 171 eligible female breast cancer patients with cycles of TAC chemotherapy treatment, randomized into four arms, received a single subcutaneous injection of pegfilgrastim (60, 100 or 120 µg/kg) per chemotherapy cycle or daily subcutaneous injections of filgrastim 5 µg/kg 24 h after chemotherapy. Efficacy and safety were analyzed. In ITT population, the mean duration of grade 3+ neutropenia (neutrophil count <1.0 × 10(9)/l) was 2.09, 1.53 and 1.73 days in patients who received pegfilgrastim 60, 100 and 120 µg/kg/cycle, respectively, and 1.69 days in patients who received 5 µg/kg/day filgrastim (P = 0.043). The incidence of grade 3+ neutropenia was 76, 83 and 74 % for doses of pegfilgrastim and 90 % for filgrastim (P = 0.409). The results for febrile neutropenia, time to neutrophil recovery and neutrophil profile were also not significantly different between arms. The safety profiles of pegfilgrastim and filgrastim were similar. A single dose of 100 µg/kg once-per-cycle administration of pegfilgrastim provided neutrophil support and a safety profile comparable to daily subcutaneous injections of filgrastim in Chinese breast cancer patients receiving TAC chemotherapy.

  17. Peripheral blood morphologic changes after high-dose antineoplastic chemotherapy and recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, D P; Castillo, A; Foucar, K; Townsend, K; Neidhart, J

    1989-09-01

    The peripheral blood morphologic findings in 17 patients with cancer who had received high-dose cytotoxic chemotherapy followed by recombinant human-granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rh-GCSF) were reviewed and compared with a control group of patients who received only high-dose chemotherapy. Both groups showed dysmyelopoiesis (abnormal granulation and nuclear lobulation) in the granulocytic series during the period of bone marrow recovery that followed the cytotoxic chemotherapy. Most of these morphologic abnormalities were more prominent in the rh-GCSF-treated group. Monocytic cells in both groups showed prominent vacuolation and immature nuclei. The percentages and absolute numbers of large granular lymphocytes were increased in the rh-GCSF group compared with the control group. No quantitative or qualitative abnormalities of eosinophilic or basophilic granulocytes were detected in either group. Both groups showed nonspecific red blood cell abnormalities, and large platelets were present in half of the control group smears. This report provides the first detailed peripheral blood morphologic description in patients treated with rh-GCSF and high-dose chemotherapy.

  18. Effects of exercise dose and type on sleep quality in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy: a multicenter randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Courneya, Kerry S; Segal, Roanne J; Mackey, John R; Gelmon, Karen; Friedenreich, Christine M; Yasui, Yutaka; Reid, Robert D; Jespersen, Diana; Cook, Diane; Proulx, Carolyn; Trinh, Linda; Dolan, Lianne B; Wooding, Evyanne; Forbes, Cynthia C; McKenzie, Donald C

    2014-04-01

    To examine the effects of different doses and types of exercise on sleep quality in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. A multicenter trial in Canada randomized 301 breast cancer patients between 2008 and 2011 to thrice weekly, supervised exercise during chemotherapy consisting of either a standard dose of 25-30 min of aerobic exercise (STAN; n = 96), a higher dose of 50-60 min of aerobic exercise (HIGH; n = 101), or a combined dose of 50-60 min of aerobic and resistance exercise (COMB; n = 104). The secondary sleep outcomes in the trial were assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) at baseline, twice during chemotherapy, and postchemotherapy. We analyzed the global PSQI and the component scores. Repeated measures analyses of variance indicated that the HIGH group was statistically superior to the STAN group for global sleep quality (mean group difference = -0.90; 95 % CI -0.05 to -1.76; p = 0.039) as well as subjective sleep quality (p = 0.028) and sleep latency (p = 0.049). The COMB group was borderline statistically superior to the STAN group for global sleep quality (mean group difference = -0.76; 95 % CI +0.11 to -1.62; p = 0.085) as well as sleep duration (p = 0.051); and statistically superior for sleep efficiency (p = 0.040), and percentage of poor sleepers (p = 0.045). Compared to a standard volume of aerobic exercise, higher volumes of both aerobic and combined exercise improved some aspects of sleep quality during breast cancer chemotherapy. Exercise may be an attractive option to manage sleep dysfunction in cancer patients during chemotherapy.

  19. High-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation changes prognosis of IgD multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Maisnar, V; Hájek, R; Scudla, V; Gregora, E; Büchler, T; Tichý, M; Kotoucek, P; Kafková, A; Forraiová, L; Minarík, J; Radocha, J; Bláha, V; Malý, J

    2008-01-01

    Immunoglobulin D (IgD) multiple myeloma (MM) is a rare plasma cell disorder constituting less than 2% of all MM cases. Survival of patients with IgD MM is generally shorter than that of patients with other types of monoclonal (M-) protein. We have retrospectively analyzed patients with IgD MM participating in clinical trials of the Czech Myeloma Group. Twenty-six IgD MM patients treated between 1996 and 2006 were identified, 14 (54%) men and 12 (46%) women. The median age was 61 years (range: 37-79 years). Ten of 26 patients (39%) were treated with first-line high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) using melphalan 200 mg/m(2) followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Thirteen of 26 patients (50%) received conventional chemotherapy (CHT), mostly melphalan and prednisone or a vincristine/doxorubicin/dexamethasone (VAD) regimen. Treatment responses were evaluable for 23 of 26 (89%) patients. All HDCT patients had treatment responses, including seven patients (70%) with complete responses and three patients (30%) with partial responses. The median progression-free survival was 18 months for HDCT patients and 20 months for CHT patients. The median overall survival (OS) for all patients was 34 months. The median OS for the HDCT group has not yet been reached (70% of the patients are still alive). In contrast, the median OS for CHT patients was only 16 months. The difference in OS between the two groups was statistically significant (P=0.005). In conclusion, the overall response rate for patients with IgD MM aged 65 years or less treated with HDCT and ASCT is similar to that seen in other MM types.

  20. Tandem High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for High-Grade Gliomas in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    With the aim to investigate the outcome of tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDCT/auto-SCT) for high-grade gliomas (HGGs), we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 30 patients with HGGs (16 glioblastomas, 7 anaplastic astrocytomas, and 7 other HGGs) between 2006 and 2015. Gross or near total resection was possible in 11 patients. Front-line treatment after surgery was radiotherapy (RT) in 14 patients and chemotherapy in the remaining 16 patients including 3 patients less than 3 years of age. Eight of 12 patients who remained progression free and 5 of the remaining 18 patients who experienced progression during induction treatment underwent the first HDCT/auto-SCT with carboplatin + thiotepa + etoposide (CTE) regimen and 11 of them proceeded to the second HDCT/auto-SCT with cyclophosphamide + melphalan (CyM) regimen. One patient died from hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) during the second HDCT/auto-SCT; otherwise, toxicities were manageable. Four patients in complete response (CR) and 3 of 7 patients in partial response (PR) or second PR at the first HDCT/auto-SCT remained event free: however, 2 patients with progressive tumor experienced progression again. The probabilities of 3-year overall survival (OS) after the first HDCT/auto-SCT in 11 patients in CR, PR, or second PR was 58.2% ± 16.9%. Tumor status at the first HDCT/auto-SCT was the only significant factor for outcome after HDCT/auto-SCT. There was no difference in survival between glioblastoma and other HGGs. This study suggests that the outcome of HGGs in children and adolescents after HDCT/auto-SCT is encouraging if the patient could achieve CR or PR before HDCT/auto-SCT. PMID:28049229

  1. Efficacy and safety of single-dose fosaprepitant in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients receiving high-dose cisplatin: a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Saito, H.; Yoshizawa, H.; Yoshimori, K.; Katakami, N.; Katsumata, N.; Kawahara, M.; Eguchi, K.

    2013-01-01

    Background We evaluated the efficacy and safety of single-dose fosaprepitant in combination with intravenous granisetron and dexamethasone. Patients and methods Patients receiving chemotherapy including cisplatin (≥70 mg/m2) were eligible. A total of 347 patients (21% had received cisplatin with vomiting) were enrolled in this trial to receive the fosaprepitant regimen (fosaprepitant 150 mg, intravenous, on day 1 in combination with granisetron, 40 μg/kg, intravenous, on day 1 and dexamethasone, intravenous, on days 1–3) or the control regimen (placebo plus intravenous granisetron and dexamethasone). The primary end point was the percentage of patients who had a complete response (no emesis and no rescue therapy) over the entire treatment course (0–120 h). Results The percentage of patients with a complete response was significantly higher in the fosaprepitant group than in the control group (64% versus 47%, P = 0.0015). The fosaprepitant regimen was more effective than the control regimen in both the acute (0–24 h postchemotherapy) phase (94% versus 81%, P = 0.0006) and the delayed (24–120 h postchemotherapy) phase (65% versus 49%, P = 0.0025). Conclusions Single-dose fosaprepitant used in combination with granisetron and dexamethasone was well-tolerated and effective in preventing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients receiving highly emetogenic cancer chemotherapy, including high-dose cisplatin. PMID:23117073

  2. High-dose therapy autotransplantation/intensification vs continued standard chemotherapy in multiple myeloma in first remission. Results of a non-randomized study from a single institution.

    PubMed

    Bladé, J; Esteve, J; Rives, S; Martínez, C; Rovira, M; Urbano-Ispizua, A; Marín, P; Carreras, E; Montserrat, E

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the outcome of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) responding to initial chemotherapy who received intensification with high-dose therapy/autotransplantation (HDT) as compared to that of those who were continued on standard chemotherapy. From 1 January 1990 to 30 June 1998, 64 patients with MM who were younger than 65 years achieved a response to initial chemotherapy. Due to referral reasons, patients preference or inclusion in trials, 31 patients received HDT as early intensification while 33 were continued on standard chemotherapy. The presenting features were similar in both groups, except for the median age, which was lower in the HDT group (53 vs 58 years, P = 0.007). Complete response negative immunofixation - (CR) was achieved in 12 of 31 (39%) patients intensified with HDT and in two of 33 (6%) patients who were continued on conventional chemotherapy (P = 0.002). Event-free survival (EFS) was significantly longer in the HDT group (median, 43 vs 21 months; P = 0.007). Overall survival (OS) was not significantly different between groups (median, 62 vs 38 months; P = 0.21). However, patients in the HDT group who achieved CR had an EFS (median, 51 vs 31 months; P = 0.03) as well as an OS (median, not reached vs 50 months; P = 0.0006) significantly longer than those achieving a lower degree of response. In conclusion, this non-randomized study shows that early HDT increases CR rate and prolongs EFS. In addition, these results highlight CR as a crucial step for achieving long-lasting disease control and prolonged survival in patients with MM.

  3. Obese non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients tolerate full uncapped doses of chemotherapy with no increase in toxicity, and a similar survival to that seen in nonobese patients.

    PubMed

    Chan, Henry; Jackson, Sharon; McLay, Jessica; Knox, Angela; Lee, Jae; Wang, Sarah; Issa, Samar

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the risk of treatment-related toxicities and long-term survival between obese and nonobese patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma when treated with full uncapped doses of R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone) chemotherapy. A total of 133 patients and 733 cycles of chemotherapy were analyzed. Obese patients did not experience an increased risk of acute treatment-related toxicities (adjusted odds ratio 0.825, p = 0.197), or delayed toxicities (adjusted odds ratio 0.819, p = 0.779). In the subgroup of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients (n = 109), treatment response rate was similar between the two body mass index (BMI) groups, and obese patients tended to have superior overall and progression-free survivals, albeit not statistically significant. Full uncapped doses of R-CHOP chemotherapy administered to obese patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) are safe, well tolerated, and do not lead to inferior treatment response or long-term outcomes.

  4. Metronomic chemotherapy: an attractive alternative to maximum tolerated dose therapy that can activate anti-tumor immunity and minimize therapeutic resistance.

    PubMed

    Kareva, Irina; Waxman, David J; Lakka Klement, Giannoula

    2015-03-28

    The administration of chemotherapy at reduced doses given at regular, frequent time intervals, termed 'metronomic' chemotherapy, presents an alternative to standard maximal tolerated dose (MTD) chemotherapy. The primary target of metronomic chemotherapy was originally identified as endothelial cells supporting the tumor vasculature, and not the tumor cells themselves, consistent with the emerging concept of cancer as a systemic disease involving both tumor cells and their microenvironment. While anti-angiogenesis is an important mechanism of action of metronomic chemotherapy, other mechanisms, including activation of anti-tumor immunity and a decrease in acquired therapeutic resistance, have also been identified. Here we present evidence supporting a mechanistic explanation for the improved activity of cancer chemotherapy when administered on a metronomic, rather than an MTD schedule and discuss the implications of these findings for further translation into the clinic.

  5. Metronomic chemotherapy: An attractive alternative to maximum tolerated dose therapy that can activate anti-tumor immunity and minimize therapeutic resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Kareva, Irina; Waxman, David J.; Klement, Giannoula Lakka

    2014-12-23

    The administration of chemotherapy at reduced doses given at regular, frequent time intervals, termed ‘metronomic’ chemotherapy, presents an alternative to standard maximal tolerated dose (MTD) chemotherapy. The primary target of metronomic chemotherapy was originally identified as endothelial cells supporting the tumor vasculature, and not the tumor cells themselves, consistent with the emerging concept of cancer as a systemic disease involving both tumor cells and their microenvironment. While anti-angiogenesis is an important mechanism of action of metronomic chemotherapy, other mechanisms, including activation of anti-tumor immunity and a decrease in acquired therapeutic resistance, have also been identified. In this paper, we present evidence supporting a mechanistic explanation for the improved activity of cancer chemotherapy when administered on a metronomic, rather than an MTD schedule and discuss the implications of these findings for further translation into the clinic.

  6. Metronomic chemotherapy: An attractive alternative to maximum tolerated dose therapy that can activate anti-tumor immunity and minimize therapeutic resistance

    DOE PAGES

    Kareva, Irina; Waxman, David J.; Klement, Giannoula Lakka

    2014-12-23

    The administration of chemotherapy at reduced doses given at regular, frequent time intervals, termed ‘metronomic’ chemotherapy, presents an alternative to standard maximal tolerated dose (MTD) chemotherapy. The primary target of metronomic chemotherapy was originally identified as endothelial cells supporting the tumor vasculature, and not the tumor cells themselves, consistent with the emerging concept of cancer as a systemic disease involving both tumor cells and their microenvironment. While anti-angiogenesis is an important mechanism of action of metronomic chemotherapy, other mechanisms, including activation of anti-tumor immunity and a decrease in acquired therapeutic resistance, have also been identified. In this paper, we presentmore » evidence supporting a mechanistic explanation for the improved activity of cancer chemotherapy when administered on a metronomic, rather than an MTD schedule and discuss the implications of these findings for further translation into the clinic.« less

  7. Adoptive Cellular Therapy Targeting Recurrent Pediatric Brain Cancers During Hematopoietic Recovery from High-Dose Chemotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    medulloblastoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors (MB/PNETs), will still die from recurrent disease. Furthermore, survivors are often left with...REMATCH: ”Recurrent Medulloblastoma and Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor Adoptive T Cell Therapy during Recovery from Myeloablative Chemotherapy and...Recurrent Medulloblastoma and Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor Adoptive T Cell Therapy during Recovery from Myeloablative Chemotherapy and Hematopoietic

  8. Types of chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000910.htm Types of chemotherapy To use the sharing features on this page, ... or on cancer cells. How Doctors Choose Your Chemotherapy The type and dose of chemotherapy your doctor ...

  9. Different doses of prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in people with haematological disorders after myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Stanworth, Simon; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Blanco, Patricia; Murphy, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Main results We included seven trials (1814 participants) in this review; six were conducted during one course of treatment (chemotherapy or HSCT). Overall the methodological quality of studies was low to moderate across different outcomes according to GRADE methodology. None of the included studies were at low risk of bias in every domain, and all the included studies had some threats to validity. Five studies reported the number of participants with at least one clinically significant bleeding episode within 30 days from the start of the study. There was no difference in the number of participants with a clinically significant bleeding episode between the low-dose and standard-dose groups (four studies; 1170 participants; risk ratio (RR) 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95 to 1.13; moderate-quality evidence); low-dose and high-dose groups (one study; 849 participants; RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.11; moderate-quality evidence); or high-dose and standard-dose groups (two studies; 951 participants; RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.11; moderate-quality evidence). Three studies reported the number of days with a clinically significant bleeding event per participant. There was no difference in the number of days of bleeding per participant between the low-dose and standard-dose groups (two studies; 230 participants; mean difference −0.17, 95% CI −0.51 to 0.17; low quality evidence). One study (855 participants) showed no difference in the number of days of bleeding per participant between high-dose and standard-dose groups, or between low-dose and high-dose groups (849 participants). Three studies reported the number of participants with severe or life-threatening bleeding. There was no difference in the number of participants with severe or life-threatening bleeding between a low-dose and a standard-dose platelet transfusion policy (three studies; 1059 participants; RR 1.33, 95% CI 0.91 to 1.92; low-quality evidence

  10. Short duration, high dose, alternating chemotherapy in metastatic neuroblastoma. (ENSG 3C induction regimen). The European Neuroblastoma Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Pinkerton, C. R.; Zucker, J. M.; Hartmann, O.; Pritchard, J.; Broadbent, V.; Morris-Jones, P.; Breatnach, F.; Craft, A. E.; Pearson, A. D.; Wallendszus, K. R.

    1990-01-01

    Fifty-one children, aged from 15 months to 13 years 5 months with metastatic neuroblastoma presenting sequentially at the participating institutions received four 3 to 4 weekly courses of high dose multiagent chemotherapy. High dose cisplatin (200 mg m-2) combined with etoposide (500 mg m-2), HIPE, was alternated with ifosfamide (9 g m-2), vincristine (1.5 mg m-2), and adriamycin (60 mg m-1), IVAd. Disease status was re-evaluated 3 to 4 weeks after the fourth course and the response classified according to the International Neuroblastoma Response Criteria (INRC). The overall response rate in evaluable patients was 55% and response rates by site were: bone marrow 67% (complete response 47%); bone scan 68%; primary tumour 61%, and urinary catecholamine metabolites (VMA/HVA) 95%. Serial 51Cr EDTA renal clearance studies showed a glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decline in 40% of patients but in only seven cases to below 50% of the pretreatment value. There was no instance of renal failure during induction, though two patients developed severe renal failure following 'megatherapy' given to consolidate remission. Serial audiometry showed a significant decline in hearing at frequencies above 2,000 Hz in 37% of children but at or below 2,000 Hz in only 17%. Neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were severe and intravenous antibiotics were required after 30% of courses. Each of two treatment-related deaths occurred during pancytopenia following courses of IVAd. Complete, or greater than 90%, removal of primary site tumour was possible in 70% of cases following this induction regimen and 75% of patients proceeded to elective megatherapy within a median time of 24 weeks after diagnosis. This short intensive induction programme is highly effective at achieving cytoreduction, enabling early surgery and early megatherapy procedures. It is, however, too early to draw firm conclusions about the impact of this approach to treatment on the cure rate. PMID:2386751

  11. Focal Radiation Therapy Dose Escalation Improves Overall Survival in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Receiving Induction Chemotherapy and Consolidative Chemoradiation

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Sunil; Chadha, Awalpreet S.; Suh, Yelin; Chen, Hsiang-Chun; Rao, Arvind; Das, Prajnan; Minsky, Bruce D.; Mahmood, Usama; Delclos, Marc E.; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O.; Beddar, Sam; Katz, Matthew H.; Fleming, Jason B.; Javle, Milind M.; Varadhachary, Gauri R.; Wolff, Robert A.; Crane, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To review outcomes of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) patients treated with dose-escalated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with curative intent. Methods and Materials A total of 200 patients with LAPC were treated with induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation between 2006 and 2014. Of these, 47 (24%) having tumors >1 cm from the luminal organs were selected for dose-escalated IMRT (biologically effective dose [BED] >70 Gy) using a simultaneous integrated boost technique, inspiration breath hold, and computed tomographic image guidance. Fractionation was optimized for coverage of gross tumor and luminal organ sparing. A 2- to 5-mm margin around the gross tumor volume was treated using a simultaneous integrated boost with a microscopic dose. Overall survival (OS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), local-regional and distant RFS, and time to local-regional and distant recurrence, calculated from start of chemoradiation, were the outcomes of interest. Results Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (BED = 59.47 Gy) with a concurrent capecitabine-based (86%) regimen. Patients who received BED >70 Gy had a superior OS (17.8 vs 15.0 months, P = .03), which was preserved throughout the follow-up period, with estimated OS rates at 2 years of 36% versus 19% and at 3 years of 31% versus 9% along with improved local-regional RFS (10.2 vs 6.2 months, P = .05) as compared with those receiving BED ≤70 Gy. Degree of gross tumor volume coverage did not seem to affect outcomes. No additional toxicity was observed in the high-dose group. Higher dose (BED) was the only predictor of improved OS on multivariate analysis. Conclusion Radiation dose escalation during consolidative chemoradiation therapy after induction chemotherapy for LAPC patients improves OS and local-regional RFS. PMID:26972648

  12. Parathyroid hormone linked to a collagen binding domain promotes hair growth in a mouse model of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in a dose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Seymour, Andrew; Sakon, Joshua; Gensure, Robert

    2014-08-01

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is a major source of psychological stress in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy, and it can influence treatment decisions. Although there is currently no therapy for alopecia, a fusion protein of parathyroid hormone and collagen binding domain (PTH-CBD) has shown promise in animal models. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are dose-dependent effects of PTH-CBD on chemotherapy-induced alopecia in a mouse model. C57BL/6J mice were waxed to synchronize hair follicles; treated on day 7 with vehicle or PTH-CBD (100, 320, and 1000 mcg/kg subcutaneous injection); and treated on day 9 with vehicle or cyclophosphamide (150 mg/kg intraperitoneally). Mice were photographed every 3-4 days and killed on day 63 for histological analysis. Photographs were quantified by gray scale analysis to assess hair content. Mice not receiving chemotherapy showed regrowth of hair 2 weeks after waxing and normal histology after 2 months. Mice receiving chemotherapy alone showed marked hair loss after chemotherapy, which was sustained for 10 days and was followed by rapid regrowth of a normal coat. Histological analysis revealed rapid cycling dystrophic anagen/catagen follicles. Animals receiving chemotherapy and PTH-CBD showed decreased hair loss and more rapid regrowth of hair than that seen with chemotherapy alone (increased hair growth by gray scale analysis, P<0.05), and the effects were dose dependent. Histologically, hair follicles in animals receiving the highest dose of PTH-CBD were in a quiescent phase, similar to that in mice that did not receive chemotherapy. Single-dose subcutaneous administration of PTH-CBD showed dose-dependent effects in minimizing hair loss and speeding up recovery from chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

  13. High-dose Chemotherapy and the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer: Selecting the Regimen and the Source of Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Fields; Agaliotis; Janssen; Perkins; Ballester; Hiemenz; Zorsky; Elfenbein

    1994-05-01

    High-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell rescue has been associated with an increased overall response rate and improved progression-free survival for patients with metastatic breast cancer when compared retrospectively to standard therapy. The optimal source of stem cells - peripheral blood or autologous bone marrow - has not been determined. We present results from two high-dose regimens - ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide (ICE) or mitoxantrone and thiotepa (MITT) followed by autologous stem cell rescue - and analyze the outcomes for patients based on the regimen used and the source of stem cells. Disease responsiveness at the time of high-dose therapy is the most important factor for determining outcome. The source of stem cells did not affect progression-free survival for either group.

  14. Radiation dose reduction for patients with extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma with complete response after initial induction chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Bi, Xi-wen; Xia, Zhong-jun; Huang, Hui-qiang; Jiang, Wen-qi; Zhang, Yu-jing

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have found that radiotherapy (RT) dose less than 50 Gy resulted in inferior outcomes for early stage extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL). Nowadays, induction chemotherapy (CT) followed by RT consolidation is often used. For patients who get complete response (CR) after CT, whether RT dose can be safely reduced or not remains unknown. This retrospective study compared the survival outcomes between patients who received higher dose (>50 Gy) and lower dose (≤50 Gy) RT after CR was attained by CT. One hundred and forty four patients of early stage ENKTL got CR after induction CT and received RT consolidation. Thirty-one patients received lower dose RT (median 46 Gy, range, 36–50 Gy), and 113 patients received higher dose RT (median 56 Gy, range, 52–66 Gy). In univariate survival analysis, age >60, local tumor invasion, and non-asparaginase-based CT were associated with inferior progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). However, there were no differences in PFS and OS between patients treated with higher and lower dose RT, which was confirmed in the multivariate survival analysis. Furthermore, reduced dose RT did not affect local control rate. Most common RT-related side effects were grade 1/2 mucositis and dermatitis, and the incidence rate of grade 3 mucositis or dermatitis was lower in patients treated with reduced dose RT (9.7% vs 15.0% for mucositis, and 6.5% vs 17.7% for dermatitis). In conclusion, this study found that RT dose could be safely reduced without compromising survival outcomes and further improved RT-related side effects. Prospective randomized controlled trials are warranted to validate our findings. PMID:27713641

  15. Reduced cerebral glucose metabolism and increased brain capillary permeability following high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy: a positron emission tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, P.C.; Dhawan, V.; Strother, S.C.; Sidtis, J.J.; Evans, A.C.; Allen, J.C.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Regional glucose metabolic rate constants and blood-to-brain transport of rubidium were estimated using positron emission tomography in an adolescent patient with a brain tumor, before and after chemotherapy with intravenous high-dose methotrexate. Widespread depression of cerebral glucose metabolism was apparent 24 hours after drug administration, which may reflect reduced glucose phosphorylation, and the influx rate constant for /sup 82/Rb was increased, indicating a drug-induced alteration in blood-brain barrier function. Associated changes in neuropsychological performance, electroencephalogram, and plasma amino acid concentration were identified in the absence of evidence of systemic methotrexate toxicity, suggesting primary methotrexate neurotoxicity.

  16. A comparative study of high-dose hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy and transarterial chemoembolization using doxorubicin for intractable, advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Yeon; Kim, Jin Dong; Park, Jun Yong; Han, Kwang Hyub; Woo, Hyun Young; Choi, Jong Young; Yoon, Seung Kew; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Hwang, Jae Seok; Kim, Sang Gyune; Kim, Young Seok; Seo, Yeon Seok; Yim, Hyung Joon; Um, Soon Ho

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) has long been used as a palliative therapy for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). High-dose hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) has showed favorable outcomes in patients with intractable, advanced HCC. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness and safety of high-dose HAIC and conventional TACE using doxorubicin for advanced HCC. Methods The high-dose HAIC group comprised 36 patients who were enrolled prospectively from six institutions. The enrollment criteria were good liver function, main portal vein invasion (including vascular shunt), infiltrative type, bilobar involvement, and/or refractory to prior conventional treatment (TACE, radiofrequency ablation, or percutaneous ethanol injection), and documented progressive disease. Patients received 5-fluorouracil (500 mg/m2 on days 1~3) and cisplatin (60 mg/m2 on day 2 every 4 weeks) via an implantable port system. In the TACE group, 31 patients with characteristics similar to those in the high-dose HAIC group were recruited retrospectively from a single center. Patients underwent a transarterial infusion of doxorubicin every 4~8 weeks. Results Overall, 6 patients (8.9%) achieved a partial response and 20 patients (29.8%) had stable disease. The objective response rate (complete response+partial response) was significantly better in the high-dose HAIC group than in the TACE group (16.7% vs. 0%, P=0.030). Overall survival was longer in the high-dose HAIC group than in the TACE group (median survival, 193 vs. 119 days; P=0.026). There were no serious adverse effects in the high-dose HAIC group, while hepatic complications occurred more often in the TACE group. Conclusions High-dose HAIC appears to improve the tumor response and survival outcome compared to conventional TACE using doxorubicin in patients with intractable, advanced HCC. PMID:21415578

  17. Randomized Trial Comparing R-CHOP Versus High-Dose Sequential Chemotherapy in High-Risk Patients With Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Cortelazzo, Sergio; Tarella, Corrado; Gianni, Alessandro Massimo; Ladetto, Marco; Barbui, Anna Maria; Rossi, Andrea; Gritti, Giuseppe; Corradini, Paolo; Di Nicola, Massimo; Patti, Caterina; Mulé, Antonino; Zanni, Manuela; Zoli, Valerio; Billio, Atto; Piccin, Andrea; Negri, Giovanni; Castellino, Claudia; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Benedetti, Fabio; La Nasa, Giorgio; Gini, Guido; Trentin, Livio; Frezzato, Maurizio; Flenghi, Leonardo; Falorio, Simona; Chilosi, Marco; Bruna, Riccardo; Tabanelli, Valentina; Pileri, Stefano; Masciulli, Arianna; Delaini, Federica; Boschini, Cristina; Rambaldi, Alessandro

    2016-11-20

    Purpose The benefit of high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) as first-line treatment in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphomas is still a matter of debate. To address this point, we designed a randomized phase III trial to compare rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP)-14 (eight cycles) with rituximab plus high-dose sequential chemotherapy (R-HDS) with ASCT. Patients and Methods From June 2005 to June 2011, 246 high-risk patients with a high-intermediate (56%) or high (44%) International Prognostic Index score were randomly assigned to the R-CHOP or R-HDS arm, and 235 were analyzed by intent to treat. The primary efficacy end point of the study was 3-year event-free survival, and results were analyzed on an intent-to-treat basis. Results Clinical response (complete response, 78% v 76%; partial response, 5% v 9%) and failures (no response, 15% v 11%; and early treatment-related mortality, 2% v 3%) were similar after R-CHOP versus R-HDS, respectively. After a median follow-up of 5 years, the 3-year event-free survival was 62% versus 65% ( P = .83). At 3 years, compared with the R-CHOP arm, the R-HDS arm had better disease-free survival (79% v 91%, respectively; P = .034), but this subsequently vanished because of late-occurring treatment-related deaths. No difference was detected in terms of progression-free survival (65% v 75%, respectively; P = .12), or overall survival (74% v 77%, respectively; P = .64). Significantly higher hematologic toxicity ( P < .001) and more infectious complications ( P < .001) were observed in the R-HDS arm. Conclusion In this study, front-line intensive R-HDS chemotherapy with ASCT did not improve the outcome of high-risk patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

  18. Dose Escalation of Total Marrow Irradiation With Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Acute Leukemia Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.; Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy; Radany, Eric; Palmer, Joycelynne; Stein, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We have demonstrated that toxicities are acceptable with total marrow irradiation (TMI) at 16 Gy without chemotherapy or TMI at 12 Gy and the reduced intensity regimen of fludarabine/melphalan in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This article reports results of a study of TMI combined with higher intensity chemotherapy regimens in 2 phase I trials in patients with advanced acute myelogenous leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (AML/ALL) who would do poorly on standard intent-to-cure HCT regimens. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 consisted of TMI on Days -10 to -6, etoposide (VP16) on Day -5 (60 mg/kg), and cyclophosphamide (CY) on Day -3 (100 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=3 patients), 13.5 (n=3 patients), and 15 (n=6 patients) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Trial 2 consisted of busulfan (BU) on Days -12 to -8 (800 {mu}M min), TMI on Days -8 to -4, and VP16 on Day -3 (30 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=18) and 13.5 (n=2) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Results: Trial 1 had 12 patients with a median age of 33 years. Six patients had induction failures (IF), and 6 had first relapses (1RL), 9 with leukemia blast involvement of bone marrow ranging from 10%-98%, 5 with circulating blasts (24%-85%), and 2 with chloromas. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Eleven patients achieved complete remission at Day 30. With a median follow-up of 14.75 months, 5 patients remained in complete remission from 13.5-37.7 months. Trial 2 had 20 patients with a median age of 41 years. Thirteen patients had IF, and 5 had 1RL, 2 in second relapse, 19 with marrow blasts (3%-100%) and 13 with peripheral blasts (6%-63%). Grade 4 dose-limiting toxicities were seen at 13.5 Gy (stomatitis and hepatotoxicity). Stomatitis was the most frequent toxicity in both trials. Conclusions: TMI dose escalation to 15 Gy is possible when combined with CY/VP16 and is associated with acceptable toxicities and encouraging outcomes. TMI dose escalation is not possible with BU/VP16 due to

  19. Metformin decreases the dose of chemotherapy for prolonging tumor remission in mouse xenografts involving multiple cancer cell types.

    PubMed

    Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Hirsch, Heather A; Struhl, Kevin

    2011-05-01

    Metformin, the first-line drug for treating diabetes, selectively kills the chemotherapy resistant subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSC) in genetically distinct types of breast cancer cell lines. In mouse xenografts, injection of metformin and the chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin near the tumor is more effective than either drug alone in blocking tumor growth and preventing relapse. Here, we show that metformin is equally effective when given orally together with paclitaxel, carboplatin, and doxorubicin, indicating that metformin works together with a variety of standard chemotherapeutic agents. In addition, metformin has comparable effects on tumor regression and preventing relapse when combined with a four-fold reduced dose of doxorubicin that is not effective as a monotherapy. Finally, the combination of metformin and doxorubicin prevents relapse in xenografts generated with prostate and lung cancer cell lines. These observations provide further evidence for the CSC hypothesis for cancer relapse, an experimental rationale for using metformin as part of combinatorial therapy in a variety of clinical settings, and for reducing the chemotherapy dose in cancer patients.

  20. Circulating progenitors following high-dose sequential (HDS) chemotherapy with G-CSF: short intervals between drug courses severely impair progenitor mobilization.

    PubMed

    Tarella, C; Caracciolo, D; Gavarotti, P; Bondesan, P; Cherasco, C; Omedè, P; Bregni, M; Siena, S; Gianni, A M; Pileri, A

    1995-08-01

    Sequential administration of high-dose chemotherapy courses possibly allows extensive in vivo purging before circulating progenitor collection for autograft. To evaluate whether progenitor cell mobilization was negatively affected by repeated high-dose chemotherapy courses, we studied 23 lymphoma patients undergoing the HDS regimen. The scheme includes the sequential administration of cyclophosphamide (CY) given at 7 g/m2 and etoposide (VP16) given at 2 g/m2, each followed by G-CSF (filgrastim) at 5 micrograms/kg/day. Eleven patients received the standard HDS sequence, with a short interval between first and second myelotoxic courses of less than 45 days (median: 30 days); the remaining 12 patients received a modified HDS where the interval between first and second high-dose course was protracted over 2 months (median: 70 days); in this latter group, 2 to 4 conventional debulking courses were delivered prior to HDS. In patients receiving the standard HDS, progenitor mobilization following the first course was consistently high (median circulating CFU-GM/ml peak value: 29,022); however, significantly lower values were observed at the second course (median CFU-GM/ml peak value 3757, P = 0.002). Circulating BFU-E and CD34+ cell values paralleled those of CFU-GM. No significant difference was observed in progenitor mobilization following either course in patients receiving HDS with extended interval (median circulating CFU-GM/ml peak value: 14,363 vs 9208, at first and second course respectively, P = 0.27). Eleven patients had their progenitor cells harvested following the second delayed course and 2-4 leucaphereses allowed very satisfactory harvests in all of them (CFU-GM/kg ranging from 39-340 x 10(4)).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Effect of Concurrent High-Dose Cisplatin Chemotherapy and Conformal Radiotherapy on Cervical Esophageal Cancer Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shaohui; Lockwood, Gina; Brierley, James; Cummings, Bernard; Kim, John; Wong, Rebecca; Bayley, Andrew; Ringash, Jolie

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether a change in treatment policy to conformal, elective nodal radiotherapy and concurrent high-dose cisplatin improved survival for cervical esophageal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: All cervical esophageal cancer patients treated between 1997 and 2005 were restaged (1983 American Joint Committee on Cancer criteria). Patients treated before 2001 (previous cohort [PC]) were compared with those treated from 2001 onward (recent cohort [RC]). The PC institutional chemoradiotherapy protocol was 54 Gy in 20 fractions within 4 weeks, with 5-fluorouracil (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1-4 and either mitomycin C (10 mg/m{sup 2}) or cisplatin (75 mg/m{sup 2}) on Day 1. The RC institutional chemoradiotherapy protocol was conformal radiotherapy, 70 Gy in 35 fractions within 7 weeks, to the primary tumor and elective nodes, with high-dose cisplatin (100 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1, 22, and 43. Results: The median follow-up was 3.1 years (PC, 8.1 and RC, 2.3). Of 71 patients (25 women and 46 men), 21 of 29 in the PC and 29 of 42 in the RC were treated curatively (curative subgroup, n = 50). Between the two groups, no differences in overall survival or locoregional relapse-free survival were seen. The overall survival rate at 2 and 5 years was 35% (range, 24-47%) and 21% (range, 12-32%) in the whole group and 46% (range 32-60%) and 28% (range, 15-42%) in the curative group, respectively. In the curative group, no statistically significant prognostic factors were found. Trends toward better locoregional relapse-free survival were seen in women (2-year rate, 73% vs. for men, 36%; p = 0.08) and in patients aged >64 years (2-year rate, 68% vs. age {<=}64 years, 34%; p = 0.10). Conclusion: No survival improvement could be demonstrated after changing the treatment policy to high-dose cisplatin-based, conventionally fractionated conformal chemoradiotherapy. Female gender and older age might predict for better outcomes.

  2. Clinical analysis and prognostic significance of L-asparaginase containing multidrug chemotherapy regimen in incipient peripheral T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Guoli; Zhou, De; Zhou, Meng; Bao, Changqian; He, Donghua; Li, Li; Zhu, Jingjing; He, Jinsong; Shi, Jimin; Zheng, Weiyan; Cai, Zhen; Huang, He; Ye, Xiujin; Xie, Wanzhuo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical effects and adverse reactions, and analyze the clinical significance of L-asparaginase (L-ASP) containing multidrug chemotherapy regimen in incipient peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted of 102 patients with incipient PTCL who received L-ASP containing multidrug chemotherapy regimens or not in our hospital from January 2010 to December 2013. Complete remission (CR) rate, partial remission (PR) rate, overall remission (OR) rate, progression free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and adverse reactions were compared. Results: Patients who received L-ASP containing multidrug chemotherapy (L-ASP group) had higher OR rate than those who received L-ASP-free ones (non L-ASP group) (83.3% vs 61.7%, P=0.016), particularly those at phase III/IV (82.4% vs 54.0%, P=0.007) and with an international prognostic index (IPI) score of ≥2 (82.1% vs 50.0%, P=0.006). The median survival time (OS) was 10.5 months (range, 1-47months) in L-ASP group, while 13 months (range, 0.3-68 months) in non L-ASP group, and they had no statistically significance (P=0.754). Similarly, the progression free survival time(PFS)was 10 months (range, 1-47 months) in L-ASP group,while 11 months (range, 0.3-68 months) in non L-ASP group, also had no statistically significance (P=0.414). The 3-year OS rate of L-ASP group and non L-ASP group were 48.9% and 65.0% , respectively (P=0.974) and the 3-year PFS rate of L-ASP group and non L-ASP group were 40.8% and 61.0%, respectively (P=0.479). They all had no statistically significance. The L-ASP group had more adverse reactions than the non L-ASP group, though most of them were mild and could be improved by symptomatic and supportive care. Conclusion: L-ASP containing multidrug chemotherapy regimen in incipient PTCL showed a better short-term effect and controllable adverse reactions. A large prospective clinical trial of use L-ASP in first-line treatment of PTCL is worthy of

  3. Phase I lead-in and subsequent randomized trial assessing safety and modulation of regulatory T cell numbers following a maximally tolerated dose doxorubicin and metronomic dose cyclophosphamide combination chemotherapy protocol in tumour-bearing dogs.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, R M; Kurzman, I D; Biller, B J; Guth, A; Vail, D M

    2015-11-01

    Maximally tolerated dose (MTD) and metronomic dose chemotherapeutic approaches alter the immune system and the angiogenic process in different yet potentially complementary ways. A combination of MTD doxorubicin (MTD-DOX) and metronomic cyclophosphamide (mCTX) protocol was evaluated for safety and effect on circulating regulatory T (Treg) cells. We found that mCTX can be safely administered with MTD-DOX in tumour-bearing dogs. Both combination DOX/mCTX and single-agent DOX resulted in significant depletions of circulating lymphocytes throughout the chemotherapy cycle without apparent selectivity for Tregs. The indiscriminant lymphocyte depletions were similar between dogs randomized to receive DOX and dogs randomized to receive DOX/mCTX, suggesting this effect is because of DOX alone. These findings may have implications as to the therapeutic benefit (or lack thereof) of concurrent combination MTD and metronomic protocols. Future investigations are required to determine the effects and indeed the efficacy of concurrent versus sequential applications of MTD and metronomic chemotherapy protocols.

  4. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Might Increase Pneumonitis Risk Relative to Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients Receiving Combined Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy: A Modeling Study of Dose Dumping

    SciTech Connect

    Vogelius, Ivan S.; Westerly, David C.; Cannon, George M.; Mackie, Thomas R.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Sugie, Chikao; Bentzen, Soren M.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To model the possible interaction between cytotoxic chemotherapy and the radiation dose distribution with respect to the risk of radiation pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 18 non-small-cell lung cancer patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy at the University of Wisconsin were selected for the present modeling study. Three treatment plans were considered: the delivered tomotherapy plans; a three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan; and a fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan. The IMRT and 3D-CRT plans were generated specifically for the present study. The plans were optimized without adjusting for the chemotherapy effect. The effect of chemotherapy was modeled as an independent cell killing process by considering a uniform chemotherapy equivalent radiation dose added to all voxels of the organ at risk. The risk of radiation pneumonitis was estimated for all plans using the Lyman and the critical volume models. Results: For radiotherapy alone, the critical volume model predicts that the two IMRT plans are associated with a lower risk of radiation pneumonitis than the 3D-CRT plan. However, when the chemotherapy equivalent radiation dose exceeds a certain threshold, the radiation pneumonitis risk after IMRT is greater than after 3D-CRT. This threshold dose is in the range estimated from clinical chemoradiotherapy data sets. Conclusions: Cytotoxic chemotherapy might affect the relative merit of competing radiotherapy plans. More work is needed to improve our understanding of the interaction between chemotherapy and the radiation dose distribution in clinical settings.

  5. High-dose chemotherapy with autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for choriocarcinoma: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Eiko; Niimi, Kaoru; Fujikake, Kayo; Nishida, Tetsuya; Murata, Makoto; Mitsuma, Ayako; Ando, Yuichi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2016-01-01

    Choriocarcinoma is a malignant gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) and one of the curable types of gynecological cancer. However, 10% of choriocarcinoma patients have a poor prognosis, particularly when they have metastasis, apart from pulmonary metastasis, or do not go into remission by the second chemotherapeutic regimen. We herein present the case of a 36-year-old patient who had choriocarcinoma with metastases to the lungs, liver and kidneys. The 5th and 6th regimens with cisplatin for choriocarcinoma failed and the patient developed brain metastases. She was then treated with four cycles of high-dose ifosfamide, carboplatin and etoposide (ICE) with blood progenitor cell support after confirming the effectiveness of ICE at normal doses. The serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) level was 140,009 mIU/ml at the start of high-dose ICE and the patient tolerated this regimen well. However, the beneficial effect was decreasing with each successive course of treatment, with the lowest level of hCG at 103 mIU/ml after the fourth course. The patient did not achieve complete remission and succumbed to the disease 4 months after the last chemotherapy. The findings of the present case and a review of the related literature suggest that high-dose ICE with stem cell rescue may be considered as a viable treatment option for a multi-drug resistant choriocarcinoma or GTN. PMID:27900108

  6. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by focal, reduced-dose irradiation for pediatric primary central nervous system germinomas.

    PubMed

    Douglas, James G; Rockhill, Jason K; Olson, James M; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Geyer, J Russell

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate retrospectively one institution's experience treating pediatric central nervous system (CNS) pure germinomas with platinum-based chemotherapy followed by focal, reduced-dose irradiation. Eight patients were identified with localized, pure CNS germinomas from 1993 to 2004 at the authors' institution. The median age at diagnosis was 13 years (range 7-19). The median follow-up was 40 months (range 8-141). The tumor location was suprasellar in four, the pineal region in three, and the third ventricle in one. Irradiation was started a median of 20 weeks (range 17-22) from diagnosis and consisted of conformal fields to the primary site as determined by the initial diagnostic MR plus a 1.5- to 2-cm margin. Six of the eight patients received a dose of 3,060 cGy; two patients received 3,600 cGy. The 5-year actuarial event free survival was 71% (56-86%, 95% CI). Two patients suffered marginal (at field edge) failures and both were salvaged using reinduction platinum-based chemotherapy followed by cranial spinal irradiation and a boost to the primary tumor. The 5-year actuarial overall survival was 100%. There were no spinal failures. These data suggest that a reduction in both volume and dose (30.6-36 Gy) retains the excellent survival rates for patients with localized, pure germinomas of the CNS. A higher rate of ventricular relapse rate is observed, although salvage of those patients is feasible.

  7. Extended Course and Increased Dose of Initial Chemotherapy for Extranodal Nasal Type Natural Killer/T (NK/T)-Cell Lymphoma in Patients <60 Years Old: A Single-Center Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Wanggang; Liu, Jie; Cao, Xingmei; He, Aili; Chen, Yinxia; Gu, Liufang; Lei, Bo; Zhang, Pengyu; Ma, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    Background Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL) of the nasal type is highly invasive and relatively resistant to chemotherapy. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of an extended chemotherapy regimen with increased dose intensity. Material/Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of 69 patients <60 years old with an ECOG score 0–2 treated for ENKTL at the Second Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University between January 2004 and December 2013. The outcomes were compared between patients who received >8 courses of high-intensity chemotherapy (n=37) vs. 6–8 courses (n=18) and <6 courses (n=14) of conventional chemotherapy. Regimens included improved CHOP, CHOP-E, EPOCH, MAED, MMED, SMILE, and Hyper-CVAD with an increased dose intensity in the >8 courses group. Results The mean follow-up was 52 months (8 to 82 months). Remission rate did not differ significantly when compared among the 3 groups after 3 courses of chemotherapy (83.8%, 77.8%, and 78.6%, respectively, overall P=0.834), but the 5-year overall survival (OS) differed significantly (63.5%, 45.1%, and 22.9%, respectively, overall P=0.030), as did progression-free survival (PFS) (59.1%, 36.0%, and 15.1%, respectively, overall P=0.020), disease-free survival (DFS) (54.1%, 35.5%, and 12.9%, respectively, overall P=0.022), and total relapse rate throughout follow-up (37.04%, 50.0%, and 88.89%, respectively, overall P=0.027). There were no differences in adverse effects among the 3 groups. Conclusions These results suggest improved OS, PFS, DFS, and relapse rate in young patients with ENKTL receiving >8 courses of high-intensity chemotherapy. PMID:27843135

  8. High-dose parenteral ascorbate enhanced chemosensitivity of ovarian cancer and reduced toxicity of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Chapman, Julia; Levine, Mark; Polireddy, Kishore; Drisko, Jeanne; Chen, Qi

    2014-02-05

    Ascorbate (vitamin C) was an early, unorthodox therapy for cancer, with an outstanding safety profile and anecdotal clinical benefit. Because oral ascorbate was ineffective in two cancer clinical trials, ascorbate was abandoned by conventional oncology but continued to be used in complementary and alternative medicine. Recent studies provide rationale for reexamining ascorbate treatment. Because of marked pharmacokinetic differences, intravenous, but not oral, ascorbate produces millimolar concentrations both in blood and in tissues, killing cancer cells without harming normal tissues. In the interstitial fluid surrounding tumor cells, millimolar concentrations of ascorbate exert local pro-oxidant effects by mediating hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) formation, which kills cancer cells. We investigated downstream mechanisms of ascorbate-induced cell death. Data show that millimolar ascorbate, acting as a pro-oxidant, induced DNA damage and depleted cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), activated the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)/adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway, and resulted in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition and death in ovarian cancer cells. The combination of parenteral ascorbate with the conventional chemotherapeutic agents carboplatin and paclitaxel synergistically inhibited ovarian cancer in mouse models and reduced chemotherapy-associated toxicity in patients with ovarian cancer. On the basis of its potential benefit and minimal toxicity, examination of intravenous ascorbate in combination with standard chemotherapy is justified in larger clinical trials.

  9. Significant survival benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy after concurrent chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced high-risk nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhong-Guo; Chen, Xiao-Qian; Lin, Guo-Xiang; Yu, Bin-Bin; Chen, Kai-Hua; Zhong, Qiu-Lu; Nong, Si-Kai; Li, Ling; Qu, Song; Su, Fang; Zhao, Wei; Li, Ye; Zhu, Xiao-Dong

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to define high-risk patients who may benefit from additional adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) after concurrent chemotherapy in combination with intensity-modulated radiotherapy among patients with loco-regionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). A cohort of 511 NPC patients who received concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) with or without AC between January 2007 and December 2012 were retrospectively analysed. One hundred seventy-seven patients received CCRT alone, whereas 334 received CCRT + AC. The survival analysis showed that ages >45 years old, T3-T4 stages, N2-N3 disease and serum albumin levels ≤42 g/L were significant independent prognostic factors for overall survival (OS). Using these four risk factors, a prognostic model for OS was created as follows: (1) low-risk group: 0–1 risk factors; and (2) high-risk group: 2–4 risk factors. In the CCRT alone and CCRT + AC groups, significant differences in survival were found between the high- and low-risk groups. Patients in the high-risk group exhibited improved OS due to the addition of AC to CCRT, but no survival benefits were found in the low-risk group. In conclusion, high-risk patients may benefit from the addition of AC to CCRT regarding OS. PMID:28150694

  10. Tolerability of piperacillin/tazobactam in children and adolescents after high dose radio-/chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nürnberger, W; Bönig, H; Burdach, S; Göbel, U

    1998-01-01

    The combination of piperacillin with tazobactam (PIP/TAZ) extends the activity of piperacillin against gram-positive, gram-negative, and anaerobic bacteria. The broad-spectrum of this formulation, together with its low degree of organ toxicity observed in adults, makes PIP/TAZ a tempting choice for children with radio-/chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. However, the use of PIP/TAZ is not yet approved for children under 12 years of age. The tolerability of PIP/TAZ was assessed in 19 children and adolescents between 2 and 18 years of age who developed a fever during aplasia after high dose radio-/chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HD-SCT) for primary multifocal or relapsed solid tumours. Treatment with PIP/TAZ was initiated on average 3 days after HD-SCT, and the treatment was continued for approximately 10 days. Both clinical observation and laboratory studies showed no relevant alterations that would have been attributable to PIP/TAZ treatment. These results indicate that PIP/TAZ appears to be well tolerated in children during the acute phase of HD-SCT.

  11. Repeated high-dose chemotherapy followed by purged autologous bone marrow transplantation as consolidation therapy in metastatic neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, O; Benhamou, E; Beaujean, F; Kalifa, C; Lejars, O; Patte, C; Behard, C; Flamant, F; Thyss, A; Deville, A

    1987-08-01

    Among 62 children over 1 year of age at diagnosis, who were treated for stage IV neuroblastoma, 33 entered complete remission (CR) or good partial remission (GPR) after conventional therapy and received high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with in vitro purged autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) as consolidation therapy. The HDC was a combination of carmustine (BCNU), teniposide (VM-26), and melphalan. Thirty-three patients received one course of this regimen, and 18 received two courses. At present, 16 of the 33 grafted patients are alive in continuous CR, with a median follow-up of 28 months. Toxicity of this regimen was tolerable, principally marked by bone marrow depression and gastrointestinal (GI) tract complications. Four complication-related deaths were observed. Relapse post-ABMT occurred most often in the bone marrow. Under this treatment, actuarial disease-free survival is improved compared with that observed under conventional therapy.

  12. A randomized trial of amifostine in patients with high-dose VIC chemotherapy plus autologous blood stem cell transplanation

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, J T; Vangerow, A von; Fels, L M; Knop, S; Stolte, H; Kanz, L; Bokemeyer, C

    2001-01-01

    This pilot study evaluates the degree of side effects during high-dose chemotherapy (HD-VIC) plus autologous bone marrow transplant (HDCT) and its possible prevention by the cytoprotective thiol-derivate amifostine. Additionally, the in-patient medical costs of both treatment arms were compared. 40 patients with solid tumours were randomized to receive HD-VIC chemotherapy with or without amifostine (910 mg/m2 at day 1–3) given as a short infusion prior to carboplatin and ifosfamide. Patients were stratified according to pretreatment. HDCT consisted of an 18 h infusion of carboplatin (500 mg/m2/d over 18 h), ifosfamide (4 g/m2/d over 4 h) and etoposide (500 mg/m2/d) all given for 3 consecutive days. All patients received prophylactic application of G-CSF (5 μg kg−1 subcutaneously) to ameliorate neutropenia after treatment. Patients were monitored for nephrotoxicity, gastrointestinal side effects, haematopoietic recovery, as well as frequency of fever and infections. The median fall of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was 10% from baseline in the amifostine group (105 to 95 ml min−1) and 37% in the control patient group (107 to 67 ml min−1) (P< 0.01). Amifostine-treated patients revealed a less pronounced increase in albumine and low molecular weight protein urinary excretion. Stomatitis grade III/IV occurred in 25% without versus 0% of patients with amifostine (P = 0.01). Acute nausea/vomiting was frequently observed immediately during or after the application of amifostine despite intensive antiemetic prophylaxis consisting of 5-HT3-receptor antagonists/dexamethasone/trifluorpromazine. However, delayed emesis occurred more often in the control patients. Engraftment of neutrophil (> 500 μl−1) and thrombocytes (> 25 000 μl−1)were observed at days 9 versus 10 and 10 versus 12, respectively, both slightly in favour of the amifostine arm. In addition, a lower number of days with fever and a shortened duration of hospital stay were observed in the

  13. Long-term remission in mantle cell lymphoma following high-dose sequential chemotherapy and in vivo rituximab-purged stem cell autografting (R-HDS regimen).

    PubMed

    Gianni, Alessandro M; Magni, Michele; Martelli, Maurizio; Di Nicola, Massimo; Carlo-Stella, Carmelo; Pilotti, Silvana; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Cortelazzo, Sergio; Patti, Caterina; Parvis, Guido; Benedetti, Fabio; Capria, Saveria; Corradini, Paolo; Tarella, Corrado; Barbui, Tiziano

    2003-07-15

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is rarely cured with standard-dose chemotherapy. From January 1997 to February 2000, 28 previously untreated advanced-stage MCL patients younger than 61 years of age were treated at 9 Italian hematologic departments with 3 cycles of standard-dose debulking chemotherapy followed by a high-dose rituximab-supplemented sequence (R-HDS) including intravenous administration of high-dose cyclophosphamide, high-dose cytarabine, high-dose melphalan, and high-dose mitoxantrone plus melphalan. Study end points included toxicity, clinical and molecular response rates, long-term event-free survival (EFS), and overall survival (OS) rates, as well as the ability to harvest tumor-free peripheral blood stem cells. Optimal amounts of polymerase chain reaction-negative (PCR-negative) CD34+ cells were collected from all 20 informative patients. One patient died of toxicity. All 27 patients assessable for response achieved a complete response (CR), of which 24 remain in continuous complete remission (CCR) after a median follow-up of 35 months. Three patients had transient evidence of PCR-detectable disease in the bone marrow. The OS and EFS rates at 54 months were 89% and 79%, respectively. These results compare with the 42% OS rate and the 18% EFS rate observed in 35 age-matched historic controls treated with standard-dose chemotherapy at the participating centers. The use of rituximab in combination with high-dose chemotherapy represents a very effective in vivo purging method. The R-HDS regimen can be safely applied in a multicenter hematology setting and leads to long-term EFS and OS in the majority of patients with an otherwise incurable disease.

  14. The effect of endocrine responsiveness on high-risk breast cancer treated with dose-intensive chemotherapy: results of International Breast Cancer Study Group Trial 15-95 after prolonged follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Colleoni, M.; Sun, Z.; Martinelli, G.; Basser, R. L.; Coates, A. S.; Gelber, R. D.; Green, M. D.; Peccatori, F.; Cinieri, S.; Aebi, S.; Viale, G.; Price, K. N.; Goldhirsch, A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The role of adjuvant dose-intensive chemotherapy and its efficacy according to baseline features has not yet been established. Patients and methods: Three hundred and forty-four patients were randomized to receive seven courses of standard-dose chemotherapy (SD-CT) or three cycles of dose-intensive epirubicin and cyclophosphamide (epirubicin 200 mg/m2 plus cyclophosphamide 4 mg/m2 with filgrastim and progenitor cell support). All patients were assigned tamoxifen at the completion of chemotherapy. The primary end point was disease-free survival (DFS). This paper updates the results and explores patterns of recurrence according to predicting baseline features. Results: At 8.3-years median follow-up, patients assigned DI-EC had a significantly better DFS compared with those assigned SD-CT [8-year DFS percent 47% and 37%, respectively, hazard ratio (HR) 0.76; 95% confidence interval 0.58–1.00; P = 0.05]. Only patients with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease benefited from the DI-EC (HR 0.61; 95% confidence interval 0.39, 0.95; P = 0.03). Conclusions: After prolonged follow-up, DI-EC significantly improved DFS, but the effect was observed only in patients with ER-positive disease, leading to the hypothesis that efficacy of DI-EC may relate to its endocrine effects. Further studies designed to confirm the importance of endocrine responsiveness in patients treated with dose-intensive chemotherapy are encouraged. PMID:19468030

  15. Dose-adjusted Chemotherapy for Untreated c-MYC-positive Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, adult patients with newly diagnosed Burkitt lymphoma or c-MYC-positive DLBCL will be separated into low-risk and high-risk groups; those in the low-risk group will be treated with at least three cycles of dose-adjusted EPOCH-R

  16. Dose escalation study of proton beam therapy with concurrent chemotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Harada, Hideyuki; Fuji, Hiroshi; Ono, Akira; Kenmotsu, Hirotsugu; Naito, Tateaki; Yamashita, Haruo; Asakura, Hirofumi; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Murayama, Shigeyuki

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the recommended dose (RD) of proton beam therapy (PBT) for inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We tested two prescribed doses of PBT: 66 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) in 33 fractions and 74 Gy (RBE) in 37 fractions in arms 1 and 2, respectively. The planning target volume (PTV) included the primary tumor and metastatic lymph nodes with adequate margins. Concurrent chemotherapy included intravenous cisplatin (60 mg/m(2) , day 1) and oral S-1 (80, 100 or 120 mg based on body surface area, days 1-14), repeated as four cycles every 4 weeks. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as grade 3 or severe toxicities related to PBT during days 1-90. Each dose level was performed in three patients, and then escalated to the next level if no DLT occurred. When one patient developed a DLT, three additional patients were enrolled. Overall, nine patients (five men, four women; median age, 72 years) were enrolled, including six in arm 1 and three in arm 2. The median follow-up time was 43 months, and the median progression-free survival was 15 months. In arm 1, grade 3 infection occurred in one of six patients, but no other DLT was reported. Similarly, no DLT occurred in arm 2. However, one patient in arm 2 developed grade 3 esophageal fistula at 9 months after the initiation of PBT. Therefore, we determined that 66 Gy (RBE) is the RD from a clinical viewpoints. (Clinical trial registration no. UMIN000005585).

  17. Plerixafor on-demand combined with chemotherapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: significant improvement in peripheral blood stem cells mobilization and harvest with no increase in costs.

    PubMed

    Milone, Giuseppe; Martino, Massimo; Spadaro, Andrea; Leotta, Salvatore; Di Marco, Annalia; Scalzulli, Potito; Cupri, Alessandra; Di Martina, Valentina; Schinocca, Elena; Spina, Eleonora; Tripepi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    To date, no prospective study on Plerixafor 'on-demand' in combination with chemotherapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been reported. We present an interim analysis of the first prospective study in which Plerixafor was administered on-demand in patients affected by multiple myeloma and lymphoma who received high dose cyclophosphamide or DHAP (dexamethasone, cytarabine, cisplatin) plus G-CSF to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). One hundred and two patients were evaluable for response. A cohort of 240 patients receiving the same mobilizing chemotherapy was retrospectively studied. Failure to mobilize CD34(+) cells in peripheral blood was reduced by 'on-demand' strategy compared to conventional mobilization; from 13·0 to 3·0% (P = 0·004). Failure to harvest CD34(+) cells 2 × 10(6) /kg decreased from 20·9 to 4·0% (P = 0·0001). The on-demand Plerixafor strategy also resulted in a lower rate of mobilization failure (P = 0·03) and harvest failure (P = 0·0008) when compared to a 'bias-adjusted set of controls'. Evaluation of economic costs of the two strategies showed that the overall cost of the two treatments were comparable when salvage mobilizations were taken into account. When in combination with cyclophosphamide or DHAP plus G-CSF, the 'on-demand' use of Plerixafor showed, in comparison to conventionally treated patients, a significant improvement in mobilization of PBSC with no increase in overall cost.

  18. Cardiac conduction abnormalities in patients with breast cancer undergoing high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ando, M; Yokozawa, T; Sawada, J; Takaue, Y; Togitani, K; Kawahigashi, N; Narabayashi, M; Takeyama, K; Tanosaki, R; Mineishi, S; Kobayashi, Y; Watanabe, T; Adachi, I; Tobinai, K

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac toxicities in 39 consecutive patients with breast cancer receiving high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with stem cell transplantation were reviewed. All 39 patients received various anthracycline-containing regimens in adjuvant settings and/or for metastatic disease before HDC. As a cytoreductive regimen, all received cyclophosphamide 2000 mg/m2 and thiotepa 200 mg/m2 for 3 consecutive days. No immediate fatal toxicities were observed, but one patient developed chronic congestive heart failure and two had transient left ventricular dysfunction. Pericardial effusion was observed in another three patients. ST-T abnormalities during HDC were observed in two patients and arrhythmias were observed in nine, four of which occurred during stem cell infusion (SCI). There were three atrial arrhythmias, two ventricular arrhythmias, and four atrioventricular (AV)-block episodes. Two patients developed advanced and complete AV-block with an asystolic pause. Notably, three patients experienced AV-block with uncontrolled vomiting. No relationship was observed between the cumulative dose of anthracycline and cardiac toxicities during HDC. These results suggest that abnormalities in the conduction system during HDC may be more frequent than previously reported. Vagal reflex secondary to emesis may play an important role in the development of AV-block. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2000) 25, 185-189.

  19. Mutation of Escherichia coli cytosine deaminase significantly enhances molecular chemotherapy of human glioma.

    PubMed

    Kaliberov, S A; Market, J M; Gillespie, G Y; Krendelchtchikova, V; Della Manna, D; Sellers, J C; Kaliberova, L N; Black, M E; Buchsbaum, D J

    2007-07-01

    Combined treatment using adenoviral (Ad)-directed enzyme/prodrug therapy and radiation therapy has the potential to become a powerful method of cancer therapy. We have developed an Ad vector encoding a mutant bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) gene (AdbCD-D314A), which has a higher affinity for cytosine than wild-type bCD (bCDwt). The purpose of this study was to evaluate cytotoxicity in vitro and therapeutic efficacy in vivo of the combination of AdbCD-D314A with the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) and ionizing radiation against human glioma. The present study demonstrates that AdbCD-D314A infection resulted in increased 5-FC-mediated cell killing, compared with AdbCDwt. Furthermore, a significant increase in cytotoxicity following AdbCD-D314A and radiation treatment of glioma cells in vitro was demonstrated as compared to AdbCDwt. Animal studies showed significant inhibition of subcutaneous or intracranial tumor growth of D54MG glioma xenografts by the combination of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC with ionizing radiation as compared with either agent alone, and with AdbCDwt/5-FC plus radiation. The results suggest that the combination of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC with radiation produces markedly increased cytotoxic effects in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. These data indicate that combined treatment with this novel mutant enzyme/prodrug therapy and radiotherapy provides a promising approach for cancer therapy.

  20. High-Dose Intravenous Vitamin C Combined with Cytotoxic Chemotherapy in Patients with Advanced Cancer: A Phase I-II Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hoffer, L. John; Robitaille, Line; Zakarian, Robert; Melnychuk, David; Kavan, Petr; Agulnik, Jason; Cohen, Victor; Small, David; Miller, Wilson H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Biological and some clinical evidence suggest that high-dose intravenous vitamin C (IVC) could increase the effectiveness of cancer chemotherapy. IVC is widely used by integrative and complementary cancer therapists, but rigorous data are lacking as to its safety and which cancers and chemotherapy regimens would be the most promising to investigate in detail. Methods and Findings We carried out a phase I-II safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic and efficacy trial of IVC combined with chemotherapy in patients whose treating oncologist judged that standard-of-care or off-label chemotherapy offered less than a 33% likelihood of a meaningful response. We documented adverse events and toxicity associated with IVC infusions, determined pre- and post-chemotherapy vitamin C and oxalic acid pharmacokinetic profiles, and monitored objective clinical responses, mood and quality of life. Fourteen patients were enrolled. IVC was safe and generally well tolerated, although some patients experienced transient adverse events during or after IVC infusions. The pre- and post-chemotherapy pharmacokinetic profiles suggested that tissue uptake of vitamin C increases after chemotherapy, with no increase in urinary oxalic acid excretion. Three patients with different types of cancer experienced unexpected transient stable disease, increased energy and functional improvement. Conclusions Despite IVC’s biological and clinical plausibility, career cancer investigators currently ignore it while integrative cancer therapists use it widely but without reporting the kind of clinical data that is normally gathered in cancer drug development. The present study neither proves nor disproves IVC’s value in cancer therapy, but it provides practical information, and indicates a feasible way to evaluate this plausible but unproven therapy in an academic environment that is currently uninterested in it. If carried out in sufficient numbers, simple studies like this one could identify

  1. Mixed Testicular Germ Cell Tumor Presenting as Metastatic Pure Choriocarcinoma Involving Multiple Lung Metastases That Was Effectively Treated with High-dose Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Cheol; Kim, Kyoung Ha; Kim, Sung Han; Lee, Nam Su; Park, Hee Sook

    2009-01-01

    Choriocarcinoma in the testis is very rare, and it represents less than 1% (0.3%) of all the testicular germ cell tumors. It is a particularly aggressive variant of non-seminoma tumor, which is characterized by a high serum β-HCG level and multiple lung metastases. The optimal management for this disease remains undefined. We report here on a case of choriocarcinoma with multiple lung metastases, and the patient has achieved continuous remission for 2 years after combination chemotherapy of BEP (bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin) and sequential high-dose chemotherapy with autologous peripheral stem cell rescue. PMID:20057969

  2. Long-term neuropsychological follow-up of young children with medulloblastoma treated with sequential high-dose chemotherapy and irradiation sparing approach.

    PubMed

    Fay-McClymont, Taryn B; Ploetz, Danielle M; Mabbott, Don; Walsh, Karin; Smith, Amy; Chi, Susan N; Wells, Elizabeth; Madden, Jennifer; Margol, Ashley; Finlay, Jonathan; Kieran, Mark W; Strother, Douglas; Dhall, Girish; Packer, Roger J; Foreman, Nicholas K; Bouffet, E; Lafay-Cousin, Lucie

    2017-04-12

    High-dose chemotherapy (HDC) strategies were developed in brain tumor protocols for young children to prevent neuropsychological (NP) impairments associated with radiotherapy. However, comprehensive NP evaluations of these children treated with such strategies remain limited. We examined the long-term neurocognitive outcomes of young children (<6 years) with medulloblastoma, treated similarly, with a HDC strategy "according to" the chemotherapy regimen of the protocol CCG 99703. This retrospective study included young children less than 6 years of age at diagnosis of medulloblastoma treated from 1998 to 2011 at 7 North American institutions. Twenty-four patients who had at least one NP assessment post-treatment are the focus of the current study. Of 24 patients in this review, 15 (63%) were male and the mean age at diagnosis was 29.4 months (SD = 13.5). Posterior fossa syndrome (PFs) was reported in five patients (21%). Nine (37.5%) received radiotherapy (5 focal, 4 craniospinal). On average, children were assessed 3.5 years (SD = 1.8) post-diagnosis, and full-scale intellectual quotient (FSIQ) scores ranged from 56 to 119 ([Formula: see text]= 92; SD = 16.8). The majority of children (74%) had low-average to average NP functioning. Very young children treated with radiotherapy, who needed hearing support or with PFs had worse neurocognitive outcomes. Clinically significant deficits (<10th percentile) in at least one area of NP functioning were found in 25% of the children. NP data obtained from this sample of survivors of medulloblastoma in early childhood, all treated with sequential HDC and 1/3 with radiotherapy, describe NP functioning within average normal limits overall. However, almost 25% of children had significant deficits in specific domains.

  3. Pharmacogenetic warfarin dose refinements remain significantly influenced by genetic factors after one week of therapy.

    PubMed

    Horne, Benjamin D; Lenzini, Petra A; Wadelius, Mia; Jorgensen, Andrea L; Kimmel, Stephen E; Ridker, Paul M; Eriksson, Niclas; Anderson, Jeffrey L; Pirmohamed, Munir; Limdi, Nita A; Pendleton, Robert C; McMillin, Gwendolyn A; Burmester, James K; Kurnik, Daniel; Stein, C Michael; Caldwell, Michael D; Eby, Charles S; Rane, Anders; Lindh, Jonatan D; Shin, Jae-Gook; Kim, Ho-Sook; Angchaisuksiri, Pantep; Glynn, Robert J; Kronquist, Kathryn E; Carlquist, John F; Grice, Gloria R; Barrack, Robert L; Li, Juan; Gage, Brian F

    2012-02-01

    By guiding initial warfarin dose, pharmacogenetic (PGx) algorithms may improve the safety of warfarin initiation. However, once international normalised ratio (INR) response is known, the contribution of PGx to dose refinements is uncertain. This study sought to develop and validate clinical and PGx dosing algorithms for warfarin dose refinement on days 6-11 after therapy initiation. An international sample of 2,022 patients at 13 medical centres on three continents provided clinical, INR, and genetic data at treatment days 6-11 to predict therapeutic warfarin dose. Independent derivation and retrospective validation samples were composed by randomly dividing the population (80%/20%). Prior warfarin doses were weighted by their expected effect on S-warfarin concentrations using an exponential-decay pharmacokinetic model. The INR divided by that "effective" dose constituted a treatment response index . Treatment response index, age, amiodarone, body surface area, warfarin indication, and target INR were associated with dose in the derivation sample. A clinical algorithm based on these factors was remarkably accurate: in the retrospective validation cohort its R(2) was 61.2% and median absolute error (MAE) was 5.0 mg/week. Accuracy and safety was confirmed in a prospective cohort (N=43). CYP2C9 variants and VKORC1-1639 G→A were significant dose predictors in both the derivation and validation samples. In the retrospective validation cohort, the PGx algorithm had: R(2)= 69.1% (p<0.05 vs. clinical algorithm), MAE= 4.7 mg/week. In conclusion, a pharmacogenetic warfarin dose-refinement algorithm based on clinical, INR, and genetic factors can explain at least 69.1% of therapeutic warfarin dose variability after about one week of therapy.

  4. Immunomodulatory effects of the Agaricus blazei Murrill-based mushroom extract AndoSan in patients with multiple myeloma undergoing high dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation: a randomized, double blinded clinical study.

    PubMed

    Tangen, Jon-Magnus; Tierens, Anne; Caers, Jo; Binsfeld, Marilene; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Trøseid, Anne-Marie Siebke; Wang, Junbai; Tjønnfjord, Geir Erland; Hetland, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Forty patients with multiple myeloma scheduled to undergo high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support were randomized in a double blinded fashion to receive adjuvant treatment with the mushroom extract AndoSan, containing 82% of Agaricus blazei Murrill (19 patients) or placebo (21 patients). Intake of the study product started on the day of stem cell mobilizing chemotherapy and continued until the end of aplasia after high dose chemotherapy, a period of about seven weeks. Thirty-three patients were evaluable for all study endpoints, while all 40 included patients were evaluable for survival endpoints. In the leukapheresis product harvested after stem cell mobilisation, increased percentages of Treg cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells were found in patients receiving AndoSan. Also, in this group, a significant increase of serum levels of IL-1ra, IL-5, and IL-7 at the end of treatment was found. Whole genome microarray showed increased expression of immunoglobulin genes, Killer Immunoglobulin Receptor (KIR) genes, and HLA genes in the Agaricus group. Furthermore, AndoSan displayed a concentration dependent antiproliferative effect on mouse myeloma cells in vitro. There were no statistically significant differences in treatment response, overall survival, and time to new treatment. The study was registered with Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00970021.

  5. Immunomodulatory Effects of the Agaricus blazei Murrill-Based Mushroom Extract AndoSan in Patients with Multiple Myeloma Undergoing High Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation: A Randomized, Double Blinded Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Tierens, Anne; Caers, Jo; Binsfeld, Marilene; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Trøseid, Anne-Marie Siebke; Wang, Junbai; Tjønnfjord, Geir Erland; Hetland, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Forty patients with multiple myeloma scheduled to undergo high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support were randomized in a double blinded fashion to receive adjuvant treatment with the mushroom extract AndoSan, containing 82% of Agaricus blazei Murrill (19 patients) or placebo (21 patients). Intake of the study product started on the day of stem cell mobilizing chemotherapy and continued until the end of aplasia after high dose chemotherapy, a period of about seven weeks. Thirty-three patients were evaluable for all study endpoints, while all 40 included patients were evaluable for survival endpoints. In the leukapheresis product harvested after stem cell mobilisation, increased percentages of Treg cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells were found in patients receiving AndoSan. Also, in this group, a significant increase of serum levels of IL-1ra, IL-5, and IL-7 at the end of treatment was found. Whole genome microarray showed increased expression of immunoglobulin genes, Killer Immunoglobulin Receptor (KIR) genes, and HLA genes in the Agaricus group. Furthermore, AndoSan displayed a concentration dependent antiproliferative effect on mouse myeloma cells in vitro. There were no statistically significant differences in treatment response, overall survival, and time to new treatment. The study was registered with Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00970021. PMID:25664323

  6. High-dose chemotherapy as salvage treatment in germ-cell cancer: when, in whom and how.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Anja; Beyer, Jörg

    2016-09-27

    Over the past two decades, the use of well-validated, guideline-based strategies resulted in high cure rates in patients with germ-cell cancer (GCC) often despite widespread metastatic disease at initial presentation. Yet, about 30 % of patients diagnosed with metastatic disease corresponding to about 5-10 % of GCC patients overall will experience disease progression or recurrence at some time point of their disease with the need for salvage treatment. Salvage treatment is more complex and less well validated than first-line treatment: Its rare patient cohorts are more heterogeneous and prognostic factors impact more compared to other treatment scenarios. In patients with metastatic GCC, there are several scenarios in which first-line treatment strategies can fail (Fig. 1). Prior to initiation of any salvage treatment, several considerations have to be made, which will be addressed in this review: verification that first-line treatment has indeed failed, estimation of the adequacy and the effectiveness of first-line treatment, search for metastatic sites and extent of disease recurrence, assessment of known prognostic factors and finally the choice of the optimal salvage strategy taking into account the aforementioned variables. High-dose chemotherapy will be a rational choice for many patients in need of salvage treatment, but careful patient selection will be required to avoid overtreatment and unnecessary long-term toxicity.

  7. Ifosfamide/etoposide alternating with high-dose methotrexate: evaluation of a chemotherapy regimen for poor-risk osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Michelagnoli, M P; Lewis, I J; Gattamaneni, H R; Bailey, C C; Lashford, L S

    1999-01-01

    Fifteen patients with relapsed osteosarcoma were treated with an intensive combination chemotherapy schedule. Ifosfamide 2.5 g m−2 daily and etoposide 150 mg m−2 daily coincidentally for 3 days and high-dose methotrexate 8 g m−2 (with folinic acid rescue) on days 10–14 in a planned 21-day cycle. Feasibility, toxicity and response to this alternative combination for the treatment of relapsed osteosarcoma was assessed. There were 98 evaluable cycles for toxicity and tolerability. The majority of cycles were well tolerated. Haematological toxicity of grade 3/4 (common toxicity criteria) was seen in all courses. Renal tubular loss of electrolytes, particularly magnesium, occurred in 71% of cycles. Thirteen per cent of cycles were repeated within 21 days and 61% within 28 days. In the thirteen patients evaluable for response, a partial response rate of 31% was seen after two cycles. However, patients with stable disease continued on therapy, and an overall consequent response rate of 62% was observed. Four patients were alive with no evidence of disease at 8–74 months. Three are alive with disease (at 8–19 months). There were six deaths, all disease related. This regimen exhibits an encouraging response rate in a group of children with poor prognosis disease, with a tolerable toxicity profile. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10098754

  8. Relationship of gonadal activity and chemotherapy-induced gonadal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rivkees, S.A.; Crawford, J.D.

    1988-04-08

    The authors tested the hypothesis that chemotherapy-induced gonadal damage is proportional to the degree of gonadal activity during treatment. Thirty studies that evaluated gonadal function after cyclophosphamide therapy for renal disease or combination chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease or acute lymphocytic leukemia provided data for analysis. Data were stratified according to sex, illness, chemotherapeutic regimen and dose, and pubertal stage at the time of treatment. Chemotherapy-induced damage was more likely to occur in patients who were treated when sexually mature compared with those who were treated when prepubertal. Males were significantly more frequently affected than females when treated for renal disease of Hodgkin's disease. Chemotherapy-induced damage was also more likely to occur when patients were treated with large doses of alkylating agents. These data suggest that chemotherapy-induced damage is proportional to gonadal activity. Further efforts are needed to test whether induced gonadal quiescence during chemotherapy will reduce the strikingly high incidence of gonadal failure following chemotherapy.

  9. Metronomic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mutsaers, Anthony J

    2009-08-01

    Chemotherapy drugs are usually administered at doses that are high enough to result in an obligatory break period to allow for the observation of potential side effects and institution of supportive care, if required. In recent years, efforts to administer chemotherapy on a more continuous basis, with a much shorter break period, or none at all, have received increased interest, and the practice has come to be known as metronomic chemotherapy. The basis for success with this currently investigational approach may be rooted in continuous drug exposure to susceptible cancer cells, inhibition of tumor blood vessel growth-a process known as tumor angiogenesis, and/or alterations in tumor immunology. Increased benefit also appears to occur when metronomic chemotherapy is used in combination with newer, targeted antiangiogenic agents, and therefore represents a promising approach to combination therapy, particularly as targeted oncology drugs make their way into veterinary oncology applications. There is still much to be learned in this field, especially with regard to optimization of the proper drugs, dose, schedule, and tumor applications. However, the low cost, ease of administration, and acceptable toxicity profiles potentially associated with this therapeutic strategy make metronomic chemotherapy protocols attractive and suitable to veterinary applications. Preliminary clinical trial results have now been reported in both human and veterinary medicine, including adjuvant treatment of canine splenic hemangiosarcoma and incompletely resected soft tissue sarcoma, and, further, more powerful studies are currently ongoing.

  10. Prophylactic ciprofloxacin treatment prevented high mortality, and modified systemic and intestinal immune function in tumour-bearing rats receiving dose-intensive CPT-11 chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xue, H; Field, C J; Sawyer, M B; Dieleman, L A; Baracos, V E

    2009-05-19

    Infectious complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality from dose-intensive cancer chemotherapy. In spite of the importance of intestinal bacteria translocation in these infections, information about the effect of high-dose chemotherapy on gut mucosal immunity is minimal. We studied prophylactic ciprofloxacin (Cipro) treatment on irinotecan (CPT-11) toxicity and host immunity in rats bearing Ward colon tumour. Cipro abolished chemotherapy-related mortality, which was 45% in animals that were not treated with Cipro. Although Cipro reduced body weight loss and muscle wasting, it was unable to prevent severe late-onset diarrhoea. Seven days after CPT-11, splenocytes were unable to proliferate (stimulation index=0.10+/-0.02) and produce proliferative and inflammatory cytokines (i.e., Interleukin (IL)-2, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) IL-1beta, IL-6) on mitogen stimulation in vitro (P<0.05 vs controls), whereas mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells showed a hyper-proliferative response and a hyper-production of pro-inflammatory cytokines on mitogen stimulation. This suggests compartmentalised effects by CPT-11 chemotherapy on systemic and intestinal immunity. Cipro normalised the hyper-responsiveness of MLN cells, and in the spleen, it partially restored the proliferative response and normalised depressed production of IL-1beta and IL-6. Taken together, Cipro prevented infectious challenges associated with immune hypo-responsiveness in systemic immune compartments, and it may also alleviate excessive pro-inflammatory responses mediating local gut injury.

  11. Optimal radiation dose for patients with one to three lymph node positive breast cancer following breast-conserving surgery and anthracycline plus taxane-based chemotherapy: A retrospective multicenter analysis (KROG 1418)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Haeyoung; Park, Won; Il Yu, Jeong; Choi, Doo Ho; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Yeon-Joo; Lee, Eun Sook; Lee, Keun Seok; Kang, Han-Sung; Park, In Hae; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Kyubo; Park, Kyung Ran; Kim, Yong Bae; Ahn, Sung Ja; Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Jin Hee; Chun, Mison; Lee, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Jung Soo; Lee, Jong-Young

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study was performed to determine optimal radiation dose in pN1 breast cancer patients who received breast conserving surgery (BCS) and anthracycline plus taxane (AT)-based chemotherapy. Materials and Methods Retrospective chart reviews were performed in 1,147 patients who were treated between January 2006 and December 2010. The impact of radiation dose on treatment outcomes was evaluated. Results Median follow-up time was 66 months. The 5-year rate of disease-free survival (DFS) was 93.2%. Larger tumor size (> 20 mm), positive lymphovascular invasion, high histologic grade, and high ratio of positive nodes (> 0.1) were significantly associated with inferior DFS. By using the 4 factors related to DFS, patients were categorized into high-risk (with ≥ 3 factors) and low-risk (with < 3 factors) groups. In the high-risk group, higher radiation dose (> 60.3 GyEQD2) was significantly associated with better DFS than the lower dose (≤ 60.3 GyEQD2). However, the radiation dose did not impact DFS in the low-risk group. Conclusions Dosing of radiation affects the outcome of post-BCS radiotherapy in pN1 breast cancer. Doses of over 60.3 GyEQD2 were associated with better outcome in the high-risk patients. PMID:27793036

  12. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing reveals shift in patient faecal microbiota during high-dose chemotherapy as conditioning regimen for bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Montassier, Emmanuel; Batard, Eric; Massart, Sébastien; Gastinne, Thomas; Carton, Thomas; Caillon, Jocelyne; Le Fresne, Sophie; Caroff, Nathalie; Hardouin, Jean Benoit; Moreau, Philippe; Potel, Gilles; Le Vacon, Françoise; de La Cochetière, Marie France

    2014-04-01

    Gastrointestinal disturbances are a side-effect frequently associated with haematological malignancies due to the intensive cytotoxic treatment given in connection with bone marrow transplantation (BMT). However, intestinal microbiota changes during chemotherapy remain poorly described, probably due to the use of culture-based and low-resolution molecular methods in previous studies. The objective of our study was to apply a next generation DNA sequencing technology to analyse chemotherapy-induced changes in faecal microbiota. We included eight patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma undergoing one course of BMT conditioning chemotherapy. We collected a prechemotherapy faecal sample, the day before chemotherapy was initiated, and a postchemotherapy sample, collected 1 week after the initiation of chemotherapy. Total DNA was extracted from faecal samples, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography based on amplification of the V6 to V8 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene, and 454-pyrosequencing of the 16 S rRNA gene, using PCR primers targeting the V5 and V6 hypervariable 16S rRNA gene regions were performed. Raw sequence data were screened, trimmed, and filtered using the QIIME pipeline. We observed a steep reduction in alpha diversity and significant differences in the composition of the intestinal microbiota in response to chemotherapy. Chemotherapy was associated with a drastic drop in Faecalibacterium and accompanied by an increase of Escherichia. The chemotherapy-induced shift in the intestinal microbiota could induce severe side effects in immunocompromised cancer patients. Our study is a first step in identifying patients at risk for gastrointestinal disturbances and to promote strategies to prevent this drastic shift in intestinal microbiota.

  13. SU-E-T-287: Dose Verification On the Variation of Target Volume and Organ at Risk in Preradiation Chemotherapy IMRT for Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X; Kong, L; Wang, J; Hu, W; Chen, Z

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the target volume and organ at risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with preradiation chemotherapy based on CT scanned during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and recalculate the dose distribution. Methods: Seven patients with NPC and preradiation chemotherapy, treated with IMRT (35 to 37 fractions) were reviewed. Repeat CT scanning was required to all of the patients during the radiotherapy, and the number of repeat CTs varies from 2 to 6. The plan CT and repeat CT were generated by different CT scanner. To ensure crespectively on the same IMPT plan. The real dose distribution was calculated by deformable registration and weighted method in Raystation (v 4.5.1). The fraction of each dose is based on radiotherapy record. The volumetric and dose differences among these images were calculated for nascIpharyngeal tumor and retro-pharyngeal lymph nodes (GTV-NX), neck lymph nodes(GTV-ND), and parotid glands. Results: The volume variation in GTV-NX from CT1 to CT2 was 1.15±3.79%, and in GTV-LN −0.23±4.93%. The volume variation in left parotid from CT1 to CT2 was −6.79±11.91%, and in right parotid −3.92±8.80%. In patient 2, the left parotid volume were decreased remarkably, as a Result, the V30 and V40 of it were increased as well. Conclusion: The target volume of patients with NPC varied lightly during IMRT. It shows that preradiation chemotherapy can control the target volume variation and perform a good dose repeatability. Also, the decreasing volume of parotid in some patient might increase the dose of it, which might course potential complications.

  14. Does the Addition of Involved Field Radiotherapy to High-Dose Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplantation Improve Outcomes for Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma?

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Shannon; Flowers, Christopher; Xu Zhiheng; Esiashvili, Natia

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the value of adding involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) to patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) undergoing high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and stem cell transplantation (SCT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-two patients with relapsed/refractory HL undergoing HDCT and SCT from 1995 to 2008 were analyzed in a case-control design. Forty-six HL patients treated with IFRT within 2 months of SCT were matched to 46 HL patients who did not receive IFRT based on age, stage at relapse, timing of relapse, histology, and year of SCT. All were evaluated for response, survival, and toxicity with a median followup of 63.5 months. Results: There was a trend for better disease control in patients receiving IFRT. Specifically, 10/46 IFRT patients (22%) relapsed/progressed after SCT compared with 17/46 control patients (37%). Of the failures after IFRT, 70% were inside the radiation field, all in sites of bulky disease. In patients with nonbulky disease, IFRT also resulted in significantly improved outcomes (failure rate 6% vs. 33%, respectively). When stratified by disease bulk, the use of IFRT was found to significantly improve DFS (p = 0.032), but did not affect OS. In addition, IFRT and nonbulky disease were found to be positive prognostic indicators for DFS with hazard ratios of 0.357 (p = 0.032) and 0.383 (p = 0.034), respectively. Grade IV/V toxicities were significantly higher in the IFRT vs. non-IFRT group (28% vs. 2%; p < 0.001), observed only in patients receiving a busulfan-based conditioning regimen. Conclusion: Patients with refractory or relapsed HL undergoing HDCT and SCT have a high risk of relapse in sites of prior disease involvement, especially in sites of bulky disease. The use of IFRT is associated with a lower risk of disease progression in these sites; however bulky disease sites are still difficult to control. Toxicity risk is significant, particularly when busulfan-based conditioning is combined with IFRT, and alternative

  15. Metronomic chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Rituparna

    2014-01-01

    Toxic effects and chemoresistance are major hurdles in chemotherapy and to avoid these problems caused by traditional chemotherapeutic regimens, a new modality of drug administration called “metronomic chemotherapy” has emerged. Such regimen involves the frequent administration of conventional chemotherapeutic agents at very low doses to target activated endothelial cells in tumors, the advantages of which include minimal adverse effects and a rare chance of developing acquired drug resistance. Previously it was thought that they act by targeting angiogenesis, but recently additional mechanisms have been discovered which has established metronomic chemotherapy as a type of multi-targeted therapy. The knowledge gained from the preclinical studies of metronomic chemotherapy, along with clinical experience, will help to design better therapeutic protocols against cancer. Detailed pharmacogenomic and pharmacoproteomic studies on tumor endothelial cells and large multi-centered clinical trials, integrating bio-marker analyzes, are needed to investigate and validate the best treatment combinations for each tumor type and patient population. PMID:25210398

  16. The effectiveness of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine impregnated central venous catheters in patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy followed by peripheral stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Maaskant, J M; De Boer, J P; Dalesio, O; Holtkamp, M J; Lucas, C

    2009-09-01

    Immuno-compromised patients are at high risk for all kind of infections. Unfortunately, they need central venous catheters (CVCs), which are associated with infectious complications. In this study we examined the effectiveness of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine impregnated CVCs to prevent catheter-related infections in patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy followed by peripheral stem cell transplantation. This historical cohort study evaluated 139 patients of whom 70 patients were provided with non-impregnated CVCs and 69 patients with impregnated CVCs. Patients were treated for different diagnoses. The median number of days a CVC stayed in situ was 18 in the non-impregnated group and 16 in the impregnated group. The median duration of neutropenia of patients with non-impregnated CVCs was 9 days compared with 7 days of patients with impregnated CVCs. We found less catheter colonization (CC) in patients with chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine CVCs (RR 0.63, 95% CI 0.41-0.96; P = 0.03). Catheter-related blood stream infections (CR-BSI) were also diminished, but this result was not statistically significant (RR 0.15, 95% CI 0.02-1.15; P = 0.06). The reduction in CC and CR-BSI did not diminish the incidence of fever. We conclude that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine impregnated CVCs provide an important improvement in the attempt to reduce CC and CR-BSI.

  17. B- and T-lymphocyte number and function in HIV+/HIV− lymphoma patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Bertoli, Diego; Re, Alessandro; Chiarini, Marco; Sottini, Alessandra; Serana, Federico; Giustini, Viviana; Roccaro, Aldo M.; Cattaneo, Chiara; Caimi, Luigi; Rossi, Giuseppe; Imberti, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Combination of anti-retroviral therapy, high-dose chemotherapy (HCT) and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has led to an improved survival of HIV+ non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients. We compared T- and B-cell subset recovery and related capability to respond to in-vitro stimulation, as well as T-cell repertoire modifications of HIV+ and HIV− NHL patients undergoing HCT and ASCT as first-line consolidation or salvage treatment, using sequential blood samples obtained before and at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after ASCT. B lymphocyte recovery occurred earlier, reaching higher levels in HIV+ patients as compared to HIV− patients and healthy controls; in particular, immature and naïve B cells were significantly higher in HIV+ patients who had received rituximab in the pre-ASCT period. These lymphocytes equally responded to in-vitro stimulation. Newly produced T cells similarly increased in HIV+ and HIV− NHL patients, but their levels remained constantly lower than in healthy controls. T lymphocytes showed a reduced proliferative capacity, but their repertoire was reassorted by the treatment. The functional and numeric B-cell recovery and the qualitative modifications of T-cell receptor repertoire may explain, at least in part, the success of this aggressive therapeutic approach in HIV+ patients. PMID:27905485

  18. Semagacestat pharmacokinetics are not significantly affected by formulation, food, or time of dosing in healthy participants.

    PubMed

    Willis, Brian A; Zhang, Wei; Ayan-Oshodi, Mosun; Lowe, Stephen L; Annes, William F; Sirois, Paul J; Friedrich, Stuart; de la Peña, Amparo

    2012-06-01

    Semagacestat, a γ-secretase inhibitor, reduces formation of amyloid beta peptide. Two single-dose (140 mg), open-label, randomized, 3-period, crossover studies evaluated the effect of formulation, food, and time of dosing on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of semagacestat in healthy participants. The first study (n = 14) compared tablet to capsules. For all formulations, the median time to maximum plasma concentration (t(max)) was generally 1.0 hour. Plasma elimination was rapid, with a half-life of approximately 2.5 hours. Tablet form II bioavailability (F) relative to capsule was approximately 100% (F = 1.03 [90% confidence interval (CI), 0.96-1.10]). In the second study, participants (n = 27) received semagacestat either fed or fasting in the morning or fasting in the evening. No significant change in exposure (AUC(0-∞) [area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to infinity] ratio = 1.02, [90% CI, 0.990-1.05]) occurred with food, whereas maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) declined approximately 15%, and median t(max) was delayed to 1.5 hours. Time of dosing made no significant difference in AUC(0-∞), C(max), or t(max) (AUC(0-∞) ratio 1.01, [90% CI, 0.975-1.04]). No clinically significant safety concerns occurred in either study. Accordingly, semagacestat may be dosed without regard to formulation, food, or time of administration.

  19. Is Intermediate Radiation Dose Escalation With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Stage III Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Beneficial? A Multi-Institutional Propensity Score Matched Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, George; Oberije, Cary; Senan, Suresh; Tsujino, Kayoko; Wiersma, Terry; Moreno-Jimenez, Marta; Kim, Tae Hyun; Marks, Lawrence B.; Rengan, Ramesh; De Petris, Luigi; Ramella, Sara; DeRuyck, Kim; De Dios, Núria Rodriguez; Warner, Andrew; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Palma, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical benefits and risks of dose escalation (DE) for stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain uncertain despite the results from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0617. There is significant heterogeneity of practice, with many clinicians prescribing intermediate dose levels between the 0617 study arms of 60 and 74 Gy. This study investigated whether this strategy is associated with any survival benefits/risks by analyzing a large multi-institutional database. Methods and Materials: An individual patient database of stage III NSCLC patients treated with radical intent concurrent chemoradiation therapy was created (13 institutions, n=1274 patients). Patients were divided into 2 groups based on tumor Biological Effective Dose at 10 Gy (BED 10): those receiving standard dose (SD; n=552), consisting of 72Gy ≤ BED 10 ≤ 76.8 Gy (eg 60-64 Gy/30-32 fractions [fr]), and those receiving intermediate dose (ID; n=497), consisting of 76.8Gy < BED 10 < 100.8 Gy (eg >64 Gy/32 fr and <74 Gy/37 fr), with lower-dose patients (n=225) excluded from consideration. Patients were then matched using propensity scores, leading to 2 matched groups of 196 patients. Outcomes were compared using various statistics including interquartile range (IQR), Kaplan-Meier curves, and adjusted Cox regression analysis. Results: Matched groups were found to be balanced except for N stage (more N3 disease in SD), median treatment year (SD in 2003; ID in 2007), platinum and taxane chemotherapy (SD in 28%; ID in 39%), and median follow-up (SD were 89 months; ID were 40 months). Median dose fractionation was 60 Gy/30 fr in SD (BED 10 IQR: 72.0-75.5 Gy) and 66 Gy/33 fr (BED 10 IQR: 78.6-79.2 Gy) in ID. Survival curves for SD and ID matched cohorts were statistically similar (P=.27); however, a nonstatistically significant trend toward better survival for ID was observed after 15 months (median survival SD: 19.3 months; ID: 21.0

  20. The comparative effects of povidone-iodine and normal saline mouthwashes on oral mucositis in patients after high-dose chemotherapy and APBSCT--results of a randomized multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Vokurka, Samuel; Bystrická, Eva; Koza, Vladimír; Scudlová, Jana; Pavlicová, Vladislava; Valentová, Dana; Bocková, Jana; Misaniová, Lubica

    2005-07-01

    Antimicrobial solutions are widely used in the nursing care of chemotherapy induced oral mucositis (OM). There is little evidence, however, supporting their use for reducing mucosal damage. In our study, 132 patients were randomized to use normal saline (n=65) or povidone-iodine diluted 1:100 (n=67) mouthwashes for OM prophylaxis and treatment after high-dose chemotherapy comprising BEAM or HD-L-PAM followed by autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation. The study groups were well balanced in respect of age, sex, chemotherapy and the number of CD34+ cells in the graft. No significant difference was found between the groups in respect of OM characteristics, fever of unknown origin (FUO) and other infections. The antimicrobial solution was less tolerable for patients. OM occurred significantly more often in females than in males (86% vs 60%, P=0.0016) and was worse and of longer duration. The mechanical effect of mouthwashes might have a certain importance in FUO prevention. When indicating oral rinses, the patient's individual preference and tolerance of solutions offered should be considered.

  1. Parathyroid hormone linked to a collagen binding domain (PTH-CBD) promotes hair growth in a mouse model of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in a dose-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Seymour, Andrew; Sakon, Joshua; Gensure, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is a major source of psychological stress in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy, and can influence treatment decisions. While there is currently no therapy, PTH-CBD, a fusion protein of parathyroid hormone and collagen binding domain, has shown promise in animal models. Objective To determine if there are dose-dependent effects of PTH-CBD on chemotherapy-induced alopecia in a mouse model. Methods C57BL/6J mice were waxed to synchronize hair follicles; treated on day 7 with vehicle or PTH-CBD (100, 320 and 1000 mcg/kg subcutaneous injection); treated on day 9 with vehicle or cyclophosphamide (150 mg/kg i.p.). Mice were photographed every 3–4 days and sacrificed on day 63 for histological analysis. Photographs were quantified by grey scale analysis to assess hair content. Results Mice not receiving chemotherapy showed regrowth of hair 2 weeks following waxing, and normal histology after 2 months. Mice receiving chemotherapy alone showed marked hair loss after chemotherapy, which was sustained for 10 days and was followed by rapid regrowth of a normal coat. Histology revealed rapid cycling dystrophic anagen/catagen follicles. Animals receiving chemotherapy and PTH-CBD showed decreased hair loss and more rapid regrowth of hair than that seen with chemotherapy alone (increased hair growth by grey scale analysis, p<0.05), and the effects were dose dependent. Histologically, hair follicles in animals receiving the highest dose of PTH-CBD were in a quiescent phase, similar to mice which did not receive chemotherapy. Conclusions Single dose subcutaneous administration of PTH-CBD showed dose-dependent effects in minimizing hair loss and speeding recovery from chemotherapy-induced alopecia. PMID:24710191

  2. Quality of life and quality-adjusted survival (Q-TWiST) in patients receiving dose-intensive or standard dose chemotherapy for high-risk primary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, J; Zahrieh, D; Zhang, J J; Martinelli, G; Basser, R; Hürny, C; Forbes, J F; Aebi, S; Yeo, W; Thürlimann, B; Green, M D; Colleoni, M; Gelber, R D; Castiglione-Gertsch, M; Price, K N; Goldhirsch, A; Coates, A S

    2008-01-15

    Quality of life (QL) is an important consideration when comparing adjuvant therapies for early breast cancer, especially if they differ substantially in toxicity. We evaluated QL and Q-TWiST among patients randomised to adjuvant dose-intensive epirubicin and cyclophosphamide administered with filgrastim and progenitor cell support (DI-EC) or standard-dose anthracycline-based chemotherapy (SD-CT). We estimated the duration of chemotherapy toxicity (TOX), time without disease symptoms and toxicity (TWiST), and time following relapse (REL). Patients scored QL indicators. Mean durations for the three transition times were weighted with patient reported utilities to obtain mean Q-TWiST. Patients receiving DI-EC reported worse QL during TOX, especially treatment burden (month 3: P<0.01), but a faster recovery 3 months following chemotherapy than patients receiving SD-CT, for example, less coping effort (P<0.01). Average Q-TWiST was 1.8 months longer for patients receiving DI-EC (95% CI, -2.5 to 6.1). Q-TWiST favoured DI-EC for most values of utilities attached to TOX and REL. Despite greater initial toxicity, quality-adjusted survival was similar or better with dose-intensive treatment as compared to standard treatment. Thus, QL considerations should not be prohibitive if future intensive therapies show superior efficacy.

  3. Higher stem cell dose infusion after intensive chemotherapy does not improve symptom burden in older patients with multiple myeloma and amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nina; Shi, Qiuling; Williams, Loretta A.; Mendoza, Tito R.; Wang, Xin Shelley; Reuben, James M.; Dougherty, Patrick M.; Bashir, Qaiser; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cleeland, Charles S.; Giralt, Sergio A.

    2015-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for multiple myeloma (MM) is associated with high symptom burden, particularly for older patients and those with amyloid light-chain (AL) amyloidosis. Symptom burden peaks during leukopenia. We hypothesized that higher doses of CD34+ stem cells would be associated with an improved symptom outcome. Patients undergoing ASCT for MM who were ≥60 years old or had AL amyloidosis were randomized to receive either a standard (4–6×106 cells/kg) or high dose (10–15×106 cells/kg) of CD34+ cells after melphalan 200 mg/m2. Symptom burden was assessed via the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory MM module (MDASI-MM). Eighty patients were enrolled. Median CD34+ cell doses were 5.1×106 cells/kg (standard dose) and 10.5×106 cells/kg (high dose). The most severe symptoms during the first week were fatigue, lack of appetite, drowsiness, disturbed sleep, and pain. The AUC for the mean composite severity score of these symptoms was similar between treatment arms (P = .819). Median times to neutrophil, lymphocyte, and platelet engraftment were also similar between groups. IL-6 increased similarly for both groups throughout the ASCT course. Infusion of higher autologous stem cell dose after high-dose chemotherapy does not yield a difference in symptom burden or engraftment time in the first few weeks post-ASCT. PMID:26253006

  4. Effect of the dose per body weight of conditioning chemotherapy on severity of mucositis and risk of relapse after autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in relapsed diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luciano J; Micallef, Ivana N; Inwards, David J; Johnston, Patrick B; Porrata, Luis F; Litzow, Mark R; Ansell, Stephen M

    2008-10-01

    High-dose chemotherapy and haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is considered standard therapy in patients with chemosensitive relapsed diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). BCNU (carmustine), etoposide, cytarabine and melphalan (BEAM) is a widely used standard DLBCL conditioning regimen. The practice of basing chemotherapy doses on body surface area (BSA) is empirical and the best biometric parameter to dose chemotherapy is unknown. Weight-based dosing has been suggested to better predict toxicity of the conditioning regimen. We correlated the dose/weight ratio with toxicity and overall outcome in a uniform cohort of 80 consecutive patients receiving HSC transplant for relapsed DLBCL at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN following BSA-dosed BEAM conditioning chemotherapy. Melphalan dose was used as surrogate for the entire regimen. Median age at the time of transplant was 62 (26-77) years; 65% were males. The median melphalan dose was 3.2 mg/kg (range 2.2-4.5). Patients who received >3.6 mg/kg of melphalan were more likely to have grade 3 or 4 mucositis (44.4% vs. 9.8%, P = 0.001) and prolonged hospitalization (median 13 vs. 7 d; P = 0.04). Dose/weight ratio did not correlate with cumulative incidence of relapse (P = 0.3) or survival (P = 0.8). Transplant physicians should consider limiting the dose of BEAM to the equivalent of 3.6 mg/kg of melphalan.

  5. Impact of high-dose chemotherapy followed by auto-SCT for positive interim [18F] FDG-PET diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Roland, V; Bodet-Milin, C; Moreau, A; Gastinne, T; Mahé, B; Dubruille, V; Maisonneuve, H; Juge-Morineau, N; Moreau, P; Jardel, H; Planche, L; Mohty, M; Moreau, P; Harousseau, J-L; Kraeber-Bodéré, F; Le Gouill, S

    2011-03-01

    [(18)F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is increasingly used for response assessment in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). A positive interim FDG-PET was shown to be associated with an unfavorable outcome in high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. For positive interim FDG-PET patients, the question of increasing the intensity of treatment using high-dose chemotherapy followed by auto-SCT (HDC-ASCT) remains unanswered. We retrospectively analyzed the prognostic value of FDG-PET in 42 DLBCL patients who were systematically evaluated at time of diagnosis, before and after HDC-ASCT. Of note, HDC-ASCT was part of the initial treatment strategy, while FDG-PET results did not influence the treatment approach. Results and outcome were analyzed according to FDG-PET results before and after HDC-ASCT. Patients were classified into three groups according to FDG-PET results before and after HDC-ASCT: those who were negative before and after (-/-; n=25), positive before and negative after (+/-; n=9) or positive before and after (+/+; n=8). The median follow-up was 34.5 (range, 19-74) months. The median EFS was significantly lower for the +/+ group (27.4 months) as compared with other groups (median not reached; P=0.0001). More importantly, there was no difference in term of EFS between the -/- group compared with the +/- group. These results suggest that HDC-ASCT can significantly improve the bad prognosis, otherwise indicated by a positive interim FDG-PET.

  6. Longitudinal effects of high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation on quality of life in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Carlson, L E; Koski, T; Glück, S

    2001-05-01

    This study determined the effects of high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) with autologous blood stem cell transplantation (ASCT) on quality of life (QL) in women with metastatic breast cancer prior to, and during treatment, and up to 1-year post-ASCT. Thirty-three women diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer participated in a phase 1 clinical trial of a new combination of cyclophosphamide (CTX) and mitoxantrone (MXT), with dose escalation of paclitaxel. Longitudinal QL data were collected using the functional living index-cancer (FLIC) and symptom scales at seven time periods: pre-induction chemotherapy (CT), post-induction CT, post-high dose CT (HDCT), and at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months post-ASCT. FLIC scores indicated that the worst problems for patients were feelings of hardship on themselves and their families, followed by psychological functioning and physical functioning problems. The time around diagnosis of the metastatic disease and following HDCT were the worst times for all levels of quality of life, but anxiety and depression symptoms continued to increase in severity across the entire follow-up period. The symptoms that were most problematic were worry about the future, loss of sexual interest, anxiety about the treatment, general worrying, and joint pain. These data highlight the problems that women with metastatic breast cancer encounter at different stages of the disease and treatment process, and can be used to tailor psychosocial interventions appropriate for treating the relevant issues at different points in time.

  7. Intracavitary chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Markman, M.

    1985-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic modeling has suggested, and clinical investigations have confirmed, that intracavitary drug administration can result in a much greater drug exposure for the cavity into which the agent is instilled compared to the plasma. Both the safety and the efficacy of several agents administered individually or in combination have now been demonstrated. Several malignancies, in particular ovarian carcinoma and malignant mesothelioma, which remain confined to body cavities for much of their natural history, might be most rationally treated by the intracavitary treatment approach. Early clinical trials have demonstrated significant activity of intracavitary chemotherapy in both of these malignancies. Optimal drugs and dosages as well as appropriate scheduling for the various tumors involving body cavities remain to be defined. Whether or not combination intracavitary chemotherapy will significantly improve survival of patients with malignant disease confined to body cavities must await carefully controlled clinical trials comparing this treatment approach to standard systemically administered chemotherapy. 144 references.

  8. Clinical significance of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β gene expression in stage II/III gastric cancer with S-1 adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Akio; Oshima, Takashi; Yoshihara, Kazue; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Aoyama, Toru; Suganuma, Nobuyasu; Yamamoto, Naoto; Sato, Tsutomu; Cho, Haruhiko; Shiozawa, Manabu; Yoshikawa, Takaki; Rino, Yasushi; Kunisaki, Chikara; Imada, Toshio; Masuda, Munetaka

    2017-01-01

    Overall survival remains unsatisfactory in stage II/III gastric cancer, even after curative surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β) is associated with the proliferation of cancer cells. The present study therefore investigated the association of PDGFR-β gene expression with patient outcome in 134 stage II/III gastric cancer patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1. Relative PDGFR-β gene expression was measured in surgical cancer tissue and adjacent normal mucosa specimens by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The PDGFR-β gene expression levels were found to be significantly higher in the cancer tissues compared with the adjacent normal mucosa. A high level of PDGFR-β gene expression was associated with a significantly poorer 5-year overall survival rate compared with a low level of PDGFR-β expression. Upon multivariate analysis, PDGFR-β gene expression was found to be an independent predictor of survival. Overall, the study indicates that PDGFR-β overexpression in gastric cancer tissues is a useful independent predictor of outcome in patients with stage II/III gastric cancer who receive adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1.

  9. High-dose Chemotherapy With Autologous Stem Cell Rescue in Saudi Children Less Than 3 Years of Age With Embryonal Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Alsultan, Abdulrahman; Alharbi, Musa; Al-Dandan, Sadeq; Bayoumi, Yasser; Alharbi, Talal; Alsudairy, Reem; Alomari, Ali; Aljamaan, Khalid; Musleh, Othman; Alharbi, Qasim; Jarrar, Mohammed

    2015-04-01

    High-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue (HDC/ASCR) has been used in children under the age of 3 years with embryonal brain tumors to avoid or delay the use of radiation. We reviewed the medical records of 10 Saudi children less than 3 years of age with embryonal brain tumors who underwent HDC/ASCR. All 10 patients underwent surgical resection followed by 3 to 5 cycles of induction chemotherapy and 1 to 3 cycles of HDC/ASCR using carboplatin and thiotepa. Isotretinoin was used as a maintenance therapy in 4 patients. Five patients had medulloblastoma, 3 had atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors, 1 had an embryonal tumor with abundant neuropil and true rosettes, and 1 had pineoblastoma. The median age of the patients was 1.9 years. A total of 19 HDC/ASCR procedures were performed. Radiotherapy (RT) was administered to 5 patients after HDC/ASCR and as a salvage therapy in 1 patient. The progression-free survival rate was 50% at 1 year and at 2 years, with a median follow-up of 24 months. All 5 patients with medulloblastoma are still alive without evidence of disease, but the other patients died secondary to tumor progression. This experience suggests that strategies combining myeloablative chemotherapy and autologous stem cell rescue appear to be feasible for children with embryonal brain tumors in the Middle East.

  10. Predictive significance of DNA damage and repair biomarkers in triple-negative breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy: An exploratory analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ercolani, Cristiana; Pizzuti, Laura; Lauro, Luigi Di; Sergi, Domenico; Sperati, Francesca; Terrenato, Irene; Dattilo, Rosanna; Botti, Claudio; Fabi, Alessandra; Ramieri, Maria Teresa; Mentuccia, Lucia; Marinelli, Camilla; Iezzi, Laura; Gamucci, Teresa; Natoli, Clara; Vitale, Ilio; Barba, Maddalena; Mottolese, Marcella; De Maria, Ruggero; Maugeri-Saccà, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Response of cancer cells to chemotherapy-induced DNA damage is regulated by the ATM-Chk2 and ATR-Chk1 pathways. We investigated the association between phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX), a marker of DNA double-strand breaks that trigger the ATM-Chk2 cascade, and phosphorylated Chk1 (pChk1), with pathological complete response (pCR) in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. γ-H2AX and pChk1 were retrospectively assessed by immunohistochemistry in a series of pretreatment biopsies related to 66 patients. In fifty-three tumors hormone receptor status was negative in both the diagnostic biopsies and residual cancers, whereas in 13 cases there was a slight hormone receptor expression that changed after chemotherapy. Internal validation was carried out. In the entire cohort elevated levels of γ-H2AX, but not pChk1, were associated with reduced pCR rate (p = 0.009). The association tested significant in both uni- and multivariate logistic regression models (OR 4.51, 95% CI: 1.39–14.66, p = 0.012, and OR 5.07, 95% CI: 1.28–20.09, p = 0.021, respectively). Internal validation supported the predictive value of the model. The predictive ability of γ-H2AX was further confirmed in the multivariate model after exclusion of tumors that underwent changes in hormone receptor status during chemotherapy (OR 7.07, 95% CI: 1.39–36.02, p = 0.018). Finally, in residual diseases a significant decrease of γ-H2AX levels was observed (p < 0.001). Overall, γ-H2AX showed ability to predict pCR in TNBC and deserves larger, prospective studies. PMID:26544894

  11. Predictive significance of DNA damage and repair biomarkers in triple-negative breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy: An exploratory analysis.

    PubMed

    Vici, Patrizia; Di Benedetto, Anna; Ercolani, Cristiana; Pizzuti, Laura; Di Lauro, Luigi; Sergi, Domenico; Sperati, Francesca; Terrenato, Irene; Dattilo, Rosanna; Botti, Claudio; Fabi, Alessandra; Ramieri, Maria Teresa; Mentuccia, Lucia; Marinelli, Camilla; Iezzi, Laura; Gamucci, Teresa; Natoli, Clara; Vitale, Ilio; Barba, Maddalena; Mottolese, Marcella; De Maria, Ruggero; Maugeri-Saccà, Marcello

    2015-12-15

    Response of cancer cells to chemotherapy-induced DNA damage is regulated by the ATM-Chk2 and ATR-Chk1 pathways. We investigated the association between phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX), a marker of DNA double-strand breaks that trigger the ATM-Chk2 cascade, and phosphorylated Chk1 (pChk1), with pathological complete response (pCR) in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. γ-H2AX and pChk1 were retrospectively assessed by immunohistochemistry in a series of pretreatment biopsies related to 66 patients. In fifty-three tumors hormone receptor status was negative in both the diagnostic biopsies and residual cancers, whereas in 13 cases there was a slight hormone receptor expression that changed after chemotherapy. Internal validation was carried out. In the entire cohort elevated levels of γ-H2AX, but not pChk1, were associated with reduced pCR rate (p = 0.009). The association tested significant in both uni- and multivariate logistic regression models (OR 4.51, 95% CI: 1.39-14.66, p = 0.012, and OR 5.07, 95% CI: 1.28-20.09, p = 0.021, respectively). Internal validation supported the predictive value of the model. The predictive ability of γ-H2AX was further confirmed in the multivariate model after exclusion of tumors that underwent changes in hormone receptor status during chemotherapy (OR 7.07, 95% CI: 1.39-36.02, p = 0.018). Finally, in residual diseases a significant decrease of γ-H2AX levels was observed (p < 0.001). Overall, γ-H2AX showed ability to predict pCR in TNBC and deserves larger, prospective studies.

  12. Long-Term Follow-Up of Dose-Adapted and Reduced-Field Radiotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy for Central Nervous System Germinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Ashley W.; Issa Laack, Nadia N.; Buckner, Jan C.; Schomberg, Paula J.; Wetmore, Cynthia J.; Brown, Paul D.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To update our institutional experience with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and minimized radiotherapy vs. radiation monotherapy for intracranial germinoma. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed records of 59 patients with diagnosis of primary intracranial germinoma between 1977 and 2007. Treatment was irradiation alone or neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy and local irradiation (initial tumor plus margin) for patients with localized complete response and reduced-dose craniospinal irradiation for others. Results: For the chemoradiotherapy group (n = 28), median follow-up was 7 years. No patient died. The freedom from progression (FFP) rate was 88% at 5 years and 80% at 10 years. In 4 patients, disease recurred 1.1 to 6.8 years after diagnosis. All were young male patients who received 30.6 Gy to local fields after complete response to chemotherapy. The FFP rate was 88% for local irradiation vs. 100% for more extensive fields (p = .06). For the radiotherapy-alone group (n = 31), median follow-up was 15 years. Overall and disease-free survival rates were 93% and 93% at 5 years and 90% and 87% at 15 years. In 5 patients, disease recurred 1.1 to 4.9 years after diagnosis. Most patients in this group were young men 18 to 23 years of age with suprasellar primary disease treated with about 50 Gy to local fields. The FFP rate was 44% for local irradiation vs. 100% for more extensive fields (p < .01). Conclusions: The addition of neoadjuvant chemotherapy to local-field radiotherapy reduced central nervous system cancer recurrence when high-risk patients were excluded by thorough pretreatment staging. There was trend toward improved central nervous system tumor control when larger fields (whole brain, whole ventricle, or craniospinal axis) were used.

  13. Intensified High-Dose Chemoradiotherapy With Induction Chemotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer-Safety and Toxicity Results Within a Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Poettgen, Christoph; Eberhardt, Wilfried E.; Gauler, Thomas; Krbek, Thomas; Berkovic, Katharina; Abu Jawad, Jehad; Korfee, Soenke; Teschler, Helmut; Stamatis, Georgios; Stuschke, Martin

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To analyze the toxicity profile of an intensified definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) schedule in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (Stage IIIA N2/selected IIIB) treated within a prospective multicenter trial. Patients and Methods: After mediastinoscopy and routine staging procedures, three cycles of induction chemotherapy (cisplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 1 and 8; paclitaxel 175 mg/m{sup 2} Day 1, every 21 days) were planned, followed by concurrent CRT (accelerated-hyperfractionated regimen, 45 Gy, 2 x 1.5 Gy/d, cisplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 64 and 71, vinorelbine 20 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 64 and 71). At 45 Gy, a multidisciplinary panel decision was made regarding operability. Inoperable patients received definitive radiotherapy (total dose 65 or 71 Gy, depending on the mean lung dose) with additional concurrent chemotherapy (cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2}, Day 85; vinorelbine 15 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 85 and 92). Results: A total of 28 patients (23 men and 5 women; median age, 58 years; range 41-73; Stage IIIA in 3 and Stage IIIB in 25) were judged ineligible for surgery by the multidisciplinary panel and underwent definitive CRT (75% of the patients received 71 Gy). The maximum toxicity (Grade 3 or greater) during induction chemotherapy included leukopenia (11%) and anemia (4%). During concurrent CRT, leukopenia (Grade 3 or greater) was observed in 39% of the patients. The maximal nonhematologic toxicity during concurrent CRT included esophagitis (Grade 3 or greater) in 18% and pneumonitis (Grade 3 or greater) in 4% of the patients. At 3 years, the locoregional control rate was 52% (95% confidence interval, 29-75%) and the overall survival rate was 31% (95% confidence interval, 12-50%). Conclusion: This intensified treatment protocol with induction chemotherapy and concurrent CRT, including hyperfractionated-accelerated RT, showed only moderate toxicity and proved feasible. This treatment represents the definitive CRT arm of our ongoing

  14. Salvage chemoimmunotherapy with rituximab, ifosfamide and etoposide (R-IE regimen) in patients with primary CNS lymphoma relapsed or refractory to high-dose methotrexate-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mappa, Silvia; Marturano, Emerenziana; Licata, Giada; Frezzato, Maurizio; Frungillo, Niccolò; Ilariucci, Fiorella; Stelitano, Caterina; Ferrari, Antonella; Sorarù, Mariella; Vianello, Fabrizio; Baldini, Luca; Proserpio, Ilaria; Foppoli, Marco; Assanelli, Andrea; Reni, Michele; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Ferreri, Andrés J M

    2013-09-01

    Despite a high proportion of patients with primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) experiences failure after/during first-line treatment, a few studies focused on salvage therapy are available, often with disappointing results. Herein, we report feasibility and activity of a combination of rituximab, ifosfamide and etoposide (R-IE regimen) in a multicentre series of patients with PCNSL relapsed or refractory to high-dose methotrexate-based chemotherapy. We considered consecutive HIV-negative patients ≤75 years old with failed PCNSL treated with R-IE regimen (rituximab 375 mg/m(2) , day 0; ifosfamide 2 g/m(2) /day, days1-3; etoposide 250 mg/m(2) , day 1; four courses). Twenty-two patients (median age 60 years; range 39-72; male/female ratio: 1:4) received R-IE as second-line (n = 18) or third-line (n = 4) treatment. Eleven patients had refractory PCNSL, and 11 had relapsing disease. Twelve patients had been previously irradiated. Sixty (68%) of the 88 planned courses were actually delivered; only one patient interrupted R-IE because of toxicity. Grade 4 hematological toxicity was manageable; a single case of grade 4 non-hematological toxicity (transient hepatotoxicity) was recorded. Response was complete in six patients and partial in three (overall response rate = 41%; 95%CI: 21-61%). Seven patients were successfully referred to autologous peripheral blood stem cell collection; four responders were consolidated with high-dose chemotherapy supported by autologous stem cell transplant. At a median follow-up of 24 months, eight responders did not experience relapse, two of them died of neurological impairment while in remission. Six patients are alive, with a 2-year survival after relapse of 25 ± 9%. We concluded that R-IE is a feasible and active combination for patients with relapsed/refractory PCNSL. This regimen allows stem cell collection and successful consolidation with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous transplant.

  15. High-dose etoposide plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor as an effective chemomobilization regimen for autologous stem cell transplantation in patients with non-Hodgkin Lymphoma previously treated with CHOP-based chemotherapy: a study from the Consortium for Improving Survival of Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Shin Young; Cheong, June-Won; Kim, Soo-Jeong; Min, Yoo Hong; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Lee, Won-Sik; Ryoo, Hun-Mo; Do, Young Rok; Lee, Ho Sup; Lee, Jae Hoon; Oh, Sung Yong; Suh, Cheolwon; Yhim, Ho-Young; Kim, Jin Seok

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a multicenter retrospective study to compare the efficacy and toxicity of various chemomobilization regimens: high-dose (HD) cyclophosphamide, HD etoposide (VP-16), and platinum-based chemotherapies. We reviewed the experiences of 10 institutions with 103 non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients who had previously only been treated with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP)-based chemotherapy. The mobilization yields for each regimen were analyzed. HD VP-16 mobilized a significantly higher median number of CD34(+) cells (16.22 × 10(6) cells/kg) than HD cyclophosphamide (4.44 × 10(6) cells/kg) or platinum-based chemotherapies (6.08 × 10(6) cells/kg, P < .001). The rate of successful mobilization (CD34(+) cell count ≥ 5.0 × 10(6) cells/kg) was also significantly higher for HD VP-16 (86%) than for HD cyclophosphamide (45%) or platinum-based chemotherapies (61%, P = .004). The successful mobilization rate on day 1 of 72% for HD VP-16 was significantly higher than the rates for HD cyclophosphamide (13%) and platinum-based chemotherapies (26%, P < .001). In multivariate analysis, HD VP-16 was a significant predictor of successful mobilization (P = .014; odds ratio, 5.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.40 to 19.63). Neutropenic fever occurred in 67% of patients treated with HD VP-16. The incidence was similar for HD cyclophosphamide (58%, P = .454) but was significantly lower for platinum-based chemotherapies (12%, P < .001). However, fatal (grade ≥ 4) infection and treatment-related mortality were not observed in this study. In conclusion, the mobilization yield was significantly influenced by the chemomobilization regimen, and HD VP-16 was a highly effective mobilization regimen in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  16. Treatment of aggressive multiple myeloma by high-dose chemotherapy and total body irradiation followed by blood stem cells autologous graft

    SciTech Connect

    Fermand, J.P.; Levy, Y.; Gerota, J.; Benbunan, M.; Cosset, J.M.; Castaigne, S.; Seligmann, M.; Brouet, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Eight patients with stage III aggressive multiple myeloma, refractory to current chemotherapy in six cases, were treated by high-dose chemotherapy (nitrosourea, etoposide, and melphalan) (HDC) and total body irradiation (TBI), followed by autografting with blood stem cells. These cells were previously collected by leukapheresis performed during hematologic recovery following cytotoxic drug-induced bone marrow aplasia. Seven patients were alive 9 to 17 months after HDC-TBI and graft. One died at day 40 from cerebral bleeding. All living patients achieved a 90% or greater reduction in tumor mass. In two cases, a complete remission (CR) has persisted at a follow-up of 15 and 16 months. Three patients have been well and off therapy with stable minimal residual disease (RD) since 10, 11, and 17 months, respectively. A patient in apparent CR and another with RD have relapsed 9 to 12 months posttreatment. Autologous blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells induced successful and sustained engraftment in all living patients. These results, although still preliminary, indicate that HDC and TBI, followed by blood stem cells autograft, which has both practical and theoretical interest over allogeneic or autologous bone marrow transplantation, deserve consideration in selected patients with multiple myeloma.

  17. Factors Influencing the Response to High Dose Methotrexate-based Vincristine and Procarbazine Combination Chemotherapy for Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kang Hyun; Lee, Eun Hee

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated objective response rate to high dose methotrexate (HDMTX)-based combination chemotherapy in primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), and sought to identify factors that influence response to HDMTX-based combination therapy. Prospective observational analysis was performed on 52 PCNSL patients. All patients received HDMTX (3.5 g/m2) and vincristine (1.4 mg/m2/day) for one day during weeks 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9, and procarbazine (100 mg/m2/day) for one week during weeks 1, 5, and 9. Forty-one patients (78.8%) achieved complete or partial remission. Higher objective response rates were observed for patients with: 1) age < 60 yr; 2) Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance score of < 2; 3) low risk status as defined by the International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group; 4) p53 positivity; 5) XBP-1 negativity; 6) MUM-1 negativity; and 7) homogenous gadolinium enhancement in MR images. Multivariate analysis showed that ECOG performance score of < 2, low risk, negativity for XBP-1, homogenous gadolinium enhancement by MRI, and response to chemotherapy were associated with longer overall survival. In particular, it is interesting to note that patients with a PCNSL that is homogenously enhanced by gadolinium have a higher objective response rate, and a longer progression-free survival and overall survival. PMID:21468264

  18. Factors influencing the response to high dose methotrexate-based vincristine and procarbazine combination chemotherapy for primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kang Hyun; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Young Zoon

    2011-04-01

    The authors investigated objective response rate to high dose methotrexate (HDMTX)-based combination chemotherapy in primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), and sought to identify factors that influence response to HDMTX-based combination therapy. Prospective observational analysis was performed on 52 PCNSL patients. All patients received HDMTX (3.5 g/m(2)) and vincristine (1.4 mg/m(2)/day) for one day during weeks 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9, and procarbazine (100 mg/m(2)/day) for one week during weeks 1, 5, and 9. Forty-one patients (78.8%) achieved complete or partial remission. Higher objective response rates were observed for patients with: 1) age < 60 yr; 2) Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance score of < 2; 3) low risk status as defined by the International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group; 4) p53 positivity; 5) XBP-1 negativity; 6) MUM-1 negativity; and 7) homogenous gadolinium enhancement in MR images. Multivariate analysis showed that ECOG performance score of < 2, low risk, negativity for XBP-1, homogenous gadolinium enhancement by MRI, and response to chemotherapy were associated with longer overall survival. In particular, it is interesting to note that patients with a PCNSL that is homogeneously enhanced by gadolinium have a higher objective response rate, and a longer progression-free survival and overall survival.

  19. Outcome analysis of high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation in adolescent and young adults with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Saad; Rauf, Shahzad M; Elhassan, Tusneem A M; Maghfoor, Irfan

    2016-09-01

    High-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and autologous stem cell transplantation (auto-SCT) can salvage many patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). We are reporting the outcome of HDC auto-SCT and the impact of 21 prognostic factors in relapsed and refractory adolescent (14-21 years) and young adult (>21-30 years) (AYA) HL patients. We used Fine and Gray's competing risk analysis method and regression model for outcome analysis. From 1996 to 2013, 290 consecutive patients with biopsy-proven HL underwent HDC auto-SCT for relapsed/refractory HL; 216 patients (74.5 %) were AYA at the time of auto-SCT. Male/female were equal, median age at auto-SCT was 22.4 years, and there were 94 adolescent (43.5 %) and 122 young adults (56.5 %). There was refractory disease in 121 (56 %) patients, relapsed in 95 (44 %). Median follow-up was 72.6 months. The Kaplan-Meier method estimated that 5-year overall survival is 62.7 % (adolescents (63.5 %), young adults (62 %)) and event-free survival was 51.3 %. Five-year cumulative incidence of disease-specific death (DS-death) is 33 % and that of DS-event is 45 %. For DS-death, the multivariate analysis identified complete remission (CR) duration of <12 months (hazard ratio (HR) 3.61, P = 0.0009), no CR after salvage (HR: 3.93, P = 0.0002), and nodular sclerosis pathology (HR 3.3, P = 0.016) and positive B symptoms (HR 2, P = 0.028) as negative factors. For DS-event, CR duration of <12 months (HR 1.88, P = 0.02), no CR after salvage (HR 3.47, P = 0.000005) and nodular sclerosis pathology (HR 1.88, P = 0.02) were found significant. The Kaplan-Meier method estimated overall survival (OS) at 36 months with 0-2:3:4 factors being 93.6:54:21 %, respectively (P value <0.001). Kaplan-Meier estimated event-free survival (EFS) at 36 months with 0-1:2:3 factors being 84.6:65:31 %, respectively (P value <0.001). Clinically, adolescents have similar outcomes as young adults.

  20. A Contralateral Esophagus-Sparing Technique to Limit Severe Esophagitis Associated With Concurrent High-Dose Radiation and Chemotherapy in Patients With Thoracic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Halabi, Hani; Paetzold, Peter; Sharp, Gregory C.; Olsen, Christine; Willers, Henning

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Severe (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] grade 3 or greater) esophagitis generally occurs in 15% to 25% of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy (CCRT), which may result in treatment breaks that compromise local tumor control and pose a barrier to dose escalation. Here, we report a novel contralateral esophagus-sparing technique (CEST) that uses intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to reduce the incidence of severe esophagitis. Methods and Materials: We reviewed consecutive patients with thoracic malignancies undergoing curative CCRT in whom CEST was used. The esophageal wall contralateral (CE) to the tumor was contoured as an avoidance structure, and IMRT was used to guide a rapid dose falloff gradient beyond the target volume in close proximity to the esophagus. Esophagitis was recorded based on the RTOG acute toxicity grading system. Results: We identified 20 consecutive patients treated with CCRT of at least 63 Gy in whom there was gross tumor within 1 cm of the esophagus. The median radiation dose was 70.2 Gy (range, 63-72.15 Gy). In all patients, ≥99% of the planning and internal target volumes was covered by ≥90% and 100% of prescription dose, respectively. Strikingly, no patient experienced grade ≥3 esophagitis (95% confidence limits, 0%-16%) despite the high total doses delivered. The median maximum dose, V45, and V55 of the CE were 60.7 Gy, 2.1 cc, and 0.4 cc, respectively, indicating effective esophagus cross-section sparing by CEST. Conclusion: We report a simple yet effective method to avoid exposing the entire esophagus cross-section to high doses. By using proposed CE dose constraints of V45 <2.5 cc and V55 <0.5 cc, CEST may improve the esophagus toxicity profile in thoracic cancer patients receiving CCRT even at doses above the standard 60- to 63-Gy levels. Prospective testing of CEST is warranted.

  1. Successful Intrathecal Chemotherapy Combined with Radiotherapy Followed by Pomalidomide and Low-Dose Dexamethasone Maintenance Therapy for a Primary Plasma Cell Leukemia Patient

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yusuke; Tamura, Shinobu; Oiwa, Takehiro; Kobata, Hiroshi; Kuriyama, Kodai; Mushino, Toshiki; Murata, Shogo; Hosoi, Hiroki; Nishikawa, Akinori; Hanaoka, Nobuyoshi; Sonoki, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Primary plasma cell leukemia (PPCL) is a rare aggressive variant of plasma cell disorder and frequently presents with extramedullary disease. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement with PPCL has an extremely poor prognosis. We describe a 46-year-old man with PPCL treated with a combination of lenalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone as induction therapy following upfront allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Despite achieving a very good partial response, the patient suffered from an isolated CNS relapse 12 months after allo-SCT. He was immediately started on concurrent intrathecal chemotherapy (IT) and cranial irradiation (RT). Subsequently, pomalidomide and low-dose dexamethasone (Pd) were given as maintenance therapy. He has been without CNS recurrence for more than 18 months. Our case suggests that concurrent IT and RT followed by Pd maintenance therapy may be an effective option to control CNS relapse of PPCL after allo-SCT. PMID:28286633

  2. [A long-surviving case of gastric cancer with peritoneal metastasis (P3) responding to short-term high-dose chemotherapy and long-term immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Kusama, M; Kimura, K; Suzuki, K; Fukaya, Y; Saitoh, S; Eiraku, H; Kawahara, S; Ueno, M; Kawaguchi, M

    1989-10-01

    A 37-year-old female was admitted to our hospital for further examination of epigastralgia. She was diagnosed as having multiple metastases due to advanced gastric cancer (Borrmann type 3). The operative findings showed bilateral ovarian (Krukenberg), Schnitzler and widespread peritoneal metastases involving the appendix (P3H0N2S2). She underwent total gastrectomy, splenectomy, bilateral oophorectomy, and appendectomy with CDDP (100 mg intraperitoneal administration). After operation, CDDP (50 mg/body, twice i.p. and once i.v.) and PSK (3.0 g/day) were administered. She has been followed in our outpatient department for 3 years without any recurrence. The findings suggest that combination therapy using short-term high-dose chemotherapy and long-term immunotherapy can be effective for such cases.

  3. Significant effects of mild endogenous hormonal changes in humans: considerations for low-dose testing.

    PubMed

    Brucker-Davis, F; Thayer, K; Colborn, T

    2001-03-01

    We review the significant and adverse health effects that can occur with relatively small endogenous hormonal changes in pubertal and adult humans. We discuss the effects of hormonal changes that occur within normal physiologic ranges--such as the rising levels of estrogen in peripuberty, which cause growth spurts at low levels and then the fusion of epiphyses at higher levels--and the hormonal variations during the menstrual cycle and their relation to genital phenotypic changes and intercurrent disease evolution. We turn next to adaptive changes in gonadal and other functions during aging, exercise, stress, starvation, and chronic diseases, which can serve as models for the effects of exogenous, hormonally active compounds. Then we review the states of borderline hormonal imbalances such as subclinical (having few or very mild symptoms, if any) hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism, glucose intolerance, and other endocrine conditions. Finally, we review the deleterious systemic effects of gonadal imbalance. Information stemming from clinical observations leads to the concept of "no threshold" within the endocrine system and thus illustrates the importance of considering low-dose testing for chemicals that interfere with hormonal activity. We also urge attention to more sensitive, less visible end points such as osteoporosis, increased risk for cardiovascular disease, or cognitive changes.

  4. High-dose chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in patients with multiple myeloma and renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Ballester, O F; Tummala, R; Janssen, W E; Fields, K K; Hiemenz, J W; Goldstein, S C; Perkins, J B; Sullivan, D M; Rosen, R; Sackstein, R; Zorsky, P; Saez, R; Elfenbein, G J

    1997-10-01

    Six patients with multiple myeloma and chronic renal insufficiency (serum creatinine >3.0 mg/dl), including four on dialysis, received high-dose busulfan and cyclophosphamide (BUCY) followed by autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation. Peripheral blood stem cells were collected after priming with cyclophosphamide, etoposide and G-CSF. Patterns of engraftment and toxicities were not apparently different from those seen in myeloma patients with normal renal function. There was one toxicity-related death, resulting from a massive spontaneous subdural hematoma. One patient died of disease progression 6 months after transplant, while the remaining four patients are alive and free of myeloma progression 6 to 39 months after high-dose therapy. Two of these patients have remained in complete remission for 28 and 39 months. Our experience suggests that high-dose therapy with BUCY and autologous peripheral blood stem cell rescue is feasible in patients with multiple myeloma and renal failure.

  5. The photon dose calculation algorithm used in breast radiotherapy has significant impact on the parameters of radiobiological models.

    PubMed

    Petillion, Saskia; Swinnen, Ans; Defraene, Gilles; Verhoeven, Karolien; Weltens, Caroline; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2014-07-08

    The comparison of the pencil beam dose calculation algorithm with modified Batho heterogeneity correction (PBC-MB) and the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) and the mutual comparison of advanced dose calculation algorithms used in breast radiotherapy have focused on the differences between the physical dose distributions. Studies on the radiobiological impact of the algorithm (both on the tumor control and the moderate breast fibrosis prediction) are lacking. We, therefore, investigated the radiobiological impact of the dose calculation algorithm in whole breast radiotherapy. The clinical dose distributions of 30 breast cancer patients, calculated with PBC-MB, were recalculated with fixed monitor units using more advanced algorithms: AAA and Acuros XB. For the latter, both dose reporting modes were used (i.e., dose-to-medium and dose-to-water). Next, the tumor control probability (TCP) and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of each dose distribution were calculated with the Poisson model and with the relative seriality model, respectively. The endpoint for the NTCP calculation was moderate breast fibrosis five years post treatment. The differences were checked for significance with the paired t-test. The more advanced algorithms predicted a significantly lower TCP and NTCP of moderate breast fibrosis then found during the corresponding clinical follow-up study based on PBC calculations. The differences varied between 1% and 2.1% for the TCP and between 2.9% and 5.5% for the NTCP of moderate breast fibrosis. The significant differences were eliminated by determination of algorithm-specific model parameters using least square fitting. Application of the new parameters on a second group of 30 breast cancer patients proved their appropriateness. In this study, we assessed the impact of the dose calculation algorithms used in whole breast radiotherapy on the parameters of the radiobiological models. The radiobiological impact was eliminated by

  6. Defining the dose of gemtuzumab ozogamicin in combination with induction chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia: a comparison of 3 mg/m2 with 6 mg/m2 in the NCRI AML17 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Alan; Cavenagh, Jamie; Russell, Nigel; Hills, Robert; Kell, Jonathan; Jones, Gail; Nielsen, Ove Juul; Khwaja, Asim; Thomas, Ian; Clark, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Arecent source data meta-analysis of randomized trials in adults assessing the immunoconjugate gemtuzumab ozogamicin combined with standard chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia showed a significant survival benefit in patients without an adverse karyotype. It is not clear whether the optimal dose should be 3 mg/m2 or 6 mg/m2. In this study, we randomized 788 patients to a single dose of gemtuzumab ozogamicin 3 mg/m2 or 6 mg/m2 with the first course of induction therapy. We found that the rate of complete remission was higher with 3 mg/m2 [82% vs. 76%; odds ratio 1.46 (1.04–2.06); P=0.03], but this was balanced by a higher rate of complete remission with incomplete peripheral blood count recovery in the 6 mg/m2 treatment (10% vs. 7%) resulting in similar overall response rate [89% vs. 86%; hazard ratio 1.34 (0.88–2.04); P=0.17]. There was no overall difference in relapse or survival at four years between the arms: 46% vs. 54%; hazard ratio 1.17 (0.94–1.45), P=0.5, and 50% versus 47%; hazard ratio 1.10 (0.90–1.34), P=0.3, respectively. The 30- and 60-day mortality was significantly higher in the 6 mg/m2 recipients: 7% versus 3%; hazard ratio 2.07 (1.11–3.87), P=0.02, and 9% versus 5%; hazard ratio 1.99 (1.17–3.39), P=0.01, respectively, which in addition was associated with a higher rate of veno-occlusive disease (5.6% vs. 0.5%; P<0.0001). Our conclusion from this trial is that there is no advantage in using a single dose of 6 mg/m2 of gemtuzumab ozogamicin in combination with induction chemotherapy when compared with a 3 mg/m2 dose, with respect to response, disease-free and overall survival, either overall, or in any disease subgroup. (AML17 was registered as ISRCTN55675535.) PMID:26921360

  7. Prognostic significance of thymidylate synthase, thymidine phosphorylase and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase expression in biliary tract cancer patients receiving adjuvant 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    KIM, KWAN WOO; KWON, HYUK-CHAN; KIM, SUNG-HYUN; OH, SUNG YONG; LEE, SUEE; LEE, JI HYUN; ROH, MYUNG HWAN; KIM, MIN CHAN; KIM, KI HAN; KIM, YOUNG HOON; ROH, YOUNG HOON; JEONG, JIN SOOK; KIM, HYO-JIN

    2013-01-01

    Biliary tract cancer (BTC) is a relatively uncommon type of cancer, accounting for ∼4% of the malignant neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to determine whether the expression of thymidylate synthase (TS), thymidine phosphorylase (TP) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) predict clinical outcome in BTC patients treated with adjuvant 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-based chemotherapy. TS and TP expression were found to be significantly correlated with cancer location (P=0.044 and 0.031, respectively). The multivariate analysis revealed that age [hazard ratio (HR)=2.157, P=0.008], stage (HR=2.234, P<0.001), resection margin status (HR=2.748, P=0.004) and TP expression (HR=2.014, P=0.039) were independently associated with overall survival (OS). PMID:24649282

  8. Combination chemotherapy with high-dose methotrexate and cytarabine with or without brain irradiation for primary central nervous system lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Calderoni, Antonello; Aebi, Stefan

    2002-09-01

    Due to the limited clinical experience there is no standard treatment of primary CNS-lymphomas (PCNSL). Based on the actual data it seems that high-dose methotrexate (HTMRX) and high-dose cytarabine (ARA-C) qualify as treatments of choice for this disease. The role of radiation therapy is still unclear, due to the high long-term toxicity, especially in elderly patients. We treated 14 HIV negative patients with 4-5 cycles of methotrexate (MTX) at 3500 mg/m2 and MTX 15 mg intrathecal weekly or MTX 8000 mg/m2 weekly without intrathecal treatment. Younger patients (<60 y) received 3 weeks after last MTX dose a whole-brain irradiation (45 Gy + 9 Gy boost), older patientsts were not irradiated and continued CT. The following treatment consisted in ARA-C 3000 mg/m2 d1 + 2 every 3 weeks for two cycles. All patients received steroids for two months or until the end of radiotherapy. The overall response rate was 100%, 12/14 CR (86%). Two patients died still on treatment but not due to lymphoma (1 pulmonary embolism, 1 herpes encephalitis). Toxicity was very mild with no grade 3-4 non-haematological toxic events and almost 100% grade 3-4 leucopenia without episodes of neutropenic fever. After a median follow up of 39 months the PFS and OS are 65% (9/14) and 78% (11/14) respectively, and compare well with other trial results.

  9. Quality of life-adjusted survival analysis of high-dose therapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation versus sequential chemotherapy for patients with aggressive lymphoma in first complete remission. Groupe d'Etude les Lymphomes de l'Adulte (GELA).

    PubMed

    Mounier, N; Haioun, C; Cole, B F; Gisselbrecht, C; Sebban, C; Morel, P; Marit, G; Bouabdallah, R; Ravoet, C; Salles, G; Reyes, F; Lepage, E

    2000-06-15

    Evaluating high-dose therapy (HDT) with autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in term of both duration and quality of life (QOL) presents major interests for patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The quality-adjusted time without symptom and toxicity (Q-TWiST) methodology was applied to the LNH87-2 trial comparing HDT with ASCT versus sequential chemotherapy in 541 patients in first complete remission (CR). Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) curves were used to estimate duration of 4 health states: acute short-term toxicity (Tox1), secondary toxicity (Tox2), time without symptom and toxicity (TWiST), and relapse (Rel). Areas under survival curves (AUC) were retrospectively weighted according to QOL coefficients. HDT increased, but not significantly, TWiST (+2. 4 months in AUC, P =.17) and decreased Rel (-3 months, P <.01). Survival estimates did not differ between the 2 treatments (AUC 47.7 months for OS, 39.7 months for DFS). High-risk patients treated by HDT versus chemotherapy had a significant benefit in DFS (AUC 28.8 versus 24.9 months, P <.01) but not in OS (AUC 37.3 versus 36 months, P =.27). Sensitivity analysis, performed by varying QOL coefficients, demonstrated significant quality-adjusted survival gain in high-risk patients treated by HDT. In low-risk patients, a diagram provided an aid to clinical decision-making. This analysis supports the use of HDT in these patients with adverse prognostic factors in the first CR, even after adjusting for QOL using the Q-TWiST method. (Blood. 2000;95:3687-3692)

  10. Outcome of Reinduction Chemotherapy with a Modified Dose of Idarubicin for Children with Marrow-Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Results of the Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (CALL)-0603 Study

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    This multicenter, prospective trial was conducted to develop an effective and safe reinduction regimen for marrow-relapsed pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) by modifying the dose of idarubicin. Between 2006 and 2009, the trial accrued 44 patients, 1 to 21 years old with first marrow-relapsed ALL. The reinduction regimen comprised prednisolone, vincristine, L-asparaginase, and idarubicin (10 mg/m2/week). The idarubicin dose was adjusted according to the degree of myelosuppression. The second complete remission (CR2) rate was 72.7%, obtained by 54.2% of patients with early relapse < 24 months after initial diagnosis and 95.0% of those with late relapse (P = 0.002). Five patients entered remission with extended treatment, resulting in a final CR2 rate of 84.1%. The CR2 rate was not significantly different according to the idarubicin dose. The induction death rate was 2.3% (1/44). The 5-year event-free and overall survival rates were 22.2% ± 6.4% and 27.3% ± 6.7% for all patients, 4.2% ± 4.1% and 8.3% ± 5.6% for early relapsers, and 43.8% ± 11.4% and 50.0% ± 11.2% for late relapsers, respectively. Early relapse and slow response to reinduction chemotherapy were predictors of poor outcomes. In conclusion, a modified dose of idarubicin was effectively incorporated into the reinduction regimen for late marrow-relapsed ALL with a low toxic death rate. However, the CR2 rate for early relapsers was suboptimal, and the second remission was not durable in most patients. PMID:28244291

  11. Patch testing with budesonide in serial dilutions: the significance of dose, occlusion time and reading time.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, M; Bruze, M; Goossens, A; Lepoittevin, J P

    1999-01-01

    Budesonide is advocated as a marker molecule for corticosteroid contact allergy. When patch testing corticosteroids, one must consider their sensitizing potential but also their anti-inflammatory properties, as well as the possibility of different time courses for such properties. The dose-response relationship for budesonide was therefore investigated with regard to dose, occlusion time, and reading time. 10 patients were patch tested with budesonide in ethanol in serial dilutions from 2.0% down to 0.0002% with occlusion times of 48, 24, and 5 h. Readings were on D2, D4, and D7. The 48-h occlusion picked up most positive reactors, 8/10. The D4 reading (48-h occlusion) detected most positive reactors, 8/10, and here 0.002% picked up most contact allergies. Late readings favoured high concentrations. The "edge effect" was noted for several concentrations at early readings. Due to the individual corticosteroid reactivity, the dose-response relationship and the time courses of the elicitation and the anti-inflammatory capacity, several features may be explained, i.e., that lower concentrations may detect budesonide allergy better at early readings, that patients with an "edge reaction" can have positive reactions to lower concentrations.

  12. Dose-rate plays a significant role in synchrotron radiation X-ray-induced damage of rodent testes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Heyu; Wang, Ban; Wang, Caixia; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Ma, Yingxin; Hong, Yunyi; Fu, Shen; Wu, Fan; Ying, Weihai

    2016-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray has significant potential for applications in medical imaging and cancer treatment. However, the mechanisms underlying SR X-ray-induced tissue damage remain unclear. Previous studies on regular X-ray-induced tissue damage have suggested that dose-rate could affect radiation damage. Because SR X-ray has exceedingly high dose-rate compared to regular X-ray, it remains to be determined if dose-rate may affect SR X-ray-induced tissue damage. We used rodent testes as a model to investigate the role of dose-rate in SR X-ray-induced tissue damage. One day after SR X-ray irradiation, we determined the effects of the irradiation of the same dosage at two different dose-rates, 0.11 Gy/s and 1.1 Gy/s, on TUNEL signals, caspase-3 activation and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) of the testes. Compared to those produced by the irradiation at 0.11 Gy/s, irradiation at 1.1 Gy/s produced higher levels of DSBs, TUNEL signals, and caspase-3 activation in the testes. Our study has provided the first evidence suggesting that dose-rate could be a significant factor in SR X-ray-induced tissue damage, which may establish a valuable base for utilizing this factor to manipulate the tissue damage in SR X-ray-based medical applications. PMID:28078052

  13. Dose-rate plays a significant role in synchrotron radiation X-ray-induced damage of rodent testes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Heyu; Wang, Ban; Wang, Caixia; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Ma, Yingxin; Hong, Yunyi; Fu, Shen; Wu, Fan; Ying, Weihai

    2016-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray has significant potential for applications in medical imaging and cancer treatment. However, the mechanisms underlying SR X-ray-induced tissue damage remain unclear. Previous studies on regular X-ray-induced tissue damage have suggested that dose-rate could affect radiation damage. Because SR X-ray has exceedingly high dose-rate compared to regular X-ray, it remains to be determined if dose-rate may affect SR X-ray-induced tissue damage. We used rodent testes as a model to investigate the role of dose-rate in SR X-ray-induced tissue damage. One day after SR X-ray irradiation, we determined the effects of the irradiation of the same dosage at two different dose-rates, 0.11 Gy/s and 1.1 Gy/s, on TUNEL signals, caspase-3 activation and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) of the testes. Compared to those produced by the irradiation at 0.11 Gy/s, irradiation at 1.1 Gy/s produced higher levels of DSBs, TUNEL signals, and caspase-3 activation in the testes. Our study has provided the first evidence suggesting that dose-rate could be a significant factor in SR X-ray-induced tissue damage, which may establish a valuable base for utilizing this factor to manipulate the tissue damage in SR X-ray-based medical applications.

  14. Optimizing initial chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Mantripragada, Kalyan C; Safran, Howard

    2016-05-01

    The two combination chemotherapy regimens FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel represent major breakthroughs in the management of metastatic pancreatic cancer. Both regimens showed unprecedented survival advantage in the setting of front-line therapy. However, their application for treatment of patients in the community is challenging because of significant toxicities, thus limiting potential benefits to a narrow population of patients. Modifications to the dose intensity or schedule of those regimens improve their tolerability, while likely retaining survival advantage over single-agent chemotherapy. Newer strategies to optimize these two active regimens in advanced pancreatic cancer are being explored that can help personalize treatment to individual patients.

  15. Management of Mucositis During Chemotherapy: From Pathophysiology to Pragmatic Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Van Sebille, Ysabella Z A; Stansborough, Romany; Wardill, Hannah R; Bateman, Emma; Gibson, Rachel J; Keefe, Dorothy M

    2015-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is a common condition caused by the breakdown of the mucosal barrier. Symptoms can include pain, vomiting and diarrhoea, which can often necessitate chemotherapy treatment breaks or dose reductions, thus compromising survival outcomes. Despite the significant impact of mucositis, there are currently limited clinically effective pharmacological therapies for the pathology. New emerging areas of research have been proposed to play key roles in the development of mucositis, providing rationale for potential new therapeutics for the prevention, treatment or management of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. This review aims to address these new areas of research and to comment on the therapeutics arising from them.

  16. Significance of PIK3CA Mutations in Patients with Early Breast Cancer Treated with Adjuvant Chemotherapy: A Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group (HeCOG) Study

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulou, Zoi; Kalogeras, Konstantine T.; Zagouri, Flora; Timotheadou, Eleni; Gogas, Helen; Pentheroudakis, George; Christodoulou, Christos; Koutras, Angelos; Bafaloukos, Dimitrios; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Papakostas, Pavlos; Charalambous, Elpida; Papadopoulou, Kyriaki; Varthalitis, Ioannis; Efstratiou, Ioannis; Zaramboukas, Thomas; Patsea, Helen; Scopa, Chrisoula D.; Skondra, Maria; Kosmidis, Paris; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Fountzilas, George

    2015-01-01

    Background The PI3K-AKT pathway is frequently activated in breast cancer. PIK3CA mutations are most frequently found in the helical (exon 9) and kinase (exon 20) domains of this protein. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of different types of PIK3CA mutations in combination with molecular biomarkers related to PI3K-AKT signaling in patients with early breast cancer. Methods Tumor tissue samples from 1008 early breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy in two similar randomized trials of HeCOG were examined. Tumors were subtyped with immunohistochemistry (IHC) and FISH for ER, PgR, Ki67, HER2 and androgen receptor (AR). PIK3CA mutations were analyzed by Sanger sequencing (exon 20) and qPCR (exon 9) (Sanger/qPCR mutations). In 610 cases, next generation sequencing (NGS) PIK3CA mutation data were also available. PIK3CA mutations and PTEN protein expression (IHC) were analyzed in luminal tumors (ER and/or PgR positive), molecular apocrine carcinomas (MAC; ER/PgR negative / AR positive) and hormone receptor (ER/PgR/AR) negative tumors. Results PIK3CA mutations were detected in 235/1008 tumors (23%) with Sanger/qPCR and in 149/610 tumors (24%) with NGS. Concordance between the two methods was good with a Kappa coefficient of 0.76 (95% CI 0.69–0.82). Lobular histology, low tumor grade and luminal A tumors were associated with helical domain mutations (PIK3CAhel), while luminal B with kinase domain mutations (PIK3CAkin). The overall incidence of PIK3CA mutations was higher in luminal as compared to MAC and hormone receptor negative tumors (p = 0.004). Disease-free and overall survival did not significantly differ with respect to PIK3CA mutation presence and type. However, a statistically significant interaction between PIK3CA mutation status and PTEN low protein expression with regard to prognosis was identified. Conclusions The present study did not show any prognostic significance of specific PIK3CA mutations in a large group of

  17. Cancer Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... controlled way. Cancer cells keep growing without control. Chemotherapy is drug therapy for cancer. It works by killing the cancer ... It depends on the type and amount of chemotherapy you get and how your body reacts. Some ...

  18. Doses and risks from uranium are not increased significantly by interactions with natural background photon radiation.

    PubMed

    Tanner, R J; Eakins, J S; Jansen, J T M; Harrison, J D

    2012-08-01

    The impact of depleted uranium (DU) on human health has been the subject of much conjecture. Both the chemical and radiological aspects of its behaviour in the human body have previously been investigated in detail, with the radiological impact being assumed to be linked to the alpha decay of uranium. More recently, it has been proposed that the accumulation in tissue of high-Z materials, such as DU, may give rise to enhanced local energy deposition in the presence of natural background photon radiation due to the high photoelectric interaction cross sections of high-Z atoms. It is speculated that, in addition to producing short-range photoelectrons, these events will be followed by intense Auger and Coster-Kronig electron emission, thereby causing levels of cell damage that are unaccounted for in conventional models of radiological risk. In this study, the physical and biological bases of these claims are investigated. The potential magnitudes of any effect are evaluated and discussed, and compared with the risks from other radiological or chemical hazards. Monte Carlo calculations are performed to estimate likely energy depositions due to the presence of uranium in human tissues in photon fields: whole body doses, organ doses in anthropomorphic phantoms and nano-/micro-dosimetric scenarios are each considered. The proposal is shown generally to be based on sound physics, but overall the impact on human health is expected to be negligible.

  19. The Potential for Bayesian Compressive Sensing to Significantly Reduce Electron Dose in High Resolution STEM Images

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Yang, Hao; Carin, Lawrence; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-02-11

    The use of high resolution imaging methods in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is limited in many cases by the sensitivity of the sample to the beam and the onset of electron beam damage (for example in the study of organic systems, in tomography and during in-situ experiments). To demonstrate that alternative strategies for image acquisition can help alleviate this beam damage issue, here we apply compressive sensing via Bayesian dictionary learning to high resolution STEM images. These experiments successively reduce the number of pixels in the image (thereby reducing the overall dose while maintaining the high resolution information) and show promising results for reconstructing images from this reduced set of randomly collected measurements. We show that this approach is valid for both atomic resolution images and nanometer resolution studies, such as those that might be used in tomography datasets, by applying the method to images of strontium titanate and zeolites. As STEM images are acquired pixel by pixel while the beam is scanned over the surface of the sample, these post acquisition manipulations of the images can, in principle, be directly implemented as a low-dose acquisition method with no change in the electron optics or alignment of the microscope itself.

  20. Highly favorable outcome in BRCA-mutated metastatic breast cancer patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Boudin, L; Gonçalves, A; Sabatier, R; Moretta, J; Sfumato, P; Asseeva, P; Livon, D; Bertucci, F; Extra, J-M; Tarpin, C; Houvenaegel, G; Lambaudie, E; Tallet, A; Resbeut, M; Sobol, H; Charafe-Jauffret, E; Calmels, B; Lemarie, C; Boher, J-M; Viens, P; Eisinger, F; Chabannon, C

    2016-08-01

    Breast cancer carrying BRCA mutation may be highly sensitive to DNA-damaging agents. We hypothesized a better outcome for BRCA-mutated (BRCA(mut)) metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HDC AHSCT) versus unaffected BRCA (BRCA wild type; (BRCA(wt))) or patients without documented BRCA mutation (BRCA untested (BRCA(ut))). All female patients treated for MBC with AHSCT at Institut Paoli-Calmettes between 2003 and 2012 were included. BRCA(mut) and BRCA(wt) patients were identified from our institutional genetic database. Overall survival (OS) was the primary end point. A total of 235 patients were included. In all, 15 patients were BRCA(mut), 62 BRCA(wt) and 149 BRCA(ut). In multivariate analyses, the BRCA(mut) status was an independent prognostic factor for OS (hazard ratio (HR): 3.08, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10-8.64, P=0.0326) and PFS (HR: 2.52, 95% CI :1.29-4.91, P=0.0069). In this large series of MBC receiving HDC AHSCT, we report a highly favorable survival outcome in the subset of patients with documented germline BRCA mutations.

  1. [Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis after intrathecal chemotherapy and intravenous high-dose cytarabine in an acute myeloid leukemia case with t(8;21)(q22;q22)].

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Keiki; Ito, Ryugo; Kageyama, Yuki; Nagaharu, Keiki; Yamaguchi, Takanori; Ito, Nobuo

    2016-04-01

    Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis (SSST) is a very rare but life-threatening complication in leukemia patients. SSST is very rare in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In leukemia patients, several risk factors for SSST have been reported such as administration of L-asparaginase, disseminated intravascular coagulation, congenital thrombophilia, meningeal leukemia, and intrathecal chemotherapy (IT). Lumbar puncture itself and corticosteroid administration have also been acknowledged as risk factors. We describe herein our clinical experience with SSST in a 29-year-old Japanese man suffering from AML with t(8;21)(q22;q22), who presented with abrupt onset of loss of consciousness, left hemiplegia, and seizure soon after IT and high-dose cytarabine (HD-AraC) with dexamethasone for post remission consolidation. Despite the presence of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) due to SSST rupture, we conducted anticoagulant therapy with heparin. Although ICH worsened temporarily, his clinical condition gradually improved with resolution of the SSST, and he eventually became fully ambulatory. There were no deficiencies of natural anticoagulants. Three additional cycles of HD-AraC without IT therapy were conducted, but no neurological complications recurred with the concomitant use of warfarin. He was discharged free of neurological deficits. In our case, there is a possibility that IT and the administration of corticosteroids along with HD-AraC triggered SSST.

  2. Metronomic chemotherapy following the maximum tolerated dose is an effective anti-tumour therapy affecting angiogenesis, tumour dissemination and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Vives, Marta; Ginestà, Mireia M; Gracova, Kristina; Graupera, Mariona; Casanovas, Oriol; Capellà, Gabriel; Serrano, Teresa; Laquente, Berta; Viñals, Francesc

    2013-11-15

    In this article, the effectiveness of a multi-targeted chemo-switch (C-S) schedule that combines metronomic chemotherapy (MET) after treatment with the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) is reported. This schedule was tested with gemcitabine in two distinct human pancreatic adenocarcinoma orthotopic models and with cyclophosphamide in an orthotopic ovarian cancer model. In both models, the C-S schedule had the most favourable effect, achieving at least 80% tumour growth inhibition without increased toxicity. Moreover, in the pancreatic cancer model, although peritoneal metastases were observed in control and MTD groups, no dissemination was observed in the MET and C-S groups. C-S treatment caused a decrease in angiogenesis, and its effect on tumour growth was similar to that produced by the MTD followed by anti-angiogenic DC101 treatment. C-S treatment combined an increase in thrombospondin-1 expression with a decrease in the number of CD133+ cancer cells and triple-positive CD133+/CD44+/CD24+ cancer stem cells (CSCs). These findings confirm that the C-S schedule is a challenging clinical strategy with demonstrable inhibitory effects on tumour dissemination, angiogenesis and CSCs.

  3. Role of parenteral antibiotherapy in gastrointestinal tract flora suppression. A study in children treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chastagner, P; Hartmann, O; Tancrede, C; Kalifa, C; Patte, C; Flamant, F; Lemerle, J

    1989-07-01

    In order to determine the effect of parenteral antibiotherapy on the fecal flora in patients with profound and prolonged granulocytopenia, we initiated a prospective study of 62 cases of autologous bone marrow transplantation following high-dose chemotherapy. All patients were children from 2 to 18 years old, isolated in a protective environment, receiving a diet low in viable microbial content but no oral non-absorbable prophylactic antibiotics to decontaminate the gastrointestinal tract. Bacteriological analysis of fecal flora was conducted at least once a week before and during parenteral antibiotherapy, administered at the first greater than 38 degrees C febrile episode in these granulocytopenic patients (granulocyte count less than 0.5 X 10(9)/l). The 58 evaluable patients fell into three groups with regard to the systemic antibiotherapy: group A (n = 16): moxalactam + mezlocillin; group B (n = 15): moxalactam + tobramycin; and group C (n = 27): cefotaxime plus gentamicin. Fecal flora suppression was observed in 51/58 cases (88%) (group A: 15/16, group B: 13/15, group C: 23/27). It always occurred within 5 days of initiating parenteral antibiotherapy and persisted in 88% of the 51 patients over the whole period of systemic antibiotherapy. During the latter, fecal recolonization was observed in seven cases (12%), always by Enterobacteriaceae sensitive to the prescribed systemic antibiotherapy, never responsible for septicemia. Since parenteral antibiotherapy alone was able to suppress the gastrointestinal tract flora, the effects of this treatment should be considered in all trials of digestive tract decontamination.

  4. Dose-intensive chemotherapy including rituximab is highly effective but toxic in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia: parallel study of 81 patients.

    PubMed

    Xicoy, Blanca; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Müller, Markus; García, Olga; Hoffmann, Christian; Oriol, Albert; Hentrich, Marcus; Grande, Carlos; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Esteve, Jordi; van Lunzen, Jan; Del Potro, Eloy; Knechten, Heribert; Brunet, Salut; Mayr, Christoph; Escoda, Lourdes; Schommers, Philipp; Alonso, Natalia; Vall-Llovera, Ferran; Pérez, Montserrat; Morgades, Mireia; González, José; Fernández, Angeles; Thoden, Jan; Gökbuget, Nicola; Hoelzer, Dieter; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Wyen, Christoph

    2014-10-01

    The results of intensive immunochemotherapy were analyzed in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia (BLL) in two cohorts (Spain and Germany). Alternating cycles of chemotherapy were administered, with dose reductions for patients over 55 years. Eighty percent of patients achieved remission, 11% died during induction, 9% failed and 7% died in remission. Four-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) probabilities were 72% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 62-82%) and 71% (95% CI: 61-81%). CD4 T-cell count < 200/μL and bone marrow involvement were associated with poor OS (hazard ratio [HR] 3.2 [1.2-8.3] and HR 2.7 [1.1-6.6]) and PFS (HR 3.5 [1.3-9.1] and HR 2.4 [1-5.7]), bone marrow involvement with poor disease-free survival (DFS) (HR 14.4 [1.7-119.7] and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score > 2 (odds ratio [OR] 11.9 [1.4-99.9]) with induction death. In HIV-related BLL, intensive immunochemotherapy was feasible and effective, but toxic. Prognostic factors were performance status, CD4 T-cell count and bone marrow involvement.

  5. Infectious Complications during Tandem High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Children with High-Risk or Recurrent Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji-Man; Lee, Ji Won; Yoo, Keon Hee; Kim, Yae-Jean; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed infectious complications during tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDCT/auto-SCT) in children and adolescents with high-risk or recurrent solid tumors. A total of 324 patients underwent their first HDCT/auto-SCT between October 2004 and September 2014, and 283 of them proceeded to their second HDCT/auto-SCT (a total of 607 HDCT/auto-SCTs). During the early transplant period of 607 HDCT/auto-SCTs (from the beginning of HDCT to day 30 post-transplant), bacteremia, urinary tract infection (UTI), respiratory virus infection, and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation occurred in 7.1%, 2.3%, 13.0%, and 2.5% of HDCT/auto-SCTs, respectively. The early transplant period of the second HDCT/auto-SCT had infectious complications similar to the first HDCT/auto-SCT. During the late transplant period of HDCT/auto-SCT (from day 31 to 1 year post-transplant), bacteremia, UTI, and VZV reactivation occurred in 7.5%, 2.5%, and 3.9% of patients, respectively. Most infectious complications in the late transplant period occurred during the first 6 months post-transplant. There were no invasive fungal infections during the study period. Six patients died from infectious complications (4 from bacterial sepsis and 2 from respiratory virus infection). Our study suggests that infectious complications are similar following second and first HDCT/auto-SCT in children. PMID:27627440

  6. Combination Chemotherapy with Suboptimal Doses of Benznidazole and Pentoxifylline Sustains Partial Reversion of Experimental Chagas' Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vilar-Pereira, Glaucia; Resende Pereira, Isabela; de Souza Ruivo, Leonardo Alexandre; Cruz Moreira, Otacilio; da Silva, Andrea Alice; Britto, Constança

    2016-01-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) progresses with parasite persistence, fibrosis, and electrical alterations associated with an unbalanced immune response such as high plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and nitric oxide (NO). Presently, the available treatments only mitigate the symptoms of CCC. To improve CCC prognosis, we interfered with the parasite load and unbalanced immune response using the trypanocidal drug benznidazole (Bz) and the immunoregulator pentoxifylline (PTX). C57BL/6 mice chronically infected with the Colombian strain of Trypanosoma cruzi and with signs of CCC were treated for 30 days with a suboptimal dose of Bz (25 mg/kg of body weight), PTX (20 mg/kg), or their combination (Bz plus PTX) and analyzed for electrocardiographic, histopathological, and immunological changes. Bz (76%) and Bz-plus-PTX (79%) therapies decreased parasite loads. Although the three therapies reduced myocarditis and fibrosis and ameliorated electrical alterations, only Bz plus PTX restored normal heart rate-corrected QT (QTc) intervals. Bz-plus-PTX-treated mice presented complementary effects of Bz and PTX, which reduced TNF expression (37%) in heart tissue and restored normal TNF receptor 1 expression on CD8+ T cells, respectively. Bz (85%) and PTX (70%) therapies reduced the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS/NOS2) in heart tissue, but only Bz (58%) reduced NO levels in serum. These effects were more pronounced after Bz-plus-PTX therapy. Moreover, 30 to 50 days after treatment cessation, reductions of the prolonged QTc and QRS intervals were sustained in Bz-plus-PTX-treated mice. Our findings support the importance of interfering with the etiological agent and immunological abnormalities to improve CCC prognosis, opening an opportunity for a better quality of life for Chagas' disease (CD) patients. PMID:27161638

  7. Combination Chemotherapy with Suboptimal Doses of Benznidazole and Pentoxifylline Sustains Partial Reversion of Experimental Chagas' Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Vilar-Pereira, Glaucia; Resende Pereira, Isabela; de Souza Ruivo, Leonardo Alexandre; Cruz Moreira, Otacilio; da Silva, Andrea Alice; Britto, Constança; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2016-07-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) progresses with parasite persistence, fibrosis, and electrical alterations associated with an unbalanced immune response such as high plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and nitric oxide (NO). Presently, the available treatments only mitigate the symptoms of CCC. To improve CCC prognosis, we interfered with the parasite load and unbalanced immune response using the trypanocidal drug benznidazole (Bz) and the immunoregulator pentoxifylline (PTX). C57BL/6 mice chronically infected with the Colombian strain of Trypanosoma cruzi and with signs of CCC were treated for 30 days with a suboptimal dose of Bz (25 mg/kg of body weight), PTX (20 mg/kg), or their combination (Bz plus PTX) and analyzed for electrocardiographic, histopathological, and immunological changes. Bz (76%) and Bz-plus-PTX (79%) therapies decreased parasite loads. Although the three therapies reduced myocarditis and fibrosis and ameliorated electrical alterations, only Bz plus PTX restored normal heart rate-corrected QT (QTc) intervals. Bz-plus-PTX-treated mice presented complementary effects of Bz and PTX, which reduced TNF expression (37%) in heart tissue and restored normal TNF receptor 1 expression on CD8(+) T cells, respectively. Bz (85%) and PTX (70%) therapies reduced the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS/NOS2) in heart tissue, but only Bz (58%) reduced NO levels in serum. These effects were more pronounced after Bz-plus-PTX therapy. Moreover, 30 to 50 days after treatment cessation, reductions of the prolonged QTc and QRS intervals were sustained in Bz-plus-PTX-treated mice. Our findings support the importance of interfering with the etiological agent and immunological abnormalities to improve CCC prognosis, opening an opportunity for a better quality of life for Chagas' disease (CD) patients.

  8. Clinical Significance of Early Changes in Circulating Tumor Cells from Patients Receiving First-Line Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy for Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma1

    PubMed Central

    Fina, Emanuela; Necchi, Andrea; Giannatempo, Patrizia; Colecchia, Maurizio; Raggi, Daniele; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Cappelletti, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Background: The therapeutic paradigm of metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC) is rapidly shifting and new biomarkers are needed to enhance patient selection. Objective: Early identification of dynamic predictors of outcome may be a key to optimize the sequence of effective therapies in metastatic UC patients. Methods: Blood samples from patients receiving first-line MVAC chemotherapy were collected at baseline (T0) and after 2 cycles (T2). Samples were processed by immunomagnetic beads (AdnaTest ProstateCancerSelect kit) and the expression of EPCAM, MUC1 and ERBB2 was studied using multiplex-PCR. Circulating tumor cell (CTC) positivity and cutoffs, obtained by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis in healthy donors, were: ≥1 positive marker among EPCAM (≥0.40 ng/μl), MUC1 (≥0.10 ng/μl) and ERBB2 (≥0.20 ng/μl). CTC variation (T0/T2) was split in favorable (+/–, –/–, –/+) and unfavorable groups (+/+). Cox regression analyses evaluated associations with clinical factors. Results: In this pilot study to assess a new CTC detection method, among 31 evaluable patients, 17 (54.8%) were CTC-positive at T0. No association was found between CTC and objective response to MVAC. CTC dynamic changes better predicted 3-year progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) compared to CTC status assessed at single time points. Unfavorable trend was univariably detrimental on 3-year PFS (10% vs. 49.2%, p = 0.006) and OS (20% vs. 63.5%, p = 0.017). Significance was maintained after controlling for liver metastases (p = 0.031 and p = 0.025 for PFS and OS) and MSKCC score (p = 0.014 and 0.025). Conclusions: Newly described early CTC changes during chemotherapy might be useful to improve our prognostic ability. Pending validation, these results could fulfill the promise to help accelerating therapeutic sequences. PMID:28035320

  9. Bevacizumab/high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem-cell transplant for poor-risk relapsed or refractory germ-cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Y.; Tu, S. -M.; Bassett, R.; Jones, R. B.; Gulbis, A. M.; Tannir, N.; Kingham, A.; Ledesma, C.; Margolin, K.; Holmberg, L.; Champlin, R.; Pagliaro, L.

    2015-01-01

    Background High-dose chemotherapy (HDC) using sequential cycles of carboplatin/etoposide is curative for relapsed germ-cell tumors (GCT). However, outcomes of high-risk patients in advanced relapse remain poor. We previously developed a new HDC regimen combining infusional gemcitabine with docetaxel/melphalan/carboplatin (GemDMC), with preliminary high activity in refractory GCT. Given the high vascular endothelial growth factor expression in metastatic GCT and the synergy between bevacizumab and chemotherapy, we studied concurrent bevacizumab and sequential HDC using GemDMC and ifosfamide/carboplatin/etoposide (ICE) in patients with poor-risk relapsed or refractory disease. Patients and methods Eligibility criteria included intermediate/high-risk relapse (Beyer Model), serum creatinine ≤1.8 mg/dl and adequate pulmonary/cardiac/hepatic function. Patients received sequential HDC cycles with bevacizumab preceding GemDMC (cycle 1) and ICE (cycle 2). The trial was powered to distinguish a target 50% 2-year relapse-free survival (RFS) from an expected 25% 2-year RFS in this population. Results We enrolled 43 male patients, median age 30 (20–49) years, with absolute refractory (N = 20), refractory (N = 17) or cisplatin-sensitive (N = 6) disease, after a median 3 (1–5) prior relapses. Disease status right before HDC was unresponsive (N = 24, progressive disease 22, stable disease 2), partial response with positive markers (PRm+) (N = 8), PRm− (N = 7) or complete response (N = 4). Main toxicities were mucositis and renal. Four patients (three with baseline marginal renal function) died from HDC-related complications. Tumor markers normalized in 85% patients. Resection of residual lesions (N = 13) showed necrosis (N = 4), mature teratoma (N = 2), necrosis/teratoma (N = 3) and viable tumor (N = 4). At median follow-up of 46 (9–84) months, the RFS and overall survival rates are 55.8% and 58.1%, respectively. Conclusions Sequential bevacizumab

  10. Standard chemotherapy with interferon compared with CHOP followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation in untreated patients with advanced follicular lymphoma: the GELF-94 randomized study from the Groupe d'Etude des Lymphomes de l'Adulte (GELA).

    PubMed

    Sebban, Catherine; Mounier, Nicolas; Brousse, Nicole; Belanger, Coralie; Brice, Pauline; Haioun, Corinne; Tilly, Herve; Feugier, Pierre; Bouabdallah, Redah; Doyen, Chantal; Salles, Gilles; Coiffier, Bertrand

    2006-10-15

    The purpose of this study is to compare our standard chemotherapy regimen (CHVP [cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, teniposide, and prednisone]) plus interferon with 4 courses of CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone) followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in treatment-naive patients with advanced follicular lymphoma. Four hundred one patients were included from July 1994 to March 2001: 209 received 12 cycles of CHVP plus interferon alpha for 18 months (CHVP-I arm) and 192 received 4 cycles of CHOP followed by high-dose therapy (HDT) with total body irradiation and ASCT (CHOP-HDT arm). Overall response rates were similar in both groups (79% and 78% after induction chemotherapy, respectively). One hundred thirty-one of the 150 patients eligible for HDT underwent transplantation (87%). Intent-to-treat analysis after a median follow-up of 7.5 years showed that there was no difference between the 2 arms for overall survival (P = .53) or event-free survival (P = .11). Patients with a complete response at the end of the induction therapy had a statistically longer event-free survival and overall survival (P = .02 and < .001, respectively). After long-term follow-up, our study showed that there was no statistically significant benefit in favor of first-line high-dose therapy in patients with follicular lymphoma. High-dose therapy should be reserved for relapsing patients.

  11. Dose-dense adjuvant chemotherapy for node-positive breast cancer in women 60 years and older: feasibility and tolerability in a subset of patients in a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Kümmel, Sherko; Krocker, Jutta; Kohls, Andreas; Breitbach, Georg-Peter; Morack, Günther; Budner, Marek; Blohmer, Jens-Uwe; Lichtenegger, Werner; Elling, Dirk

    2006-05-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and tolerability of dose-dense adjuvant chemotherapy for older patients with node-positive breast cancer, a retrospective subset analysis compared dose delays and dose reductions for women aged > or = 60 years with those of younger women. Patients were randomized to a dose-dense (DD, 14-day cycle) or conventional-schedule (CS, 21-day cycle) regimen. DD patients (n = 104; 25 aged > or = 60 years) received epirubicin 90 mg/m2 plus paclitaxel 175 mg/m2 (four cycles), then cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2, methotrexate 40 mg/m2 and fluorouracil 600 mg/m2 (CMF 600/40/600) (three cycles), plus filgrastim 5 microg/kg per day in every cycle. CS patients (n = 107; 27 aged > or = 60 years) received epirubicin 90 mg/m2 plus cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m2 (four cycles), then CMF 600/40/600 (three cycles), plus filgrastim if required. Delays were more common in older patients in both the DD and CS groups (DD, 17% versus 6%; CS, 11% versus 6%), as were Grades 3-4 leukopenia (26% versus 12%) and neutropenia (33% versus 25%). All older DD and 89% of older CS patients received all seven chemotherapy cycles, with 99% of cycles at full dose. This study demonstrates that a dose-dense regimen combining epirubicin and paclitaxel can be administered to patients > or = 60 years of age with a tolerable safety profile.

  12. Prognostic impact of hormone receptor- and HER2-defined subtypes in inflammatory breast cancer treated with high-dose chemotherapy: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Boudin, Laurys; Gonçalves, Anthony; Sfumato, Patrick; Sabatier, Renaud; Bertucci, François; Tarpin, Carole; Provansal, Magali; Houvenaeghel, Gilles; Lambaudie, Eric; Tallet, Agnes; Resbeut, Michel; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Calmels, Boris; Lemarie, Claude; Boher, Jean-Marie; Extra, Jean-Marc; Viens, Patrice; Chabannon, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Studies examining high-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HDC-AHSCT) strategies in inflammatory breast cancer (IBC), showed encouraging results in terms of disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). The lack of data regarding HER2 status in all of these studies prevented any prognostic analysis involving breast cancer subtypes. Methods: All consecutive female patients treated for IBC with HDC and AHSCT at Institut Paoli-Calmettes between 2003 and 2012 were included. Since 2005, trastuzumab was included in initial treatment. Patient, tumor and treatment characteristics were collected. Patients were categorized in three subtypes based on hormonal receptor (HR) and HER2 status of the primary tumor: Luminal, (HR+/HER2-), HER2 (HER2+, any HR), and triple negative (TN) (HER2- and HR-). The main objective was the analysis of OS according to the IHC subtypes. Results: Sixty-seven patients were included. Eleven patients received trastuzumab. Median follow up was 80.04 months (95% CI 73.2-88.08). Five-year OS and DFS for the whole population patients were 74% (95% CI 61-83) and 65 % (95% CI 52-75), respectively. OS differed across subtypes (p=0.057) : HER2 subgroup appeared to have the best prognosis with a 5-year OS of 89% (95% CI 64-97) compared to 57% (95% CI 33-76) for the TN subgroup (HR 5.38, 95% CI 1.14-25.44; p=0.034). Conclusions: In IBC patients receiving HDC-AHSCT, OS favorably compares with data available in the literature on similar groups of patients. TN patients carried the least favourable OS and HER2 patients, half of them also receiving trastuzumab, had the best outcome. These findings provide additional information and options for patients with IBC and who could potentially benefit of HDC-AHSCT. PMID:27877223

  13. Italian daily platelet transfusion practice for haematological patients undergoing high dose chemotherapy with or without stem cell transplantation: a survey by the GIMEMA Haemostasis and Thrombosis Working Party

    PubMed Central

    Tagariello, Giuseppe; Castaman, Giancarlo; Falanga, Anna; Santoro, Rita; Napolitano, Mariasanta; Storti, Sergio; Veneri, Dino; Basso, Marco; Candiotto, Laura; Tassinari, Cristina; Federici, Augusto B.; De Stefano, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Background Following high-dose chemotherapy/bone marrow transplantation, patients are routinely, prophylactically transfused with platelet concentrates (PC) if they have a platelet count ≤10×109/L or higher in the presence of risk factors for bleeding. However, whether such transfusions are necessary in clinically stable patients with no bleeding, or whether a therapeutic transfusion strategy could be sufficient and safe, is still debated. Materials and methods The GIMEMA Haemostasis and Thrombosis Working Party sent a questionnaire to Italian haematology departments to survey several aspects of daily platelet transfusion practice, such as the cut-off platelet count for transfusion, the evaluation of refractoriness and the type of PC administered. Results The questionnaire was answered by 18 out of 31 centres (58%). A total of 23,162 PC were transfused in 2,396 patients in 2013. The vast majority of centres (95%) transfused PC according to Italian and international guidelines; only a few transfused always at platelet counts ≤20×109/L. The broad agreement on platelet count cut-off for transfusion (≤10×109/L) was not confirmed when the World Health Organization (WHO) bleeding score was considered: only a third of centres (33%) used transfusions as recommended when the bleeding grade was ≥2. Platelet refractoriness was poorly monitored and most centres (89%) evaluated, mostly empirically (67%), response to transfusion only 24 hours later. Thirty percent of centres transfused platelets in asymptomatic refractory patients. Discussion Although most Italian haematology departments transfuse PC according to Italian and international guidelines, our survey shows that in routine daily practice physicians do not comply closely with the WHO recommendations on platelet transfusions and monitoring platelet refractoriness. This causes excessive platelet transfusions, with a resulting increase of costs and waste of public health resources. PMID:27416570

  14. High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Children with High-Risk or Recurrent Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite increasing evidence that high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDCT/auto-SCT) might improve the survival of patients with high-risk or recurrent solid tumors, therapy effectiveness for bone and soft tissue sarcoma treatment remains unclear. This study retrospectively investigated the feasibility and effectiveness of HDCT/auto-SCT for high-risk or recurrent bone and soft tissue sarcoma. A total of 28 patients (18 high-risk and 10 recurrent) underwent single or tandem HDCT/auto-SCT between October 2004 and September 2014. During follow-up of a median 15.3 months, 18 patients exhibited disease progression and 2 died of treatment-related toxicities (1 veno-occlusive disease and 1 sepsis). Overall, 8 patients remained alive and progression-free. The 3-year overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) rates for all 28 patients were 28.7% and 26.3%, respectively. In the subgroup analysis, OS and EFS rates were higher in patients with complete or partial remission prior to HDCT/auto-SCT than in those with worse responses (OS, 39.1% vs. 0.0%, P = 0.002; EFS, 36.8% vs. 0.0%, P < 0.001). Therefore, careful selection of patients who can benefit from HDCT/auto-SCT and maximal effort to reduce tumor burden prior to treatment will be important to achieve favorable outcomes in patients with high-risk or recurrent bone and soft tissue sarcomas. PMID:27366002

  15. Feasibility of concurrent chemoradiotherapy with high-dose cisplatin after induction TPF chemotherapy in head and neck cancer: a critical review of the literature and the experience of the European Institute of Oncology.

    PubMed

    Alterio, D; Cossu Rocca, M; Russell-Edu, W; Dicuonzo, S; Fanetti, G; Marvaso, G; Preda, L; Zorzi, S; Verri, E; Nole', F; Jereczek-Fossa, B A

    2017-05-01

    Many concerns are related to the idea that the acute toxicity of induction chemotherapy (IC) performed with TPF (docetaxel, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil) could reduce the ability to deliver the subsequent standard concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in head and neck cancer patients. We performed a critical review of the literature on the toxicity profile of the standard CRT administered after the IC with TPF. A total of 13 papers (including 950 patients) were selected. Results showed that most patients were treated with an adequate radiation total dose although a significant proportion of them (from 15 to 30%) completed the planned treatment with a delay of more than 5 days. A minority of patients were able to be treated with three cycles of concurrent cisplatin, but only few papers reported how many of patients reached the cumulative total dose of almost 200 mg/m(2) cisplatin. The rate of deaths due to treatment-related toxicity varied from 0 to 9% (median and mean 2%). Two prospective trials stopped patient enrollment due to acute treatment-related toxicity and because a low number of patients were able to undergo the planned full schedule of cisplatin during the CRT, respectively. Retrospective analysis of 45 patients treated at our institute showed that this schedule was feasible with manageable side effects. In conclusion, the literature data did not provide homogeneous information on the feasibility of the standard CRT after induction TPF. A more uniform data collection of treatment-related toxicity will be helpful in better selecting the patients who might adequately tolerate this multimodality strategy.

  16. Myeloablative chemotherapy for recurrent aggressive oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed Central

    Cairncross, G.; Swinnen, L.; Bayer, R.; Rosenfeld, S.; Salzman, D.; Paleologos, N.; Kaminer, L.; Forsyth, P.; Stewart, D.; Peterson, K.; Hu, W.; Macdonald, D.; Ramsay, D.; Smith, A.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to ascertain the duration of tumor control and the toxicities of dose-intense myeloablative chemotherapy for patients with recurrent oligodendrogliomas. Patients with previously irradiated oligodendrogliomas, either pure or mixed, that were contrast enhancing, measurable, and behaving aggressively at recurrence were eligible for this study. Only complete responders or major partial responders (75 % reduction in tumor size) to induction chemotherapy--either intensive-dose procarbazine, lomustine, and vincristine or cisplatin plus etoposide-could receive high-dose thiotepa (300 mg/m2/day for 3 days) followed by hematopoietic reconstitution using either bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells. Thirty-eight patients began induction chemotherapy and 20 (10 men, 10 women; median age 46 years; median Karnofsky score 80) received high-dose thiotepa. For the high-dose group, the median event-free, progression-free, and overall survival times from recurrence were 17, 20, and 49 months, respectively. Tumor control in excess of 2 years was observed in 6 patients (30%). Four patients (20%) are alive and tumor free 27 to 77 months (median, 42 months) from the start of induction therapy; however, fatal treatment-related toxicities also occurred in 4 patients (20%). Three patients died as a result of a progressive encephalopathy which, in 2 instances, was accompanied by a wasting syndrome; 1 patient died as a consequence of an intracerebral (intratumoral) hemorrhage. Fatal toxicities occurred in patients with pretreatment Karnofsky scores of 60 or 70. High-dose thiotepa to consolidate response was a disappointing treatment strategy for patients with recurrent aggressive oligodendroglial neoplasms, although several patients had durable responses. Moreover, as prescribed, high-dose thiotepa had significant toxic effects in previously irradiated patients, especially those with poorer performance status. PMID:11303620

  17. Phase II Study of Accelerated High-Dose Radiotherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Limited Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0239

    SciTech Connect

    Komaki, Ritsuko; Paulus, Rebecca; Ettinger, David S.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Sause, William T.; Curran, Walter J.; Choy, Hak

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether high-dose thoracic radiation given twice daily during cisplatin-etoposide chemotherapy for limited small-cell lung cancer (LSCLC) improves survival, acute esophagitis, and local control rates relative to findings from Intergroup trial 0096 (47%, 27%, and 64%). Patients and Methods: Patients were accrued over a 3-year period from 22 US and Canadian institutions. Patients with LSCLC and good performance status were given thoracic radiation to 61.2 Gy over 5 weeks (daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 1-22, then twice-daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 23-33). Cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} IV) was given on day 1 and etoposide (120 mg/m{sup 2} IV) on days 1-3 and days 22-24, followed by 2 cycles of cisplatin plus etoposide alone. Patients who achieved complete response were offered prophylactic cranial irradiation. Endpoints included overall and progression-free survival; severe esophagitis (Common Toxicity Criteria v 2.0) and treatment-related fatalities; response (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors); and local control. Results: Seventy-two patients were accrued from June 2003 through May 2006; 71 were evaluable (median age 63 years; 52% female; 58% Zubrod 0). Median survival time was 19 months; at 2 years, the overall survival rate was 36.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 25.6%-47.7%), and progression-free survival 19.7% (95% CI 11.4%-29.6%). Thirteen patients (18%) experienced severe acute esophagitis, and 2 (3%) died of treatment-related causes; 41% achieved complete response, 39% partial response, 10% stable disease, and 6% progressive disease. The local control rate was 73%. Forty-three patients (61%) received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Conclusions: The overall survival rate did not reach the projected goal; however, rates of esophagitis were lower, and local control higher, than projected. This treatment strategy is now one of three arms of a prospective trial of chemoradiation for LSCLC (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0538

  18. Discovery and Delivery of Synergistic Chemotherapy Drug Combinations to Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, Kathryn Militar

    Chemotherapy combinations for cancer treatments harbor immense therapeutic potentials which have largely been untapped. Of all diseases, clinical studies of drug combinations are the most prevalent in oncology, yet their effectiveness is disputable, as complete tumor regressions are rare. Our research has been devoted towards developing delivery vehicles for combinations of chemotherapy drugs which elicit significant tumor reduction yet limit toxicity in healthy tissue. Current administration methods assume that chemotherapy combinations at maximum tolerable doses will provide the greatest therapeutic effect -- a presumption which often leads to unprecedented side effects. Contrary to traditional administration, we have found that drug ratios rather than total cumulative doses govern combination therapeutic efficacy. In this thesis, we have developed nanoparticles to incorporate synergistic ratios of chemotherapy combinations which significantly inhibit cancer cell growth at lower doses than would be required for their single drug counterparts. The advantages of multi-drug incorporation in nano-vehicles are many: improved accumulation in tumor tissue via the enhanced permeation and retention effect, limited uptake in healthy tissue, and controlled exposure of tumor tissue to optimal synergistic drug ratios. To exploit these advantages for polychemotherapy delivery, two prominent nanoparticles were investigated: liposomes and polymer-drug conjugates. Liposomes represent the oldest class of nanoparticles, with high drug loading capacities and excellent biocompatibility. Polymer-drug conjugates offer controlled drug incorporations through reaction stoichiometry, and potentially allow for delivery of precise ratios. Here, we show that both vehicles, when armed with synergistic ratios of chemotherapy drugs, significantly inhibit tumor growth in an aggressive mouse breast carcinoma model. Furthermore, versatile drug incorporation methods investigated here can be broadly

  19. Hepatic Artery Infusion Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schüller, J.; Kroiss, A.; Dinstl, K.

    1990-01-01

    Hepatic artery chemotherapy was given to 36 patients, using totally implantable devices consisting of a port and external pump. Twenty-seven patients had inoperable liver metastases of colorectal origin. The infusion system was inserted by laparotomy into the hepatic artery via the gastroduodenal artery. There was no operative mortality. Thirteen infusion systems could not be used for chemotherapy due to dislodgement, early death and lack of follow-up. FUdR was infused every two weeks. There were minor local complications like thrombosis of the system and dislodgement of the port. Toxic effects could be managed by reducing the dose. Response to chemotherapy was evaluated by survival, clinical condition, CEA, ultrasound and CT six months after onset of arterial chemotherapy. Ten/twenty-three patients (43%) responded to therapy, eight of them died on the average 19 months after initial chemotherapy. Six patients were non-responders, seven had stable disease. Five/ten patients developed extrahepatic metastases. Mean survival time was 13.1 months, mean interval until relapse 10.6 months. PMID:2149279

  20. Convection-enhanced delivery of Ls-TPT enables an effective, continuous, low-dose chemotherapy against malignant glioma xenograft model1

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Ryuta; Krauze, Michal T.; Noble, Charles O.; Drummond, Daryl C.; Kirpotin, Dmitri B.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Park, John W.; Bankiewicz, Krystof S.

    2006-01-01

    Treatment of malignant gliomas represents one of the most formidable challenges in oncology. The combination of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy yields median survivals of less than one year. Here we demonstrate the use of a minimally invasive surgical technique, convection-enhanced delivery (CED), for local administration of a novel nanoparticle liposome containing topotecan. CED of this liposomal topotecan (Ls-TPT) resulted in extended brain tissue retention (t½ = 1.5 days), whereas free topotecan was rapidly cleared (t½ = 0.1 days) after CED. The favorable pharmacokinetic profile of extended topotecan release for about seven days, along with biodistribution featuring perivascular accumulation of the nanoparticles, provided, in addition to the known topoisomerase I inhibition, an effective antiangiogenic therapy. In the rat intracranial U87MG tumor model, vascular targeting of Ls-TPT with CED was associated with reductions in laminin expression and vascular density compared to free topotecan or control treatments. A single CED treatment on day 7 showed that free topotecan conferred no survival benefit versus control. However, Ls-TPT produced a significant (P = 0.0002) survival benefit, with six of seven complete cures. Larger U87MG tumors, where CED of Ls-TPT on day 12 resulted in one of six cures, indicated the necessity to cover the entire tumor with the infused therapeutic agent. CED of Ls-TPT was also efficacious in the intracranial U251MG tumor model (P = 0.0005 versus control). We conclude that the combination of a novel nanoparticle Ls-TPT and CED administration was very effective in treating experimental brain tumors. PMID:16723630

  1. Long-term survival after high-dose chemotherapy followed by peripheral stem cell rescue for high-risk, locally advanced/inflammatory, and metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    VanderWalde, A; Ye, W; Frankel, P; Asuncion, D; Leong, L; Luu, T; Morgan, R; Twardowski, P; Koczywas, M; Pezner, R; Paz, I B; Margolin, K; Wong, J; Doroshow, J H; Forman, S; Shibata, S; Somlo, G

    2012-08-01

    Patients with high-risk locally advanced/inflammatory and oligometastatic (≤3 sites) breast cancer frequently relapse or experience early progression. High-dose chemotherapy combined with peripheral stem cell rescue may prolong progression-free survival/relapse-free survival (PFS/RFS) and overall survival (OS). In this study, patients initiated high-dose chemotherapy with STAMP-V (carboplatin, thiotepa, and cyclophosphamide), ACT (doxorubicin, paclitaxel, and cyclophosphamide), or tandem melphalan and STAMP-V. Eighty-six patients were diagnosed with locally advanced/inflammatory (17 inflammatory) breast cancer, and 12 were diagnosed with oligometastatic breast cancer. Median follow-up was 84 months (range, 6-136 months) for patients with locally advanced cancer and 40 months (range, 24-62 months) for those with metastatic cancer. In the patients with locally advanced cancer, 5-year RFS and OS were 53% (95% CI, 41%-63%) and 71% (95% CI, 60%-80%), respectively, hormone receptors were positive in 74%, and HER2 overexpression was seen in 23%. In multivariate analysis, hormone receptor-positive disease and lower stage were associated with better 5-year RFS (60% for ER [estrogen receptor]/PR [progesterone receptor]-positive versus 30% for ER/PR-negative; P < .01) and OS (83% for ER/PR-positive versus 38% for ER/PR-negative; P < .001). In the patients with metastatic cancer, 3-year PFS and OS were 49% (95% CI, 19%-73%) and 73% (95% CI, 38%-91%), respectively. The favorable long-term RFS/PFS and OS for high-dose chemotherapy with peripheral stem cell rescue in this selected patient population reflect the relative safety of the procedure and warrant validation in defined subgroups through prospective, randomized, multi-institutional trials.

  2. Phase I trial of split-dose induction docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (TPF) chemotherapy followed by curative surgery combined with postoperative radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer (TISOC-1)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Induction chemotherapy (ICT) with docetaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil (TPF) followed by radiotherapy is an effective treatment option for unresectable locally advanced head and neck cancer. This phase I study was designed to investigate the safety and tolerability of a split-dose TPF ICT regimen prior to surgery for locally advanced resectable oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Methods Patients received TPF split on two dosages on day 1 and 8 per cycle for one or three 3-week cycles prior to surgery and postoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy. Docetaxel was escalated in two dose levels, 40 mg/m2 (DL 0) and 30 mg/m2 (DL −1), plus 40 mg/m2 cisplatin and 2000 mg/m2 fluorouracil per week using a 3 +3 dose escalation algorithm. Results Eighteen patients were enrolled and were eligible for toxicity and response. A maximum tolerated dose of 30 mg/m2 docetaxel per week was reached. The most common grade 3+ adverse event was neutropenia during ICT in 10 patients. Surgery reached R0 resection in all cases. Nine patients (50%) showed complete pathologic regression. Conclusions A split-dose regime of TPF prior to surgery is feasible, tolerated and merits additional investigation in a phase II study with a dose of 30 mg/m docetaxel per week. Trial registration number NCT01108042 (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier) PMID:23083061

  3. Seven year update of an EORTC phase III trial of high-dose intensity M-VAC chemotherapy and G-CSF versus classic M-VAC in advanced urothelial tract tumours.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, C N; de Mulder, P; Schornagel, J H; Theodore, C; Fossa, S D; van Oosterom, A T; Witjes, J A; Spina, M; van Groeningen, C J; Duclos, B; Roberts, J T; de Balincourt, C; Collette, L

    2006-01-01

    EORTC protocol 30924 is an international randomized trial reporting a 7.3 year update of a 2 weekly regimen of high-dose intensity chemotherapy with M-VAC plus granulocyte colony stimulating factor (HD-M-VAC) compared to classic M-VAC in advanced transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Two hundred and sixty three untreated patients with bidimensionally measurable TCC were included. In an intention to treat analysis, there were 28 complete responses (CR) (21%) and 55 partial responses (PR) (41%), for an overall response rate (RR) of 64% on the HD-M-VAC arm. On M-VAC, there were 12 CR (9%) and 53 PR (41%), for an overall RR of 50% . The P-value for the difference in CR was 0.009; and for RR, was 0.06. After a median follow-up of 7.3 years, 24.6% are alive on the HD-M-VAC arm vs. 13.2% on the M-VAC arm. Median progression-free survival was better with HD-MVAC (9.5 months) vs. M-VAC (8.1 months). The mortality hazard ratio (HR) was 0.76. The 2-year survival rate for HD-M-VAC was 36.7% vs. 26.2% for M-VAC. At 5 years, the survival rate was 21.8% in the HD-M-VAC vs. 13.5%. Median survival was 15.1 months on HD-MVAC and 14.9 months on M-VAC. There was one death from toxicity in each arm; and more patients died to malignant disease in the M-VAC arm (76%) than in the HD-M-VAC arm (64.9%). With longer follow-up initial results have been confirmed, and shows that HD-M-VAC produces a borderline statistically significant relative reduction in the risk of progression and death compared to M-VAC.

  4. High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation as Adjuvant Treatment in High-Risk Breast Cancer: Data from the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation Registry.

    PubMed

    Martino, Massimo; Lanza, Francesco; Pavesi, Lorenzo; Öztürk, Mustafa; Blaise, Didier; Leno Núñez, Rubén; Schouten, Harry C; Bosi, Alberto; De Giorgi, Ugo; Generali, Daniele; Rosti, Giovanni; Necchi, Andrea; Ravelli, Andrea; Bengala, Carmelo; Badoglio, Manuela; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Bregni, Marco

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess toxicity and efficacy of adjuvant high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) in 583 high-risk breast cancer (BC) patients (>3 positive nodes) who were transplanted between 1995 and 2005 in Europe. All patients received surgery before transplant, and 55 patients (9.5%) received neoadjuvant treatment before surgery. Median age was 47.1 years, 57.3% of patients were premenopausal at treatment, 56.5% had endocrine-responsive tumors, 19.5% had a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative tumor, and 72.4% had ≥10 positive lymph nodes at surgery. Seventy-nine percent received a single HDC procedure. Overall transplant-related mortality was 1.9%, at .9% between 2001 and 2005, whereas secondary tumor-related mortality was .9%. With a median follow-up of 120 months, overall survival and disease-free survival rates at 5 and 10 years in the whole population were 75% and 64% and 58% and 44%, respectively. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that rates of overall survival were significantly better in patients with endocrine-responsive tumors, <10 positive lymph nodes, and smaller tumor size. HER2 status did not affect survival probability. Adjuvant HDC with AHSCT has a low mortality rate and provides impressive long-term survival rates in patients with high-risk BC. Our results suggest that this treatment modality should be considered in selected high-risk BC patients and further investigated in clinical trials.

  5. Hypoalbuminemia is significantly associated with increased clearance time of high dose methotrexate in patients being treated for lymphoma or leukemia.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Samantha N; Buie, Larry W; Adel, Nelly; Goldman, Debra A; Devlin, Sean M; Douer, Dan

    2016-12-01

    As a weak acid, methotrexate (MTX) is bound to serum albumin and has variable protein binding. The purpose of this study was to assess serum albumin's relationship with MTX pharmacokinetics by comparing MTX clearance and toxicities between patients with normal serum albumin to those with hypoalbuminemia. This single-center retrospective study included adult patients with leukemia or lymphoma who received their first MTX at a dose ≥1 g/m(2). Hypoalbuminemia was defined as serum albumin ≤3.4 g/dL. MTX clearance was defined as the first documented time the MTX level ≤0.05 μM. Fisher's exact tests and Wilcoxon rank sum tests were used to examine differences in toxicities, and Cox proportional hazard regression was used to assess relationship with time to clearance. Of 523 patients identified, 167 patients were evaluable. One hundred thirty-five patients had normal serum albumin and 32 had hypoalbuminemia. Hypoalbuminemia was associated with a higher proportion of patients experiencing edema, ascites or pleural effusions (34 vs. 12 %, p = 0.006), and the concomitant use of nephrotoxic agents (41 vs. 20 %, p = 0.021). Hypoalbuminemia was associated with a significantly longer time to MTX clearance (median 96 vs. 72 h, p = 0.004). In addition, patients with hypoalbuminemia had a higher proportion of hyperbilirubinemia and significantly longer hospitalization (median 14 vs. 5 days, p < 0.001). In conclusion, hypoalbuminemia was associated with increased time to MTX clearance and increased length of hospitalization. High dose MTX is safe to administer in patients with low albumin levels, with appropriate leucovorin rescue, and good supportive care.

  6. Impact of High-Dose Chemotherapy on the Ability to Deliver Subsequent Local-Regional Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B Protocol 9082

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, Lawrence B.; Cirrincione, Constance M.S.; Fitzgerald, Thomas J.; Laurie, Frances; Glicksman, Arvin S.; Vredenburgh, James; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Crump, Michael; Richardson, Paul G.; Schuster, Michael W.; Ma Jinli; Peterson, Bercedis L.; Norton, Larry; Seagren, Steven

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To report, from Cancer and Leukemia Group B Protocol 9082, the impact of high-dose cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, and BCNU (HD-CPB) vs. intermediate-dose CPB (ID-CPB) on the ability to start and complete the planned course of local-regional radiotherapy (RT) for women with breast cancer involving >=10 axillary nodes. Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 1998, 785 patients were randomized. The HD-CPB and ID-CPB arms were balanced regarding patient characteristics. The HD-CPB and ID-CPB arms were compared on the probability of RT initiation, interruption, modification, or incompleteness. The impact of clinical variables and interactions between variables were also assessed. Results: Radiotherapy was initiated in 82% (325 of 394) of HD-CPB vs. 92% (360 of 391) of ID-CPB patients (p = 0.001). On multivariate analyses, RT was less likely given to patients who were randomized to HD treatment (odds ratio [OR] = 0 .38, p < 0.001), older (p = 0.005), African American (p = 0.003), postmastectomy (p = 0.02), or estrogen receptor positive (p = 0.03). High-dose treatment had a higher rate of RT interruption (21% vs. 12%, p = 0.001, OR = 2.05), modification (29% vs. 14%, p = 0.001, OR = 2.46), and early termination of RT (9% vs. 2%, p = 0.0001, OR = 5.35), compared with ID. Conclusion: Treatment arm significantly related to initiation, interruption, modification, and early termination of RT. Patients randomized to HD-CPB were less likely to initiate RT, and of those who did, they were more likely to have RT interrupted, modified, and terminated earlier than those randomized to ID-CPB. The observed lower incidence of RT usage in African Americans vs. non-African Americans warrants further study.

  7. Impact of Drug Therapy, Radiation Dose, and Dose Rate on Renal Toxicity Following Bone Marrow Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jonathan C.; Schultheiss, Timothy E. Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate a radiation dose response and to determine the dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors that influence the incidence of late renal toxicity following total body irradiation (TBI). Methods and Materials: A comprehensive retrospective review was performed of articles reporting late renal toxicity, along with renal dose, fractionation, dose rate, chemotherapy regimens, and potential nephrotoxic agents. In the final analysis, 12 articles (n = 1,108 patients), consisting of 24 distinct TBI/chemotherapy conditioning regimens were included. Regimens were divided into three subgroups: adults (age {>=}18 years), children (age <18 years), and mixed population (both adults and children). Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors significantly associated with late renal complications. Results: Individual analysis was performed on each population subgroup. For the purely adult population, the only significant variable was total dose. For the mixed population, the significant variables included total dose, dose rate, and the use of fludarabine. For the pediatric population, only the use of cyclosporin or teniposide was significant; no dose response was noted. A logistic model was generated with the exclusion of the pediatric population because of its lack of dose response. This model yielded the following significant variables: total dose, dose rate, and number of fractions. Conclusion: A dose response for renal damage after TBI was identified. Fractionation and low dose rates are factors to consider when delivering TBI to patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. Drug therapy also has a major impact on kidney function and can modify the dose-response function.

  8. [Chemotherapy-induced stomatitis and diarrhea].

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, Shigenori; Yamaguchi, Kensei

    2011-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is a clinically important and sometimes dose-limiting toxicity of cancer treatment, including standard-dose chemotherapy, high-dose chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Consequently, dose reductions or treatment delays resulting from mucositis may impair treatment effectiveness. Symptoms are oral mucositis, dysphagia, abdominal pain and diarrhea, depending on the affected site. Although the underlying pathobiology of oral mucositis has been considerably elucidated over the past decade, there are few interventions for the prevention or treatment validated by randomized trials. The most commonly accepted intervention is basic oral care. Diarrhea is most common in patients treated with irinotecan and in some cases, life-threatening. No definitive interventions for the prevention of diarrhea exist, but there is evidence that loperamide and octreotide are effective for chemotherapy-induced diarrhea. In future, there is a need for well designed trials, preferably including a placebo or no treatment control, validating more effective interventions for managing chemotherapy- induced mucositis.

  9. Chemotherapy in Retinoblastoma: Current Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Yanık, Özge; Gündüz, Kaan; Yavuz, Kıvılcım; Taçyıldız, Nurdan; Ünal, Emel

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common childhood malignant intraocular tumor. Although enucleation and external beam radiotherapy have been historically used, today the most commonly used eye-sparing approach is chemotherapy. Chemotherapy can be used in both intraocular and extraocular RB cases. Chemotherapeutic agents may be applied in different ways, including systemic, subconjunctival, intra-arterial and intravitreal routes. The main purposes of application of systemic therapy are to reduce the tumor size for local treatment (chemoreduction), or to reduce the risk of metastasis after enucleation surgery (adjuvant therapy). Intra-arterial chemotherapy with the current name “super-selective intra-arterial infusion therapy” could be applied as primary therapy in tumors confined to the retina or as a secondary method in tumor recurrence. The most important advantage of intra-arterial therapy is the prevention of systemic chemotherapy complications. Intravitreal chemotherapy is administered in the presence of persistent or recurrent vitreous seeding. The term “extraocular RB” includes orbital invasion and metastatic disease. Current treatment for orbital invasion is neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgical enucleation and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy after surgery. In metastatic disease, regional lymph node involvement, distant metastases, and/or central nervous system (CNS) involvement may occur. Among them, CNS involvement has the worst prognosis, remaining at almost 100% mortality. In metastatic disease, high-dose salvage chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell rescue therapy are the possible treatment options; radiotherapy could also be added to the protocol according to the side of involvement. PMID:27800245

  10. Phase I North Central Cancer Treatment Group Trial-N9923 of escalating doses of twice-daily thoracic radiation therapy with amifostine and with alternating chemotherapy in limited stage small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Garces, Yolanda I. . E-mail: garces.yolanda@Mayo.edu; Okuno, Scott H.; Schild, Steven E.; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.; Bot, Brian M.; Martens, John M.; Wender, Donald B.; Soori, Gamini S.; Moore, Dennis F.; Kozelsky, Timothy F.; Jett, James R.

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: The primary goal was to identify the maximum tolerable dose (MTD) of thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) that can be given with chemotherapy and amifostine for patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LSCLC). Methods and Materials: Treatment began with two cycles of topotecan (1 mg/m{sup 2}) Days 1 to 5 and paclitaxel (175 mg/m{sup 2}) Day 5 (every 3 weeks) given before and after TRT. The TRT began at 6 weeks. The TRT was given in 120 cGy fractions b.i.d. and the dose escalation (from 4,800 cGy, dose level 1, to 6,600 cGy, dose level 4) followed the standard 'cohorts of 3' design. The etoposide (E) (50 mg/day) and cisplatin (C) (3 mg/m{sup 2}) were given i.v. before the morning TRT and amifostine (500 mg/day) was given before the afternoon RT. This was followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI). The dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were defined as Grade {>=}4 hematologic, febrile neutropenia, esophagitis, or other nonhematologic toxicity, Grade {>=}3 dyspnea, or Grade {>=}2 pneumonitis. Results: Fifteen patients were evaluable for the Phase I portion of the trial. No DLTs were seen at dose levels 1 and 2. Two patients on dose level 4 experienced DLTs: 1 patient had a Grade 4 pneumonitis, dyspnea, fatigue, hypokalemia, and anorexia, and 1 patient had a Grade 5 hypoxia attributable to TRT. One of 6 patients on dose level 3 had a DLT, Grade 3 esophagitis. The Grade {>=}3 toxicities seen in at least 10% of patients during TRT were esophagitis (53%), leukopenia (33%), dehydration (20%), neutropenia (13%), and fatigue (13%). The median survival was 14.5 months. Conclusion: The MTD of b.i.d. TRT was 6000 cGy (120 cGy b.i.d.) with EP and amifostine.

  11. Induction chemotherapy in metastatic neuroblastoma--does dose influence response? A critical review of published data standards, options and recommendations (SOR) project of the National Federation of French Cancer Centres (FNCLCC).

    PubMed

    Pinkerton, C R; Blanc Vincent, M P; Bergeron, C; Fervers, B; Philip, T

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, from a review of published data, whether in stage 4 neuroblastoma in children over 1 year of age, the dose or scheduling of induction chemotherapy influenced the response rate in distant metastases. Publications relating to induction chemotherapy since the introduction of cisplatin/epipodophyllotoxin combinations were identified using Medline, Current Contents and personal reference lists. Thirteen publications were identified which described 17 regimens involving 948 children. The doses and the scheduling of the various regimens were compared with a standard regimen OPEC (vincristine, cisplatin, teniposide, cyclophosphamide). These were correlated with the reported response rates in the bone marrow. Due to a lack of standardisation in the nature of restaging investigations, timing of restaging and definitions of response it was difficult to compare all studies. The complete response rate at distant metastases ranged from less than 40% to over 90%. For individual drugs; the comparative doses given in each course ranged up to 4.2 g/m(2) for cyclophosphamide, 280 mg/m(2) for cisplatin, 600 mg/m(2) for etoposide and 4.5 mg/m(2) for vincristine. There was no evidence of any positive correlation between response rate in the marrow and either the dose of any individual drug or the schedule used. In contrast to a previous study which included a number of older studies where disease assessment was even more variable, this analysis has failed to show any justification for the routine use of very intensive induction regimens in this disease. Such an approach should only be taken in the context of randomised trials in which timing and methods of reassessment can be standardised. Until such studies demonstrate superiority either in terms of response rate or progression-free survival lower morbidity regimens should remain the standard therapy.

  12. Intensive chemotherapy as salvage treatment for solid tumors: focus on germ cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Selle, F.; Gligorov, J.; Richard, S.; Khalil, A.; Alexandre, I.; Avenin, D.; Provent, S.; Soares, D.G.; Lotz, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Germ cell tumors present contrasting biological and molecular features compared to many solid tumors, which may partially explain their unusual sensitivity to chemotherapy. Reduced DNA repair capacity and enhanced induction of apoptosis appear to be key factors in the sensitivity of germ cell tumors to cisplatin. Despite substantial cure rates, some patients relapse and subsequently die of their disease. Intensive doses of chemotherapy are used to counter mechanisms of drug resistance. So far, high-dose chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell support for solid tumors is used only in the setting of testicular germ cell tumors. In that indication, high-dose chemotherapy is given as the first or late salvage treatment for patients with either relapsed or progressive tumors after initial conventional salvage chemotherapy. High-dose chemotherapy is usually given as two or three sequential cycles using carboplatin and etoposide with or without ifosfamide. The administration of intensive therapy carries significant side effects and can only be efficiently and safely conducted in specialized referral centers to assure optimum patient care outcomes. In breast and ovarian cancer, most studies have demonstrated improvement in progression-free survival (PFS), but overall survival remained unchanged. Therefore, most of these approaches have been dropped. In germ cell tumors, clinical trials are currently investigating novel therapeutic combinations and active treatments. In particular, the integration of targeted therapies constitutes an important area of research for patients with a poor prognosis. PMID:25493378

  13. The addition of rituximab to fludarabine and cyclophosphamide chemotherapy results in a significant improvement in overall survival in patients with newly diagnosed mantle cell lymphoma: results of a randomized UK National Cancer Research Institute trial

    PubMed Central

    Rule, Simon; Smith, Paul; Johnson, Peter W.M.; Bolam, Simon; Follows, George; Gambell, Joanne; Hillmen, Peter; Jack, Andrew; Johnson, Stephen; Kirkwood, Amy A; Kruger, Anton; Pocock, Christopher; Seymour, John F.; Toncheva, Milena; Walewski, Jan; Linch, David

    2016-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is an incurable and generally aggressive lymphoma that is more common in elderly patients. Whilst a number of different chemotherapeutic regimens are active in this disease, there is no established gold standard therapy. Rituximab has been used widely to good effect in B-cell malignancies but there is no evidence that it improves outcomes when added to chemotherapy in this disease. We performed a randomized, open-label, multicenter study looking at the addition of rituximab to the standard chemotherapy regimen of fludarabine and cyclophosphamide in patients with newly diagnosed mantle cell lymphoma. A total of 370 patients were randomized. With a median follow up of six years, rituximab improved the median progression-free survival from 14.9 to 29.8 months (P<0.001) and overall survival from 37.0 to 44.5 months (P=0.005). This equates to absolute differences of 9.0% and 22.1% for overall and progression-free survival, respectively, at two years. Overall response rates were similar, but complete response rates were significantly higher in the rituximab arm: 52.7% vs. 39.9% (P=0.014). There was no clinically significant additional toxicity observed with the addition of rituximab. Overall, approximately 18% of patients died of non-lymphomatous causes, most commonly infections. The addition of rituximab to fludarabine and cyclophosphamide chemotherapy significantly improves outcomes in patients with mantle cell lymphoma. However, these regimens have significant late toxicity and should be used with caution. This trial has been registered (ISRCTN81133184 and clinicaltrials.gov:00641095) and is supported by the UK National Cancer Research Network. PMID:26611473

  14. The addition of rituximab to fludarabine and cyclophosphamide chemotherapy results in a significant improvement in overall survival in patients with newly diagnosed mantle cell lymphoma: results of a randomized UK National Cancer Research Institute trial.

    PubMed

    Rule, Simon; Smith, Paul; Johnson, Peter W M; Bolam, Simon; Follows, George; Gambell, Joanne; Hillmen, Peter; Jack, Andrew; Johnson, Stephen; Kirkwood, Amy A; Kruger, Anton; Pocock, Christopher; Seymour, John F; Toncheva, Milena; Walewski, Jan; Linch, David

    2016-02-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is an incurable and generally aggressive lymphoma that is more common in elderly patients. Whilst a number of different chemotherapeutic regimens are active in this disease, there is no established gold standard therapy. Rituximab has been used widely to good effect in B-cell malignancies but there is no evidence that it improves outcomes when added to chemotherapy in this disease. We performed a randomized, open-label, multicenter study looking at the addition of rituximab to the standard chemotherapy regimen of fludarabine and cyclophosphamide in patients with newly diagnosed mantle cell lymphoma. A total of 370 patients were randomized. With a median follow up of six years, rituximab improved the median progression-free survival from 14.9 to 29.8 months (P<0.001) and overall survival from 37.0 to 44.5 months (P=0.005). This equates to absolute differences of 9.0% and 22.1% for overall and progression-free survival, respectively, at two years. Overall response rates were similar, but complete response rates were significantly higher in the rituximab arm: 52.7% vs. 39.9% (P=0.014). There was no clinically significant additional toxicity observed with the addition of rituximab. Overall, approximately 18% of patients died of non-lymphomatous causes, most commonly infections. The addition of rituximab to fludarabine and cyclophosphamide chemotherapy significantly improves outcomes in patients with mantle cell lymphoma. However, these regimens have significant late toxicity and should be used with caution. This trial has been registered (ISRCTN81133184 and clinicaltrials.gov:00641095) and is supported by the UK National Cancer Research Network.

  15. Practical considerations in ovarian cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cristea, Mihaela; Han, Ernest; Salmon, Lennie; Morgan, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer remains the most lethal gynecologic malignancy despite advances in treatment. The standard management generally involves a combination of surgical tumor debulking and chemotherapy. Over the decades, chemotherapy for ovarian cancer has evolved and currently involves a combination of intravenous platinum and taxane chemotherapy. Over the past decade, three randomized phase III trials have been reported, and all have demonstrated a significant survival advantage for intraperitoneal compared with intravenous chemotherapy. However, there are potential barriers and controversies related to the administration of intraperitoneal chemotherapy in ovarian cancer patients. In this review, we discuss the evolution and current management considerations of chemotherapy for the treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer. PMID:21789133

  16. Oral Chemotherapy: What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Is Chemotherapy Used to Treat Cancer? How Chemotherapy Drugs Work Getting Chemotherapy Questions to Ask About Chemotherapy Chemotherapy ... How Is Chemotherapy Used to Treat Cancer? How Chemotherapy Drugs Work Getting Chemotherapy Questions to Ask About Chemotherapy Chemotherapy ...

  17. Pulmonary Toxicity in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With High-Dose (74 Gy) 3-Dimensional Conformal Thoracic Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Trial 30105

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, Joseph K.; Stinchcombe, Thomas E.; Gu Lin; Wang Xiaofei; Morano, Karen; Bogart, Jeffrey A.; Crawford, Jeffrey C.; Socinski, Mark A.; Blackstock, A. William; Vokes, Everett E.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 30105 tested two different concurrent chemoradiotherapy platforms with high-dose (74 Gy) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy for Stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to determine if either could achieve a primary endpoint of >18-month median survival. Final results of 30105 demonstrated that induction carboplatin and gemcitabine and concurrent gemcitabine 3D-CRT was not feasible because of treatment-related toxicity. However, induction and concurrent carboplatin/paclitaxel with 74 Gy 3D-CRT had a median survival of 24 months, and is the basis for the experimental arm in CALGB 30610/RTOG 0617/N0628. We conducted a secondary analysis of all patients to determine predictors of treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patient, tumor, and treatment-related variables were analyzed to determine their relation with treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Results: Older age, higher N stage, larger planning target volume (PTV)1, smaller total lung volume/PTV1 ratio, larger V20, and larger mean lung dose were associated with increasing pulmonary toxicity on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that V20 and nodal stage as well as treatment with concurrent gemcitabine were associated with treatment-related toxicity. A high-risk group comprising patients with N3 disease and V20 >38% was associated with 80% of Grades 3-5 pulmonary toxicity cases. Conclusions: Elevated V20 and N3 disease status are important predictors of treatment related pulmonary toxicity in patients treated with high-dose 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Further studies may use these metrics in considering patients for these treatments.

  18. A quantitative sensory analysis of peripheral neuropathy in colorectal cancer and its exacerbation by oxaliplatin chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Barbosa, Mariana; Kosturakis, Alyssa K; Eng, Cathy; Wendelschafer-Crabb, Gwen; Kennedy, William R; Simone, Donald A; Wang, Xin S; Cleeland, Charles S; Dougherty, Patrick M

    2014-11-01

    Peripheral neuropathy caused by cytotoxic chemotherapy, especially platins and taxanes, is a widespread problem among cancer survivors that is likely to continue to expand in the future. However, little work to date has focused on understanding this challenge. The goal in this study was to determine the impact of colorectal cancer and cumulative chemotherapeutic dose on sensory function to gain mechanistic insight into the subtypes of primary afferent fibers damaged by chemotherapy. Patients with colorectal cancer underwent quantitative sensory testing before and then prior to each cycle of oxaliplatin. These data were compared with those from 47 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. Patients showed significant subclinical deficits in sensory function before any therapy compared with healthy volunteers, and they became more pronounced in patients who received chemotherapy. Sensory modalities that involved large Aβ myelinated fibers and unmyelinated C fibers were most affected by chemotherapy, whereas sensory modalities conveyed by thinly myelinated Aδ fibers were less sensitive to chemotherapy. Patients with baseline sensory deficits went on to develop more symptom complaints during chemotherapy than those who had no baseline deficit. Patients who were tested again 6 to 12 months after chemotherapy presented with the most numbness and pain and also the most pronounced sensory deficits. Our results illuminate a mechanistic connection between the pattern of effects on sensory function and the nerve fiber types that appear to be most vulnerable to chemotherapy-induced toxicity, with implications for how to focus future work to ameloirate risks of peripheral neuropathy.

  19. Combination with intravenous iron supplementation or doubling erythropoietin dose for patients with chemotherapy-induced anaemia inadequately responsive to initial erythropoietin treatment alone: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Jiang, Hong; Gao, Wei; Tu, Ye; Zhou, Ying; Li, Xi; Zhu, Zhe; Jiang, Qixin; Zhan, Haifeng; Yu, Jiangming; Fu, Chuangang; Gao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Erythropoietin (EPO) is a commonly used option in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anaemia (CIA). However, ∼30–50% of patients fail to achieve an adequate response after initial treatment. Prior studies have demonstrated that intravenous iron might synergistically improve therapeutic response to EPO treatment in this patient population. Methods and analysis We will perform this multicentre, randomised, open-label, parallel-group, active controlled non-inferiority study to compare the two combination therapies of EPO plus intravenous iron regimen versus doubling the dose of EPO in patients with CIA who have an inadequate response to initial EPO treatment at a routine dose. A total of 603 patients with an increase in haemoglobin (Hb) <1 g/dL will be enrolled and randomised to one of the three study treatment groups at a 1:1:1 ratio Group 1: EPO treatment at the original dose plus intravenous iron dextran 200 mg every 3 weeks (Q3W) for 15 weeks; Group 2: EPO treatment at the original dose plus intravenous iron dextran 100 mg, twice a week for 5 weeks; Group 3: the control group, doubling the EPO dose without preplanned iron supplementation. The primary outcome measure to compare is the Hb response rate at week 15 and the secondary end points involve therapeutic blood transfusions. Time-to-progression, adverse events and quality of life will also be evaluated. Ethics and dissemination All participants will provide informed consent; the study protocol has been approved by the independent ethics committee of Shanghai East Hospital. This study would clearly demonstrate the potential benefit of combining epoetin treatment with intravenous iron supplementation. Findings will be shared with participating hospitals, policymakers and the academic community to promote the clinical management of CIA in China. Trial registration number NCT02731378. PMID:27855097

  20. Rationale for combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dalgleish, Angus G

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy has usually been considered as an alternative to more traditional modalities. Moreover, it has previously been felt that chemotherapy is inherently immunosuppressive and not suitable for combining with immunotherapy. In this review, the concept of combining different modalities that result in cell death, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy, with immunotherapy is explored. Tumors actively cause immune suppression which can be reversed by their removal but when this is not possible, enhancing the immune response with nonspecific immune stimulation can enhance the response to other modalities, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Additionally, several chemotherapy agents at low doses selectively inhibit regulatory and suppressor cells.

  1. MicroRNAs and Metabolites in Serum Change after Chemotherapy: Impact on Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Edgar; Morin-Kensicki, Elizabeth; Goecke, Tamme W.; Bosio, Andreas; Rath, Björn; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Bissels, Ute; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic regeneration after high dose chemotherapy necessitates activation of the stem cell pool. There is evidence that serum taken after chemotherapy comprises factors stimulating proliferation and self-renewal of CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) – however, the nature of these feedback signals is yet unclear. Here, we addressed the question if specific microRNAs (miRNAs) or metabolites are affected after high dose chemotherapy. Serum taken from the same patients before and after chemotherapy was supplemented for in vitro cultivation of HSPCs. Serum taken after chemotherapy significantly enhanced HSPC proliferation, better maintained a CD34+ immunophenotype, and stimulated colony forming units. Microarray analysis revealed that 23 miRNAs changed in serum after chemotherapy – particularly, miRNA-320c and miRNA-1275 were down-regulated whereas miRNA-3663-3p was up-regulated. miRNA-320c was exemplarily inhibited by an antagomiR, which seemed to increase proliferation. Metabolomic profiling demonstrated that 44 metabolites were less abundant, whereas three (including 2-hydroxybutyrate and taurocholenate sulphate) increased in serum upon chemotherapy. Nine of these metabolites were subsequently tested for effects on HSPCs in vitro, but none of them exerted a clear concentration dependent effect on proliferation, immunophenotype and colony forming unit formation. Taken together, serum profiles of miRNAs and metabolites changed after chemotherapy. Rather than individually, these factors may act in concert to recruit HSPCs into action for hematopoietic regeneration. PMID:26024523

  2. Chemotherapy of Rodent Malaria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    15 ML W_____ 1 .5 1.25 1-4 1. j . .. .... AD CHEMOTHERAPY OF RODENT MALARIA /I ’ IFINAL REPORT 00 WALLACE PETERS MD DSc I!JULY 1985 Supported by US...Table 15 and detailed report sheets are appended as Tables 16 through 21. 3.1.1 WR 251855 AA This lepidine, an analogue of primaquine, is very active...in our 15 preliminary test. The remaining three compounds also exhibited toxicity in varying degrees at this dose and, consequently, even the low level

  3. Addition of a third field significantly increases dose to the brachial plexus for patients undergoing tangential whole-breast therapy after lumpectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Stanic, Sinisa; Mathai, Mathew; Mayadev, Jyoti S.; Do, Ly V.; Purdy, James A.; Chen, Allen M.

    2012-07-01

    Our goal was to evaluate brachial plexus (BP) dose with and without the use of supraclavicular (SCL) irradiation in patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy with whole-breast radiation therapy (RT) after lumpectomy. Using the standardized Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-endorsed guidelines delineation, we contoured the BP for 10 postlumpectomy breast cancer patients. The radiation dose to the whole breast was 50.4 Gy using tangential fields in 1.8-Gy fractions, followed by a conedown to the operative bed using electrons (10 Gy). The prescription dose to the SCL field was 50.4 Gy, delivered to 3-cm depth. The mean BP volume was 14.5 {+-} 1.5 cm{sup 3}. With tangential fields alone, the median mean dose to the BP was 0.57 Gy, the median maximum dose was 1.93 Gy, and the irradiated volume of the BP receiving 40, 45, and 50 Gy was 0%. When the third (SCL field) was added, the dose to the BP was significantly increased (P = .01): the median mean dose to the BP was 40.60 Gy, and the median maximum dose was 52.22 Gy. With 3-field RT, the median irradiated volume of the BP receiving 40, 45, and 50 Gy was 83.5%, 68.5%, and 24.6%, respectively. The addition of the SCL field significantly increases dose to the BP. The possibility of increasing the risk of BP morbidity should be considered in the context of clinical decision making.

  4. Genetic advances uncover mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chua, K C; Kroetz, D L

    2017-04-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common dose-limiting toxicity experienced in 30-40% of patients undergoing treatment with various chemotherapeutics, including taxanes, vinca alkaloids, epothilones, proteasome inhibitors, and thalidomide. Importantly, CIPN significantly affects a patient's quality of life. Recent genetic association studies are enhancing our understanding of CIPN pathophysiology and serve as a foundation for identification of genetic biomarkers to predict toxicity risk and for the development of novel strategies for prevention and treatment.

  5. High-Dose Methotrexate and Cytarabine-Based Multi-Agent Chemotherapy (Modified Bonn Protocol) for Systemic Lymphoma with CNS Involvement.

    PubMed

    Umino, Kento; Fujiwara, Shin-Ichiro; Sato, Kazuya; Minakata, Daisuke; Nakano, Hirofumi; Yamasaki, Ryoko; Kawasaki, Yasufumi; Sugimoto, Miyuki; Yamamoto, Chihiro; Hatano, Kaoru; Okazuka, Kiyoshi; Oh, Iekuni; Ohmine, Ken; Suzuki, Takahiro; Muroi, Kazuo; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2017-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with systemic lymphoma with central nervous system (CNS) involvement is very poor and there is no established standard therapy. We retrospectively analyzed 18 patients (4 untreated and 14 relapsed) with systemic lymphoma with CNS involvement who received methotrexate and cytarabine-based multiagent chemotherapy (modified Bonn protocol). Complete and partial responses were achieved in 56 and 22% of the patients, respectively. The 1-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) was 81.0 and 39.2%, respectively. Patients with parenchymal involvement showed a better 1-year PFS than those with either leptomeningeal involvement or both. In a multivariate analysis, poor performance status (PS) was the only independent prognostic factor for the 1-year OS and PFS (HR 10.8, 95% CI 1.09-108, p = 0.042; HR 20.8, 95% CI 2.39-181, p = 0.006, respectively). Grade 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia occurred in 17 patients each (94%), but there were no grade 4 nonhematopoietic adverse events. The modified Bonn protocol resulted in relatively favorable response and survival, and provided clinical benefits to patients with good PS, in particular. This study demonstrated that the modified Bonn protocol could be a feasible and encouraging treatment approach for lymphoma with CNS and systemic involvement.

  6. Progress in systemic chemotherapy of primary breast cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    Hortobagyi, G N

    2001-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the multidisciplinary management of primary breast cancer during the last 30 years. Adjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to significantly reduce the annual risk of cancer recurrence and mortality, and these effects persist even 15 years after diagnosis. Combination chemotherapy is superior to single-agent therapy and anthracycline-containing regimens. Those that combine an anthracycline with 5-fluorouracil and cyclophosphamide are more effective than regimens without an anthracycline. Six cycles of a single regimen appear to provide optimal benefit. Dose reductions below the standard range are associated with inferior results. Dose increases that require growth factor or hematopoietic stem cell support are under investigation; at this time, the existing results provide no compelling reason to use this strategy outside a clinical trial. Regimens using fixed crossover designs with two non-cross-resistant regimens are being evaluated. The addition of a taxane to anthracycline-containing regimens is currently under intense scrutiny, and preliminary analysis of the first three clinical trials has shown encouraging, albeit not compelling, results. For patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer, the sequential administration of chemotherapy and 5 years of tamoxifen therapy provides additive benefits. No compelling evidence exists to combine ovarian ablation with chemotherapy. Most side effects and toxic effects are self-limited, although premature menopause requires monitoring and preventive interventions to preserve bone mineral density. The small risk of acute leukemia is of concern, and additional research to develop safer regimens is clearly indicated. The overall effect of optimal local/regional treatment combined with an anthracycline-containing adjuvant chemotherapy and a taxane (and, for patients with estrogen receptor-positive tumors, 5 years of tamoxifen therapy) is a greater than 50% reduction in annual risks of

  7. MRI-Guided 3D Optimization Significantly Improves DVH Parameters of Pulsed-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lindegaard, Jacob C. Tanderup, Kari; Nielsen, Soren Kynde; Haack, Soren; Gelineck, John

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To compare dose-volume histogram parameters of standard Point A and magnetic resonance imaging-based three-dimensional optimized dose plans in 21 consecutive patients who underwent pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDR-BT) for locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: All patients received external beam radiotherapy (elective target dose, 45 Gy in 25-30 fractions; tumor target dose, 50-60 Gy in 25-30 fractions). PDR-BT was applied with a tandem-ring applicator. Additional ring-guided titanium needles were used in 4 patients and a multichannel vaginal cylinder in 2 patients. Dose planning was done using 1.5 Tesla T{sub 1}-weighted and T{sub 2}-weighted paratransversal magnetic resonance imaging scans. T{sub 1}-weighted visible oil-containing tubes were used for applicator reconstruction. The prescribed standard dose for PDR-BT was 10 Gy (1 Gy/pulse, 1 pulse/h) for two to three fractions to reach a physical dose of 80 Gy to Point A. The total dose (external beam radiotherapy plus brachytherapy) was normalized to an equivalent dose in 2-Gy fractions using {alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor, {alpha}/{beta} = 3 Gy for normal tissue, and a repair half-time of 1.5 h. The goal of optimization was dose received by 90% of the target volume (D{sub 90}) of {>=}85 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub /{beta}}{sub 10} in the high-risk clinical target volume (cervix and remaining tumor at brachytherapy), but keeping the minimal dose to 2 cm{sup 3} of the bladder and rectum/sigmoid at <90 and <75 Gy{sub {alpha}}{sub /{beta}}{sub 3}, respectively. Results: Using three-dimensional optimization, all dose-volume histogram constraints were met in 16 of 21 patients compared with 3 of 21 patients with two-dimensional library plans (p < 0.001). Optimization increased the minimal target dose (D{sub 100}) of the high-risk clinical target volume (p < 0.007) and decreased the minimal dose to 2 cm{sup 3} for the sigmoid significantly (p = 0.03). For the high-risk clinical target volume, D

  8. Epigenetic priming with decitabine followed by low-dose idarubicin/cytarabine has an increased anti-leukemic effect compared to traditional chemotherapy in high-risk myeloid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xing-Nong; Zhou, Xin-Ping; Wei, Ju-Ying; Xu, Gai-Xiang; Li, Ying; Mao, Li-Ping; Huang, Jian; Ren, Yan-Ling; Mei, Chen; Wang, Jing-Han; Lou, Yin-Jun; Ma, Li-Ya; Yu, Wen-Juan; Ye, Li; Xie, Li-Li; Luo, Yin-Wan; Hu, Chao; Niu, Lin-Mei; Dou, Min-Hua; Jin, Jie; Tong, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Decitabine (DAC) is commonly used for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Previous studies have indicated DAC sequentially combined with idarubicin was an effective treatment for myeloid neoplasms. Therefore, a clinical study was conducted of the sequential combination of DAC followed by low-dose idarubicin/cytarabine in high-risk myeloid neoplasms. A total of 30 patients with a diagnosis of high-risk MDS, AML evolving from MDS or relapsed/refractory AML were enrolled in the study. DAC was administered 20 mg/m(2) daily for 3 consecutive days. Idarubicin (3 mg/m(2)/day) was administered 24 h after the last administration of DAC for 5-7 consecutive days, combined with cytarabine (30 mg/m(2)/day) for 7-14 days. The overall complete remission rate was 66.67%. The results demonstrate that epigenetic priming with decitabine followed by low-dose idarubicin/ytarabine has an increased anti-leukemia effect compared to traditional chemotherapy in high-risk myeloid neoplasms.

  9. Long-term adverse effects on dentition in children with poor-risk neuroblastoma treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation with or without total body irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hölttä, P; Alaluusua, S; Saarinen-Pihkala, U M; Wolf, J; Nyström, M; Hovi, L

    2002-01-01

    Chemo- and radiotherapy may have injurious effects on developing teeth. In this long-term follow-up study among poor-risk neuroblastoma (NBL) survivors our aims were: (1) to assess both the type and extent of the side-effects of the anticancer treatment on tooth development; and (2) to develop an index for expressing total damage to the permanent dentition. We studied the dental development from panoramic radiographs (PRG) of 18 long-term survivors treated under the age of 6 years with high-dose (HD) chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for poor-risk NBL. The myeloablative therapy was either HD chemotherapy and fractionated total body irradiation (TBI) of 10-12 Gy (TBI group, n = 10) or HD chemotherapy only (non-TBI group, n = 8). A defect index (DeI) was developed to describe the damage to the permanent dentition. The DeI was also tested in 18 healthy adolescents. All NBL patients had disturbances in dental development including short roots, arrested root development, microdontia and tooth aplasia. After TBI, 9/10 patients had very severe root defects, in contrast to none in the non-TBI group. All children in the TBI group had 2-12 (mean 6.6) missing permanent teeth, while 2/5 in the non-TBI group (3/8 excluded due to young age) had two and four missing permanent teeth, respectively. Microdontia was found at equal frequency in both groups. The mean value of the DeI was 70.0 (range 28-117) in the TBI group, 15.2 (range 4-34) in the non-TBI group (P<0.001, Mann-Whitney U test) and 1.8 (range 0-15) in healthy adolescents. Disturbances in dental development may compromise occlusal function in poor-risk NBL patients after ASCT, especially when TBI is included in the conditioning regimen. Long-term dental follow-up and rehabilitation is required.

  10. p53-Based Strategy to Reduce Hematological Toxicity of Chemotherapy: A Proof of Principle Study

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Chul S.; Michalek, Joel E.; Elledge, Richard; Kelly, Kevin R.; Ganapathy, Suthakar; Su, Hang; Jenkins, Carol A.; Argiris, Athanassios; Swords, Ronan; Eng, Tony Y.; Karnad, Anand; Crownover, Richard L.; Swanson, Gregory P.; Goros, Martin; Pollock, Brad H.; Yuan, Zhi-Min

    2015-01-01

    P53 activation is a primary mechanism underlying pathological responses to DNA-damaging agents such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Our recent animal studies showed that low dose arsenic (LDA)-induced transient p53 inhibition selectively protected normal tissues from chemotherapy-induced toxicity. Study objectives were to: 1) define the lowest safe dose of arsenic trioxide that transiently blocks p53 activation in patients and 2) assess the potential of LDA to decrease hematological toxicity from chemotherapy. Patients scheduled to receive minimum 4 cycles of myelosuppressive chemotherapy were eligible. For objective 1, dose escalation of LDA started at 0.005mg/kg/day for 3 days. This dose satisfied objective 1 and was administered before chemotherapy cycles 2, 4 and 6 for objective 2. P53 level in peripheral lymphocytes was measured on day 1 of each cycle by ELISA assay. Chemotherapy cycles 1, 3, and 5 served as the baseline for the subsequent cycles of 2, 4 and 6 respectively. If p53 level for the subsequent cycle was lower (or higher) than the baseline cycle, p53 was defined as “suppressed” (or “activated”) for the pair of cycles. Repeated measures linear models of CBC in terms of day, cycle, p53 activity and interaction terms were used. Twenty-six patients treated with 3 week cycle regimens form the base of analyses. The mean white blood cell, hemoglobin and absolute neutrophil counts were significantly higher in the “suppressed” relative to the “activated” group. These data support the proof of principle that suppression of p53 could lead to protection of bone marrow in patients receiving chemotherapy. PMID:26440706

  11. Exhaling a budesonide inhaler through the nose results in a significant reduction in dose requirement of budesonide nasal spray in patients having asthma with rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, W A

    1999-01-01

    Budesonide, an inhaled corticosteroid is used routinely in the treatment of bronchial asthma and rhinitis. Although inhaled corticosteroids in therapeutic doses are unlikely to result in systemic side effects, there is as yet skepticism about their routine and prolonged use. The aim of this study was to determine whether budesonide inhalation through a metered dose inhaler, when exhaled through the nose could result in a reduction in the dose requirement of budesonide metered nasal spray in patients having perennial allergic asthma with rhinitis. This study was an open, parallel, comparative, crossover trial in which 49 young patients having perennial allergic asthma with rhinitis were divided into two groups and administered either a combination of budesonide metered dose inhaler with a budesonide nasal spray or a budesonide inhaler alone, which was to be exhaled through the nose. Both groups were later crossed over and weekly symptom scores and peak nasal inspiratory flow rates were monitored during each phase of the study. Finally, patients who volunteered from both groups were instructed to note the reduction in dose requirement of budesonide nasal spray while using a budesonide inhaler and exhaling it through the nose. The results of this study reveal that when a budesonide inhaler is exhaled through the nose, it results in an improvement in symptom scores and peak nasal inspiratory flow rates, which were significantly less than those obtained in the group using both a budesonide nasal spray and a metered dose inhaler. In addition, exhaling budesonide through the nose results in a 40.1% reduction in the dose requirement of a budesonide nasal spray, which is statistically significant (p < 0.001).

  12. Antineoplastic chemotherapy and congenital tooth abnormalities in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Brożyna, Agnieszka; Dembowska-Bagińska, Bożenna; Olczak-Kowalczyk, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Chemotherapeutic treatment in children and adolescents carries a risk of congenital tooth disorders and dentinoma. Study objective is to assess the correlation between tooth abnormalities, early complications of multidrug chemotherapy, and chemotherapeutics used in different antineoplastic therapies in children and adolescents. Material and methods Enamel defects (developmental defects of enamel index – DDE index) and defects in tooth number, size, and structure were assessed clinically and radiologically in 60 patients who underwent chemotherapy on average 4.9 ±3.4 years earlier (PCH), and 60 generally healthy subjects (control group – CG), aged 6–18 years. Höltta’s defect index (DeI) was calculated. Medical files provided information on neoplasm type, age at treatment start and chemotherapy duration, chemotherapeutic type and dose, vomiting, and mucositis (CTCAE v4.0). Statistical significance of differences between groups was assessed with the Mann-Whitney U test and the correlation between dental defects and chemotherapy with Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient (significance p ≤ 0.05). Results Enamel defects, tooth agenesis, microdontia, root resorption, taurodontism, and dentinoma occurred statistically significantly more often in the PCH group. A correlation was established between vincristine use and dose and all types of dental defects; cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and isophosphamide and hypodontia; microdontia, root resorption, and enamel defects; etoposide and cisplatin and microdontia, root resorption, and enamel defects; methotrexate root resorption and enamel defects; carboplatin and dentinoma and enamel defects. Mucositis and vomiting promoted root resorption, microdontia, and enamel defects. Conclusions Dental defects are related to both the use of respective chemotherapeutics, especially vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and isophosphamide, and to early complications in multidrug chemotherapy

  13. Blinatumomab versus Chemotherapy for Advanced Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kantarjian, Hagop; Stein, Anthony; Gökbuget, Nicola; Fielding, Adele K; Schuh, Andre C; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Wei, Andrew; Dombret, Hervé; Foà, Robin; Bassan, Renato; Arslan, Önder; Sanz, Miguel A; Bergeron, Julie; Demirkan, Fatih; Lech-Maranda, Ewa; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Thomas, Xavier; Horst, Heinz-August; Brüggemann, Monika; Klapper, Wolfram; Wood, Brent L; Fleishman, Alex; Nagorsen, Dirk; Holland, Christopher; Zimmerman, Zachary; Topp, Max S

    2017-03-02

    Background Blinatumomab, a bispecific monoclonal antibody construct that enables CD3-positive T cells to recognize and eliminate CD19-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) blasts, was approved for use in patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell precursor ALL on the basis of single-group trials that showed efficacy and manageable toxic effects. Methods In this multi-institutional phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned adults with heavily pretreated B-cell precursor ALL, in a 2:1 ratio, to receive either blinatumomab or standard-of-care chemotherapy. The primary end point was overall survival. Results Of the 405 patients who were randomly assigned to receive blinatumomab (271 patients) or chemotherapy (134 patients), 376 patients received at least one dose. Overall survival was significantly longer in the blinatumomab group than in the chemotherapy group. The median overall survival was 7.7 months in the blinatumomab group and 4.0 months in the chemotherapy group (hazard ratio for death with blinatumomab vs. chemotherapy, 0.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.55 to 0.93; P=0.01). Remission rates within 12 weeks after treatment initiation were significantly higher in the blinatumomab group than in the chemotherapy group, both with respect to complete remission with full hematologic recovery (34% vs. 16%, P<0.001) and with respect to complete remission with full, partial, or incomplete hematologic recovery (44% vs. 25%, P<0.001). Treatment with blinatumomab resulted in a higher rate of event-free survival than that with chemotherapy (6-month estimates, 31% vs. 12%; hazard ratio for an event of relapse after achieving a complete remission with full, partial, or incomplete hematologic recovery, or death, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.71; P<0.001), as well as a longer median duration of remission (7.3 vs. 4.6 months). A total of 24% of the patients in each treatment group underwent allogeneic stem-cell transplantation. Adverse events of grade 3 or higher were reported in

  14. Assessment of adherence to the guidelines for the management of nausea and vomiting induced by chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    França, Monique Sedlmaier; Usón, Pedro Luiz Serrano; Antunes, Yuri Philippe Pimentel Vieira; Prado, Bernard Lobato; Donnarumma, Carlos del Cistia; Mutão, Taciana Sousa; Rodrigues, Heloisa Veasey; del Giglio, Auro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To assess adherence of the prescribing physicians in a private cancer care center to the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline for antiemetic prophylaxis, in the first cycle of antineoplastic chemotherapy. Methods: A total of 139 chemotherapy regimens, of 105 patients, were evaluated retrospectively from 2011 to 2013. Results: We observed 78% of non-adherence to the guideline rate. The main disagreements with the directive were the prescription of higher doses of dexamethasone and excessive use of 5-HT3 antagonist for low risk emetogenic chemotherapy regimens. On univariate analysis, hematological malignancies (p=0.005), the use of two or more chemotherapy (p=0.05) and high emetogenic risk regimes (p=0.012) were factors statistically associated with greater adherence to guidelines. Treatment based on paclitaxel was the only significant risk factor for non-adherence (p=0.02). By multivariate analysis, the chemotherapy of high emetogenic risk most correlated with adherence to guideline (p=0.05). Conclusion: We concluded that the adherence to guidelines is greater if the chemotherapy regime has high emetogenic risk. Educational efforts should focus more intensely on the management of chemotherapy regimens with low and moderate emetogenic potential. Perhaps the development of a computer generated reminder may improve the adherence to guidelines. PMID:26154543

  15. Ginger (Zingiber officinale) reduces acute chemotherapy-induced nausea: A URCC CCOP study of 576 patients

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Julie L.; Heckler, Charles E.; Roscoe, Joseph A.; Dakhil, Shaker R.; Kirshner, Jeffrey; Flynn, Patrick J.; Hickok, Jane T.; Morrow, Gary R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Despite the widespread use of antiemetics, nausea continues to be reported by over 70% of patients receiving chemotherapy. Methods In this double blind, multicenter trial, we randomly assigned 744 cancer patients to four arms: 1) placebo, 2) 0.5g ginger, 3) 1.0g ginger, or 4) 1.5g ginger. Nausea occurrence and severity were assessed at a baseline cycle and the two following cycles during which patients were taking their assigned study medication. All patients received a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist antiemetic on Day 1 of all cycles. Patients took three capsules of ginger (250mg) or placebo twice daily for six days starting three days before the first day of chemotherapy. Patients reported the severity of nausea on a 7-point rating scale (“1” = “Not at all Nauseated” and “7” = “Extremely Nauseated”) for Days 1-4 of each cycle. The primary outcomes were to determine the dose and efficacy of ginger at reducing the severity of chemotherapy-induced nausea on Day 1 of chemotherapy. Results A total of 576 patients were included in final analysis (91% female, mean age = 53). Mixed model analyses demonstrated that all doses of ginger significantly reduced acute nausea severity compared to placebo on Day 1 of chemotherapy (p=0.003). The largest reduction in nausea intensity occurred with 0.5g and 1.0g of ginger (p=0.017 and p=0.036, respectively). Anticipatory nausea was a key factor in acute chemotherapy-induced nausea (p<0.0001). Conclusions Ginger supplementation at daily dose of 0.5g-1.0g significantly aids in reduction of the severity of acute chemotherapy-induced nausea in adult cancer patients. PMID:21818642

  16. The potential for Bayesian compressive sensing to significantly reduce electron dose in high-resolution STEM images.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Andrew; Yang, Hao; Carin, Lawrence; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D

    2014-02-01

    The use of high-resolution imaging methods in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is limited in many cases by the sensitivity of the sample to the beam and the onset of electron beam damage (for example, in the study of organic systems, in tomography and during in situ experiments). To demonstrate that alternative strategies for image acquisition can help alleviate this beam damage issue, here we apply compressive sensing via Bayesian dictionary learning to high-resolution STEM images. These computational algorithms have been applied to a set of images with a reduced number of sampled pixels in the image. For a reduction in the number of pixels down to 5% of the original image, the algorithms can recover the original image from the reduced data set. We show that this approach is valid for both atomic-resolution images and nanometer-resolution studies, such as those that might be used in tomography datasets, by applying the method to images of strontium titanate and zeolites. As STEM images are acquired pixel by pixel while the beam is scanned over the surface of the sample, these postacquisition manipulations of the images can, in principle, be directly implemented as a low-dose acquisition method with no change in the electron optics or the alignment of the microscope itself.

  17. Tackling pancreatic cancer with metronomic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Romiti, Adriana; Falcone, Rosa; Roberto, Michela; Marchetti, Paolo

    2017-05-28

    Pancreatic tumours, the majority of which arise from the exocrine pancreas, have recently shown an increasing incidence in western countries. Over the past few years more and more new selective molecules directed against specific cellular targets have become available for cancer therapy, leading to significant improvements. However, despite such advances in therapy, prognosis of pancreatic cancer remains disappointing. Metronomic chemotherapy (MCT), which consists in the administration of continuous, low-dose anticancer drugs, has demonstrated the ability to suppress tumour growth. Thus, it may provide an additional therapeutic opportunity for counteracting the progression of the tumour. Here we discuss evidence arising from preclinical and clinical studies regarding the use of MCT in pancreatic cancer. Good results have generally been achieved in preclinical studies, particularly when MCT was combined with standard dose chemotherapy or antinflammatory, antiangiogenic and immunostimolatory agents. The few available clinical experiences, which mainly refer to retrospective data, have reported good tolerability though mild activity of metronomic schedules. Further studies are therefore awaited to confirm both preclinical findings and the preliminary clinical data.

  18. Repeated dose (28-day) administration of silver nanoparticles of varied size and coating does not significantly alter the indigenous murine gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Wilding, Laura A; Bassis, Christine M; Walacavage, Kim; Hashway, Sara; Leroueil, Pascale R; Morishita, Masako; Maynard, Andrew D; Philbert, Martin A; Bergin, Ingrid L

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antimicrobials in a number of applications, including topical wound dressings and coatings for consumer products and biomedical devices. Ingestion is a relevant route of exposure for AgNPs, whether occurring unintentionally via Ag dissolution from consumer products, or intentionally from dietary supplements. AgNP have also been proposed as substitutes for antibiotics in animal feeds. While oral antibiotics are known to have significant effects on gut bacteria, the antimicrobial effects of ingested AgNPs on the indigenous microbiome or on gut pathogens are unknown. In addition, AgNP size and coating have been postulated as significantly influential towards their biochemical properties and the influence of these properties on antimicrobial efficacy is unknown. We evaluated murine gut microbial communities using culture-independent sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments following 28 days of repeated oral dosing of well-characterized AgNPs of two different sizes (20 and 110 nm) and coatings (PVP and Citrate). Irrespective of size or coating, oral administration of AgNPs at 10 mg/kg body weight/day did not alter the membership, structure or diversity of the murine gut microbiome. Thus, in contrast to effects of broad-spectrum antibiotics, repeat dosing of AgNP, at doses equivalent to 2000 times the oral reference dose and 100-400 times the effective in vitro anti-microbial concentration, does not affect the indigenous murine gut microbiome.

  19. Chemotherapy-induced neuropathy: A comprehensive survey.

    PubMed

    Miltenburg, N C; Boogerd, W

    2014-08-01

    Chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a potentially dose limiting side effect of commonly used chemotherapeutic agents like taxanes, vinca-alkaloids, platinum compounds, bortezomib and thalidomide. Supposed pathogenetic mechanisms of CIPN are axonopathy through dying back axon damage and neuronopathy in which the cell bodies of the dorsal root ganglia are involved. The exact pathophysiology however is not clear and different underlying mechanisms have been proposed for different classes of anti-cancer drugs. Sensory symptoms, like pain, numbness and tingling are most common, but motor weakness, autonomic dysfunction and even cranial nerve involvement may occur. CIPN can be painful and/or disabling, causing significant loss of functional abilities and decreasing quality of life. This can lead to dose reductions, discontinuation of treatment and may thus, ultimately, affect survival. Risk factors for CIPN include dose per cycle, cumulative dose, treatment schedule, duration of infusion, administration of other chemotherapeutics, comorbidity and pre-existing peripheral neuropathy. The exploration of polymorphisms in genes associated with incidence or severity of neuropathy might result in identifying individuals being at higher risk of neurotoxicity. An update on genes possibly associated with CIPN is given. CIPN may be reversible or be more or less permanent. Many preventive and treatment strategies have been explored, without significant efficacy up till now. In this review we describe the different drug-related characteristics of CIPN, pharmacogenomic studies, neurophysiological findings, treatment and outcome, and neuroprotective strategies.

  20. Prognostic significance of nestin expression in patients with resected non-small cell lung cancer treated with platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy; relationship between nestin expression and epithelial to mesenchymal transition related markers

    PubMed Central

    Ryuge, Shinichiro; Sato, Yuichi; Nagashio, Ryo; Hiyoshi, Yasuhiro; Katono, Ken; Igawa, Satoshi; Nakashima, Hiroyasu; Shiomi, Kazu; Ichinoe, Masaaki; Murakumo, Yoshiki; Saegusa, Makoto; Satoh, Yukitoshi; Masuda, Noriyuki

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Although adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy (AC) has been shown to improve survival of patients with completely resected stage II and stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), its effect is limited. Nestin is a class VI intermediate filament protein expressed in neural stem cells and several cancer cells including NSCLC. In the present study, we aimed to determine its prognostic significance concerning survival in NSCLC patients receiving AC. Methods Nestin expression in cancer cells was immunohistochemically studied in 90 patients with completely resected stage II and stage IIIA NSCLC treated with AC and its association with clinicopathologic parameters, including ABCG2, E-cadherin, and vimentin expression, was evaluated. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the effect of nestin expression on survival. Results Nestin expression was observed in 28 of the 90 (31.1%) NSCLCs. Clinicopathologically, nestin expression was associated with loss of E-cadherin expression (P = 0.006) and vimentin positive expression (P < 0.001). In survival analysis, nestin expression was significantly associated with a poorer prognosis (P = 0.028). Multivariable analysis confirmed that nestin expression is an independent prognostic indicator in NSCLC patients receiving AC (HR = 2.56; 95% CI, 1.23–5.30, P = 0.01). Conclusion The present study reveals that nestin expression is a prognostic indicator of a poorer survival probability in NSCLC patients receiving AC, although its prognostic significance still requires confirmation with larger patient populations. PMID:28358810

  1. Significance of including field non-uniformities such as the heel effect and beam scatter in the determination of the skin dose distribution during interventional fluoroscopic procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Vijay; Gill, Kamaljit; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2012-03-01

    The current version of the real-time skin-dose-tracking system (DTS) we have developed assumes the exposure is contained within the collimated beam and is uniform except for inverse-square variation. This study investigates the significance of factors that contribute to beam non-uniformity such as the heel effect and backscatter from the patient to areas of the skin inside and outside the collimated beam. Dose-calibrated Gafchromic film (XR-RV3, ISP) was placed in the beam in the plane of the patient table at a position 15 cm tube-side of isocenter on a Toshiba Infinix C-Arm system. Separate exposures were made with the film in contact with a block of 20-cm solid water providing backscatter and with the film suspended in air without backscatter, both with and without the table in the beam. The film was scanned to obtain dose profiles and comparison of the profiles for the various conditions allowed a determination of field non-uniformity and backscatter contribution. With the solid-water phantom and with the collimator opened completely for the 20-cm mode, the dose profile decreased by about 40% on the anode side of the field. Backscatter falloff at the beam edge was about 10% from the center and extra-beam backscatter decreased slowly with distance from the field, being about 3% of the beam maximum at 6 cm from the edge. Determination of the magnitude of these factors will allow them to be included in the skin-dose-distribution calculation and should provide a more accurate determination of peak-skin dose for the DTS.

  2. The effect of postoperative radiotherapy on the feasibility of optimal dose adjuvant CMF chemotheraphy in stage II breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkes, A.; Brufman, G.; Rizel, S.; Weshler, Z.; Biran, S.; Fuks, Z.

    1983-01-01

    The impact of a number of variables upon the effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy given to 87 patients with Stage II breast carcinoma was retrospectively analyzed. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil (CMF). Drugs were given in optimal doses (85% or more of the planned dose) to 17% of the patients; in intermediate doses (66 to 84% of the planned dose) to 50% of the patients; and in low doses (65% or less of the planned dose) to 33% of the patients. Myelosuppression was the main reason for giving intermediate or low doses. At a median follow-up of three years, 84% of all patients remain alive. Radiation therapy preceding chemotherapy was given to 70% of the patients, concomitant irradation and chemotherapy to 15%, and 13 patients (15%) received chemotheapy only. Of the 14 patients who received optimal doses of CMF, 12 (86%) also received radiation therapy. Disease-free survival at three years is similar for irradiated and nonirradiated patients, but the latter have a higher incidence of local recurrence (5% vs. 15%), although the difference is not statistically significant. Delay in the intiation of chemotherapy, mostly because of the administration of postoperative irradiation, adversely affected the probability and duration of disease-free survival, particulararly in premenopausal women in whom chemotherapy was started within more than 90 days of mastectomy. The administration of optimal doses of adjuvant chemotherapy should follow the primary treatment to the breast tumor as closely as possible. If radiation therapy is indicated as well, it should be delivered concomitantly with chemotherapy, given the feasibility of administering both modalities simultaneously, as demonstrated in this study.

  3. Clinicopathologic significance of tumor microenvironment CD11c, and FOXP3 expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients receiving rituximab, cyclophosphamide, anthracycline, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) combination chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seul; Kim, Dong Hyun; Oh, Sung Yong; Kim, So Yeon; Koh, Myeong Seok; Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Suee; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kwak, Jong-Young; Pak, Min Gyoung; Ju, Mi Ha; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Jeong, Jin Sook

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims CD11c is a dendritic cell marker in humans, which potentially induces a cytotoxic effect on lymphoma cells. Forkhead boxP3 (FOXP3) is a regulator of T lymphocyte in the microenvironment of the lymphoma. The principal objective of this study was to determine whether the tumors’ microenvironment expressions of CD11c and FOXP3 are predictive of clinical outcomes in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients receiving treatment with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, anthracycline, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) combination chemotherapy. Methods The study population consisted of 100 patients with DLBCL. The CD11c and FOXP3 expression in primary tumors’ microenvironment were evaluated using an immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results CD11c and FOXP3 expression positivity in microenvironment were 25% and 35%, respectively. Each one counted for 1 point. In CD11c and FOXP3 stain, positive was counted as 0 and negative was 1. The points were separated into low risk (0 to 1) and high risk (2) groups. Only the extranodal DLBCL patient group analysis conveyed significant differences of progression-free survival (p = 0.019) and overall survival (p = 0.039) between the two groups. Conclusions We can achieve possible clinical significance of lymphoma tumor microenvironments through CD11c and FOXP3 IHC stains in extranodal DLBCL patients receiving R-CHOP therapy. PMID:26968188

  4. Assessment of oral complications in children receiving chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    El-Housseiny, Azza A; Saleh, Susan M; El-Masry, Ashraf A; Allam, Amany A

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the early oral complications in pediatric patients receiving chemotherapy. An interview and oral examination was conducted on 150 pediatric cancer patients receiving standard dose chemotherapy. Results showed that oral pain and dry mouth were the most frequent patients' complaints. The prevalences of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis and oral infections were relatively high. The chemotherapeutic antimetabolites were the most frequently associated with oral complications than other types of chemotherapy. The present results indicate that the oral complications among patients receiving chemotherapy are common.

  5. Metronomic chemotherapy and immunotherapy in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Li; Chang, Ming-Cheng; Cheng, Wen-Fang

    2017-02-09

    Systemic chemotherapy given at maximum tolerated doses (MTD) has been the mainstay of cancer treatment for more than half a century. In some chemosensitive diseases such as hematologic malignancies and solid tumors, MTD has led to complete remission and even cure. The combination of maintenance therapy and standard MTD also can generate good disease control; however, resistance to chemotherapy and disease metastasis still remain major obstacles to successful cancer treatment in the majority of advanced tumors. Metronomic chemotherapy, defined as frequent administration of chemotherapeutic agents at a non-toxic dose without extended rest periods, was originally designed to overcome drug resistance by shifting the therapeutic target from tumor cells to tumor endothelial cells. Metronomic chemotherapy also exerts anti-tumor effects on the immune system (immunomodulation) and tumor cells. The goal of immunotherapy is to enhance host anti-tumor immunities. Adding immunomodulators such as metronomic chemotherapy to immunotherapy can improve the clinical outcomes in a synergistic manner. Here, we review the anti-tumor mechanisms of metronomic chemotherapy and the preliminary research addressing the combination of immunotherapy and metronomic chemotherapy for cancer treatment in animal models and in clinical setting.

  6. Managing thrombocytopenia associated with cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kuter, David J

    2015-04-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common problem in cancer patients. Aside from bleeding risk, thrombocytopenia limits chemotherapy dose and frequency. In evaluating thrombocytopenic cancer patients, it is important to assess for other causes of thrombocytopenia, including immune thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, infection, drug reaction, post-transfusion purpura, and thrombotic microangiopathy. The incidence of chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia varies greatly depending on the treatment used; the highest rates of this condition are associated with gemcitabine- and platinum-based regimens. Each chemotherapy agent differs in how it causes thrombocytopenia: alkylating agents affect stem cells, cyclophosphamide affects later megakaryocyte progenitors, bortezomib prevents platelet release from megakaryocytes, and some treatments promote platelet apoptosis. Thrombopoietin is the main regulator of platelet production. In numerous studies, recombinant thrombopoietin raised the platelet count nadir, reduced the need for platelet transfusions, reduced the duration of thrombocytopenia, and allowed maintenance of chemotherapy dose intensity. Two thrombopoietin receptor agonists now available, romiplostim and eltrombopag, are potent stimulators of platelet production. Although few studies have been completed to demonstrate their ability to treat chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia, these agents may be useful in treating this condition in some situations. Chemotherapy dose reduction and platelet transfusions remain the major treatments for affected patients.

  7. Significance of higher drug concentration in erythrocytes of mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum and treated orally with mefloquine at single doses.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi; Xue, Jian; Jiang, Bin; Zhang, Hao-Bing; Xiao, Shu-Hua

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study is to understand the pharmacokinetic feature of mefloquine measured by erythrocytes and plasma in Schistosoma japonicum (S. j.)-infected mice and non-infected mice after oral administration of the drug at single doses. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was used to measure the plasma and erythrocyte concentrations of mefloquine at varying intervals posttreatment. Our results demonstrated that in non-infected mice treated orally with mefloquine at an ineffective dose of 50 mg/kg or effective dose of 200 mg/kg for 2-72 h, the erythrocyte-to-plasma ratios of mefloquine were 5.8-11.2 or 2-14.2. On the other hand, in S. j.-infected mice treated with the same single doses of the drug, the erythrocyte and plasma drug concentration ratios were 3.1-4.6 or 2.9-8.5, manifesting that either in infected mice or in non-infected mice that received oral mefloquine resulted in higher concentration of mefloquine in erythrocytes than that in plasma. Unexpectedly, under oral administration of mefloquine at a higher single dose of 200 mg/kg, the pharmacokinetic parameter C max values for plasma from S. j.-infected and non-infected mice were 1.6 ± 0.3 and 2.0 ± 0.4 μg/mL, respectively, which were below the determined in vitro LC50 (50 % lethal concentration) value of 4.93 μg/mL. Therefore, the plasma concentration of mefloquine may display a little effect against schistosomes during the treatment. Although the values of T 1/2 and AUC0-∞ for erythrocytes were significantly longer and higher in infected mice than those of corresponding non-infect mice that received the same single mefloqine dose of 50 mg/kg, the C max value was only 2.6 ± 0.4 μg/mL lower than the determined in vitro LC50, which may explain why this low single dose is ineffective against schistosomes in vivo. After administration of higher mefloquine dose of 200 mg/kg, the C max value for erythrocytes in infected mice was 30 % (7.4 ± 0

  8. Prognostic Significance of Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Dose-Escalated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine: Analysis of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Dose Escalation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Schipper, Matthew; Zalupski, Mark M.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Abrams, Ross; Francis, Isaac R.; Khan, Gazala; Leslie, William; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Although established in the postresection setting, the prognostic value of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is less clear. We examined the prognostic utility of CA19-9 in patients with unresectable LAPC treated on a prospective trial of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients with unresectable LAPC were treated at the University of Michigan on a phase 1/2 trial of IMRT dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. CA19-9 was obtained at baseline and during routine follow-up. Cox models were used to assess the effect of baseline factors on freedom from local progression (FFLP), distant progression (FFDP), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Stepwise forward regression was used to build multivariate predictive models for each endpoint. Results: Thirty-eight patients were eligible for the present analysis. On univariate analysis, baseline CA19-9 and age predicted OS, CA19-9 at baseline and 3 months predicted PFS, gross tumor volume (GTV) and black race predicted FFLP, and CA19-9 at 3 months predicted FFDP. On stepwise multivariate regression modeling, baseline CA19-9, age, and female sex predicted OS; baseline CA19-9 and female sex predicted both PFS and FFDP; and GTV predicted FFLP. Patients with baseline CA19-9 ≤90 U/mL had improved OS (median 23.0 vs 11.1 months, HR 2.88, P<.01) and PFS (14.4 vs 7.0 months, HR 3.61, P=.001). CA19-9 progression over 90 U/mL was prognostic for both OS (HR 3.65, P=.001) and PFS (HR 3.04, P=.001), and it was a stronger predictor of death than either local progression (HR 1.46, P=.42) or distant progression (HR 3.31, P=.004). Conclusions: In patients with unresectable LAPC undergoing definitive chemoradiation therapy, baseline CA19-9 was independently prognostic even after established prognostic factors were controlled for, whereas CA19-9 progression

  9. Chemotherapy | Smokefree.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Chemotherapy works by killing cancer cells, but healthy cells get attacked too. Damage to healthy cells can cause uncomfortable side effects. Use this action deck to get information on common chemotherapy side effects and learn how to manage them.

  10. Chemotherapy for Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage Thyroid Cancer Treating Thyroid Cancer Chemotherapy for Thyroid Cancer Chemotherapy (chemo) uses anti-cancer drugs that are ... Thyroid Cancer, by Type and Stage More In Thyroid Cancer About Thyroid Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  11. Immunization of teenagers with a fifth dose of reduced DTaP-IPV induces high levels of pertussis antibodies with a significant increase in opsonophagocytic activity.

    PubMed

    Aase, Audun; Herstad, Tove Karin; Merino, Samuel; Bolstad, Merete; Sandbu, Synne; Bakke, Hilde; Aaberge, Ingeborg S

    2011-08-01

    Waning vaccine-induced immunity against Bordetella pertussis is observed among adolescents and adults. A high incidence of pertussis has been reported in this population, which serves as a reservoir for B. pertussis. A fifth dose of reduced antigen of diphtheria-tetanus-acellular-pertussis and inactivated polio vaccine was given as a booster dose to healthy teenagers. The antibody activity against B. pertussis antigens was measured prior to and 4 to 8 weeks after the booster by different assays: enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) of IgG and IgA against pertussis toxin (PT) and filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), IgG against pertactin (PRN), opsonophagocytic activity (OPA), and IgG binding to live B. pertussis. There was a significant increase in the IgG activity against PT, FHA, and PRN following the booster immunization (P < 0.001). The prebooster sera showed a geometric mean OPA titer of 65.1 and IgG binding to live bacteria at a geometric mean concentration of 164.9 arbitrary units (AU)/ml. Following the fifth dose, the OPA increased to a titer of 360.4, and the IgG concentration against live bacteria increased to 833.4 AU/ml (P < 0.001 for both). The correlation analyses between the different assays suggest that antibodies against FHA and PRN contribute the most to the OPA and IgG binding.

  12. Long-term results of dose-intensive chemotherapy with G-CSF support (TCC-NHL-91) for advanced intermediate-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: a review of 59 consecutive cases treated at a single institute.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Miyuki; Tsunoda, Saburo; Izumi, Tohru; Tanaka, Masaru; Katano, Susumu; Inoue, Koichi; Igarashi, Seiji; Hirabayashi, Kaoru; Furukawa, Yusuke; Ohmine, Ken; Sato, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Keiya; Kirito, Keita; Nagashima, Takahiro; Teramukai, Satoshi; Fukushima, Masanori; Kano, Yasuhiko

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the long-term outcome of very dose-intensive chemotherapy (TCC-NHL-91) for advanced intermediate-grade lymphoma, in which an eight-cycle regimen with 11 drugs was given with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support (total 18 weeks). Fifty-nine patients were treated during February 1, 1991 and March 31, 2001 (median age: 48 years). Forty-three patients (73%) were in a high-intermediate risk or high-risk group (HI/H) according to the age-adjusted International Prognostic Index (aa-IPI). Forty-six patients received 7 or 8 cycles of therapy. Ten of 15 patients over age 60 stopped before 7 cycles. Forty-three patients with an initial bulky mass or a residual mass received involved-field radiation. Overall, 56 patients (95%) achieved complete remission (CR). Grade 4 hematotoxicity was observed in all patients. With a median follow-up of 128 months, the 10-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 76% and 61%, respectively. Neither aa-IPI risk factors nor the index itself was associated with response, OS, or PFS. One patient died of sepsis during the therapy and one died of secondary leukemia. This retrospective study suggests that the TCC-NHL-91 regimen achieves high CR, OS, and PFS in patients with advanced intermediate-grade lymphoma up to 60 years old and may be a valuable asset in the management of this disease. Further evaluation and prospective studies of the TCC-NHL-91 are warranted.

  13. Dexamethasone, carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan (dexa-BEAM) followed by high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell rescue--a highly effective regimen for patients with refractory or relapsed indolent lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Josting, A; Reiser, M; Wickramanayake, P D; Rueffer, U; Draube, A; Söhngen, D; Tesch, H; Wolf, J; Diehl, V; Engert, A

    2000-03-01

    We performed a phase II study to determine the efficacy of maximal cytoreductive therapy with up to five cycles of Dexa-BEAM (dexamethasone, carmustine [BCNU], etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan) followed by high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for patients with advanced relapsed or refractory indolent lymphoma. Thirty-two patients with primary refractory or relapsed indolent lymphoma were treated with the Dexa-BEAM regimen. Thirteen patients had primary refractory disease, 4 patients partial remission, and 15 patients first or subsequent relapse. Patients achieving PR or CR received HDCT with ASCT. The conditioning regimen used was BEAM (carmustine [BCNU], etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan). Twenty-two patients responded to Dexa-BEAM resulting in a response rate of 78%. Maximum response was observed after 3.2 (range 2-5) courses. One patient with progressive disease died in septic shock during neutropenia. Nineteen patients with partial or complete remission after Dexa-BEAM received HDCT. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) were collected after two cycles of Dexa-BEAM. The median number of CD34+ HSC reinfused was 3.1 x 10(6)/kg (range 1.6-8.2 x 10(6)/kg). There was no transplantation-related death. All patients receiving HDCT achieved complete remission. Overall survival (OS) and freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) for all patients are estimated to be 68% and 65% at two years, respectively. With a mean follow-up of 20 months (range 8-42 months), 16/19 patients receiving HDCT are in continuous complete remission. The Dexa-BEAM regimen is effective in overcoming drug resistance in patients with indolent lymphoma who failed to respond to conventional treatment or who relapsed. The CR rate of 100% of those patients receiving HDCT and ASCT after maximal cytoreductive treatment with Dexa-BEAM suggests the use of HDCT at the time of maximal response.

  14. Low dose of the gamma acute radiation syndrome (1.5 Gy) does not significantly alter either cognitive behavior or dopaminergic and serotoninergic metabolism.

    PubMed

    Martin, C; Martin, S; Viret, R; Denis, J; Mirguet, F; Diserbo, M; Multon, E; Lamproglou, I

    2001-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the early-delayed effects of a low dose of the gamma acute radiation syndrome (1.5 Gy) on memory and on dopaminergic and serotoninergic metabolism in Swiss albino CD1 mice, of various ages (6, 10 and 20 weeks). At different times after irradiation (from 24 hr to three months), the mice were trained in a single-trial passive avoidance task and tested for retention either 24 hr or 5 days later. Their performance was compared to that of mice that were sham-irradiated. At the end of the behavioral test (days 3, 9, 30 and 93), the concentrations of dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5HT) and their metabolites were determined in hippocampus, anterior cortex and striatum of mice irradiated at the age of six weeks. No significant behavioral effect was observed whichever the age of the animals or the delay of observation. On the contrary at the moderate dose of 4.5 Gy we observed a significant memory deficit 9 days after the exposure. Considering the neurochemical study, in the striatum or in the frontal cortex, no significant modification was observed whichever the delay or the molecule. In the hippocampus slight modifications were noted: an increase (+144%, p = 0.002) in DA level on day 3 after exposure, and a decrease (-27%, p = 0.028) of 5HT level on day 30 post-irradiation. These modifications were only transient and not associated to modifications of the catabolites. This study demonstrates that total-body exposure to gamma radiation at low dose seems to induce only slight effects on the central nervous system.

  15. Statins dose-dependently exert a significant chemopreventive effect on colon cancer in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yi-Ping; Sung, Li-Chin; Kao, Pai-Feng; Lin, Chao-Feng; Wu, Alexander T.H.; Yuan, Kevin Sheng-Po; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the chemopreventive effect of statins on colon cancer in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and identified the statin exerting the strongest chemopreventive effect. Methods Using the National Health Insurance Research Database, we identified patients who received a COPD diagnosis in Taiwan between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2012, and included them in the study cohort. Each patient was followed to assess the colon cancer risk and protective factors. A propensity score was derived using a logistic regression model to estimate the effect of statins by accounting for covariates predicted during the intervention (statins). To examine the dose–response relationship, we categorized statin doses into four groups in each cohort [<28, 28–90, 91–365, and >365 cumulative defined daily dose]. Results Compared with the statin nonusers, the adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) for colon cancer decreased in the statin users (aHR = 0.52, 95% confidence interval = 0.44, 0.62). Hydrophilic statins exerted a stronger preventive effect against colon cancer. Regarding the statin type, lovastatin, pravastatin, and fluvastatin nonsignificantly reduced the colon cancer risk in the patients with COPD. Compared with the statin nonusers, the aHRs for colon cancer decreased in the individual statin users (rosuvastatin, simvastatin, and atorvastatin: aHRs = 0.28, 0.64, and 0.65, respectively). In the sensitivity analysis, statins dose-dependently reduced the colon cancer risk. Conclusions Statins dose-dependently exert significant chemopreventive effects on colon cancer in patients with COPD, with rosuvastatin exerting the largest chemopreventive effect. PMID:27542242

  16. An oral DNA vaccine against infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) encapsulated in alginate microspheres induces dose-dependent immune responses and significant protection in rainbow trout (Oncorrhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Natalia A; Alonso, Marta; Saint-Jean, Sylvia Rodríguez; Perez-Prieto, Sara I

    2015-08-01

    Administered by intramuscular injection, a DNA vaccine (pIRF1A-G) containing the promoter regions upstream of the rainbow trout interferon regulatory factor 1A gene (IRF1A) driven the expression of the infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) glycoprotein (G) elicited protective immune responses in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). However, less laborious and cost-effective routes of DNA vaccine delivery are required to vaccinate large numbers of susceptible farmed fish. In this study, the pIRF1A-G vaccine was encapsulated into alginate microspheres and orally administered to rainbow trout. At 1, 3, 5, and 7 d post-vaccination, IHNV G transcripts were detected by quantitative real-time PCR in gills, spleen, kidney and intestinal tissues of vaccinated fish. This result suggested that the encapsulation of pIRF1A-G in alginate microparticles protected the DNA vaccine from degradation in the fish stomach and ensured vaccine early delivery to the hindgut, vaccine passage through the intestinal mucosa and its distribution thought internal and external organs of vaccinated fish. We also observed that the oral route required approximately 20-fold more plasmid DNA than the injection route to induce the expression of significant levels of IHNV G transcripts in kidney and spleen of vaccinated fish. Despite this limitation, increased IFN-1, TLR-7 and IgM gene expression was detected by qRT-PCR in kidney of vaccinated fish when a 10 μg dose of the oral pIRF1A-G vaccine was administered. In contrast, significant Mx-1, Vig-1, Vig-2, TLR-3 and TLR-8 gene expression was only detected when higher doses of pIRF1A-G (50 and 100 μg) were orally administered. The pIRF1A-G vaccine also induced the expression of several markers of the adaptive immune response (CD4, CD8, IgM and IgT) in kidney and spleen of immunized fish in a dose-dependent manner. When vaccinated fish were challenged by immersion with live IHNV, evidence of a dose-response effect of the oral vaccine could also

  17. [Chemotherapy-induced alopecia].

    PubMed

    Spaëth, Dominique; Rosso, Nathalie; Clivot, Laetitia

    2006-11-30

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is frequent with most chemotherapy regimens; mechanisms, evolution and small prevention tools are described. Scalp cooling (helmets or continuous cooling systems) can avoid or diminish hair loss in selected chemotherapy regimens but tolerance can be fair and long harmlessness needs to be confirmed by prospective studies. Drug prevention is only in the first steps of research.

  18. [Construction of optimal combined chemotherapy of anti-tumor drugs based on chronotherapy].

    PubMed

    To, Hideto

    2006-06-01

    Metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is almost always incurable, and the median survival is of the order on 18-24 months. Combination therapy with adriamycin (ADR) and docetaxel (DOC) is more effective against MBC than the previous therapy due to differences between their mechanisms. However, the combination of ADR and DOC induces severe adverse effects, limiting its clinical use in many patients with MBC. The biologic functions of most living organisms are organized along an approximate 24 h time cycle or circadian rhythm. Chronotherapy is defined as the administration of medications using biological rhythms to optimize the therapeutic outcomes and/or control adverse effects. To decrease adverse effects, many antitumor drugs have been particularly studied in humans and animals. The toxicities of ADR and DOC have also been found to depend on dosing-time in animals and humans. This study was to establish the most suitable dosing schedule to relieve severe adverse effects and improve antitumor effects by considering a chronopharmacological approach, dosing-interval and dosing-sequence to the combination chemotherapy of ADR and DOC in mice. In the results, we demonstrate that the dosing schedule based on dosing-sequence, dosing-interval and dosing-time not only significantly reduced leukopenia and toxic death but also significantly increased the inhibition rate of tumor growth compared with the dosing schedule without an interval between each injection, commonly used in clinical practice. These findings suggest that the therapeutic index of combined chemotherapy can be improved by choosing an optimal dosing-schedule (dosing-interval, dosing-sequence and dosing-time).

  19. Protected Graft Copolymer Excipient Leads to a Higher Acute Maximum Tolerated Dose and Extends Residence Time of Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Significantly Better than Sterically Stabilized Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Reichstetter, Sandra; Castillo, Gerardo M.; Rubinstein, Israel; Nishimoto-Ashfield, Akiko; Lai, ManShun; Jones, Cynthia C.; Banjeree, Aryamitra; Lyubimov, Alex; Bloedow, Duane C.; Bogdanov, Alexei; Bolotin, Elijah M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine and compare pharmacokinetics and toxicity of two nanoformulations of Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP). Methods VIP was formulated using a micellar (Sterically Stabilized Micelles, SSM) and a polymer-based (Protected Graft Copolymer, PGC) nanocarrier at various loading percentages. VIP binding to the nanocarriers, pharmacokinetics, blood pressure, blood chemistry, and acute maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of the formulations after injection into BALB/c mice were determined. Results Both formulations significantly extend in vivo residence time compared to unformulated VIP. Formulation toxicity is dependent on loading percentage, showing major differences between the two carrier types. Both formulations increase in vivo potency of unformulated VIP and show acute MTDs at least 140 times lower than unformulated VIP, but still at least 100 times higher than the anticipated highest human dose, 1–5 μg/kg. These nanocarriers prevented a significant drop in arterial blood pressure compared to unformulated VIP. Conclusions While both carriers enhance in vivo residence time compared to unformulated VIP and reduce the drop in blood pressure immediately after injection, PGC is the excipient of choice to extend residence time and improve the safety of potent therapeutic peptides such as VIP. PMID:23224976

  20. Administration of chemotherapy in patients on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Kuo, James C; Craft, Paul S

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of patients on dialysis has increased and these patients present a challenge for chemotherapy administration when diagnosed with cancer. A consensus on the dosage and timing of different chemotherapeutic agents in relation to dialysis has not been established. We describe the pattern of care and treatment outcome for cancer patients on dialysis in our institution. The dataset from the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry of patients on dialysis who had a diagnosis of cancer was obtained and matched to the pharmacy records in our institution to identify patients who had received chemotherapy while on dialysis. Relevant clinical information including details of the dialysis regimen, chemotherapy administration and adverse events was extracted for analysis. Between July 1999 and July 2014, 21 patients on dialysis were included for analysis. Five (23.8%) received chemotherapy, most of which was administered before dialysis sessions. As a result of adverse events, one patient discontinued treatment; two other patients required dose reduction or treatment delay. Chemotherapy administration was feasible in cancer patients on dialysis, but chemotherapy usage was low. Better understanding of the altered pharmacokinetics in patients on dialysis may improve chemotherapy access and practice.

  1. Efficacy of Ginger in Control of Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Doxorubicin-Based Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Mansour; Porouhan, Pezhman; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Omidvari, Shapour; Mosalaei, Ahmad; Ahmadloo, Niloofar; Nasrollahi, Hamid; Hamedi, Seyed Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are among the most serious side effects of chemotherapy, in some cases leading to treatment interruption or chemotherapy dose reduction. Ginger has long been known as an antiemetic drug, used for conditions such as motion sickness, nausea-vomiting in pregnancy, and post-operation side effects. One hundred and fifty female patients with breast cancer entered this prospective study and were randomized to receive ginger (500 mg ginger powder, twice a day for 3 days) or placebo. One hundred and nineteen patients completed the study: 57 of them received ginger and 62 received ginger for the frst 3 chemotherapy cycles. Mean age in all patients was 48.6 (25-79) years. After 1st chemotherapy, mean nausea in the ginger and control arms were 1.36 (±1.31) and 1.46 (±1.28) with no statistically significant difference. After the 2nd chemotherapy session, nausea score was slightly more in the ginger group (1.36 versus 1.32). After 3rd chemotherapy, mean nausea severity in control group was less than ginger group [1.37 (±1.14), versus 1.42 (±1.30)]. Considering all patients, nausea was slightly more severe in ginger arm. In ginger arm mean nausea score was 1.42 (±0.96) and in control arm it was 1.40 (±0.92). Mean vomiting scores after chemotherapy in ginger arm were 0.719 (±1.03), 0.68 (±1.00) and 0.77 (±1.18). In control arm, mean vomiting was 0.983 (±1.23), 1.03 (±1.22) and 1.15 (±1.27). In all sessions, ginger decreased vomiting severity from 1.4 (±1.04) to 0.71 (±0.86). None of the differences were significant. In those patients who received the AC regimen, vomiting was less severe (0.64±0.87) compared to those who received placebo (1.13±1.12), which was statistically significant (p-value <0.05). Further and larger studies are needed to draw conclusions.

  2. Tuberculosis chemotherapy: current drug delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    du Toit, Lisa Claire; Pillay, Viness; Danckwerts, Michael Paul

    2006-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading killer of young adults worldwide and the global scourge of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis is reaching epidemic proportions. It is endemic in most developing countries and resurgent in developed and developing countries with high rates of human immunodeficiency virus infection. This article reviews the current situation in terms of drug delivery approaches for tuberculosis chemotherapy. A number of novel implant-, microparticulate-, and various other carrier-based drug delivery systems incorporating the principal anti-tuberculosis agents have been fabricated that either target the site of tuberculosis infection or reduce the dosing frequency with the aim of improving patient outcomes. These developments in drug delivery represent attractive options with significant merit, however, there is a requisite to manufacture an oral system, which directly addresses issues of unacceptable rifampicin bioavailability in fixed-dose combinations. This is fostered by the need to deliver medications to patients more efficiently and with fewer side effects, especially in developing countries. The fabrication of a polymeric once-daily oral multiparticulate fixed-dose combination of the principal anti-tuberculosis drugs, which attains segregated delivery of rifampicin and isoniazid for improved rifampicin bioavailability, could be a step in the right direction in addressing issues of treatment failure due to patient non-compliance. PMID:16984627

  3. Pegfilgrastim use during chemotherapy: current and future applications.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Todd; Densmore, John J

    2004-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression is the most common dose-limiting side effect of cancer chemotherapy. Neutropenia is a serious risk with chemotherapy, associated with infectious complications, use of intravenous antibiotics, hospitalization, and even death. The occurrence of febrile neutropenia can lead to dose reductions and delay in subsequent cycles of chemotherapy that may have a detrimental affect on overall survival and disease-free survival. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) can reduce the duration of severe neutropenia, the incidence of febrile neutropenia, and allow planned dosing and timing of chemotherapy. Filgrastim is a G-CSF that has demonstrated benefit for the treatment and prophylaxis of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (CIN), but its short half-life requires repeated daily subcutaneous injection. Pegfilgrastim is a recombinant G-CSF created by attaching a polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecule to the filgrastim protein. Once-per-cycle dosing of pegfilgrastim has been evaluated in clinical trials using myelosuppressive chemotherapy in breast cancer, Hodgkin's lymphoma, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Trials have demonstrated that pegfilgrastim is comparable in safety and efficacy to filgrastim for decreasing the duration of severe neutropenia after chemotherapy in patients with nonmyeloid malignancy. This review will summarize recent clinical trial results and novel uses of pegfilgrastim.

  4. Olanzapine for the Prevention of Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Navari, Rudolph M.; Qin, Rui; Ruddy, Kathryn J.; Liu, Heshan; Powell, Steven F.; Bajaj, Madhuri; Dietrich, Leah; Biggs, David; Lafky, Jacqueline M.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We examined the efficacy of olanzapine for the prevention of nausea and vomiting in patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy. METHODS In a randomized, double-blind, phase 3 trial, we compared olanzapine with placebo, in combination with dexamethasone, aprepitant or fosaprepitant, and a 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3–receptor antagonist, in patients with no previous chemotherapy who were receiving cisplatin (≥70 mg per square meter of body-surface area) or cyclophosphamide–doxorubicin. The doses of the three concomitant drugs administered before and after chemotherapy were similar in the two groups. The two groups received either 10 mg of olanzapine orally or matching placebo daily on days 1 through 4. Nausea prevention was the primary end point; a complete response (no emesis and no use of rescue medication) was a secondary end point. RESULTS In the analysis, we included 380 patients who could be evaluated (192 assigned to olanzapine, and 188 to placebo). The proportion of patients with no chemotherapy-induced nausea was significantly greater with olanzapine than with placebo in the first 24 hours after chemotherapy (74% vs. 45%, P = 0.002), the period from 25 to 120 hours after chemotherapy (42% vs. 25%, P = 0.002), and the overall 120-hour period (37% vs. 22%, P = 0.002). The complete-response rate was also significantly increased with olanzapine during the three periods: 86% versus 65% (P<0.001), 67% versus 52% (P = 0.007), and 64% versus 41% (P<0.001), respectively. Although there were no grade 5 toxic effects, some patients receiving olanzapine had increased sedation (severe in 5%) on day 2. CONCLUSIONS Olanzapine, as compared with placebo, significantly improved nausea prevention, as well as the complete-response rate, among previously untreated patients who were receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy. (Funded by the National Cancer Institute; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02116530.) PMID:27410922

  5. Pros and cons of intraperitoneal chemotherapy in the treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zeimet, Alain G; Reimer, Daniel; Radl, Alice C; Reinthaller, Alexander; Schauer, Christian; Petru, Edgar; Concin, Nicole; Braun, Stephan; Marth, Christian

    2009-07-01

    Development of the pros and cons of intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy in the treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer based on the most prominent data published on the evolution of IP chemotherapy and on experience with this therapeutic strategy in clinical routine. The literature published on IP chemotherapy in ovarian cancer between 1970 and 2008 was identified systematically by computer-based searches in MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library. Furthermore, a preliminary analysis of data recorded during an observational nationwide multicenter study of the Austrian AGO on IP-IV chemotherapy using the GOG-172 treatment regimen was performed. The literature review unequivocally revealed a significantly greater toxicity for IP than for intravenous (IV) cisplatin-based chemotherapy. However, according to a Cochrane meta-analysis, IP-IV administration of chemotherapy is associated with a 21.6% decrease in the risk for death. In agreement with earlier reports, the most frequently mentioned side-effects in the Austria-wide observational study were long-lasting neurotoxicity, abdominal pain, fatigue, gastrointestinal and metabolic toxicities, and catheter-related complications. Most of these toxicities were identified as mirroring the toxicity profile of high-dose IV cisplatin (>or=100 mg/m(2)). In some patients, the classic IP-IV regimen with cisplatin/paclitaxel was changed to an alternative schedule comprising carboplatin AUC 5 (d1) and weekly paclitaxel 60 mg/m(2) (d1, 8, 15) completely administered via the IP route. This treatment was better tolerated and quality of life was significantly less compromised. However, neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were the limiting side-effects of this IP regimen. In cases where optimal cytoreduction with residual disease chemotherapy should be given serious consideration, even at the expense of significantly increased, but manageable toxicity.

  6. Why chemotherapy can fail?

    PubMed

    Król, M; Pawłowski, K M; Majchrzak, K; Szyszko, K; Motyl, T

    2010-01-01

    There are many reasons that lead to failure of cancer chemotherapy. Cancer has the ability to become resistant to many different types of drugs. Increased efflux of drug, enhanced repair/increased tolerance to DNA damage, high antiapoptotic potential, decreased permeability and enzymatic deactivation allow cancer cell survive the chemotherapy. Treatment can lead to the death of most tumor cells (drug-sensitive), but some of them (drug-resistant) survive and grow again. These tumor cells may arise from stem cells. There are many studies describing human experiments with multidrug resistance, especially in breast cancer. Unfortunately, studies of canine or feline ABC super family members are not as extensive as in human or mice and they are limited to several papers describing PGP in mammary cancer, cutaneous mast cell tumors and lymphoma. Multidrug resistance is one of the most significant problems in oncology today. The involvement of many different, not fully recognized, mechanisms in multidrug resistance of cancer cells makes the development of effective methods of therapy very difficult. Understanding the mechanisms of drug resistance in cancer cells may improve the results of treatment. This review article provides a synopsis of all aspects that refer to cancer cell resistance to antitumor drugs.

  7. Protection against chemotherapy-induced alopecia: targeting ATP-binding cassette transporters in the hair follicle?

    PubMed

    Haslam, Iain S; Pitre, Aaron; Schuetz, John D; Paus, Ralf

    2013-11-01

    Currently, efficacious treatments for chemotherapy-induced alopecia (hair loss) are lacking, and incidences of permanent hair loss following high-dose chemotherapy are on the increase. In this article, we describe mechanisms by which the pharmacological defense status of the hair follicle might be enhanced, thereby reducing the accumulation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and preventing or reducing hair loss and damage. We believe this could be achieved via the selective increase in ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expression within the hair follicle epithelium, following application of topical agonists for regulatory nuclear receptors. Clinical application would require the development of hair follicle-targeted formulations, potentially utilizing nanoparticle technology. This novel approach has the potential to yield entirely new therapeutic options for the treatment and management of chemotherapy-induced alopecia, providing significant psychological and physical benefit to cancer patients.

  8. Schedule-Dependent Antiangiogenic and Cytotoxic Effects of Chemotherapy on Vascular Endothelial and Retinoblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Ursula; Mena, Hebe A.; Negrotto, Soledad; Arana, Eloisa; Pascual-Pasto, Guillem; Laurent, Viviana; Suñol, Mariona; Chantada, Guillermo L.; Carcaboso, Angel M.; Schaiquevich, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment of retinoblastoma involves using the maximum dose of chemotherapy that induces tumor control and is tolerated by patients. The impact of dose and schedule on the cytotoxicity of chemotherapy has not been studied. Our aim was to gain insight into the cytotoxic and antiangiogenic effect of the treatment scheme of chemotherapy used in retinoblastoma by means of different in vitro models and to evaluate potential effects on multi-drug resistance proteins. Two commercial and two patient-derived retinoblastoma cell types and two human vascular endothelial cell types were exposed to increasing concentrations of melphalan or topotecan in a conventional (single exposure) or metronomic (7-day continuous exposure) treatment scheme. The concentration of chemotherapy causing a 50% decrease in cell proliferation (IC50) was determined by MTT and induction of apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry. Expression of ABCB1, ABCG2 and ABCC1 after conventional or metronomic treatments was assessed by RT-qPCR. We also evaluated the in vivo response to conventional (0.6 mg/kg once a week for 2 weeks) and metronomic (5 days a week for 2 weeks) topotecan in a retinoblastoma xenograft model. Melphalan and topotecan were cytotoxic to both retinoblastoma and endothelial cells after conventional and metronomic treatments. A significant decrease in the IC50 (median, 13-fold; range: 3–23) was observed following metronomic chemotherapy treatment in retinoblastoma and endothelial cell types compared to conventional treatment (p<0.05). Metronomic topotecan or melphalan significantly inhibited in vitro tube formation in HUVEC and EPC compared to vehicle-treated cells (p<0.05). Both treatment schemes induced apoptosis and/or necrosis in all cell models. No significant difference was observed in the expression of ABCB1, ABCC1 or ABCG2 when comparing cells treated with melphalan or topotecan between treatment schedules at the IC50 or with control cells (p>0.05). In mice, continuous

  9. Chemotherapy for intraperitoneal use: a review of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy and early post-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    McPartland, Sarah; Detelich, Danielle; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal spread of tumors is a major problem in cancer management. Patients develop a marked deterioration in quality of life and shortened survival. This is in part due to bowel obstructions, marked ascites, and overall increase debilitation. Standard medical management has shown to be inadequate for the treatment of these problems. Surgery can palliate symptoms, however, it is unable to be complete at the microscopic level by a significant spillage of tumor cells throughout the abdomen. Chemotherapy can have some improvement in symptoms however it is short lived due to poor penetration into the peritoneal cavity. The role of intraperitoneal chemotherapy is to maximize tumor penetration and optimize cell death while minimizing systemic toxicity. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) and early post-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC) are two treatment methods that serve this role and have been shown to improve survival. This review will discuss different chemotherapies used for both of these treatment options. PMID:26941983

  10. Anatomy-Based Inverse Planning Simulated Annealing Optimization in High-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy: Significant Dosimetric Advantage Over Other Optimization Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jacob, Dayee Raben, Adam; Sarkar, Abhirup; Grimm, Jimm; Simpson, Larry

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: To perform an independent validation of an anatomy-based inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) algorithm in obtaining superior target coverage and reducing the dose to the organs at risk. Method and Materials: In a recent prostate high-dose-rate brachytherapy protocol study by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (0321), our institution treated 20 patients between June 1, 2005 and November 30, 2006. These patients had received a high-dose-rate boost dose of 19 Gy to the prostate, in addition to an external beam radiotherapy dose of 45 Gy with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Three-dimensional dosimetry was obtained for the following optimization schemes in the Plato Brachytherapy Planning System, version 14.3.2, using the same dose constraints for all the patients treated during this period: anatomy-based IPSA optimization, geometric optimization, and dose point optimization. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the planning target volume and organs at risk for each optimization method, from which the volume receiving at least 75% of the dose (V{sub 75%}) for the rectum and bladder, volume receiving at least 125% of the dose (V{sub 125%}) for the urethra, and total volume receiving the reference dose (V{sub 100%}) and volume receiving 150% of the dose (V{sub 150%}) for the planning target volume were determined. The dose homogeneity index and conformal index for the planning target volume for each optimization technique were compared. Results: Despite suboptimal needle position in some implants, the IPSA algorithm was able to comply with the tight Radiation Therapy Oncology Group dose constraints for 90% of the patients in this study. In contrast, the compliance was only 30% for dose point optimization and only 5% for geometric optimization. Conclusions: Anatomy-based IPSA optimization proved to be the superior technique and also the fastest for reducing the dose to the organs at risk without compromising the target coverage.

  11. Sarcopenia and chemotherapy-mediated toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Maria Cecília Monteiro Dela; Laviano, Alessandro; Pimentel, Gustavo Duarte

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This narrative review focuses on the role of sarcopenia and chemotherapy-induced toxicity in cancer patients. Consistent evidence shows that sarcopenia in cancer patients leads to decreased overall survival by influencing treatment discontinuation and dose reduction. Therefore, sarcopenia should be considered a robust prognostic factor of negative outcome as well as a determinant of increased healthcare costs. PMID:28076611

  12. In vivo neuroimaging and behavioral correlates in a rat model of chemotherapy-induced cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Barry, Robert L; Byun, Nellie E; Tantawy, M Noor; Mackey, Chase A; Wilson, George H; Stark, Adam J; Flom, Michael P; Gee, Laura C; Quarles, C Chad

    2017-01-20

    Adjuvant chemotherapy has been used for decades to treat cancer, and it is well known that disruptions in cognitive function and memory are common chemotherapeutic adverse effects. However, studies using neuropsychological metrics have also reported group differences in cognitive function and memory before or without chemotherapy, suggesting that complex factors obscure the true etiology of chemotherapy-induced cognitive dysfunction (CICD) in humans. Therefore, to better understand possible mechanisms of CICD, we explored the effects of CICD in rats through cognition testing using novel object recognition (NOR) and contextual fear conditioning (CFC), and through metabolic neuroimaging via [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Cancer-naïve, female Sprague-Dawley rats were administered either saline (1 mL/kg) or doxorubicin (DOX) (1 mg/kg in a volume of 1 mL/kg) weekly for five weeks (total dose = 5 mg/kg), and underwent cognition testing and PET imaging immediately following the treatment regime and 30 days post treatment. We did not observe significant differences with CFC testing post-treatment for either group. However, the chemotherapy group exhibited significantly decreased performance in the NOR test and decreased (18)F-FDG uptake only in the prefrontal cortex 30 days post-treatment. These results suggest that long-term impairment within the prefrontal cortex is a plausible mechanism of CICD in this study, suggesting DOX-induced toxicity in the prefrontal cortex at the dose used.

  13. Novel High-Throughput Drug Screening Platform for Chemotherapy-Induced Axonal Neuropathy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is the most common dose-limiting neurotoxicity...10 Introduction: Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is the most...and workloss burden of patients with chemotherapy-associated peripheral neuropathy in breast, ovarian, head and neck, and nonsmall cell lung cancer

  14. Outcomes for newly diagnosed patients with acute myeloid leukemia dosed on actual or adjusted body weight

    PubMed Central

    Bivona, Cory; Rockey, Michelle; Henry, Dave; Grauer, Dennis; Abhyankar, Sunil; Aljitawi, Omar; Ganguly, Siddhartha; McGuirk, Joseph; Singh, Anurag; Lin, Tara L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Data from solid tumor malignancies suggest that actual body weight (ABW) dosing improves overall outcomes. There is the potential to compromise efficacy when chemotherapy dosages are reduced, but the impact of dose adjustment on clinical response and toxicity in hematologic malignancies is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of utilizing a percent of ABW for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) induction chemotherapy dosing. Methods This retrospective, single-center study included 146 patients who received 7 + 3 induction (cytarabine and anthracycline) for treatment of AML. Study design evaluated the relationship between percentage of ABW dosing and complete response (CR) rates in patients newly diagnosed with AML. Results Percentage of ABW dosing did not influence CR rates in patients undergoing induction chemotherapy for AML (p = 0.83); nor did it influence rate of death at 30 days or relapse at 6 months (p = 0.94). When comparing patients dosed at 90–100 % of ABW compared to <90 % ABW, CR rates were not significantly different in patients classified as poor risk (p = 0.907). All favorable risk category patients obtained CR. Conclusions Preemptive dose reductions for obesity did not influence CR rates for patients with AML undergoing induction chemotherapy and did not influence the composite endpoint of death at 30 days or disease relapse at 6 months. PMID:26231954

  15. An Undesired Effect of Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Sumit; Bhardwaj, Arun; Singh, Seema; Srivastava, Sanjeev K.; McClellan, Steven; Nirodi, Chaitanya S.; Piazza, Gary A.; Grizzle, William E.; Owen, Laurie B.; Singh, Ajay P.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have shown that CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling plays an important role in gemcitabine resistance of pancreatic cancer (PC) cells. Here, we explored the effect of gemcitabine on this resistance mechanism. Our data demonstrate that gemcitabine induces CXCR4 expression in two PC cell lines (MiaPaCa and Colo357) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Gemcitabine-induced CXCR4 expression is dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation because it is abrogated by pretreatment of PC cells with the free radical scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine. CXCR4 up-regulation by gemcitabine correlates with time-dependent accumulation of NF-κB and HIF-1α in the nucleus. Enhanced binding of NF-κB and HIF-1α to the CXCR4 promoter is observed in gemcitabine-treated PC cells, whereas their silencing by RNA interference causes suppression of gemcitabine-induced CXCR4 expression. ROS induction upon gemcitabine treatment precedes the nuclear accumulation of NF-κB and HIF-1α, and suppression of ROS diminishes these effects. The effect of ROS on NF-κB and HIF-1α is mediated through activation of ERK1/2 and Akt, and their pharmacological inhibition also suppresses gemcitabine-induced CXCR4 up-regulation. Interestingly, our data demonstrate that nuclear accumulation of NF-κB results from phosphorylation-induced degradation of IκBα, whereas HIF-1α up-regulation is NF-κB-dependent. Lastly, our data demonstrate that gemcitabine-treated PC cells are more motile and exhibit significantly greater invasiveness against a CXCL12 gradient. Together, these findings reinforce the role of CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling in gemcitabine resistance and point toward an unintended and undesired effect of chemotherapy. PMID:23740244

  16. Chemotherapy Studies on Schistosomiasis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Schistosoma mansoni, *Chemotherapy, *Prophylaxis, Preventive medicine, Mice, Drugs, Brazil , Laboratory tests, Snails, Cercariae, Tropical medicine, Selection, Parasitology, Schistosomiasis, Chemotherapeutic agents, Medical research

  17. The role of induction chemotherapy before radiation therapy in non-operative management of stage III NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Green, M R

    1994-11-01

    Radiation therapy alone has been 'standard' management of patients with Stage III non-small cell lung cancer for several decades. Palliative benefits are routinely achieved but significant survival benefits have not been documented. Patterns of failure in Stage III patients emphasize the need to pursue better treatment for both local macroscopic disease and distant micrometastatic sites. Improved control in both areas will be necessary to meaningfully enhance outcome for the universe of Stage III NSCLC patients. Several randomized trials show a significant survival benefit when cisplatin-containing induction chemotherapy is administered prior to locoregional treatment. In the favorable subset of Stage III patients selected for study by CALGB, the surviving fraction at 2-5 years post-therapy was > or = 2-fold larger in the chemoradiation group than in the cohort treated with radiation alone. The French trial documented a significant decrease in distant metastases rate among the chemotherapy treated patients. In all the trials where patterns of failure are discussed, local disease persistence is the overwhelming rule. Future trials must evaluate improved induction chemotherapy approaches. Stage III patients are an ethical population in which to test induction therapy with new drug combinations randomized against already 'active' regimens for comparative efficacy. End points would be initial response rates, patterns of failure, and overall survival. The feasibility of high-dose chemotherapy regimens with growth factor and hematopoietic support followed by aggressive radiation must be tested. If feasible, trials randomizing high dose versus conventional dose induction programs within the context of sequential multimodality therapy should follow. Intensified radiation approaches such as hyperfractionation or CHART should be paired with active concurrent chemotherapy following induction chemotherapy alone. Pursuit of these approaches over the next several years will

  18. Treatment of chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

    PubMed

    Yeager, Caroline E; Olsen, Elise A

    2011-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia has been well documented as a cause of distress to patients undergoing cancer treatment. Despite the importance of hair loss to patients, however, patients often receive little more counseling than the advice to purchase a wig or other head covering for the duration of their treatment. Research into non-camouflage (wigs, turbans, and head scarves) treatment methods has been complicated both by a lack of a standardized methodology for evaluating hair loss and hair regrowth and by a lack of human trials. Nevertheless, scalp cooling as a method of preventing hair loss during chemotherapy and 2% topical minoxidil as a therapy for accelerating regrowth after chemotherapy are both effective non-camouflage options for treatment. Other proposed treatments for prevention of hair loss during chemotherapy have demonstrated promise in early trials, but these findings will need validation from rigorous further studies. The increasing number of reports of permanent alopecia not just with pre-bone marrow transplant, high-dose busulfan, and cyclophosphamide regimens but also with standard breast cancer chemotherapy regimens illustrates the importance of further research into treatment methods for chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

  19. Inhaled chemotherapy in lung cancer: future concept of nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Chatzaki, Ekaterini; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Domvri, Kalliopi; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Goldberg, Eugene P; Karamanos, Nikos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Regional chemotherapy was first used for lung cancer 30 years ago. Since then, new methods of drug delivery and pharmaceuticals have been investigated in vitro, and in animals and humans. An extensive review of drug delivery systems, pharmaceuticals, patient monitoring, methods of enhancing inhaled drug deposition, safety and efficacy, and also additional applications of inhaled chemotherapy and its advantages and disadvantages are presented. Regional chemotherapy to the lung parenchyma for lung cancer is feasible and efficient. Safety depends on the chemotherapy agent delivered to the lungs and is dose-dependent and time-dependent. Further evaluation is needed to provide data regarding early lung cancer stages, and whether regional chemotherapy can be used as neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatment. Finally, inhaled chemotherapy could one day be administered at home with fewer systemic adverse effects. PMID:22619512

  20. Inhaled chemotherapy in lung cancer: future concept of nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Chatzaki, Ekaterini; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Domvri, Kalliopi; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Goldberg, Eugene P; Karamanos, Nikos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Regional chemotherapy was first used for lung cancer 30 years ago. Since then, new methods of drug delivery and pharmaceuticals have been investigated in vitro, and in animals and humans. An extensive review of drug delivery systems, pharmaceuticals, patient monitoring, methods of enhancing inhaled drug deposition, safety and efficacy, and also additional applications of inhaled chemotherapy and its advantages and disadvantages are presented. Regional chemotherapy to the lung parenchyma for lung cancer is feasible and efficient. Safety depends on the chemotherapy agent delivered to the lungs and is dose-dependent and time-dependent. Further evaluation is needed to provide data regarding early lung cancer stages, and whether regional chemotherapy can be used as neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatment. Finally, inhaled chemotherapy could one day be administered at home with fewer systemic adverse effects.

  1. Clinical significance of the changes of platelet counts and serum thrombopoietin levels in chronic hepatitis C patients treated with different doses of consensus interferon.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chen Wei; Hwang, Shinn Jang; Lu, Rei Hwa; Lai, Chiung Ru; Luo, Jiing Chyuan; Wang, Yuan Jen; Chang, Full Young; Lee, Shou Dong

    2002-11-01

    Thrombocytopenia is commonly seen in patients with cirrhosis. Both splenomegaly and inadequate thrombopoietin (TPO) production by the cirrhotic liver are responsible for thrombocytopenia. In addition, thrombocytopenia is frequently observed in chronic hepatitis patients who received interferon therapy, and may even lead to the discontinuation of treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical significance of the changes of platelet counts and serum TPO levels in chronic hepatitis C patients treated with different doses of consensus interferon (CIFN). Data from 75 chronic hepatitis C patients who received subcutaneous injection of either CIFN 9 (25 patients) or 3 &mgr;g (26 patients) or placebo (24 patients), three times a week for 24 weeks, were analyzed from a randomized controlled study. All patients received a 24-week observation period after the end of the treatment. The results showed a significantly higher degree of decrease in platelet counts and elevated serum TPO in patients receiving CIFN 9 or 3 &mgr;g as compared with placebo at week 12 and week 24 of treatment, respectively. These changes were more obvious in patients receiving CIFN 9 &mgr;g than in patients receiving CIFN 3 &mgr;g. However, both the decrease of platelet counts and elevated serum TPO levels returned to the baseline values after stopping CIFN therapy. Lower hepatic fibrosis score, lower pretreatment serum HCV RNA level, genotype non-1b infection and patients with sustained response to CIFN were manifested with higher degree of serum TPO elevation in response to the CIFN-induced thrombocytopenia. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that an age of less than 45 years and a serum TPO level elevation greater than 50% of baseline level at week 12 of CIFN treatment were significantly independent predictors associated with the sustained response to the CIFN treatment. In conclusion, the changes of platelet counts and serum TPO levels in chronic hepatitis C patients

  2. Prognostic nutritional index before adjuvant chemotherapy predicts chemotherapy compliance and survival among patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Katsuhiko; Okita, Riki; Saisho, Shinsuke; Yukawa, Takuro; Maeda, Ai; Nojima, Yuji; Nakata, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Background Adjuvant chemotherapy after the complete resection of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is now the standard of care. To improve survival, it is important to identify risk factors for the continuation of adjuvant chemotherapy. In this study, we analyzed chemotherapy compliance and magnitude of the prognostic impact of the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) before adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of data from 106 patients who had received adjuvant chemotherapy. The adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of an oral tegafur agent (OT) or platinum-based chemotherapy (PB). The correlations between the PNI values and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were then evaluated. Results In the PB group, the percentage of patients who completed the four planned cycles of chemotherapy was not correlated with the PNI. In the OT group, however, a significant difference was observed in the percentage of patients who completed the planned chemotherapy according to the PNI before adjuvant chemotherapy. The RFS of patients with a PNI <50 before adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly poorer than that of the patients with a PNI ≥50. A multivariate analysis showed that nodal metastasis and PNI before chemotherapy were independent predictors of the RFS. However, PNI before surgery was not a predictor of the RFS. In the subgroup analysis, PNI before chemotherapy was independent predictor of the RFS in the OT group (P=0.019), but not in the PB group (P=0.095). Conclusion The PNI before adjuvant chemotherapy influenced the treatment compliance with the planned chemotherapy in the OT group, but not the PB group. In addition, a low PNI before adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with a poor RFS in a multivariate analysis, especially in the OT group. PMID:26504397

  3. WE-D-BRE-04: Modeling Optimal Concurrent Chemotherapy Schedules

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, J; Deasy, J O

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Concurrent chemo-radiation therapy (CCRT) has become a more common cancer treatment option with a better tumor control rate for several tumor sites, including head and neck and lung cancer. In this work, possible optimal chemotherapy schedules were investigated by implementing chemotherapy cell-kill into a tumor response model of RT. Methods: The chemotherapy effect has been added into a published model (Jeong et al., PMB (2013) 58:4897), in which the tumor response to RT can be simulated with the effects of hypoxia and proliferation. Based on the two-compartment pharmacokinetic model, the temporal concentration of chemotherapy agent was estimated. Log cell-kill was assumed and the cell-kill constant was estimated from the observed increase in local control due to concurrent chemotherapy. For a simplified two cycle CCRT regime, several different starting times and intervals were simulated with conventional RT regime (2Gy/fx, 5fx/wk). The effectiveness of CCRT was evaluated in terms of reduction in radiation dose required for 50% of control to find the optimal chemotherapy schedule. Results: Assuming the typical slope of dose response curve (γ50=2), the observed 10% increase in local control rate was evaluated to be equivalent to an extra RT dose of about 4 Gy, from which the cell-kill rate of chemotherapy was derived to be about 0.35. Best response was obtained when chemotherapy was started at about 3 weeks after RT began. As the interval between two cycles decreases, the efficacy of chemotherapy increases with broader range of optimal starting times. Conclusion: The effect of chemotherapy has been implemented into the resource-conservation tumor response model to investigate CCRT. The results suggest that the concurrent chemotherapy might be more effective when delayed for about 3 weeks, due to lower tumor burden and a larger fraction of proliferating cells after reoxygenation.

  4. High-dose electron beam sterilization of soft-tissue grafts maintains significantly improved biomechanical properties compared to standard gamma treatment.

    PubMed

    Hoburg, A; Keshlaf, S; Schmidt, T; Smith, M; Gohs, U; Perka, C; Pruss, A; Scheffler, S

    2015-06-01

    Allografts have gained increasing popularity in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. However, one of the major concerns regarding allografts is the possibility of disease transmission. Electron beam (Ebeam) and Gamma radiation have been proven to be successful in sterilization of medical products. In soft tissue sterilization high dosages of gamma irradiation have been shown to be detrimental to biomechanical properties of grafts. Therefore, it was the objective of this study to compare the biomechanical properties of human bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) grafts after ebeam with standard gamma irradiation at medium (25 kGy) and high doses (34 kGy). We hypothesized that the biomechanical properties of Ebeam irradiated grafts would be superior to gamma irradiated grafts. Paired 10 mm-wide human BPTB grafts were harvested from 20 donors split into four groups following irradiation with either gamma or Ebeam (each n = 10): (A) Ebeam 25 kGy, (B) Gamma 25 kGy, (C) Ebeam 34 kGy (D) Gamma 34 kGy and ten non-irradiated BPTB grafts were used as controls. All grafts underwent biomechanical testing which included preconditioning (ten cycles, 0-20 N); cyclic loading (200 cycles, 20-200 N) and a load-to-failure (LTF) test. Stiffness of non-irradiated controls (199.6 ± 59.1 N/mm) and Ebeam sterilized grafts did not significantly differ (152.0 ± 37.0 N/mm; 192.8 ± 58.0 N/mm), while Gamma-irradiated grafts had significantly lower stiffness than controls at both irradiation dosages (25 kGy: 126.1 ± 45.4 N/mm; 34 kGy: 170.6 ± 58.2 N/mm) (p < 0.05). Failure loads at 25 kGy were significantly lower in the gamma group (1,009 ± 400 N), while the failure load was significantly lower in both study groups at high dose irradiation with 34 kGy (Ebeam: 1,139 ± 445 N, Gamma: 1,073 ± 617 N) compared to controls (1,741 ± 304 N) (p < 0.05). Creep was significantly larger in the gamma irradiated groups (25 kGy: 0.96 ± 1.34 mm; 34 kGy: 1.06 ± 0.58 mm) than in the Ebeam (25 k

  5. Mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities

    PubMed Central

    Vichaya, Elisabeth G.; Chiu, Gabriel S.; Krukowski, Karen; Lacourt, Tamara E.; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Dantzer, Robert; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Walker, Adam K.

    2015-01-01

    While chemotherapeutic agents have yielded relative success in the treatment of cancer, patients are often plagued with unwanted and even debilitating side-effects from the treatment which can lead to dose reduction or even cessation of treatment. Common side effects (symptoms) of chemotherapy include (i) cognitive deficiencies such as problems with attention, memory and executive functioning; (ii) fatigue and motivational deficit; and (iii) neuropathy. These symptoms often develop during treatment but can remain even after cessation of chemotherapy, severely impacting long-term quality of life. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms responsible for the development of these behavioral toxicities, however, neuroinflammation is widely considered to be one of the major mechanisms responsible for chemotherapy-induced symptoms. Here, we critically assess what is known in regards to the role of neuroinflammation in chemotherapy-induced symptoms. We also argue that, based on the available evidence, neuroinflammation is unlikely the only mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. We evaluate two other putative candidate mechanisms. To this end we discuss the mediating role of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) activated in response to chemotherapy-induced cellular damage. We also review the literature with respect to possible alternative mechanisms such as a chemotherapy-induced change in the bioenergetic status of the tissue involving changes in mitochondrial function in relation to chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie the emergence of fatigue, neuropathy, and cognitive difficulties is vital to better treatment and long-term survival of cancer patients. PMID:25954147

  6. Mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities.

    PubMed

    Vichaya, Elisabeth G; Chiu, Gabriel S; Krukowski, Karen; Lacourt, Tamara E; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Dantzer, Robert; Heijnen, Cobi J; Walker, Adam K

    2015-01-01

    While chemotherapeutic agents have yielded relative success in the treatment of cancer, patients are often plagued with unwanted and even debilitating side-effects from the treatment which can lead to dose reduction or even cessation of treatment. Common side effects (symptoms) of chemotherapy include (i) cognitive deficiencies such as problems with attention, memory and executive functioning; (ii) fatigue and motivational deficit; and (iii) neuropathy. These symptoms often develop during treatment but can remain even after cessation of chemotherapy, severely impacting long-term quality of life. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms responsible for the development of these behavioral toxicities, however, neuroinflammation is widely considered to be one of the major mechanisms responsible for chemotherapy-induced symptoms. Here, we critically assess what is known in regards to the role of neuroinflammation in chemotherapy-induced symptoms. We also argue that, based on the available evidence, neuroinflammation is unlikely the only mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. We evaluate two other putative candidate mechanisms. To this end we discuss the mediating role of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) activated in response to chemotherapy-induced cellular damage. We also review the literature with respect to possible alternative mechanisms such as a chemotherapy-induced change in the bioenergetic status of the tissue involving changes in mitochondrial function in relation to chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie the emergence of fatigue, neuropathy, and cognitive difficulties is vital to better treatment and long-term survival of cancer patients.

  7. Antiangiogenic (metronomic) chemotherapy for brain tumors: current and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Samuel, David P; Wen, Patrick Y; Kieran, Mark W

    2009-07-01

    Significant advances in the diagnosis and treatment of brain tumors have been made through better imaging, surgical techniques and advances in radiation therapy. However, the cure rate for most adult and pediatric brain tumor patients has not mirrored this success. Angiogenesis, the development of neovascularization, provides the required nutrients and oxygen to an expanding tumor and is controlled by a complex balance of proangiogenic cytokines and antiangiogenic factors. A series of new inhibitors of angiogenesis are now in clinical trials. Most of these rely on inhibiting tumor cell-mediated cytokines or blocking the activation of their cognate receptors. Cytotoxic chemotherapy, by contrast, targets dividing cells but can be modulated to attack dividing endothelial cells. This review will focus on the use of low-dose antiangiogenic (also called metronomic) chemotherapy to inhibit endothelial cell function and resultant neovascularization in the treatment of adult and pediatric brain tumors. By examining the biology and preclinical findings that led to the development of antiangiogenic/metronomic chemotherapy, clinical studies have been undertaken that support the role of this approach in the clinic, and have led to the introduction of a number of markers being used to better predict active combinations and appropriate patient populations.

  8. Postoperative Chemotherapy Followed by Conformal Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy in High-Risk Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Quero, Laurent; Bouchbika, Zineb; Kouto, Honorine; Baruch-Hennequin, Valerie; Gornet, Jean-Marc; Munoz, Nicolas; Cojean-Zelek, Isabelle; Houdart, Remi; Panis, Yves; Valleur, Patrice; Aparicio, Thomas; Maylin, Claude; Hennequin, Christophe

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the efficacy, toxicity, and pattern of relapse after adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by three-dimensional irradiation and concomitant LV5FU2 chemotherapy (high-dose leucovorin and 5-fluorouracil bolus plus continuous infusion) in the treatment of completely resected high-risk gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of 52 patients with high-risk gastric cancer initially treated by total/partial gastrectomy and lymphadenectomy between January 2002 and June 2007. Median age was 54 years (range, 36-75 years). Postoperative treatment consisted of 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy was followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in the tumor bed and regional lymph nodes at 4500 cGy/25 fractions in association with concomitant chemotherapy. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of a 2-h infusion of leucovorin (200 mg/m Superscript-Two ) followed by a bolus of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m Superscript-Two ) and then a 44-h continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (2400-3600 mg/m Superscript-Two ) given every 14 days, for three cycles (LV5FU2 protocol). Results: Five-year overall and disease-free survival were 50% and 48%, respectively. Distant metastases and peritoneal spread were the most frequent sites of relapse (37% each). After multivariate analysis, only pathologic nodal status was significantly associated with disease-free and overall survival. Acute toxicities were essentially gastrointestinal and hematologic. One myocardial infarction and one pulmonary embolism were also reported. Eighteen patients had a radiotherapy program interruption because of acute toxicity. All patients but 2 have completed radiotherapy. Conclusion: Postoperative cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by conformal radiotherapy in association with concurrent 5-fluorouracil seemed to be feasible and resulted in successful locoregional control.

  9. SU-E-J-28: Gantry Speed Significantly Affects Image Quality and Imaging Dose for 4D Cone-Beam Computed Tomography On the Varian Edge Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Santoso, A; Song, K; Gardner, S; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 4D-CBCT facilitates assessment of tumor motion at treatment position. We investigated the effect of gantry speed on 4D-CBCT image quality and dose using the Varian Edge On-Board Imager (OBI). Methods: A thoracic protocol was designed using a 125 kVp spectrum. Image quality parameters were obtained via 4D acquisition using a Catphan phantom with a gating system. A sinusoidal waveform was executed with a five second period and superior-inferior motion. 4D-CBCT scans were sorted into 4 and 10 phases. Image quality metrics included spatial resolution, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), uniformity index (UI), Hounsfield unit (HU) sensitivity, and RMS error (RMSE) of motion amplitude. Dosimetry was accomplished using Gafchromic XR-QA2 films within a CIRS Thorax phantom. This was placed on the gating phantom using the same motion waveform. Results: High contrast resolution decreased linearly from 5.93 to 4.18 lp/cm, 6.54 to 4.18 lp/cm, and 5.19 to 3.91 lp/cm for averaged, 4 phase, and 10 phase 4DCBCT volumes respectively as gantry speed increased from 1.0 to 6.0 degs/sec. CNRs decreased linearly from 4.80 to 1.82 as the gantry speed increased from 1.0 to 6.0 degs/sec, respectively. No significant variations in UIs, HU sensitivities, or RMSEs were observed with variable gantry speed. Ion chamber measurements compared to film yielded small percent differences in plastic water regions (0.1–9.6%), larger percent differences in lung equivalent regions (7.5–34.8%), and significantly larger percent differences in bone equivalent regions (119.1–137.3%). Ion chamber measurements decreased from 17.29 to 2.89 cGy with increasing gantry speed from 1.0 to 6.0 degs/sec. Conclusion: Maintaining technique factors while changing gantry speed changes the number of projections used for reconstruction. Increasing the number of projections by decreasing gantry speed decreases noise, however, dose is increased. The future of 4DCBCT’s clinical utility relies on further

  10. Chemotherapy for Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treating Soft Tissue Sarcomas Chemotherapy for Soft Tissue Sarcomas Chemotherapy (chemo) is the use of drugs given into ... Depending on the type and stage of sarcoma, chemotherapy may be given as the main treatment or ...

  11. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Localized Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarty, Twisha; Crane, Christopher H.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Briere, Tina M.; Beddar, A. Sam; Mok, Henry; Reed, Valerie K.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Das, Prajnan

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate dosimetric parameters, acute toxicity, pathologic response, and local control in patients treated with preoperative intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for localized gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods: Between November 2007 and April 2010, 25 patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma were treated with induction chemotherapy, followed by preoperative IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy and, finally, surgical resection. The median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in 18 patients, capecitabine in 3, and other regimens in 4. Subsequently, resection was performed with total gastrectomy in 13 patients, subtotal gastrectomy in 7, and other surgeries in 5. Results: Target coverage, expressed as the ratio of the minimum dose received by 99% of the planning target volume to the prescribed dose, was a median of 0.97 (range, 0.92-1.01). The median V{sub 30} (percentage of volume receiving at least 30 Gy) for the liver was 26%; the median V{sub 20} (percentage of volume receiving at least 20 Gy) for the right and left kidneys was 14% and 24%, respectively; and the median V{sub 40} (percentage of volume receiving at least 40 Gy) for the heart was 18%. Grade 3 acute toxicity developed in 14 patients (56%), including dehydration in 10, nausea in 8, and anorexia in 5. Grade 4 acute toxicity did not develop in any patient. There were no significant differences in the rates of acute toxicity, hospitalization, or feeding tube use in comparison to those in a group of 50 patients treated with preoperative three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. R0 resection was obtained in 20 patients (80%), and pathologic complete response occurred in 5 (20%). Conclusions: Preoperative IMRT for gastric adenocarcinoma was well tolerated, accomplished excellent target coverage and normal structure sparing, and led to appropriate

  12. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy and pathologic response: a retrospective cohort

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Diocésio Alves Pinto; Zucca-Matthes, Gustavo; Vieira, René Aloísio da Costa; de Andrade, Cristiane Thomaz de Aquino Exel; da Costa, Allini Mafra; Monteiro, Aurélio Julião de Castro; Lago, Lissandra Dal; Nunes, João Soares

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the complete pathologic response attained by patients diagnosed with locally advanced breast cancer submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy based on the doxorubicin/ cyclophosphamide regimen followed by paclitaxel. Methods: A retrospective cohort of patients with locally advanced breast cancer, admitted to the Hospital de Câncer de Barretos between 2006 and 2008 submitted to the doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide protocol followed by paclitaxel (4 cycles of doxorubicin 60mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide 600mg/m2 every 21 days; 4 cycles of paclitaxel 175mg/m2 every 21 days). The following variables were assessed: age, menopause, performance status, initial clinical staging, anthropometric data, chemotherapy (dose – duration), toxicity profile, post-treatment staging, surgery, pathologic complete response rate, disease-free survival, and pathological characteristics (type and histological degree, hormonal profile and lymph node involvement). Statistical analysis was performed using a 5% level of significance. Results: Of the 434 patients evaluated, 136 were excluded due to error in staging or because they had received another type of chemotherapy. Median age was 50 years, all with performance status 0-1. Median initial clinical size of tumor was 65mm and the median final clinical size of the tumor was 22mm. Fifty-one (17.1%) patients experienced a pathologic complete response. Those with a negative hormonal profile or who were triple-negative (negative Her-2 and hormonal profile) experienced a favorable impact on the pathologic complete response. Conclusion: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with doxorubicin/ cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel provided a pathologic complete response in the population studied in accordance with that observed in the literature. Triple-negative patients had a greater chance of attaining this response. PMID:24488382

  13. Intermediate dose of imatinib in combination with chemotherapy followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation improves early outcome in paediatric Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL): results of the Spanish Cooperative Group SHOP studies ALL-94, ALL-99 and ALL-2005.

    PubMed

    Rives, Susana; Estella, Jesús; Gómez, Pedro; López-Duarte, Mónica; de Miguel, Purificación García; Verdeguer, Amparo; Moreno, Maria José; Vivanco, José Luis; Couselo, José Miguel; Fernández-Delgado, Rafael; Maldonado, Marisol; Tasso, María; López-Ibor, Blanca; Lendínez, Francisco; López-Almaraz, Ricardo; Uriz, Javier; Melo, Montserrat; Fernández-Teijeiro, Ana; Rodríguez, Isidoro; Badell, Isabel

    2011-09-01

    Philadelphia-chromosome acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (Ph+ ALL) is a subgroup of ALL with very high risk of treatment failure. We report here the results of the Sociedad Española de Hematología y Oncología Pediátricas (SEHOP/SHOP) in paediatric Ph+ ALL treated with intermediate-dose imatinib concurrent with intensive chemotherapy. The toxicities and outcome of these patients were compared with historical controls not receiving imatinib. Patients with Ph+ ALL aged 1-18years were enrolled in three consecutive ALL/SHOP trials (SHOP-94/SHOP-99/SHOP-2005). In the SHOP-2005 trial, imatinib (260mg/m(2) per day) was given on day-15 of induction. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) from a matched related or unrelated donor was scheduled in first complete remission (CR1). Forty-three patients were evaluable (22 boys, median age 6·8years, range, 1·2-15). Sixteen received imatinib whereas 27 received similar chemotherapy without imatinib. Seventeen of 27 and 15 of 16 patients in the non-imatinib and imatinib cohort, respectively, underwent HSCT in CR1. With a median follow-up of 109 and 39months for the non-imatinib and imatinib cohorts, the 3-year event-free survival (EFS) was 29·6% and 78·7%, respectively (P=0·01). These results show that, compared to historical controls, intermediate dose of imatinib given concomitantly with chemotherapy and followed by allogeneic HSCT markedly improved early EFS in paediatric Ph+ ALL.

  14. Experimentally induced, synergistic late effects of a single dose of radiation and aging: significance in LKS fraction as compared with mature blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Yoko; Tsuboi, Isao; Nakachi, Kei; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Inoue, Tohru

    2015-03-01

    The number of murine mature blood cells recovered within 6 weeks after 2-Gy whole-body irradiation at 6 weeks of age, whereas in the case of the undifferentiated hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSC/HPC) compartment [cells in the lineage-negative, c-kit-positive and stem-cell-antigen-1-positive (LKS) fraction], the numerical differences between mice with and without irradiation remained more than a year, but conclusively the cells showed numerical recovery. When mice were exposed to radiation at 6 months of age, acute damages of mature blood cells were rather milder probably because of their maturation with age; but again, cells in the LKS fraction were specifically damaged, and their numerical recovery was significantly delayed probably as a result of LKS-specific cellular damages. Interestingly, in contrast to the recovery of the number of cells in the LKS fraction, their quality was not recovered, which was quantitatively assessed on the basis of oxidative-stress-related fluorescence intensity. To investigate why the recovery in the number of cells in the LKS fraction was delayed, expression levels of genes related to cellular proliferation and apoptosis of cells in the bone marrow and LKS fraction were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In the case of 21-month-old mice after radiation exposure, Ccnd1, PiK3r1 and Fyn were overexpressed solely in cells in the LKS fraction. Because Ccnd1and PiK3r1 upregulated by aging were further upregulated by radiation, single-dose radiation seemed to induce the acceleration of aging, which is related to the essential biological responses during aging based on a lifetime-dependent relationship between a living creature and xenobiotic materials.

  15. Robotic Stereotactic Radioablation Concomitant With Neo-Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Bahadoran, Phillipe; Lallement, Michel; Birtwisle-Peyrottes, Isabelle; Chapellier, Claire; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Courdi, Adel; Quielle-Roussel, Catherine; Thariat, Juliette; Ferrero, Jean-Marc

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Robotic stereotactic radioablation (RSR) allows stereotactic irradiation of thoracic tumors; however, it has never been used for breast tumors and may have a real potential. We conducted a Phase I study, including neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT), a two-level dose-escalation study (6.5 Gy x 3 fractions and 7.5 Gy x 3 fractions) using RSR and breast-conserving surgery followed by conventional radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: To define toxicity, we performed a dermatologic exam (DE) including clinical examination by two independent observers and technical examination by colorimetry, dermoscopy, and skin ultrasound. DE was performed before NACT (DE0), at 36 days (DE1), at 56 days (DE2), after the NACT treatment onset, and before surgery (DE3). Surgery was performed 4-8 weeks after the last chemotherapy session. A pathologic examination was also performed. Results: There were two clinical complete responses and four clinical partial responses at D56 and D85. Maximum tolerable dose was not reached. All patients tolerated RSR with no fatigue; 2 patients presented with mild pain after the third fraction of the treatment. There was no significant toxicity measured with ultrasound and dermoscopy tests. Postoperative irradiation (50 Gy) has been delivered without toxicity. Conclusion: The study showed the feasibility of irradiation with RSR combined with chemotherapy and surgery for breast tumors. There was no skin toxicity at a dose of 19.5 Gy or 22.5 Gy delivered in three fractions combined with chemotherapy. Lack of toxicity suggested that the dose could be increased further. Pathologic response was acceptable.

  16. Chemotherapy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... road, children and teens treated for cancer often go on to lead long, healthy, and happy lives. Reviewed by: Lisa Wray, MD Date ... Center Side Effects of Chemotherapy and Radiation Late Effects of Cancer and Cancer Treatment Effects ...

  17. Chemotherapy in metastatic retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kingston, J E; Hungerford, J L; Plowman, P N

    1987-03-01

    Eleven children with metastatic retinoblastoma diagnosed during the period 1970-1984 were treated with chemotherapy. Short-term complete responses were observed in three children treated with a four-drug combination which included cisplatinum, and in one child treated with vincristine and cyclophosphamide. The median duration of survival of the 11 children receiving chemotherapy was nine months, whilst the median survival of 13 children with metastatic retinoblastoma who were not given chemotherapy was only 2.3 months (p = 0.06). This suggests that retinoblastoma is a chemosensitive tumour and therefore adjuvant chemotherapy may have a role in children with retinoblastoma who at diagnosis are thought to be at high risk of developing metastatic disease.

  18. Significance of GATA-3 expression in outcomes of patients with breast cancer who received systemic chemotherapy and/or hormonal therapy and clinicopathologic features of GATA-3-positive tumors.

    PubMed

    Gulbahce, H Evin; Sweeney, Carol; Surowiecka, Maria; Knapp, Dennis; Varghese, Linda; Blair, Cindy K

    2013-11-01

    GATA-3 and estrogen receptor (ER) are involved in a positive cross-regulatory loop and are frequently coexpressed in breast cancers. GATA-3 expression was shown to be an independent predictor of overall and disease-free survival in some studies, whereas others showed no difference. However, the studies used different cutoff values for determining GATA-3 positivity and analyzed outcomes in patients who received systemic therapy together with those who did not. We investigated GATA-3 expression and correlated clinicopathologic findings and outcomes in 516 women who received systemic chemotherapy and/or hormonal therapy. Nuclear staining of 1% or greater was considered positive for GATA-3, ER and progesterone receptor (PR). Of 516 cases, 436 (84.5%) were GATA-3+. GATA-3+ tumors were more likely to be grade 1 or 2, ER+, PR+, non-triple-negative phenotypes (all P < .0001), and higher stage (P = .01). ER-/GATA-3+ tumors, compared with ER-/GATA-3- tumors, had worse breast cancer survival (BCS) (P = .02) and a trend for worse overall survival (OS) (P = .05) in univariate analysis. However, there was no difference in OS and BCS between patients who received chemotherapy and/or hormonal therapy among GATA-3-positive and GATA-3-negative groups. GATA-3+ tumors are correlated with lower grade, ER+, PR+, and non-triple-negative phenotypes. Although there was no difference in OS and BCS between GATA-3-positive and GATA-3-negative groups, there was an adverse effect of GATA-3 expression in the ER-negative subgroup of patients who received systemic therapy.

  19. Relative Contributions of Radiation and Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy to Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hitchcock, Ying J. Tward, Jonathan D.; Szabo, Aniko; Bentz, Brandon G.; Shrieve, Dennis C.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the risk of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in patients with head-and-neck cancer and treated with radiation therapy (RT) or concomitant cisplatin-based chemoradiation, the relationship among SNHL and radiation dose to the cochlea, the use of two common cisplatin dose regimens. Methods and Materials: A total of 62 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with curative intent were included in this prospective study. Of the patients, 21 received RT alone, 27 received 40 mg/m{sup 2} weekly cisplatin, 13 received 100 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks during RT, and 1 received RT with weekly epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor antibody. The effect of chemotherapy and RT dose on hearing was determined using a model that accounted for the age and variability between each ear for each patient. Results: We constructed a model to predict dose-dependent hearing loss for RT or cisplatin-based chemotherapy either alone or in combination. For patients only receiving RT, no significant hearing loss was found at doses to the cochlea of less than 40 Gy. Patients receiving 100 mg/m{sup 2} or 40 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin chemotherapy had an estimated +21.5 dB and +9.5 dB hearing loss at 8,000 Hz with low radiation doses (10 Gy), which rose to +38.4 dB and +18.9 dB for high radiation doses (40 Gy). Conclusions: Use of RT alone with doses of less than 40 Gy did not result in clinically significant hearing loss. High-frequency SNHL was profoundly damaged in patients who received concomitant cisplatin when doses of 100 mg/m{sup 2} were used. The threshold cochlear dose for hearing loss with cisplatin-based chemotherapy and RT was predicted to be 10 Gy. The inner ear radiation dose constraints and cisplatin dose intensity should be considered in the treatment of advanced head-and-neck cancer.

  20. Favorable effect of priming with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in remission induction of acute myeloid leukemia restricted to dose escalation of cytarabine.

    PubMed

    Pabst, Thomas; Vellenga, Edo; van Putten, Wim; Schouten, Harry C; Graux, Carlos; Vekemans, Marie-Christiane; Biemond, Bart; Sonneveld, Peter; Passweg, Jakob; Verdonck, Leo; Legdeur, Marie-Cecile; Theobald, Matthias; Jacky, Emanuel; Bargetzi, Mario; Maertens, Johan; Ossenkoppele, Gert Jan; Löwenberg, Bob

    2012-06-07

    The clinical value of chemotherapy sensitization of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with G-CSF priming has remained controversial. Cytarabine is a key constituent of remission induction chemotherapy. The effect of G-CSF priming has not been investigated in relationship with variable dose levels of cytarabine. We randomized 917 AML patients to receive G-CSF (456 patients) or no G-CSF (461 patients) at the days of chemotherapy. In the initial part of the study, 406 patients were also randomized between 2 cytarabine regimens comparing conventional-dose (199 patients) versus escalated-dose (207 patients) cytarabine in cycles 1 and 2. We found that patients after induction chemotherapy plus G-CSF had similar overall survival (43% vs 40%, P = .88), event-free survival (37% vs 31%, P = .29), and relapse rates (34% vs 36%, P = .77) at 5 years as those not receiving G-CSF. However, patients treated with the escalated-dose cytarabine regimen benefited from G-CSF priming, with improved event-free survival (P = .01) and overall survival (P = .003), compared with patients without G-CSF undergoing escalated-dose cytarabine treatment. A significant survival advantage of sensitizing AML for chemotherapy with G-CSF was not apparent in the entire study group, but it was seen in patients treated with escalated-dose cytarabine during remission induction. The HOVON-42 study is registered under The Netherlands Trial Registry (www.trialregister.nl) as #NTR230.

  1. Acute Esophagus Toxicity in Lung Cancer Patients After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kwint, Margriet; Uyterlinde, Wilma; Nijkamp, Jasper; Chen, Chun; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Heuvel, Michel van den; Knegjens, Joost; Herk, Marcel van; Belderbos, Jose

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-effect relation between acute esophageal toxicity (AET) and the dose-volume parameters of the esophagus after intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: One hundred thirty-nine patients with inoperable NSCLC treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy were prospectively analyzed. The fractionation scheme was 66 Gy in 24 fractions. All patients received concurrently a daily dose of cisplatin (6 mg/m Superscript-Two ). Maximum AET was scored according to Common Toxicity Criteria 3.0. Dose-volume parameters V5 to V70, D{sub mean} and D{sub max} of the esophagus were calculated. A logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the dose-effect relation between these parameters and grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 AET. The outcome was compared with the clinically used esophagus V35 prediction model for grade {>=}2 after radical 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) treatment. Results: In our patient group, 9% did not experience AET, and 31% experienced grade 1 AET, 38% grade 2 AET, and 22% grade 3 AET. The incidence of grade 2 and grade 3 AET was not different from that in patients treated with CCRT using 3DCRT. The V50 turned out to be the most significant dosimetric predictor for grade {>=}3 AET (P=.012). The derived V50 model was shown to predict grade {>=}2 AET significantly better than the clinical V35 model (P<.001). Conclusions: For NSCLC patients treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy, the V50 was identified as most accurate predictor of grade {>=}3 AET. There was no difference in the incidence of grade {>=}2 AET between 3DCRT and IMRT in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  2. Modification of chemotherapy by nitroimidazoles

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, D.W.

    1984-09-01

    The potentiation of chemotherapeutic agents by radiation sensitizers has been extensively studied for several years. There is little doubt that the effectiveness of certain anti-cancer drugs, primarily alkylating agents, can readily be enhanced both in vitro and in vivo through the addition of a sensitizer. While enhanced effects have been observed in certain critical normal tissues, in general most animal model studies have demonstrated a therapeutic gain at large sensitizer doses. This approach to combination therapies therefore appears promising. Yet many questions concerning the interaction between chemotherapeutic agents and radiosensitizers, particularly in the aspects of modification of chemotherapy by nitroimidazoles are reviewed and discussed. These address the importance in chemopotentiation of (i) hypoxia, (ii) alterations in DNA damage and/or repair, (iii) depletion of intracellular sulfhydryls and (iv) modification of drug pharmacokinetics.

  3. The Absence of a Clinically Significant Effect of Food on the Single Dose Pharmacokinetics of Vorapaxar, a PAR-1 Antagonist, in Healthy Adult Subjects.

    PubMed

    Behm, Martin O; Kosoglou, Teddy; Miltenburg, André M M; Li, Jing; Statkevich, Paul; Johnson-Levonas, Amy O; Martinho, Monika; Fackler, Paul

    2013-10-01

    In this open-label, randomized, 2-period crossover study, 16 healthy subjects received a single oral 2.5-mg dose of vorapaxar in the fed (i.e., standardized high-fat breakfast) and fasted (i.e., an overnight fast) state with a 6-week washout. Plasma samples for vorapaxar assay were obtained pre-dose and up to 72 hours post-dose. Least squares (LS) geometric mean AUC0-72 hr and Cmax were analyzed by ANOVA. If 90% confidence intervals (CI) for the geometric mean ratios (GMRs; fed/fasted) of AUC0-72 hr and Cmax were within the 50-200% range, then food was deemed not to have a clinically important effect. The LS geometric mean (90% CI) AUC0-72 hr and Cmax of vorapaxar in the fasted state were 314 (284-348) ng hr/mL and 23.4 (20.7-26.4) ng/mL, respectively. The GMRs (fed/fasted) and 90% CIs for AUC0-72 hr and Cmax were 96.9 (92.2-102) and 79.1 (67.6-92.5), respectively. Vorapaxar was generally safe and well tolerated in the presence and absence of food. Concomitant food decreased the rate (i.e., 21% reduction in Cmax and 45-min delay in Tmax ) with no effect on the extent of vorapaxar absorption when administered as a single 2.5-mg dose. Thus, vorapaxar can be administered without regard to food.

  4. Mitoxantrone-loaded albumin microspheres for localized intratumoral chemotherapy of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almond, Brett Anthony

    The safety and efficacy of conventional chemotherapy is limited by its toxicity. The direct intratumoral injection of free or microsphere-loaded antineoplastic drugs is a promising modality for the treatment of solid tumors. Intratumoral chemotherapy delivers high localized doses of cytotoxic drugs to the tumor tissues than does systemic (intravenous) chemotherapy and it decreases systemic drug concentrations and toxicities. The use of drug-loaded microspheres also provides a prolonged release of drug into the surrounding tumor tissues, increasing exposure of the neoplasm to therapeutic levels of the cytotoxic drug. Mitoxantrone and 5-fluorouracil-loaded albumin microspheres were synthesized. The microspheres were synthesized using a suspension crosslinking technique and a glutardehyde crosslinking agent. The particle-size distribution of the microspheres was controlled by adjusting the emulsion energy and the concentration of cellulose acetate butyrate, the emulsion stabilization agent. Both microsphere size and crosslink density (glutaraldehyde concentration) were found to affect the in vitro release of loaded drugs in in vitro infinite sink conditions. The in vivo efficacy and toxicity of intratumoral chemotherapy with free and microsphere-loaded mitoxantrone were evaluated in a 16/C murine mammary adenocarcinoma model. Intratumoral chemotherapy with free mitoxantrone significantly improved survival and decreased toxicity compared to intravenously delivered drug. The efficacy of two size distributions of mitoxantrone-loaded albumin microspheres, corresponding to mean diameters of 5 to 10 mum and 20 to 40 mum, were evaluated delivered both alone and in combination with free mitoxantrone. Intratumoral injection of mitoxantrone-loaded microspheres was found to allow the safe delivery of increased doses compared to free drug. The maximum tolerated doses were approximately 40 mg/kg compared to 12 mg/kg, respectively. Intratumoral chemotherapy using free and

  5. Adoptive T-cell therapy improves treatment of canine non–Hodgkin lymphoma post chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Colleen M.; Sheppard, Sabina; Hartline, Cassie A.; Huls, Helen; Johnson, Mark; Palla, Shana L.; Maiti, Sourindra; Ma, Wencai; Davis, R. Eric; Craig, Suzanne; Lee, Dean A.; Champlin, Richard; Wilson, Heather; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical observations reveal that an augmented pace of T-cell recovery after chemotherapy correlates with improved tumor-free survival, suggesting the add-back of T cells after chemotherapy may improve outcomes. To evaluate adoptive immunotherapy treatment for B-lineage non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), we expanded T cells from client-owned canines diagnosed with NHL on artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) in the presence of human interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21. Graded doses of autologous T cells were infused after CHOP chemotherapy and persisted for 49 days, homed to tumor, and significantly improved survival. Serum thymidine kinase changes predicted T-cell engraftment, while anti-tumor effects correlated with neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios and granzyme B expression in manufactured T cells. Therefore, chemotherapy can be used to modulate infused T-cell responses to enhance anti-tumor effects. The companion canine model has translational implications for human immunotherapy which can be readily exploited since clinical-grade canine and human T cells are propagated using identical approaches. PMID:22355761

  6. Hepatic arterial infusion pump chemotherapy for colorectal liver metastases: an old technology in a new era.

    PubMed

    Ko, Y J; Karanicolas, P J

    2014-02-01

    Aggressive treatment of colorectal cancer (crc) liver metastases can yield long-term survival and cure. Unfortunately, most patients present with technically unresectable metastases; conventional therapy in such patients consists of systemic therapy. Despite advances in the effectiveness of systemic therapy in the first-line setting, the tumour response rate and median survival remain low in the second-line setting. The preferential blood supply from the hepatic artery to crc liver metastases allows for excellent regional delivery of chemotherapy. Here, we review efficacy and safety data for hepatic artery infusion (hai) pump chemotherapy in patients with metastatic crc from the 5-fluorouracil era and from the era of modern chemotherapy. In selected patients with liver-only or liver-dominant disease who have progressed on first-line chemotherapy, hai combined with systemic agents is a viable therapeutic option when performed at experienced centres. Furthermore, significantly improved survival has been demonstrated with adjuvant hai therapy after liver resection in the phase iii setting. The complication rates and local toxicities associated with hai pump therapy are infrequent at experienced centres and can be managed with careful follow-up and early intervention. The major obstacles to the wide adoption of hai therapy include technical expertise for pump insertion and maintenance, and for floxuridine dose modification. The creation of formal preceptor-focused education and training in hai therapy for interdisciplinary medical professionals might encourage the creation and expansion of this liver-directed approach.

  7. Atorvastatin has cardiac safety at intensive cholesterol-reducing protocols for long term, yet its cancer-treatment doses with chemotherapy may cause cardiomyopathy even under coenzyme-Q10 protection.

    PubMed

    Caner, Metin; Sonmez, Bingur; Kurnaz, Ozlem; Aldemir, Caner; Salar, Seda; Altug, Tuncay; Bilir, Ayhan; Altinoz, Meric A

    2007-01-01

    Statins provide strong clinical benefits via reducing stroke deaths, and they are also considered for tumor reduction and chemo-sensitization. High dose atorvastatin in adults (80 mg daily, approx. 1 mg/kg) is proven to afford greater protection against cardiac deaths than does a standard lipid-lowering dose in coronary syndrome. For cancer trials, mega doses up to 30 mg/kg have been used for short term treatments but neither a high nor a mega-dose of atorvastatin has been tested for long term cardiac safety. This may be of special concern, since some animal studies showed deleterious effects of statins on cardiac tissue, which may be related with coenzymeQ (CoQ) depletion. We performed an electron microscopic analysis of rat hearts after low, high-or mega-dose atorvastatin therapy and with or without MNU (methyl-nitrosourea)-stress. MNU + daily high dose atorvastatin treatment for 13 months did not produce severe cardiac toxicity with CoQ. However, at mega doses (30 mg/kg) and with MNU, mitochondrial damage and myofibrillary disintegration was obvious. Strong proliferation of mitochondria under high dose atorvastatin therapy with CoQ may explain the lack of cardiotoxicity; and this finding seems to parallel recent data that statins induce HNF-4 and PPAR-alpha, both responsible for mitochondria-proliferation. Employment of statins for tumor chemo-sensitization at high-dosage and for long term treatments may require strategies to direct the mevalonate-entry differentially into cardiac and tumor cells and to develop a protocol analogous to folic acid salvage of methotrexate toxicity.

  8. SU-E-J-66: Significant Anatomical and Dosimetric Changes Observed with the Pharyngeal Constrictor During Head and Neck Radiotherapy Elicited From Daily Deformable Image Registration and Dose Accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumarasiri, A; Siddiqui, F; Liu, C; Kamal, M; Fraser, C; Chetty, I; Kim, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the anatomical changes and associated dosimetric consequences to the pharyngeal constrictor (PC) that occurs during head and neck radiotherapy (H&N RT). Methods: A cohort of 13 oro-pharyngeal cancer patients, who had daily CBCT’s for localization, was retrospectively studied. On every 5th CBCT, PC was manually delineated by a radiation oncologist. The anterior-posterior PC thickness was measured at the C3 level. Delivered dose to PC was estimated by calculating daily doses on CBCT’s, and accumulating to corresponding planning CT images. For accumulation, a parameter-optimized B- spline-based deformable image registration algorithm (Elastix) was used, in conjunction with an energy-mass mapping dose transfer algorithm. Mean and maximum dose (Dmean, Dmax) to PC was determined and compared with corresponding planned quantities. Results: The mean (±standard deviation) volume increase (ΔV) and thickness increase (Δt) over the course of 35 total fractions were 54±33% (11.9±7.6 cc), and 63±39% (2.9±1.9 mm), respectively. The resultant cumulative mean dose increase from planned dose to PC (ΔDmean) was 1.4±1.3% (0.9±0.8 Gy), while the maximum dose increase (ΔDmax) was 0.0±1.6% (0.0±1.1 Gy). Patients with adaptive replanning (n=6) showed a smaller mean dose increase than those without (n=7); 0.5±0.2% (0.3±0.1 Gy) vs. 2.2±1.4% (1.4±0.9 Gy). There was a statistically significant (p<0.0001) strong correlation between ΔDmean and Δt (Pearson coefficient r=0.78), and a moderate-to-strong correlation (r=0.52) between ΔDmean and ΔV. Correlation between ΔDmean and weight loss ΔW (r=0.1), as well as ΔV and ΔW (r=0.2) were negligible. Conclusion: Patients were found to undergo considerable anatomical changes to pharyngeal constrictor during H&N RT, resulting in non-negligible dose deviations from intended dose. Results are indicative that pharyngeal constrictor thickness, measured at C3 level, is a good predictor for the dose change to

  9. Human circulating plasma DNA significantly decreases while lymphocyte DNA damage increases under chronic occupational exposure to low-dose gamma-neutron and tritium β-radiation.

    PubMed

    Korzeneva, Inna B; Kostuyk, Svetlana V; Ershova, Liza S; Osipov, Andrian N; Zhuravleva, Veronika F; Pankratova, Galina V; Porokhovnik, Lev N; Veiko, Natalia N

    2015-09-01

    The blood plasma of healthy people contains cell-fee (circulating) DNA (cfDNA). Apoptotic cells are the main source of the cfDNA. The cfDNA concentration increases in case of the organism's cell death rate increase, for example in case of exposure to high-dose ionizing radiation (IR). The objects of the present research are the blood plasma and blood lymphocytes of people, who contacted occupationally with the sources of external gamma/neutron radiation or internal β-radiation of tritium N = 176). As the controls (references), blood samples of people, who had never been occupationally subjected to the IR sources, were used (N = 109). With respect to the plasma samples of each donor there were defined: the cfDNA concentration (the cfDNA index), DNase1 activity (the DNase1 index) and titre of antibodies to DNA (the Ab DNA index). The general DNA damage in the cells was defined (using the Comet assay, the tail moment (TM) index). A chronic effect of the low-dose ionizing radiation on a human being is accompanied by the enhancement of the DNA damage in lymphocytes along with a considerable cfDNA content reduction, while the DNase1 content and concentration of antibodies to DNA (Ab DNA) increase. All the aforementioned changes were also observed in people, who had not worked with the IR sources for more than a year. The ratio cfDNA/(DNase1×Ab DNA × TM) is proposed to be used as a marker of the chronic exposure of a person to the external low-dose IR. It was formulated the assumption that the joint analysis of the cfDNA, DNase1, Ab DNA and TM values may provide the information about the human organism's cell resistivity to chronic exposure to the low-dose IR and about the development of the adaptive response in the organism that is aimed, firstly, at the effective cfDNA elimination from the blood circulation, and, secondly - at survival of the cells, including the cells with the damaged DNA.

  10. Targeting Cancer using Polymeric Nanoparticle mediated Combination Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Aniket; Kydd, Janel; Piel, Brandon; Rai, Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Cancer forms exhibiting poor prognosis have been extensively researched for therapeutic solutions. One of the conventional modes of treatment, chemotherapy shows inadequacy in its methodology due to imminent side-effects and acquired drug-resistance by cancer cells. However, advancements in nanotechnology have opened new frontiers to significantly alleviate collateral damage caused by current treatments via innovative delivery techniques, eliminating pitfalls encountered in conventional treatments. Properties like reduced drug-clearance and increased dose efficacy by the enhanced permeability and retention effect deem nanoparticles suitable for this application. Optimization of size, surface charge and surface modifications have provided nanoparticles with stealth properties capable of evading immune responses, thus deeming them as excellent carriers of chemotherapeutic agents. Biocompatible and biodegradable forms of polymers enhance the bioavailability of chemotherapeutic agents, and permit a sustained and time-dependent release of drugs which is a characteristic of their composition, thereby providing a controlled therapeutic approach. Studies conducted in vitro and animal models have also demonstrated a synergism in cytotoxicity given the mechanism of action of anticancer drugs when administered in combination providing promising results. Combination therapy has also shown implications in overcoming multiple-drug resistance, which can however be subdued by the adaptable nature of tumor microenvironment. Surface modifications with targeting moieties can therefore feasibly increase nanoparticle uptake by specific receptor-ligand interactions, increasing dose efficacy which can seemingly overcome drug-resistance. This article reviews recent trends and investigations in employing polymeric nanoparticles for effectively delivering combination chemotherapy, and modifications in delivery parameters enhancing dose efficacy, thus validating the potential in this

  11. Radio-chemotherapy for bladder cancer: Contribution of chemotherapy on local control

    PubMed Central

    Plataniotis, George A; Dale, Roger G

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to review the magnitude of contribution of chemotherapy (CT) in the local control of muscle invasive bladder carcinoma in the studies where a combined radio-chemotherapy (RCT) was used (how much higher local control rates are obtained with RCT compared to RT alone). Studies on radiotherapy (RT) and combined RCT, neo-adjuvant, concurrent, adjuvant or combinations, reported after 1990 were reviewed. The mean complete response (CR) rates were significantly higher for the RCT studies compared to RT-alone studies: 75.9% vs 64.4% (Wilcoxon rank-sum test, P = 0.001). Eleven of the included RCT studies involved 2-3 cycles of neo-adjuvant CT, in addition to concurrent RCT. The RCT studies included the one-phase type (where a full dose of RCT was given and then assessment of response and cystectomy for non-responders followed) and the two-phase types (where an assessment of response was undertaken after an initial RCT course, followed 6 wk later by a consolidation RCT for those patients with a CR). CR rates between the two subgroups of RCT studies were 79.6% (one phase) vs 71.6% (two-phase) (P = 0.015). The average achievable tumour control rates, with an acceptable rate of side effects have been around 70%, which may represent a plateau. Further increase in CR response rates demands for new chemotherapeutic agents, targeted therapies, or modified fractionation in various combinations. Quantification of RT and CT contribution to local control using radiobiological modelling in trial designs would enhance the potential for both improved outcomes and the estimation of the potential gain. PMID:24003352

  12. Marginal effects of glucose, insulin and insulin-like growth factor on chemotherapy response in endothelial and colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    VOLKOVA, EKATERINA; ROBINSON, BRIDGET A.; WILLIS, JINNY; CURRIE, MARGARET J.; DACHS, GABI U.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a major clinical issue for patients with colorectal cancer. Obesity has been associated with a poorer outcome and is a possible mechanism of resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of obesity-related factors on the cell response to standard chemotherapy in stromal and colorectal cancer cells. Viability was measured following the treatment of colorectal cancer cell lines (WiDr and SW620) and stromal cells (human microvascular endothelial cells) in vitro with 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan and oxaliplatin under obesity-related conditions [elevated levels of insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and glucose] and compared with non-elevated conditions. Obesity-related conditions alone increased cell viability and in selected cases, accumulation of the transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor-1. However, these conditions did not consistently increase resistance to the chemotherapy agents tested. The combination of IGF-1 and extremely low-dose chemotherapy significantly induced cell viability in WiDr colorectal cancer cells. These in vitro results may have clinical importance in an environment of increasing rates of obesity and colorectal cancer, and the frequent under-dosing of obese cancer patients. PMID:24396438

  13. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 02-29: A Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Full-Dose Radiation Therapy Followed by Surgical Resection and Consolidative Therapy for Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Carcinoma of the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Suntharalingam, Mohan; Paulus, Rebecca; Edelman, Martin J.; Krasna, Mark; Burrows, Whitney; Gore, Elizabeth; Wilson, Lynn D.; Choy, Hak

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate mediastinal nodal clearance (MNC) rates after induction chemotherapy and concurrent, full-dose radiation therapy (RT) in a phase II trimodality trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0229). Patients and Methods: Patients (n=57) with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (pathologically proven N2 or N3) were eligible. Induction chemotherapy consisted of weekly carboplatin (AUC = 2.0) and paclitaxel 50 mg/m{sup 2}. Concurrent RT was prescribed, with 50.4 Gy to the mediastinum and primary tumor and a boost of 10.8 Gy to all gross disease. The mediastinum was pathologically reassessed after completion of chemoradiation. The primary endpoint of the study was MNC, with secondary endpoints of 2-year overall survival and postoperative morbidity/mortality. Results: The grade 3/4 toxicities included hematologic 35%, gastrointestinal 14%, and pulmonary 23%. Forty-three patients (75%) were evaluable for the primary endpoint. Twenty-seven patients achieved the primary endpoint of MNC (63%). Thirty-seven patients underwent resection. There was a 14% incidence of grade 3 postoperative pulmonary complications and 1 30-day, postoperative grade 5 toxicity (3%). With a median follow-up of 24 months for all patients, the 2-year overall survival rate was 54%, and the 2-year progression-free survival rate was 33%. The 2-year overall survival rate was 75% for those who achieved nodal clearance, 52% for those with residual nodal disease, and 23% for those who were not evaluable for the primary endpoint (P=.0002). Conclusions: This multi-institutional trial confirms the ability of neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation with full-dose RT to sterilize known mediastinal nodal disease.

  14. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Pain It’s important to treat pain. If you ... to pay for pain medicine. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Pain Keep track of the pain. Each day, ...

  15. Cataracts after total body irradiation and marrow transplantation: a sparing effect of dose fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Deeg, H.J.; Flournoy, N.; Sullivan, K.M.; Sheehan, K.; Buckner, C.D.; Sanders, J.E.; Storb, R.; Witherspoon, R.P.; Thomas, E.D.

    1984-07-01

    Two hundred seventy-seven patients, who have been followed for 1 to 12 years after marrow transplantation, have been examined for cataract development. In preparation for transplantation, 96 patients with aplastic anemia were conditioned with chemotherapy only, while 181 patients (two with aplastic anemia and 179 with a hematologic malignancy) were conditioned with a regimen of total body irradiation (TBI) and chemotherapy. TBI was delivered from two opposing /sup 60/Co sources at an exposure rate of 4 to 8 cGy/min, either as a single dose of 10 Gy (105 patients) or in fractions (76 patients). To date, 86 patients have developed cataracts. Kaplan-Meier product limit estimates of the incidence of cataracts for patients given chemotherapy only and no TBI, single-dose TBI, and fractionated TBI are 19, 80, 18%, respectively. On the basis of proportional hazards regression analyses, patients given single-dose TBI had a relative risk of developing cataracts that was 4.7-fold higher than in patients given fractionated TBI or chemotherapy only, suggesting a significant sparing effect with use of TBI dose fractionation.

  16. Enhanced anti-tumor activity of the glycoengineered type II CD20 antibody obinutuzumab (GA101) in combination with chemotherapy in xenograft models of human lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Herting, Frank; Friess, Thomas; Bader, Sabine; Muth, Gunter; Hölzlwimmer, Gabriele; Rieder, Natascha; Umana, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a novel glycoengineered type II CD20 antibody in development for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We compared the anti-tumor activity of obinutuzumab and rituximab in preclinical studies using subcutaneous Z138 and WSU-DLCL2 xenograft mouse models. Obinutuzumab and rituximab were assessed alone and in combination with bendamustine, fludarabine, chlorambucil, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide/vincristine. Owing to strong single-agent efficacy in these models, suboptimal doses of obinutuzumab were applied to demonstrate a combination effect. Obinutuzumab plus bendamustine achieved superior tumor growth inhibition versus rituximab plus bendamustine and showed a statistically significant effect versus the respective single treatments. Combinations of obinutuzumab with fludarabine, chlorambucil or cyclophosphamide/vincristine demonstrated significantly superior activity to rituximab-based treatment. Obinutuzumab monotherapy was at least as effective as rituximab plus chemotherapy in vivo, and obinutuzumab plus chemotherapy was superior to the respective monotherapies. These data support further clinical investigation of obinutuzumab plus chemotherapy. PMID:24304419

  17. Enhanced anti-tumor activity of the glycoengineered type II CD20 antibody obinutuzumab (GA101) in combination with chemotherapy in xenograft models of human lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Herting, Frank; Friess, Thomas; Bader, Sabine; Muth, Gunter; Hölzlwimmer, Gabriele; Rieder, Natascha; Umana, Pablo; Klein, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a novel glycoengineered type II CD20 antibody in development for non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We compared the anti-tumor activity of obinutuzumab and rituximab in preclinical studies using subcutaneous Z138 and WSU-DLCL2 xenograft mouse models. Obinutuzumab and rituximab were assessed alone and in combination with bendamustine, fludarabine, chlorambucil, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide/vincristine. Owing to strong single-agent efficacy in these models, suboptimal doses of obinutuzumab were applied to demonstrate a combination effect. Obinutuzumab plus bendamustine achieved superior tumor growth inhibition versus rituximab plus bendamustine and showed a statistically significant effect versus the respective single treatments. Combinations of obinutuzumab with fludarabine, chlorambucil or cyclophosphamide/vincristine demonstrated significantly superior activity to rituximab-based treatment. Obinutuzumab monotherapy was at least as effective as rituximab plus chemotherapy in vivo, and obinutuzumab plus chemotherapy was superior to the respective monotherapies. These data support further clinical investigation of obinutuzumab plus chemotherapy.

  18. Modeling Combined Chemotherapy and Particle Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Durante, Marco; Tommasino, Francesco; Yamada, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the only cancer for which deaths are predicted to increase in 2014 and beyond. Combined radiochemotherapy protocols using gemcitabine and hypofractionated X-rays are ongoing in several clinical trials. Recent results indicate that charged particle therapy substantially increases local control of resectable and unresectable pancreas cancer, as predicted from previous radiobiology studies considering the high tumor hypoxia. Combination with chemotherapy improves the overall survival (OS). We compared published data on X-ray and charged particle clinical results with or without adjuvant chemotherapy calculating the biological effective dose. We show that chemoradiotherapy with protons or carbon ions results in 1 year OS significantly higher than those obtained with other treatment schedules. Further hypofractionation using charged particles may result in improved local control and survival. A comparative clinical trial using the standard X-ray scheme vs. the best current standard with carbon ions is crucial and may open new opportunities for this deadly disease. PMID:26217585

  19. Lack of correlation between histologic findings and response to chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, L D; Connelly, J H; Frye, D; Smith, T L; Hortobagyi, G N

    1991-08-01

    A retrospective analysis was undertaken to assess the prognostic role of histologic findings in response to chemotherapy and survival in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Histologic material was available for 395 of 1587 patients treated for metastatic breast cancer at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1973 and 1984. Chemotherapy consisted of 5-fluorouracil, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide or similar drugs, with or without tamoxifen. Maintenance cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil was continued for 2 years after a cumulative doxorubicin dose of 450 mg/m2 was administered. The histologic distribution was as follows: infiltrating ductal carcinoma, 353; invasive lobular, 14; mixed histology, ten; mucinous, seven; signet ring, four; tubular, three; papillary, two; sarcomatoid, one; and apocrine, one. Because individual histologic types occurred infrequently, the patients were divided into infiltrating ductal and nonductal groups. Baseline patient characteristics included age, performance status, estrogen-receptor status, prior hormone response, disease extent, and levels of alkaline phosphatase, bilirubin, and lactate dehydrogenase. These were similar in the two groups. Significantly more patients with nonductal histology had greater than three metastatic sites. There were also more patients with hemoglobin less than 10 mg/dl and albumin less than 3.5 mg/dl in the nonductal group of patients. However, statistically these factors did not have an impact on the results. There was a 63% response rate (17% complete and 46% partial) for the ductal group and a 60% response rate (12% complete and 48% partial) for the nonductal group. The time from initiation of chemotherapy to disease progression was identical (12 months) for the two groups. Survival from initiation of chemotherapy was not significantly different (22 months for ductal and 27 months for nonductal). Based on this study, the authors conclude that histologic findings have no bearing on

  20. Chemotherapy can induce weight normalization of morbidly obese mice despite undiminished ingestion of high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Myers, Cheryl E; Hoelzinger, Dominique B; Truong, Tiffany N; Chew, Lindsey A; Myles, Arpita; Chaudhuri, Leena; Egan, Jan B; Liu, Jun; Gendler, Sandra J; Cohen, Peter A

    2017-01-17

    Morbidly obese patients who accomplish substantial weight loss often display a long-term decline in their resting metabolism, causing even relatively restrained caloric intake to trigger a relapse to the obese state. Paradoxically, we observed that morbidly obese mice receiving chemotherapy for cancer experienced spontaneous weight reduction despite unabated ingestion of their high fat diet (HFD). This response to chemotherapy could also be achieved in morbidly obese mice without cancer. Optimally dosed methotrexate (MTX) or cyclophosphamide (CY) enabled the mice to completely and safely normalize their body weight despite continued consumption of obesogenic quantities of HFD. Weight reduction was not attributable to decreased HFD intake, enhanced energy expenditure or malabsorption. MTX or CY dosing significantly depleted both adipose tissue and preadipocyte progenitors. Remarkably, however, despite continued high fat feeding, a compensatory increase in hepatocyte lipid storage was not observed, but rather the opposite. Gene microarray liver analyses demonstrated that HFD mice receiving MTX or CY experienced significantly inhibited lipogenesis and lipid storage, whereas Enho (energy homeostasis) gene expression was significantly upregulated. Further metabolic studies employing a human hepatocellular line revealed that MTX treatment preserved robust oxidative phosphorylation, but also promoted mitochondrial uncoupling with a surge in proton leak. This is the first report that certain optimally dosed chemotherapeutic agents can induce weight loss in morbidly obese mice without reduced dietary intake, apparently by depleting stores of adipocytes and their progenitors, curtailment of lipogenesis, and inconspicuous disposal of incoming dietary lipid via a steady state partial uncoupling of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation.

  1. Preexisting antitumor immunity augments the antitumor effects of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingbing; Feng, Dongdong; Yu, Lynda X; Tsung, Kangla; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2013-06-01

    Efficacy of cancer chemotherapy is generally believed to be the result of direct drug killing of tumor cells. However, increased tumor cell killing does not always lead to improved efficacy. Herein, we demonstrate that the status of antitumor immunity at the time of chemotherapy treatment is a critical factor affecting the therapeutic outcome in that tumor-bearing mice that possess preexisting antitumor immunity respond to chemotherapy much better than those that do not. Enhancing antitumor immunity before or at the time of chemotherapy-induced antigen release increases subsequent response to chemotherapy significantly. By in vitro and in vivo measurements of antitumor immunity, we found a close correlation between the intensity of antitumor immunity activated by chemotherapy and the efficacy of treatment. Immune intervention with interleukin-12 during the early phase of chemotherapy-induced immune activation greatly amplifies the antitumor response, often resulting in complete tumor eradication not only at the chemo-treated local site, but also systemically. These findings provide additional evidence for an immune-mediated antitumor response to chemotherapy. Further, our results show that timely immune modification of chemotherapy-activated antitumor immunity can result in enhanced antitumor-immune response and complete tumor eradication.

  2. Phase Ib/II randomized, open-label study of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide with or without low-dose, short-course sunitinib in the pre-operative treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Andrea L.A.; Sundar, Raghav; Wang, Ting-Ting; Ng, Thian-C; Zhang, Bo; Tan, Sing-Huang; Soh, Thomas I.P.; Pang, Angela S.L.; Tan, Chee-Seng; Ow, Samuel G.W.; Wang, Lingzhi; Mogro, Jannet; Ho, Jingshan; Jeyasekharan, Anand D.; Huang, Yiqing; Thng, Choon-Hua; Chan, Ching-Wan; Hartman, Mikael; Iau, Philip; Buhari, Shaik A.; Goh, Boon-Cher; Lee, Soo-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Background Prolonged anti-angiogenic therapy destroys tumor vasculature, whereas vascular-normalizing doses may enhance intra-tumoral drug delivery. We hypothesize that low-dose, short-course sunitinib normalizes vasculature, enhancing chemotherapy efficacy. Patients and Methods In phase Ib, treatment-naïve breast cancer patients received four cycles of pre-operative doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide, with sunitinib before each cycle. The optimal dose of sunitinib leading to tumor vessel normalization on immunohistochemistry was identified. In phase II, subjects were randomized to chemotherapy alone or chemotherapy plus sunitinib at the recommended phase II dose (RP2D). Primary endpoint was pathological complete response (pCR) rate. Tumor and functional imaging biomarkers were evaluated serially. Results In phase Ib (n=9), sunitinib 12.5 mg daily for 7 days before each chemotherapy was established as RP2D. In phase II, patients receiving chemotherapy plus sunitinib (n=24) had similar pCR rates (5.0% versus 4.3%, p=1.00), but a higher incidence of chemotherapy dose delays (33.3% versus 8.7%, p=0.04), compared to those receiving chemotherapy alone (n=25). The addition of sunitinib to chemotherapy significantly increased vascular normalization index (VNI) and decreased lymphatic vessel density (D2-40) on immunohistochemistry [VNI:25.50±27.94% versus 49.29±31.84%, p=0.034; D2-40:3.29±2.70 versus 1.29±1.54, p=0.014, baseline versus post-cycle 1], and improved perfusion on DCE-MRI (Ktrans:12.6±9.6 mL/100 g/min versus 16.3±10.7 mL/100 g/min, baseline versus post-cycle 1, p=0.015). Conversely, immunohistochemical and DCE-MRI parameters were not significantly altered by chemotherapy alone. Conclusion Low-dose, short-course sunitinib prior to anthracycline-based chemotherapy in breast cancer patients did not improve pCR and increased chemotherapy dose delays. However, the addition of sunitinib induced compelling pharmacodynamic evidence of vascular normalization. Further

  3. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia as an adjuvant cancer therapy with chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryk, Alicia Ailie

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPH) is an emerging cancer therapy which has shown to be most effective when applied in the adjuvant setting with chemotherapy, radiation or surgery. Although mNPH employs heat as a primary therapeutic modality, conventional heat may not be the only cytotoxic effect. As such, my studies have focused on the mechanism and use of mNPH alone and in conjunction with cisplatinum chemotherapy in murine breast cancer cells and a related in vivo model. MNPH was compared to conventional microwave tumor heating, with results suggesting that mNPH (mNP directly injected into the tumor and immediately activated) and 915 MHz microwave hyperthermia, at the same thermal dose, result in similar tumor regrowth delay kinetics. However, mNPH shows significantly less peri-tumor normal tissue damage. MNPH combined with cisplatinum also demonstrated significant improvements in regrowth delay over either modality applied as a monotherapy. Additional studies demonstrated that a relatively short tumor incubation time prior to AMF exposure (less than 10 minutes) as compared to a 4-hour incubation time, resulted in faster heating rates, but similar regrowth delays when treated to the same thermal dose. The reduction of heating rate correlated well with the observed reduction in mNP concentration in the tumor observed with 4 hour incubation. The ability to effectively deliver cytotoxic mNPs to metastatic tumors is the hope and goal of systemic mNP therapy. However, delivering relevant levels of mNP is proving to be a formidable challenge. To address this issue, I assessed the ability of cisplatinum to simultaneously treat a tumor and improve the uptake of systemically delivered mNPs. Following a cisplatinum pretreatment, systemic mNPs uptake was increased by 3.1 X, in implanted murine breast tumors. Additional in vitro studies showed the necessity of a specific mNP/ Fe architecture and spatial relation for heat-based cytotoxicity in cultured cells.

  4. Influence of definitive radiation therapy for primary breast cancer on ability to deliver adjuvant chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lippman, M.E.; Edwards, B.K.; Findlay, P.; Danforth, D.W. Jr.; MacDonald, H.; D'Angelo, T.; Gorrell, C.

    1986-01-01

    Primary radiotherapy as a means of managing stage I and II breast cancer is receiving increasing attention. In a prospectively randomized trial comparing modified radical mastectomy to lumpectomy followed by definitive radiotherapy, we evaluated whether radiotherapy has a deleterious effect on the ability to administer adjuvant doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide to patients with histologically positive axillary lymph nodes. All patients were treated with an identical regimen, and doses were escalated to the same degree until myelosuppression occurred. There were no significant differences in the amount of chemotherapy administered to either treatment group. Patients in both groups received approximately 100% of the predicted dose of doxorubicin and approximately 117% of the predicted dose of cyclophosphamide. At present, we have no evidence that there are differences in recurrence rates as a function of the quantity of drug received, although longer follow-up is required.

  5. Protective Role of Silymarin on Hepatic and Renal Toxicity Induced by MTX Based Chemotherapy in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hagag, Adel A.; Elgamsy, Mohamed A.; El-Asy, Hassan M.; Mabrouk, Maaly M.

    2016-01-01

    Background ALL is the most common childhood malignancy. The children with ALL are treated with methotrexate (MTX) based chemotherapy protocols. MTX causes unpredictable serious hepatic and renal side effects. Silymarin has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities and stimulates tissue regeneration. This study aims to evaluate the protective effects of Silymarin on MTX-based chemotherapy-induced Hepatic and renal toxicity in children with ALL. Patients and Methods 80 children with newly diagnosed ALL were enrolled in the study. They were randomly divided into two groups. Group I included 40 children with ages ranging from 4–13 years and the mean age of 6.85± 2.89 years, who received Silymarin 420 mg/day in 3 divided doses for one week after each MTX dose. Group II included 40 children, with ages ranging from 4–12 years and the mean age of 7.30±2.6 years, who received placebo for one week after MTX therapy. For all patients liver functions including serum bilirubin, total proteins, albumin, globulin and albumin-globulin ratio, alkaline phosphatase, ALT and AST, prothrombin time and activity and renal functions including blood urea and serum creatinine, serum cystatin C and urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase were done to assess hepatic and renal toxicity before and after chemotherapy. Results There were no significant differences between group I and II as regard liver and renal functions before chemotherapy. After chemotherapy, there were significantly higher values of ALT and AST and alkaline phosphatase, and significantly lower Prothrombin activity in group II compared with group I. No significant differences between group I and II were found in total bilirubin, serum protein, and albumin levels. There was significantly lower blood urea, serum creatinine, and cystatin C and urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase in group I compared with group II. Conclusion Silymarin improved some hepatic and renal functions in children with ALL who received MTX

  6. Adjuvant chemotherapy for endometrial cancer after hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nick; Bryant, Andrew; Miles, Tracie; Hogberg, Thomas; Cornes, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometrial adenocarcinoma (womb cancer) is a malignant growth of the lining (endometrium) of the womb (uterus). It is distinct from sarcomas (tumours of the uterine muscle). Survival depends the risk of microscopic metastases after surgery. Adjuvant (postoperative) chemotherapy improves survival from some other adenocarcinomas, and there is evidence that endometrial cancer is sensitive to cytotoxic therapy. This systematic review examines the effect of chemotherapy on survival after hysterectomy for endometrial cancer. Objectives To assess efficacy of adjuvant (postoperative) chemotherapy for endometrial cancer. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 3), MEDLINE and EMBASE up to August 2010, registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing adjuvant chemotherapy with any other adjuvant treatment or no other treatment. Data collection and analysis We used a random-effects meta-analysis to assess hazard ratios (HR) for overall and progression-free survival and risk ratios (RR) to compare death rates and site of initial relapse. Main results Five RCTs compared no additional treatment with additional chemotherapy after hysterectomy and radiotherapy. Four trials compared platinum based combination chemotherapy directly with radiotherapy. Indiscriminate pooling of survival data from 2197 women shows a significant overall survival advantage from adjuvant chemotherapy (RR (95% CI) = 0.88 (0.79 to 0.99)). Sensitivity analysis focused on trials of modern platinum based chemotherapy regimens and found the relative risk of death to be 0.85 ((0.76 to 0.96); number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNT) = 25; absolute risk reduction = 4% (1% to 8%)). The HR for overall survival is 0.74 (0.64 to 0.89), significantly

  7. Dose response and factors related to interstitial pneumonitis after bone marrow transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Sagus; Schultheiss, Timothy E. . E-mail: schultheiss@coh.org; Wong, Jeffrey

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) and chemotherapy are common components of conditioning regimens for bone marrow transplantation. Interstitial pneumonitis (IP) is a known regimen-related complication. Using published data of IP in a multivariate logistic regression, this study sought to identify the parameters in the bone marrow transplantation conditioning regimen that were significantly associated with IP and to establish a radiation dose-response function. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of articles that reported IP incidence along with lung dose, fractionation, dose rate, and chemotherapy regimen. In the final analysis, 20 articles (n = 1090 patients), consisting of 26 distinct TBI/chemotherapy regimens, were included in the analysis. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors that influenced the incidence of IP. Results: A logistic model was generated from patients receiving daily fractions of radiation. In this model, lung dose, cyclophosphamide dose, and the addition of busulfan were significantly associated with IP. An incidence of 3%-4% with chemotherapy-only conditioning regimens is estimated from the models. The {alpha}/{beta} value of the linear-quadratic model was estimated to be 2.8 Gy. The dose eliciting a 50% incidence, D {sub 50}, for IP after 120 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide was 8.8 Gy; in the absence of chemotherapy, the estimated D {sub 50} is 10.6 Gy. No dose rate effect was observed. The use of busulfan as a substitute for radiation is equivalent to treating with 14.8 Gy in 4 fractions with 50% transmission blocks shielding the lung. The logistic regression failed to find a model that adequately fit the multiple-fraction-per-day data. Conclusions: Dose responses for both lung radiation dose and cyclophosphamide dose were identified. A conditioning regimen of 12 Gy TBI in 6 daily fractions induces an IP incidence of about 11% in the absence of lung shielding

  8. MAPK-ERK activation in kidney of male rats chronically fed ochratoxin A at a dose causing a significant incidence of renal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Marin-Kuan, M. Nestler, S.; Verguet, C.; Bezencon, C.; Piguet, D.; Delatour, T.; Mantle, P.; Cavin, C.; Schilter, B.

    2007-10-15

    Kidney samples of male Fischer 344 (F-344) rats fed a carcinogenic dose of OTA over 7 days, 21 days and 12 months were analysed for various cell signalling proteins known to be potentially involved in chemical carcinogenicity. OTA was found to increase the phosphorylation of atypical-PKC. This was correlated with a selective downstream activation of the MAP-kinase extracellular regulated kinases isoforms 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and of their substrates ELK1/2 and p90RSK. Moreover, analysis of effectors acting upstream of PKC indicated a possible mobilisation of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (lGFr) and phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1) system. An increased histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymatic activity associated with enhanced HDAC3 protein expression was also observed. These findings are potentially relevant with respect to the understanding of OTA nephrocarcinogenicity. HDAC-induced gene silencing has previously been shown to play a role in tumour development. Furthermore, PKC and the MEK-ERK MAP-kinase pathways are known to play important roles in cell proliferation, cell survival, anti-apoptotic activity and renal cancer development.

  9. Absence of a significant pharmacokinetic interaction between atorvastatin and fenofibrate: a randomized, crossover, study of a fixed-dose formulation in healthy Mexican subjects

    PubMed Central

    Patiño-Rodríguez, Omar; Martínez-Medina, Rosa María; Torres-Roque, Irma; Martínez-Delgado, Maricela; Mares-García, América Susana; Escobedo-Moratilla, Abraham; Covarrubias-Pinedo, Amador; Arzola-Paniagua, Angélica; Herrera-Torres, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Several clinical trials have substantiated the efficacy of the co-administration of statins like atorvastatin (ATO) and fibrates. Without information currently available about the interaction between the two drugs, a pharmacokinetic study was conducted to investigate the effect when both drugs were co-administered. The purpose of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic profile of tablets containing ATO 20 mg, or the combination of ATO 20 mg with fenofibrate (FNO) 160 mg administered to healthy Mexican volunteers. This was a randomized, two-period, two-sequence, crossover study; 36 eligible subjects aged between 20–50 years were included. Blood samples were collected up to 96 h after dosing, and pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained by non-compartmental analysis. Adverse events were evaluated based on subject interviews and physical examinations. Area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) and maximum plasma drug concentration (Cmax) were measured for ATO as the reference and ATO and FNO as the test product for bioequivalence design. The estimation computed (90% confidence intervals) for ATO and FNO combination versus ATO for Cmax, AUC0-t and AUC0-∞, were 102,09, 125,95, and 120,97%, respectively. These results suggest that ATO and FNO have no relevant clinical-pharmacokinetic drug interaction. PMID:25688207

  10. [Scalp cooling for chemotherapy-induced alopecia].

    PubMed

    Komen, Marion M C; Smorenburg, Carolien H; van den Hurk, Corina J G; Nortier, J W R Hans

    2011-01-01

    Alopecia is a very common side effect of cytostatic therapy and is considered one of the most emotionally distressing effects. To prevent alopecia scalp cooling is currently used in some indications in medical oncology in 59 hospitals in the Netherlands. The success of scalp cooling depends on various factors such as type of chemotherapy, dose, infusion time, number of treatment cycles and combinations of drugs. In general, scalp cooling is well tolerated. The reported side-effects are headache, coldness, dizziness and sometimes claustrophobia. An increase in the risk of scalp metastases has not been demonstrated. Proceeding from the South Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Centre a national working group is put together in order to draw up a national guideline for chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

  11. B-IGEV (bortezomib plus IGEV) versus IGEV before high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation in relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma: a randomized, phase II trial of the Fondazione Italiana Linfomi (FIL).

    PubMed

    Balzarotti, Monica; Brusamolino, Ercole; Angelucci, Emanuele; Carella, Angelo Michele; Vitolo, Umberto; Russo, Eleonora; Congiu, Angelagiovanna; Gotti, Manuel; Massidda, Stefania; Botto, Barbara; Annechini, Giorgia; Spina, Michele; Re, Alessandro; Zilioli, Vittorio Ruggero; Merli, Francesco; Salvi, Flavia; Stelitano, Caterina; Bonfichi, Maurizio; Rodari, Marcello; Murru, Roberta; Magagnoli, Massimo; Anastasia, Antonella; Mazza, Rita; Giordano, Laura; Santoro, Armando

    2016-10-01

    This randomized, multicenter study evaluates the addition of bortezomib (13 mg/m(2)) to IGEV (B-IGEV) in patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL). Patients received either four courses of IGEV alone (n = 40) or B-IGEV (n = 40). The primary endpoint was the complete response (CR) proportion, evaluated by FDG-PET, after induction chemotherapy. CR proportion was 39% with B-IGEV and 53% with IGEV. PFS and OS were similar between the two groups (two-year PFS: 58% vs 56%; two-year OS: 93% vs 81%). The PET-negative status after treatment was the only variable favorably influencing both PFS (two-year PFS: 77% vs 40%; p = 0.002) and OS (two-year OS: 100% vs 76%; p < 0.001). Toxicity was overall similar with the two regimens. The addition of bortezomib to IGEV does not improve response in relapsed/refractory HL patients. However, its favorable therapeutic and safety profile, and the prognostic role of pre-transplant PET negativity in patients receiving IGEV-based regimens are confirmed.

  12. Effect of vinorelbine, ifosfamide, and cisplatin combination chemotherapy in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahn, J B; Ko, W K; Lee, J G; Shim, K Y; Jeung, H C; Park, J O; Yoo, N C; Kim, B S; Kim, S K; Kim, S K; Kim, J H

    2000-12-01

    Cisplatin-based chemotherapy is being tried in the treatment of nonoperable cases of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the prognosis is unfavorable and to improve survival, clinical studies using various combinations of a variety of drugs as well as experimental material are in progress. We compared the efficacy and toxicities of combination chemotherapy using different doses of vinorelbine and ifosfamide with a constant dose of cisplatin in this study. Patients diagnosed with inoperable stage III or IV NSCLC between June 1997 and December 1998 were included. Cisplatin was administered at a constant dose of 80 mg/m2 on day 5, whereas vinorelbine on days 1 and 5 and ifosfamide on day 5 were administered in one of two different doses. In arm A, vinorelbine 25 mg/m2 and ifosfamide 3.0 g/m2 were administered. In arm B, vinorelbine 20 mg/m2 and ifosfamide 2.5 g/m2 were administered. Also, we reviewed for phase II and III studies that test 1) cisplatin, 2) vinorelbine monotherapy, and 3) vinorelbine/cisplatin/ifosfamide combination chemotherapy for stage IIIb-IV non-SCLC. Summation dose intensity (SDI) was calculated in each published and current study. Twenty patients in arm A and 35 patients in arm B were available for evaluation. There was no difference in patient activity, pathologic diagnosis, and differentiation or stage between the two arms. The median number of cycles was four in both arms. The response rate was 50% in arm A and 30% in arm B. The median survival times for arm A and B were 40 and 42 weeks, respectively, whereas the SDI was 1.94 and 1.7, respectively. More than grade III leukopenia was observed in 28.9% in arm A, which is more frequent than the 17.2% in arm B. There was a significant correlation between the SDIs and response rates and median survival (r2 = 0.629, p = 0.001; r2 = 0.453, p = 0.001, respectively). Although the follow-up period is relatively short, the survival time was similar in both arms. Because a high response rate may

  13. Immunogenicity of a reduced-dose whole killed rabies vaccine is significantly enhanced by ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant, Merck amorphous aluminum hydroxylphosphate sulfate (MAA) or a synthetic TLR9 agonist in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    DiStefano, Daniel; Antonello, Joseph M; Bett, Andrew J; Medi, Muneeswara B; Casimiro, Danilo R; ter Meulen, Jan

    2013-10-01

    There is a need for novel rabies vaccines suitable for short course, pre- and post-exposure prophylactic regimens which require reduced doses of antigen to address the current worldwide supply issue. We evaluated in rhesus macaques the immunogenicity of a quarter-dose of a standard rabies vaccine formulated with Merck's amorphous aluminum hydroxylphosphate sulfate adjuvant, the saponin-based ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant, or a synthetic TLR9 agonist. All adjuvants significantly increased the magnitude and durability of the humoral immune response as measured by rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). Several three-dose vaccine regimens resulted in adequate neutralizing antibody of ≥ 0.5 IU/ml earlier than the critical day seven post the first dose. Rabies vaccine with ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant given at days 0 and 3 resulted in neutralizing antibody titers which developed faster and were up to one log10 higher compared to WHO-recommended intramuscular and intradermal regimens and furthermore, passive administration of human rabies immunoglobulin did not interfere with immunogenicity of this reduced dose, short course vaccine regimen. Adjuvantation of whole-killed rabies vaccine for intramuscular injection may therefore be a viable alternative to intradermal application of non-adjuvanted vaccine for both pre- and post-exposure regimens.

  14. Reducing psychological distress in patients undergoing chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Milanti, Ariesta; Metsälä, Eija; Hannula, Leena

    Psychological distress is a common problem among patients with cancer, yet it mostly goes unreported and untreated. This study examined the association of a psycho-educational intervention with the psychological distress levels of breast cancer and cervical cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. The design of the study was quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design with a comparison group. One hundred patients at a cancer hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia, completed Distress Thermometer screening before and after chemotherapy. Fifty patients in the intervention group were given a psycho-educational video with positive reappraisal, education and relaxation contents, while receiving chemotherapy. Patients who received the psycho-educational intervention had significantly lower distress levels compared with those in the control group. Routine distress screening, followed by distress management and outcome assessment, is needed to improve the wellbeing of cancer patients.

  15. Comparison of consolidation strategies in acute myeloid leukemia: high-dose cytarabine alone versus intermediate-dose cytarabine combined with anthracyclines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Sik; Kang, Ka-Won; Lee, Se Ryeon; Park, Yong; Sung, Hwa Jung; Kim, Seok Jin; Choi, Chul Won; Kim, Byung Soo

    2015-09-01

    We compared the efficacy of high-dose cytarabine alone to that of intermediate-dose cytarabine combined with anthracyclines as consolidation therapy. Patients enrolled in the Korea University acute myeloid leukemia (AML) registry received remission induction chemotherapy with the same standard induction regimen (idarubicin and cytarabine 3 + 7). Postremission therapy was performed for three or four cycles according to one of the following regimens: high-dose cytarabine (3 g/m(2)) or combination of intermediate-dose cytarabine (1 g/m(2)) with anthracyclines (idarubicin or mitoxantrone). Among the 443 AML patients enrolled in the registry, 145 patients received consolidation chemotherapy. The median overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) in the high-dose cytarabine group were significantly longer than those in the anthracycline combination group (OS, not reached vs. 16.6 months, p = 0.045; RFS, 38.6 months vs. 11.0 months, p = 0.011). The median duration of neutropenia was longer in the anthracycline combination group than in the high-dose cytarabine group (8 vs. 10 days, p = 0.001). This study suggests that high-dose cytarabine consolidation may produce superior outcomes than combination treatment with intermediate-dose cytarabine and anthracyclines and that the addition of anthracyclines during AML consolidation has limited value as compared to cytarabine intensification.

  16. Delayed Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting: Pathogenesis, Incidence, and Current Management

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Bernardo L.

    2017-01-01

    Even when chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) can be effectively controlled in the acute phase, it may still occur in the delayed phase. Identifying at-risk patients is complex and requires consideration of clinical, personal, demographic, and behavioral factors. Delayed CINV has a significant detrimental effect on patients’ daily life and is responsible for significant healthcare resource utilization. Patients who do not experience acute CINV are not necessarily exempt from delayed CINV, and healthcare professionals have been shown to underestimate the incidence of delayed CINV. Failure to protect against CINV during the first cycle of chemotherapy is the most significant independent risk factor for delayed CINV during subsequent cycles. Addition of a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist to antiemetic prophylactic regimens involving a 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptor antagonist and a corticosteroid helps to ameliorate delayed CINV, particularly vomiting. Netupitant and rolapitant are second-generation neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists that provide effective prophylaxis against delayed chemotherapy-induced vomiting and also have an antinausea benefit. All of the neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists with the exception of rolapitant inhibit or induce cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), and a reduced dose of dexamethasone (a CYP3A4 substrate) should be administered with aprepitant or netupitant; by contrast, this is not necessary with rolapitant. Here we review specific challenges associated with delayed CINV, its pathophysiology, epidemiology, treatment, and outcomes relative to acute CINV, and its management within the larger context of overall CINV. PMID:28194109

  17. Chemotherapy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ngu, Siew-Fei; Ngan, Hextan Y S

    2016-05-01

    Cancer diagnosed during pregnancy is uncommon, complicating between 0.02% and 0.1% of all pregnancies. Nonetheless, due to increasing age of childbearing, the incidence of cancer during pregnancy is likely to increase due to higher incidence of several age-dependent malignancies. The most common malignancies include breast cancer, cervical cancer, malignant melanoma and lymphoma. One of the key challenges in the management of cancer in pregnancy is treating the women with standard chemotherapy regimen, without compromising the safety of the developing foetus. Exposure of chemotherapy in the first trimester is associated with an increased risk of major birth defects, whereas use in the second and third trimesters is associated with intrauterine growth restriction, low birthweight and stillbirth. In this article, we review available data regarding the use of chemotherapeutic agents in pregnancy, and we summarise the neonatal outcomes, including malformations, perinatal complications and long-term follow-up. In addition, the management plan during pregnancy is also discussed.

  18. [Management of adverse effects with antituberculosis chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Tsuyuguchi, Kazunari; Wada, Masako

    2011-02-01

    Tuberculosis has now become a curable disease with chemotherapy. So it is natural that the present issues in tuberculosis management are focused on how to complete standard chemotherapy. In this context, management of adverse effects constitutes an essential part of antituberculosis chemotherapy, as well as directly observed therapy. In this symposium, discussions were held about three major subjects on this issue. First, hepatotoxicity develops frequently and has sometimes fatal outcome, which makes it the most problematic adverse effect. "Management of hepatotoxicity during antituberculosis chemotherapy" was published by the Japanese Society for Tuberculosis (JST) in 2006. Dr. Shinsho Yoshiba evaluated this recommendation and pointed out that the criteria for discontinuation of drug based on AST, ALT and bilirubin levels is too sensitive and the concept of predicting fulminant hepatic failure (FHF) is lacking. He stressed the importance of monitoring serum prothrombin time for predicting FHF. Next, allergic drug reaction such as fever or skin rash often causes distress, although rarely fatal. As isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RFP) are key drugs for the cure, readministration of these drugs is often attempted by desensitization therapy. "Recommendation about desensitization therapy of antituberculosis drugs" was also published by JST in 1997. Dr. Yoshihiro Kobashi reported high success rates of 79 percent for INH and 75 percent for RFP according to this recommendation. He also reported correlated factor with the success, such as the longer period from the discontinuation to the desensitization therapy and lower doses of drugs at starting desensitization. Finally, we sometimes experience transient worsening of radiographical findings and general symptoms during antituberculosis chemotherapy. This is presumed to be due to allergic reaction to dead bacilli without requiring discontinuation of the drug. Differential diagnosis includes drug-induced pneumonia requring

  19. Lack of significant effect of bilastine administered at therapeutic and supratherapeutic doses and concomitantly with ketoconazole on ventricular repolarization: results of a thorough QT study (TQTS) with QT-concentration analysis.

    PubMed

    Tyl, Benoît; Kabbaj, Meriam; Azzam, Sara; Sologuren, Ander; Valiente, Román; Reinbolt, Elizabeth; Roupe, Kathryn; Blanco, Nathalie; Wheeler, William

    2012-06-01

    The effect of bilastine on cardiac repolarization was studied in 30 healthy participants during a multiple-dose, triple-dummy, crossover, thorough QT study that included 5 arms: placebo, active control (400 mg moxifloxacin), bilastine at therapeutic and supratherapeutic doses (20 mg and 100 mg once daily, respectively), and bilastine 20 mg administered with ketoconazole 400 mg. Time-matched, triplicate electrocardiograms (ECGs) were recorded with 13 time points extracted predose and 16 extracted over 72 hours post day 4 dosing. Four QT/RR corrections were implemented: QTcB; QTcF; a linear individual correction (QTcNi), the primary correction; and a nonlinear one (QTcNnl). Moxifloxacin was associated with a significant increase in QTcNi at all time points between 1 and 12 hours, inclusively. Bilastine administration at 20 mg and 100 mg had no clinically significant impact on QTc (maximum increase in QTcNi, 5.02 ms; upper confidence limit [UCL] of the 1-sided, 95% confidence interval, 7.87 ms). Concomitant administration of ketoconazole and bilastine 20 mg induced a clinically relevant increase in QTc (maximum increase in QTcNi, 9.3 ms; UCL, 12.16 ms). This result was most likely related to the cardiac effect of ketoconazole because for all time points, bilastine plasma concentrations were lower than those observed following the supratherapeutic dose.

  20. Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia among pediatric cancer patients in Egypt: Risks and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Mohamed; Hassan, Tamer; Sakr, Hanan; Karam, Nehad; Rahman, Doaa Abdel; Shahbah, Doaa; Zakaria, Marwa; Fehr, Sahbaa

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (CIN) is the major dose-limiting toxicity of systemic chemotherapy and it is associated with significant morbidity, mortality and treatment cost. The aim of the present study was to identify the risk factors that may predispose pediatric cancer patients who receive myelosuppressive chemotherapy to CIN and associated sequelae. A total of 113 neutropenia episodes were analyzed and the risk factors for CIN were classified as patient-specific, disease-specific and regimen-specific, while the consequences of CIN were divided into infectious and dose-modifying sequelae. The risks and consequences were analyzed to target high-risk patients with appropriate preventive strategies. Among our patients, 28% presented with a single neutropenia attack, while 72% experienced recurrent attacks during their treatment cycles. The mean absolute neutrophil count was 225.5±128.5 ×109/l (range, 10–497 ×109/l), starting 14.2±16.3 days (range, 2–100 days) after the onset of chemotherapy and resolving within 11.2±7.3 days, either with (45.1%) or without (54.9%) granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). No significant association was observed between any patient characteristics or disease stage and the risk for CIN. However, certain malignancies, such as acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), neuroblastoma and Burkitt's lymphoma, and certain regimens, such as induction block for ALL and acute myelocytic leukemia, exerted the most potent myelotoxic effect, with severe and prolonged episodes of neutropenia. G-CSF significantly shortened the duration of the episodes and enhanced bone marrow recovery. Febrile neutropenia was the leading complication among our cases (73.5%) and was associated with several documented infections, particularly mucositis (54.9%), respiratory (45.1%), gastrointestinal tract (38.9%) and skin (23.9%) infections. A total of 6% of our patients succumbed to infection-related complications. Neutropenia was responsible for treatment

  1. Chemotherapy of Leishmaniasis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    NOTES 1S. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side linscoeawy and identiIIy by block number) LEISHMANIA LEISHMANIASIS CHEMOTHERAPY ANTILEISHMANIAL PENTOSTAM...number of compounds was supplied by WRAIR for testing on four strains of Leishmania in December 1977. Preliminary data were supplied to WRAIR by the...1 Visceral leishmaniasis The laboratory model used for the investigation of drug activity against visceral infection in this laboratory is L. donovani

  2. Chemotherapy of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    bacterial emerging diseases. 43rd Annual Commonwealth Caribbean Medical Research Council Meeting. Ocho Rios, Jamaica, April, 1998. Palmer, C.J., J...1 Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0196 TITLE: CHEMOTHERAPY OF CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: DR. ARBA AGER CONTRACTING ...Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a

  3. Survival outcomes and toxicity of intraoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ji-Young; Koo, Yu-Jin; Kim, Mi-Jung; Kim, Tae-Jin; Lim, Kyung-Taek

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of single-dose cisplatin intraperitoneally administered during cytoreductive surgery in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods Data from patients who underwent surgical management followed by intravenous (IV) chemotherapy for stage III epithelial ovarian cancer from 2003 to 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Subjects were divided into intraperitoneal (IP) and no-intraperitoneal (NIP) groups according to the administration of IP cisplatin 100 mg during the staging surgery. Clinical results such as survival outcomes and chemotherapeutic toxicity were compared between the two groups. Results Thirty-seven patients in the IP group and 26 in the NIP group were identified. There were no significant differences between the two groups in basic characteristics such as age, histology, and surgical procedures. After the surgery with or without IP chemotherapy, there was no difference in the rate of either hematologic or gastrointestinal toxicity or in the rate of incompletion of following IV chemotherapy. Tumor recurrence occurred in 67.6% (25 patients) of IP group and 57.7% (15 patients) of NIP group (P=0.423) during the mean follow-up period of 37 months. The 3-year disease free-survival rate was 39.9% in the IP group and 35.8% in the NIP group, and the relative risk of recurrence was 0.864 (95% confidence interval, 0.447-1.673; P=0.665) in the IP group as compared with the NIP group. Conclusion IP chemotherapy with single-dose cisplatin during cytoreductive surgery is safe and feasible with little chemotherapeutic toxicity in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer, but no distinct improvement in survival could be demonstrated in the present study. PMID:25469337

  4. Chemotherapy, IL-12 gene therapy and combined adjuvant therapy of HPV 16-associated MHC class I-proficient and -deficient tumours.

    PubMed

    Indrová, Marie; Bieblová, Jana; Jandlová, Tána; Vonka, Vladimír; Pajtasz-Piasecka, Elzbieta; Reinis, Milan

    2006-01-01

    Moderately immunogenic HPV 16-associated murine tumour cell line mimicking human HPV 16-associated neoplasms TC-1 (MHC class I(+)) and its variants, TC-1/P3C10 and TC-1/A9, with a marked down-regulation of MHC I molecules, were used to examine the effect of local interleukin 12 (IL-12) gene therapy for the treatment of early tumour transplants and minimal residual tumour disease obtained after cytoreductive chemotherapy (CMRTD). Experiments were designed to examine whether down-regulation of MHC class I molecules plays a role during chemotherapy and gene therapy of early tumour transplants. It was found that peritumoral administration of IL-12-producing tumour cell vaccines (single dose, day 8 after tumour cell administration) inhibited the growth of both TC-1 (MHC class I positive) tumours and their MHC class I-deficient variants. To investigate the antitumour effects in a clinically relevant setting, IL-12 gene therapy was utilised for the treatment of minimal residual tumour disease after cytoreductive chemotherapy. Intra-peritoneal treatment of tumour-bearing mice with ifosfamide derivative, CBM-4A, produced a significant tumour-inhibitory effect. This treatment was followed by peritumoral s.c. administration of genetically modified TC-1 (MHC class I positive) or MK16/I/IIIABC (MHC class I negative) vaccines producing IL-12 (single dose, day 7 after chemotherapy) or with recombinant interleukin 12 (rIL-12) in two cycles of 5 daily doses (days 8-19) after chemotherapy. This combined therapy significantly inhibited the growth of TC-1 and TC-1/A9 (MHC class I-) tumours. When the combined therapy of TC-1 (MHC class I positive) tumours was followed by peritumoral administration of bone marrow dendritic cell (BMDC) vaccines, the IL-12-mediated inhibitory effect was significantly boosted. In the next set of experiments, the impacts of chemotherapy and IL-12 adjuvant therapy on MHC class I surface expression were assessed. Chemotherapy and gene therapy of tumours led

  5. Preradiation chemotherapy may improve survival in pediatric diffuse intrinsic brainstem gliomas: Final results of BSG 98 prospective trial

    PubMed Central

    Frappaz, Didier; Schell, Matthias; Thiesse, Philippe; Marec-Bérard, Perrine; Mottolese, Carmine; Perol, David; Bergeron, Christophe; Philip, Thierry; Ricci, Anne Claire; Galand-Desme, Sophie; Szathmari, Alexandru; Carrie, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Radiation therapy remains the only treatment that provides clinical benefit to children with diffuse brainstem tumors. Their median survival, however, rarely exceeds 9 months. The authors report a prospective trial of front-line chemotherapy aimed at delaying radiation until time of clinical progression. The aim was to investigate the possibility that radiotherapy would maintain its activity in children whose disease progressed after chemotherapy. Twenty-three patients took part in this protocol, the BSG 98 protocol, which consisted of frontline chemotherapy alternating hematotoxic and nonhematotoxic schedules. Each cycle included three courses delivered monthly; the first course was 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea– cisplatin, and the second and third were high-dose methotrexate. Three patients underwent one cycle; 5 patients each, two and three cycles; and 10 patients, four cycles. Twenty of the 23 patients eventually received local radiation therapy. A historical cohort of 14 patients who received at least local radiation therapy served as controls. Four patients experienced severe iatrogenic infections, and 11 patients required platelet transfusions. Median survival increased significantly in patients participating in the protocol compared to that in the historical controls (17 months, 95% confidence interval [CI], 10–23 months, vs. 9 months, 95% CI, 8–10 months; p = 0.022), though hospitalization was prolonged (57 vs. 25 days, p = 0.001). Although frontline chemotherapy alternating hematotoxic and nonhematotoxic schedules significantly increases overall median survival, its cost from infection and hospitalization deserves honest discussion with the children and their parents. PMID:18577561

  6. Chemotherapy-related toxicity in patients with non-metastatic Ewing sarcoma: influence of sex and age.

    PubMed

    Paioli, Anna; Luksch, Roberto; Fagioli, Franca; Tamburini, Angela; Cesari, Marilena; Palmerini, Emanuela; Abate, Massimo Eraldo; Marchesi, Emanuela; Balladelli, Alba; Pratelli, Loredana; Ferrari, Stefano

    2014-02-01

    Influence of age and sex on chemotherapy-related toxicity was evaluated in children (3-9 years), adolescents (10-17 years), and adults (up to 40 years) with localized Ewing sarcoma (ES) enrolled in the ISG/SSG III protocol. Treatment was based on vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, dactinomycin, and etoposide. High-dose chemotherapy with busulfan and melphalan was given in poor responder patients. The analysis was based on 2191 courses of standard chemotherapy and 230 patients. A lower risk of G4 leukopenia and thrombocytopenia, hospitalization, febrile neutropenia, and red blood cell (RBC) transfusions was observed in males. Use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was more frequent in adults, while children more often received RBC transfusions. A significant correlation between sex and chemotherapy-related toxicity was observed in the study, whereas no significant differences in terms of bone marrow toxicity can be expected according to patient age. Further studies should analyse the role of pharmacokinetics, pharmacogenomics, and clinical characteristics.

  7. Radiation therapy for early stage unfavorable Hodgkin lymphoma: is dose reduction feasible?

    PubMed

    Laskar, Siddhartha; Kumar, Deepak P; Khanna, Nehal; Menon, Hari; Sengar, Manju; Arora, Brijesh; Gujral, Sumeet; Shet, Tanuja; Sridhar, Epari; Rangarajan, Venkatesh; Muckaden, Mary Ann; Nair, Reena; Banavali, Shripad

    2014-10-01

    One hundred and fifty-one patients aged between 3 and 70 years with early stage unfavorable Hodgkin lymphoma were included. Patients received 4-6 cycles of ABVD (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine) chemotherapy and involved field radiation therapy (IFRT). The most common histology was mixed cellularity (43%). The majority had stage IIAX disease. IFRT doses were 25.2 Gy/14 fractions and 34.2 Gy/19 fractions for adults with a complete response (CR) and partial response (PR), respectively, while the doses were 19.8 Gy/11 fractions and 30.6 Gy/17 fractions, respectively, for children. After 60 months (median), the 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 88.4% and 93.2%, respectively. On univariate analysis, prognostic factors with significant impact on PFS were age ≥ 18 years, nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) histology, extranodal disease and response to treatment. Extranodal disease had a significant impact on OS. On multivariate analysis, NLPHL histology (p = 0.001) and response at 3 months (p = 0.000) had a significant impact on PFS. There were no in-field relapses in patients with bulky disease receiving RT doses > 25.2 Gy. Chemotherapy related acute pulmonary toxicity was documented in 21.4% and 4.8% of patients after six and four cycles of ABVD chemotherapy (p = 0.041). Four cycles of ABVD and reduced dose IFRT resulted in optimal outcomes.

  8. Gender difference: fertility preservation in young women but not in men exposed to gonadotoxic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, Z

    2007-03-01

    Decreased secretion of pituitary gonadotropins, by decreasing gonadal function, may possibly protect against the sterilizing effects of chemotherapy. Although previous claims that primordial germ cells fare better than germ cells that are part of an active cell cycle have been made, this hypothesis has not been seriously tested clinically until recently. The only prospective randomized study performed to date found that gonadotropin releasing hormone agonistic analogue (GnRH-a) protected the ovary against cyclophosphamide-induced damage in Rhesus monkeys by significantly decreasing the number of follicles lost during the chemotherapeutic insult. We have administered a monthly depot i.m. injection of GnRH-a to more than 125 young patients exposed to gonadotoxic chemotherapy for malignant or nonmalignant diseases, after informed consent, starting before chemotherapy for up to 6 months, in parallel and until the end of chemotherapeutic treatment. Less than 7% developed irreversible hypergonadotropic amenorrhea. The remainder (>93%) resumed cyclic ovarian function, of which 32 patients spontaneously conceived 46 times. These patients were compared to a control group of over 125 patients of comparable age (15-40 years), who were similarly treated with chemotherapy but without the GnRH-a adjuvant. The 2 groups were similar in age, diagnosis, and the ratio of HD to non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients. The 2 groups also received similar doses of radiotherapy exposure and the proportion of radio-plus chemotherapy-treated patients was similar. The cumulative doses of each chemotherapeutic agent and the mean or median radiotherapy exposure did not differ between the groups. Our and others' results support the effectiveness of GnRH-a administration also to patients receiving cyclophosphamide pulses for systemic lupus erythematosus and other autoimmune diseases. Possible explanations for the beneficial effect of the GnRH-a on minimizing the gonadotoxic effect of chemotherapy are

  9. A Combination of Spatial and Recursive Temporal Filtering for Noise Reduction when Using Region of Interest (ROI) Fluoroscopy for Patient Dose Reduction in Image Guided Vascular Interventions with Significant Anatomical Motion

    PubMed Central

    Nagesh, S.V. Setlur; Khobragade, P.; Ionita, C.; Bednarek, D.R; Rudin, S.

    2015-01-01

    Because x-ray based image-guided vascular interventions are minimally invasive they are currently the most preferred method of treating disorders such as stroke, arterial stenosis, and aneurysms; however, the x-ray exposure to the patient during long image-guided interventional procedures could cause harmful effects such as cancer in the long run and even tissue damage in the short term. ROI fluoroscopy reduces patient dose by differentially attenuating the incident x-rays outside the region-of-interest. To reduce the noise in the dose-reduced regions previously recursive temporal filtering was successfully demonstrated for neurovascular interventions. However, in cardiac interventions, anatomical motion is significant and excessive recursive filtering could cause blur. In this work the effects of three noise-reduction schemes, including recursive temporal filtering, spatial mean filtering, and a combination of spatial and recursive temporal filtering, were investigated in a simulated ROI dose-reduced cardiac intervention. First a model to simulate the aortic arch and its movement was built. A coronary stent was used to simulate a bio-prosthetic valve used in TAVR procedures and was deployed under dose-reduced ROI fluoroscopy during the simulated heart motion. The images were then retrospectively processed for noise reduction in the periphery, using recursive temporal filtering, spatial filtering and a combination of both. Quantitative metrics for all three noise reduction schemes are calculated and are presented as results. From these it can be concluded that with significant anatomical motion, a combination of spatial and recursive temporal filtering scheme is best suited for reducing the excess quantum noise in the periphery. This new noise-reduction technique in combination with ROI fluoroscopy has the potential for substantial patient-dose savings in cardiac interventions. PMID:26900203

  10. A Combination of Spatial and Recursive Temporal Filtering for Noise Reduction when Using Region of Interest (ROI) Fluoroscopy for Patient Dose Reduction in Image Guided Vascular Interventions with Significant Anatomical Motion.

    PubMed

    Nagesh, S V Setlur; Khobragade, P; Ionita, C; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2015-02-21

    Because x-ray based image-guided vascular interventions are minimally invasive they are currently the most preferred method of treating disorders such as stroke, arterial stenosis, and aneurysms; however, the x-ray exposure to the patient during long image-guided interventional procedures could cause harmful effects such as cancer in the long run and even tissue damage in the short term. ROI fluoroscopy reduces patient dose by differentially attenuating the incident x-rays outside the region-of-interest. To reduce the noise in the dose-reduced regions previously recursive temporal filtering was successfully demonstrated for neurovascular interventions. However, in cardiac interventions, anatomical motion is significant and excessive recursive filtering could cause blur. In this work the effects of three noise-reduction schemes, including recursive temporal filtering, spatial mean filtering, and a combination of spatial and recursive temporal filtering, were investigated in a simulated ROI dose-reduced cardiac intervention. First a model to simulate the aortic arch and its movement was built. A coronary stent was used to simulate a bio-prosthetic valve used in TAVR procedures and was deployed under dose-reduced ROI fluoroscopy during the simulated heart motion. The images were then retrospectively processed for noise reduction in the periphery, using recursive temporal filtering, spatial filtering and a combination of both. Quantitative metrics for all three noise reduction schemes are calculated and are presented as results. From these it can be concluded that with significant anatomical motion, a combination of spatial and recursive temporal filtering scheme is best suited for reducing the excess quantum noise in the periphery. This new noise-reduction technique in combination with ROI fluoroscopy has the potential for substantial patient-dose savings in cardiac interventions.

  11. A combination of spatial and recursive temporal filtering for noise reduction when using region of interest (ROI) fluoroscopy for patient dose reduction in image guided vascular interventions with significant anatomical motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Khobragade, P.; Ionita, C.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2015-03-01

    Because x-ray based image-guided vascular interventions are minimally invasive they are currently the most preferred method of treating disorders such as stroke, arterial stenosis, and aneurysms; however, the x-ray exposure to the patient during long image-guided interventional procedures could cause harmful effects such as cancer in the long run and even tissue damage in the short term. ROI fluoroscopy reduces patient dose by differentially attenuating the incident x-rays outside the region-of-interest. To reduce the noise in the dose-reduced regions previously recursive temporal filtering was successfully demonstrated for neurovascular interventions. However, in cardiac interventions, anatomical motion is significant and excessive recursive filtering could cause blur. In this work the effects of three noise-reduction schemes, including recursive temporal filtering, spatial mean filtering, and a combination of spatial and recursive temporal filtering, were investigated in a simulated ROI dose-reduced cardiac intervention. First a model to simulate the aortic arch and its movement was built. A coronary stent was used to simulate a bioprosthetic valve used in TAVR procedures and was deployed under dose-reduced ROI fluoroscopy during the simulated heart motion. The images were then retrospectively processed for noise reduction in the periphery, using recursive temporal filtering, spatial filtering and a combination of both. Quantitative metrics for all three noise reduction schemes are calculated and are presented as results. From these it can be concluded that with significant anatomical motion, a combination of spatial and recursive temporal filtering scheme is best suited for reducing the excess quantum noise in the periphery. This new noise-reduction technique in combination with ROI fluoroscopy has the potential for substantial patient-dose savings in cardiac interventions.

  12. Hyperammonemic encephalopathy after chemotherapy. Survival after treatment with sodium benzoate and sodium phenylacetate.

    PubMed

    del Rosario, M; Werlin, S L; Lauer, S J

    1997-12-01

    A 16-year-old boy had hyperammonemia and encephalopathy develop after high-dose chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. He was treated successfully with the ammonia-trapping agents sodium benzoate and sodium phenylacetate.

  13. Clinical roundtable monograph: New data in emerging treatment options for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Gary R; Navari, Rudolph M; Rugo, Hope S

    2014-03-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) has long been one of the most troublesome adverse effects of chemotherapy, leading to significant detriments in quality of life and functioning, increased economic costs, and, in some cases, the discontinuation of effective cancer therapy. The past 2 decades have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of effective antiemetic agents, with the introduction of the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT₃]) receptor antagonists (ondansetron, granisetron, and palonosetron), the neurokinin-1 (NK₁) receptor antagonists (aprepitant and fosaprepitant), and the identification of other agents that have demonstrated efficacy against CINV, including corticosteroids. These agents often provide excellent control of emesis. Nausea, however, has proven more intractable, particularly in the days after administration of chemotherapy. Newer antiemetic agents under study may provide additional CINV control, particularly against delayed nausea. New agents undergoing review by the US Food and Drug Administration for the prevention of CINV include the novel NK₁ receptor antagonist rolapitant and a fixed-dose combination consisting of the novel NK₁ receptor antagonist netupitant and palonosetron (NEPA). Adherence to clinical practice guidelines has been shown to significantly improve CINV control. As antiemetic therapy continues to evolve, it will be important for clinicians to stay informed of new developments and changes in guidelines.

  14. Keratinocyte growth factor protects mice from chemotherapy and radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury and mortality.

    PubMed

    Farrell, C L; Bready, J V; Rex, K L; Chen, J N; DiPalma, C R; Whitcomb, K L; Yin, S; Hill, D C; Wiemann, B; Starnes, C O; Havill, A M; Lu, Z N; Aukerman, S L; Pierce, G F; Thomason, A; Potten, C S; Ulich, T R; Lacey, D L

    1998-03-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells including those of the gastrointestinal tract. Although chemotherapeutics and radiation exposure kill rapidly proliferating tumor cells, rapidly dividing normal cells of the host's gastrointestinal tract are also frequently damaged, leading to the clinical condition broadly termed "mucositis." In this report, recombinant human KGF used as a pretreatment in several mouse models of chemotherapy and/or radiation-induced gastrointestinal injury significantly improved mouse survival. Using multiple-dose 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, and radiation in combination and total body radiation alone models, KGF increased survival by 55% or greater. In the models that used chemotherapy with or without radiation, KGF significantly ameliorated weight loss after injury and accelerated weight gain during recovery. The basis of these systemic benefits appears to be due in part to the trophic effects of the growth factor on the intestinal epithelium because KGF pretreatment caused an increase in measures of mucosal thickness (villus height and crypt depth) that persisted during the course of 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Treatment with KGF also afforded a 3.5-fold improvement in crypt survival in the small intestine, suggesting that KGF also has a direct effect on the crypt stem cells. These data indicate that KGF may be therapeutically useful to lessen the intestinal side effects of current cancer therapy regimens.

  15. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy (IPC) for peritoneal carcinomatosis: review of animal models.

    PubMed

    Gremonprez, Félix; Willaert, Wouter; Ceelen, Wim

    2014-02-01

    The development of suitable animal models is essential to experimental research on intraperitoneal chemotherapy (IPC). This review of the English literature (MEDLINE) presents a detailed analysis of current animal models and gives recommendations for future experimental research. Special consideration should be given to cytotoxic drug dose and concentration, tumor models, and outcome parameters.

  16. Consolidation whole abdomen irradiation following adjuvant carboplatin-paclitaxel based chemotherapy for advanced uterine epithelial cancer: feasibility, toxicity and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate feasibility and preliminary outcomes associated with sequential whole abdomen irradiation (WAI) as consolidative treatment following comprehensive surgery and systemic chemotherapy for advanced endometrial cancer. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients treated at our institution from 2000 to 2011. Inclusion criteria were stage III-IV endometrial cancer patients with histological proof of one or more sites of extra-uterine abdomen-confined disease, treated with WAI as part of multimodal therapy. Endpoints were feasibility, acute toxicity, late effects, recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). Twenty patients were identified. Chemotherapy consisted of 3 to 6 cycles of a platinum-paclitaxel regimen in 18 patients. WAI was delivered using conventional technique to a median total dose of 27.5 Gy. Results No grade 4 toxicities occurred during chemotherapy or radiotherapy. No radiation dose reduction was necessary. Three patients developed small bowel obstruction, all in the context of recurrent intraperitoneal disease. Kaplan-Meier estimates and 95% confidence intervals for RFS and OS at one year were 63% (38–80%) and 83% (56-94%) and at 3 years 57% (33-76%) and 62% (34-81%), respectively. On univariate Cox analysis, stage IVB and serous papillary (SP) histology were found to be statistically significantly (at the p = 0.05 level) associated with worse RFS and OS. The peritoneal cavity was the most frequent site of initial failure. Conclusions Consolidative WAI following chemotherapy is feasible and can be performed without interruption with manageable acute and late toxicity. Patients with endometrioid adenocarcinoma, especially stage FIGO III, had favorable outcomes possibly meriting prospective evaluation of the addition of WAI following chemotherapy in selected patients. Patients with SP do poorly and do not routinely benefit from this approach. PMID:24125168

  17. Body Composition as a Prognostic Factor of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Toxicity and Outcome in Patients with Locally Advanced Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Velho, Sónia; Agostinho, Lisa; Branco, Francisco; Santos, Marta; Santos, Maria Pia Costa; Oliveira, Maria Helena; Strecht, João; Maio, Rui; Cravo, Marília; Baracos, Vickie E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Neoadjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival in locally advanced gastric cancer, but it is associated with significant toxicity. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity have been studied in several types of cancers and have been reported to be associated with higher chemotherapy toxicity and morbi-mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of sarcopenia/sarcopenic obesity in patients with gastric cancer, as well as its association with chemotherapy toxicity and long-term outcomes. Materials and Methods A retrospective analysis was performed using an academic cancer center patient cohort diagnosed with locally advanced gastric cancer between January 2012 and December 2014 and treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We analyzed body composition (skeletal muscle and visceral fat index) in axial computed tomography images. Results A total of 48 patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 68±10 years, and 33 patients (69%) were men. Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 22 patients (46%), and treatment was terminated early owing to toxicity in 17 patients (35%). Median follow-up was 17 months. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity were found at diagnosis in 23% and 10% of patients, respectively. We observed an association between termination of chemotherapy and both sarcopenia (P=0.069) and sarcopenic obesity (P=0.004). On multivariate analysis, the odds of treatment termination were higher in patients with sarcopenia (odds ratio=4.23; P=0.050). Patients with sarcopenic obesity showed lower overall survival (median survival of 6 months [95% confidence interval {CI}=3.9–8.5] vs. 25 months [95% CI=20.2–38.2]; log-rank test P=0.000). Conclusions Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity were associated with early termination of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with gastric cancer; additionally, sarcopenic obesity was associated with poor survival. PMID:28337365

  18. Human recombinant TSH preceding a therapeutic dose of radioiodine for multinodular goiters has no significant effect in the surge of TSH-receptor and TPO antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Ileana G S; Perone, Bruno H; Silva, Marcia N C; Knobel, Meyer; Medeiros-Neto, Geraldo

    2005-02-01

    Radioiodine (RAI) treatment has increasingly been used mostly in elderly patients with multinodular goiter (MNG) as an alternative for surgery. Recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) has been demonstrated to increase the uptake of RAI and also to promote a more even distribution of radionuclide among the various nodules. We have compared the surge of autoantibodies to thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) and to the TSH receptor (TRAb) in two groups of patients with MNG. Group RAI (n = 15) received only RAI, and Group RAI+rhTSH (n = 15) received RAI 24 h after 0.45 mg of rhTSH intramuscularly. At baseline, all 30 patients had negative anti-TPO antibodies. After RAI, 16 patients (eight in each group) exhibited a positive anti-TPO test (range, 70-2359 U/mL). In the rhTSH-treated group, anti-TPO values were significantly higher (as compared to basal levels; p < 0.02) after 3 months of RAI treatment. After 12 months, the anti-TPO values decreased to lower but still positive concentrations in nine patients (Group RAI: three patients; Group RAI+rhTSH: five patients). Only one patient had a positive TRAb test at baseline (67.5% inhibition of the TSH binding). After RAI, positive TRAb values were present in 21/30 patients. After 6 months of RAI treatment, there was a significant increase of the TRAb values in Group RAI+rhTSH patients. After 12 months, only four patients had positive TRAb (Group RAI: three patients; Group RAI+rhTSH: one patient). Two patients, one of each group, had an elevation of free T4 levels and suppressed serum TSH values, indicating hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease). Bioassay of TSH receptor (TSHR) indicated absence of a significant elevation of cAMP in the medium before and after RAI treatment in all patients. Moreover, predominantly blocking TSHR autoantibodies were detected in six of the 30 patients (three of each group). Sera from these patients were able to reduce the TSH-stimulated cAMP generation by CHO cells. We conclude that the autoantibodies to the

  19. Chemotherapy-induced alopecia: advice and support for hair loss.

    PubMed

    Roe, Helen

    This article provides insight into the growth cycle of a hair follicle and the potential impact chemotherapy agents can have on this process, which often results in hair loss (alopecia). It explores the psychological consequences of chemotherapy-induced alopecia for an individual as a result of the perceptions of others as well as an individual's perception of his or her self-image. Despite the development of various forms of scalp cooling, chemotherapy-induced alopecia remains a major side effect for patients receiving chemotherapy; however, there have been improvements in wig provision and changing public opinion relating to baldness. Although chemotherapy-induced alopecia affects both males and females and all age groups, this article focuses on the potential impact for patients receiving chemotherapy as a form of treatment for breast cancer. As professionals we need to understand the social significance of hair in relation to a person's outward presentation and social interactions, along with the possible psychological implications of a person losing his or her bodily hair, and not just the head hair. We must aim to minimize the distress alopecia can cause by: ensuring we provide patients with up-to-date verbal and written information to enable them to prepare for losing their hair; helping them to preserve their self-image and minimize the psychological consequences of hair loss while receiving chemotherapy; and preparing them for their hair re-growth following completion of chemotherapy.

  20. [Genomic markers and anticancer chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Masahiko

    2008-02-01

    Worldwide research on the human genome exerts a major impact on medical science. The growing evidence that genetic polymorphisms in the metabolism, the disposition, and the targets of drugs can have an even greater influence on the efficacy and the toxicity led to the creation of a novel chemotherapeutic strategy, personalized medicine. Much effort has been directed toward identifying the indicators of individual response to drugs, and these studies have provided a variety of potent predictive markers of individual drug response, which include some significant markers in clinical practice with sufficient evidence. Personalized medicine based on the response prediction using genomic marker is increasingly being recognized as a practical treatment approach in cancer chemotherapy, and to be indispensable when molecular targeted drugs are involved in the therapy. Even so, the ingenious and intricate mechanism of individual drug response creates obstacles in predicting chemotherapeutic response: Multiple factors are involved in the mechanisms, and key factors for drug response vary significantly among individuals. DNA chip technology enables us to overview a huge number of gene expressions simultaneously, but gene expression profiles of drug sensitivity vary considerably even for the same drug, which shows the limited value of a static microarray-expression profile as a marker aimed at individualizing patient therapy. Selection of a set of truly significant genomic markers and understanding of their interplay are of key importance in prediction of individual response to drug therapies. Challenges to such biological complexity are now started to identify a better genomic marker. The contribution of genomic marker research to anticancer chemotherapy and problems of the day were reviewed.

  1. Secondary malignancies following cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Boffetta, P; Kaldor, J M

    1994-01-01

    Many agents used in cancer chemotherapy are known carcinogens. However, few secondary malignancies have been definitely linked to chemotherapy, since studies on this problem are complicated by methodological problems. A causal relationship has been established between alkylating agents and leukaemia and between cyclophosphamide and bladder cancer. The risk of leukaemia peaks at 5-10 years after beginning of chemotherapy and declines steadily after its end. The interaction between chemotherapy and radiotherapy has not been fully clarified, nor has the leukaemogenic potency of individual drugs, although combinations without nitrogen mustard seem to entail a lower risk. Other tumours reported at increased incidence, in particular among Hodgkin's disease patients, for whom a carcinogenic effect of chemotherapy seems plausible, are non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and lung cancer. Other secondary solid tumors have also been reported, but for none of them an independent effect of chemotherapy has been demonstrated.

  2. Chemotherapy of Rodent Malaria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    Route of administration :sc FORMULATION: Tween 80 /H2 0 Strain Daily dose No. of No. of Mean control Treated PR% X i0C mg/kg DO - D+3 Mice...PARASITE (SUB) SPECIES ........................... FORMULATION Tween 80 /H 0 Route of administration : po 2 Strain Daily dose No. of No. of...Route of administration SCFORMULATION Tween 80 /H20 Daily dose No. of No. of Mean control Treated PR% Strain mg/kg DO - D+3 Mice experiment parasite

  3. Attenuation effect of Abnormal Savda Munziq on liver and heart toxicity caused by chemotherapy in mice

    PubMed Central

    AIKEMU, AINIWAER; AMAT, NURMUHAMAT; YUSUP, ABDIRYIM; SHAN, LIANLIAN; QI, XINWEI; UPUR, HALMURAT

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal Savda Munziq (ASMq), an Uighur medicine formula commonly used in the treatment of cancer, has been speculated to possess antioxidative and antiproliferative effects, and to regulate immune activity. The present study was designed to systematically elucidate the toxicity-reducing activity of ASMq in mice undergoing combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The mice were divided into normal (saline, 10 ml/kg) and doxorubicin + 5-FU groups (doxorubicin, 2.5 mg/kg; 5-FU, 10 mg/kg on alternate days). In addition, three groups received different doses of ASMq (2, 4 and 8 g/kg), in addition to doxorubicin (2.5 mg/kg) and 5-FU (10 mg/kg) treatment on alternate days. The histology of the heart and liver, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations in heart homogenate, and various biochemical parameters of the liver were evaluated. Compared with the normal control group, ASMq dose-dependently improved a number of variables, including body weight, liver index, transaminase and total protein, and partially normalized liver and cardiac pathology. ASMq restored activities of defense antioxidant enzymes SOD and GSH-Px towards normal levels, and decreased MDA concentration in dose-dependent manner. These results demonstrated that ASMq provides significant protection against doxorubicin + 5-FU combination induced hepatotoxicity and cardiotoxicity. Further studies are required to determine the effects of ASMq against doxorubicin + 5-FU-induced toxicity during chemotherapy in vivo. PMID:27347066

  4. Decreased identification rate of sentinel lymph node after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seok Hyung; Kim, Seok-Ki; Kwon, Youngmee; Kang, Han-Sung; Kang, Jae Hee; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Eun Sook

    2004-10-01

    We prospectively studied the feasibility of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy by comparing the identification rate and the false-negative rate (FNR) with the results obtained from the patients without chemotherapy. From October 2001 to March 2003, a total of 284 consecutive patients who underwent SLNB and axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) at the Center for Breast Cancer, National Cancer Center were enrolled. Of the 284 patients, 54 underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to operation. The sentinel lymph node (SLN) was mapped by radioactive colloid alone or in combination with blue dye. All SLNs were evaluated by 2 mm serial sections after hematoxylin-eosin staining. The overall SLN identification rate was 91.9% (261/284): 72.2% (39/54) of the patients after chemotherapy and 96.5% (222/230) of the patients without chemotherapy. These results suggest that preoperative chemotherapy significantly affects lymphatic mapping ( p< 0.001). Among the patients with chemotherapy, there were 3 false negatives in 39 successfully mapped tumors, yielding an FNR of 11.1% (3/27), a negative prediction value (NPV) of 80.0% (12/15), and an accuracy of 92.3% (36/39). There were 10 false negatives among 222 successfully detected patients without chemotherapy, yielding an FNR of 9.9% (10/101), an NPV of 92.4% (121/131), and an accuracy of 95.5% (212/222). These results were not statistically different when compared ( p > 0.05). Although the SLN identification rate significantly decreased after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, SLNB could accurately predict axillary status. Thus SLNB can be an alternative to ALND even after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in cases of successful identification of the SLN.

  5. Thoracic and elective brain irradiation with concomitant or delayed multiagent chemotherapy in the treatment of localized small cell carcinoma of the lung: a randomized prospective study by the Southeastern Cancer Study Group. [X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, C.A.; Krauss, S.; Bartolucci, A.A.; Durant, J.R.; Lowenbraun, S.; Salter, M.M.; Storaasli, J.; Kellermeyer, R.; Comas, F.

    1981-05-15

    A prospective randomized study was carried out to compare the effectiveness of concomitant or delayed multiagent chemotherapy combined with irradiation to the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes and to the brain in a group of 70 patients with histologically proven small cell undifferentiated carcinoma of the lung. Complete and partial response in both groups was comparable, and the overall survival was comparable. However, relapse-free survival was significantly higher in patients receiving concomitant chemotherapy and irradiation in comparison with the radiotherapy alone group. Disease-free survival was higher in the concomitant chemotherapy-radiotherapy patients, although survival was not significantly modified, probably because of suboptimal chemotherapy. The incidence of distant metastasis was slightly lower in the chemotherapy groups. Brain metastases were noted in 7% of the patients in both groups. Increased intrathoracic recurrences were noted in patients with lower doses of irradiation. The study emphasizes the need for intensive chemotherapy and adequate radiation therapy to improve survival of patients with small cell undifferentiated carcinoma of the lung.

  6. The significance of antral follicle size prior to stimulation in predicting ovarian response in a multiple dose GnRH antagonist protocol.

    PubMed

    Lai, Qiaohong; Chen, Cai; Zhang, Zhijun; Zhang, Shu; Yu, Qilin; Yang, Ping; Hu, Jun; Wang, Cong-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of ovarian responses prior to stimulation is not only useful for patient counseling, but also important in tailoring the optimal dosage of gonadotrophin for individual patients. By prospectively study of 214 women undergoing in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET) treatment, we obtained data supporting that antral follicle size could be an additional valuable predictive marker other than the antral follicle count (AFC) in predicting ovarian response. Our studies revealed that AFC achieved the best predictive value in relation to the number of oocyte obtained, followed by antral follicle size, basal follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and body mass index (BMI). Unlike AFC, antral follicle size was noted to be negatively correlated with the dosage (R = -0.493) and duration (R = -0.465) of rFSH stimulation. Antral follicle size was also found with higher negative regression coefficient (B = -0.661) as compared with that of basal FSH concentration (B = -0.326) and BMI (b = -0.281). More importantly, women with antral follicle size 6-7 mm showed significantly higher AFC, oocytes retrieved, fertilized oocytes and grade I/II embryos along with much lower transfer cycle cancellation rate (7.5% vs. 16-17%). Together, our data suggest that basal antral follicle size could be a valued predictive marker in women with IVF-ET treatment, in which women with antral follicle size 6-7 mm are likely predisposed to better IVF-ET outcomes.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of metronomic chemotherapy: a neglected but crucial aspect.

    PubMed

    Bocci, Guido; Kerbel, Robert S

    2016-11-01

    Metronomic chemotherapy describes the close, regular administration of chemotherapy drugs at less-toxic doses over prolonged periods of time. In 2015, the results of randomized phase III clinical trials demonstrated encouraging, albeit limited, efficacy benefits of metronomic chemotherapy regimens administered as adjuvant maintenance therapy for the treatment of breast cancer, or as maintenance therapy in combination with an antiangiogenic agent for metastatic colorectal cancer. Owing to the investigational nature of this approach, metronomic chemotherapy regimens are highly empirical in terms of the optimal dose and schedule for the drugs administered; therefore, greater knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of metronomic chemotherapy is critical to the future success of this treatment strategy. Unfortunately, such preclinical and clinical pharmacokinetic studies are rare. Herein, we present situations in which active drug concentrations have been achieved with metronomic schedules, and discuss their associated pharmacokinetic parameters. We summarize examples from the limited number of clinical studies in order to illustrate the importance of assessing such pharmacokinetic parameters, and discuss the influence this information can have on improving efficacy and reducing toxicity.

  8. Metronomic Chemotherapy for Metastatic Breast Cancer – a Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Banys-Paluchowski, M.; Schütz, F.; Ruckhäberle, E.; Krawczyk, N.; Fehm, T.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is generally administered in high doses followed by a treatment-free period to give the body needful time to recover. This “maximum tolerated dose” approach results in high response rates. However, long periods between therapy cycles can lead to development of resistance mechanisms and consequently disease progression. One of the most interesting alternative strategies is metronomic chemotherapy. This concept relies on the continuous administration of chemotherapy at low doses and aims at targeting endothelial cells in the tumor bed as well. Recently, metronomic chemotherapy has been incorporated into the recommendations issued by the German AGO expert panel (www.ago-online.de). A systematic review of PubMed/Medline, ClinicalTrials.gov, the European Clinical Trials Database (EudraCT) and the Cochrane Database was conducted. In the present review, we discuss the current evidence on metronomic chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer. PMID:27239061

  9. ATP-binding cassette transporters in tumor endothelial cells and resistance to metronomic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hida, Kyoko; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Maishi, Nako; Hida, Yasuhiro

    2017-02-16

    Drug resistance is a major problem in anticancer therapy. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters have a role in the multidrug resistance. A new regimen of chemotherapy has been proposed, called "metronomic chemotherapy". Metronomic chemotherapy is the frequent, regular administration of drug doses designed to maintain low, but active, concentrations of chemotherapeutic drugs over prolonged periods of time, without causing serious toxicities. Metronomic chemotherapy regimens were developed to optimize the antitumor efficacy of agents that target the tumor vasculature instead of tumor cells, and to reduce toxicity of antineoplastic drugs [1]. Nevertheless, recent studies revealed that ABC transporters are expressed at a higher level in the endothelium in the tumor. To avoid resistance to metronomic anti-angiogenic chemotherapy, ABC transporter inhibition of tumor endothelial cells may be a promising strategy. In this mini-review, we discuss the possible mechanism of resistance to metronomic chemotherapy from the viewpoint of tumor endothelial cell biology, focusing on ABC transporters.

  10. The use of Ginkgo biloba for the prevention of chemotherapy-related cognitive dysfunction in women receiving adjuvant treatment for breast cancer, N00C9

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Kelli; Novotny, Paul J.; Fitch, Tom R.; Kohli, Sadhna; Soori, Gamini; Wilwerding, Mary Beth; Sloan, Jeff A.; Kottschade, Lisa A.; Rowland, Kendrith M.; Dakhil, Shaker R.; Nikcevich, Daniel A.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Patients undergoing treatment for cancer often report problems with their cognitive function, which is an essential component of health-related quality of life. Pursuant to this, a two-arm randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, phase III clinical trial was conducted to evaluate Ginkgo biloba (EGB 761) for the prevention of chemotherapy-related cognitive dysfunction in patients with breast cancer. Methods Previously chemotherapy naïve women about to receive adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer were randomized to receive 60 mg of EGB 761 or a matching placebo twice daily. The study agent was to begin before their second cycle of chemotherapy and to be taken throughout chemotherapy and 1 month beyond completion. The primary measure for cognitive function was the High Sensitivity Cognitive Screen (HSCS), with a secondary measure being the Trail Making Tests (TMT) A and B. Subjective assessment of cognitive function was evaluated by the cognitive subscale of the Perceived Health Scale (PHS) and the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Data were collected at baseline and at intervals throughout and after chemotherapy, up to 24 months after completion of adjuvant treatment. The primary statistical analysis included normalized area under the curve (AUC) comparisons of the HSCS, between the arms. Secondary analyses included evaluation of the other measures of cognition as well as correlational analyses between self-report and cognitive testing. Results One hundred and sixty-six women provided evaluable data. There were no significant differences in AUC up to 12 months on the HSCS between arms at the end of chemotherapy or at any other time point after adjuvant treatment. There were also no significant differences in TMT A or B at any data point. Perceived cognitive functions, as measured by the PHS and confusion/bewilderment subscale of the POMS, were not different between arms at the end of chemotherapy. There was also little correlation between self

  11. Induction Chemotherapy with Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil in Advanced Head and Neck Cancers: A Short Term Response Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Raghavendra; Shenoy, Vijendra; Hegde, Mahesh Chandra; Prasad, Vishnu; Prasad, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Background Considering the uprising number of Head and neck cancer in the state with limited options of medical and surgical treatment, the focus of this study involved on chemotherapy in advanced Head and neck cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of combination of Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil (PF) as induction chemotherapy in patients in locally advanced squamous cell cancer of head and neck. Materials and Methods Forty four patients with previously untreated stage III -IV advanced and inoperable cases were included in this prospective study. Induction chemotherapy consisted of 3 cycles of Cisplatin 100mg/mt2 as infusion on day 1, 5-Fluorouracil of 750mg/mt2 on day 2, 5-Fluorouracil of 1000mg/mt2 as infusion on day 3 in an inpatient basis. Cycles were repeated with an interval of 21 days. Patients were evaluated within a period of 3 weeks at the end of completion of third cycle of chemotherapy. Post chemotherapy local therapy was individualized based on the response, site and stage of the tumour. Results Out of 44 eligible and evaluable patients, major dominance was noted in male group constituting 68%. After induction chemotherapy 58.8% of stage III experienced stable response, & 44% had partial response. In stage IV, 44% showed a stable response and 33.3% had partial response. But in comparison to primary tumour response and nodal response, which had a significant clinical response, the overall response of malignancy with respect to stage and site specificity was clinically insignificant. Moderate adverse reaction was noted in 47.6% and 42.1% had mild reactions. Majority of patients experienced grade 3 adverse events, of which anaemia in females and leucopenia in males pre-dominated. Conclusion With the use of cisplatin and 5-FU as induction chemotherapy agents in advanced and inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck, a distinct benefit was seen in stabilizing the tumour from progression. But achieving a significant

  12. Cytotoxic Chemotherapy Tooth Ache Following Chemotherapy: a Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kuzekanani, Maryam; Haghani, Jahangir

    2012-01-01

    Currently, localized pulpalgia is listed as a rare manifestation of chemotherapy treatments in patients with malignant tumors. The neuropathy originated from neurotoxicity of anticancer drugs is usually described as a diffuse jaw pain or numbness in orofacial structures. This article reports localized tooth pain as a possible outcome of administrating high dosage chemotherapy drugs particularly in the last cycles of application. PMID:25628837

  13. Structural Brain Alterations in Children an Average of 5 Years after Surgery and Chemotherapy for Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Mary Baron; Macey, Paul M.; Harper, Ronald M.; Jacob, Eufemia; Patel, Sunita K.; Finlay, Jonathan L.; Nelson, Marvin D.; Compton, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    Background Young children with brain tumors are often treated with high-dose chemotherapy after surgery to avoid brain tissue injury associated with irradiation. The effects of systemic chemotherapy on healthy brain tissue in this population, however, are unclear. Our objective was to compare gray and white matter integrity using MRI procedures in children with brain tumors (n=7, mean age 8.3 years), treated with surgery and high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous hematopoietic cell rescue (AuHCR) an average of 5.4 years earlier, to age- and gender-matched healthy controls (n=9, mean age 9.3 years). Methods Diffusion tensor imaging data were collected to evaluate tissue integrity throughout the brain, as measured by mean diffusivity (MD), a marker of glial, neuronal, and axonal status, and fractional anisotropy (FA), an index of axonal health. Individual MD and FA maps were calculated, normalized, smoothed, and compared between groups using analysis of covariance, with age and sex as covariates. Results Higher mean diffusivity values, indicative of injury, emerged in patients compared with controls (p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons), and were especially apparent in the central thalamus, external capsule, putamen, globus pallidus and pons. Reduced FA values in some regions did not reach significance after correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusions Children treated with surgery and high-dose chemotherapy with AuHCR for brain tumors an average of 5.4 years earlier show alterations in white and gray matter in multiple brain areas distant from the tumor site, raising the possibility for long-term consequences of the tumor or treatment. PMID:24830985

  14. Taste Alteration in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sözeri, Elif; Kutlutürkan, Sevinç

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study is aimed to determine factors that affect conditions of patients receiving chemotherapy in terms of experienced taste alteration. Materials and Methods In this descriptive study, 184 patients receiving chemotherapy were included in the sample. Data were collected during the period of December 2013 to May 2014 using “Patient Characteristics Identification Form” and “Chemotherapy-induced Taste Alteration Scale (CiTAS).” The data were analyzed using SPSS 20 (SPSS Inc., Chicago IL, USA) statistical software in terms of number, percentage, Mann-Whitney U test, and Kruskal-Wallis H test. Results The mean age of the patients was 55.5±11.8 and 57.1% of them were female. The clinical diagnosis of the patients were most frequently breast cancer (n=46), colorectal cancer (n=45), and lung cancer (n=25). Furthermore, 37.5% of the patients were in clinical stage II; 15.8% of the patients received paclitaxel+herceptin and 14.1% received gemcitabine+cisplatin chemotherapy protocols. Data demonstrated significant differences in mean scores (p<0.05) taken from “Decline in Basic Taste” and “Phantogeusia and Parageusia” subscales with patients with or without xerostomia. There were significant differences in the average scores of the subscales between those with and without a sore mouth “Discomfort” and “General taste alterations” (p<0.05). Conclusion It has been established that patients receiving chemotherapy experience substantial alteration in taste by exposure of different subscales of CiTAS. Analysis of scores collected from different subscales of CiTAS with respect to sociodemographic and pathological differences showed that patients with xerostomia and sore mouth experienced more severe taste alterations.

  15. Chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2009-03-01

    Few dermatologic conditions carry as much emotional distress as chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA). The prerequisite for successful development of strategies for CIA prevention is the understanding of the pathobiology of CIA. The incidence and severity of CIA are variable and related to the particular chemotherapeutic protocol. CIA is traditionally categorized as acute diffuse hair loss caused by dystrophic anagen effluvium; however, CIA presents with different clinical patterns of hair loss. When an arrest of mitotic activity occurs, obviously numerous and interacting factors influence the shedding pattern. The major approach to minimize CIA is by scalp cooling. Unfortunately, most published data on scalp cooling are of poor quality. Several experimental approaches to the development of pharmacologic agents are under evaluation and include drug-specific antibodies, hair growth cycle modifiers, cytokines and growth factors, antioxidants, inhibitors of apoptosis, and cell-cycle and proliferation modifiers. Ultimately, the protection should be selective to the hair follicle; for example, topical application, such that the anticancer efficacy of chemotherapy is not hampered. Among the few agents that have been evaluated so far in humans, AS101 and minoxidil were able to reduce the severity or shorten the duration of CIA, but could not prevent CIA.

  16. Circumventing Tumor Resistance to Chemotherapy by Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xing-Jie; Chen, Chunying; Zhao, Yuliang; Wang, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    Patient relapse and metastasis of malignant cells is very common after standard cancer treatment with surgery, radiation, and/or chemotherapy. Chemotherapy, a cornerstone in the development of present day cancer therapy, is one of the most effective and potent strategies to treat malignant tumors. However, the resistance of cancer cells to the drugs remains a significant impediment to successful chemotherapy. An additional obstacle is the inability of chemotherapeutic drugs to selectively target tumor cells. Almost all the anticancer agents have severe side effects on normal tissues and organs. The toxicity of currently available anticancer drugs and the inefficiency of chemotherapeutic treatments, especially for advanced stages of the disease, have limited the optimization of clinical drug combinations and effective chemotherapeutic protocols. Nanomedicine allows the release of drugs by biodegradation and self-regulation of nanomaterials in vitro and in vivo. Nanotechnologies are characterized by effective drug encapsulation, controllable self-assembly, specificity and biocompatibility as a result of their own material properties. Nanotechnology has the potential to overcome current chemotherapeutic barriers in cancer treatment, because of the unique nanoscale size and distinctive bioeffects of nanomaterials. Nanotechnology may help to solve the problems associated with traditional chemotherapy and multidrug resistance. PMID:19949937

  17. Pre-irradiation with low-dose 12C6+ beam significantly enhances the efficacy of AdCMV-p53 gene therapy in human non-small lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing; Zhang, Hong; Li, Wenjian; Li, Qiang; Zhou, Guangming; Xie, Yi; Hao, Jifang; Min, Fengling; Zhou, Qingming; Duan, Xin

    2007-04-01

    The combination of ionizing radiation and gene therapy has been investigated. However, there are very few reports about the combination of heavy-ion irradiation and gene therapy. To determine if the pre-exposure to low-dose heavy ion beam enhances the suppression of AdCMV-p53 on non-small lung cancer (NSLC), the cells pre-irradiated or non-irradiated were infected with 20, 40 MOI of AdCMV-p53. Survival fraction and the relative biology effect (RBE) were determined by clonogenic assay. The results showed that the proportions of p53 positive cells in 12C6+ beam induced AdCMV-p53 infected cells were more than 90%, which were significantly more than those in γ-ray induced AdCMV-p53 infected cells. The pre-exposure to low-dose 12C6+ beam significantly prevented the G0/G1 arrest and activated G2/M checkpoints. The pre-exposure to 12C6+ beam significantly improved cell to apoptosis. RBEs for the 12C6+ + AdCMV-p53 infection groups were 30% 60%, 20% 130% and 30% 70% more than those for the 12C6+-irradiated only, AdCMV-p53 infected only, and γ-irradiation induced AdCMVp53 infected groups, respectively. The data suggested that the pre-exposure to low-dose 12C6+ beam significantly promotes exogenous p53 expression in NSLC, and the suppression of AdCMV-p53 gene therapy on NSLC.

  18. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for radioinduced osteosarcoma of the extremity: The Rizzoli experience in 20 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Bacci, Gaetano . E-mail: gaetano.bacci@ior.it; Longhi, Alessandra; Forni, Cristiana R.N.; Fabbri, Nicola; Briccoli, Antonio; Barbieri, Enza; Mercuri, Mario; Balladelli, Alba B.A.; Ferrari, Stefano; Picci, Piero

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Evaluate treatment and outcome of 20 patients with radioinduced osteosarcoma (RIO). Because of previous primary tumor treatment, RIO protocols were different from others we used for non-RIO. Patients and Methods: Between 1983 and 1998, we treated 20 RIO patients, ages 4-36 years (mean 16 years), with chemotherapy (two cycles before surgery, three postoperatively). The first preoperative cycle consisted of high-dose Methotrexate (HDMTX)/Cisplatinum (CDP)/Adriamycin (ADM) and the second of HDMTX/CDP/Ifosfamide (IFO). The three postoperative treatments were performed with cycles of MTX/CDP; IFO was used as single agent per cycle repeated three times. Results: Two patients received palliative treatment because their osteosarcoma remained unresectable after preoperative chemotherapy. The remaining 18 patients had surgery (7 amputations, 11 resections); histologic response to preoperative chemotherapy was good in 8 patients, poor in 10. At a mean follow-up of 11 years (range, 7-22 years), 9 patients remained continuously disease-free, 10 died from osteosarcoma and 1 died from a third neoplasm (myeloid acute leukemia). These results are not significantly different from those achieved in 754 patients with conventional osteosarcoma treated in the same period with protocols used for conventional treatment. However, this later group had an 18% 3-year event-free survival after treatment of relapse vs. 0% in the RIO group. Conclusion: Treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy RIO seem to have an outcome that is not significantly different from that of comparable patients with conventional primary high grade osteosarcoma (5-year event-free survival: 40% vs. 60%, p = NS; 5-year overall survival 40% vs. 67%, p < 0.00008.

  19. Palliative chemotherapy: oxymoron or misunderstanding?

    PubMed

    Roeland, E J; LeBlanc, T W

    2016-03-21

    Oncologists routinely prescribe chemotherapy for patients with advanced cancer. This practice is sometimes misunderstood by palliative care clinicians, yet data clearly show that chemotherapy can be a powerful palliative intervention when applied appropriately. Clarity regarding the term "palliative chemotherapy" is needed: it is chemotherapy given in the non-curative setting to optimize symptom control, improve quality of life, and sometimes to improve survival. Unfortunately, oncologists lack adequate tools to predict which patients will benefit. In a study recently published in BMC Palliative Care, Creutzfeldt et al. presented an innovative approach to advancing the science in this area: using patient reported outcomes to predict responses to palliative chemotherapy. With further research, investigators may be able to develop predictive models for use at the bedside to inform clinical decision-making about the risks and benefits of treatment. In the meantime, oncologists and palliative care clinicians must work together to reduce the use of "end-of-life chemotherapy"-chemotherapy given close to death, which does not improve longevity or symptom control-while optimizing the use of chemotherapy that has true palliative benefits for patients.

  20. Peripheral blood stem cell mobilization in multiple myeloma patients treat in the novel therapy-era with plerixafor and G-CSF has superior efficacy but significantly higher costs compared to mobilization with low-dose cyclophosphamide and G-CSF.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Lubna; Awan, Farrukh; Cumpston, Aaron; Leadmon, Sonia; Watkins, Kathy; Tse, William; Craig, Michael; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2013-10-01

    Studies comparing the efficacy and cost of peripheral blood stem and progenitor cells mobilization with low-dose cyclophosphamide (LD-CY) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) against plerixafor and G-CSF, in multiple myeloma (MM) patients treated in the novel therapy-era are not available. Herein, we report mobilization outcomes of 107 patients who underwent transplantation within 1-year of starting induction chemotherapy with novel agents. Patients undergoing mobilization with LD-CY (1.5 gm/m(2)) and G-CSF (n = 74) were compared against patients receiving plerixafor and G-CSF (n = 33). Compared to plerixafor, LD-CY was associated with a significantly lower median peak peripheral blood CD34+ cell count (68/µL vs. 36/µL, P = 0.048), and lower CD34+ cell yield on day 1 of collection (6.9 × 10(6)/kg vs. 2.4 × 10(6)/kg, P = 0.001). Six patients (8.1%) in the LD-CY group experienced mobilization failure, compared to none in the plerixafor group. The total CD34+ cell yield was significantly higher in the plerixafor group (median 11.6 × 10(6)/kg vs. 7 × 10(6)/kg; P-value = 0.001). Mobilization with LD-CY was associated with increased (albeit statistically non-significant) episodes of febrile neutropenia (5.4% vs. 0%; P = 0.24), higher use of intravenous antibiotics (6.7% vs. 3%; P = 0.45), and need for hospitalizations (9.4% vs. 3%; P = 0.24). The average total cost of mobilization in the plerixafor group was significantly higher compared to the LD-CY group ($28,980 vs. $19,626.5 P-value < 0.0001). In conclusion, in MM plerixafor-based mobilization has superior efficacy, but significantly higher mobilization costs compared to LD-CY mobilization. Our data caution against the use of LD-CY in MM patients for mobilization, especially after induction with lenalidomide-containing regimens.

  1. Defect in assimilation following combined radiation and chemotherapy in patients with locally unresectable pancreatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Barkin, J.S.; Kalser, M.H.; Thomsen, S.; Redlhammer, D.

    1982-11-15

    The relative contributions of high-dose irradiation and/or chemotherapy to the nutritional problems of patients with inoperable pancreatic carcinoma were evaluated by study of pancreatic exocrine function and jejunal function and morphologic findings in ten patients before and after treatment. Nutrient assimilation studies included determination of serum carotene levels, D-xylose absorption and fat absorption. Crosby capsule biopsy specimen of jejunal mucosa were evaluated with light microscopy. Fat assimilation was the only parameter of nutritional function to significantly worsen after therapy. Low serum carotene levels present in the patients before therapy remained low but did not significantly change after treatment. D-xylose absorption and the morphologic structure of the jejunal mucosa were normal before and after treatment. These findings support the previous observations that the nutritional problems of the patient with inoperable pancreatic carcinoma are due to pancreatic insufficiency and that high dose irradiation and chemotherapy can exacerbate the pancreatic insufficiency but do not produce jejunal dysfunction. Therefore, it is suggested that pancreatic exocrine replacement therapy may improve the nutritional status of these patients.

  2. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cancer stem cell hypothesis inspired our search for a novel chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize cancer stem cell enrichment methods, the search for new efficient drugs, and the delivery of drugs targeting cancer stem cells. We also discuss cancer stem cell hierarchy complexity and the corresponding combination therapy for both cancer stem and non-stem cells. Learning from cancer stem cells may reveal novel strategies for chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26045975

  3. Quantitative changes in skin composition parameters due to chemotherapy in breast cancer patients: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Danbee; Kim, Im-Ryung; Im, Young Hyuck; Park, Yeon Hee; Ahn, Jin Seok; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin; Park, Hyeokgon; Kim, Eunjoo; Lee, Hae Kwang; Lee, Dong-Youn; Cho, Juhee

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate objective changes in water content, sebum content, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and melanin due to breast cancer chemotherapy, and their association with subjective symptoms. Prospective cohort study of 61 patients 18 years of age or older with a postoperative diagnosis of stage I-III breast cancer, who received adjuvant chemotherapy between February and September 2012 at an outpatient breast cancer clinic in Korea. Objective skin parameters, measured using a noninvasive bioengineering device, and patient-reported dryness and dullness were assessed before chemotherapy, after two cycles of chemotherapy, and 1, 3, and 6 months after completion of chemotherapy. Water content (-6.5 %), sebum (-75.5 %), and TEWL (-22.4 %) significantly decreased during chemotherapy compared to pre-chemotherapy levels (all p values <0.001). These parameters were lowest at 1 month after completion of chemotherapy and recovered thereafter but did not return to baseline levels after 6 months of follow-up. Melanin increased during chemotherapy with respect to pre-chemotherapy levels (8.4 %; p < 0.001) but decreased from the first month after completion of chemotherapy through the end of follow-up (-17.1 %; p < 0.001). The patterns of skin changes were similar in patients with or without hormone therapy. Most of patients reported dryness (57.9 %) and dullness (49.1 %) after chemotherapy, and patient-reported dryness was significantly associated with decreased sebum content. Chemotherapy-induced substantial changes in objective skin composition parameters. These changes persisted after 6 months from completion of chemotherapy and were associated with patient-reported symptoms. Additional research is needed to translate these findings into interventions for improving the dermatologic quality of life of breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  4. [Combined Chemotherapy with Radiation was Tolerable and Effective Treatment in Female Octogenarian Patients with Urethral Cancer -Two Case Reports].

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Takashi; Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Nagi, Shoji; Hagiwara, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Kentaro; Tsumura, Hideyasu; Yoshida, Kazunari; Iwamura, Masatsugu

    2016-07-01

    We report two octogenarian patients with primary urethral cancer treated with chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy. An 85-year-old female presented with perineal bleeding. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a locally advanced tumor in the urethra. Biopsy was performed and pathologic findings demonstrated squamous cell carcinoma. After receiving one cycle of a half dose of gemcitabine and nedaplatin, the patient received external beam radiation therapy with gemcitabine and nedaplatin treatment followed by two more cycles of chemotherapy. Complete response was achieved. An 87-year-old female presented with vaginal bleeding. MRIrevealed locally advanced urethral tumor with bilateral inguinal lymph node metastases. Scratch and urine cytology of tumor demonstrated squamous cell carcinoma. After the same treatment as in case 1, primary cancer and lymph node metastases were significantly decreased. There have been no signs of recurrence or progression after treatment, and no severe adverse events in either patient during 53 and 26 months'follow up, respectively.

  5. Randomized trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in oropharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Domenge, C; Hill, C; Lefebvre, J L; De Raucourt, D; Rhein, B; Wibault, P; Marandas, P; Coche-Dequeant, B; Stromboni-Luboinski, M; Sancho-Garnier, H; Luboinski, B

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on the survival of patients with oropharyngeal cancer. Patients with a squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx for whom curative radiotherapy or surgery was considered feasible were entered in a multicentric randomized trial comparing neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by loco-regional treatment to the same loco-regional treatment without chemotherapy. The loco-regional treatment consisted either of surgery plus radiotherapy or of radiotherapy alone. Three cycles of chemotherapy consisting of Cisplatin (100 mg/m2) on day 1 followed by a 24-hour i.v. infusion of fluorouracil (1000 mg/m2/day) for 5 days were delivered every 21 days. 2–3 weeks after the end of chemotherapy, local treatment was performed. The trial was conducted by the Groupe d'Etude des Tumeurs de la Tête Et du Cou (GETTEC). A total of 318 patients were enrolled in the study between 1986 and 1992. Overall survival was significantly better (P = 0.03) in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy group than in the control group, with a median survival of 5.1 years versus 3.3 years in the no chemotherapy group. The effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on event-free survival was smaller and of borderline significance (P = 0.11). Stratification of the results on the type of local treatment, surgery plus radiotherapy or radiotherapy alone, did not reveal any heterogeneity in the effect of chemotherapy. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11189100

  6. Impact of Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS) Standardization on Carboplatin Dose and Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Justin; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; McKibbin, Trevor; Harvey, R. Donald

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND When using area under the concentration-time curve-based strategies for dosing carboplatin, accurate estimation of glomerular filtration rate is required for determining dose. Commonly, the Cockcroft–Gault equation is used, which is dependent on measurement of serum creatinine (SCr). Because analysis of SCr changed to an isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) standard, we sought to determine the impact of this assay change on carboplatin dosing and related toxicity. METHODS This was a single-center, retrospective chart review of adults treated with carboplatin between April 2008 and April 2010 divided into cohorts that initiated carboplatin before or after IDMS standardization. End points included grade 3 thrombocytopenia, decrease in platelet count, and hospitalization and were evaluated in cohorts based on concomitant chemotherapy. RESULTS The chart review identified 158 patients, with 63 patients in the pre-IDMS group and 95 patients in the post-IDMS group. Average SCr (pre 1.01 mg/dl vs post 0.86 mg/dl, p<0.001) and average carboplatin dose (pre 580 mg vs post 703 mg, p<0.001) were significantly different between the groups. The frequency of grade 3 thrombocytopenia was not statistically significant across three partner chemotherapy cohorts before and after IDMS implementation. CONCLUSION IDMS standardization led to an overall decrease in SCr with subsequent increase in carboplatin doses. However, no increase in recorded adverse events was observed, suggesting that the clinical relevance in toxicity from higher doses was minimal. PMID:27130286

  7. Prognostic relevance of DHAP dose-density in relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma: an analysis of the German Hodgkin-Study Group.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Stephanie; Alram, Magdalena; Müller, Horst; Smardová, Lenka; Metzner, Bernd; Doehner, Hartmut; Fischer, Thomas; Niederwieser, Dietger W; Schmitz, Norbert; Schäfer-Eckart, Kerstin; Raemaekers, John M M; Schmalz, Oliver; Tresckow, Bastian V; Engert, Andreas; Borchmann, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Only 50% of patients with relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) can be cured with intensive induction chemotherapy, followed by high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT). Based on the results of the HDR2 trial two courses of DHAP and subsequent HDCT/ASCT are the current standard of care in relapsed HL. In order to assess the prognostic relevance of DHAP dose density, we performed a retrospective multivariate analysis of the HDR2 trial (N=266). In addition to four risk factors (early or multiple relapse, stage IV disease or anemia at relapse, and grade IV hematotoxicity during the first cycle of DHAP) a delayed start of the second cycle of DHAP>day 22 predicted a significantly poorer progression-free survival (PFS, p=0.0356) and overall survival (OS, p=0.0025). In conclusion, our analysis strongly suggests that dose density of DHAP has a relevant impact on the outcome of relapsed HL patients.

  8. Assessment of the Radiation-Equivalent of Chemotherapy Contributions in 1-Phase Radio-chemotherapy Treatment of Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Plataniotis, George A.; Dale, Roger G.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To estimate the radiation equivalent of the chemotherapy contribution to observed complete response rates in published results of 1-phase radio-chemotherapy of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: A standard logistic dose–response curve was fitted to data from radiation therapy-alone trials and then used as the platform from which to quantify the chemotherapy contribution in 1-phase radio-chemotherapy trials. Two possible mechanisms of chemotherapy effect were assumed (1) a fixed radiation-independent contribution to local control; or (2) a fixed degree of chemotherapy-induced radiosensitization. A combination of both mechanisms was also considered. Results: The respective best-fit values of the independent chemotherapy-induced complete response (CCR) and radiosensitization (s) coefficients were 0.40 (95% confidence interval −0.07 to 0.87) and 1.30 (95% confidence interval 0.86-1.70). Independent chemotherapy effect was slightly favored by the analysis, and the derived CCR value was consistent with reports of pathologic complete response rates seen in neoadjuvant chemotherapy-alone treatments of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The radiation equivalent of the CCR was 36.3 Gy. Conclusion: Although the data points in the analyzed radio-chemotherapy studies are widely dispersed (largely on account of the diverse range of chemotherapy schedules used), it is nonetheless possible to fit plausible-looking response curves. The methodology used here is based on a standard technique for analyzing dose-response in radiation therapy-alone studies and is capable of application to other mixed-modality treatment combinations involving radiation therapy.

  9. Chemotherapy and Biochemistry of Leishmania

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    D,’IBR18 flC FiLE (,QP,Y U. CHEMOTHERAPY AND BIOCHEMISTRY OF LEISHMANIA AANNUAL REPORT LINDA L. NOLAN, Ph.D. DECEMBE 198598 Supported by U. S. ARMY...NUMBER 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER Four 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Chemotherapy and Biochemistry...enzymes may be ex- ploited for chemotherapy . MATERIALS AND METHODS [3H]TP (45 Ci mmole -1 ) was purchased from Amersham. Heparin-Sepharose CL- 6B

  10. Chemotherapy and plasma adipokines level in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Słomian, Grzegorz; Świętochowska, Elżbieta; Nowak, Grzegorz; Pawlas, Krystyna; Żelazko, Aleksandra; Nowak, Przemysław

    2017-04-12

    Adipokines are molecules produced and secreted by adipose tissue and are linked to multiple malignancies. Adipokines can suppress or promote particular cell behaviors in different types of cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of chemotherapy on select adipokines in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Blood samples were collected from 42 patients with pathologically documented advanced CRC, who required palliative chemotherapy. Leptin, adiponectin, resistin and visfatin levels were measured by ELISA before and 3 months after the administration of chemotherapy. Among the 42 patients evaluated, 18 achieved a partial response (PR), 16 achieved stable disease (SD) and 8 patients experienced disease progression (PD). We found that 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy regimens significantly increased plasma levels of leptin and adiponectin and decreased plasma levels of resistin and visfatin in PR and SD patients, whereas the plasma levels of these molecules were not affected in PD patients. Furthermore, the mean plasma levels of leptin were significantly lower, and the mean plasma levels of resistin and visfatin were significantly greater in patients with PD compared with PR and SD both before and after chemotherapy treatment. We conclude that palliative chemotherapy in CRC patients, in addition to providing clinical benefits, positively affects cytokine production and secretion in PR and SD patients. Specifically, we found that palliative chemotherapy increased plasma levels of the anti-inflammatory adipokine adiponectin and decreased the plasma levels of visfatin and resistin, molecules known to promote angiogenesis and cancer cell proliferation in PR and SD patients. Moreover, the baseline values of leptin, visfatin and resistin might serve as prognostic indicators of a poor response to chemotherapy.

  11. A metronomic schedule as salvage chemotherapy for upper gastrointestinal tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Michela; Romiti, Adriana; Onesti, Concetta E; D'Antonio, Chiara; Milano, Annalisa; Falcone, Rosa; Barucca, Viola; Palombi, Lucia; Righini, Riccardo; Marchetti, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, metronomic chemotherapy, consisting of continuous administration of low doses of cytotoxic agents, has being used as rescue therapy for different tumours. The aim of this study was to retrospectively assess the efficacy and safety of low-dose metronomic, oral capecitabine in pretreated or frail patients with recurrent upper gastrointestinal tract cancer. Patients with pretreated upper gastrointestinal tract cancer or who were not candidates for standard chemotherapy because of toxicity concerns received capecitabine at 1500 mg per day continuously until disease progression or occurrence of toxicity. Forty-seven patients (25 oesophagogastric cancer, 22 pancreatobiliary cancer; 25 men, 22 women; median age 69 years, range 42-90) were included in the study. Forty-five percent of the patients had received at least two previous lines of treatment and the median number of previous treatments was 1 (range 0-5). Twelve (31.6%) patients achieved clinical benefit (one partial response, 11 stable disease), whereas nine (23.7%) patients were progression free for at least 6 months. In an exploratory analysis, there was a significant relationship between performance status and clinical benefit (hazard ratio=8.25; P=0.01). The median overall survival was 5 months. A good performance status was associated with a longer survival (hazard ratio=0.26; P<0.01). No severe toxicity or treatment-related death was reported. Metronomic capecitabine showed good safety and moderate activity in frail or pretreated patients with advanced, upper gastrointestinal tract cancer.

  12. Pharmacokinetic studies in the chemotherapy of neuroblastoma using the C1300 murine system.

    PubMed

    Sufrin, G; Murphy, P

    1976-01-01

    The transplantable C1300 murine neuroblastoma has been characterized biochemically and an in vivo model for the screening of new therapeutic approaches to the treatment of neuroblastoma developed. Subcutaneous inoculation of A/J mice with 10)6) C1300 cells results in predictable tumor growth and animal death in 25 +/- 4 days. Tumor growth is Gompertzian, correlates with increases in tumor RNA and DNA content and with the rate of tumor DNA synthesis as measured by [3H] thymidine incorporation. The model proposed is based on the degree to which various therapeutic options are able to inhibit tumor DNA synthesis, and these observations have been confirmed autoradiographically. A single course of either cyclophosphamide (25, 50, 100 or 200 mg/kg), BCNU (2, 7.5, 15, or 30 mg/kg) or cytosine arabinoside (15, 30, 60, 90 mg/kg) resulted in dose-related inhibition of tumor DNA synthesis. The maximum decline in DNA synthesis that was produced by the highest dose of each agent was by 81%, 77% and 68% of untreated tumor values respectively. Adriamycin, however, even at lethal levels (10 mg/kg), did not elicit significant inhibition of tumor DNA synthesis. Radiotherapy (200 R, 500 R or 1000 R) also produced graded inhibition of tumor DNA synthesis. This model is potentially useful for the preclinical screening of therapuetic options in the treatment of neuroblastoma. Thus, single agent therapy, combination chemotherapy and combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy may be rapidly evaluated for possible clinical use.

  13. Impact of Toceranib/Piroxicam/Cyclophosphamide Maintenance Therapy on Outcome of Dogs with Appendicular Osteosarcoma following Amputation and Carboplatin Chemotherapy: A Multi-Institutional Study

    PubMed Central

    Mathie, Tamra; Stingle, Nicole; Portela, Roberta; Pennell, Michael L.; Clifford, Craig A.; Rosenberg, Mona P.; Vail, David M.; Williams, Laurel E.; Cronin, Kim L.; Wilson-Robles, Heather; Borgatti, Antonella; Henry, Carolyn J.; Bailey, Dennis B.; Locke, Jennifer; Northrup, Nicole C.; Crawford-Jakubiak, Martin; Gill, Virginia L.; Klein, Mary K.; Ruslander, David M.; Thamm, Doug H.; Phillips, Brenda; Post, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that the addition of toceranib to metronomic cyclophosphamide/piroxicam therapy would significantly improve disease-free interval (DFI) and overall survival (OS) in dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma (OSA) following amputation and carboplatin chemotherapy. Methods and Findings This was a randomized, prospective clinical trial in which dogs with OSA free of gross metastatic disease (n = 126) received carboplatin chemotherapy (4 doses) following amputation. On study entry, dogs were randomized to receive piroxicam/cyclophosphamide with or without toceranib (n = 63 each) after completing chemotherapy. Patient demographics were not significantly different between both groups. During or immediately following carboplatin chemotherapy, 32 dogs (n = 13 toceranib; n = 19 control) developed metastatic disease, and 13 dogs left the study due to other medical conditions or owner preference. Following carboplatin chemotherapy, 81 dogs (n = 46 toceranib; n = 35 control) received the metronomic treatment; 35 dogs (n = 20 toceranib; n = 15 control) developed metastatic disease during the maintenance therapy, and 26 dogs left the study due to other medical conditions or owner preference. Nine toceranib-treated and 11 control dogs completed the study without evidence of metastatic disease 1-year following amputation. Toceranib-treated dogs experienced more episodes of diarrhea, neutropenia and weight loss than control dogs, although these toxicities were low-grade and typically resolved with supportive care. More toceranib-treated dogs (n = 8) were removed from the study for therapy-associated adverse events compared to control dogs (n = 1). The median DFI for control and toceranib treated dogs was 215 and 233 days, respectively (p = 0.274); the median OS for control and toceranib treated dogs was 242 and 318 days, respectively (p = 0.08). The one year survival rate for control dogs was 35% compared to 38% for dogs receiving toceranib. Conclusions The

  14. [Effectiveness of scalp cooling in chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Poder, Thomas G; He, Jie; Lemieux, Renald

    2011-10-01

    The main objectives of this literature review are to determine if scalp cooling is efficient and safe, if there are side effects and if the patients' quality of life improves. In terms of effectiveness, scalp cooling seems to get good performance in its aim to prevent hair loss in patients receiving chemotherapy. The weighted average results of all identified studies indicate that this technology allows for 63.5% of patients to have a good preservation of their hair. In studies with a group of control, the weighted rates of good preservation of the hair are 50.6% with scalp cooling and 16.3% without. From the standpoint of safety technology, the main risk is that of scalp metastases. However, no study has successfully demonstrated a statistically significant difference between groups of patients receiving chemotherapy with or without scalp cooling.

  15. Chemotherapy in Early Breast Cancer: When, How and Which One?

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Summary The efficacy of chemotherapy depends on the level of risk of the individual patient. Because of this, careful estimation of the risk level is mandatory. In addition to well-established clinicopathological factors, validated gene expression signatures might be useful in selected patients if all other criteria are inconclusive for therapeutic decision-making. If indicated, chemotherapy can be used either after surgery (adjuvant) or before surgery (neoadjuvant). Both approaches lead to comparable long-term survival. The neoadjuvant setting offers the additional opportunity for elaborate translational studies to develop and validate predictive biomarkers and to discover mechanisms of resistance to therapy. If possible, chemotherapy regimens should include both anthracyclines and taxanes. Docetaxel should be used every 3 weeks; better tolerability with equivalent efficacy favors the concurrent over the sequential approach. Paclitaxel, on the other hand, should be administered sequentially, either weekly or every 2 weeks. Especially, intense dose-dense sequential chemotherapy with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor support is very effective in high-risk breast cancer patients. In order to decrease toxicities, anthracycline-free regimens or a shortening of the duration of adjuvant chemotherapy are potential options that should be further explored. PMID:25177256

  16. Pathobiology of cancer chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN)

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yaqin; Smith, Maree T.

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a type of neuropathic pain that is a major dose-limiting side-effect of potentially curative cancer chemotherapy treatment regimens that develops in a “stocking and glove” distribution. When pain is severe, a change to less effective chemotherapy agents may be required, or patients may choose to discontinue treatment. Medications used to alleviate CIPN often lack efficacy and/or have unacceptable side-effects. Hence the unmet medical need for novel analgesics for relief of this painful condition has driven establishment of rodent models of CIPN. New insights on the pathobiology of CIPN gained using these models are discussed in this review. These include mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress that are implicated as key mechanisms in the development of CIPN. Associated structural changes in peripheral nerves include neuronopathy, axonopathy and/or myelinopathy, especially intra-epidermal nerve fiber (IENF) degeneration. In patients with CIPN, loss of heat sensitivity is a hallmark symptom due to preferential damage to myelinated primary afferent sensory nerve fibers in the presence or absence of demyelination. The pathobiology of CIPN is complex as cancer chemotherapy treatment regimens frequently involve drug combinations. Adding to this complexity, there are also subtle differences in the pathobiological consequences of commonly used cancer chemotherapy drugs, viz platinum compounds, taxanes, vincristine, bortezomib, thalidomide and ixabepilone, on peripheral nerves. PMID:24385965

  17. The effect of training during treatment with chemotherapy on muscle strength and endurance capacity: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Van Moll, Christel C A; Schep, Goof; Vreugdenhil, Art; Savelberg, Hans H C M; Husson, Olga

    2016-05-01

    Background Treatment of cancer with chemotherapy decreases endurance capacity and muscle strength. Training during chemotherapy might prevent this. There are no clear guidelines concerning which type of training and which training dose are effective. This review aims to gain insight into the different training modalities during chemotherapy and the effects of such training to improve endurance capacity and muscle strength in order to obtain the knowledge to compose a future training program which trains cancer patients in the most effective way. Material and methods A systematic search of PubMed was carried out. In total, 809 studies of randomized controlled trials studying the effects of training during chemotherapy on endurance capacity and muscle strength were considered. Only 14 studies met all the inclusion criteria. The studies were assessed on methodological quality by using Cochrane criteria for randomized controlled trials. Results The quality of the studies was generally poor and the study populations varied considerably as the training programs were very heterogeneous. Variables of endurance capacity reported beneficial effects in 10 groups (59%). Increases due to training ranged from 8% to 31%. Endurance capacity decreased in nine of 13 control groups (69%), which ranged from 1% to 32%. Muscle strength improved significantly in 17 of 18 intervention groups (94%), ranging from 2% to 38%. Muscle strength also improved in 11 of 14 control groups (79%), but this increase was only minimal, ranging from 1.3% to 6.5%. Conclusions This review indicates that training during chemotherapy may help in preventing the decrease in muscle strength and endurance capacity. It is important to know which training intensity and duration is the most effective in training cancer patients, to provide a training program suitable for every cancer patient. Training should be based on good research and should be implemented into international guidelines and daily practice. More

  18. Dosimetric Evaluation and Treatment Outcome of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy After Doxorubicin-Based Chemotherapy for Primary Mediastinal Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Li-Ming; Li, Ye-Xiong; Fang, Hui; Jin, Jing; Wang, Wei-Hu; Wang, Shu-Lian; Liu, Yue-Ping; Song, Yong-Wen; Liu, Qing-Feng; Chen, Bo; Qi, Shu-Nan; Ren, Hua; Dai, Jian-Rong

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: The value of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after doxorubicin-based chemotherapy in primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMBCL) is unknown. We assessed the dosimetric parameters, treatment outcomes, and toxicity of IMRT in PMBCL. Methods and Materials: Forty-one PMBCL patients underwent mediastinal IMRT after doxorubicin-based chemotherapy. Thirty-eight patients had stage I-II disease, and 3 patients had stage III-IV disease. Most patients presented with bulky mediastinal disease (65.9%) and local invasion (82.9%). The dose-volume histograms of the target volume and critical normal structures were evaluated. Results: The average planning target volume (PTV) mean dose was 39 Gy. Only 0.5% and 1.4% of the PTV received <90% and <95% of the prescribed dose, respectively, indicating excellent target coverage. The median mean lung dose and percentage lung volume receiving 20 Gy (V20) were 16.3 Gy and 30.6%. The 5-year overall survival (OS) and local control (LC) were 95.1% and 89.8%. After chemotherapy, consolidation radiation therapy in patients with complete/partial response resulted in significantly better survival than salvage radiation therapy in patients with stable/progressive disease (3-year OS 100% vs 75%; 3-year LC 96.6% vs 62.5%). No grade 4 or 5 acute or late toxicities occurred. Conclusions: Mediastinal IMRT after doxorubicin-based chemotherapy can be safely and efficiently delivered, and it provides favorable outcomes in PMBCL patients with a large target volume and high-risk features.

  19. Somnolence syndrome in leukemic children following reduced daily dose fractions of cranial radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Littman, P.; Rosenstock, J.; Gale, G.; Krisch, R.E.; Meadows, A.; Sather, H.; Coccia, P.; DeCamagro, B.

    1984-10-01

    A group of children with acute lymphocytic leukemia was studied to investigate if a reduction in daily dose fraction of cranial radiation would reduce the incidence of somnolence syndrome. Thirty-one evaluable patients received 100 rad x 18 cranial radiation therapy. Sixty-six similar evaluable patients were given 180 rad x 10. Both groups received the same chemotherapy including intrathecal methotrexate. Clinically detectable somnolence appeared in 58% of each group without significant differences in the overall frequency or severity of somnolence. This study failed to substantiate a radiation dose fraction size dependence for somnolence syndrome in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia.

  20. A New mouthwash for Chemotherapy Induced Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Miranzadeh, Sedigheh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Soleymanpoor, Leyla; Ehsani, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Stomatitis is a disturbing side-effect of chemotherapy that disturbs patients and causes difficulties in patient’s drinking, eating and talking, and may results in infection and bleeding. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effect of Yarrow distillate in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced stomatitis. Patients and Methods: This randomized controlled trial study was conducted during 2013. The study population consisted of all cancer patients with chemotherapy-induced oral stomatitis referred to Shahid Beheshti Medical Center, Kashan, Iran. The data collection instrument had two-part; a demographic part and another part recording the severity of the stomatitis at the first, seventh, and 14th days of the intervention based on a WHO criteria checklist in 2005. In this study, 56 patients diagnosed with cancer were randomly assigned into control and experimental groups in similar blocks according to their stomatitis severity. The experimental group gargled 15 mL of a routine solution mixed with Yarrow distillate 4 times a day for 14 days while the control group gargled 15 mL of routine solution. The severity of stomatitis was assessed at the beginning of the intervention, and then after 7 and 14 days of the study. Data were analyzed using chi-square and Fisher exact test, Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis, and Friedman tests using SPSS 11.5 software. Results: At first, the median score of stomatitis in the experimental group was 2.50 that significantly reduced to 1 and 0 in days 7 and 14 of the intervention, respectively (P value < 0.001). However, in the control group, the median score of stomatitis was 2.50, which significantly increased to 3 in days 7 and 14 (P value < 0.001). Conclusions: Yarrow distillate-contained solution reduced stomatitis severity more than the routine solution. Therefore, we suggest using it in patients with chemotherapy-induced stomatitis. PMID:25699281

  1. (18)F-FLT and (18)F-FDG PET-CT imaging in the evaluation of early therapeutic effects of chemotherapy on Walker 256 tumor-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weina; Yu, Shupeng; Xin, Jun; Guo, Qiyong

    2016-12-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the early therapeutic effects of chemotherapy on Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats via F-18-fluoro-3'-deoxy-3'-L-fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT) and F-18-fluoro-deoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) imaging. Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats were subjected to (18)F-FLT and (18)F-FDG PET-CT imaging prior to and 24 and 48 h after epirubicin chemotherapy. (18)F-FLT and (18)F-FDG uptake [tumor/muscle (T/M)], the percentage of injected dose per gram (% ID/g), and the Ki-67 labeling index (LI-Ki-67) were quantitatively determined for each rat prior to and following epirubicin chemotherapy. The correlation between % ID/g and tumor LI-Ki-67 was analyzed. Both (18)F-FLT and (18)F-FDG tumor uptake decreased significantly at 24 and 48 h after chemotherapy (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively). LI-Ki-67 also significantly reduced 24 and 48 h after chemotherapy (P<0.001). Furthermore, (18)F-FLT and (18)F-FDG T/M tumor uptake correlated positively with LI-Ki-67 before and after chemotherapy (r=0.842 and 0.813, respectively). During the early post-chemotherapy stage, (18)F-FLT and (18)F-FDG uptake in Walker 256 tumors reduced significantly, which correlated positively with the tumor cell proliferative activity.

  2. 18F-FLT and 18F-FDG PET-CT imaging in the evaluation of early therapeutic effects of chemotherapy on Walker 256 tumor-bearing rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weina; Yu, Shupeng; Xin, Jun; Guo, Qiyong

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the early therapeutic effects of chemotherapy on Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats via F-18-fluoro-3′-deoxy-3′-L-fluorothymidine (18F-FLT) and F-18-fluoro-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) imaging. Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats were subjected to 18F-FLT and 18F-FDG PET-CT imaging prior to and 24 and 48 h after epirubicin chemotherapy. 18F-FLT and 18F-FDG uptake [tumor/muscle (T/M)], the percentage of injected dose per gram (% ID/g), and the Ki-67 labeling index (LI-Ki-67) were quantitatively determined for each rat prior to and following epirubicin chemotherapy. The correlation between % ID/g and tumor LI-Ki-67 was analyzed. Both 18F-FLT and 18F-FDG tumor uptake decreased significantly at 24 and 48 h after chemotherapy (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively). LI-Ki-67 also significantly reduced 24 and 48 h after chemotherapy (P<0.001). Furthermore, 18F-FLT and 18F-FDG T/M tumor uptake correlated positively with LI-Ki-67 before and after chemotherapy (r=0.842 and 0.813, respectively). During the early post-chemotherapy stage, 18F-FLT and 18F-FDG uptake in Walker 256 tumors reduced significantly, which correlated positively with the tumor cell proliferative activity. PMID:28101193

  3. Chemotherapy for bladder cancer: treatment guidelines for neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bladder preservation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Cora N; Donat, S Machele; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Millikan, Randall E; Stadler, Walter; De Mulder, Pieter; Sherif, Amir; von der Maase, Hans; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Soloway, Mark S

    2007-01-01

    To determine the optimal use of chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and metastatic setting in patients with advanced urothelial cell carcinoma, a consensus conference was convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Société Internationale d'Urologie (SIU) to critically review the published literature on chemotherapy for patients with locally advanced bladder cancer. This article reports the development of international guidelines for the treatment of patients with locally advanced bladder cancer with neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Bladder preservation is also discussed, as is chemotherapy for patients with metastatic urothelial cancer. The conference panel consisted of 10 medical oncologists and urologists from 3 continents who are experts in this field and who reviewed the English-language literature through October 2004. Relevant English-language literature was identified with the use of Medline; additional cited works not detected on the initial search regarding neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bladder preservation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and chemotherapy for patients with metastatic urothelial cancer were reviewed. Evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and management of the disease were made with reference to a 4-point scale. Results of the authors' deliberations are presented as a consensus document. Meta-analysis of randomized trials on cisplatin-containing combination neoadjuvant chemotherapy revealed a 5% difference in favor of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. No randomized trials have yet compared survival with transurethral resection of bladder tumor alone versus cystectomy for the management of patients with muscle-invasive disease. Collaborative international adjuvant chemotherapy trials are needed to assist researchers in assessing the true value of adjuvant chemotherapy. Systemic cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy is the only current modality that has been shown in phase 3 trials to improve survival in responsive patients

  4. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Black, Peter C; Brown, Gordon A; Grossman, H Barton; Dinney, Colin P

    2006-11-01

    The 30-45% failure rate after radical cystoprostatectomy mandates that we explore and optimize multimodal therapy to achieve better disease control in these patients. Cisplatin-based multi-agent combination chemotherapy has been used with success in metastatic disease and has therefore also been introduced in patients with high-risk but non-metastatic bladder cancer. There is now convincing evidence that chemotherapy given pre-operatively can improve survival in these patients. In this review we establish the need for peri-operative chemotherapy in bladder cancer patients and summarize the evidence for the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The advantages and disadvantages of neoadjuvant versus adjuvant chemotherapy are discussed, and the main shortcomings of both--treatment-related toxicity and the inability to prospectively identify likely responders--are presented. Finally, a risk-adapted approach to neoadjuvant chemotherapy is presented, whereby the highest risk patients are offered treatment while those unlikely to benefit are spared the treatment-related toxicity.

  5. The double-edged sword: Neurotoxicity of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Magge, Rajiv S; DeAngelis, Lisa M

    2015-03-01

    The number of available therapies for hematologic malignancies continues to grow at a rapid pace. Unfortunately, many of these treatments carry both central and peripheral nervous system toxicities, potentially limiting a patient's ability to tolerate a full course of treatment. Neurotoxicity with chemotherapy is common and second only to myelosuppression as a reason to limit dosing. This review addresses the neurotoxicity of newly available therapeutic agents including brentuximab vedotin and blinatumomab as well as classic ones such as methotrexate, vinca alkaloids and platinums. Although peripheral neuropathy is common with many drugs, other complications such as seizures and encephalopathy may require more immediate attention. Rapid recognition of adverse neurologic effects may lead to earlier treatment and appropriate adjustment of dosing regimens. In addition, knowledge of common toxicities may help differentiate chemotherapy-related symptoms from actual progression of cancer into the CNS.

  6. [Male fertility after chemotherapy during childhood].

    PubMed

    Aubier, F; Patte, C; de Vathaire, F; Tournade, M F; Oberlin, O; Sakiroglu, O; Lemerle, J

    1995-01-01

    Chemotherapy has considerably improved the prognosis of solid tumours in children, but may have very adverse effects, particularly on fertility. A study was conducted at the Gustave Roussy Institute to identify the toxic effect of chemotherapy on male fertility. At present, 205 patients, treated during childhood have entered the study. Basal FSH-LH have been assayed to assess possible germ cell damage although azoosperia can not be eliminated. Results were normal in 127 patients (62%) and increased basal FSH levels were found in 78 (38%). Endocrine function was not altered: all patients were either impubertal or intrapubertal at diagnosis and subsequently achieved normal puberty. Multivariate analysis revealed an obvious toxic effect of 2 alkylating drugs: cyclophosphamide and procarbazine. No toxic effect was observed for vincristine, dohorubicin or actinomycin D. Age and pubertal status at diagnosis were not correlated with toxic effects. At present, no conclusion for other drugs may be made but results high dose metotrexate are promising. For lomustine and cisplatin, less favourable, though nonsignificant, results have been obtained. Complete recovery is possible several years later.

  7. AB058. Intravenous chemotherapy combined with intravesical chemotherapy to treat T1G3 bladder urothelial carcinoma after transurethral resection of bladder tumor: results of a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Hu, Hailong; Tian, Dawei; Wu, Changli

    2016-01-01

    Objective The management of stage 1 and grade 3 (T1G3) bladder cancer continues to be controversial. Although the transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) followed by intravesical chemotherapy is a conservative strategy for treatment of T1G3 bladder cancer, a relatively high risk of tumor recurrence and progression remains regarding the therapy. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of intravenous chemotherapy combined with intravesical chemotherapy versus intravesical chemotherapy alone for T1G3 bladder cancer after TURBT surgery. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 457 patients who were newly diagnosed with T1G3 bladder urothelial carcinoma between January 2009 and March 2014. After TURBT, 281 patients received intravesical chemotherapy alone, whereas 176 patients underwent intravesical chemotherapy in combination with intravenous chemotherapy. Tumor recurrence and progression were monitored periodically by urine cytology and cystoscopy in follow-up. Recurrence-free survival and progression-free survival of the two chemotherapy strategies following TURBT were analyzed. Univariable and multivariable Cox hazards analyses were performed to predict the prognostic factors for tumor recurrence and progression. Results The tumor recurrence rate was 36.7% for patients who received intravesical chemotherapy alone after TURBT, compared with 19.9% for patients who received intravenous chemotherapy combined with intravesical chemotherapy after TURBT (P<0.001). The progression rate was 10.6% for patients who underwent intravesical chemotherapy alone and 2.3% for patients who underwent the combined chemotherapies (P=0.003). Kaplan-Meier curves showed significant differences in recurrence-free survival and progression-free survival between the two treatment strategies, with a log-rank P value of <0.001 and 0.003, respectively. Multivariable analyses revealed that intravenous chemotherapy was the independent prognostic factor for tumor recurrence and

  8. Therapeutic efficacy of 177Lu-CHX-A″-DTPA-hu3S193 radioimmunotherapy in prostate cancer is enhanced by EGFR inhibition or docetaxel chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Marcus P; Lee, Sze Ting; Lee, F-T; Smyth, Fiona E; Davis, Ian D.; Brechbiel, Martin W; Scott, Andrew M

    2008-01-01

    Background This study investigated the biodistribution and therapeutic efficacy of Lutetium-177 (177Lu) radiolabeled anti-Lewis Y monoclonal antibody hu3S193 radioimmunotherapy (RIT) in mice bearing prostate cancer xenografts. The ability of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478 and docetaxel chemotherapy to enhance the efficacy of RIT was also assessed in vivo. Methods The in vitro cytotoxicity of 177Lu labeled hu3S193 on Ley positive DU145 prostate cancer cells was assessed using proliferation assays, with induction of apoptosis measured by ELISA. The in vivo biodistribution and tumor localization of 177Lu-hu3S193 was assessed in mice bearing established DU145 tumor xenografts. The efficacy and maximum tolerated dose of 177Lu-hu3S193 RIT in vivo was determined by a dose escalation study. EGFR inhibitor AG1478 or docetaxel chemotherapy was administered at sub-therapeutic doses in conjunction with RIT in vivo. Results 177Lu-hu3S193 mediated significant induction of cytotoxicity and apoptosis in vitro. In vivo analysis of 177Lu-hu3S193 biodistribution demonstrated specific targeting of DU145 prostate cancer xenografts, with maximal tumor uptake of 33.2 ± 3.9 %ID/g observed at 120 hr post injection. In RIT studies, 177Lu-hu3S193 caused specific and dose-dependent inhibition of prostate cancer tumor growth. A maximum tolerated dose of 350μCi was determined for 177Lu-hu3S193. Combination of 177Lu-hu3S193 RIT with EGFR inhibitor AG1478 or docetaxel chemotherapy both significantly improved efficacy. Conclusions 177Lu-hu3S193 RIT is effective as a single agent in the treatment of Ley positive prostate cancer models. The enhancement of RIT by AG1478 or docetaxel indicates the promise of combined modality strategies. PMID:18942092

  9. Clinical significance of TT virus (TTV) infection in chronic hepatitis C patients with high dose interferon-alpha therapy in Taiwan: re-evaluated by using new set of TTV primers.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chia Yen; Yu, Ming Lung; Lin, Zu Yau; Chen, Shinn Cherng; Hsieh, Ming Yen; Lee, Li Po; Hou, Nei Jen; Hsieh, Ming Yuh; Wang, Liang Yen; Tsai, Jung Fa; Chuang, Wan Long; Chang, Wen Yu

    2003-10-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical significance of TT virus (TTV) coinfection in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients and influence of TTV viremia on hepatitis C virus (HCV) response to high dose interferon-alpha therapy in Taiwan were investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Total 102 HCV RNA-positive CHC patients were enrolled. TTV DNA (using polymerase chain reaction primers derived from 5' non-coding region and open reading frame 2), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), GB virus-C/hepatitis G virus (GBV-C/HGV) RNA, anti-E2 antibody, genotype and RNA levels of HCV were tested. RESULTS: The prevalence of TTV DNA was 51.0%. The mean age of TTV viremic CHC patients was significant higher than non-viremic ones (P<0.05). HCV sustained viral response (SVR) was achieved in 42 (41.2%) patients. Based on multivariate regression analyses, SVR were significantly associated with low pretreatment HCV RNA levels, HCV genotype non-1b and high pretreatment levels of ALT but not TTV viremia. CONCLUSIONS: TTV viremia is highly prevalent among Taiwanese CHC patients and related to increased ages. Neither severity of liver disease nor replication and genotype distribution of HCV was affected by concurrent TTV infection. With high HCV SVR rate associated with pretreatment HCV RNA and ALT levels and HCV genotype, TTV viremia did not influence the HCV response.

  10. Resection of colorectal liver metastases following neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chiappa, A; Bertani, E; Biffi, R; Pace, U; Viale, G; Pruneri, G; Zampino, G; Fazio, N; Orsi, F; Bonomo, G; Monfardini, L; Vigna, P Della; Andreoni, B

    2007-01-01

    Background/aims: Hepatic resection in metastatic disease from colorectal cancer offers the best chance in selected cases for long-term survival. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) has been advocated in some cases initially deemed irresectable, with few reports of the efficacy of such a strategy and the influence of the response to chemotherapy on the outcome of radical hepatic resection. Methodology: Between December 1995 and May 2005, 27 patients with colorectal liver metastases (seven males, 20 females, mean age: 58 ± 8 years; range: 40–75) were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. A seven-year survival analysis was performed. Chemotherapy included mainly 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin and either oxaliplatin or irinotecan for a median of eight courses. Results: A total of 16 patients (59%) had synchronous and 11 (41%) metachronous metastases. During pre-operative chemotherapy, tumour regression occurred in ten cases (37%), stable disease in a further ten patients (37%) and progressive disease developed in seven cases (26%). The five-year overall survival for NACT responders was 64% and only 15% for non-responders (p=0.044). Conclusions: The response to chemotherapy is likely to be a significant prognostic factor affecting survival after liver resection for cure. PMID:22275956

  11. Role of chemotherapy in the management of advanced thymic tumors.

    PubMed

    Evans, Tracey L; Lynch, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    Chemotherapy has an important role in the treatment of advanced thymic tumors. Early stage tumors are successfully treated with surgery. Locally advanced tumors (Masaoka stage III and IVA) are often treated with combined modality treatment including surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. For patients with curable thymic tumors, the ability to attain a complete resection is a critical prognostic factor. Locally advanced tumors have a relatively high risk of recurrence and decreased rates of long-term survival. A multimodality approach including induction chemotherapy and postoperative radiation therapy can improve complete resection rates and long-term outcomes. Thymic tumors are chemoresponsive with optimal responses achieved with cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy. Chemotherapy with radiation can result in long-term progression-free survival for patients with locally advanced disease who remain inoperable following induction therapy. Patients with disseminated (stage IVB) thymic tumors can also have significant disease response and palliation of symptoms when treated with chemotherapy. Octreotide and corticosteroids also have shown efficacy. For best results, it is important that thoracic surgeons, radiation oncologists, and medical oncologists work together to obtain the best local control of tumor and optimal treatment of metastases.

  12. Acute leukemia occurring after radiotherapy and chemotherapy with a nitrosourea, PCNU.

    PubMed

    Shepard, K V; Larson, R; Le Beau, M M; Leichman, L; Levin, B

    1988-06-01

    Secondary acute leukemias can occur in patients who have been treated with chemotherapy. Several reports have shown that treatment with nitrosoureas can result in secondary leukemia, but this is the first report implicating the investigational drug PCNU as a cause. This case is unique because of the cytogenetic findings, the short latency period between the chemotherapy and the diagnosis of leukemia, and the successful treatment of the leukemia with high-dose cytarabine (ara-C).

  13. Cyclophosphamide dose intensification may circumvent anthracycline resistance of p53 mutant breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Lehmann-Che, Jacqueline; André, Fabrice; Desmedt, Christine; Mazouni, Chafika; Giacchetti, Sylvie; Turpin, Elisabeth; Espié, Marc; Plassa, Louis-François; Marty, Michel; Bertheau, Philippe; Sotiriou, Christos; Piccart, Martine; Symmans, W Fraser; Pusztai, Lajos; de Thé, Hugues

    2010-01-01

    The predictive value of p53 for the efficacy of front-line anthracycline-based chemotherapy regimens has been a matter of significant controversy. Anthracyclines are usually combined with widely different doses of alkylating agents, which may significantly modulate tumor response to these combinations. We analyzed three series of de novo stage II-III breast cancer patients treated front line with anthracycline-based regimens of various cyclophosphamide dose intensities: 65 patients with estrogen receptor (ER)(-) tumors treated with anthracyclines alone (Institut Jules Bordet, Brussels), 51 unselected breast cancer patients treated with intermediate doses of cyclophosphamide (MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX), and 128 others treated with a dose-dense anthracycline-cyclophosphamide combination (St. Louis, Paris). After chemotherapy and surgery, pathologic complete response (pCR) was evaluated. p53 status was determined by a yeast functional assay on the pretreatment tumor sample. In a multivariate analysis of the pooled results, a lack of ER expression and high-dose cyclophosphamide administration were associated with a higher likelihood of pCR. A sharp statistical interaction was detected between p53 status and cyclophosphamide dose intensity. Indeed, when restricting our analysis to patients with ER(-) tumors, we confirmed that a mutant p53 status was associated with anthracycline resistance, but found that p53 inactivation was required for response to the dose-intense alkylating regimen. The latter allowed very high levels of pCR in triple-negative tumors. Thus, our data strongly suggest that cyclophosphamide dose intensification in ER(-) p53-mutated breast cancer patients could significantly improve their response.

  14. Differential cellular responses induced by dorsomorphin and LDN-193189 in chemotherapy-sensitive and chemotherapy-resistant human epithelial ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ali, Jennifer L; Lagasse, Brittany J; Minuk, Ainsley J; Love, Allison J; Moraya, Amani I; Lam, Linda; Arthur, Gilbert; Gibson, Spencer B; Morrison, Ludivine Coudière; Werbowetski-Ogilvie, Tamra E; Fu, Yangxin; Nachtigal, Mark W

    2015-03-01

    Inherent or acquired drug resistance is a major contributor to epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) mortality. Novel drugs or drug combinations that produce EOC cell death or resensitize drug resistant cells to standard chemotherapy may improve patient treatment. After conducting drug tolerability studies for the multikinase inhibitors dorsomorphin (DM) and it is structural analogue LDN-193189 (LDN), these drugs were tested in a mouse intraperitoneal xenograft model of EOC. DM significantly increased survival, whereas LDN showed a trend toward increased survival. In vitro experiments using cisplatin (CP)-resistant EOC cell lines, A2780-cp or SKOV3, we determined that pretreatment or cotreatment with DM or LDN resensitized cells to the killing effect of CP or carboplatin (CB). DM was capable of blocking EOC cell cycle and migration, whereas LDN produced a less pronounced effect on cell cycle and no effect on migration. Subsequent analyses using primary human EOC cell samples or additional established EOC cells lines showed that DM or LDN induced a dose-dependent autophagic or cell death response, respectively. DM induced a characteristic morphological change with the appearance of numerous LC3B-containing acidic vacuoles and an increase in LC3BII levels. This was coincident with a decrease in cell growth and the altered cell cycle consistent with DM-induced cytostasis. By contrast, LDN produced a caspase 3-independent, reactive oxygen species-dependent cell death. Overall, DM and LDN possess drug characteristics suitable for adjuvant agents used to treat chemotherapy-sensitive and -resistant EOC.

  15. The treatment of advanced stage favorable histology non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: a preliminary report of a randomized trial comparing single agent chemotherapy, combination chemotherapy, and whole body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, R.T.; Kushlan, P.; Kaplan, H.S.; Rosenberg, S.A.; Brown, B.W.

    1981-09-01

    Between 1975 and 1978, 51 patients with favorable histology non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, pathologic stage III-IV, were treated prospectively on a randomized treatment protocol. Treatment options were single alkylating agent chemotherapy, combination chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone (CVP), or fractionated whole body irradiation followed by low dose involved field irradiation. The median follow-up interval in this group of patients is not 41 mo. Actuarial survival is excellent, 84% at 4 yr for the entire group, with similar survival observed for each of the three treatment options. Initial complete remission rates (64%, 88%, and 71%) were not significantly different in the three treatment arms. Frequent relapse after initial remission induction was noted, however, with a freedom from relapse at 4 yr of only 25%. The toxicities of the three therapies were acceptable. Acute complications of therapy were most numerous in the group of patients treated with CVP; however, long-term hematologic depression was most commonly observed in patients treated with whole body irradiation. In general, hematologic complications were more frequent among patients who had marrow involvement and intact spleens at the time of initial therapy. The relationship of this study to other clinical trials in the management of patients with advanced stage favorable histology lymphomas and its implications for future clinical trials are discussed.

  16. Correlation between the expression of S100A4 and the efficacy of TAC neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Lei; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Bao-Guo; DU, Qian; Zhou, Chang-Xin; Tian, Xing-Song

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between the expression of S100A4 and the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer. A total of 65 patients with invasive breast cancer were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy using the TAC regimen. The expression of S100A4 was detected by an immunohistochemical two-step method prior to treatment, after 2 cycles of chemotherapy and after 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Pathological evaluations of the chemotherapy were performed using the Miller and Payne (MP) grading system and their correlation with the changes of S100A4 expression during and after the treatment were explored. Between pre-neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 4 cycles post-chemotherapy, there was a significant difference in the expression of S100A4 (P<0.05); S100A4 expression was associated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. However, between pre-neoadjuvant chemotherapy and 2 cycles post-chemotherapy, there was no significant difference in the expression of S100A4 (P>0.05). The intensity and changes of S100A4 expression were positively correlated with the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (r=0.259, P<0.05). When patients with an MP grade of I or II following the second cycle of neoadjuvant chemotherapy were continually treated with the original chemotherapy for another 2 cycles, the desired effect was generally not achieved. S100A4 may be used as a predictor of the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer, guiding the formulation of individualized programs to improve the effectiveness of the treatment. For patients with an MP grade level of I or II after 2 cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, the use of alternative chemotherapy regimens should be considered.

  17. The CCL2/CCR2 Axis Affects Transmigration and Proliferation but Not Resistance to Chemotherapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Macanas-Pirard, Patricia; Quezada, Thomas; Navarrete, Leonardo; Broekhuizen, Richard; Leisewitz, Andrea; Nervi, Bruno; Ramírez, Pablo A.

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has a high mortality rate despite chemotherapy and transplantation. Both CXCR4/SDF-1 and VLA-4/VCAM1 axes are involved in leukemia protection but little is known about the role of CCL2/CCR2 in AML biology and protection against chemotherapy. We measured CCR2 expression in AML cell lines and primary AML cells by flow cytometry (FCM), real time PCR (RT-PCR) and western blot (WB). CCL2 production was quantified by solid phase ELISA in peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) serum. We measured chemotaxis in a transwell system with different concentrations of CCL2/CCR2 blockers; cell cycle with BrDU and propidium iodide and proliferation with yellow tetrazolium MTT. We determined synergy in in vitro cell apoptosis combining chemotherapy and CCL2/CCR2 blockade. Finally, we performed chemoprotection studies in an in vivo mouse model. Of 35 patients, 23 (65%) expressed CCR2 by FCM in PB. Two cell lines expressed high levels of CCR2 (THP-1 and murine AML). RT-PCR and WB confirmed CCR2 production. CCL2 solid phase ELISA showed significantly lower levels of CCL2 in PB and BM compared to normal controls. Chemotaxis experiments confirmed a dose-dependent migration in AML primary cells expressing CCR2 and THP-1 cells. A significant inhibition of transmigration was seen after CCL2/CCR2 blockade. Proliferation of CCR2+ AML cell lines was slightly increased (1.4-fold) after axis stimulation. We observed a non-significant increase in phase S THP-1 cells exposed to CCL2 and a concomitant decrease of cells in G1. The chemotherapy studies did not show a protective effect of CCL2 on cytarabine-induced apoptosis or synergy with chemotherapy after CCL2/CCR2 blockade both in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, CCL2/CCR2 axis is expressed in the majority of monocytoid AML blasts. The axis is involved in cell trafficking and proliferation but no in vitro and in vivo chemotherapy protective effect was seen. PMID:28045930

  18. Quiescent cells: A natural way to resist chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menchón, S. A.; Condat, C. A.

    2011-10-01

    Most chemotherapeutic treatments use drugs that target proliferating cancer cells. Therefore, they do not affect quiescent cells which are naturally resistant. Surviving cancer cells can reactivate their cell cycles in the intervals between doses, becoming proliferative again and thus restarting tumor growth. In this work, we present a mathematical model to study the impact of quiescent cells on chemotherapy effectiveness. Our simulations show that, although tumor growth is delayed after the beginning of each dose, the resistance of quiescent cells is enough to reactivate it due to accelerated repopulation, eventually causing therapy failure even in the absence of acquired resistance.

  19. Short course chemotherapy for tuberculous lymphadenitis in children.

    PubMed Central

    Jawahar, M S; Sivasubramanian, S; Vijayan, V K; Ramakrishnan, C V; Paramasivan, C N; Selvakumar, V; Paul, S; Tripathy, S P; Prabhakar, R

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the efficacy of a short course chemotherapy regimen for treating tuberculosis of the lymph nodes in children. DESIGN--Open, collaborative, outpatient clinical trial. SETTING--Outpatient department of the Tuberculosis Research Centre, paediatric surgery departments of the Institute of Child Health and Hospital for Children and the Government Stanley Hospital, Madras, South India. PATIENTS--Children aged 1-12 years with extensive, multiple site, superficial tuberculous lymphadenitis confirmed by biopsy (histopathology or culture). INTERVENTIONS--Patients were treated with a fully supervised intermittent chemotherapy regimen consisting of streptomycin, rifampicin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide three times a week for two months followed by streptomycin and isoniazid twice a week for four months on an outpatient basis. Surgery was limited to biopsy of nodes for diagnosis and assessment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Response to chemotherapy was assessed by regression of lymph nodes and healing of sinuses and abscesses during treatment and follow up. Compliance with treatment and frequency of adverse reactions were also estimated. RESULTS--197 Patients were admitted to the study and 168 into the analysis. The regimen was well tolerated and compliance was good with 101 (60%) patients receiving the prescribed chemotherapy within 15 days of the stipulated period of six months. Those whose chemotherapy extended beyond that period received the same total number of doses. Clinical response was favourable in most patients at the end of treatment. Sinuses and abscesses healed rapidly. Residual lymphadenopathy (exceeding 10 mm diameter) was present in 50 (30%) patients at the end of treatment; these nodes were biopsied. Fresh nodes, increase in size of nodes, and sinuses and abscesses occurred both during treatment and follow up. After 36 months of follow up after treatment only 5 (3%) patients required retreatment for tuberculosis. CONCLUSION

  20. Genome-wide discovery of loci influencing chemotherapy cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Watters, James W; Kraja, Aldi; Meucci, Melissa A; Province, Michael A; McLeod, Howard L

    2004-08-10

    Little is known about the heritability of chemotherapy activity or the identity of genes that may enable the individualization of cancer chemotherapy. Although numerous genes are likely to influence chemotherapy response, current candidate gene-based pharmacogenetics approaches require a priori knowledge and the selection of a small number of candidate genes for hypothesis testing. In this study, an ex vivo familial genetics strategy using lymphoblastoid cells derived from Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain reference pedigrees was used to discover genetic determinants of chemotherapy cytotoxicity. Cytotoxicity to the mechanistically distinct chemotherapy agents 5-fluorouracil and docetaxel were shown to be heritable traits, with heritability values ranging from 0.26 to 0.65 for 5-fluorouracil and 0.21 to 0.70 for docetaxel, varying with dose. Genome-wide linkage analysis was also used to map a quantitative trait locus influencing the cellular effects of 5-fluorouracil to chromosome 9q13-q22 [logarithm of odds (LOD) = 3.44], and two quantitative trait loci influencing the cellular effects of docetaxel to chromosomes 5q11-21 (LOD = 2.21) and 9q13-q22 (LOD = 2.73). Finally, 5-fluorouracil and docetaxel were shown to cause apoptotic cell death involving caspase-3 cleavage in Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain lymphoblastoid cells. This study identifies genomic regions likely to harbor genes important for chemotherapy cytotoxicity using genome-wide linkage analysis in human pedigrees and provides a widely applicable strategy for pharmacogenomic discovery without the requirement for a priori candidate gene selection.

  1. Systematic Review: Generating Evidence-Based Guidelines on the Concurrent Use of Dietary Antioxidants and Chemotherapy or Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Akiko; Alladin, Karen P.; Igbokwe, Obianuju; White, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    The risk–benefit ratio for concurrent use of dietary antioxidants with chemotherapy or radiation therapy is a controversial topic. In this review, the medical literature on concurrent antioxidant use with chemotherapy or radiotherapy was assessed and further steps for generating evidence-based guidelines are suggested. The clinical cancer research community should cooperate and focus new studies on the use of a specific combination of antioxidant and chemotherapy or radiotherapy, and determine optimal doses for a specific cancer setting. Mechanistic studies on the interaction between antioxidants and conventional cancer therapy could lead to novel biomarkers for assessing dose adequacy. PMID:22085269

  2. Chemotherapy of leishmaniasis: present challenges.

    PubMed

    Uliana, Silvia R B; Trinconi, Cristiana T; Coelho, Adriano C

    2017-01-20

    Cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis are amongst the most devastating infectious diseases of our time, affecting millions of people worldwide. The treatment of these serious diseases rely on a few chemotherapeutic agents, most of which are of parenteral use and induce severe side-effects. Furthermore, rates of treatment failure are high and have been linked to drug resistance in some areas. Here, we reviewed data on current chemotherapy practice in leishmaniasis. Drug resistance and mechanisms of resistance are described as well as the prospects for applying drug combinations for leishmaniasis chemotherapy. It is clear that efforts for discovering new drugs applicable to leishmaniasis chemotherapy are essential. The main aspects on the various steps of drug discovery in the field are discussed.

  3. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia enhancement of cisplatin chemotherapy cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Petryk, Alicia A.; Giustini, Andrew J.; Gottesman, Rachel E.; Kaufman, Peter A.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the therapeutic effect of magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPH) combined with systemic cisplatin chemotherapy in a murine mammary adenocarcinoma model (MTGB). Materials and methods An alternating magnetic field (35.8 kA/m at 165 kHz) was used to activate 110 nm hydroxyethyl starch-coated magnetic nanoparticles (mNP) to a thermal dose of 60 min at 43 °C. Intratumoral mNP were delivered at 7.5 mg of Fe/cm3 of tumour (four equal tumour quadrants). Intraperitoneal cisplatin at 5 mg/kg body weight was administered 1 h prior to mNPH. Tumour regrowth delay time was used to assess the treatment efficacy. Results mNP hyperthermia, combined with cisplatin, was 1.7 times more effective than mNP hyperthermia alone and 1.4 times more effective than cisplatin alone (p<0.05). Conclusions Our results demonstrate that mNP hyperthermia can result in a safe and significant therapeutic enhancement for cisplatin cancer therapy. PMID:24144336

  4. Overestimation of carboplatin doses is avoided by radionuclide GFR measurement

    PubMed Central

    Craig, A J; Samol, J; Heenan, S D; Irwin, A G; Britten, A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is used in the calculation of carboplatin dose. Glomerular filtration rate is measured using a radioisotope method (radionuclide GFR (rGFR)), however, estimation equations are available (estimated GFR (eGFR)). Our aim was to assess the accuracy of three eGFR equations and the subsequent carboplatin dose in an oncology population. Patients and methods: Patients referred for an rGFR over a 3-year period were selected; eGFR was calculated using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD), Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) and Cockcroft-Gault (CG) equations. Carboplatin doses were calculated for those patients who had received carboplatin chemotherapy. Bias, precision and accuracy were examined. Results: Two hundred and eighty-eight studies met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Paired t-tests showed significant differences for all three equations between rGFR and eGFR with biases of 12.3 (MDRD), 13.6 (CKD-EPI) and 7.7 ml min−1 per 1.73 m2 (CG). An overestimation in carboplatin dose was seen in 81%, 87% and 66% of studies using the MDRD, CKD-EPI and CG equations, respectively. Conclusion: The MDRD and CKD-EPI equations performed poorly compared with the reference standard rGFR; the CG equation showed smaller bias and higher accuracy in our oncology population. On the basis of our results we recommend that the rGFR should be used for accurate carboplatin chemotherapy dosing and where unavailable the use of the CG equation is preferred. PMID:22935580

  5. Recovery of mucosal-associated invariant T cells after myeloablative chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Novak, Jan; Dobrovolny, Jan; Brozova, Jitka; Novakova, Lucie; Kozak, Tomas

    2016-11-01

    Immune reconstitution after high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation plays a key role in restoring immunocompetence including defense against infection, immune regulation, and onco-immune surveillance. In this work, we examined the recovery of mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, recently discovered innate-like T cells, after various types of myeloablative chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in 29 patients. We show that MAIT cells are relatively resistant to myeloablative conditioning. The median amount of MAIT cells rises to 43 % around day +30 and is sustained through further measurements on days +60 and +100. Moreover, MAIT cell recovery reaches 100 % of pre-treatment values in 33 % of patients already by day +60. The only factor affecting recovery of MAIT cells is age, younger age being associated with earlier MAIT cell recovery. The pre-treatment quantity of MAIT cells carries a prognostic impact on the early post-transplantation course. Patients with high levels of MAIT cells pre-treatment have significantly lower peak CRP levels (79.45 vs. 150 mg/L) post-treatment, reflecting a clinical trend of less severe infectious complications (less febrile days and less days on intravenous antibiotics). Altogether these data suggest that a high proportion of MAIT cells survive myeloablative chemotherapy and maintain their capacity to fight against infections probably on mucosal surfaces.

  6. Phase II Trial Assessing the Ability of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy With or Without Second-Look Surgery to Eliminate Measurable Disease for Nongerminomatous Germ Cell Tumors: A Children's Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Stewart; Bouffet, Eric; Fisher, Paul G.; Allen, Jeffrey C.; Robertson, Patricia L.; Chuba, Paul J.; Donahue, Bernadine; Kretschmar, Cynthia S.; Zhou, Tianni; Buxton, Allen B.; Pollack, Ian F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This phase II trial evaluated the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with or without second-look surgery before craniospinal irradiation on response rates and survival outcomes in children with newly diagnosed nongerminomatous germ cell tumors. Patients and Methods Induction chemotherapy consisted of six cycles of carboplatin/etoposide alternating with ifosfamide/etoposide. Patients demonstrating less than complete response after induction chemotherapy were encouraged to undergo second-look surgery. Patients who did not achieve complete response or partial response after chemotherapy with or without second-look surgery proceeded to high-dose chemotherapy with thiotepa and etoposide and autologous peripheral blood stem-cell rescue before craniospinal irradiation. Results The study included 102 patients treated between January 2004 and July 2008. Median age was 12 years, and 76% were male; 53.9% had pineal region masses, and 23.5% had suprasellar lesions. Sixty-nine percent of patients achieved complete response or partial response with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. At 5 years, event-free survival was 84% ± 4% (SE) and overall survival was 93% ± 3%. During the median follow-up of 5.1 years, 16 patients recurred or progressed, with seven deaths after relapse. No deaths were attributed to therapy-related toxicity. Relapse occurred at the site of primary disease in 10 patients, at a distant site in three patients, or both in one patient. In two patients, progression was detected by marker increase alone. Increased serum α-fetoprotein was a negative prognostic variable. Histologic subtype and increase of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin were not significantly correlated with worse outcomes. Conclusion Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with or without second-look surgery achieved high response rates contributing to excellent survival outcomes in children with newly diagnosed nongerminomatous germ cell tumors. This regimen should be included as a backbone for further

  7. Transient focal liver scan defects in children receiving chemotherapy (pseudometastases): work in progress

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, S.J.; Barash, F.S.; Seldin, D.W.; Berdon, W.E.

    1984-03-01

    Three pediatric patients with tumors (two rhabdomyosarcoma, one Wilms tumor) had significant focal defects on Tc-99m sulfur colloid scans while receiving chemotherapy (all three had received chemotherapy, including actinomycin D, within ten days prior to scanning). In all three, the defects resolved spontaneously; one biopsy showed fibrosis of a mild degree. The finding of defects on liver scans of pediatric patients receiving chemotherapy must not be automatically assumed to be metastatic disease; the changes may relate to hepatic response to recently administered chemotherapy.

  8. Administration of Concurrent Vaginal Brachytherapy During Chemotherapy for Treatment of Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagar, Himanshu; Boothe, Dustin; Parikh, Amar; Yondorf, Menachem; Parashar, Bhupesh; Gupta, Divya; Holcomb, Kevin; Caputo, Thomas; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Wernicke, A. Gabriella

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability and toxicity of administering vaginal brachytherapy (VB) concurrently during chemotherapy compared with the sequential approach for patients with endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 372 surgically staged patients with endometrial cancer American Joint Committee on Cancer 2009 stages I to IV treated with adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy (RT) at our institution from 2001 to 2012 was conducted. All patients received VB + external beam RT (EBRT) + 6 cycles of adjuvant carboplatin- and paclitaxel-based chemotherapy. The VB mean dose was 15.08 Gy (range, 15-20 Gy), with 3 to 4 weekly applications, and the EBRT mean dose was 45 Gy delivered with 3-dimensional or intensity modulated RT techniques. Hematologic, gastrointestinal (GI), and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were assessed by Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) and compared between sequential and concurrent chemotherapy and VB schedules. Results: Among patients who received RT and adjuvant chemotherapy, 180 of 372 patients (48%) received RT sandwiched between cycles 3 and 4 of chemotherapy. A separate group of 192 patients (52%) were treated with VB during the first 3 cycles of chemotherapy, with a weekly application on nonchemotherapy days, and received the EBRT portion in a sandwiched fashion. Patients treated with VB during chemotherapy had a decreased overall treatment time by 4 weeks (P<.001; 95% confidence interval: 3.99-4.02) and sustained no difference in CTC-graded acute hematologic, GI, or GU toxicities in comparison with the patients treated with VB and chemotherapy in a sequential manner (P>.05). CTC grade 3 or 4 hematologic, GI, and GU toxicities were zero. Conclusions: VB during chemotherapy is well tolerated, decreases overall treatment time, and does not render more toxicity than the sequential regimen.

  9. Transarterial Infusion Chemotherapy Using Cisplatin-Lipiodol Suspension With or Without Embolization for Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Aikata, Hiroshi Takaki, Shintaro; Katamura, Yoshio; Hiramatsu, Akira; Waki, Koji; Takahashi, Shoichi; Hieda, Masashi; Toyota, Naoyuki; Ito, Katsuhide; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2009-07-15

    We evaluate the long-term prognosis and prognostic factors in patients treated with transarterial infusion chemotherapy using cisplatin-lipiodol (CDDP/LPD) suspension with or without embolization for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Study subjects were 107 patients with HCC treated with repeated transarterial infusion chemotherapy alone using CDDP/LPD (adjusted as CDDP 10mg/LPD 1ml). The median number of transarterial infusion procedures was two (range, one to nine), the mean dose of CDDP per transarterial infusion chemotherapy session was 30 mg (range, 5.0-67.5 mg), and the median total dose of transarterial infusion chemotherapy per patient was 60 mg (range, 10-390 mg). Survival rates were 86% at 1 year, 40% at 3 years, 20% at 5 years, and 16% at 7 years. For patients with >90% LPD accumulation after the first transarterial infusion chemotherapy, rates were 98% at 1 year, 60% at 3 years, and 22% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis identified >90% LPD accumulation after the first transarterial infusion chemotherapy (p = 0.001), absence of portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT; p < 0.001), and Child-Pugh class A (p = 0.012) as independent determinants of survival. Anaphylactic shock was observed in two patients, at the fifth transarterial infusion chemotherapy session in one and the ninth in the other. In conclusion, transarterial infusion chemotherapy with CDDP/LPD appears to be a useful treatment option for patients with unresectable HCC without PVTT and in Child-Pugh class A. LPD accumulation after the first transarterial infusion chemotherapy is an important prognostic factor. Careful consideration should be given to the possibility of anaphylactic shock upon repeat infusion with CDDP/LPD.

  10. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Appetite Changes

    MedlinePlus

    ... ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Appetite Changes “Many days I’m just not ... are eating and drinking enough. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Appetite Changes Keep this list on your refrigerator. ...

  11. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Memory Changes

    MedlinePlus

    ... C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Memory Changes What is causing these changes? Your doctor ... thinking or remembering things Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Memory Changes Get help to remember things. Write down ...

  12. Low-level laser therapy for the prevention of low salivary flow rate after radiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Gonnelli, Fernanda Aurora Stabile; Palma, Luiz Felipe; Giordani, Adelmo José; Deboni, Aline Lima Silva; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Segreto, Roberto Araújo; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether low-level laser therapy can prevent salivary hypofunction after radiotherapy and chemotherapy in head and neck cancer patients. Materials and Methods We evaluated 23 head and neck cancer patients, of whom 13 received laser therapy and 10 received clinical care only. An InGaAlP laser was used intra-orally (at 660 nm and 40 mW) at a mean dose of 10.0 J/cm2 and extra-orally (at 780 nm and 15 mW) at a mean dose of 3.7 J/cm2, three times per week, on alternate days. Stimulated and unstimulated sialometry tests were performed before the first radiotherapy and chemotherapy sessions (N0) and at 30 days after the end of treatment (N30). Results At N30, the mean salivary flow rates were significantly higher among the laser therapy patients than among the patients who received clinical care only, in the stimulated and unstimulated sialometry tests (p = 0.0131 and p = 0.0143, respectively). Conclusion Low-level laser therapy, administered concomitantly with radiotherapy and chemotherapy, appears to mitigate treatment-induced salivary hypofunction in patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:27141130

  13. Intra-arterial infusion of radiosensitizer (BUdR) combined with hypofractionated irradiation and chemotherapy for primary treatment of osteogenic sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Goffinet, D.R.; Donaldson, S.S.; Bagshaw, M.A.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1985-01-01

    Combined modality treatment was given in nine patients of osteogenic sarcoma wherein the tumor was unresectable because of location or amputation was refused. This alternative to massive surgery comprised hypofractionated irradiation, intra-arterial infusion of the radiosensitizer 5'-bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) and adjuvant systemic chemotherapy. Local control was achieved in seven of the nine patients. Four survived, all without evidence of disease at 6, 7.1, 8.8, and 10.5 years after completion of irradiation. Pulmonary metastases developed in six patients - of whom one survives, following high-dose pulmonary irradiation and additional chemotherapy. Significant soft-tissue injury occurred in five patients. On the basis of our experience, the authors believe that new approaches using modifications of external beam irradiation with different fractionation schedules or better radiosensitizing compounds may hold promise for patients with non-resectable osteosarcoma.

  14. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as Pedialyte ® ••Tea (without caffeine) ••Water ••Applesauce ••Bananas ••Crackers ••Cream of wheat or rice cereal ••Eggs •• ... has a series of 18 Chemotherapy Side Effects Sheets at: www.cancer.gov/chemo-side-effects

  15. Chemotherapy-induced hair loss.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, R M

    2010-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced hair loss occurs with an estimated incidence of 65%. Forty-seven percent of female patients consider hair loss to be the most traumatic aspect of chemotherapy and 8% would decline chemotherapy due to fears of hair loss. At present, no approved pharmacologic intervention exists to circumvent this side-effect of anticancer treatment, though a number of agents have been investigated on the basis of the current understanding of the underlying pathobiology. Among the agents that have been evaluated, topical minoxidil was able to reduce the severity or shorten the duration, but it did not prevent hair loss. The major approach to minimize chemotherapy-induced hair loss is by scalp cooling, though most published data on this technique are of poor quality. Fortunately, the condition is usually reversible, and appropriate hair and scalp care along with temporarily wearing a wig may represent the most effective coping strategy. However, some patients may show changes in color and/or texture of regrown hair, and in limited cases the reduction in density may persist.

  16. Palifermin and Chlorhexidine Mouthwashes in Prevention of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis in Children with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gholizadeh, Narges; Mehdipoor, Masoumeh; Sajadi, Hasan; Moosavi, Mahdieh-Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Over the past three decades, significant improvements have been achieved in the survival of children with cancer. However, the considerable morbidity which occurs as a result of chemotherapy often restricts the treatment intensity. One of the important dose-limiting and costly adverse effects of cancer therapy is mucositis. Children with hematological malignancies are greatly at risk of developing mucositis. Purpose: This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of palifermin in preventing mucositis in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who undergo chemotherapy. Materials and Method: In this clinical trial, 90 children with ALL were randomized to receive chlorhexidine (n=45) or palifermin (n=45). One group received 60 μg/ kg/ day palifermin as an intravenous bolus once daily for 3 days before and 3 days after the chemotherapy. Chlorhexidine mouthwash was administered once daily for 3 days before and 3 days after the chemotherapy. The world health organization (WHO) oral toxicity scale was employed for grading the mucositis. The data were analyzed by using two-way ANOVA. Results: The two groups were matched for age and gender. The study groups were significantly different in terms of mucositis grading (P values after 1 and 2 week therapy were 0.00). Palifermin decreased the incidence and severity of chemotherapy-induced mucositis. Conclusion: Palifermin reduces the oral mucositis in children with ALL. Several mechanisms of action are suggested for keratinocyte growth factor (such as palifermin) including promotion of cell proliferation and cytoprotection, restraining the apoptosis, and changing the cytokine profile. PMID:27942550

  17. Validity of Eight Integrated Healthcare Delivery Organizations’ Administrative Clinical Data to Capture Breast Cancer Chemotherapy Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Delate, Thomas; Bowles, Erin J. Aiello; Pardee, Roy; Wellman, Robert D.; Habel, Laurel A.; Yood, Marianne Ulcickas; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Goddard, Katrina A.; Davis, Robert L.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Freml, Jared; Wagner, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancer Research Network (CRN) sites use administrative data to populate their Virtual Data Warehouse (VDW). However, information on VDW chemotherapy data validity is limited. The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of VDW chemotherapy data. Methods This was a retrospective, cohort study of women ≥18 years with incident, invasive breast cancer diagnosed between January 1999 and December 2007. Pharmacy and procedure chemotherapy data were extracted from each site’s VDW. Random samples of 50 patients stratified on trastuzumab, anthracyclines, and no chemotherapy exposure were selected from each site for detailed chart abstraction. Weighted sensitivities and specificities of VDW compared to abstracted data were calculated. Cumulative doses calculated from VDW data were compared to doses obtained from the medical chart review. Results The cohort included 13497 patients with 6456 (48%) chart-review eligible. Patients in the sample (N=400) had a mean age of 65 years. Trastuzumab, anthracycline, and other chemotherapy weighted sensitivities were 95%, 97%, and 100%, respectively; specificities were 99%, 99%, and 93%, respectively; positive predictive values were 96%, 99%, and 55%, respectively; and negative predictive values were 99%, 96%, and 100%. Trastuzumab and anthracyclines VDW mean doses were 873 mgs and 386 mgs, respectively, while abstracted mean doses were 1734 mgs and 369 mgs, respectively (R2=0.14, p<0.01 and R2=0.05, p=0.03, respectively). Conclusions Sensitivities and specificities for CRN chemotherapy VDW data were high and dosages were correlated with chart information. Impact The findings support the use of CRN data in evaluating chemotherapy exposures and related outcomes. PMID:22337532

  18. Synergistic Cisplatin/Doxorubicin Combination Chemotherapy for Multidrug-Resistant Cancer via Polymeric Nanogels Targeting Delivery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haiqiu; Jin, Haojie; Wang, Cun; Zhang, Zihao; Ruan, Haoyu; Sun, Luyan; Yang, Chen; Li, Yongjing; Qin, Wenxin; Wang, Changchun

    2017-03-08

    Combination chemotherapy has been proposed to achieve synergistic effect and minimize drug dose for cancer treatment in clinic application. In this article, the stimuli-responsive polymeric nanogels (<100 nm in size) based on poly(acrylic acid) were designed as codelivery system for doxorubicin and cisplatin to overcome drug resistance. By chelation, electrostatic interaction, and π-π stacking interactions, the nanogels could encapsulate doxorubicin and cisplatin with designed ratio and high capacity. Compared with free drugs, the nanogels could deliver more drugs into MCF-7/ADR cells. Significant accumulation in tumor tissues was observed in the biodistribution experiments. The in vitro antitumor studies demonstrated the superior cell-killing activity of the nanogel drug delivery system with a combination index of 0.84, which indicated the great synergistic effect. All the antitumor experimental data revealed that the combination therapy was effective for the multidrug-resistant MCF-7/ADR tumor with reduced side effects.

  19. Enhancement of cancer chemotherapy in vitro by intense ultrawideband electric field pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, David W.; Uhler, Michael D.; Gilgenbach, Ronald M.; Lau, Y. Y.

    2006-05-01

    Experiments have been performed to enhance the Jurkat cell-killing effects of the cancer chemotherapy agent bleomycin using electric field pulses of 50-200 kV/cm peak electric field strength, ~150 ns duration, and nanosecond rise time. Dramatic increases in cell killing (factors of ~1000) were observed with a low dose of bleomycin after treatment with trains of ten or more pulses at all electric field strengths tested, compared to pulse-only or drug-only treatments. Cell death occurred within 24 h for treated cells, with some evidence of membrane phosphatidylserine externalization at 6 h postexposure but no significant increase in caspase activity, indicating that the primary mode of cell death was not caspase-mediated apoptosis.

  20. Pharmacokinetics of piperacillin/tazobactam in cancer patients with hematological malignancies and febrile neutropenia after chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Patients with febrile neutropenia (FN) exhibit changes in extracellular fluid that may alter the plasma concentrations of beta-lactams and result in therapeutic failure or toxicity. We evaluated the pharmacokinetics of piperacillin/tazobactam in patients with hematological malignancies and FN after receiving chemotherapy at a primary public cancer center. Methods This was an open, nonrandomized, observational, descriptive, and prospective study. Samples from 15 patients with hematological malignancies and FN were evaluated after the administration of chemotherapy. Five blood samples were taken from each patient when the antibiotic level was at steady-state 10, 60, 120, 180, and 350 min after each dose. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using gel diffusion with Bacillus subtilis. All study participants provided written informed consent. Results We investigated the pharmacokinetics of piperacillin in 14 patients between the ages of 18 years and 59 years and with a mean absolute neutrophil count of 208 cells per mm3 (standard deviation (SD) ± 603.2). The following pharmacokinetic measurements were obtained: maximum concentration, 94.1–1133 mg/L; minimum concentration, 0.47–37.65 mg/L; volume of distribution, 0.08–0.65 L/kg (mean, 0.34 L/kg); drug clearance (CL), 4.42–27.25 L/h (mean, 9.93 L/h); half-life (t1/2), 0.55–2.65 h (mean, 1.38 h); and area under the curve, 115.12–827.16 mg · h/L. Conclusion Patients with FN after receiving chemotherapy exhibited significant variations in the pharmacokinetic parameters of piperacillin compared with healthy individuals; specifically, FN patients demonstrated an increase in t1/2 and decreased CL. PMID:24286231

  1. Gemcitabine Chemotherapy and Single-Fraction Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schellenberg, Devin; Goodman, Karyn A.; Lee, Florence; Chang, Stephanie; Kuo, Timothy; Quon, Andrew; Desser, Terry S.; Norton, Jeffrey; Greco, Ralph; Yang, George P.; Koong, Albert C.

    2008-11-01

    Purpose: Fractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer achieves only modest local control. This prospective trial evaluated the efficacy of a single fraction of 25 Gy stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) delivered between Cycle 1 and 2 of gemcitabine chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 16 patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, pancreatic adenocarcinoma received gemcitabine with SBRT delivered 2 weeks after completion of the first cycle. Gemcitabine was resumed 2 weeks after SBRT and was continued until progression or dose-limiting toxicity. The gross tumor volume, with a 2-3-mm margin, was treated in a single 25-Gy fraction by Cyberknife. Patients were evaluated at 4-6 weeks, 10-12 weeks, and every 3 months after SBRT. Results: All 16 patients completed SBRT. A median of four cycles (range one to nine) of chemotherapy was delivered. Three patients (19%) developed local disease progression at 14, 16, and 21 months after SBRT. The median survival was 11.4 months, with 50% of patients alive at 1 year. Patients with normal carbohydrate antigen (CA)19-9 levels either at diagnosis or after Cyberknife SBRT had longer survival (p <0.01). Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was mild, with 2 cases of Grade 2 (13%) and 1 of Grade 3 (6%) toxicity. Late gastrointestinal toxicity was more common, with five ulcers (Grade 2), one duodenal stenosis (Grade 3), and one duodenal perforation (Grade 4). A trend toward increased duodenal volumes radiated was observed in those experiencing late effects (p = 0.13). Conclusion: SBRT with gemcitabine resulted in comparable survival to conventional chemoradiotherapy and good local control. However, the rate of duodenal ulcer development was significant.

  2. AMH/MIS as a contraceptive that protects the ovarian reserve during chemotherapy

    PubMe