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Sample records for dose chemotherapy significantly

  1. How to calculate the dose of chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gurney, H

    2002-01-01

    Body surface area-dosing does not account for the complex processes of cytotoxic drug elimination. This leads to an unpredictable variation in effect. Overdosing is easily recognised but it is possible that unrecognised underdosing is more common and may occur in 30% or more of patients receiving standard regimen. Those patients who are inadvertently underdosed are at risk of a significantly reduced anticancer effect. Using published data, it can be calculated that there is an almost 20% relative reduction in survival for women receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer as a result of unrecognised underdosing. Similarly, the cure rate of cisplatin-based chemotherapy for advanced testicular cancer may be reduced by as much as 10%. The inaccuracy of body surface area-dosing is more than an inconvenience and it is important that methods for more accurate dose calculation are determined, based on the known drug elimination processes for cytotoxic chemotherapy. Twelve rules for dose calculation of chemotherapy are given that can be used as a guideline until better dose-calculation methods become available. Consideration should be given to using fixed dose guidelines independent of body surface area and based on drug elimination capability, both as a starting dose and for dose adjustment, which may have accuracy, safety and financial advantages. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1297–1302. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600139 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11953888

  2. The significance of relative dose intensity in adjuvant chemotherapy of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma-including the analysis of clinicopathological factors influencing relative dose intensity.

    PubMed

    Yabusaki, Norimitsu; Fujii, Tsutomu; Yamada, Suguru; Murotani, Kenta; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Kanda, Mitsuro; Nakayama, Goro; Koike, Masahiko; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Kodera, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Recently, it has been reported that the relative dose intensity (RDI) of adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) influences survival in various cancers, but there are very few reports about RDI in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The optimal timing for initiation of AC for PDAC also remains unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the significance of RDI and the time interval between surgery and initiation of AC on survival of patients with PDAC. Clinicopathological factors that affect RDI were also investigated.A total of 311 consecutive PDAC patients who underwent curative resection between May 2005 and January 2015 were enrolled. Patients who underwent neoadjuvant chemoradiation, had UICC stage IV disease, or had early recurrences within 6 months were excluded, and the remaining 168 cases were analyzed.Patients with RDIs ≥80% (n = 79) showed significantly better overall survival (OS) compared to patients with RDIs <80% (n = 55) (median survival time (MST): 45.6 months, 26.0 months, P < 0.001). Patients with no AC (n = 34) showed the worst OS (MST: 20.8 months). Whether the AC was initiated earlier or later than 8 weeks after surgery did not influence survival, either in patients with RDIs ≥80% (P = 0.79) or in those with <80% (P = 0.73). Patients in the S-1 monotherapy group (n = 49) showed significantly better OS than patients in the gemcitabine monotherapy group (n = 51) (MST: 95.0 months, 26.0 months, respectively; P = 0.001). Univariate analysis conducted after adjusting for the chemotherapeutic drug used identified several prognostic factors; male gender (P = 0.01), intraoperative blood transfusion (P = 0.005), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.03), and postoperative WBC count (P = 0.03). Multivariate analysis identified intra-plus postoperative blood transfusion (P = 0.002) and high postoperative platelet-to-lymphocyte ratios (PLR) (P = 0.04) as independent predictors of poor RDI.Efforts to

  3. Low-dose metronomic chemotherapy: a systematic literature analysis.

    PubMed

    Lien, K; Georgsdottir, S; Sivanathan, L; Chan, K; Emmenegger, U

    2013-11-01

    Low-dose metronomic (LDM) chemotherapy, the frequent and continuous use of low doses of conventional chemotherapeutics, is an emerging alternative to conventional chemotherapy. While promising tumour control rates and excellent safety profiles have been observed, there are no definitive phase III trial results. Furthermore, the selection of patients, drug dosages and dosing intervals is empirical. To systematically review the current state of knowledge regarding LDM chemotherapy, we searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL and PubMed databases for fully published LDM chemotherapy trials. We calculated the relative dose-intensity (RDI, mg/m(2)/week) of each LDM regimen as compared to conventional maximum tolerated dose (MTD) dosages and the 'dosing-density' (DD, % of days with chemotherapy administration per cycle). Meta-regression was performed to examine factors associated with disease control rate (DCR; complete response (CR)+partial response (PR)+stable disease (SD)). Eighty studies involving mainly pretreated patients with advanced/metastatic breast (26.25%) and prostate (11.25%) cancers were retrieved. The most commonly used drug was cyclophosphamide (43%). LDM chemotherapy was frequently combined with other therapies (64.5%). Response rate (RR) and progression-free survival (PFS) were the most frequent primary end-points (24% and 19%). Mean RR was 26.03% (95% confidence interval (CI): 21.4-30.7), median PFS was 4.6months (interquartile range (IQR): 2.9-7.0) and mean DCR was 56.3% (95% CI: 50.9-61.6). RDI, DD and metronomic drug used were not associated with DCR. Grade 3/4 adverse events were rare (anaemia 7.78%, fatigue 13.4%). Thus, LDM therapy appears to be clinically beneficial and safe in a broad range of tumors. However, meta-regression analysis did not identify predictive factors of response.

  4. Stress Encountered by Significant Others of Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Kay

    1987-01-01

    Attempts to identify and describe perceived stress and coping responses of family and nonfamily significant others of cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Significant others were asked to identify stressful events related to treatment factors, relationship factors, and perception of the patient's condition. Coping responses were categorized in…

  5. From total empiricism to a rational design of metronomic chemotherapy phase I dosing trials.

    PubMed

    Lam, Thomas; Hetherington, John W; Greenman, John; Maraveyas, Anthony

    2006-02-01

    'Metronomic chemotherapy' represents a novel anti-angiogenic strategy whereby low-dose chemotherapy is utilized in a continuous fashion in order to target tumor endothelium. There are many potential advantages of this strategy and clinical trials are already underway. However, although the scheduling of metronomic chemotherapy is relatively unequivocal, metronomic dosing principles are at present poorly defined. Arbitrarily, 10-33% of the maximum tolerated dose comprises 'the dose range'. We argue that this is too empirical and propose a set of phase I metronomic chemotherapy dosing strategies based on a principled approach which may help to reduce the problem of empiricism in dosing for metronomic chemotherapy trials.

  6. Ocular toxicity following high dose chemotherapy and autologous transplant.

    PubMed

    Rubin, P; Hulette, C; Khawly, J A; Elkordy, M; Hussein, A; Vredenburgh, J J; Jaffe, G J; Peters, W P

    1996-07-01

    A 49-year-old woman received an autologous transplant for breast cancer. Six weeks later she noticed visual disturbance of the left eye which correlated with a visual field abnormality. There was a milder degree of visual disturbance in the right eye. Treatment with high-dose steroids partially stabilized the problem, which was felt to be an ischemic optic neuropathy. She ultimately died of respiratory failure. Pathology of the optic nerves revealed demyelination. Visual disturbances following high-dose chemotherapy are uncommon; the pathology to date has not been elucidated. Steroid therapy may be useful. PMID:8832031

  7. [Dose-intensive chemotherapy with continuous infusion 5-fluorouracil].

    PubMed

    Tichler, T; Ghodsizade, E; Katz, A; Rath, P; Berger, R; Brenner, H

    1999-11-01

    54 patients with advanced malignancy refractory to chemotherapy were studied to evaluate efficacy and toxicity of continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) given for 3 weeks. We report results of the first 156 courses given in combination with other drugs. 19 (37%) of the 54 responded, including 3 (6%) with complete response. Toxicity was acceptable, with mucositis in 13 (26%) and 3 (6%) with grade II-III toxicity. Results and toxicity profile were compatible with further disease-oriented studies using this dose-intensive program.

  8. Validity of reduced radiation dose for localized diffuse large B-cell lymphoma showing a good response to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Koiwai, Keiichiro; Sasaki, Shigeru; Yoshizawa, Eriko; Ina, Hironobu; Fukazawa, Ayumu; Sakai, Katsuya; Ozawa, Takesumi; Matsushita, Hirohide; Kadoya, Masumi

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the validity of a decrease in the radiation dose for patients who were good responders to chemotherapy for localized diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), 91 patients with localized DLBCL who underwent radiotherapy after multi-agent chemotherapy from 1988-2008 were reviewed. Exclusion criteria were as follows: central nervous system or nasal cavity primary site, or Stage II with bulky tumor (≥10 cm). Of these patients, 62 were identified as good responders to chemotherapy. They were divided into two groups receiving either a higher or a lower radiation dose (32-50.4 Gy or 15-30.6 Gy, respectively). There were no statistically significant differences between the lower and higher dose groups in progression-free survival, locoregional progression-free survival or overall survival. Adaptation of decreased radiation dose may be valid for localized DLBCL patients who show a good response to chemotherapy. PMID:24187329

  9. [Infection control in neutropenia induced by high-dose cytarabine chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Masayuki; Senzaki, Kouji; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Kohno, Shigekatu; Noda, Yukihiro; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2004-11-01

    A high-dose cytarabine (Cylocide; Ara-C: HDAC) chemotherapy has been successfully used as a postremission consolidation therapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Although this chemotherapy has been estimated to cause severe myelosuppression, there has been no report about infection risk relating to HDAC chemotherapy. The purpose of this retrospective study is to evaluate the infection risk in AML patients treated with HDAC (n = 18) compared to those treated with standard-dose Ara-C (SDAC, n = 18). The mean duration of severe neutropenia (neutrophils < 500/microl) in HDAC group and SDAC was 14.8 days and 10.4 days, respectively, indicating a significant prolongation in the HDAC group (p < 0.05). The frequency of febrile neutropenia in the HDAC group tended to increase compared to that in the SDAC group (p = 0.093). The average days of usage of quinolone antimicrobial prophylaxis and aminoglycoside antibiotic injection in febrile neutropenia in the HDAC group were significantly longer than those of the SDAC group (quinolone; p < 0.01, aminoglycoside; p < 0.05). The frequency of Streptococcus infection isolated from pharyngeal mucus in the HDAC group was significantly higher than that in the SDAC group (100% versus 75%; p < 0.05). These results suggest that HDAC chemotherapy increased the infection risk compared to SDAC, and especially patients who received HDAC need a further prevention plan against gram-positive bacteria.

  10. A short course of induction chemotherapy followed by two cycles of high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue for chemotherapy naive metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Elias, A D; Richardson, P; Avigan, D; Ibrahim, J; Joyce, R; Demetri, G; Levine, J; Warren, D; Arthur, T; Reich, E; Wheele, C; Frei, E; Ayash, L

    2001-02-01

    A single cycle of high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell support (HDC) in women with responsive metastatic breast cancer (BC) consistently achieves over 50% complete and near complete response (CR/nCR). This significant cytoreduction results in a median event-free survival (EFS) of 8 months, and approximately 20% 3-year and 16% 5-year EFS in selected patients. To improve long-term outcomes, new strategies to treat minimal residual tumor burden are needed. Increased total dose delivered can be achieved with two cycles of HDC. Critical design issues include shortening induction chemotherapy to avoid development of drug resistance and the use of different agents for each HDC cycle. We have determined the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) for paclitaxel combined with high-dose melphalan in the context of a double transplant and explored the impact of a short induction phase. Between June 1994 and August 1996, we enrolled 32 women with metastatic BC on to this phase I double transplant trial. Induction consisted of doxorubicin 30 mg/m2/day days 1-3 given for 2 cycles every 14 days with G-CSF 5 microg/kg s.c. days 4-12. Stem cell collection was performed by leukapheresis in each cycle when the WBC recovered to above 1000/microl. Patients with stable disease or better response to induction were eligible to proceed with HDC. HDC regimen I (TxM) included paclitaxel with dose escalation from 0 to 300 mg/m2 given on day 1 and melphalan 180 mg/m2 in two divided doses given on day 3. HDC regimen II was CTCb (cyclophosphamide 6 g/m2, thiotepa 500 mg/m2, and carboplatin 800 mg/m2 total doses) delivered by 96-h continuous infusion. At the first dose level of 150 mg/m2 paclitaxel by 3 h infusion, four of five patients developed dose-limiting toxicity consisting of diffuse skin erythema and capillary leak syndrome. Only two of these five completed the second transplant. Subsequently, paclitaxel was delivered by 24-h continuous infusion together with 96 h of dexamethasone and histamine

  11. Low-dose total body irradiation versus combination chemotherapy for lymphomas with follicular growth pattern.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, J H; Carde, P; Burgers, J M; Monconduit, M; Thomas, J; Somers, R; Sizoo, W; Glabbeke, M V; Duez, N; de Wolf-Peeters, C

    1991-10-01

    The treatment of Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with follicular growth pattern and advanced stage of disease remains controversial. Treatments varying from no initial treatment up to aggressive combination chemotherapy have been advocated. The EORTC Lymphoma Cooperative Group has performed a randomized prospective trial comparing short duration low dose total body irradiation (TBI) vs combination chemotherapy (CHVmP) + consolidation radiotherapy. Ninety-three patients were entered; of 84 evaluable patients, 44 received TBI and 40 CHVmP. Complete remission (CR) rates were 36%--TBI and 55%--CHVmP, but overall response rates were identical, 76 versus 69%. No significant difference in freedom from progression or survival was observed. No unexpected toxicity was seen. Although numbers are small, we cannot conclude that aggressive combination chemo-radiotherapy resulted in a better survival. Our analysis confirms that there is a constant risk of relapse. Other approaches should be explored if survival benefit is the ultimate goal in treatment of this patient population.

  12. Hematologic parameters in the adjustment of chemotherapy doses in combined modality treatments involving radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Byfield, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    The differential white blood cell count of a group of patients with Stages I and II infiltrating ductal carcinoma who underwent treatment in the preadjuvant chemotherapy era have been evaluated. All patients received a modified radical mastectomy followed by postoperative radiation therapy to the chest wall and draining regional lymph node chains (ipsilateral internal mammary, axillary,and supraclavicular regions). When the levels of circulating neutrophils, band cells, and lymphocytes were compared for the period beginning prior to surgery and ending 1 year after the completion of radiotherapy, it was found that radiation induced a significant lymphopenia. However, all patients maintained a neutrophil count at least twice that needed for full-dose conventional chemotherapy. Based on these observations and related preclinical and clinical information, it is proposed that future clinical trials utilizing even local radiotherapy as a component of therapy must have their chemotherapy doses based on appropriate hematologic parameters (neutrophil + band count) in order to avoid spurious and quite possibly erroneous results.

  13. [Chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Aiba, Keisuke

    2004-05-01

    Cancer chemotherapy in the treatment of colorectal cancer has been evolving so extensively than ever. 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been a pivotal and a single active agent in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Reproducing and consistent better response rate has been shown since the introduction of the concept of biochemical modulation of 5-FU by leucovorin, a reduced folate, to the clinic and a combination chemotherapy of 5-FU and leucovorin (FL) has enable us to obtain a response rate around 20-30% and a median survival time ranging from 10 to 12 months. IFL regimen combing CPT-11 with FL showed a better MST ranging from 14 to 15 months, but now serious toxicity precludes general use outside of clinical trials. In the Europe, de Gramont regimen, an unique dose and schedule of 5-FU using a combination of continuous intravenous infusion of 5-FU with leucovorin over two days and bolus infusion of 5-FU twice over the same period, has been developed and shown improved antitumor activity and toxic profiles. FOLFOX 4, a combination chemotherapy of de Gramont regimen and oxaliplatin which is a third generation of cisplatin and a uniqe toxic profile with neuropathy, has demonstrated improved MST over a year and acceptable toxic profiles. Now FOLFOX 4 is considered to be a standard chemotherapy for the patients with advanced colorectal cancer, since a large phase III randomized study has shown that FOLFOX 4 was the most active and less toxic treatment regimen among active regimens such as IFL and IROX (CPT-11 and oxaliplatin). More recently, a combination of IFL and bevacizumab which is one of the molecular target agents and a antibody agent against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), has demonstrated better MST reaching 20 months. Future large scale trials will attempt to develop more active regimen incorporating so-called molecular target agents.

  14. Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... getting chemotherapy. Chemotherapy is most often given in cycles. These cycles may last one day, several days, or a ... period when no chemotherapy is given between each cycle. A rest period may last for days, weeks, ...

  15. Total lymphoid irradiation, high-dose chemotherapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation for chemotherapy-resistant Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Yahalom, J; Gulati, S; Shank, B; Clarkson, B; Fuks, Z

    1989-11-01

    Seventeen patients with advanced stage Hodgkin's disease who relapsed or failed to respond to multiple regimens of combination chemotherapy (mostly Mechlorethamine, Vincristine, Procarbarzine, Prednisone and Adriamycin, Bleomycin, Vinblastine, Dacarbazine) were treated with accelerated hyperfractionated total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous bone marrow transplantation (AuBMT). Candidates for the protocol did not have prior radiation therapy and had no evidence of bone marrow involvement. Their bone marrow was initially harvested and cryopreserved. The treatment protocol consisted of reinduction with conventional doses of combination chemotherapy followed by boost local field irradiation to areas of residual disease (1500 cGy within 5 days) and total lymphoid irradiation (2004 cGy given in 12 fractions of 167 cGy each t.i.d. delivered within 4 days). The patients were treated with Etoposide (250 mg/m2/day I.V. X 3 days) and high-dose Cyclophosphamide (60 mg/kg/day I.V. X 2 days). Cryopreserved (unpurged) autologous bone marrow was infused 48 hr after completion of chemotherapy. Of the 17 patients treated, four were in relapse and 13 refractory to multiple regimens of combination chemotherapy. Four patients died during the immediate peritransplant period (2--septicemia, 2--pulmonary complications). Of the 13 surviving patients, 12 entered a complete remission and one had a partial remission and died of disease 6 months later. One patient relapsed 5 months after treatment and is currently alive with disease. Eleven patients (65%) are alive with no evidence of disease 4-35 months (median 20 months) following completion of therapy. Treatment with this protocol results in a high rate of complete remission and a potential for long-term disease-free survival in previously unirradiated patients with advanced stage refractory or relapsed Hodgkin's disease who have exhausted conventional modes of chemotherapy. PMID:2478511

  16. Chemotherapy of onchocerciasis with high doses of diethylcarbamazine or a single dose of ivermectin: microfilaria levels and side effects.

    PubMed

    Albiez, E J; Newland, H S; White, A T; Kaiser, A; Greene, B M; Taylor, H R; Büttner, D W

    1988-03-01

    Fifty adult male subjects with moderate to heavy onchocerciasis from the Liberian rain forest were selected for a double-blind placebo-controlled chemotherapy study. The effects of high doses of diethylcarbamazine (DEC) - 30 mg/kg/d - over one week preceded by a one week initial treatment with normal oral doses of DEC or DEC lotion were compared with a single dose of ivermectin (150 micrograms/kg) and placebo. During the initial treatment DEC tablets or lotion caused distinctly more frequent and severe reactions than did invermectin. The reactions to ivermectin did not differ from those of the placebo patients. High doses of DEC caused, in about half of the patients, headache, dizziness, nausea or vomiting. DEC markedly increased the number of corneal microfilariae and of corneal opacities compared to ivermectin. All changes resolved with a return to pretreatment findings two months after treatment. The three treatment groups showed no differences at the ten months follow-up. In all treated patients skin microfilaria counts fell almost to zero by the end of the two week therapy. In the ivermectin group microfilaria counts remained significantly lower than in the DEC patients at the two and ten months examinations. In summary, ivermectin was much better tolerated than DEC and had a longer lasting effect on the microfilariae in the skin. Since high doses of DEC were less effective and caused more frequent and severe side effects, this approach cannot be recommended for treatment of onchocerciasis.

  17. Low-dose docetaxel, estramustine and prednisolone combination chemotherapy for castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    NAKANO, MAYURA; SHOJI, SUNAO; HIGURE, TARO; KAWAKAMI, MASAYOSHI; TOMONAGA, TETSURO; TERACHI, TOSHIRO; UCHIDA, TOYOAKI

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to report our experience with weekly low-dose docetaxel (DOC) chemotherapy for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). From 2007 to 2014, 39 consecutive patients received weekly low-dose DOC; the oncological effectiveness, side effects and tolerability were prospectively analyzed. The median patient age, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level and Gleason score at diagnosis of prostate cancer were 71 years (range, 55–83 years), 187 ng/ml (range, 2.0–1711 ng/ml) and 8 (range, 5–10), respectively. The median number of cycles of DOC was 7 (range, 1–45 cycles). Of the 39 patients, the PSA level decreased by >50% in 13 (33%). In the multivariate analysis of prediction of patient overall survival, a decrease of the PSA level to <50% was a significant predictor (hazard ratio = 6.913; 95% confidence interval: 1.147–41.669; P=0.035). The median cancer-specific overall survival from the diagnosis of CRPC was 16.7 months (range, 2–54 months). Grade 3 toxicities were observed in 5 patients (13%); specifically, limb edema, nausea and hepatic disorders were detected in 2 (5%), 2 (5%) and 1 patient (3%), respectively. Treatment-related death (grade 5) occurred in 1 patient due to interstitial pneumonia after two courses of chemotherapy. The chemotherapy was completed in the majority of the patients (n=37, 94.8%) in the outpatient department, without interruption. These findings suggest that weekly low-dose DOC is feasible and safe for selected patients with CRPC, without treament with novel agents, such as abiraterone, enzalutamide and cabazitaxel. PMID:27284427

  18. High dose intensity combination chemotherapy for advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma: results of a pilot study.

    PubMed Central

    Sweetenham, J. W.; McKendrick, J. J.; Jones, D. H.; Whitehouse, J. M.; Williams, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    Retrospective studies have recently demonstrated a significant correlation between dose intensity of chemotherapy and response rates and survival in various diseases including epithelial ovarian carcinoma. As part of a proposed randomised trial to assess the effect of dose intensity on outcome in ovarian carcinoma, a pilot study has been undertaken to determine the toxicity and efficacy of the high intensity therapy. Nineteen patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma received initial treatment with cisplatin 120 mg m-2 i.v. day 1, and cyclophosphamide 1,000 mg-2 i.v. day 1, given at 21-day intervals for six cycles. The average relative dose intensity of this therapy is 1.14 when compared with the CHAP regimen. Severe toxicity was experienced by most patients. The median received average relative dose intensity was 0.90, with only one patient receiving treatment to the proposed intensity. Randomised studies of the effect of dose intensity in ovarian carcinoma are essential, but an initial step must be to assess whether the proposed high dose treatment can be delivered. PMID:2155645

  19. Hepatocellular carcinoma stem cell-like cells are enriched following low-dose 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Yongqiang; Mou, Lisha; Cheng, Kangwen; Wang, Chengyou; Deng, Xuesong; Chen, Junren; Fan, Zhibing; Ni, Yong

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that cancer stem cells (CSCs) are involved in tumor resistance to chemotherapy and tumor relapse. The goal of the present study was to determine the effect of low-dose 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu) on enriched hepatocellular CSC-like cells. Increased cell motility and epithelial-mesenchymal transition were observed by migration assay in human hepatoblastoma PLC/RAF/5 cells following 5-Fu treatment, as well as a significant enhancement in their sphere-forming abilities. CSC-like cells were identified by side population cell analysis. The percentage of CSC-like cells in the surviving cells was greatly increased in response to 5-Fu. These findings indicate that low-dose 5-Fu treatment may efficiently enrich the CSC-like cell population in PLC/RAF/5 cells.

  20. Significant response to lacosamide in a patient with severe chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Samar A; Albany, Zhanna; Albany, Constantine

    2015-05-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a major dose-limiting toxicity of potentially curative cancer therapy regimens. Cisplatin is the class of chemotherapy agent that has a broad spectrum of activity against several solid tumors, but it induces sensory neuropathy of upper and lower extremities. Cisplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy is usually in a "gloves and socks" distribution that can persist for months or years after completion of chemotherapy treatment. If the pain is severe, it affects the patient's long-term quality of life and can potentially result in chemotherapy dose reduction or treatment discontinuation. The mechanism of CIPN is not well understood, and a number of pathophysiological mechanisms have been proposed to explain the phenomenon. Although many therapies have been investigated for the prevention or treatment of CIPN, there is currently no accepted proven therapy. Here we report a case in which lacosamide alleviated painful CIPN symptoms. Lacosamide is an anticonvulsant drug that blocks the voltage-gated sodium channels in the neurons and may also be a promising novel candidate for the prevention and treatment of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Preclinical data support the role of lacosamide protective effect in a rat model of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy, randomized clinical trial is needed.

  1. Neutrophil dynamics during concurrent chemotherapy and G-CSF administration: Mathematical modelling guides dose optimisation to minimise neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Craig, Morgan; Humphries, Antony R; Nekka, Fahima; Bélair, Jacques; Li, Jun; Mackey, Michael C

    2015-11-21

    The choice of chemotherapy regimens is often constrained by the patient's tolerance to the side effects of chemotherapeutic agents. This dose-limiting issue is a major concern in dose regimen design, which is typically focused on maximising drug benefits. Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia is one of the most prevalent toxic effects patients experience and frequently threatens the efficient use of chemotherapy. In response, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is co-administered during chemotherapy to stimulate neutrophil production, increase neutrophil counts, and hopefully avoid neutropenia. Its clinical use is, however, largely dictated by trial and error processes. Based on up-to-date knowledge and rational considerations, we develop a physiologically realistic model to mathematically characterise the neutrophil production in the bone marrow which we then integrate with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PKPD) models of a chemotherapeutic agent and an exogenous form of G-CSF (recombinant human G-CSF, or rhG-CSF). In this work, model parameters represent the average values for a general patient and are extracted from the literature or estimated from available data. The dose effect predicted by the model is confirmed through previously published data. Using our model, we were able to determine clinically relevant dosing regimens that advantageously reduce the number of rhG-CSF administrations compared to original studies while significantly improving the neutropenia status. More particularly, we determine that it could be beneficial to delay the first administration of rhG-CSF to day seven post-chemotherapy and reduce the number of administrations from ten to three or four for a patient undergoing 14-day periodic chemotherapy. PMID:26343861

  2. Quantitative Sensory Analysis of Peripheral Neuropathy Produced by Colorectal Cancer and its Exacerbation by Cumulative Dose of Oxaliplatin Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho Barbosa, Mariana; Kosturakis, Alyssa K.; Eng, Cathy; Wendelschafer-Crabb, Gwen; Kennedy, William R.; Simone, Donald A.; Wang, Xin Shelley; Cleeland, Charles S.; Dougherty, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    The goal in this study was to determine the impact of colorectal cancer and cumulative chemotherapeutic dose on sensory function to gain mechanistic insight to the subtypes of primary afferent fibers damaged by chemotherapy. Patients with colorectal cancer underwent quantitative sensory testing (QST) before and then prior to each cycle of oxaliplatin. These data were compared to that from age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. The patients showed significant subclinical deficits in sensory function prior to any therapy compared to healthy volunteers. Sensory deficits became more pronounced in patients with chemotherapy. Sensory deficits were most pronounced for modalities mediated by large Aβ myelinated fibers and unmyelinated C fibers whereas those modalities of sensation conveyed by thinly myelinated Aδ fibers appeared showed less sensitivity to chemotherapy. Patients with baseline sensory deficits went on to develop more symptom complaints during chemotherapy than those who had no baseline deficit. Patients who were re-tested 6 to 12 months following chemotherapy showed the most numbness and pain as well as the most pronounced sensory deficits. The pattern of effects on sensory function has clear mechanistic implications for the fibers types that are vulnerable to the toxicity of chemotherapy. PMID:25183707

  3. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging After High-Dose Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Childhood Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Spreafico, Filippo Gandola, Lorenza; Marchiano, Alfonso; Simonetti, Fabio; Poggi, Geraldina; Adduci, Anna; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Luksch, Roberto; Biassoni, Veronica; Meazza, Cristina; Catania, Serena; Terenziani, Monica; Musumeci, Renato; Fossati-Bellani, Franca; Massimino, Maura

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Brain necrosis or other subacute iatrogenic reactions has been recognized as a potential complication of radiotherapy (RT), although the possible synergistic effects of high-dose chemotherapy and RT might have been underestimated. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the clinical and radiologic data of 49 consecutive children with malignant brain tumors treated with high-dose thiotepa and autologous hematopoietic stem cell rescue, preceded or followed by RT. The patients were assessed for neurocognitive tests to identify any correlation with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) anomalies. Results: Of the 49 children, 18 (6 of 25 with high-grade gliomas and 12 of 24 with primitive neuroectodermal tumors) had abnormal brain MRI findings occurring a median of 8 months (range, 2-39 months) after RT and beginning to regress a median of 13 months (range, 2-26 months) after onset. The most common lesion pattern involved multiple pseudonodular, millimeter-size, T{sub 1}-weighted unevenly enhancing, and T{sub 2}-weighted hyperintense foci. Four patients with primitive neuroectodermal tumors also had subdural fluid leaks, with meningeal enhancement over the effusion. One-half of the patients had symptoms relating to the new radiographic findings. The MRI lesion-free survival rate was 74% {+-} 6% at 1 year and 57% {+-} 8% at 2 years. The number of marrow ablative courses correlated significantly to the incidence of radiographic anomalies. No significant difference was found in intelligent quotient scores between children with and without radiographic changes. Conclusion: Multiple enhancing cerebral lesions were frequently seen on MRI scans soon after high-dose chemotherapy and RT. Such findings pose a major diagnostic challenge in terms of their differential diagnosis vis-a-vis recurrent tumor. Their correlation with neurocognitive results deserves further investigation.

  4. Adjuvant chemotherapy dosing in low-income women: the impact of Hispanic ethnicity and patient self-efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yihang; Sorbero, Melony E.; Jagielski, Christina H.; Maly, Rose C.

    2015-01-01

    Unwarranted breast cancer adjuvant chemotherapy dose reductions have been documented in black women, women of lower socioeconomic status, and those who are obese. No information on the quality of chemotherapy is available in Hispanic women. The purpose of this study was to characterize factors associated with first cycle chemotherapy dose selection in a multi-ethnic sample of low-income women receiving chemotherapy through the Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention Treatment Program (BCCPT) and to investigate the impact of Hispanic ethnicity and patient self-efficacy on adjuvant chemotherapy dose selection. Survey and chemotherapy information were obtained from consenting participants enrolled in the California BCCPT. Analyses identified clinical and non-clinical factors associated with first cycle chemotherapy doses less than 90 % of expected doses. Of 552 patients who received chemotherapy, 397 (72 %) were eligible for inclusion. First cycle dose reductions were given to 14 % of the sample. In multivariate analyses, increasing body mass index and non-academic treatment site were associated with doses below 90 % of the expected doses. No other clinical or non-clinical factors, including ethnicity, were associated with first cycle doses selection. In this universally low-income sample, we identified no association between Hispanic ethnicity and other non-clinical patient factors, including patient self-efficacy, in chemotherapy dose selection. As seen in other studies, obesity was associated with systematic dose limits. The guidelines on chemotherapy dose selection in the obese may help address such dose reductions. A greater understanding of the association between type of treatment site and dose selection is warranted. Overall, access to adequate health care allows the vast majority of low-income women with breast cancer to receive high-quality breast cancer chemotherapy. PMID:24596046

  5. Adjuvant chemotherapy dosing in low-income women: the impact of Hispanic ethnicity and patient self-efficacy.

    PubMed

    Griggs, Jennifer J; Liu, Yihang; Sorbero, Melony E; Jagielski, Christina H; Maly, Rose C

    2014-04-01

    Unwarranted breast cancer adjuvant chemotherapy dose reductions have been documented in black women, women of lower socioeconomic status, and those who are obese. No information on the quality of chemotherapy is available in Hispanic women. The purpose of this study was to characterize factors associated with first cycle chemotherapy dose selection in a multi-ethnic sample of low-income women receiving chemotherapy through the Breast and Cervical Cancer Prevention Treatment Program (BCCPT) and to investigate the impact of Hispanic ethnicity and patient self-efficacy on adjuvant chemotherapy dose selection. Survey and chemotherapy information were obtained from consenting participants enrolled in the California BCCPT. Analyses identified clinical and non-clinical factors associated with first cycle chemotherapy doses less than 90 % of expected doses. Of 552 patients who received chemotherapy, 397 (72 %) were eligible for inclusion. First cycle dose reductions were given to 14 % of the sample. In multivariate analyses, increasing body mass index and non-academic treatment site were associated with doses below 90 % of the expected doses. No other clinical or non-clinical factors, including ethnicity, were associated with first cycle doses selection. In this universally low-income sample, we identified no association between Hispanic ethnicity and other non-clinical patient factors, including patient self-efficacy, in chemotherapy dose selection. As seen in other studies, obesity was associated with systematic dose limits. The guidelines on chemotherapy dose selection in the obese may help address such dose reductions. A greater understanding of the association between type of treatment site and dose selection is warranted. Overall, access to adequate health care allows the vast majority of low-income women with breast cancer to receive high-quality breast cancer chemotherapy.

  6. Low-dose total body irradiation versus combination chemotherapy for lymphomas with follicular growth pattern.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, J H; Carde, P; Burgers, J M; Monconduit, M; Thomas, J; Somers, R; Sizoo, W; Glabbeke, M V; Duez, N; de Wolf-Peeters, C

    1991-10-01

    The treatment of Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with follicular growth pattern and advanced stage of disease remains controversial. Treatments varying from no initial treatment up to aggressive combination chemotherapy have been advocated. The EORTC Lymphoma Cooperative Group has performed a randomized prospective trial comparing short duration low dose total body irradiation (TBI) vs combination chemotherapy (CHVmP) + consolidation radiotherapy. Ninety-three patients were entered; of 84 evaluable patients, 44 received TBI and 40 CHVmP. Complete remission (CR) rates were 36%--TBI and 55%--CHVmP, but overall response rates were identical, 76 versus 69%. No significant difference in freedom from progression or survival was observed. No unexpected toxicity was seen. Although numbers are small, we cannot conclude that aggressive combination chemo-radiotherapy resulted in a better survival. Our analysis confirms that there is a constant risk of relapse. Other approaches should be explored if survival benefit is the ultimate goal in treatment of this patient population. PMID:1938514

  7. Quality of life of long-term survivors with Hodgkin lymphoma after high-dose chemotherapy, autologous stem cell transplantation, and conventional chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Juliane; Dietrich, Sascha; Meissner, Julia; Neben, Kai; Ho, Anthony D; Witzens-Harig, Mathias

    2010-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the quality of life (QoL) of long-term survivors with Hodgkin lymphoma who received high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). QoL of this group was compared with QoL of patients who were treated with conventional chemotherapy and with QoL of the healthy German population. Two standardized questionnaires, the EORTC QLQ-C30 and the EQ-5D, including the visual analogue scale (VAS) were applied. A total of 98 patients were included in the study, all of them treated in our institution. Thirty-seven patients who received HDCT with PBSCT between 1986 and 2007 were compared with 61 patients treated with conventional chemotherapy and supplementary radiation between 1998 and 2009. The median follow-up for the HDCT group was 11 years. Statistical analysis with the one-sample t-test shows a reduced QoL of both groups of patients compared to the healthy population. Compared to the group of patients who received conventional chemotherapy, there is a tendency towards reduced QoL in patients with HDCT in all of the three main categories of the EORTC-QLQ-C30. However, these differences were not statistically significant, with the exception of the subcategory of dyspnoea, which was worse in the group that was treated with BCNU containing high-dose protocols. We conclude that the negative impact of both HDCT and conventional therapy on the QoL of long-term survivors with Hodgkin lymphoma should not be underestimated and should lead to the development of less toxic therapy strategies.

  8. Hypofractionated Dose-Painting Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Chemotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Bakst, Richard L.; Lee, Nancy; Pfister, David G.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Hunt, Margie A.; Kraus, Dennis H.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of dose-painting intensity-modulated radiation therapy (DP-IMRT) with a hypofractionated regimen to treat nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) with concomitant toxicity reduction. Methods and Materials: From October 2002 through April 2007, 25 newly diagnosed NPC patients were enrolled in a prospective trial. DP-IMRT was prescribed to deliver 70.2 Gy using 2.34-Gy fractions to the gross tumor volume for the primary and nodal sites while simultaneously delivering 54 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions to regions at risk of microscopic disease. Patients received concurrent and adjuvant platin-based chemotherapy similar to the Intergroup 0099 trial. Results: Patient and disease characteristics are as follows: median age, 46; 44% Asian; 68% male; 76% World Health Organization III; 20% T1, 52% T2, 16% T3, 12% T4; 20% N0, 36% N1, 36% N2, 8% N3. With median follow-up of 33 months, 3-year local control was 91%, regional control was 91%, freedom from distant metastases was 91%, and overall survival was 89%. The average mean dose to each cochlea was 43 Gy. With median audiogram follow-up of 14 months, only one patient had clinically significant (Grade 3) hearing loss. Twelve percent of patients developed temporal lobe necrosis; one patient required surgical resection. Conclusions: Preliminary findings using a hypofractionated DP-IMRT regimen demonstrated that local control, freedom from distant metastases, and overall survival compared favorably with other series of IMRT and chemotherapy. The highly conformal boost to the tumor bed resulted low rates of severe ototoxicity (Grade 3-4). However, the incidence of in-field brain radiation necrosis indicates that 2.34 Gy per fraction is not safe in this setting.

  9. Value of hepatic diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating liver fibrosis following transarterial chemoembolization with low doses of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Li, Na; Xiang, Qin; Zhou, Yan

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the value of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) measured with magnetic resonance (MR) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in evaluating liver fibrosis and curative effects on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) following transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) with low doses of chemotherapy. In total, 84 patients with HCC not recommended for surgical resection underwent TACE. The patients were divided into small dose (n=46) and conventional dose (n=38) chemotherapy groups, and underwent MR-DWI prior to and following TACE. Examination of the four liver fibrosis indexes, hyaluronate, laminin, human procollagen type-III and collagen type-IV, as well as ADC values (b=600 sec/mm(2)), was conducted in the two groups. With small dose chemotherapy, the ADC values were not significantly different preoperatively and postoperatively (P>0.05). By contrast, with a conventional dose, statistically significant differences were observed between the preoperative and postoperative ADC values (P<0.01). ADC values in the small and conventional dose chemotherapy groups prior to the first cycle of TACE were 1.613±0.133×10(-3) and 1.488±0.248×10(-3) mm(2)/sec, respectively, while following four cycles of TACE, the ADC values were 1.598±0.147×10(-3) and 1.206±0.222×10(-3) mm(2)/sec, respectively. With regard to chemotherapy, the ADC values before and after TACE were significantly different (P<0.05). A significant negative correlation was observed between the ADC values and the fibrosis stage (P<0.05). Therefore, hepatic MR-DWI plays a key role in evaluating liver fibrosis following TACE with low doses of chemotherapy, resulting in improved curative effects of TACE. PMID:25009633

  10. Does High-Dose Antimicrobial Chemotherapy Prevent the Evolution of Resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Day, Troy; Read, Andrew F.

    2016-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy has long been advocated as a means of controlling drug resistance in infectious diseases but recent empirical studies have begun to challenge this view. We develop a very general framework for modeling and understanding resistance emergence based on principles from evolutionary biology. We use this framework to show how high-dose chemotherapy engenders opposing evolutionary processes involving the mutational input of resistant strains and their release from ecological competition. Whether such therapy provides the best approach for controlling resistance therefore depends on the relative strengths of these processes. These opposing processes typically lead to a unimodal relationship between drug pressure and resistance emergence. As a result, the optimal drug dose lies at either end of the therapeutic window of clinically acceptable concentrations. We illustrate our findings with a simple model that shows how a seemingly minor change in parameter values can alter the outcome from one where high-dose chemotherapy is optimal to one where using the smallest clinically effective dose is best. A review of the available empirical evidence provides broad support for these general conclusions. Our analysis opens up treatment options not currently considered as resistance management strategies, and it also simplifies the experiments required to determine the drug doses which best retard resistance emergence in patients. PMID:26820986

  11. Roles of Radiation Dose and Chemotherapy in the Etiology of Stomach Cancer as a Second Malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Belt-Dusebout, Alexandra W. van den; Aleman, Berthe M.P.; Besseling, Gijs; Bruin, Marie L. de; Hauptmann, Michael; Veer, Mars B. van't; Wit, Ronald de; Ribot, Jacques G.; Noordijk, Evert M.; Kerst, J. Martijn; Gietema, Jourik A.; Leeuwen, Flora E. van

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the roles of radiation dose, chemotherapy, and other factors in the etiology of stomach cancer in long-term survivors of testicular cancer or Hodgkin lymphoma. Methods and Materials: We conducted a cohort study in 5,142 survivors of testicular cancer or Hodgkin lymphoma treated in the Netherlands between 1965 and 1995. In a nested case-control study, detailed information on treatment, smoking, gastrointestinal diseases, and family history was collected for 42 patients with stomach cancer and 126 matched controls. For each subject, the mean radiation dose to the stomach was estimated. Relative risks (RRs) of stomach cancer and the radiation-related excess relative risk (ERR) per gray were calculated by conditional logistic regression analysis. Results: The risk of stomach cancer was 3.4-fold increased compared with the general population. The risk increased with increasing mean stomach dose (p for trend, <0.001), at an ERR of 0.84 per Gy (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.12-15.6). Mean stomach doses of more than 20 Gy were associated with a RR of 9.9 (95% CI, 3.2-31.2) compared with doses below 11 Gy. The risk was 1.8-fold (95% CI, 0.8-4.4) increased after chemotherapy and 5.4-fold (95% CI, 1.2-23.9) increased after high doses of procarbazine (>=13,000 mg) vs. <10,000 mg. The RR of smoking more than 10 cigarettes per day vs. no smoking was 1.6 (95% CI, 0.6-4.2). Conclusions: Stomach cancer risk is strongly radiation dose dependent. The role of chemotherapy, particularly of procarbazine and related agents, needs further study, because of the relatively small numbers of chemotherapy-treated subjects.

  12. Time to use a dose of Chloroquine as an adjuvant to anti-cancer chemotherapies.

    PubMed

    Pascolo, Steve

    2016-01-15

    Chloroquine, a drug used for over 80 years to treat and prevent malaria and, more recently, to treat autoimmune diseases, is very safe but has a plethora of dose-dependent effects. By increasing pH in acidic compartments it inhibits for example lysosomal enzymes. In the context of cancer, Chloroquine was found to have direct effects on different types of malignancies that could potentiate chemotherapies. For example, the anti-malaria drug may inhibit both the multidrug-resistance pump and autophagy (mechanisms that tumor cells may use to resist chemotherapies), intercalate in DNA and enhance the penetration of chemotherapeutic drugs in cells or solid cancer tissues. However, these activities were mostly demonstrated at high doses of Chloroquine (higher than 10mg/kg or 10mg/l i.e. ca. 31μM). Nevertheless, it was reported that daily uptake of clinically acceptable doses (less than 10mg/kg) of Chloroquine in addition to chemo-radio-therapy increases the survival of glioblastoma patients (Sotelo et al., 2006; Briceno et al., 2007). However, the optimal dose and schedule of this multi-active drug with respect to chemotherapy has never been experimentally determined. The present article reviews the several known direct and indirect effects of different doses of Chloroquine on cancer and how those effects may indicate that a fine tuning of the dose/schedule of Chloroquine administration versus chemotherapy may be critical to obtain an adjuvant effect of Chloroquine in anti-cancer treatments. We anticipate that the appropriate (time and dose) addition of Chloroquine to the standard of care may greatly and safely potentiate current anti-cancer treatments. PMID:26687632

  13. Renal function in high dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic cell support treatment for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Merouani, A; Shpall, E J; Jones, R B; Archer, P G; Schrier, R W

    1996-09-01

    Autologous and allogeneic bone marrow grafting both require cytoreductive therapy but only the allogeneic procedure requires immunosuppressive agents. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation has been reported to be associated with a high incidence of both renal failure and veno-occlusive disease (VOD) of the liver, the combination of which is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. There is less known about the frequency and severity of these complications in patients undergoing autologous bone marrow transplantation. In the present study renal, hepatic and other complications were examined in 232 patients with Stages II/III and IV breast cancer who were treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic cell support with either marrow or peripheral blood progenitor cells. The post-treatment severity of the renal dysfunction was classified as follows: Grade 0, normal renal function [< 25% decrement in glomerular filtration rate (GFR)]; Grade 1. mild renal dysfunction (> 25% decrement in GFR but < a twofold increase in serum creatinine); Grade 2, > twofold rise in serum creatinine but no need for dialysis; Grade 3 > than twofold rise in serum creatinine and need for dialysis. There were 102 patients (44%) who were classified as Grade 0 and 81 patients (35%) who were classified as Grade 1 renal dysfunction. Severe renal dysfunction (Grades 2 and 3) was observed in 49 of the 232 patients (21%). This severe renal dysfunction of 21% compares with a previously reported 53% incidence of severe renal dysfunction for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Similarly, the frequency of hepatic VOD was less (4.7% or 11 of 232 patients) in this autologous bone marrow transplant study as compared to a reported incidence of hepatic VOD ranging from 22 to 53% in large series of allogeneic bone marrow transplant patients. The severe renal dysfunction (Grades 2 and 3) in the present autologous hematopoietic cell support study correlated most significantly with

  14. High dose chemotherapy with stem cell support in the treatment of testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Lazar; Matovina-Brko, Gorana; Popovic, Milica; Petrovic, Dragana; Cvetanovic, Ana; Vukojevic, Jelena; Jovanovic, Darjana

    2015-12-26

    Testicular germ cell cancer (TGCC) is rare form of malignant disease that occurs mostly in young man between age 15 and 40. The worldwide incidence of TGCC is 1.5 per 100000 man with the highest rates in North Europe. After discovery of cisplatin cure rates of TGCC are very favorable between 90%-95% and unlike most solid tumors, cure rate for metastatic TGCC is around 80%. Metastatic TGCC is usually treated with 3-4 cycles of bleomycin, etoposide, cisplatinum chemotherapy with or without retroperitoneal surgery and cure rates with this approach are between 41% in poor risk group and 92% in good risk group of patients. Cure rates are lower in relapsed and refractory patients and many of them will die from the disease if not cured with first line chemotherapy. High dose chemotherapy (HDCT) approach was used for the first time during the 1980s. Progress in hematology allowed the possibility to keep autologous haematopoietic stem cells alive ex-vivo at very low temperatures and use them to repopulate the bone marrow after sub-lethal dose of intesive myeloablative chemotherapy. Despite the fact that there is no positive randomized study to prove HDCT concept, cure rates in relapsed TGCC are higher after high dose therapy then in historical controls in studies with conventional treatment. Here we review clinical studies in HDCT for TGCC, possibilities of mobilising sufficient number of stem cells and future directions in the treatment of this disease. PMID:26730267

  15. High dose chemotherapy with stem cell support in the treatment of testicular cancer

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Lazar; Matovina-Brko, Gorana; Popovic, Milica; Petrovic, Dragana; Cvetanovic, Ana; Vukojevic, Jelena; Jovanovic, Darjana

    2015-01-01

    Testicular germ cell cancer (TGCC) is rare form of malignant disease that occurs mostly in young man between age 15 and 40. The worldwide incidence of TGCC is 1.5 per 100000 man with the highest rates in North Europe. After discovery of cisplatin cure rates of TGCC are very favorable between 90%-95% and unlike most solid tumors, cure rate for metastatic TGCC is around 80%. Metastatic TGCC is usually treated with 3-4 cycles of bleomycin, etoposide, cisplatinum chemotherapy with or without retroperitoneal surgery and cure rates with this approach are between 41% in poor risk group and 92% in good risk group of patients. Cure rates are lower in relapsed and refractory patients and many of them will die from the disease if not cured with first line chemotherapy. High dose chemotherapy (HDCT) approach was used for the first time during the 1980s. Progress in hematology allowed the possibility to keep autologous haematopoietic stem cells alive ex-vivo at very low temperatures and use them to repopulate the bone marrow after sub-lethal dose of intesive myeloablative chemotherapy. Despite the fact that there is no positive randomized study to prove HDCT concept, cure rates in relapsed TGCC are higher after high dose therapy then in historical controls in studies with conventional treatment. Here we review clinical studies in HDCT for TGCC, possibilities of mobilising sufficient number of stem cells and future directions in the treatment of this disease. PMID:26730267

  16. [Ultra high-dose chemotherapy with peripheral blood stem cell autotransplantation for refractory testicular cancer].

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, K; Nakagawa, S; Mikami, K; Watanabe, H; Sonoda, Y; Abe, T; Fujii, H

    1994-02-01

    This is a report of 45-year-old man with advanced nonseminomatous germ cell tumor (stage IIIB2: embryonal carcinoma, yolk sac tumor, seminoma), who had relapse after PVB (cisplatin, vinblastine, bleomycin) chemotherapy. Peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) were taken by two consecutive apheresis using a CS-3000 blood separator after high-dose chemotherapy of cytarabine and mitoxantrone. In total, 6.4 x 10(5)/kg of granulocytic cells (CFU-GM) was collected. He was treated with ultra high-dose chemotherapy consisting of carboplatin (800 mg/m2), etoposide (1,000 mg/m2) and cyclophosphamide (100 mg/kg) from day 1, followed by peripheral blood stem cell autotransplantation (PBSCT) on day 9. We transfused 2.4 x 10(5)/kg CFU-GM, which was enough number of stem cells for safe PBSCT. No serious side effects or complications were encountered. The patient achieved partial remission for more than two months. However, he died of respiratory dysfunction caused by metastatic lung cancer 5 months later. It was thought that ultra high-dose chemotherapy with PBSCT might be a new therapy for refractory testicular cancer.

  17. High-dose chemotherapy: is it standard management for any common solid tumor?

    PubMed

    MacNeil, M; Eisenhauer, E A

    1999-10-01

    High-dose chemotherapy with stem-cell support had as its basis the observation of dose-response relationships for many chemotherapeutic agents in laboratory models. The rationale to explore high-dose treatment in the clinic was further enhanced by several retrospective reviews in the 1980s which suggested delivered dose intensity of treatment was an important determinant of patient outcome. The availability of hematopoietic growth factors and technologic advances in the efficiency of stem-cell collection and administration have made the evaluation of exploring high-dose therapy safe and feasible. However, real questions remain regarding the apparently superior results of this treatment in the management of solid tumors. This paper reviews the results of high-dose chemotherapy in breast, ovarian and small cell lung cancers. Firstly the evidence for a dose-response relationship to chemotherapeutic agents in the 'standard' dosage range is examined. Secondly results of non-randomized and, where available, randomized trials of high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) with stem-cell support are summarized and finally conclusions regarding the weight of the evidence for use of HDCT as 'standard' treatment are given. In none of these tumors is there sufficient evidence from randomized trials to consider HDCT a standard to be offered to all patients with a given stage of disease. The apparent benefit of HDCT seen in phase II trials could well be explained by such phenomena as stage shifts and patient selection. Many randomized trials in ovary and breast cancer are either ongoing or presented only as abstracts so final results must be awaited to quantify the benefit, if any of HDCT. It is acknowledged, however, that some practitioners already utilize this treatment. We speculate about the differences in philosophical approaches to cancer treatment which might contribute to early acceptance of novel therapies in the absence of adequate randomized data.

  18. [High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell support for solid tumors in adults].

    PubMed

    Rodenhuis, S; de Vries, E G

    1999-04-01

    High-dose chemotherapy for advanced solid malignancies has been the subject of many clinical studies. The replacement of autologous bone marrow transplantation by peripheral blood haematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation and other advances in supportive care have led to a considerable reduction of therapy-related mortality and morbidity. In certain rare disorders, such as germ cell tumours or pediatric sarcomas in adults, high-dose therapy is currently considered the therapeutic standard. It is likely that a subgroup of patients with high-risk or disseminated breast cancer can also benefit in terms of survival from this treatment modality, but final proof from randomized studies remains to be generated. On theoretical grounds, high-dose chemotherapy could also be effective in small cell lung cancer and ovarian cancer, and randomized studies to answer this question are in progress. Many investigators concur that high-dose chemotherapy often leads to dramatic cytoreduction in solid tumours, but only rarely achieves cure. Novel therapeutic modalities are required to control the residual microscopic disease.

  19. Tandem High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Ki Woong; Lim, Do Hoon; Yi, Eun Sang; Choi, Young Bae; Lee, Ji Won; Yoo, Keon Hee; Koo, Hong Hoe; Kim, Ji Hye; Suh, Yeon-Lim; Joung, Yoo Sook; Shin, Hyung Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We prospectively evaluated the effectiveness of tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDCT/auto-SCT) in improving the survival of patients with atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors while reducing the risks of late adverse effects from radiotherapy (RT). Materials and Methods For young children (< 3 years old), tandem HDCT/auto-SCT was administered after six cycles of induction chemotherapy. RT was deferred until after 3 years of age unless the tumor showed relapse or progression. For older patients (> 3 years old), RT including reduced-dose craniospinal RT (23.4 or 30.6 Gy) was administered either after two cycles of induction chemotherapy or after surgery, and tandem HDCT/auto-SCT was administered after six cycles of induction chemotherapy. Results A total of 13 patients (five young and eight older) were enrolled from November 2004 to June 2012. Eight patients, including all five young patients, had metastatic disease at diagnosis. Six patients (four young and two older) experienced progression before initiation of RT, and seven were able to proceed to HDCT/auto-SCT without progression during induction treatment. Three of six patients who experienced progression during induction treatment underwent HDCT/auto-SCT as salvage treatment. All five young patients died from disease progression. However, four of the eight older patients remain progression-freewith a median follow-up period of 64 months (range, 39 to 108 months). Treatment-related late toxicities were acceptable. Conclusion The required dose of craniospinal RT might be reduced in older patients if the intensity of chemotherapy is increased. However, early administration of RT should be considered to prevent early progression in young patients. PMID:27034140

  20. No Salvage Using High-Dose Chemotherapy Plus/Minus Reirradiation for Relapsing Previously Irradiated Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Massimino, Maura Gandola, Lorenza; Spreafico, Filippo; Biassoni, Veronica; Luksch, Roberto; Collini, Paola; Solero, Carlo N.; Simonetti, Fabio; Pignoli, Emanuele; Cefalo, Graziella; Poggi, Geraldina; Modena, Piergiorgio Ph.D.; Mariani, Luigi; Potepan, Paolo; Podda, Marta; Casanova, Michela; Pecori, Emilia; Acerno, Stefania; Ferrari, Andrea; Terenziani, Monica

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: Myeloablative regimens were frequently used for medulloblastoma relapsing after craniospinal irradiation (CSI): in 1997-2002, we used repeated surgery, standard-dose and myeloablative chemotherapy, and reirradiation. Methods and Materials: In 10 patients, reinduction included sequential high-dose etoposide, high-dose cyclophosphamide/vincristine, and high-dose carboplatin/vincristine, then two myeloablative courses with high-dose thiotepa ({+-} carboplatin); 6 other patients received two of four courses of cisplatin/etoposide. Hematopoietic precursor mobilization followed high-dose etoposide or high-dose cyclophosphamide or cisplatin/etoposide therapy. After the overall chemotherapy program, reirradiation was prescribed when possible. Results: Seventeen patients were treated: previous treatment included CSI of 19.5-36 Gy with posterior fossa/tumor boost and chemotherapy in 16 patients. Fifteen patients were in their first and 2 in their second and third relapses, respectively. First progression-free survival had lasted a median of 26 months. Relapse sites included leptomeninges in 9 patients, spine in 4 patients, posterior fossa in 3 patients, and brain in 1 patient. Three patients underwent complete resection of recurrence, and 10 underwent reirradiation. Twelve of 14 patients with assessable tumor had an objective response after reinduction; 2 experienced progression and were not given the myeloablative courses. Remission lasted a median of 16 months. Additional relapses appeared in 13 patients continuing the treatment. Fifteen patients died of progression and 1 died of pneumonia 13 months after relapse. The only survivor at 93 months had a single spinal metastasis that was excised and irradiated. Survival for the series as a whole was 11-93 months, with a median of 41 months. Conclusions: Despite responses being obtained and ample use of surgery and reirradiation, second-line therapy with myeloablative schedules was not curative, barring a few

  1. Metronomic chemotherapy with daily low-dose temozolomide and celecoxib in elderly patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Welzel, Grit; Gehweiler, Julian; Brehmer, Stefanie; Appelt, Jens-Uwe; von Deimling, Andreas; Seiz-Rosenhagen, Marcel; Schmiedek, Peter; Wenz, Frederik; Giordano, Frank A

    2015-09-01

    Chemotherapy is often omitted in elderly patients with glioblastoma multiforme due to a fear of side effects. We applied metronomic chemotherapy with low-dose temozolomide and celecoxib (LD-TEM/CEL) during and after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and here report on how this regimen compares to standard temozolomide radiochemotherapy (SD-TEM) in elderly patients. We retrospectively analyzed records of 146 patients aged 65 years and older that underwent EBRT. Factors of interest were age, performance status, comorbidities, MGMT status, therapy (resection/biopsy, radiotherapy/dose, chemotherapy/regimen/dose), progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) status. Irrespective of the regimen, addition of chemotherapy more than doubled median survival rates (EBRT only: 4.2 months; EBRT + LD-TEM/CEL: 8.5 months; EBRT + SD-TEM: 10.8 months; p ≤ 0.008). Although patients receiving metronomic LD-TEM/CEL were significantly older (62 % were ≥75 years vs. 22 %; p < 0.001), had significantly lower performance scores (50 % had a KPS <70 vs. 28 %; p = 0.049) and were significantly more comorbid (73 % had ≥4 comorbidities vs. 37 %; p = 0.002) than patients of the SD-TEM group, there were no significant differences in PFS and OS. Independent of other factors, omission of chemotherapy significantly impairs progression-free and overall survival. With all the limitations of a retrospective analysis, our data suggest that metronomic chemotherapy with LD-TEM/CEL may be equieffective and eventually better tolerated than SD-TEM. It may be offered to elderly patients that are not eligible for standard chemotherapy.

  2. Relationship between size and thiazole orange fluorescence of platelets in patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Balduini, C L; Noris, P; Spedini, P; Belletti, S; Zambelli, A; Da Prada, G A

    1999-07-01

    The reticulated platelet count relies upon the assumption that newly formed platelets contain a residual amount of RNA which selectively binds the dye thiazole orange (TO) and greatly enhances its fluorescence signal. It has, however, recently been shown that almost half of the platelet TO-signal is derived from the labelling of dense-granule nucleotides. It is therefore possible that the higher TO fluorescence of young platelets partially derives from the higher granule content due to their larger volume. To investigate the relationship between platelet size and TO fluorescence we studied 13 patients with high-risk breast cancer undergoing high-dose chemotherapy. Mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width, platelet-large cell ratio, membrane content of glycoprotein Ib and IIb-IIIa and platelet aggregation were significantly greater during resolution than during development of thrombocytopenia, suggesting a prevalence of young and old platelets respectively. Mean TO fluorescence per cell was higher in the platelet population enriched in young cells than in that enriched in old cells, but this difference was no longer observed when the ratio TO signal/platelet size was examined. Moreover, RNase treatment and platelet degranulation reduced TO fluorescence to a similar extent in platelet populations enriched in young or old cells. Therefore our data suggest that the higher TO signal of young platelets is derived, to a significant extent, from their larger volume and granule content.

  3. Low Dose Vaporized Cannabis Significantly Improves Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wilsey, Barth; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Deutsch, Reena; Gouaux, Ben; Sakai, Staci; Donaghe, Haylee

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study evaluating the analgesic efficacy of vaporized cannabis in subjects, the majority of whom were experiencing neuropathic pain despite traditional treatment. Thirty-nine patients with central and peripheral neuropathic pain underwent a standardized procedure for inhaling either medium dose (3.53%), low dose (1.29%), or placebo cannabis with the primary outcome being VAS pain intensity. Psychoactive side-effects, and neuropsychological performance were also evaluated. Mixed effects regression models demonstrated an analgesic response to vaporized cannabis. There was no significant difference between the two active dose groups’ results (p>0.7). The number needed to treat (NNT) to achieve 30% pain reduction was 3.2 for placebo vs. low dose, 2.9 for placebo vs. medium dose, and 25 for medium vs. low dose. As these NNT are comparable to those of traditional neuropathic pain medications, cannabis has analgesic efficacy with the low dose being, for all intents and purposes, as effective a pain reliever as the medium dose. Psychoactive effects were minimal and well-tolerated, and neuropsychological effects were of limited duration and readily reversible within 1–2 hours. Vaporized cannabis, even at low doses, may present an effective option for patients with treatment-resistant neuropathic pain. PMID:23237736

  4. Impressive Response to Dose-Dense Chemotherapy in a Patient with NUT Midline Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Maur, Michela; Toss, Angela; Dominici, Massimo; Frassoldati, Antonio; Corradini, Paolo; Maiorana, Antonio; Fontana, Annalisa; Conte, Pierfranco

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 21 Final Diagnosis: NUT midline carcinoma Symptoms: Fatigue • fever • pain Medication: Romidepsin Clinical Procedure: Chemotherapy Specialty: Oncology Objective: Rare disease Background: NUT midline carcinoma (NMC) is a rare, highly lethal malignancy that results from a chromosome translocation and mostly arises in the midline organs. To date, no treatment has been established. Most patients receive combinations of chemotherapy regimens and radiation, and occasionally subsequent resection; nevertheless, patients have an average survival hardly exceeding 7 months. Case Report: A 21-year-old patient was admitted to our division with a large mediastinal mass with lung nodules, multiple vertebral metastases, and massive nodal involvement. In a few days, the patient developed a superior vena cava syndrome and an acute respiratory failure. Due to the rapid course of the disease, based on preliminary histology of poorly differentiated carcinoma, a dose-dense biweekly chemotherapy with paclitaxel, ifosfamide, and cisplatin was started. In the meantime, the diagnosis of NMC was confirmed. A surprising clinical benefit was obtained after the first cycle of chemotherapy, and after 6 cycles a PET-CT scan showed a very good response. At this point, radiotherapy was started but the disease progressed outside of the radiation field. The patient entered into a compassionate use protocol with Romidepsin, but a PET/CT scan after the first course showed disease progression with peritoneal and retroperitoneal carcinosis. A treatment with Pemetrexed was then started but the patient eventually died with rapid progressive disease. Conclusions: Our case history adds some interesting findings to available knowledge: NMC can be chemosensitive and radiosensitive. This opens the possibility to study more aggressive treatments, including high-dose consolidation chemotherapy and to evaluate the role of biological agents as maintenance treatments. PMID:26140332

  5. Radiation dose escalation by simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy for esophageal cancer: a phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Tiantian; Chang, Daniel; Chen, Zhijian; Huang, Ruihong; Zhang, Wuzhe; Lin, Kun; Guo, Longjia; Zhou, Mingzhen; Li, Dongsheng; Li, Derui; Chen, Chuangzhen

    2016-01-01

    The outcomes for patients with esophageal cancer (EC) underwent standard-dose radical radiotherapy were still disappointing. This phase II study investigated the feasibility, safety and efficacy of radiation dose escalation using simultaneous modulated accelerated radiotherapy (SMART) combined with chemotherapy in 60 EC patients. Radiotherapy consisted of 66Gy at 2.2 Gy/fraction to the gross tumor and 54Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction to subclinical diseases simultaneously. Chemotherapy including cisplatin and 5fluorouracil were administered to all patients during and after radiotherapy. The data showed that the majority of patients (98.3%) completed the whole course of radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. The most common ≥ grade 3 acute toxicities were neutropenia (16.7%), followed by esophagitis (6.7%) and thrombopenia (5.0%). With a median follow-up of 24 months (5-38) for all patients and 30 months (18-38) for those still alive, 11 patients (18.3%) developed ≥ Grade 3 late toxicities and 2 (3.3%) of them died subsequently due to esophageal hemorrhage. The 1- and 2-year local-regional control, distant metastasis-free survival, disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 87.6% and 78.6%, 86.0% and 80.5%, 75.6% and 64.4%, 86.7% and 72.7%, respectively. SMART combined with concurrent chemotherapy is feasible in EC patients with tolerable acute toxicities. They showed a trend of significant improvements in local-regional control and overall survival. Further follow-up is needed to evaluate the late toxicities. PMID:26992206

  6. The cost-effectiveness of high dose chemotherapy in the treatment of relapsed Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Beard, S M; Lorigan, P C; Sampson, F C

    1999-01-01

    As part of an NHS Executive Trent regional initiative we considered the role and cost-effectiveness of high dose chemotherapy in the treatment of relapsed Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The key trials and case series show an additional patient benefit of 0.8–1.1 life years over standard chemotherapy. We estimate incremental cost per life year gained of £12 800–£17 600, which reduces further if long-term benefits are considered. High dose chemotherapy in these conditions is both life-saving and cost-effective. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10638970

  7. Significance of multidrug resistance gene-related proteins in the postoperative chemotherapy of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Pengfei; Du, Yian; Yang, Litao; Fan, Sunfu; Wu, Jian; Zheng, Shusen

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a serious problem in chemotherapy and is one of the main reasons for a poor outcome of gastric cancer. Study on the key proteins in multidrug resistance is necessary for the treatment of gastric cancer. Methods: The expression of ToPo II, MRP and GST-π in 119 gastric cancers was retrospectively examined, and the results were analyzed in correlation with clinicopathological data. ToPo II negative, MRP positive and GST-π positive were regarded as three risk factors which may be associated with chemotherapy resistance and poor prognosis. Patients were divided into two groups: high-risk group (≥2 risk factors) and the low-risk group (<2 risk factors), and the tumor recurrence and patients’ survival time of the two groups were also analyzed. Results: The positive rates of ToPo II, MRP and GST-π were 73.9%, 42.9% and 51.3%, respectively. The positively correlation between the expression of MRP and GST-π had been found. A significant correlation was shown between ToPo II expression and the level of differentiation. Significant differences with GST-π expression were also found in relation to the sex and differentiation. In the high-risk group, the 3-year survival rate of patients with/without chemotherapy were 62.1% and 52.0%, 5-year survival rates were 44.8% and 40.0%, but the difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). In the low-risk group, the 3-year survival rate of patients with/without chemotherapy were 81.2% and 51.5%, 5-year survival rates were 71.9% and 45.5%, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusions: Combined detection of MDR-related proteins ToPo II, MRP and GST-π may be prospectively valuable for postoperative individualized chemotherapy, and further predict the outcomes of gastric cancer patients. PMID:25550836

  8. Evaluating the efficacies of Maximum Tolerated Dose and metronomic chemotherapies: A mathematical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiraldello, Rafael T.; Martins, Marcelo L.; Mancera, Paulo F. A.

    2016-08-01

    We present a mathematical model based on partial differential equations that is applied to understand tumor development and its response to chemotherapy. Our primary aim is to evaluate comparatively the efficacies of two chemotherapeutic protocols, Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD) and metronomic, as well as two methods of drug delivery. Concerning therapeutic outcomes, the metronomic protocol proves more effective in prolonging the patient's life than MTD. Moreover, a uniform drug delivery method combined with the metronomic protocol is the most efficient strategy to reduce tumor density.

  9. Continuous Low-Dose Temozolomide Chemotherapy and Microvessel Density in Recurrent Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jong-Yun; Yang, Seung Ho; Lee, Youn Soo; Lee, Su Youn; Kim, Jeana

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of continuous low-dose temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy for recurrent and TMZ-refractory glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and to study the relationship between its efficacy and microvessel density within the tumor. Methods Thirty patients who had recurrent GBM following Stupp's regimen received TMZ daily at 50 mg/m2/day until tumor progression between 2007 and 2013. The median duration of continuous low-dose TMZ administration was 8 weeks (range, 2-64). Results The median progression-free survival (PFS) of continuous low-dose TMZ therapy was 2 months (range, 0.5-16). At 6 months, PFS was 20%. The median overall survival (OS) from the start of this therapy to death was 6 months (95% CI : 5.1-6.9). Microvessel density of recurrent tumor tissues obtained by reoperation of 17 patients was 22.7±24.1/mm2 (mean±standard deviation), and this was lower than that of the initial tumor (61.4±32.7/mm2) (p-value=0.001). It suggests that standard TMZ-chemoradiotherapy reduces the microvessel density within GBM and that recurrences develop in tumor cells with low metabolic burden. The efficacy of continuous low-dose TMZ could not be expected in recurrent GBM cells in poor angiogenic environments. Conclusion The efficacy of continuous low-dose TMZ chemotherapy is marginal. This study suggests the need to develop further treatment strategies for recurrent and TMZ-refractory GBM. PMID:26713142

  10. Development of an oral solid dispersion formulation for use in low-dose metronomic chemotherapy of paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Moes, Johannes; Koolen, Stijn; Huitema, Alwin; Schellens, Jan; Beijnen, Jos; Nuijen, Bastiaan

    2013-01-01

    For the clinical development of low-dose metronomic (LDM) chemotherapy of paclitaxel, oral administration is vital. However, the development of an oral formulation is difficult due to paclitaxel's low oral bioavailability, caused by its low permeability and low solubility. We increased the oral bioavailability of paclitaxel by combining a pharmacokinetic booster, ritonavir, with a new oral solid dispersion formulation of paclitaxel. The combined use of Hansen solubility parameters and dissolution experiments resulted in the development of a solid dispersion formulation containing 1/11 w/w paclitaxel, 9/11 w/w polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) K30, and 1/11 w/w sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS). Analysis of the solid dispersion formulation by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and modulated differential scanning calorimetry (mDSC) confirmed the amorphous nature of paclitaxel and the fine dispersion of paclitaxel in the matrix of PVP-K30 and SLS. Furthermore, in vitro tests showed a major increase in the apparent solubility and dissolution rate of paclitaxel. To test the clinical significance of these findings, the solid dispersion formulation of paclitaxel (ModraPac001 10mg capsule) was compared to the paclitaxel premix solution in four patients with advanced cancer. Although the mean systemic exposure to paclitaxel after oral administration of the solid dispersion formulation was slightly lower compared to the paclitaxel premix solution (190±63.1ng/mLh for vs. 247±100ng/mLh), the systemic exposure to paclitaxel is clinically relevant [1,2]. In addition to this, the favorable pharmaceutical characteristics, for example, neutral taste, dosing accuracy, and the 2-year ambient shelf life, make the ModraPac001 10mg capsule an attractive candidate for oral paclitaxel chemotherapy. Currently, the ModraPac001 formulation is applied in the first clinical trial with oral LDM chemotherapy of paclitaxel.

  11. Response of osteosarcoma to preoperative intravenous high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy: CT evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Mail, J.T.; Cohen, M.D.; Mirkin, L.D.; Provisor, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    The histologic response of an osteosarcoma to preamputation high-dose methotrexate therapy can be used to determine the optimum maintenance chemotherapy regimen to be administered after amputation. This study evaluates computed tomography (CT) as a method of assessing the response of the tumor to the methotrexate therapy. Nine patients with nonmetastatic osteosarcoma of an extremity had a CT scan of the tumor at initial presentation. This was compared with a second CT scan after four courses of high-dose intravenous methotrexate. Each set of scans was evaluated for changes in bony destruction, soft-tissue mass, pattern of calcification, and extent of tumor involvement of the marrow cavity. These findings were correlated with the histologic response of the tumor as measured by the degree of tumor necrosis. The changes seen on CT correlated well with the degree of the histologic response in seven of the nine patients.

  12. High-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue in the outpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Dix, S P; Geller, R B

    2000-02-01

    Intensive outpatient care is rapidly becoming the primary mode of care for selected patients undergoing high-dose chemotherapy with autologous peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation. Although the traditional inpatient model of care may still be necessary for high-risk patients, published data suggest that outpatient care is safe and feasible during or after administration of high-dose chemotherapy and autologous PBSC transplant. Blood and marrow transplant (BMT) centers have developed programs to provide more outpatient care under three basic models: an early discharge model, a delayed admission model, and a comprehensive, or total, outpatient model. This review will describe these models of care and address the elements necessary for the development of an outpatient BMT program, including patient selection, staff development, and patient and caregiver education. Available supportive care strategies to facilitate outpatient care will also be highlighted. Clinical outcome data and pharmacoeconomic analyses evaluating various outpatient BMT programs, as well as limited quality-of-life evaluations, will be reviewed.

  13. Definitive high-dose radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Kim, Eun Seok; Yeo, Seung-Gu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Standard management for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) involves preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and radical surgery. However, this level of treatment may be unnecessary for a subgroup of LARC patients. Previous reports have shown that approximately 20% of LARC patients experience a complete tumor response to preoperative CRT. Post-CRT nonoperative management of these patients may prevent morbidities associated with radical surgery. To our knowledge, this case report firstly presents the favorable long-term outcomes of a LARC patient who underwent definitive aim CRT. Methods: The patient was 73 years’ old, and staging workups revealed T3N2bM0 rectal adenocarcinoma. He agreed to receive CRT, but refused surgery. A radiotherapy (RT) dose of 64.8 Gy was prescribed, which was higher than conventional (50.4 Gy) preoperative aim RT. The regimen of concurrent chemotherapy was the same as that used in preoperative aim CRT: 2 cycles of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin. Results: Three months after CRT completion, a complete tumor response was identified clinically. Colonoscopic biopsy after 1 year showed no tumor cells. This patient is alive after 4 years with no evidence of recurrence or severe toxicity. Conclusion: The long-term outcomes of this case indicate the feasibility of definitive high-dose RT with concurrent chemotherapy for LARC. PMID:27749573

  14. Use of Concept of Chemotherapy-Equivalent Biologically Effective Dose to Provide Quantitative Evaluation of Contribution of Chemotherapy to Local Tumor Control in Chemoradiotherapy Cervical Cancer Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Plataniotis, George A. Dale, Roger G.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To express the magnitude of the contribution of chemotherapy to local tumor control in chemoradiotherapy cervical cancer trials in terms of the concept of the biologically effective dose. Methods and Materials: The local control rates of both arms of each study (radiotherapy vs. radiotherapy plus chemotherapy) reported from randomized controlled trials of concurrent chemoradiotherapy for cervical cancer were reviewed and expressed using the Poisson model for tumor control probability (TCP) as TCP = exp(-exp E), where E is the logarithm of cell kill. By combining the two TCP values from each study, we calculated the chemotherapy-related log cell kill as Ec = ln[(lnTCP{sub Radiotherapy})/(lnTCP{sub Chemoradiotherapy})]. Assuming a range of radiosensitivities ({alpha} = 0.1-0.5 Gy{sup -1}) and taking the calculated log cell kill, we calculated the chemotherapy-BED, and using the linear quadratic model, the number of 2-Gy fractions corresponding to each BED. The effect of a range of tumor volumes and radiosensitivities ({alpha} Gy{sup -1}) on the TCP was also explored. Results: The chemotherapy-equivalent number of 2-Gy fractions range was 0.2-4 and was greater in tumors with lower radiosensitivity. In those tumors with intermediate radiosensitivity ({alpha} = 0.3 Gy{sup -1}), the equivalent number of 2-Gy fractions was 0.6-1.3, corresponding to 120-260 cGy of extra dose. The opportunities for clinically detectable improvement are only available in tumors with intermediate radiosensitivity with {alpha} = 0.22-0.28 Gy{sup -1}. The dependence of TCP on the tumor volume decreases as the radiosensitivity increases. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that the contribution of chemotherapy to the TCP in cervical cancer is expected to be clinically detectable in larger and less-radiosensitive tumors.

  15. Estimation of Radiobiologic Parameters and Equivalent Radiation Dose of Cytotoxic Chemotherapy in Malignant Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Bleddyn . E-mail: b.jones.1@bham.ac.uk; Sanghera, Paul

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the radiobiologic parameters for high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: The biologic effective dose concept is used to estimate the {alpha}/{beta} ratio and K (dose equivalent for tumor repopulation/d) for high-grade glioma patients treated in a randomized fractionation trial. The equivalent radiation dose of temozolomide (Temodar) chemotherapy was estimated from another randomized study. The method assumes that the radiotherapy biologic effective dose is proportional to the adjusted radiotherapy survival duration of high-grade glioma patients. Results: The median tumor {alpha}/{beta} and K estimate is 9.32 Gy and 0.23 Gy/d, respectively. Using the published surviving fraction after 2-Gy exposure (SF{sub 2}) data, and the above {alpha}/{beta} ratio, the estimated median {alpha} value was 0.077 Gy{sup -1}, {beta} was 0.009 Gy{sup -2}, and the cellular doubling time was 39.5 days. The median equivalent biologic effective dose of temozolomide was 11.03 Gy{sub 9.3} (equivalent to a radiation dose of 9.1 Gy given in 2-Gy fractions). Random sampling trial simulations based on a cure threshold of 70 Gy in high-grade gliomas have shown the potential increase in tumor cure with dose escalation. Partial elimination of hypoxic cells (by chemical hypoxic cell sensitizers or carbon ion therapy) has suggested that considerable gains in tumor control, which are further supplemented by temozolomide, are achievable. Conclusion: The radiobiologic parameters for human high-grade gliomas can be estimated from clinical trials and could be used to inform future clinical trials, particularly combined modality treatments with newer forms of radiotherapy. Other incurable cancers should be studied using similar radiobiologic analysis.

  16. Addition of bortezomib to standard dose chop chemotherapy improves response and survival in relapsed mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Michelle; Johnson, Rod; Kruger, Anton; Turner, Deborah; Rule, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, potentially increases cell sensitivity to chemotherapy. This study was performed to determine the overall response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS) and toxicity of CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone) compared to CHOP + bortezomib chemotherapy in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) patients at first relapse. Forty-six patients were randomly assigned to standard dose CHOP ± bortezomib 1·6 mg/m(2) given on a 21-d cycle for up to eight cycles of treatment. Median age was 71 years (CHOP arm) and 69 years (CHOP-bortezomib arm). Median Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status was 1 (CHOP) and 0 (CHOP-bortezomib) with 65% and 52%, respectively, having a disease stage of IV. ORR was 47·8% (CHOP) and 82·6% (CHOP-bortezomib). Complete response rate was 21·7% (CHOP) vs. 34·8% (CHOP-bortezomib); partial response rate was 26·1% (CHOP) vs. 47·8% (CHOP-bortezomib). Median OS was 11·8 months (CHOP) and 35·6 months (CHOP-bortezomib) (P = 0·01, Hazard ratio [HR] 0·37 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0·16-0·83)] and there was a non-significant improvement in PFS: 8·1 months (CHOP) and 16·5 months (CHOP-bortezomib) [P = 0·12, HR 0·60 (95% CI 0·31-1·15)]. Severe (≥grade 3) sensory neuropathy was similar in both arms (4·3% CHOP vs. 6·5% CHOP-bortezomib). We conclude that the addition of bortezomib to CHOP chemotherapy for relapsed MCL significantly improves outcome with a manageable increase in toxicity.

  17. Immunotherapy with low-dose recombinant interleukin 2 after high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Pession, A; Prete, A; Locatelli, F; Pierinelli, S; Pession, A L; Maccario, R; Magrini, E; De Bernardi, B; Paolucci, P; Paolucci, G

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in a phase I-II trial whether low doses of recombinant human interleukin 2 (rHuIL-2) over a prolonged period of time are safe and effective in eradicating or controlling minimal residual disease in children with neuroblastoma given high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). From January 1992 to July 1996, 17 consecutive patients, with either stage IV or relapsed neuroblastoma, were enrolled. Patients received rHuIL-2 after a median time interval (min-max) of 105 days (56-153) after HDCT and ASCT. The protocol consisted of 2 'priming' courses of rHuIL-2 at escalating doses administered intravenously at 72-h intervals, followed by 'maintenance' with 11 monthly and six bimonthly boosting 5-day courses administered subcutaneously on an outpatient basis. At April 1997, 7 out of the 17 patients had completed the treatment schedule, four had discontinued treatment because of toxicity and four because of relapse; the remaining two patients are still on treatment, having completed 15 courses. Expansion of T lymphocytes, together with an increase in both natural killer cells and in activated T lymphocytes was evidenced. After a median (min-max) follow-up time of 30 (16-64) months, 12 out of 17 patients are alive and well. Two patients relapsed and died 14 and 35 months after transplant. Three patients are alive after having relapsed at 41, 21 and 13 months. The actuarial 2-year event-free survival and overall survival are 67% and 92% respectively. Intermittent administration of low doses of rHuIL-2 given for a long period of time is well tolerated and seems capable of controlling minimal residual disease after HDCT and ASCT in children with high-risk neuroblastoma.

  18. Consolidation Radiotherapy in Primary Central Nervous System Lymphomas: Impact on Outcome of Different Fields and Doses in Patients in Complete Remission After Upfront Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreri, Andres Jose Maria; Verona, Chiara; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Chiara, Anna; Perna, Lucia; Villa, Eugenio; Reni, Michele

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Avoidance radiotherapy or reduction of irradiation doses in patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) in complete remission (CR) after high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX)-based chemotherapy has been proposed to minimize the neurotoxicity risk. Nevertheless, no study has focused on the survival impact of radiation parameters, as far as we know, and the optimal radiation schedule remains to be defined. Methods and Materials: The impact on outcome and neurologic performance of different radiation fields and doses was assessed in 33 patients with PCNSL who achieved CR after MTX-containing chemotherapy and were referred to consolidation whole-brain irradiation (WBRT). Patterns of relapse were analyzed on computed tomography-guided treatment planning, and neurologic impairment was assessed by the Mini Mental Status Examination. Results: At a median follow-up of 50 months, 21 patients are relapse-free (5-year failure-free survival [FFS], 51%). WBRT doses {>=}40 Gy were not associated with improved disease control in comparison with a WBRT dose of 30 to 36 Gy (relapse rate, 46% vs. 30%; 5-year FFS, 51% vs. 50%; p = 0.26). Disease control was not significantly different between patients irradiated to the tumor bed with 45 to 54 Gy or with 36 to 44 Gy, with a 5-year FFS of 35% and 44% (p = 0.43), respectively. Twenty patients are alive (5-year overall survival, 54%); WB and tumor bed doses did not have an impact on survival. Impairment as assessed by the Mini Mental Status Examination was significantly more common in patients treated with a WBRT dose {>=}40 Gy. Conclusion: Consolidation with WBRT 36 Gy is advisable in patients with PCNSL in CR after HD-MTX-based chemotherapy. Higher doses do not change the outcome and could increase the risk of neurotoxicity.

  19. Long-Term Prognostic Significance of Extent of Rectal Cancer Response to Preoperative Radiation and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ruo, Leyo; Tickoo, Satish; Klimstra, David S.; Minsky, Bruce D.; Saltz, Leonard; Mazumdar, Madhu; Paty, Philip B.; Wong, W. Douglas; Larson, Steven M.; Cohen, Alfred M.; Guillem, Jose G.

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine whether selected clinicopathologic factors, including the extent of pathologic response to preoperative radiation and chemotherapy (RT ± chemo), have an impact on long-term recurrence-free survival (RFS) in patients with locally advanced primary rectal cancer after optimal multimodality therapy. Summary Background Data Although complete pathologic response to preoperative RT ± chemo has been detected in up to 30% of rectal cancers, its significance on long-term outcome has not been widely reported. Previous retrospective studies evaluating clinical outcome in patients with complete or near-complete pathologic response documented good prognosis in this population but were limited by median follow-up in the range of 2 to 3 years. Methods Sixty-nine patients with locally advanced (T3–4 and/or N1) primary rectal cancer were prospectively identified. All were treated at one institution with preoperative RT to the pelvis (at least 4,500 cGy). Forty patients received concurrent preoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy and 27 received both pre- and postoperative chemotherapy. Patients underwent resection 4 to 7 weeks after completion of RT. TNM stage, angiolymphatic or perineural invasion, and extent of response to preoperative RT ± chemo were determined by pathologic evaluation. Adverse pathologic features were defined as the presence of angiolymphatic and/or perineural invasion. RFS at 5 years was determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results With a median follow-up of 69 months, 5-year RFS was 79%. RFS was significantly worse for patients with aggressive pathologic features and positive nodal status identified in the postirradiated surgical specimen. Risk ratios for RFS were 3.68 for the presence of aggressive pathologic features and 4.64 for node-positive rectal cancers. In patients with greater than 95% rectal cancer response to preoperative RT ± chemo, only one patient has died as a consequence of cancer, another has died of an

  20. Phase I dose-escalation study of docetaxel, nedaplatin, and 5-fluorouracil combination chemotherapy in patients with advanced esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Sohda, Makoto; Tanaka, Naritaka; Suzuki, Shigemasa; Ieta, Keisuke; Sakai, Makoto; Sano, Akihiko; Yokobori, Takehiko; Inose, Takanori; Nakajima, Masanobu; Fukuchi, Minoru; Ojima, Hitoshi; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2013-04-01

    More effective protocols are needed for unresectable and recurrent esophageal cancer. Therefore, we conducted a phase I trial to establish the recommended dose of docetaxel, nedaplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (DNF) as combination chemotherapy. Fourteen patients with esophageal cancer were enrolled and received DNF combination therapy at different dose levels according to the treatment and examination plan. Dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) included febrile neutropenia. DLTs occurred in 3/5 patients at level 4. The recommended doses (level 3) of DNF were 60 mg/m(2) (day 1), 70 mg/m(2) (day 1), and 700 mg/m(2) (days 1-5), respectively, given at 3-week intervals. In conclusion, DNF combined chemotherapy for advanced esophageal cancer was associated with relatively minor adverse events and was safely administered at the recommended dose. A phase II study is now underway.

  1. A non-comparative phase II study of dose intensive chemotherapy with doxorubicin and ifosfamide followed by high dose ICE consolidation with PBSCT in non-resectable, high grade, adult type soft tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Jörg Thomas; Horger, M; Kluba, T; Königsrainer, A; de Zwart, P; von Weyhern, C Hann; Eckert, F; Budach, W; Bokemeyer, C

    2013-12-01

    The objective was to determine the role of dose intensive induction chemotherapy in patients with soft tissue sarcomas (STS) that were considered unresectable. Treatment consisted of 2-3 cycles of doxorubicin (Dox) and ifosfamide (Ifo) followed by high dose chemotherapy with ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide (HD-ICE) plus peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). 30 out of 631 consecutive patients, median age 46 years (21-62), with high grade STS were included. 29 patients completed at least 2 cycles of Dox/Ifo. HD-ICE was withheld because of progressive disease (PD) in 5 patients, neurotoxicity in 6 cases, insufficient peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization, complete remission (CR) and refusal in 1 patient each. HD-ICE was associated with non-haematological grade III toxicity including emesis, mucositis, fever, neurotoxicity, and transaminase level elevation. Two additional patients attained a partial response after HD-ICE. Overall, 24 of 30 (80%) patients underwent surgery, with complete tumor resections in 19 patients (63% of all patients, 79% of the operated subgroup); however, 2 of these required amputation. After a median follow up period of 50 months in surviving patients (range, 26-120), 5-year PFS and OS rates were 39% and 48%, respectively. Induction chemotherapy plus consolidation HD-ICE is generally feasible, but is associated with significant neurotoxicity. The advantage of HD-ICE over conventional dose chemotherapy plus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in non-resectable disease remains unproven.

  2. Feasibility of sequential high-dose chemotherapy in advanced pediatric solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Seung Yeon; Won, Sung Chul; Han, Jung Woo; Shin, Yoon Jung; Lyu, Chuhl Joo

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and tumor response of 3 cycles of sequential high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) in advanced pediatric solid tumor patients. Medical records of 11 children who underwent 2 consequent courses of reduced conditioning HDCT followed by final HDCT with autologous HSC infusion were reviewed in a retrospective manner. Each median time to an absolute neutrophil count > 0.5 x 10(9)/L was 12, 13, and 12 days. Major toxic reactions were fever, infection, and vomiting. One patient experienced transplantation-related mortality. Nine patients showed complete and partial responses to the therapy at 6 months follow-up after final HDCT. Finally, 6 patients are alive without evidence of disease at median follow-up of 24 months. Even though it is a preliminary result, the authors think that this treatment could be a feasible treatment option for advanced pediatric solid tumor patients.

  3. High-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue in children with nephroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kremens, B; Gruhn, B; Klingebiel, T; Hasan, C; Laws, H-J; Koscielniak, E; Hero, B; Selle, B; Niemeyer, C; Finckenstein, F G; Schulz, A; Wawer, A; Zintl, F; Graf, N

    2002-12-01

    Children with Wilms tumor who have a particular risk of failure at relapse or at primary diagnosis were treated with high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and autologous peripheral blood stem cell rescue in order to improve their probability of survival. From April 1992 to December 1998, 23 evaluable patients received HDC within the German Cooperative Wilms Tumor Studies. Nineteen were given melphalan, etoposide and carboplatin (MEC); the others received different regimens. The dose of carboplatin was adjusted according to renal function. Indications for HDC were high-risk relapse in 20 patients, bone metastases in two patients and no response in one patient. Fourteen of 23 patients are alive after a median observation time of 41 months, 11 of 14 in continuous complete remission, three in CR after relapse post HDC. The estimated survival and event-free survival for these patients are 60.9% and 48.2%. Twelve children relapsed after HDC; nine of them died within 12 months and three are surviving from 20 to 33 months after relapse. The main toxicities were hematologic, mucositis and renal (tubular dysfunction; intermittent hemodialysis in one patient). There were no toxic deaths. About half of the children suffering from Wilms tumor with very unfavorable prognostic factors survive disease-free after HDC for over 3 years. Besides hematological toxicity, mucositis and infections, renal function is at risk during HDC. With dose adjustment on glomerular filtration rate, however, no permanent renal failure was observed. PMID:12476282

  4. Different doses of prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Stanworth, Simon; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Murphy, Michael F; Tinmouth, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine whether different doses of prophylactic platelet transfusions (platelet transfusions given to prevent bleeding) affect their efficacy and safety in preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after chemotherapy with or without stem cell transplantation. PMID:25722652

  5. Effects of exercise dose and type on sleep quality in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy: a multicenter randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Courneya, Kerry S; Segal, Roanne J; Mackey, John R; Gelmon, Karen; Friedenreich, Christine M; Yasui, Yutaka; Reid, Robert D; Jespersen, Diana; Cook, Diane; Proulx, Carolyn; Trinh, Linda; Dolan, Lianne B; Wooding, Evyanne; Forbes, Cynthia C; McKenzie, Donald C

    2014-04-01

    To examine the effects of different doses and types of exercise on sleep quality in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. A multicenter trial in Canada randomized 301 breast cancer patients between 2008 and 2011 to thrice weekly, supervised exercise during chemotherapy consisting of either a standard dose of 25-30 min of aerobic exercise (STAN; n = 96), a higher dose of 50-60 min of aerobic exercise (HIGH; n = 101), or a combined dose of 50-60 min of aerobic and resistance exercise (COMB; n = 104). The secondary sleep outcomes in the trial were assessed by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) at baseline, twice during chemotherapy, and postchemotherapy. We analyzed the global PSQI and the component scores. Repeated measures analyses of variance indicated that the HIGH group was statistically superior to the STAN group for global sleep quality (mean group difference = -0.90; 95 % CI -0.05 to -1.76; p = 0.039) as well as subjective sleep quality (p = 0.028) and sleep latency (p = 0.049). The COMB group was borderline statistically superior to the STAN group for global sleep quality (mean group difference = -0.76; 95 % CI +0.11 to -1.62; p = 0.085) as well as sleep duration (p = 0.051); and statistically superior for sleep efficiency (p = 0.040), and percentage of poor sleepers (p = 0.045). Compared to a standard volume of aerobic exercise, higher volumes of both aerobic and combined exercise improved some aspects of sleep quality during breast cancer chemotherapy. Exercise may be an attractive option to manage sleep dysfunction in cancer patients during chemotherapy.

  6. Megatherapy combining I(131) metaiodobenzylguanidine and high-dose chemotherapy with haematopoietic progenitor cell rescue for neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Miano, M; Garaventa, A; Pizzitola, M R; Piccolo, M S; Dallorso, S; Villavecchia, G P; Bertolazzi, C; Cabria, M; De Bernardi, B

    2001-03-01

    Despite the use of aggressive chemotherapy, stage 4 high risk neuroblastoma still has very poor prognosis which is estimated at 25%. Metabolic radiotherapy with I(131) MIBG appears a feasible option to enhance the effects of chemotherapy. Seventeen patients having MIBG-positive residual disease received 4.1-11.1 mCi/kg of I(131) MIBG 7-10 days before initiating the high-dose chemotherapy cycle consisting of busulphan 16 mg/kg and melphalan 140 mg/m(2) followed by PBSC infusion. We compared the toxicity in these patients to that seen in 15 control subjects with neuroblastoma who underwent a PBSC transplant without MIBG therapy. We observed greater toxic involvement of the gastrointestinal system in children treated with I(131) MIBG: grade 2 or 3 mucositis developed in 13/17 patients treated with I(131) MIBG and in 9/15 treated without it. Grade 1-2 gastrointestinal toxicity occurred in 12/17 children given MIBG and in 5/15 of the controls. One child receiving I(131) MIBG developed transient interstitial pneumonia. Another child who also received I(131) MIBG after PBSC rescue developed fatal pneumonia after the third course of metabolic radiotherapy. Our experience indicates that MIBG can be included in the high-dose chemotherapy regimens followed by PBSC rescue for children with residual neuroblastoma taking up MIBG. Attention should be paid to avoiding lung complications. Prospective studies are needed to demonstrate the real efficacy of this treatment.

  7. Metronomic chemotherapy: an attractive alternative to maximum tolerated dose therapy that can activate anti-tumor immunity and minimize therapeutic resistance.

    PubMed

    Kareva, Irina; Waxman, David J; Lakka Klement, Giannoula

    2015-03-28

    The administration of chemotherapy at reduced doses given at regular, frequent time intervals, termed 'metronomic' chemotherapy, presents an alternative to standard maximal tolerated dose (MTD) chemotherapy. The primary target of metronomic chemotherapy was originally identified as endothelial cells supporting the tumor vasculature, and not the tumor cells themselves, consistent with the emerging concept of cancer as a systemic disease involving both tumor cells and their microenvironment. While anti-angiogenesis is an important mechanism of action of metronomic chemotherapy, other mechanisms, including activation of anti-tumor immunity and a decrease in acquired therapeutic resistance, have also been identified. Here we present evidence supporting a mechanistic explanation for the improved activity of cancer chemotherapy when administered on a metronomic, rather than an MTD schedule and discuss the implications of these findings for further translation into the clinic.

  8. Role of Maintenance Therapy after High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Aggressive Lymphomas: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Taverna, Josephine A; Yun, Seongseok; Jonnadula, Jayasree; Saleh, Ahlam; Riaz, Irbaz Bin; Abraham, Ivo; Yeager, Andrew M; Persky, Daniel O; McBride, Ali; Haldar, Subrata; Anwer, Faiz

    2016-07-01

    Significant uncertainty exists in regard to the efficacy of maintenance therapy after high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) as well as autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for the treatment of patients with aggressive lymphoma. A systematic review was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of post-ASCT maintenance therapy in patients with relapsed/refractory lymphoma. A comprehensive literature search yielded 4476 studies and a total of 42 studies (11 randomized controlled trials [RCT], 9 retrospective comparative studies, and 22 single-arm studies) were included in the systematic review. There was significant heterogeneity in study design, chemotherapeutic regimens, post-ASCT maintenance strategies, patient enrollment criteria, and study endpoints. Our findings suggest that post-ASCT maintenance immune-targeting strategies, including PD-1/PD-L1 blocking antibodies, rituximab, and brentuximab, may improve progression-free survival but not overall survival. Collectively, the results indicate a need for testing new strategies with well-designed and adequately powered RCTs to better address the role of post-ASCT maintenance in relapsed/refractory lymphomas.

  9. Randomized trial of loperamide versus dose escalation of octreotide acetate for chemotherapy-induced diarrhea in bone marrow transplant and leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Geller, R B; Gilmore, C E; Dix, S P; Lin, L S; Topping, D L; Davidson, T G; Holland, H K; Wingard, J R

    1995-11-01

    This study compares maximal daily doses of loperamide to escalating doses of continuous intravenous (CI) octreotide acetate in bone marrow transplant (BMT) and leukemia patients. Following chemotherapy, BMT and leukemia patients who developed > or = 600 ml of stool volume in a 24-hr period were randomized to receive loperamide 4 mg po q6h or octreotide 150 micrograms mixed in hyperalimentation solution or normal saline and administered CI. Patients were assessed at 48 hr intervals for decrease in stool volume from baseline. Complete response (CR) was defined as > or = 50% from baseline stool volume (BSV). Patients receiving octreotide who did not achieve a CR at 48 hr were dose escalated by doubling the dose to a maximum of 2,400 micrograms with evaluations at 48 hr intervals. Patients receiving loperamide who did not achieve a CR at 48 hr had treatment discontinued. A total of 36 patients were enrolled in the study. Of these, all were evaluable for intention to treat, and 31 were evaluable for initial response. Based on intent to treat at the initial 48 hr, patients receiving loperamide had a higher complete response rate (86% vs. 45%, P = 0.033) than did those who received octreotide. By treatment analysis (patients who actually received the drug), patients receiving loperamide had a higher complete response rate (92% vs. 56%, P = 0.0448) than did those who received octreotide at the 150 micrograms dosage level. Additional octreotide patients eventually achieved a CR at a higher dosage level (78%). Loperamide at maximal doses of 4 mg po q6h is more effective than octreotide 150 micrograms CI in treating diarrhea following chemotherapy in BMT and leukemia patients. Higher doses of octreotide may be required in a significant number of patients not responding to lower doses.

  10. Pre-transplant (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-based survival model in patients with aggressive lymphoma undergoing high-dose chemotherapy and autologous SCT.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, S; Al-Sugair, A S; Abouzied, M; Alkadhi, Y; Dingle, M; Abdelsalam, M; Soudy, H; Darwish, A; Eltigani, A; Elhassan, T A M; Nabil-Ahmed, M; Maghfoor, I

    2013-04-01

    (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) documented response after salvage chemotherapy has been reported to impact survival in patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, especially diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) undergoing high dose chemotherapy and autologous SCT (HDC auto-SCT). We reviewed the impact of 19 different prognostic/predictive factors before salvage chemotherapy and post-salvage chemotherapy FDG-PET results in patients with aggressive lymphoma and developed an FDG-PET integrated model for post-HDC auto-SCT outcome. The Fine and Gray method for competing risk analysis and a regression model was used to assess the risk associated with different factors on outcome. Fifty-five patients had FDG-PET after salvage chemotherapy; male 65%, female 45%, relapsed 55%, refractory 45%, DLBCL 82%, T cell lymphoma 18%, median age at auto-SCT 40 years, median follow-up 42.4 months. Multivariate analysis identified only positive FDG-PET (P=0.04) and mediastinal involvement (P=0.05) with higher hazard rate of disease-specific death (model P=0.008) but only positive FDG-PET (P=0.01) for disease-specific events (persistent, progressive or relapsed disease). Cumulative incidence of disease-specific death for patients with 0, 1 and 2 risk factors was 5, 30 and 62%, respectively (P=0.01). Our model is significant and showed an increasing risk of failure with mediastinal involvement and post-salvage positive FDG-PET.

  11. Is it important to maintain high-dose intensity chemotherapy in the treatment of adults with osteosarcoma?

    PubMed

    Kushnir, I; Kolander, Y; Bickels, J; Gortzak, Y; Flusser, G; Issakov, J; Merimsky, O

    2014-05-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for osteosarcoma is the standard of care, but there is still confusion regarding the best chemotherapy regimen and the optimal intensity. This retrospective study intends to evaluate whether there is a clear correlation between the chemotherapy dose intensity (DI) and the percentage of tumor necrosis, the risk of tumor recurrence after surgery and patient survival. The medical records of all adult patients with localized osteosarcoma that received treatment between the years of 1998 and 2009 at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center were analyzed. We used multiple logistic/linear regression models to test the effect of the neoadjuvant chemotherapy relative DI (RDI) on histological response, recurrence and time to recurrence. A Cox regression analysis was conducted for the effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy RDI, histological response, tumor location, gender and age on patient survival. Thirty medical records were analyzed. Survival, histological response, recurrence and time to recurrence were not affected by the chemotherapy RDI. The 5-year overall survival of the patient's population was found to be 63% with a median survival of 9.4 years. Patients with a good histological response had a longer survival than those with a bad response (mean survival times 11.0 vs. 6.6 years, log-rank test, P = 0.046). High DI is not a prognostic factor in osteosarcoma and maintaining it should not be a prime priority. Histological response is a prognostic but possibly not a reliable predictive factor, and further research is needed in order to find other reliable factors. PMID:24719037

  12. EMP combination chemotherapy and low-dose monotherapy in advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Tadaichi; Nishimatsu, Hiroaki; Hamamoto, Toshiaki; Tomita, Kyoichi; Takeuchi, Takumi; Ohta, Nobutaka

    2002-02-01

    Many chemotherapeutic regimens combined with estramustine phosphate (EMP) have been elaborated for the treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer over 30 years. However, older EMP-based combination chemotherapies with vinblastine, vinorelbine, doxorubicin or cyclophosphamide showed relatively low PSA response rate (25-58%) accompanied with high toxicities. On the other hand, newly developed EMP-based combination regimens with etoposide, pacitaxel, carboplatin or docetaxel demonstrated promising PSA response rate (43-77%) with moderate to severe toxicity in the rate of thromboembolic event (5-18%) and of neutropenia (9-41%). Treatment-related death was less in the latter combination group (5/615, 0.8%) than that in the former group (3/234, 1.3%). Of note, in the docetaxel combination with EMP, PSA response rate is as high as 77% with high rate (41%) of neutropenia but no treatment-related death was observed. Docetaxel combination with EMP seems to be the best regimen, though not completely justified by randomized trials, to be selected in the modern era, which will be followed by paclitaxel, carboplatin and EMP combination with PSA response rate of 71%. In addition, an interim report in 83 patients was presented. They were not consecutively enrolled but were treated on low-dose EMP monotherapy for previously untreated advanced prostate cancer in Department of Urology of Tokyo University and our 21 affiliated hospitals. Overall PSA response rate was as high as 93.4% out of 76 assessable patients. However, overall toxicity rate was abnormally high (39.5%) with drug discontinuation rate of 32.1%. The reason of low drug compliance may be attributed to gastrointestinal symptoms. To overcome the low drug compliance, appropriate patients for EMP administration should be selected by using gene analysis on the basis of sophisticated tailor-made medicine.

  13. Myeloablative Anti-CD20 Radioimmunotherapy +/- High-Dose Chemotherapy Followed by Autologous Stem Cell Support for Relapsed/Refractory B-Cell Lymphoma Results in Excellent Long-Term Survival

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Susanne; Schmidt, Burkhard; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Peschel, Christian; von Schilling, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Background Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has been used to treat relapsed/refractory CD20+ Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Myeloablative anti-CD20 RIT followed by autologous stem cell infusion (ASCT) enables high radiation doses to lymphoma sites. We performed a phase I/II trial to assess feasibility and survival. Methods Twenty-three patients with relapsed/refractory NHL without complete remission (CR) to salvage chemotherapy were enrolled to evaluate RIT with Iodine-131 labelled rituximab (131I-rituximab) in a myeloablative setting. Biodistribution and dosimetric studies were performed to determine 131I activity required to induce a total body dose of 21-27Gy to critical organs. In 6/23 patients RIT was combined with high-dose chemotherapy. 8/23 patients received a sequential high-dose chemotherapy with a second ASCT. The median follow-up is 9.5 years. Results 6.956-19.425GBq of 131I was delivered to achieve the limiting organ dose to lungs or kidneys. No grade III/IV non-hematologic toxicity was seen with RIT alone. Significant grade III/IV toxicity (mucositis, fever, infection, one therapy related death) was observed in patients treated with RIT combined with high-dose chemotherapy. The overall response rate was 87% (64% CR). The median progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) is 47.5 and 101.5 months. An international prognostic index score >1 was predictive for OS. Conclusion Myeloablative RIT with 131I-rituximab followed by ASCT is feasible, well-tolerated and effective in high risk CD20+ NHL. Combination of RIT and high-dose chemotherapy increased toxicity significantly. Long-term results for PFS and OS are encouraging. PMID:23765188

  14. Different doses of prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in people with haematological disorders after myelosuppressive chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Stanworth, Simon; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Blanco, Patricia; Murphy, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Main results We included seven trials (1814 participants) in this review; six were conducted during one course of treatment (chemotherapy or HSCT). Overall the methodological quality of studies was low to moderate across different outcomes according to GRADE methodology. None of the included studies were at low risk of bias in every domain, and all the included studies had some threats to validity. Five studies reported the number of participants with at least one clinically significant bleeding episode within 30 days from the start of the study. There was no difference in the number of participants with a clinically significant bleeding episode between the low-dose and standard-dose groups (four studies; 1170 participants; risk ratio (RR) 1.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95 to 1.13; moderate-quality evidence); low-dose and high-dose groups (one study; 849 participants; RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.11; moderate-quality evidence); or high-dose and standard-dose groups (two studies; 951 participants; RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.11; moderate-quality evidence). Three studies reported the number of days with a clinically significant bleeding event per participant. There was no difference in the number of days of bleeding per participant between the low-dose and standard-dose groups (two studies; 230 participants; mean difference −0.17, 95% CI −0.51 to 0.17; low quality evidence). One study (855 participants) showed no difference in the number of days of bleeding per participant between high-dose and standard-dose groups, or between low-dose and high-dose groups (849 participants). Three studies reported the number of participants with severe or life-threatening bleeding. There was no difference in the number of participants with severe or life-threatening bleeding between a low-dose and a standard-dose platelet transfusion policy (three studies; 1059 participants; RR 1.33, 95% CI 0.91 to 1.92; low-quality evidence

  15. Phase II study of central nervous system (CNS)-directed chemotherapy including high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation for CNS relapse of aggressive lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Korfel, Agnieszka; Elter, Thomas; Thiel, Eckhard; Hänel, Matthias; Möhle, Robert; Schroers, Roland; Reiser, Marcel; Dreyling, Martin; Eucker, Jan; Scholz, Christian; Metzner, Bernd; Röth, Alexander; Birkmann, Josef; Schlegel, Uwe; Martus, Peter; Illerhaus, Gerard; Fischer, Lars

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with central nervous system relapse of aggressive lymphoma is very poor with no therapy established so far. In a prospective multicenter phase II study, we evaluated a potentially curative chemotherapy-only regimen in these patients. Adult immunocompetent patients 65 years of age or under received induction chemotherapy with MTX/IFO/DEP (methotrexate 4 g/m2 intravenously (i.v.) Day 1, ifosfamide 2 g/m2 i.v. Days 3– 5 and liposomal cytarabine 50 mg intrathecally (i.th) Day 6) and AraC/TT/DEP (cytarabine 3g/m2 i.v. Days 1–2, thiotepa 40 mg/m2 i.v. Day 2 and i.th. liposomal cytarabine 50 mg i.th. Day 3) followed by high-dose chemotherapy with carmustine 400 mg/m2 i.v. Day −5, thiotepa 2×5 mg/kg i.v. Days −4 to −3 and etoposide 150 mg/m2 i.v. Days −5 to −3, and autologous stem cell transplantation Day 0 (HD-ASCT). Thirty eligible patients (median age 58 years) were enrolled. After HD-ASCT (n=24), there was a complete remission in 15 (63%), partial remission in 2 (8%) and progressive disease in 7 (29%) patients. Myelotoxicity was the most adverse event with CTC grade 3/4 infections in 12% of MTX/IFO/DEP courses, 21% of AraC/TT/DEP courses and 46% of HD-ASCT courses. The 2-year time to treatment failure was 49%±19 for all patients and 58%±22 for patients completing HD-ASCT. The protocol assessed proved feasible and highly active with long-lasting remissions in a large proportion of patients. (ClinicalTrials.govIdentifier NCT01148173) PMID:23242601

  16. High-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell support followed by posttransplantation doxorubicin as initial therapy for metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    deMagalhaes-Silverman, M; Bloom, E; Lembersky, B; Lister, J; Pincus, S; Rybka, W; Voloshin, M; Wilson, J; Ball, E

    1997-02-01

    High-dose chemotherapy is associated with a high complete response rate and possibly some survival advantage in patients with metastatic breast cancer. We designed a clinical trial consisting of a two-step high-dose chemotherapy regimen followed by posttransplantation doxorubicin as the first chemotherapy treatment for metastatic disease. Twenty-one patients with metastatic breast cancer and no previous chemotherapy for metastatic disease were treated with high-dose cyclophosphamide (Cy; 5000 mg/m2), followed by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. Peripheral blood stem cells were collected. Subsequently, patients received Cy (6000 mg/m2), thiotepa (500 mg/m2), and carboplatin (800 mg/m2) (CTCb) with hematopoietic rescue. Upon recovery of hematopoietic and gastrointestinal toxicity, three cycles of doxorubicin (Dox; 60 mg/m2) were delivered. After Cy, nine patients (45%) developed neutropenic fevers. There were no episodes of bacteremia. Patients received CTCb 37 days after starting Cy and had a hospital stay of 19 days. After CTCb, the median number of days to an absolute neutrophil count >5 x 10(9)/liter was 8, and the median number of days to a platelet count >20 x 10(9)/liter was 9. Neutropenic fevers occurred in 12 patients. There were no hemorrhagic complications. Fifty-five of the 63 planned courses of Dox were delivered. The median time from peripheral blood stem cell infusion to the first Dox cycle was 38 days. The median time to the second Dox cycle was 28 days, and to the last cycle was 30 days. Three episodes of neutropenic fevers were observed. Two patients developed herpes zoster. This regimen is feasible, with acceptable toxicity. PMID:9815672

  17. Randomised trial: survival benefit and safety of adjuvant dose-dense chemotherapy for node-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kümmel, S; Krocker, J; Kohls, A; Breitbach, G-P; Morack, G; Budner, M; Blohmer, J-U; Elling, D

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the survival benefit, safety, feasibility, and tolerability of dose-dense (DD) adjuvant chemotherapy with epirubicin and paclitaxel for women with node-positive primary breast cancer. Randomised patients (n=216) received DD or conventional-schedule (CS) chemotherapy. Dose-dense regimen patients (n=108) received epirubicin 90 mg m−2 plus paclitaxel 175 mg m−2 in four 14-day cycles, then cyclophosphamide 600 mg m−2, methotrexate 40 mg m−2, and fluorouracil 600 mg m−2 (CMF 600/40/600) in three 14-day cycles, plus filgrastim 5 μg kg day−1 as growth support in every cycle. Conventional-schedule regimen patients (n=108) received epirubicin 90 mg m−2 plus cyclophosphamide 600 mg m−2 in four 21-day cycles, then CMF 600/40/600 in three 21-day cycles, plus filgrastim if required. After a median follow-up of 38.4 months, 71 patients (33%) relapsed or died: DD, 33 patients (15 deaths); CS, 38 patients (22 deaths). Dose dense showed a trend for improved disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Four-year rates of DFS and OS were 64 and 85% for DD, and 58 and 75% for CS. All seven cycles were administered to 208 patients (96%). Rates of cycle delay, discontinuation, dose reduction, and adverse events were similar in both groups. Dose-dense sequential chemotherapy with epirubicin/paclitaxel then CMF, supported by filgrastim, is safe and improves survival for patients with node-positive breast cancer. PMID:16622463

  18. Safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability of single-dose fosaprepitant regimen for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Celio, Luigi; Ricchini, Francesca; De Braud, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is a crucial factor in ensuring that patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy can get the full benefit of therapy. Current antiemetic guidelines recommend that the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) antagonist aprepitant should be used as part of a combination regimen with dexamethasone and a serotonin receptor antagonist for the prevention of CINV in patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC). Fosaprepitant is a water-soluble N-phosphoryl derivative of aprepitant that, when infused, is rapidly metabolized back to an active aprepitant. The existing literature in PubMed about fosaprepitant was screened and selected in order to address the emerging data from two randomized clinical trials evaluating the efficacy and safety of a single-dose fosaprepitant regimen. These phase III trials demonstrated that fosaprepitant given as a single intravenous dose of 150 mg was either noninferior to the conventional 3-day aprepitant or significantly superior to placebo for the prevention of acute and delayed CINV in patients receiving high-dose cisplatin. In both trials, fosaprepitant was well tolerated although more frequent infusion-site adverse events were observed with fosaprepitant. The new dosage regimen of fosaprepitant, therefore, would be an option for CINV control in patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy. The clinical efficacy is consistent with the findings from a time-on-target, positron-emission tomography study evaluating the NK-1R occupancy in the central nervous system (CNS) over 5 days after a single-dose infusion of 150 mg fosaprepitant in healthy participants. The single-dose regimen is capable of blocking more than 90% of the NK-1Rs in the CNS for at least 48 hours after infusion, which is sufficient to control delayed CINV for 2 to 5 days after HEC. The new dosage regimen of fosaprepitant can provide a simplified treatment option that maintains high protection while ensuring adherence

  19. [THE TOXIC EFFECTS OF CHEMOTHERAPY ON THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT].

    PubMed

    Sivak, L A; Maidanevich, N N; Lyalkin, S A; Aleksik, E M; Askolskiy, A V; Klimanov, M Y; Kasap, N V

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy in modern oncology is one of the main methods of treatment, along with surgery and radiotherapy techniques. More than 60% of patients receiving chemotherapy at different stages of treatment. Recently, modern chemotherapy has become more urgent personal approach to the choice of drugs and their doses, aimed at reducing the toxicity of chemotherapy. Complications of chemotherapy significantly degrade the effectiveness of the treatment of patients with malignant tumors, because they require lower doses of anticancer drug, or lengthening the intervals between cycles of chemotherapy, which affects treatment outcomes and quality of life. PMID:26118038

  20. Brazilian experience using high dose sequential chemotherapy followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for malignant lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Bruno Kosa Lino; Miranda, Eliana Cristina Martins; Nucci, Marcio; Vigorito, Afonso Celso; Penteado, Francisco José; Marques Jr, José Francisco Comenalli; Oliveira-Duarte, Gislaine Borba; Lorand-Metze, Irene Gyongyver Heidemarie; Pagnano, Katia Borgia; Delamain, Marcia Torresan; Baldissera, Renata; Valente, Isabella Salvetti; de Souza, Carmino Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the use of high-dose sequential chemotherapy in a Brazilian population. Methods High-dose cyclophosphamide followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an effective and feasible therapy for refractory/relapsed lymphomas; this regimen has never before been evaluated in a Brazilian population. All patients (106 with high-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 77 with Hodgkin's lymphoma) submitted to this treatment between 1998 and 2006 were analyzed. Chemotherapy consisted of the sequential administration of high-dose cyclophosphamide (4 or 7 g/m2) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (300 µg/day), followed by peripheral blood progenitor cell harvesting, administration of etoposide (2g/m2) and methotrexate (8 g/m2 only for Hodgkin's lymphoma) and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Results At diagnosis, non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients had a median age of 45 (range: 8-65) years old, 78% had diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and 83% had stage III/IV disease. The Hodgkin's lymphoma patients had a median age of 23 (range: 7-68) years old, 64.9% had the nodular sclerosis subtype and 65% had stage III/IV disease. Nine Hodgkin's lymphoma patients (13%) and 10 (9%) non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients had some kind of cardiac toxicity. The overall survival, disease-free survival and progression-free survival in Hodgkin's lymphoma were 29%, 59% and 26%, respectively. In non-Hodgkin lymphoma, these values were 40%, 49% and 31%, respectively. High-dose cyclophosphamide-related mortality was 10% for Hodgkin's lymphoma and 5% for non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients. High-dose cyclophosphamide dosing had no impact on toxicity or survival for both groups. Conclusions Despite a greater prevalence of poor prognostic factors, our results are comparable to the literature. The incidence of secondary neoplasias is noteworthy. Our study suggests that this approach is efficient and feasible, regardless of toxicity-related mortality. PMID:23049359

  1. Dose-intensified CHOP with rituximab (R-Double-CHOP) followed by consolidation high-dose chemotherapies for patients with advanced diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Daisuke; Miura, Katsuhiro; Nakagawa, Masaru; Ohtake, Shimon; Sakagami, Masashi; Uchino, Yoshihito; Takahashi, Hiromichi; Kiso, Satomi; Hojo, Atsuko; Kodaira, Hitomi; Yagi, Mai; Hirabayashi, Yukio; Kobayashi, Yujin; Iriyama, Noriyoshi; Kobayashi, Sumiko; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Kura, Yoshimasa; Sugitani, Masahiko; Takei, Masami

    2015-06-01

    Even after the advent of rituximab, clinical outcomes of conventional immuno-chemotherapy for high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) remain unsatisfactory. We retrospectively evaluated the efficacy and safety of R-Double-CHOP (R-D-CHOP), consisting of rituximab (375 mg/m(2), day -2), cyclophosphamide (750 mg/m(2), day 1, 2), doxorubicin (50 mg/m(2), day 1, 2), vincristine [1.4 mg/m(2) (maximum 2.0 mg/body), day 1], and prednisolone (50 mg/m(2), day 1-5), followed by consolidation high-dose chemotherapy. This treatment was given to 51 de novo DLBCL patients with a median age of 54 (range 19-65), who were categorized as high/high-intermediate risk by the age-adjusted International Prognostic Index. Treatment was given every 3 weeks up to three courses. The overall response and the complete response rate for R-D-CHOP were 94 and 78 %, respectively. A total of 30 responders proceeded to high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (HDC/ASCT), whereas 16 received high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) alternatively. The 3-year overall survival and the event-free survival for all patients were 78 and 61 %, respectively. Major adverse events included hematological toxicities, but there were no treatment-related deaths during the observation period. We conclude that the R-D-CHOP regimen followed by HDC/ASCT or HD-MTX is a promising treatment option for younger patients with highly advanced DLBCL. PMID:25776837

  2. Dose-intensified CHOP with rituximab (R-Double-CHOP) followed by consolidation high-dose chemotherapies for patients with advanced diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Daisuke; Miura, Katsuhiro; Nakagawa, Masaru; Ohtake, Shimon; Sakagami, Masashi; Uchino, Yoshihito; Takahashi, Hiromichi; Kiso, Satomi; Hojo, Atsuko; Kodaira, Hitomi; Yagi, Mai; Hirabayashi, Yukio; Kobayashi, Yujin; Iriyama, Noriyoshi; Kobayashi, Sumiko; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Kura, Yoshimasa; Sugitani, Masahiko; Takei, Masami

    2015-06-01

    Even after the advent of rituximab, clinical outcomes of conventional immuno-chemotherapy for high-risk diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) remain unsatisfactory. We retrospectively evaluated the efficacy and safety of R-Double-CHOP (R-D-CHOP), consisting of rituximab (375 mg/m(2), day -2), cyclophosphamide (750 mg/m(2), day 1, 2), doxorubicin (50 mg/m(2), day 1, 2), vincristine [1.4 mg/m(2) (maximum 2.0 mg/body), day 1], and prednisolone (50 mg/m(2), day 1-5), followed by consolidation high-dose chemotherapy. This treatment was given to 51 de novo DLBCL patients with a median age of 54 (range 19-65), who were categorized as high/high-intermediate risk by the age-adjusted International Prognostic Index. Treatment was given every 3 weeks up to three courses. The overall response and the complete response rate for R-D-CHOP were 94 and 78 %, respectively. A total of 30 responders proceeded to high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (HDC/ASCT), whereas 16 received high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) alternatively. The 3-year overall survival and the event-free survival for all patients were 78 and 61 %, respectively. Major adverse events included hematological toxicities, but there were no treatment-related deaths during the observation period. We conclude that the R-D-CHOP regimen followed by HDC/ASCT or HD-MTX is a promising treatment option for younger patients with highly advanced DLBCL.

  3. Radiation dose reduction for patients with extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma with complete response after initial induction chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Bi, Xi-wen; Xia, Zhong-jun; Huang, Hui-qiang; Jiang, Wen-qi; Zhang, Yu-jing

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have found that radiotherapy (RT) dose less than 50 Gy resulted in inferior outcomes for early stage extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma (ENKTL). Nowadays, induction chemotherapy (CT) followed by RT consolidation is often used. For patients who get complete response (CR) after CT, whether RT dose can be safely reduced or not remains unknown. This retrospective study compared the survival outcomes between patients who received higher dose (>50 Gy) and lower dose (≤50 Gy) RT after CR was attained by CT. One hundred and forty four patients of early stage ENKTL got CR after induction CT and received RT consolidation. Thirty-one patients received lower dose RT (median 46 Gy, range, 36–50 Gy), and 113 patients received higher dose RT (median 56 Gy, range, 52–66 Gy). In univariate survival analysis, age >60, local tumor invasion, and non-asparaginase-based CT were associated with inferior progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). However, there were no differences in PFS and OS between patients treated with higher and lower dose RT, which was confirmed in the multivariate survival analysis. Furthermore, reduced dose RT did not affect local control rate. Most common RT-related side effects were grade 1/2 mucositis and dermatitis, and the incidence rate of grade 3 mucositis or dermatitis was lower in patients treated with reduced dose RT (9.7% vs 15.0% for mucositis, and 6.5% vs 17.7% for dermatitis). In conclusion, this study found that RT dose could be safely reduced without compromising survival outcomes and further improved RT-related side effects. Prospective randomized controlled trials are warranted to validate our findings. PMID:27713641

  4. Reduced cerebral glucose metabolism and increased brain capillary permeability following high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy: a positron emission tomographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, P.C.; Dhawan, V.; Strother, S.C.; Sidtis, J.J.; Evans, A.C.; Allen, J.C.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Regional glucose metabolic rate constants and blood-to-brain transport of rubidium were estimated using positron emission tomography in an adolescent patient with a brain tumor, before and after chemotherapy with intravenous high-dose methotrexate. Widespread depression of cerebral glucose metabolism was apparent 24 hours after drug administration, which may reflect reduced glucose phosphorylation, and the influx rate constant for /sup 82/Rb was increased, indicating a drug-induced alteration in blood-brain barrier function. Associated changes in neuropsychological performance, electroencephalogram, and plasma amino acid concentration were identified in the absence of evidence of systemic methotrexate toxicity, suggesting primary methotrexate neurotoxicity.

  5. Female fertility following dose-adjusted EPOCH-R chemotherapy in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Gharwan, Helen; Lai, Catherine; Grant, Cliona; Dunleavy, Kieron; Steinberg, Seth M; Shovlin, Margaret; Fojo, Tito; Wilson, Wyndham H

    2016-07-01

    We assessed fertility/gonadal function in premenopausal women treated with dose-adjusted EPOCH-Rituximab for untreated primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL). Eligible patents were ≤ 50 years and premenopausal. Serial reproductive histories were obtained and hormonal assays were performed on serum samples before, at the end of treatment and 4-18 months later. Twenty-eight eligible women had a median age (range) of 31 (21-50) years and were followed a median of 7.3 years. Of 23 patients who completed a questionnaire, 19 (83%) were and four were not menstruating prior to chemotherapy. Amenorrhea developed in 12 patients during chemotherapy. At > 1-year follow-up, 14/19 (74%) patients were menstruating, all < 35 years old, and six (43%) of these patients delivered healthy children. Hormonal assays showed ovarian dysfunction during chemotherapy in all patients with varying recovery at 4-18 months after treatment. Fertility was preserved in most women with ovarian failure confined to patients > 40 years old. PMID:27183887

  6. Clinical analysis and prognostic significance of L-asparaginase containing multidrug chemotherapy regimen in incipient peripheral T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Guoli; Zhou, De; Zhou, Meng; Bao, Changqian; He, Donghua; Li, Li; Zhu, Jingjing; He, Jinsong; Shi, Jimin; Zheng, Weiyan; Cai, Zhen; Huang, He; Ye, Xiujin; Xie, Wanzhuo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical effects and adverse reactions, and analyze the clinical significance of L-asparaginase (L-ASP) containing multidrug chemotherapy regimen in incipient peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted of 102 patients with incipient PTCL who received L-ASP containing multidrug chemotherapy regimens or not in our hospital from January 2010 to December 2013. Complete remission (CR) rate, partial remission (PR) rate, overall remission (OR) rate, progression free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and adverse reactions were compared. Results: Patients who received L-ASP containing multidrug chemotherapy (L-ASP group) had higher OR rate than those who received L-ASP-free ones (non L-ASP group) (83.3% vs 61.7%, P=0.016), particularly those at phase III/IV (82.4% vs 54.0%, P=0.007) and with an international prognostic index (IPI) score of ≥2 (82.1% vs 50.0%, P=0.006). The median survival time (OS) was 10.5 months (range, 1-47months) in L-ASP group, while 13 months (range, 0.3-68 months) in non L-ASP group, and they had no statistically significance (P=0.754). Similarly, the progression free survival time(PFS)was 10 months (range, 1-47 months) in L-ASP group,while 11 months (range, 0.3-68 months) in non L-ASP group, also had no statistically significance (P=0.414). The 3-year OS rate of L-ASP group and non L-ASP group were 48.9% and 65.0% , respectively (P=0.974) and the 3-year PFS rate of L-ASP group and non L-ASP group were 40.8% and 61.0%, respectively (P=0.479). They all had no statistically significance. The L-ASP group had more adverse reactions than the non L-ASP group, though most of them were mild and could be improved by symptomatic and supportive care. Conclusion: L-ASP containing multidrug chemotherapy regimen in incipient PTCL showed a better short-term effect and controllable adverse reactions. A large prospective clinical trial of use L-ASP in first-line treatment of PTCL is worthy of

  7. Systemic interleukin-2 therapy in children with progressive neuroblastoma after high dose chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Favrot, M C; Floret, D; Negrier, S; Cochat, P; Bouffet, E; Zhou, D C; Franks, C R; Bijman, T; Brunat-Mentigny, M; Philip, I

    1989-09-01

    Two children with active metastatic neuroblastoma after high dose chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) received a high dose continuous infusion of interleukin-2 (IL2) 120 days after an autologous BMT for patient 1 and 90 days after an allogeneic non T cell-depleted BMT for patient 2. Usual side effects of IL2 therapy were observed without life-threatening complications or any major hematological toxicity. The reactivation of graft-versus-host disease during IL2 infusion in patient 2 was the major BM-related complication but it improved with IL2 interruption and corticosteroids. IL2 induced a complete remission (9+ months) in patient 1 with the disappearance of bone metastases and local tumor but patient 2 progressed after cessation of therapy. Patient 1 presented with a large excess of circulating NK cells in the period after autologous BMT and IL2 induced a preferential outgrowth of this lymphocyte subset.

  8. Dose Escalation of Total Marrow Irradiation With Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Acute Leukemia Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.; Forman, Stephen; Somlo, George; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy; Radany, Eric; Palmer, Joycelynne; Stein, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: We have demonstrated that toxicities are acceptable with total marrow irradiation (TMI) at 16 Gy without chemotherapy or TMI at 12 Gy and the reduced intensity regimen of fludarabine/melphalan in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This article reports results of a study of TMI combined with higher intensity chemotherapy regimens in 2 phase I trials in patients with advanced acute myelogenous leukemia or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (AML/ALL) who would do poorly on standard intent-to-cure HCT regimens. Methods and Materials: Trial 1 consisted of TMI on Days -10 to -6, etoposide (VP16) on Day -5 (60 mg/kg), and cyclophosphamide (CY) on Day -3 (100 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=3 patients), 13.5 (n=3 patients), and 15 (n=6 patients) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Trial 2 consisted of busulfan (BU) on Days -12 to -8 (800 {mu}M min), TMI on Days -8 to -4, and VP16 on Day -3 (30 mg/kg). TMI dose was 12 (n=18) and 13.5 (n=2) Gy at 1.5 Gy twice daily. Results: Trial 1 had 12 patients with a median age of 33 years. Six patients had induction failures (IF), and 6 had first relapses (1RL), 9 with leukemia blast involvement of bone marrow ranging from 10%-98%, 5 with circulating blasts (24%-85%), and 2 with chloromas. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Eleven patients achieved complete remission at Day 30. With a median follow-up of 14.75 months, 5 patients remained in complete remission from 13.5-37.7 months. Trial 2 had 20 patients with a median age of 41 years. Thirteen patients had IF, and 5 had 1RL, 2 in second relapse, 19 with marrow blasts (3%-100%) and 13 with peripheral blasts (6%-63%). Grade 4 dose-limiting toxicities were seen at 13.5 Gy (stomatitis and hepatotoxicity). Stomatitis was the most frequent toxicity in both trials. Conclusions: TMI dose escalation to 15 Gy is possible when combined with CY/VP16 and is associated with acceptable toxicities and encouraging outcomes. TMI dose escalation is not possible with BU/VP16 due to

  9. Choice of study endpoint significantly impacts the results of breast cancer trials evaluating chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    PubMed

    Ng, Terry; Mazzarello, Sasha; Wang, Zhou; Hutton, Brian; Dranitsaris, George; Vandermeer, Lisa; Smith, Stephanie; Clemons, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Multiple endpoints can be used to evaluate chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). These endpoints reflect the various combinations of vomiting, nausea and rescue antiemetic use in the acute (0-24 h), delayed (>24-120 h) and overall (0-120 h) periods after chemotherapy. As the choice of outcome measure could potentially change the interpretation of clinical trial results, we evaluated CINV rates using different endpoints on a single dataset from a prospective cohort. Data from 177 breast cancer patients receiving anthracycline and cyclophosphamide-based chemotherapy was used to calculate CINV control rates using the 15 most commonly reported CINV endpoints. As nausea remains such a significant symptom, we explored the frequency at which pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical company-funded studies included measures of nausea in their primary study endpoint. CINV control rates ranged from 12.5 %, 95 % (CI 7.6-17.4 %) for total control (no vomiting, no nausea and no rescue medication) in the overall period to 77.4 %, 95 % (CI 71.2-83.6 %) for no vomiting in the overall period. Similar differences were found in the acute and delayed periods. Non-pharmaceutical company-funded trials were more likely to include a measure of nausea in the primary study outcome (9/18, 50 %) than pharmaceutical-funded trials (1/12, 8.3 %). The choice of trial endpoint has an important impact on reported CINV control rates and could significantly impact on interpretation of the results. Primary endpoints of studies, including those mandated by regulatory bodies, should account for nausea to reflect patient experience. Reporting of endpoints should be more comprehensive to allow for cross-trial comparisons.

  10. Multidisciplinary therapy including high-dose chemotherapy followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for invasive thymoma.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Ohsugi, Shuji; Takemura, Yoshizumi; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Harada, Hidehiko; Nakagawa, Masao

    2002-12-01

    We describe two patients with invasive thymomas who responded to high-dose chemotherapy followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) combined with surgery and radiotherapy. The first patient was a 42-year-old man admitted to the hospital with chest pain, and the second patient was a 45-year-old man admitted with myasthenia gravis. Both patients had nonresectable thymomas (stage IVa) because of invasion of the aorta, pulmonary artery, or both, and dissemination to the pericardium. They initially received two cycles of chemotherapy consisting of adriamycin (40 mg/m(2), day 1), cisplatin (50 mg/m(2), day 1), vincristine (0.6 mg/m(2), day 3), and cyclophosphamide (700 mg/m(2), day 4) at 3-week intervals. Four weeks later, they were administered high-dose etoposide (300 mg/m(2), days 1 to 5) followed by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) [50 micro g/m(2)/d] subcutaneously to mobilize stem cells into the blood. After two additional cycles of adriamycin, cisplatin, vincristine, and cyclophosphamide (ADOC), the patients received high-dose ifosfamide (1.5 g/m(2), days 1 to 4), carboplatin (400 mg/m(2), days 3 to 5), and etoposide (200 mg/m(2), days 1 to 5) followed by PBSCT. They were administered G-CSF (50 micro g/m(2)/d) after PBSCT, with subsequent rapid recovery of neutrophil and platelet level. The tumors shrank remarkably, and could be excised completely in both patients. Postoperatively, 50 Gy of irradiation was administered. Disease-free status has been maintained for 5 years in the first patient and 2 years in the second patient. Our findings suggest that high-dose ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide followed by PBSCT in combination with an ADOC regimen, surgery, and radiotherapy is very effective and well tolerated in patients with advanced nonresectable thymoma.

  11. Dose intensity and toxicity associated with Taxotere formulation: a retrospective study in a population of breast cancer patients treated with docetaxel as an adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chanat, Cédric; Delbaldo, Catherine; Denis, Jennifer; Bocaccio, François; Cojean-Zelek, Isabelle; Le Guyader, Nathalie

    2015-10-01

    Docetaxel is an antineoplastic drug from the taxane family that inhibits tubulin polymerization. Its brand name is Taxotere. In mid-2010, the formulation of Taxotere changed from a two-vial preparation needing a predilution (T2V) to a one-vial ready-to-use preparation (T1V). The aim of this study was to compare the toxicity profile of these two formulations. This retrospective observational and monocentric study included all patients who received Taxotere-based chemotherapy (100 mg/m) as an adjuvant or a neoadjuvant treatment for localized breast cancer, following initial treatment with anthracycline-based chemotherapy. Patients received either T2V or T1V Taxotere depending on the period of treatment. The main endpoint was the ratio of the dose of Taxotere received to that scheduled (R=docetaxel dose received/docetaxel dose scheduled). The secondary endpoint was tolerance. A total of 97 patients were included: 39 in the T2V group and 58 in the T1V group. The ratio of docetaxel received/docetaxel scheduled was significantly lower in the T1V than in the T2V group (0.83 vs. 0.95, respectively; P=0.028). A higher proportion of patients did not receive the totality of the scheduled dose in the T1V than in the T2V group (28 vs. 8%, respectively; P=0.03). Furthermore, the proportion of patients experiencing cutaneous toxicity was significantly higher in the T1V than in the T2V group (50 vs. 15%, respectively; P<0.001) as well as for neurological toxicity (31 vs. 15%, respectively; P=0.03). The frequency of grade 3 toxicities was higher in the T1V than in the T2V group (50 vs. 8%, P=0.016). The frequency of idiosyncratic toxicities was not affected by the change of formulation (4.7 vs. 5.4%, P=0.98). This study shows that patients treated with the T1V formulation received a significantly smaller dose of Taxotere than patients treated with T2V. In this small retrospective study, no conclusions can be drawn as to why a change in formulation would be associated with

  12. Multi-Institution Prospective Trial of Reduced-Dose Craniospinal Irradiation (23.4 Gy) Followed by Conformal Posterior Fossa (36 Gy) and Primary Site Irradiation (55.8 Gy) and Dose-Intensive Chemotherapy for Average-Risk Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Thomas E. Kun, Larry E.; Krasin, Matthew J.; Wallace, Dana; Chintagumpala, Murali M.; Woo, Shiao Y.; Ashley, David M.; Sexton, Maree; Kellie, Stewart J.; Ahern, Verity M.B.B.S.; Gajjar, Amar

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: Limiting the neurocognitive sequelae of radiotherapy (RT) has been an objective in the treatment of medulloblastoma. Conformal RT to less than the entire posterior fossa (PF) after craniospinal irradiation might reduce neurocognitive sequelae and requires evaluation. Methods and Materials: Between October 1996 and August 2003, 86 patients, 3-21 years of age, with newly diagnosed, average-risk medulloblastoma were treated in a prospective, institutional review board-approved, multi-institution trial of risk-adapted RT and dose-intensive chemotherapy. RT began within 28 days of definitive surgery and consisted of craniospinal irradiation (23.4 Gy), conformal PF RT (36.0 Gy), and primary site RT (55.8 Gy). The planning target volume for the primary site included the postoperative tumor bed surrounded by an anatomically confined margin of 2 cm that was then expanded with a geometric margin of 0.3-0.5 cm. Chemotherapy was initiated 6 weeks after RT and included four cycles of high-dose cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, and vincristine. Results: At a median follow-up of 61.2 months (range, 5.2-115.0 months), the estimated 5-year event-free survival and cumulative incidence of PF failure rate was 83.0% {+-} 5.3% and 4.9% {+-} 2.4% ({+-} standard error), respectively. The targeting guidelines used in this study resulted in a mean reduction of 13% in the volume of the PF receiving doses >55 Gy compared with conventionally planned RT. The reductions in the dose to the temporal lobes, cochleae, and hypothalamus were statistically significant. Conclusion: This prospective trial has demonstrated that irradiation of less than the entire PF after 23.4 Gy craniospinal irradiation for average-risk medulloblastoma results in disease control comparable to that after treatment of the entire PF.

  13. Single-dose fosaprepitant for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting associated with moderately emetogenic chemotherapy: results of a randomized, double-blind phase III trial†

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, C.; Jordan, K.; Green, S. A.; Camacho, E.; Khanani, S.; Beckford-Brathwaite, E.; Vallejos, W.; Liang, L. W.; Noga, S. J.; Rapoport, B. L.

    2016-01-01

    Background To establish the role of antiemetic therapy with neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor antagonists (RAs) in nonanthracycline and cyclophosphamide (AC)-based moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC) regimens, this study evaluated single-dose intravenous (i.v.) fosaprepitant for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) associated with non-AC MEC. Patients and methods In this international, phase III, double-blind trial, adult cancer subjects scheduled to receive ≥1 non-AC MEC on day 1 were randomized to a regimen comprising single-dose i.v. fosaprepitant 150 mg or placebo along with ondansetron and dexamethasone on day 1; control regimen recipients received ondansetron on days 2 and 3. Primary end points were the proportion of subjects achieving a complete response (CR; no vomiting and no use of rescue medication) in the delayed phase (25–120 h after MEC initiation) and safety. Secondary end points included CR in the overall and acute phases (0–120 and 0–24 h after MEC initiation, respectively) and no vomiting in the overall phase. Nausea and the Functional Living Index-Emesis were assessed as exploratory end points. Results The fosaprepitant regimen improved CR significantly in the delayed (78.9% versus 68.5%; P < 0.001) and overall (77.1% versus 66.9%; P < 0.001) phases, but not in the acute phase (93.2% versus 91.0%; P = 0.184), versus control. In the overall phase, the proportion of subjects with no vomiting (82.7% versus 72.9%; P < 0.001) and no significant nausea (83.2% versus 77.9%; P = 0.030) was also significantly improved with the fosaprepitant regimen. The fosaprepitant regimen was generally well tolerated. Conclusion Single-dose fosaprepitant added to a 5-HT3 RA and dexamethasone was well tolerated and demonstrated superior control of CINV (primary end point achieved) associated with non-AC MEC. This is the first study to evaluate NK1 RA therapy as an i.v. formulation in a well-defined non-AC MEC population. Clinical

  14. Pre-transplant FDG-PET-based survival model in relapsed and refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma: outcome after high-dose chemotherapy and auto-SCT.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, S; Al-Sugair, A S; Abouzied, M; Alkadhi, Y; Dingle, M; Abdelsalam, M; Soudy, H; Darwish, A; Eltigani, A; Elhassan, T A M; Nabil-Ahmed, M; Maghfoor, I

    2013-11-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) patients with positive (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) post salvage chemotherapy or before high-dose chemotherapy and auto-SCT (HDC ASCT) have inferior outcomes. We reviewed 21 prognostic factors before salvage chemotherapy (at relapse/progression) and integrated post salvage FDG-PET results to develop a prognostic model for post HDC ASCT outcome. We used Fine and Gray method for competing risk analysis and regression model for risks assessment and outcome. One hundred and forty-one patients had post salvage FDG-PET before HDC ASCT (median age 25.5 years); male/female 55%:45%, relapsed/refractory 43%:57%, median follow-up 33 months. Multivariate analysis identified HL International Prognostic Score 3 (P=0.001; hazard ratio (HR): 3.7 (1.6-8.3)) and post salvage positive FDG-PET (P=0.011; HR: 3.4 (1.3-8.9)) with higher hazard of disease-specific death (model P=0.0001). Cumulative incidence of disease-specific death with 0, 1, 2 risk factors was 7%:29%:52%, respectively (P=0.00003). For disease-specific event (persistent, progressive or relapsed disease), mediastinal involvement (P=0.024; HR: 2.7 (1.14-6.5)), B symptoms (P=0.027; HR: 2.1 (1.09-4.2)) and positive post salvage FDG-PET (P=0.001; HR: 3.3 (1.7-6.7)) were significant (model P=<0.00001). Cumulative incidence of disease-specific event with 0, 1, 2, 3 risk factors was 8%:31%:50%:75%, respectively (P=0.0000006). Patients with higher scores have higher risk of treatment failure. They are potential candidates for newer therapies along with HDC ASCT.

  15. Clinical results of high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in children with advanced stage rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nam Kyun; Kim, Hyo Sun; Suh, Chang-Ok; Kim, Hyun Ok; Lyu, Chuhl Joo

    2012-09-01

    Regardless of improvement in cure of Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), the results in treatment of advanced stage of RMS in children are still dismal. Recently, high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (HDC/APBSCT) has been tried to manage the advanced high-risk RMS patients. We investigated the effectiveness of HDC/APBSCT by reviewing the clinical records of high-risk pediatric RMS patients in single institute database. Over twenty years, 37 patients were diagnosed as RMS with high-risk at the time of first diagnosis. These patients were classified as two groups according to treatment method. The first group was HDC/APBSCT and the other was conventional multi-agent chemotherapy group. Differences of clinical results between the two groups were analyzed. The median age of patients was 5 yr, ranging from 6 months to 15 yr. The 5-yr event free survival rate (EFS) of all patients was 24.8% ± 4.8%. HDC/APBSCT group and conventional multi-agent chemotherapy group were 41.3% ± 17.8% and 16.7% ± 7.6% for 5-yr EFS, respectively (P = 0.023). There was a significant difference in the result of HDC/APBSCT between complete remission or very good partial response group and poor response group (50% ± 20.4% vs 37.5% ± 28.6%, P = 0.018). HDC/APBSCT can be a promising treatment modality in high-risk RMS patients. PMID:22969254

  16. Repeated high-dose chemotherapy followed by purged autologous bone marrow transplantation as consolidation therapy in metastatic neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, O; Benhamou, E; Beaujean, F; Kalifa, C; Lejars, O; Patte, C; Behard, C; Flamant, F; Thyss, A; Deville, A

    1987-08-01

    Among 62 children over 1 year of age at diagnosis, who were treated for stage IV neuroblastoma, 33 entered complete remission (CR) or good partial remission (GPR) after conventional therapy and received high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with in vitro purged autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) as consolidation therapy. The HDC was a combination of carmustine (BCNU), teniposide (VM-26), and melphalan. Thirty-three patients received one course of this regimen, and 18 received two courses. At present, 16 of the 33 grafted patients are alive in continuous CR, with a median follow-up of 28 months. Toxicity of this regimen was tolerable, principally marked by bone marrow depression and gastrointestinal (GI) tract complications. Four complication-related deaths were observed. Relapse post-ABMT occurred most often in the bone marrow. Under this treatment, actuarial disease-free survival is improved compared with that observed under conventional therapy. PMID:3305792

  17. [Clinical study on the inhibitory effect of a 5-HT3 antagonist, granisetron, for nausea and vomiting induced by chemotherapy (CHOP, VEPA, high-dose ETP) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Sasai, Y; Misawa, S; Iwai, T; Tamura, A; Nakazawa, N; Ueda, Y; Kaneko, H; Horiike, S; Yokota, S; Taniwaki, M; Kashima, K; Tsuda, S; Ookawara, Y; Nakao, M; Nakagawa, H; Fujii, H

    1998-04-01

    The antiemetic effect of granisetron on nausea and vomiting induced by cancer chemotherapy (CHOP, VEPA, VEPA-B, massive dose of ETP) was studied in fifty patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. There was almost no difference in the inhibitory effect by regimen, with the rates of perfect inhibition of nausea and vomiting standing at 55.6% to 60%. Nausea and vomiting was perfectly controlled in 60% of 35 patients receiving CHOP therapy. As a part of this study, a comparison was made of perfect inhibitory effect on nausea and vomiting by potency of chemotherapy under the potency scale of 750 mg/m2 of CPA as 1, revealing no significant difference in the rates of complete inhibition as 71.4% for a drug potency of less than 0.8 vs 52.4% for 0.8 or above (p = 0.26). However, it was clear that the higher the dose of chemotherapy, the lower the rate of complete inhibition. The results confirmed the high efficacy and safety of granisetron in the treatment of nausea and vomiting induced by cancer chemotherapy.

  18. Plerixafor on-demand combined with chemotherapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor: significant improvement in peripheral blood stem cells mobilization and harvest with no increase in costs.

    PubMed

    Milone, Giuseppe; Martino, Massimo; Spadaro, Andrea; Leotta, Salvatore; Di Marco, Annalia; Scalzulli, Potito; Cupri, Alessandra; Di Martina, Valentina; Schinocca, Elena; Spina, Eleonora; Tripepi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    To date, no prospective study on Plerixafor 'on-demand' in combination with chemotherapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been reported. We present an interim analysis of the first prospective study in which Plerixafor was administered on-demand in patients affected by multiple myeloma and lymphoma who received high dose cyclophosphamide or DHAP (dexamethasone, cytarabine, cisplatin) plus G-CSF to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). One hundred and two patients were evaluable for response. A cohort of 240 patients receiving the same mobilizing chemotherapy was retrospectively studied. Failure to mobilize CD34(+) cells in peripheral blood was reduced by 'on-demand' strategy compared to conventional mobilization; from 13·0 to 3·0% (P = 0·004). Failure to harvest CD34(+) cells 2 × 10(6) /kg decreased from 20·9 to 4·0% (P = 0·0001). The on-demand Plerixafor strategy also resulted in a lower rate of mobilization failure (P = 0·03) and harvest failure (P = 0·0008) when compared to a 'bias-adjusted set of controls'. Evaluation of economic costs of the two strategies showed that the overall cost of the two treatments were comparable when salvage mobilizations were taken into account. When in combination with cyclophosphamide or DHAP plus G-CSF, the 'on-demand' use of Plerixafor showed, in comparison to conventionally treated patients, a significant improvement in mobilization of PBSC with no increase in overall cost. PMID:24138497

  19. A randomized trial of amifostine in patients with high-dose VIC chemotherapy plus autologous blood stem cell transplanation

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, J T; Vangerow, A von; Fels, L M; Knop, S; Stolte, H; Kanz, L; Bokemeyer, C

    2001-01-01

    This pilot study evaluates the degree of side effects during high-dose chemotherapy (HD-VIC) plus autologous bone marrow transplant (HDCT) and its possible prevention by the cytoprotective thiol-derivate amifostine. Additionally, the in-patient medical costs of both treatment arms were compared. 40 patients with solid tumours were randomized to receive HD-VIC chemotherapy with or without amifostine (910 mg/m2 at day 1–3) given as a short infusion prior to carboplatin and ifosfamide. Patients were stratified according to pretreatment. HDCT consisted of an 18 h infusion of carboplatin (500 mg/m2/d over 18 h), ifosfamide (4 g/m2/d over 4 h) and etoposide (500 mg/m2/d) all given for 3 consecutive days. All patients received prophylactic application of G-CSF (5 μg kg−1 subcutaneously) to ameliorate neutropenia after treatment. Patients were monitored for nephrotoxicity, gastrointestinal side effects, haematopoietic recovery, as well as frequency of fever and infections. The median fall of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was 10% from baseline in the amifostine group (105 to 95 ml min−1) and 37% in the control patient group (107 to 67 ml min−1) (P< 0.01). Amifostine-treated patients revealed a less pronounced increase in albumine and low molecular weight protein urinary excretion. Stomatitis grade III/IV occurred in 25% without versus 0% of patients with amifostine (P = 0.01). Acute nausea/vomiting was frequently observed immediately during or after the application of amifostine despite intensive antiemetic prophylaxis consisting of 5-HT3-receptor antagonists/dexamethasone/trifluorpromazine. However, delayed emesis occurred more often in the control patients. Engraftment of neutrophil (> 500 μl−1) and thrombocytes (> 25 000 μl−1)were observed at days 9 versus 10 and 10 versus 12, respectively, both slightly in favour of the amifostine arm. In addition, a lower number of days with fever and a shortened duration of hospital stay were observed in the

  20. Dose-Modified Oral Chemotherapy in the Treatment of AIDS-Related Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma in East Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mwanda, Walter O.; Orem, Jackson; Fu, Pingfu; Banura, Cecilia; Kakembo, Joweria; Onyango, Caren Auma; Ness, Anne; Reynolds, Sherrie; Johnson, John L.; Subbiah, Vivek; Bako, Jacob; Wabinga, Henry; Abdallah, Fatuma K.; Meyerson, Howard J.; Whalen, Christopher C.; Lederman, Michael M.; Black, Jodi; Ayers, Leona W.; Katongole-Mbidde, Edward; Remick, Scot C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Africa is burdened by the AIDS epidemic and attendant increase in HIV/AIDS-related malignancies. Pragmatic approaches to therapeutic intervention could be of great value. Dose-modified oral chemotherapy for AIDS-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is one such approach. Patients and Methods The oral regimen consisted of lomustine 50 mg/m2 on day 1 (cycle 1 only), etoposide 100 mg/m2 on days 1 to 3, and cyclophosphamide/procarbazine 50 mg/m2 each on days 22 to 26 at 6-week intervals (one cycle) for two total cycles in HIV-infected patients with biopsy-proven non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Results Forty-nine patients (21 in Uganda and 28 in Kenya) were treated. The majority of patients were female (59%) and had a poor performance status (63%); 69% of patients had advanced-stage disease; and 18 patients (37%) had access to antiretroviral therapy. In total, 79.5 cycles of therapy were administered. The regimen was well tolerated, had modest effects (decline) on CD4+ lymphocyte counts (P = .077), and had negligible effects on HIV-1 viral replication. Four febrile neutropenia episodes and three treatment-related deaths (6% mortality rate) occurred. The overall objective response rate was 78% (95% CI, 62% to 88%); median follow-up time was 8.2 months (range, 0.1 to 71 months); median event-free and overall survival times were 7.9 months (95% CI, 3.3 to 13.0 months) and 12.3 months (95% CI, 4.9 to 32.4 months), respectively; and 33% of patients survived 5 years. Conclusion Dose-modified oral chemotherapy is efficacious, has comparable outcome to that in the United States in the pre–highly active antiretroviral therapy setting, has an acceptable safety profile, and is pragmatic in sub-Saharan Africa. The international collaboration has been highly successful, and subsequent projects should focus on strategies to optimize combination antiretroviral therapy and chemotherapy and follow-up tissue correlative studies. PMID:19470940

  1. Low-dose decitabine plus all-trans retinoic acid in patients with myeloid neoplasms ineligible for intensive chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Lin, Yan; Xiang, Lili; Dong, Weimin; Hua, Xiaoying; Ling, Yun; Li, Haiqian; Yan, Feng; Xie, Xiaobao; Gu, Weiying

    2016-06-01

    In our previous in vitro trials, decitabine and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) demonstrated synergistic effects on growth inhibition, differentiation, and apoptosis in SHI-1 cells; in K562 cells, ATRA enhanced the effect of decitabine on p16 demethylation, and the combination of the two drugs was found to activate RAR-β expression (p16 and RAR-β are two tumor suppressor genes). On the rationale of our in vitro trials, we used low-dose decitabine and ATRA to treat 31 myeloid neoplasms deemed ineligible for intensive chemotherapy. The regimen consisted of decitabine at the dose of 15 mg/m(2) intravenously over 1 h daily for consecutive 5 days and ATRA at the dose of 20 mg/m(2) orally from day 1 to 28 except day 4 to 28 in the first cycle, and the regimen was repeated every 28 days. After 6 cycles, decitabine treatment was stopped, and ATRA treatment was continued for maintenance treatment. Treated with a median of 2 cycles (range 1-6), 7 patients (22.6 %) achieved complete remission (CR), 7 (22.6 %) marrow CR (mCR), and 4 (12.9 %) partial remission (PR). The overall remission (CR, mCR, and PR) rate was 58.1 %, and the best response (CR and mCR) rate was 45.2 %. The median overall survival (OS) was 11.0 months, the 1-year OS rate was 41.9 %, and the 2-year OS rate was 26.6 %. In univariate analyses, age, performance status, comorbidities, white blood cell counts and platelets at diagnosis, percentage of bone marrow blasts, karyotype, and treatment efficacy demonstrated no impacts on OS (P > 0.05, each). Main side effects were tolerable hematologic toxicities. In conclusion, low-dose decitabine plus ATRA is a promising treatment for patients with myeloid neoplasms judged ineligible for intensive chemotherapy.

  2. Dose-adjusted Chemotherapy for Untreated c-MYC-positive Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    In this trial, adult patients with newly diagnosed Burkitt lymphoma or c-MYC-positive DLBCL will be separated into low-risk and high-risk groups; those in the low-risk group will be treated with at least three cycles of dose-adjusted EPOCH-R

  3. Trichoderma species fungemia after high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Festuccia, M; Giaccone, L; Gay, F; Brunello, L; Maffini, E; Ferrando, F; Talamo, E; Boccadoro, M; Serra, R; Barbui, A; Bruno, B

    2014-08-01

    We present a case of Trichoderma fungemia with pulmonary involvement in a multiple myeloma patient, who was severely immunocompromised and heavily treated with high-dose melphalan, and underwent autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of proven Trichoderma fungemia, defined by published criteria, successfully treated with voriconazole.

  4. Antiangiogenic agents significantly improve survival in tumor-bearing mice by increasing tolerance to chemotherapy-induced toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Danfang; Hedlund, Eva-Maria E.; Lim, Sharon; Chen, Fang; Zhang, Yin; Sun, Baocun; Cao, Yihai

    2011-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced broad toxicities are the leading cause of the drug-induced mortality in cancer patients. Antiangiogenic drugs (ADs) in combination with chemotherapy are widely used as front-line therapy for the treatment of various human cancers. However, the beneficial mechanisms underlying combination therapy are poorly understood. Here we show that, in several murine tumor models, administration of sunitinib markedly reduced chemotherapy-induced bone marrow toxicity. Intriguingly, in a sequential treatment regimen, delivery of ADs followed by chemotherapy demonstrated superior survival benefits compared with simultaneous administration of two drugs. In murine tumor models, we show that VEGF increased chemotoxicity by synergistically suppressing bone marrow hematopoiesis with cytostatic drugs. These findings shed light on molecular mechanisms by which ADs in combination with chemotherapy produce survival benefits in cancer patients and provide conceptual information guiding future designs of clinical trials, current practice, and optimization of ADs for the treatment of cancer. PMID:21367692

  5. A randomised trial of low-dose/high-frequency chemotherapy as palliative treatment of poor-prognosis small-cell lung cancer: a Cancer research Campaign trial.

    PubMed Central

    James, L. E.; Gower, N. H.; Rudd, R. M.; Spiro, S. G.; Harper, P. G.; Trask, C. W.; Partridge, M.; Ruiz de Elvira, M. C.; Souhami, R. L.

    1996-01-01

    We report the results of a randomised trial in extensive small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) of a novel approach to palliative chemotherapy. A widely used 3 weekly regimen was compared with the same drugs given at half the dose but twice the frequency with the same intended overall dose intensity (DI). A total of 167 patients defined as having extensive SCLC with adverse prognostic features were randomised to receive either a 3 weekly regimen of cisplatin 60 mg m-2 i.v. on day 1 and etoposide 120 mg m-2 i.v. on day 1 and 100 mg b.d. orally on days 2 and 3 alternating with cyclophosphamide 600 mg m-2 i.v., doxorubicin 50 mg m-2 i.v. and vincristine 2 mg i.v. all on day 1 for a maximum of six courses (3 weekly); or treatment with the same drugs but with each course consisting of half the 3 weekly dose given every 10 or 11 days for a maximum of 12 courses. In the 10/11 day regimen overall response rate was 58.9% (95% CI, 47.9-69.2%) with 12.8% complete responses (CR). For the 3 weekly treatment the overall response rate was 44.9% (95% CI, 35.0-55.5%) with 10.1% CR. Median survival was similar in the two arms at 6.4 months (95% CI, 4.9-7.3 months) and 5.8 months (95% CI, 4.0-6.6 months) respectively. Survival at 1 year was 9.9% (95% CI, 5.0-18.5%) and 8.9% (95% CI, 4.6-16.6%). The 95% CI for the difference in survival at 1 year is -7.09% to +9.09%. Haematological toxicity and treatment delays owing to infection were more frequent with the 10/11 day regimen but other toxicities were equal in both arms. Other aspects of quality of life were measured in a small representative cohort of patients using a daily diary card (DDC). There was a trend of improved quality of life on the 10/11 day arm, but there was little difference between the two treatments. The trial shows that a low-dose/high-frequency regimen with the same DI as conventionally scheduled chemotherapy gives similar response rates and survival. This and other modifications of the schedule may offer new approaches to

  6. High-Dose Intravenous Vitamin C Combined with Cytotoxic Chemotherapy in Patients with Advanced Cancer: A Phase I-II Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hoffer, L. John; Robitaille, Line; Zakarian, Robert; Melnychuk, David; Kavan, Petr; Agulnik, Jason; Cohen, Victor; Small, David; Miller, Wilson H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Biological and some clinical evidence suggest that high-dose intravenous vitamin C (IVC) could increase the effectiveness of cancer chemotherapy. IVC is widely used by integrative and complementary cancer therapists, but rigorous data are lacking as to its safety and which cancers and chemotherapy regimens would be the most promising to investigate in detail. Methods and Findings We carried out a phase I-II safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic and efficacy trial of IVC combined with chemotherapy in patients whose treating oncologist judged that standard-of-care or off-label chemotherapy offered less than a 33% likelihood of a meaningful response. We documented adverse events and toxicity associated with IVC infusions, determined pre- and post-chemotherapy vitamin C and oxalic acid pharmacokinetic profiles, and monitored objective clinical responses, mood and quality of life. Fourteen patients were enrolled. IVC was safe and generally well tolerated, although some patients experienced transient adverse events during or after IVC infusions. The pre- and post-chemotherapy pharmacokinetic profiles suggested that tissue uptake of vitamin C increases after chemotherapy, with no increase in urinary oxalic acid excretion. Three patients with different types of cancer experienced unexpected transient stable disease, increased energy and functional improvement. Conclusions Despite IVC’s biological and clinical plausibility, career cancer investigators currently ignore it while integrative cancer therapists use it widely but without reporting the kind of clinical data that is normally gathered in cancer drug development. The present study neither proves nor disproves IVC’s value in cancer therapy, but it provides practical information, and indicates a feasible way to evaluate this plausible but unproven therapy in an academic environment that is currently uninterested in it. If carried out in sufficient numbers, simple studies like this one could identify

  7. Health-related quality of life in outpatients with primary central nervous system lymphoma after radiotherapy and high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Okita, Yoshiko; Narita, Yoshitaka; Miyakita, Yasuji; Miyahara, Ruriko; Ohno, Makoto; Takahashi, Masamichi; Nonaka, Masahiro; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Nakajima, Shin; Fujinaka, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy for primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is associated with a considerable risk of long-term neurotoxicity. The present study aimed to assess the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of outpatients with PCNSL who have received radiotherapy and high-dose methotrexate (HDMTX) chemotherapy, and to determine the factors that cause a decline in HRQOL and interfere with home living. A total of 37 patients were surveyed 0.9–14.2 years after their initial diagnosis and treatment. Each patient completed a multi-part HRQOL questionnaire that was used to examine the associations of HRQOL scores with leukoencephalopathy, Karnofsky performance status (KPS) scores, age, history of recurrence and HDMTX-based chemoradiotherapy. The results demonstrated that the history of recurrence, number of cycles of MTX chemotherapy and age affected the development of leukoencephalopathy. Reductions in KPS score were associated with a history of recurrence (P=0.03), but not with leukoencephalopathy (P=0.8). KPS score, leukoencephalopathy and age were significantly associated with a decline in HRQOL score. A decline in the HRQOL associated with a reduction in KPS score was also observed by multivariate analyses. Deterioration of the HRQOL among outpatients with PCNSL post-chemoradiotherapy was significantly associated with older age (≥66 years) and decreased KPS score. Older patients with a history of recurrence had a higher risk for deteriorated QOL due to development of leukoencephalopathy. Therefore, it is recommended that clinicians monitor the KPS score among outpatients with PCNSL. QOL examination for older patients with a lower KPS score was found to be particularly important for identifying any obstacles for home living.

  8. Health-related quality of life in outpatients with primary central nervous system lymphoma after radiotherapy and high-dose methotrexate chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Okita, Yoshiko; Narita, Yoshitaka; Miyakita, Yasuji; Miyahara, Ruriko; Ohno, Makoto; Takahashi, Masamichi; Nonaka, Masahiro; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Nakajima, Shin; Fujinaka, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Chemoradiotherapy for primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is associated with a considerable risk of long-term neurotoxicity. The present study aimed to assess the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of outpatients with PCNSL who have received radiotherapy and high-dose methotrexate (HDMTX) chemotherapy, and to determine the factors that cause a decline in HRQOL and interfere with home living. A total of 37 patients were surveyed 0.9–14.2 years after their initial diagnosis and treatment. Each patient completed a multi-part HRQOL questionnaire that was used to examine the associations of HRQOL scores with leukoencephalopathy, Karnofsky performance status (KPS) scores, age, history of recurrence and HDMTX-based chemoradiotherapy. The results demonstrated that the history of recurrence, number of cycles of MTX chemotherapy and age affected the development of leukoencephalopathy. Reductions in KPS score were associated with a history of recurrence (P=0.03), but not with leukoencephalopathy (P=0.8). KPS score, leukoencephalopathy and age were significantly associated with a decline in HRQOL score. A decline in the HRQOL associated with a reduction in KPS score was also observed by multivariate analyses. Deterioration of the HRQOL among outpatients with PCNSL post-chemoradiotherapy was significantly associated with older age (≥66 years) and decreased KPS score. Older patients with a history of recurrence had a higher risk for deteriorated QOL due to development of leukoencephalopathy. Therefore, it is recommended that clinicians monitor the KPS score among outpatients with PCNSL. QOL examination for older patients with a lower KPS score was found to be particularly important for identifying any obstacles for home living. PMID:27602217

  9. Nutritional status is superior to the ECOG performance status in predicting the dose-intensity of the GEMOX chemotherapy regimen in patients with advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Cessot, Anatole; Coriat, Romain; Mir, Oliver; Boudou-Rouquette, Pascaline; Giroux, Julie; Durand, Jean-Philippe; Alexandre, Jérôme; Goldwasser, Francois

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of unfit patients calls for better risk assessment prior to initiating anti-tumor treatment. This is a major concern in the prevention and reduction of treatment-related complications. The aim of our study was to evaluate the nutritional status for the risk assessment of patients qualifying to receive the gemcitabine and oxaliplatin (GEMOX) regimen. This single-center, retrospective study examined baseline clinical and biological characteristics in a cohort of 165 unselected, consecutive cancer patients receiving GEMOX. Malnutrition was defined as either body mass index (BMI) <18.5 kg/m(2), body weight loss >10% over 3 mo, or albuminemia <35 g/L. A total of 165 patients (median age 61 yr, PS 0-1: 71%) were studied. Malnutrition was seen in 43% of PS 0-1 patients, vs. 60% of PS 2 and 66% of PS 3 patients (P > 0.05). Median relative dose-intensity was 0.90 (0.17-1.04). GEMOX dose-intensity correlated negatively with loss of baseline weight (r = -0.24, P < 0.02). In patients who did not complete more than 2 cycles of chemotherapy, median PS (P < 0.01), mean C-reactive protein (CRP; P < 0.01), and mean albuminemia (P < 0.05) were, respectively, significantly higher, higher, and lower. Malnutrition is associated with a high risk of early discontinuance of treatment. Systematic basal evaluation of the nutritional status, including albuminemia and BMI, is recommended.

  10. High-dose chemotherapy with carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine and melphalan followed by autologous stem cell transplant is an effective treatment for elderly patients with poor-prognosis lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Martin, Nicolas; Borchiellini, Delphine; Coso, Diane; Gastaud, Lauris; Boscagli, Annick; Saudes, Laurence; Re, Daniel; Gutnecht, Jean; Garnier, Georges; Petit, Emmanuel; Barriere, Jèrôme; Naman, Hervé; Rossignol, Benoit; Thyss, Antoine; Peyrade, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) after high-dose chemotherapy (HDT) increases overall survival when used in relapsed non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in patients under 65 years old. Limited experience is available for older patients. We present a retrospective analysis of 73 consecutive patients aged over 65 years treated for aggressive or relapsed lymphoma by HDT with carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine and melphalan (BEAM) at full dosage followed by ASCT. Patient data were obtained from medical charts from two institutions. Median age was 67 years (65-74). Significant comorbidities were present in 24.7% of patients. The median number of days for grade 4 neutropenia was 9 (5-18). The early treatment-related mortality rate (<100 days) was 2.7%. The estimated 2-year progression-free survival and overall survival rates were 67.2% and 78.5%, respectively. In conclusion, the full-dose HDT-ASCT regimen is feasible, safe and efficient in selected patients over 65 years old.

  11. A phase I/II study of dose and administration of non-glycosylated bacterially synthesized G-M CSF in chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Hovgaard, D; Nissen, N I

    1992-06-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) derived from E. coli was administered to 24 previously untreated patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma following the first cycle of CHOP chemotherapy. Four dose levels were examined, 1.5, 3.0, 5.5 and 11 micrograms/kg and patients were randomized to receive the drug either once or twice daily subcutaneously (s.c.). During rhGM-CSF treatment, the leucocyte counts increased up to 3-4 fold in 20/24 patients, reaching a peak 24-48 (mean 35) hours after initiation of rhGM-CSF. The leukopenic period in cycle one of the CHOP chemotherapy with rhGM-CSF, was shorter than after the course of chemotherapy without rhGM-CSF and also shorter when compared to cycle one of CHOP in the 127 historical controls (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001 respectively). Similar results were observed for neutrophil counts. No effect was seen on platelet counts at nadir but a significant, although moderate increase occurred in the recovery period on days 15 and 22 when compared to control cycles and historical controls. When dose levels were compared, there was only a trend to higher WBC counts at the higher dose groups (5.5 and 11 micrograms/kg) when compared to the two lower dose groups (1.5 and 3.0 micrograms/kg). In the overall evaluation there was no statistical significant difference in results between patients treated s.c. once daily versus twice daily. However when only the two highest dose levels (5.5 + 11 micrograms/kg) were compared, s.c. administration of rhGM-CSF twice daily led to higher leucocyte counts than once daily in the recovery period on day 15 (p < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Immunomodulatory effects of the Agaricus blazei Murrill-based mushroom extract AndoSan in patients with multiple myeloma undergoing high dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation: a randomized, double blinded clinical study.

    PubMed

    Tangen, Jon-Magnus; Tierens, Anne; Caers, Jo; Binsfeld, Marilene; Olstad, Ole Kristoffer; Trøseid, Anne-Marie Siebke; Wang, Junbai; Tjønnfjord, Geir Erland; Hetland, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Forty patients with multiple myeloma scheduled to undergo high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support were randomized in a double blinded fashion to receive adjuvant treatment with the mushroom extract AndoSan, containing 82% of Agaricus blazei Murrill (19 patients) or placebo (21 patients). Intake of the study product started on the day of stem cell mobilizing chemotherapy and continued until the end of aplasia after high dose chemotherapy, a period of about seven weeks. Thirty-three patients were evaluable for all study endpoints, while all 40 included patients were evaluable for survival endpoints. In the leukapheresis product harvested after stem cell mobilisation, increased percentages of Treg cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells were found in patients receiving AndoSan. Also, in this group, a significant increase of serum levels of IL-1ra, IL-5, and IL-7 at the end of treatment was found. Whole genome microarray showed increased expression of immunoglobulin genes, Killer Immunoglobulin Receptor (KIR) genes, and HLA genes in the Agaricus group. Furthermore, AndoSan displayed a concentration dependent antiproliferative effect on mouse myeloma cells in vitro. There were no statistically significant differences in treatment response, overall survival, and time to new treatment. The study was registered with Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00970021.

  13. Relationship of gonadal activity and chemotherapy-induced gonadal damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rivkees, S.A.; Crawford, J.D.

    1988-04-08

    The authors tested the hypothesis that chemotherapy-induced gonadal damage is proportional to the degree of gonadal activity during treatment. Thirty studies that evaluated gonadal function after cyclophosphamide therapy for renal disease or combination chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease or acute lymphocytic leukemia provided data for analysis. Data were stratified according to sex, illness, chemotherapeutic regimen and dose, and pubertal stage at the time of treatment. Chemotherapy-induced damage was more likely to occur in patients who were treated when sexually mature compared with those who were treated when prepubertal. Males were significantly more frequently affected than females when treated for renal disease of Hodgkin's disease. Chemotherapy-induced damage was also more likely to occur when patients were treated with large doses of alkylating agents. These data suggest that chemotherapy-induced damage is proportional to gonadal activity. Further efforts are needed to test whether induced gonadal quiescence during chemotherapy will reduce the strikingly high incidence of gonadal failure following chemotherapy.

  14. High-dose Extended-Field Irradiation and High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Cervical Cancer With Positive Para-Aortic Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young Seok; Kim, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-wook; Shin, Seong Soo; Nam, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Young-Tak; Kim, Yong-Man; Kim, Jong-Hyeok; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy and toxicity of extended-field radiotherapy (RT) with concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy in patients with uterine cervical carcinoma and positive para-aortic nodes. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the results for 33 women with Stage IB-IVB cervical cancer. Each patient had received 59.4 Gy, including a three-dimensional conformal boost to the para-aortic lymph nodes and 41.4-50.4 Gy of external beam radiotherapy to the pelvis. Each patient also underwent six or seven applications of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (median, 5 Gy to point A at each session). Results: The median follow-up period of surviving patients was 39 months. The most common acute toxicity was hematologic, observed in 23 women. Severe acute and late gastrointestinal toxicity was observed in 3 and 4 patients, respectively. More than three-quarters of patients showed a complete response, encompassing the primary mass, metastatic pelvic, and para-aortic lymph nodes. Of the 33 women, 15 had no evidence of disease, 6 had persistent disease, 4 developed in-field failures, and 6 developed distant failures. The 5-year overall and disease-free survival rate was 47% and 42%, respectively. Conclusion: Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with extended-field radiotherapy is feasible in women with uterine cervical carcinoma and positive para-aortic lymph nodes, with acceptable late morbidity and a high survival rate, although it was accompanied by substantial acute toxicity.

  15. Infectious complications in 126 patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Salazar, R; Solá, C; Maroto, P; Tabernero, J M; Brunet, J; Verger, G; Valentí, V; Cancelas, J A; Ojeda, B; Mendoza, L; Rodríguez, M; Montesinos, J; López-López, J J

    1999-01-01

    The effect of an extensive prophylactic antimicrobial regimen was prospectively assessed in 126 patients after high-dose chemotherapy and autologous PBSC. They received ciprofloxacin (500 mg/12 h), acyclovir (200 mg/6 h), and itraconazole (200 mg/12 h) orally until neutrophil recovery. Febrile patients received i.v. imipenem (500 mg/6 h) to which vancomycin and amikacin were added if fever persisted for 2-3 and 5 days, respectively. Amphotericin B lipid complex was further given on day 7 or 8 of fever. Median times for a neutrophil count of >0.5 x 10(9)/l and a platelet count of >20 x 10(9)/l were 9 and 11 days. Severe neutropenia (<0.1 x 10(9)/l) lasted for a median of 5 days in which 72% of febrile episodes and 50% of cases of bacteremia occurred. Gram-positive bacteria were isolated in 30 of 40 episodes of bacteremia, 25 of which were caused by Staphylococcus epidermidis. Clinical foci were the intravascular catheter in 35 cases, respiratory infection in 11, cellulitis in two, anal abscess in one, and neutropenic enterocolitis in one. The high incidence of febrile episodes (94%) and bacteremias (31%) may be due to the lack of efficacy of antimicrobial prophylaxis and the persistence of a 5-day period of severe neutropenia.

  16. Effect of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor on Chemotherapy-Related Neutropenia in Patients with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas-A Phase I/II Study of Dose and Mode of Administration.

    PubMed

    Hovgaard, D J; Nissen, N I

    1991-01-01

    The effect of mammalian glycosylated recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor was investigated in 24 patients with newly diagnosed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in a phase I/II study. All patients received standard chemotherapy with CHOP. RhGM-CSF was administered after the first cycle for 5 days, and at one of four dose levels (2, 4, 8 and 16 μg/kg). Patients were randomized to receive the drug either by continuous intravenous infusion or twice daily as subcutaneous injection. No significant difference in results was observed between subcutaneous administration of rhGM-CSF and continuous i.v. infusion and these patient groups could therefore be combined in the analysis. Administration of rhGM-CSF resulted in a significant dose-dependent increase of total WBC, mainly neutrophils, eosinophils and monocytes. The increase was observed in 18/24 patients, reaching a peak 24-72 (median 24) hours after the start of rhGM-CSF. The CHOP chemotherapy-induced leucocyte nadir occurred on day 12 (mean) compared to day 14 for the 127 historical controls. The WBC nadir values were higher (2.4 ± 1.4) than for historical controls (1.8 ± 1.1) and the leucopenic/neutropenic period was of shorter duration. Following the chemotherapy nadir a more rapid recovery of WBC was seen than in controls. GM-CSF was well tolerated, the side effects were mild and transient, and included myalgias, low grade fever, headache, chest/bone discomfort, nausea, erythema at injection site and superficial phlebitis. The encouraging results of this phase I/II study indicate the need for a prospective controlled study of GM-CSF in chemotherapy of malignant lymphoma.

  17. Anticancer chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Despite troubled beginnings, anticancer chemotherapy has made significant contribution to the control of cancer in man, particularly within the last two decades. Early conceptual observations awakened the scientific community to the potentials of cancer chemotherapy. There are now more than 50 agents that are active in causing regression of clinical cancer. Chemotherapy's major conceptual contributions are two-fold. First, there is now proof that patients with overt metastatic disease can be cured, and second, to provide a strategy for control of occult metastases. In man, chemotherapy has resulted in normal life expectancy for some patients who have several types of metastatic cancers, including choriocarcinoma, Burkitt's lymphomas, Wilm's tumor, acute lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkins disease, diffuse histiocytic lymphoma and others. Anticancer chemotherapy in Veterinary medicine has evolved from the use of single agents, which produce only limited remissions, to the concept of combination chemotherapy. Three basic principles underline the design of combination chemotherapy protocols; the fraction of tumor cell killed by one drug is independent of the fraction killed by another drug; drugs with different mechanisms of action should be chosen so that the antitumor effects will be additive; and since different classes of drugs have different toxicities the toxic effects will not be additive.

  18. [Successful collection of peripheral blood stem cells mobilized by high-dose etoposide for patients with chemotherapy-resistant and/or poor prognostic testicular cancer].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, S; Sugimoto, K; Mikami, K; Watanabe, H; Sonoda, Y; Kuzuyama, Y; Abe, T; Fujii, H

    1994-04-01

    Clinical effects of peripheral blood stem cell autotransplantation (PBSCT) after ultra high-dose chemotherapy were evaluated in patients with chemotherapy-resistant and/or poor prognostic testicular cancer. Four patients with testicular cancer, who had high-risk malignancy, were treated with high-dose etoposide (500 mg/m2 x 4 days) in order to collect peripheral blood stem cells. After the administration of high-dose etoposide, rG-CSF (250 micrograms/body) was administered from nadir state. Blood mononuclear cells were collected using a Fenwall CS-3000 blood cell separator. Fractions enriched for stem cells were obtained by discontinuous Percoll gradient centrifugation and were stored in liquid nitrogen using patient's sera and DMSO. The mean number of peripheral blood granulocyte-macrophage-colony-forming units (CFU-GM) collected by one apheresis was 22.3 x 10(5)/kg body weight. In addition, CFU-GM more than 2.0 x 10(5)/kg body weight could be collected in each apheresis, which was though to be sufficient dosis to perform PBSCT in safe, based upon our previous studies. All the patients were treated by a combination of cisplatin (20 mg/m2 x 5 days), etoposide (100 mg/m2 x 5 days) and bleomycin (15 mg x 3 days). Three patients responded to BEP therapy and obtained a CR, however, remaining 1 patient failed to achieve CR, who was later treated by ultrahigh-dose chemotherapy including carboplatin (200 mg/m2 x 4 days), etoposide (250 mg/m2 x 4 days) and cyclophosphamide (50 mg/kg x 2 days) followed by PBSCT. He responded to this therapy and obtained a CR for 10 months. The results suggested the method was promising for patients with chemotherapy-resistant and/or poor prognostic testicular cancer.

  19. Does the Addition of Involved Field Radiotherapy to High-Dose Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplantation Improve Outcomes for Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma?

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, Shannon; Flowers, Christopher; Xu Zhiheng; Esiashvili, Natia

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the value of adding involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) to patients with relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) undergoing high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and stem cell transplantation (SCT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-two patients with relapsed/refractory HL undergoing HDCT and SCT from 1995 to 2008 were analyzed in a case-control design. Forty-six HL patients treated with IFRT within 2 months of SCT were matched to 46 HL patients who did not receive IFRT based on age, stage at relapse, timing of relapse, histology, and year of SCT. All were evaluated for response, survival, and toxicity with a median followup of 63.5 months. Results: There was a trend for better disease control in patients receiving IFRT. Specifically, 10/46 IFRT patients (22%) relapsed/progressed after SCT compared with 17/46 control patients (37%). Of the failures after IFRT, 70% were inside the radiation field, all in sites of bulky disease. In patients with nonbulky disease, IFRT also resulted in significantly improved outcomes (failure rate 6% vs. 33%, respectively). When stratified by disease bulk, the use of IFRT was found to significantly improve DFS (p = 0.032), but did not affect OS. In addition, IFRT and nonbulky disease were found to be positive prognostic indicators for DFS with hazard ratios of 0.357 (p = 0.032) and 0.383 (p = 0.034), respectively. Grade IV/V toxicities were significantly higher in the IFRT vs. non-IFRT group (28% vs. 2%; p < 0.001), observed only in patients receiving a busulfan-based conditioning regimen. Conclusion: Patients with refractory or relapsed HL undergoing HDCT and SCT have a high risk of relapse in sites of prior disease involvement, especially in sites of bulky disease. The use of IFRT is associated with a lower risk of disease progression in these sites; however bulky disease sites are still difficult to control. Toxicity risk is significant, particularly when busulfan-based conditioning is combined with IFRT, and alternative

  20. Determination of hydroxyl radical production in aqueous solutions irradiated to clinically significant doses

    SciTech Connect

    Sagone, A.L. Jr.; Democko, C.; Clark, L.; Kartha, M.

    1983-02-01

    Decarboxylation of /sup 14/C-carboxylbenzoic acid in aqueous solutions after low-dose irradiation has been used to determine the relative magnitude of oxidation reactions and estimate the hydroxyl radicals produced. The G CO/sub 2/ values determined from these measurements of 0.4 to 1.0 mM solutions of benzoic acid after x-ray doses of 1000 rads ranged from 0.72 to 0.77, in excellent agreement with values reported by authors using much higher doses of radiation. Superoxide dismutase and catalase, known scavengers of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, respectively, did not show impairment of the oxidation of benzoic acid. On the other hand, biologically significant concentrations of phenol and mannitol appear to impair the radiation-induced oxidation of benzoic acid, indicating that the process is secondary to a reaction with OH . . We found that serum and glucose, common cell media contents, are potent OH . scavengers. These observations indicate that the oxidation of benzoic acid can be as a reliable method to estimate OH . with radiation doses of clinically significant magnitudes. In addition, these results suggest that the radiation induced by OH . in cell systems can be significantly modified by the type of buffer used.

  1. Semagacestat pharmacokinetics are not significantly affected by formulation, food, or time of dosing in healthy participants.

    PubMed

    Willis, Brian A; Zhang, Wei; Ayan-Oshodi, Mosun; Lowe, Stephen L; Annes, William F; Sirois, Paul J; Friedrich, Stuart; de la Peña, Amparo

    2012-06-01

    Semagacestat, a γ-secretase inhibitor, reduces formation of amyloid beta peptide. Two single-dose (140 mg), open-label, randomized, 3-period, crossover studies evaluated the effect of formulation, food, and time of dosing on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of semagacestat in healthy participants. The first study (n = 14) compared tablet to capsules. For all formulations, the median time to maximum plasma concentration (t(max)) was generally 1.0 hour. Plasma elimination was rapid, with a half-life of approximately 2.5 hours. Tablet form II bioavailability (F) relative to capsule was approximately 100% (F = 1.03 [90% confidence interval (CI), 0.96-1.10]). In the second study, participants (n = 27) received semagacestat either fed or fasting in the morning or fasting in the evening. No significant change in exposure (AUC(0-∞) [area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to infinity] ratio = 1.02, [90% CI, 0.990-1.05]) occurred with food, whereas maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) declined approximately 15%, and median t(max) was delayed to 1.5 hours. Time of dosing made no significant difference in AUC(0-∞), C(max), or t(max) (AUC(0-∞) ratio 1.01, [90% CI, 0.975-1.04]). No clinically significant safety concerns occurred in either study. Accordingly, semagacestat may be dosed without regard to formulation, food, or time of administration. PMID:21724950

  2. A phase I clinical trial of dose escalation of lobaplatin in combination with fixed-dose docetaxel for the treatment of human solid tumours that had progressed following chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yu; Liu, Yue-E; Ren, Xiao-Can; Chen, Xue-Ji; Su, Hui-Ling; Zong, Jie; Feng, Zeng-Li; Wang, Dong-Ying; Lin, Qiang; Gao, Xian-Shu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of lobaplatin (LBP) when it was combined with docetaxel (TXT) for the treatment of solid tumours that had progressed following chemotherapy was determined, and toxicities to this regimen were evaluated. A modified Fibonacci method was used for the dose escalation of LBP. The patients received TXT (at a fixed dose of 60 mg/m(2)) on day one (d1) and LBP (at an initial tested dose of 30 mg/m(2)) on day two (d2) of a treatment cycle that was repeated every 21 days. Each dose group consisted of at least three cases. In the absence of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), we proceeded to the next dose group, with a dose increment of 5 mg/m(2) between groups, until DLT occurred. The dose immediately below the dose that produced DLT was regarded as the MTD. The 17 patients examined in this study completed a total of 58 cycles of chemotherapy, and a total of three dose-escalation groups (30 mg/m(2) LBP, 35 mg/m(2) LBP, and 40 mg/m(2) LBP) were established. The main adverse event that was observed was myelosuppression. DLT occurred in four patients, including three patients in the 40 mg/m(2) LBP group and one patient in the 35 mg/m(2) LBP group. In total, three out of the four patients in the 40 mg/m(2) LBP group exhibited DLT. We determined that the treatment administered to the 35 mg/m(2) LBP group represented the MTD. Thus, our phase I trial revealed that the MTD for the tested LBP combination regimen was 35 mg/m(2) LBP and 60 mg/m(2) TXT. This regimen resulted in mild adverse reactions and favourable patient tolerance. Therefore, we recommend the use of these dosages in phase II clinical trials. PMID:25435935

  3. Is Intermediate Radiation Dose Escalation With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Stage III Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Beneficial? A Multi-Institutional Propensity Score Matched Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, George; Oberije, Cary; Senan, Suresh; Tsujino, Kayoko; Wiersma, Terry; Moreno-Jimenez, Marta; Kim, Tae Hyun; Marks, Lawrence B.; Rengan, Ramesh; De Petris, Luigi; Ramella, Sara; DeRuyck, Kim; De Dios, Núria Rodriguez; Warner, Andrew; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Palma, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The clinical benefits and risks of dose escalation (DE) for stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain uncertain despite the results from Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0617. There is significant heterogeneity of practice, with many clinicians prescribing intermediate dose levels between the 0617 study arms of 60 and 74 Gy. This study investigated whether this strategy is associated with any survival benefits/risks by analyzing a large multi-institutional database. Methods and Materials: An individual patient database of stage III NSCLC patients treated with radical intent concurrent chemoradiation therapy was created (13 institutions, n=1274 patients). Patients were divided into 2 groups based on tumor Biological Effective Dose at 10 Gy (BED 10): those receiving standard dose (SD; n=552), consisting of 72Gy ≤ BED 10 ≤ 76.8 Gy (eg 60-64 Gy/30-32 fractions [fr]), and those receiving intermediate dose (ID; n=497), consisting of 76.8Gy < BED 10 < 100.8 Gy (eg >64 Gy/32 fr and <74 Gy/37 fr), with lower-dose patients (n=225) excluded from consideration. Patients were then matched using propensity scores, leading to 2 matched groups of 196 patients. Outcomes were compared using various statistics including interquartile range (IQR), Kaplan-Meier curves, and adjusted Cox regression analysis. Results: Matched groups were found to be balanced except for N stage (more N3 disease in SD), median treatment year (SD in 2003; ID in 2007), platinum and taxane chemotherapy (SD in 28%; ID in 39%), and median follow-up (SD were 89 months; ID were 40 months). Median dose fractionation was 60 Gy/30 fr in SD (BED 10 IQR: 72.0-75.5 Gy) and 66 Gy/33 fr (BED 10 IQR: 78.6-79.2 Gy) in ID. Survival curves for SD and ID matched cohorts were statistically similar (P=.27); however, a nonstatistically significant trend toward better survival for ID was observed after 15 months (median survival SD: 19.3 months; ID: 21.0

  4. Parathyroid hormone linked to a collagen binding domain (PTH-CBD) promotes hair growth in a mouse model of chemotherapy-induced alopecia in a dose-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Katikaneni, Ranjitha; Ponnapakkam, Tulasi; Seymour, Andrew; Sakon, Joshua; Gensure, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced alopecia is a major source of psychological stress in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy, and can influence treatment decisions. While there is currently no therapy, PTH-CBD, a fusion protein of parathyroid hormone and collagen binding domain, has shown promise in animal models. Objective To determine if there are dose-dependent effects of PTH-CBD on chemotherapy-induced alopecia in a mouse model. Methods C57BL/6J mice were waxed to synchronize hair follicles; treated on day 7 with vehicle or PTH-CBD (100, 320 and 1000 mcg/kg subcutaneous injection); treated on day 9 with vehicle or cyclophosphamide (150 mg/kg i.p.). Mice were photographed every 3–4 days and sacrificed on day 63 for histological analysis. Photographs were quantified by grey scale analysis to assess hair content. Results Mice not receiving chemotherapy showed regrowth of hair 2 weeks following waxing, and normal histology after 2 months. Mice receiving chemotherapy alone showed marked hair loss after chemotherapy, which was sustained for 10 days and was followed by rapid regrowth of a normal coat. Histology revealed rapid cycling dystrophic anagen/catagen follicles. Animals receiving chemotherapy and PTH-CBD showed decreased hair loss and more rapid regrowth of hair than that seen with chemotherapy alone (increased hair growth by grey scale analysis, p<0.05), and the effects were dose dependent. Histologically, hair follicles in animals receiving the highest dose of PTH-CBD were in a quiescent phase, similar to mice which did not receive chemotherapy. Conclusions Single dose subcutaneous administration of PTH-CBD showed dose-dependent effects in minimizing hair loss and speeding recovery from chemotherapy-induced alopecia. PMID:24710191

  5. Renal Medullary Carcinoma: Case Report of an Aggressive Malignancy with Near-Complete Response to Dose-Dense Methotrexate, Vinblastine, Doxorubicin, and Cisplatin Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Amjad, Ali Imran; Ali, Hira; Appleman, Leonard J.; Parwani, Anil; Dhir, Rajiv; Roy, Somak; Parikh, Rahul A.

    2014-01-01

    Renal medullary carcinoma (RMC) is a rare but aggressive malignancy affecting young individuals with sickle cell trait. Renal medullary carcinoma commonly presents with advanced or metastatic disease and is associated with a rapidly progressive clinical course and an extremely short overall survival measured in weeks to few months. Due to the rarity of RMC, there is no proven effective therapy and patients are often treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. We report near-complete radiological and pathological response in a patient treated with dose-dense MVAC (methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, and cisplatin) chemotherapy. The patient underwent consolidation nephrectomy and retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and had a 16-month progression-free survival, one of the longest reported in patients with RMC. PMID:25215253

  6. Prognostic and Predictive Significance of MYC and KRAS Alterations in Breast Cancer from Women Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Carolina Rosal Teixeira; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Rey, Juan Antonio; Carvalho, Antônio Alberto; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Khayat, André Salim; Pinto, Giovanny Rebouças; Demachki, Sâmia; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex disease, with heterogeneous clinical evolution. Several analyses have been performed to identify the risk factors for breast cancer progression and the patients who respond best to a specific treatment. We aimed to evaluate whether the hormone receptor expression, HER2 and MYC genes and their protein status, and KRAS codon 12 mutations may be prognostic or predictive biomarkers of breast cancer. Protein, gene and mutation status were concomitantly evaluated in 116 breast tumors from women who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy with doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide. We observed that MYC expression was associated with luminal B and HER2 overexpression phenotypes compared to luminal A (p<0.05). The presence of MYC duplication or polysomy 8, as well as KRAS mutation, were also associated with the HER2 overexpression subtype (p<0.05). MYC expression and MYC gain were more frequently observed in early-onset compared to late-onset tumors (p<0.05). KRAS mutation was a risk factor of grade 3 tumors (p<0.05). A multivariate logistic regression demonstrated that MYC amplification defined as MYC/nucleus ratio of ≥2.5 was a protective factor for chemotherapy resistance. On the other hand, age and grade 2 tumors were a risk factor. Additionally, luminal B, HER2 overexpression, and triple-negative tumors presented increased odds of being resistant to chemotherapy relative to luminal A tumors. Thus, breast tumors with KRAS codon 12 mutations seem to present a worse prognosis. Additionally, MYC amplification may help in the identification of tumors that are sensitive to doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide treatment. If confirmed in a large set of samples, these markers may be useful for clinical stratification and prognosis. PMID:23555992

  7. Feasibility of radiotherapy after high-dose dense chemotherapy with epirubicin, preceded by dexrazoxane, and paclitaxel for patients with high-risk Stage II-III breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    De Giorgi, Ugo . E-mail: ugo_degiorgi@yahoo.com; Giannini, Massimo; Frassineti, Luca; Kopf, Barbara; Palazzi, Silvia; Giovannini, Noemi; Zumaglini, Federica; Rosti, Giovanni; Emiliani, Ermanno; Marangolo, Maurizio

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: To verify the feasibility of, and quantify the risk of, pneumonitis from locoregional radiotherapy (RT) after high-dose dense chemotherapy with epirubicin and paclitaxel with peripheral blood progenitor cell support in patients with high-risk Stage II-III breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Treatment consisted of a mobilizing course of epirubicin 150 mg/m{sup 2}, preceded by dexrazoxane (Day 1), paclitaxel 175 mg/m{sup 2} (Day 2), and filgrastim; followed by three courses of epirubicin 150 mg/m{sup 2}, preceded by dexrazoxane (Day 1), paclitaxel 400 mg/m{sup 2} (Day 2), and peripheral blood progenitor cell support and filgrastim, every 16-19 days. After chemotherapy, patients were treated with locoregional RT, which included the whole breast or the chest wall, axilla, and supraclavicular area. Results: Overall, 64 of 69 patients were evaluable. The interval between the end of chemotherapy and the initiation of RT was at least 1.5-2 months (mean 2). No treatment-related death was reported. After a median follow-up of 27 months from RT (range 5-77 months), neither clinically relevant radiation pneumonitis nor congestive heart failure had been reported. Minor and transitory lung and cardiac toxicities were observed. Conclusion: Sequential high doses of epirubicin, preceded by dexrazoxane, and paclitaxel did not adversely affect the tolerability of locoregional RT in breast cancer patients. The risk of pneumonitis was not affected by the use of sequential paclitaxel with an interval of at least 1.5-2 months between the end of chemotherapy and the initiation of RT. Long-term follow-up is needed to define the risk of cardiotoxicity in these patients.

  8. Intracavitary chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Markman, M.

    1985-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic modeling has suggested, and clinical investigations have confirmed, that intracavitary drug administration can result in a much greater drug exposure for the cavity into which the agent is instilled compared to the plasma. Both the safety and the efficacy of several agents administered individually or in combination have now been demonstrated. Several malignancies, in particular ovarian carcinoma and malignant mesothelioma, which remain confined to body cavities for much of their natural history, might be most rationally treated by the intracavitary treatment approach. Early clinical trials have demonstrated significant activity of intracavitary chemotherapy in both of these malignancies. Optimal drugs and dosages as well as appropriate scheduling for the various tumors involving body cavities remain to be defined. Whether or not combination intracavitary chemotherapy will significantly improve survival of patients with malignant disease confined to body cavities must await carefully controlled clinical trials comparing this treatment approach to standard systemically administered chemotherapy. 144 references.

  9. Induction chemotherapy with carboplatin-paclitaxel followed by standard radiotherapy with concurrent daily low-dose cisplatin plus weekly paclitaxel for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ardizzoni, Andrea; Scolaro, Tindaro; Mereu, Carlo; Cafferata, Mara Argenide; Tixi, Lucia; Bacigalupo, Almalina; Tiseo, Marcello; Monetti, Francesco; Rosso, Riccardo

    2005-02-01

    Both induction chemotherapy and concurrent platinating agents have been shown to improve results of thoracic irradiation in the treatment of locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This phase II study investigated activity and feasibility of a novel chemoradiation regimen, including platinum and paclitaxel, both as induction chemotherapy and concurrently with thoracic radiotherapy. Previously untreated patients with histologically/cytologically proven unresectable stage I-III NSCLC were eligible. Induction chemotherapy consisted of 2 courses of 200 mg/m2 paclitaxel and carboplatin at AUC of 6 mg/mL/min every 3 weeks. From day 43, continuous thoracic irradiation (60 Gy in 30 fractions radiotherapy for 6 weeks) was given concurrently with daily cisplatin at a dose of 5 mg/m2 intravenously and weekly paclitaxel at a dose of 45 mg/m2 for 6 weeks. Fifteen patients were accrued in the first stage of the trial. According to the previous statistical considerations, accrual at the second stage of the study was halted as a result of the achievement an insufficient number of successes. Major toxicity of combined chemoradiation was grade III-IV esophagitis requiring hospitalization for artificial nutrition, which occurred in 58% of patients. Other toxicities included grade II-IV fatigue in 75% of patients and grade I-IV neuromuscular toxicity in 67%. Only 7 patients completed the treatment program as scheduled. Eight patients (53.3%; 95% confidence interval, 26.5-78.7%) had a major response (5 partial response, 3 complete response), 2 patients had disease progression, and 1 was stable at the end of treatment. Four patients died early. With a median follow up of 38 months, the median survival was 12 months. A combined chemoradiation program, including platinum and paclitaxel, appears difficult to deliver at full dose as a result of toxicity, mainly esophagitis. More active and less toxic combined modality treatments need to be developed for inoperable NSCLC.

  10. Significant Increase in Salivary Substance P Level after a Single Oral Dose of Cevimeline in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yosuke; Itoh, Hiroki; Amada, Kohei; Yamamura, Ryota; Sato, Yuhki; Takeyama, Masaharu

    2013-01-01

    Cevimeline is a novel muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist currently being developed as a therapeutic agent for xerostomia. We examined the effects of cevimeline on salivary and plasma levels of substance-P- (SP-), calcitonin-gene-related-peptide- (CGRP-), and vasoactive-intestinal-polypeptide- (VIP-) like immunoreactive substances (ISs) in humans. An open-labeled crossover study was conducted on seven healthy volunteers. Saliva volume was measured, and saliva and venous blood samples were collected before and 30–240 min after a single oral dose of cevimeline or placebo. Salivary and plasma levels of SP-, CGRP-, and VIP-IS were measured using a highly sensitive enzyme immunoassay. A single oral dose of cevimeline resulted in significant increases in salivary but not plasma SP-IS level compared to placebo. Cevimeline administration did not alter the salivary or plasma levels of CGRP-IS or VIP-IS compared to placebo. Significant increases in salivary volume were observed after cevimeline administration compared to placebo. A significant correlation was observed between the total release of SP-IS and that of salivary volume. These findings suggest an association of SP with the enhancement of salivary secretion by cevimeline. PMID:23589717

  11. Adjuvant high-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic stem cell support for high-risk primary breast cancer: results from the Italian national registry.

    PubMed

    Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Martinelli, Giovanni; Gianni, Alessandro Massimo; Da Prada, Gian Antonio; Ballestrero, Alberto; Rosti, Giovanni; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca; Aieta, Michele; Secondino, Simona; Cinieri, Saverio; Fedele, Roberta; Bengala, Carmelo; Bregni, Marco; Grasso, Donatella; De Giorgi, Ugo; Lanza, Francesco; Castagna, Luca; Bruno, Barbara; Martino, Massimo

    2014-04-01

    The efficacy of high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and autologous hemopoietic progenitor cell transplantation (AHPCT) for breast cancer (BC) patients has been an area of intense controversy among the medical oncology community. The aim of this study was to assess toxicity and efficacy of this procedure in a large cohort of high-risk primary BC patients who underwent AHPCT in Italy. A total of 1183 patients receiving HDC for high-risk BC (HRBC) (>3 positive nodes) were identified in the Italian registry. The median age was 46 years, 62% of patients were premenopausal at treatment, 60.1% had endocrine-responsive tumors, and 20.7% had a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive tumor. The median number of positive lymph nodes (LN) at surgery was 15, with 71.5% of patients having ≥ 10 positive nodes. Seventy-three percent received an alkylating agent-based HDC as a single procedure, whereas 27% received epirubicin or mitoxantrone-containing HDC, usually within a multitransplantation program. The source of stem cells was peripheral blood in the vast majority of patients. Transplantation-related mortality was .8%, whereas late cardiac and secondary tumor-related mortality were around 1%, overall. With a median follow-up of 79 months, median disease-free and overall survival (OS) in the entire population were 101 and 134 months, respectively. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that OS was significantly better in patients with endocrine-responsive tumors and in patients receiving multiple transplantation procedures. HER2 status did not affect survival probability. The size of the primary tumor and number of involved LN negatively affected OS. Adjuvant HDC with AHPCT has a low mortality rate and provides impressive long-term survival rates in patients with high-risk primary BC. Our results suggest that this treatment modality should be proposed in selected HRBC patients and further investigated in clinical trials.

  12. Long-Term Follow-Up of Dose-Adapted and Reduced-Field Radiotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy for Central Nervous System Germinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Ashley W.; Issa Laack, Nadia N.; Buckner, Jan C.; Schomberg, Paula J.; Wetmore, Cynthia J.; Brown, Paul D.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To update our institutional experience with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and minimized radiotherapy vs. radiation monotherapy for intracranial germinoma. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed records of 59 patients with diagnosis of primary intracranial germinoma between 1977 and 2007. Treatment was irradiation alone or neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy and local irradiation (initial tumor plus margin) for patients with localized complete response and reduced-dose craniospinal irradiation for others. Results: For the chemoradiotherapy group (n = 28), median follow-up was 7 years. No patient died. The freedom from progression (FFP) rate was 88% at 5 years and 80% at 10 years. In 4 patients, disease recurred 1.1 to 6.8 years after diagnosis. All were young male patients who received 30.6 Gy to local fields after complete response to chemotherapy. The FFP rate was 88% for local irradiation vs. 100% for more extensive fields (p = .06). For the radiotherapy-alone group (n = 31), median follow-up was 15 years. Overall and disease-free survival rates were 93% and 93% at 5 years and 90% and 87% at 15 years. In 5 patients, disease recurred 1.1 to 4.9 years after diagnosis. Most patients in this group were young men 18 to 23 years of age with suprasellar primary disease treated with about 50 Gy to local fields. The FFP rate was 44% for local irradiation vs. 100% for more extensive fields (p < .01). Conclusions: The addition of neoadjuvant chemotherapy to local-field radiotherapy reduced central nervous system cancer recurrence when high-risk patients were excluded by thorough pretreatment staging. There was trend toward improved central nervous system tumor control when larger fields (whole brain, whole ventricle, or craniospinal axis) were used.

  13. R-MPV followed by high-dose chemotherapy with TBC and autologous stem-cell transplant for newly diagnosed primary CNS lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Omuro, Antonio; Correa, Denise D; DeAngelis, Lisa M; Moskowitz, Craig H; Matasar, Matthew J; Kaley, Thomas J; Gavrilovic, Igor T; Nolan, Craig; Pentsova, Elena; Grommes, Christian C; Panageas, Katherine S; Baser, Raymond E; Faivre, Geraldine; Abrey, Lauren E; Sauter, Craig S

    2015-02-26

    High-dose methotrexate-based chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), but relapses remain frequent. High-dose chemotherapy (HDC) with autologous stem-cell transplant (ASCT) may provide an alternative to address chemoresistance and overcome the blood-brain barrier. In this single-center phase-2 study, newly diagnosed PCNSL patients received 5 to 7 cycles of chemotherapy with rituximab, methotrexate (3.5 g/m(2)), procarbazine, and vincristine (R-MPV). Those with a complete or partial response proceeded with consolidation HDC with thiotepa, cyclophosphamide, and busulfan, followed by ASCT and no radiotherapy. Primary end point was 1-year progression-free survival (PFS), N = 32. Median age was 57, and median Karnofsky performance status 80. Following R-MPV, objective response rate was 97%, and 26 (81%) patients proceeded with HDC-ASCT. Among all patients, median PFS and overall survival (OS) were not reached (median follow-up: 45 months). Two-year PFS was 79% (95% confidence interval [CI], 58-90), with no events observed beyond 2 years. Two-year OS was 81% (95% CI, 63-91). In transplanted patients, 2-year PFS and OS were 81%. There were 3 treatment-related deaths. Prospective neuropsychological evaluations suggested relatively stable cognitive functions posttransplant. In conclusion, this treatment was associated with excellent disease control and survival, an acceptable toxicity profile, and no evidence of neurotoxicity thus far. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00596154.

  14. Tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation in patients with high-risk neuroblastoma: results of SMC NB-2004 study.

    PubMed

    Sung, K W; Son, M H; Lee, S H; Yoo, K H; Koo, H H; Kim, J Y; Cho, E J; Lee, S K; Choi, Y S; Lim, D H; Kim, J-S; Kim, D W

    2013-01-01

    From January 2004 to December 2008, 50 consecutive patients with high-risk neuroblastoma were assigned to receive tandem HDCT (high-dose chemotherapy)/auto-SCT after nine cycles of induction chemotherapy. CEC (carboplatin + etoposide + cyclophosphamide) regimen and TM (thiotepa + melphalan)-TBI regimen (or TM regimen for stage 3 patients) were the first and second HDCT regimens. Local radiotherapy, differentiation therapy with 13-cis-retinoid acid and immunotherapy with interleukin-2 were given after tandem HDCT/auto-SCT. Of the 50 patients, 49 underwent a first HDCT/auto-SCT and 47 underwent a second HDCT/auto-SCT. The tumor relapsed or progressed in 14 patients, secondary malignancy developed in one patient and one patient died from chronic lung disease. Therefore, 34 patients remained event free with a median follow-up of 54.5 months (range, 14-94 months) from diagnosis. The probabilities of 5-year OS and EFS for all 50 patients were 77.0% (95% confidence interval (CI), 63.7-90.3) and 71.4% (95% CI, 58.7-84.1), respectively. However, all patients who remained event free for >3 years after tandem HDCT/auto-SCT experienced late adverse effects. Chemotherapeutic dose-escalation strategy using tandem HDCT/auto-SCT was very encouraging for survival. However, further studies incorporating newer treatment modalities are needed to reduce late adverse effects without jeopardizing the survival rate.

  15. Treatment of neuroblastoma stage 4 with 131I-meta-iodo-benzylguanidine, high-dose chemotherapy and immunotherapy. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Klingebiel, T; Bader, P; Bares, R; Beck, J; Hero, B; Jürgens, H; Lang, P; Niethammer, D; Rath, B; Handgretinger, R

    1998-08-01

    Disseminated neuroblastoma after infancy has a prognosis of approximately 10-20% with conventional therapy. We investigated the role of high-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) with peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) rescue in combination with 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine ([131I-m]IBG). 11 children with neuroblastoma stage 4 were pretreated within the German Neuroblastoma Trial NB90 and included in a high-dose concept for consolidation. Remission was documented by ultrasound, CT, NMR, or [123I-m]IBG scanning. HDCT was a combination of melphalan (180 mg/m2), carboplatin (1,500 mg/m2) and etoposide (40 mg/kg). All children were treated by [131I-m]IBG (0.58 GBq/kg) prior to high-dose treatment. All 11 children were additionally treated with antiGD2 murine- or chimeric-antibody (ch14.18). 4 children had no change to their remission status but three achieved a complete response (from a partial response to first line) and one a partial response (from no response to first line). The other 3 children progressed, 2 dying of their disease. Using Kaplan-Meier analysis, the probability of progression-free survival was 0.70 +/- 0.15 with a median observation time of 19 months. 9/11 children are alive, 8 without progression or relapse, whilst 2 have died of their disease. The combination of mIBG plus high-dose chemotherapy with PBSC support supplemented by immunotherapy with antiGD2 antibody appears to be a feasible and effective treatment regimen for disseminated neuroblastoma in this limited series. Larger numbers of patients should be treated to confirm these results.

  16. Strategies to eradicate minimal residual disease in small cell lung cancer: high-dose chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, and BEC2 plus BCG vaccination.

    PubMed

    Krug, L M; Grant, S C; Miller, V A; Ng, K K; Kris, M G

    1999-10-01

    In the last 25 years, treatment for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has improved with advances in chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Standard chemotherapy regimens can yield 80% to 90% response rates and some cures when combined with thoracic irradiation in limited-stage patients. Nonetheless, small cell lung cancer has a high relapse rate due to drug resistance; this has resulted in poor survival for most patients. Attacking this problem requires a unique approach to eliminate resistant disease remaining after induction therapy. This review will focus on three potential strategies: high-dose chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, and BEC2 plus BCG vaccination.

  17. Advances in data assessment. Application to the etiology of nausea reported during chemotherapy, concerns about significance testing, and opportunities in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Morrow, G R; Black, P M; Dudgeon, D J

    1991-02-01

    Typical inferential statistical procedures, such as the t-test and analysis of variance, compare differences in mean values of variables. This approach can sometimes obscure rather than illuminate research data. Here we present and discuss alternative data analytic techniques. Potential advantages of box plots over conventional t-tests for understanding data are shown by comparing the area under high and low frequencies from spectral curves of autonomic changes following chemotherapy treatment. Typical t-tests provide information regarding statistical significance in terms of the differences in group means; box plots and related exploratory techniques provide information regarding the characteristics of the distributions within the groups as well as examination of potential outliers. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and other multivariate techniques are commonly used to deal with potentially complex data sets with multiple outcome measures. The potential advantages of visual clustering techniques such as star plots, Chernoff faces, and Andrew's Function Plots are demonstrated by examining changes in facial pallor caused by chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Typical MANOVA approaches can identify potential differences in mean values between groups; visual clustering approaches do this by graphically presenting complex interrelationships for individual cases. This approach enhances the visual interpretation of potential interactions that would be obscured by simply focusing on overall mean values. Preliminary data from a meta-analysis on the effect of metoclopramide on chemotherapy-induced vomiting demonstrates the potential uses and advantages of this summary technique over simple tabular summaries. We found significant relationships between the effect size of the drug and variables such as the year of study publication and whether the publication was an article or an abstract. While none of these techniques are meant to replace traditional

  18. Potential Increased Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease Mortality With Significant Dose Fractionation in the Canadian Fluoroscopy Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Zablotska, Lydia B.; Little, Mark P.; Cornett, R. Jack

    2014-01-01

    Risks of noncancer causes of death, particularly cardiovascular disease, associated with exposures to high-dose ionizing radiation, are well known. Recent studies have reported excess risk in workers who are occupationally exposed to low doses at a low dose rate, but the risks of moderately fractionated exposures, such as occur during diagnostic radiation procedures, remain unclear. The Canadian Fluoroscopy Cohort Study includes 63,707 tuberculosis patients exposed to multiple fluoroscopic procedures in 1930–1952 and followed-up for death from noncancer causes in 1950–1987. We used a Poisson regression to estimate excess relative risk (ERR) per Gy of cumulative radiation dose to the lung (mean dose = 0.79 Gy; range, 0–11.60). The risk of death from noncancer causes was significantly lower in these subjects compared with the Canadian general population (P < 0.001). We estimated small, nonsignificant increases in the risk of death from noncancer causes with dose. We estimated an ERR/Gy of 0.176 (95% confidence interval: 0.011, 0.393) (n = 5,818 deaths) for ischemic heart disease (IHD) after adjustment for dose fractionation. A significant (P = 0.022) inverse dose fractionation effect in dose trends of IHD was observed, with the highest estimate of ERR/Gy for those with the fewest fluoroscopic procedures per year. Radiation-related risks of IHD decreased significantly with increasing time since first exposure and age at first exposure (both P < 0.05). This is the largest study of patients exposed to moderately fractionated low-to-moderate doses of radiation, and it provides additional evidence of increased radiation-associated risks of death from IHD, in particular, significantly increased radiation risks from doses similar to those from diagnostic radiation procedures. The novel finding of a significant inverse dose-fractionation association in IHD mortality requires further investigation. PMID:24145888

  19. Chemotherapy-Related Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Taillibert, Sophie; Le Rhun, Emilie; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2016-09-01

    Chemotherapy may have detrimental effects on either the central or peripheral nervous system. Central nervous system neurotoxicity resulting from chemotherapy manifests as a wide range of clinical syndromes including acute, subacute, and chronic encephalopathies, posterior reversible encephalopathy, acute cerebellar dysfunction, chronic cognitive impairment, myelopathy, meningitis, and neurovascular syndromes. These clinical entities vary by causative agent, degree of severity, evolution, and timing of occurrence. In the peripheral nervous system, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) and myopathy are the two main complications of chemotherapy. CIPN is the most common complication, and the majority manifest as a dose-dependent length-dependent sensory axonopathy. In severe cases of CIPN, the dose of chemotherapy is reduced, the administration delayed, or the treatment discontinued. Few treatments are available for CIPN and based on meta-analysis, duloxetine is the preferred symptomatic treatment. Myopathy due to corticosteroid use is the most frequent cause of muscle disorders in patients with cancer. PMID:27443648

  20. Intensified High-Dose Chemoradiotherapy With Induction Chemotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer-Safety and Toxicity Results Within a Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Poettgen, Christoph; Eberhardt, Wilfried E.; Gauler, Thomas; Krbek, Thomas; Berkovic, Katharina; Abu Jawad, Jehad; Korfee, Soenke; Teschler, Helmut; Stamatis, Georgios; Stuschke, Martin

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To analyze the toxicity profile of an intensified definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) schedule in patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (Stage IIIA N2/selected IIIB) treated within a prospective multicenter trial. Patients and Methods: After mediastinoscopy and routine staging procedures, three cycles of induction chemotherapy (cisplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 1 and 8; paclitaxel 175 mg/m{sup 2} Day 1, every 21 days) were planned, followed by concurrent CRT (accelerated-hyperfractionated regimen, 45 Gy, 2 x 1.5 Gy/d, cisplatin 50 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 64 and 71, vinorelbine 20 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 64 and 71). At 45 Gy, a multidisciplinary panel decision was made regarding operability. Inoperable patients received definitive radiotherapy (total dose 65 or 71 Gy, depending on the mean lung dose) with additional concurrent chemotherapy (cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2}, Day 85; vinorelbine 15 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 85 and 92). Results: A total of 28 patients (23 men and 5 women; median age, 58 years; range 41-73; Stage IIIA in 3 and Stage IIIB in 25) were judged ineligible for surgery by the multidisciplinary panel and underwent definitive CRT (75% of the patients received 71 Gy). The maximum toxicity (Grade 3 or greater) during induction chemotherapy included leukopenia (11%) and anemia (4%). During concurrent CRT, leukopenia (Grade 3 or greater) was observed in 39% of the patients. The maximal nonhematologic toxicity during concurrent CRT included esophagitis (Grade 3 or greater) in 18% and pneumonitis (Grade 3 or greater) in 4% of the patients. At 3 years, the locoregional control rate was 52% (95% confidence interval, 29-75%) and the overall survival rate was 31% (95% confidence interval, 12-50%). Conclusion: This intensified treatment protocol with induction chemotherapy and concurrent CRT, including hyperfractionated-accelerated RT, showed only moderate toxicity and proved feasible. This treatment represents the definitive CRT arm of our ongoing

  1. Impact of high-dose chemotherapy on antigen-specific T cell immunity in breast cancer patients. Application of new flow cytometric method.

    PubMed

    Svane, I M; Nikolajsen, K; Hansen, S W; Kamby, C; Nielsen, D L; Johnsen, H E

    2002-04-01

    The present study analyses the influence of high-dose chemotherapy (HD) and autologous stem cell transplantation on natural and vaccine-induced specific immunity in breast cancer patients. Peripheral blood was collected from five breast cancer patients at serial time points in connection with treatment and in a follow-up period of 1 year. The frequencies of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells responsive to cytomegalovirus (CMV), varicella zoster virus (VZV), and tetanus in antigen-activated whole blood were determined by flow cytometric analysis of CD69, TNF alpha, IFN gamma and IL-4 expression. Mononuclear cells were labelled with PKH26 dye and the CMV, VZV, and tetanus toxoid-specific proliferation of T cell subpopulations was analysed by flow cytometry. In none of the patients did the treatment result in loss of overall T cell reactivity for any of the antigens. Prior to chemotherapy 5/5 patients possessed TNF alpha expressing T cells specific for CMV, 4/5 for VZV, and 3/5 for tetanus. One year after stem cell transplantation all patients possessed TNF alpha expressing T cells specific for CMV, VZV and tetanus. The highest percentages of cytokine-responding T cells were seen after stimulation with CMV antigen. In general, the lowest reactivity (close to zero) was measured in G-CSF-mobilised blood at the time of leukapheresis. In spite of a continuously reduced CD4 to CD8 ratio after transplantation, recovery of CD4+ T cells usually occurred prior to CD8+ recovery and often to a higher level. The study demonstrates that natural as well as vaccine-induced specific immunity established prior to HD can be regained after stem cell transplantation. These data indicate that introduction of a preventive cancer vaccination in combination with intensive chemotherapy may be a realistic treatment option.

  2. Significant impact on effective doses received during commercial flights calculated using the new ICRP radiation weighting factors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Mares, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    This note discusses the significant impact on effective doses received during commercial flights calculated using the new International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) radiation weighting factors. It also provides an update on adult effective doses given in a previous article in Health Physics when the old ICRP radiation weighting factors were used.

  3. Significant impact on effective doses received during commercial flights calculated using the new ICRP radiation weighting factors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Mares, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    This note discusses the significant impact on effective doses received during commercial flights calculated using the new International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) radiation weighting factors. It also provides an update on adult effective doses given in a previous article in Health Physics when the old ICRP radiation weighting factors were used. PMID:19959953

  4. Treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in a rat model by using multiple daily doses of oral administration of G-CSF-containing nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Su, Fang-Yi; Chuang, Er-Yuan; Lin, Po-Yen; Chou, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chiung-Tong; Mi, Fwu-Long; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Lin, Kun-Ju; Sung, Hsing-Wen

    2014-04-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia often increases the likelihood of life-threatening infections. In this study, a nanoparticle (NP) system composed of chitosan and poly(γ-glutamic acid) conjugated with diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (γPGA-DTPA) was prepared for oral delivery of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), a hematopoietic growth factor. The therapeutic potential of this NP system for daily administration of G-CSF to treat neutropenia associated with chemotherapy was evaluated in a rat model. In vitro results indicate that the procedures of NP loading and release preserved the structural integrity and bioactivity of the G-CSF molecules adequately. Those results further demonstrated the enzymatic inhibition activity of γPGA-DTPA towards G-CSF against intestinal proteases. Additionally, the in vivo biodistribution study clearly identified accumulations of G-CSF in the heart, liver, bone marrow, and urinary bladder, an indication of systemic absorption of G-CSF; its relative bioavailability was approximately 13.6%. Moreover, significant glucose uptake was observed in bone marrow during G-CSF treatment, suggesting increased bone marrow metabolism and neutrophil production. Consequently, neutrophil count in the blood increased in a sustained manner; this fact may help a patient's immune system recover from the side effects of chemotherapy.

  5. Treatment of aggressive multiple myeloma by high-dose chemotherapy and total body irradiation followed by blood stem cells autologous graft

    SciTech Connect

    Fermand, J.P.; Levy, Y.; Gerota, J.; Benbunan, M.; Cosset, J.M.; Castaigne, S.; Seligmann, M.; Brouet, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Eight patients with stage III aggressive multiple myeloma, refractory to current chemotherapy in six cases, were treated by high-dose chemotherapy (nitrosourea, etoposide, and melphalan) (HDC) and total body irradiation (TBI), followed by autografting with blood stem cells. These cells were previously collected by leukapheresis performed during hematologic recovery following cytotoxic drug-induced bone marrow aplasia. Seven patients were alive 9 to 17 months after HDC-TBI and graft. One died at day 40 from cerebral bleeding. All living patients achieved a 90% or greater reduction in tumor mass. In two cases, a complete remission (CR) has persisted at a follow-up of 15 and 16 months. Three patients have been well and off therapy with stable minimal residual disease (RD) since 10, 11, and 17 months, respectively. A patient in apparent CR and another with RD have relapsed 9 to 12 months posttreatment. Autologous blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells induced successful and sustained engraftment in all living patients. These results, although still preliminary, indicate that HDC and TBI, followed by blood stem cells autograft, which has both practical and theoretical interest over allogeneic or autologous bone marrow transplantation, deserve consideration in selected patients with multiple myeloma.

  6. Factors influencing the response to high dose methotrexate-based vincristine and procarbazine combination chemotherapy for primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kang Hyun; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Young Zoon

    2011-04-01

    The authors investigated objective response rate to high dose methotrexate (HDMTX)-based combination chemotherapy in primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), and sought to identify factors that influence response to HDMTX-based combination therapy. Prospective observational analysis was performed on 52 PCNSL patients. All patients received HDMTX (3.5 g/m(2)) and vincristine (1.4 mg/m(2)/day) for one day during weeks 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9, and procarbazine (100 mg/m(2)/day) for one week during weeks 1, 5, and 9. Forty-one patients (78.8%) achieved complete or partial remission. Higher objective response rates were observed for patients with: 1) age < 60 yr; 2) Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance score of < 2; 3) low risk status as defined by the International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group; 4) p53 positivity; 5) XBP-1 negativity; 6) MUM-1 negativity; and 7) homogenous gadolinium enhancement in MR images. Multivariate analysis showed that ECOG performance score of < 2, low risk, negativity for XBP-1, homogenous gadolinium enhancement by MRI, and response to chemotherapy were associated with longer overall survival. In particular, it is interesting to note that patients with a PCNSL that is homogeneously enhanced by gadolinium have a higher objective response rate, and a longer progression-free survival and overall survival.

  7. Outcome analysis of high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation in adolescent and young adults with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Saad; Rauf, Shahzad M; Elhassan, Tusneem A M; Maghfoor, Irfan

    2016-09-01

    High-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and autologous stem cell transplantation (auto-SCT) can salvage many patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). We are reporting the outcome of HDC auto-SCT and the impact of 21 prognostic factors in relapsed and refractory adolescent (14-21 years) and young adult (>21-30 years) (AYA) HL patients. We used Fine and Gray's competing risk analysis method and regression model for outcome analysis. From 1996 to 2013, 290 consecutive patients with biopsy-proven HL underwent HDC auto-SCT for relapsed/refractory HL; 216 patients (74.5 %) were AYA at the time of auto-SCT. Male/female were equal, median age at auto-SCT was 22.4 years, and there were 94 adolescent (43.5 %) and 122 young adults (56.5 %). There was refractory disease in 121 (56 %) patients, relapsed in 95 (44 %). Median follow-up was 72.6 months. The Kaplan-Meier method estimated that 5-year overall survival is 62.7 % (adolescents (63.5 %), young adults (62 %)) and event-free survival was 51.3 %. Five-year cumulative incidence of disease-specific death (DS-death) is 33 % and that of DS-event is 45 %. For DS-death, the multivariate analysis identified complete remission (CR) duration of <12 months (hazard ratio (HR) 3.61, P = 0.0009), no CR after salvage (HR: 3.93, P = 0.0002), and nodular sclerosis pathology (HR 3.3, P = 0.016) and positive B symptoms (HR 2, P = 0.028) as negative factors. For DS-event, CR duration of <12 months (HR 1.88, P = 0.02), no CR after salvage (HR 3.47, P = 0.000005) and nodular sclerosis pathology (HR 1.88, P = 0.02) were found significant. The Kaplan-Meier method estimated overall survival (OS) at 36 months with 0-2:3:4 factors being 93.6:54:21 %, respectively (P value <0.001). Kaplan-Meier estimated event-free survival (EFS) at 36 months with 0-1:2:3 factors being 84.6:65:31 %, respectively (P value <0.001). Clinically, adolescents have similar outcomes as young adults. PMID:27376363

  8. A Contralateral Esophagus-Sparing Technique to Limit Severe Esophagitis Associated With Concurrent High-Dose Radiation and Chemotherapy in Patients With Thoracic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Halabi, Hani; Paetzold, Peter; Sharp, Gregory C.; Olsen, Christine; Willers, Henning

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Severe (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] grade 3 or greater) esophagitis generally occurs in 15% to 25% of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy (CCRT), which may result in treatment breaks that compromise local tumor control and pose a barrier to dose escalation. Here, we report a novel contralateral esophagus-sparing technique (CEST) that uses intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to reduce the incidence of severe esophagitis. Methods and Materials: We reviewed consecutive patients with thoracic malignancies undergoing curative CCRT in whom CEST was used. The esophageal wall contralateral (CE) to the tumor was contoured as an avoidance structure, and IMRT was used to guide a rapid dose falloff gradient beyond the target volume in close proximity to the esophagus. Esophagitis was recorded based on the RTOG acute toxicity grading system. Results: We identified 20 consecutive patients treated with CCRT of at least 63 Gy in whom there was gross tumor within 1 cm of the esophagus. The median radiation dose was 70.2 Gy (range, 63-72.15 Gy). In all patients, ≥99% of the planning and internal target volumes was covered by ≥90% and 100% of prescription dose, respectively. Strikingly, no patient experienced grade ≥3 esophagitis (95% confidence limits, 0%-16%) despite the high total doses delivered. The median maximum dose, V45, and V55 of the CE were 60.7 Gy, 2.1 cc, and 0.4 cc, respectively, indicating effective esophagus cross-section sparing by CEST. Conclusion: We report a simple yet effective method to avoid exposing the entire esophagus cross-section to high doses. By using proposed CE dose constraints of V45 <2.5 cc and V55 <0.5 cc, CEST may improve the esophagus toxicity profile in thoracic cancer patients receiving CCRT even at doses above the standard 60- to 63-Gy levels. Prospective testing of CEST is warranted.

  9. Clinical protocol. Purging of autologous stem cell sources with bcl-x(s) adenovirus for women undergoing high-dose chemotherapy for stage IV breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ayash, L J; Clarke, M; Adams, P; Ferrara, J; Ratanatharathorn, V; Reynolds, C; Roessler, B; Silver, S; Strawderman, M; Uberti, J; Wicha, M

    2001-11-01

    High-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) and autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is frequently used to treat patients with metastatic cancer including breast cancer and neuroblastoma. However, the bone marrow of such patients is often contaminated with tumor cells. Recently, we have found that a recombinant adenovirus vector that contains a bcl-x, minigene (a dominant negative inhibitor of the bcl-2 family), called the bcl-x(s) adenovirus, is lethal to cancer cells derived from epithelial tissues, but not to normal human hematopoietic cells. To determine the mechanism, by which this virus spares normal hematopoietic cells, we isolated normal mouse hematopoietic stem cells and infected them with an adenovirus that contains a beta-galactosidase minigene. Such cells do not express beta-galactosidase, indicating that hematopoietic stem cells do not express transgene encoded by adenovirus vectors based upon the RSV-AD5 vector system. When breast cancer cells mixed with hematopoietic cells were infected with the bcl-x(s) adenovirus, cancer cells were selectively killed by the suicide adenoviruses. Hematopoietic cells exposed to the suicide vectors were able to reconstitute the bone marrow of mice exposed to lethal doses of y-irradiation. These studies suggest that adenovirus suicide vectors may provide a simple and effective method to selectively eliminate cancer cells derived from epithelial tissue that contaminate bone marrow to be used for autologous BMT. We therefore propose to initiate a phase I clinical trial to test the safety of this virus in women with breast cancer undergoing high does chemotherapy and autologous BMT.

  10. Tacrolimus dose requirement in renal transplant recipients is significantly higher when used in combination with corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Hesselink, Dennis A; Ngyuen, Hien; Wabbijn, Marike; Gregoor, Peter J H Smak; Steyerberg, Ewout W; van Riemsdijk, Iza C; Weimar, Willem; van Gelder, Teun

    2003-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the effect of corticosteroids on tacrolimus pharmacokinetics. Methods In a randomized trial, kidney transplant recipients were treated with tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil with either daclizumab (n = 31) or 3 months of prednisone (n = 34). Tacrolimus dose-adjusted predose concentrations (C0) at month 1–6 were compared between both groups and within the corticosteroid group before and after prednisone withdrawal. Results At month 1 the tacrolimus dose-adjusted C0 in the corticosteroid group was 83 ± 8 vs 119 ± 17 ng ml−1 mg−1 kg−1 in the daclizumab group. The tacrolimus dose-adjusted C0 within the corticosteroid group at month 1 and 2 was 42% and 29% lower compared with month 4 (P < 0.001). Conclusions A higher tacrolimus dose is required to reach target concentrations when used in combination with corticosteroids. PMID:12919182

  11. First-line high-dose sequential chemotherapy with rG-CSF and repeated blood stem cell transplantation in untreated inflammatory breast cancer: toxicity and response (PEGASE 02 trial)

    PubMed Central

    Viens, P; Palangié, T; Janvier, M; Fabbro, M; Roché, H; Delozier, T; Labat, J P; Linassier, C; Audhuy, B; Feuilhade, F; Costa, B; Delva, R; Cure, H; Rousseau, F; Guillot, A; Mousseau, M; Ferrero, J M; Bardou, V J; Jacquemier, J; Pouillart, P

    1999-01-01

    Despite the generalization of induction chemotherapy and a better outcome for chemosensitive diseases, the prognosis of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is still poor. In this work, we evaluate response and toxicity of high-dose sequential chemotherapy with repeated blood stem cell (BSC) transplantation administered as initial treatment in 100 women with non-metastatic IBC. Ninety-five patients (five patients were evaluated as non-eligible) of median age 46 years (range 26–56) received four cycles of chemotherapy associating: cyclophosphamide (C) 6 g m−2 – doxorubicin (D) 75 mg m−2 cycle 1, C: 3 g m−2 – D: 75 mg m−2 cycle 2, C: 3 g m−2 – D: 75 mg m−2 – 5 FU 2500 mg m−2 cycle 3 and 4. BSC were collected after cycle 1 or 2 and reinfused after cycle 3 and 4. rG-CSF was administered after the four cycles. Mastectomy and radiotherapy were planned after chemotherapy completion. Pathological response was considered as the first end point of this trial. A total of 366 cycles of chemotherapy were administered. Eighty-seven patients completed the four cycles and relative dose intensity was respectively 0.97 (range 0.4–1.04) and 0.96 (range 0.25–1.05) for C and D. Main toxicity was haematological with febrile neutropenia ranging from 26% to 51% of cycles; one death occurred during aplasia. Clinical response rate was 90% ± 6%. Eighty-six patients underwent mastectomy in a median of 3.5 months (range 3–9) after the first cycle of chemotherapy; pathological complete response rate in breast was 32% ± 10%. All patients were eligible to receive additional radiotherapy. High-dose chemotherapy with repeated BSC transplantation is feasible with acceptable toxicity in IBC. Pathological response rate is encouraging but has to be confirmed by final outcome. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10507769

  12. Defining the dose of gemtuzumab ozogamicin in combination with induction chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia: a comparison of 3 mg/m2 with 6 mg/m2 in the NCRI AML17 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Alan; Cavenagh, Jamie; Russell, Nigel; Hills, Robert; Kell, Jonathan; Jones, Gail; Nielsen, Ove Juul; Khwaja, Asim; Thomas, Ian; Clark, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Arecent source data meta-analysis of randomized trials in adults assessing the immunoconjugate gemtuzumab ozogamicin combined with standard chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia showed a significant survival benefit in patients without an adverse karyotype. It is not clear whether the optimal dose should be 3 mg/m2 or 6 mg/m2. In this study, we randomized 788 patients to a single dose of gemtuzumab ozogamicin 3 mg/m2 or 6 mg/m2 with the first course of induction therapy. We found that the rate of complete remission was higher with 3 mg/m2 [82% vs. 76%; odds ratio 1.46 (1.04–2.06); P=0.03], but this was balanced by a higher rate of complete remission with incomplete peripheral blood count recovery in the 6 mg/m2 treatment (10% vs. 7%) resulting in similar overall response rate [89% vs. 86%; hazard ratio 1.34 (0.88–2.04); P=0.17]. There was no overall difference in relapse or survival at four years between the arms: 46% vs. 54%; hazard ratio 1.17 (0.94–1.45), P=0.5, and 50% versus 47%; hazard ratio 1.10 (0.90–1.34), P=0.3, respectively. The 30- and 60-day mortality was significantly higher in the 6 mg/m2 recipients: 7% versus 3%; hazard ratio 2.07 (1.11–3.87), P=0.02, and 9% versus 5%; hazard ratio 1.99 (1.17–3.39), P=0.01, respectively, which in addition was associated with a higher rate of veno-occlusive disease (5.6% vs. 0.5%; P<0.0001). Our conclusion from this trial is that there is no advantage in using a single dose of 6 mg/m2 of gemtuzumab ozogamicin in combination with induction chemotherapy when compared with a 3 mg/m2 dose, with respect to response, disease-free and overall survival, either overall, or in any disease subgroup. (AML17 was registered as ISRCTN55675535.) PMID:26921360

  13. CHOP chemotherapy with preemptive granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in elderly patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: a dose-intensity analysis.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, J O; Grossbard, M; Shulman, L N; Neuberg, D

    2000-12-01

    This prospective trial was designed to determine the safety and efficacy of full-dose, on-time chemotherapy in elderly patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Twenty patients (median age, 71 years; range, 66 to 80 years) were enrolled in a phase II, multicenter trial to receive cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin/vincristine/prednisone (CHOP) supported by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). CHOP was given in standard doses. Six cycles were planned every 21 days, with G-CSF starting on day 3 and continuing until the absolute neutrophil count was greater than 10,000/microL. Consolidation radiation therapy was permitted. Restaging was performed following cycles 4 and 6. By the age-adjusted International Prognostic Index, four patients were low, 10 were low-intermediate, four were high-intermediate, and two were high risk. Eighteen cases completed all 6 cycles. The average cycle length for all 112 cycles was 21.7 days. The dose intensities (corrected for delay) for each agent were cyclophosphamide 97.3%, doxorubicin 97.3%, vincristine 91.5%, and prednisone 97.3%. Treatment-related complications included grade 4 leukopenia and grade 4 thrombocytopenia in 11.6% and 3.6% of cycles, respectively. Hospitalization for neutropenia and fever was needed for 7.1% of cycles. There was no grade 3/4 cardiac toxicity. No treatment-related mortality occurred. All toxicities were reversible. There were 12 (60%) complete responses, four (20%) gallium-negative partial responses, and four patients (20%) with progressive disease. With a median follow-up of 2.29 years, progression-free and overall survival rates at 2 years are 42% (90% confidence interval: 23%-61%) and 66% (90% confidence interval: 47%-85%), respectively. Using preemptive G-CSF, full-dose CHOP can be administered safely to elderly patients.

  14. High-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic stem-cell rescue for pediatric brain tumor patients: a single institution experience from UCLA.

    PubMed

    Panosyan, Eduard H; Ikeda, Alan K; Chang, Vivian Y; Laks, Dan R; Reeb, Charles L; Bowles, La Vette; Lasky, Joseph L; Moore, Theodore B

    2011-01-01

    Background. Dose-dependent response makes certain pediatric brain tumors appropriate targets for high-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic stem-cell rescue (HDCT-AHSCR). Methods. The clinical outcomes and toxicities were analyzed retrospectively for 18 consecutive patients ≤19 y/o treated with HDCT-AHSCR at UCLA (1999-2009). Results. Patients' median age was 2.3 years. Fourteen had primary and 4 recurrent tumors: 12 neural/embryonal (7 medulloblastomas, 4 primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and a pineoblastoma), 3 glial/mixed, and 3 germ cell tumors. Eight patients had initial gross-total and seven subtotal resections. HDCT mostly consisted of carboplatin and/or thiotepa ± etoposide (n = 16). Nine patients underwent a single AHSCR and nine ≥3 tandems. Three-year progression-free and overall survival probabilities were 60.5% ± 16 and 69.3% ± 11.5. Ten patients with pre-AHSCR complete remissions were alive/disease-free, whereas 5 of 8 with measurable disease were deceased (median followup: 2.3 yrs). Nine of 13 survivors avoided radiation. Single AHSCR regimens had greater toxicity than ≥3 AHSCR (P < .01). Conclusion. HDCT-AHSCR has a definitive, though limited role for selected pediatric brain tumors with poor prognosis and pretransplant complete/partial remissions. PMID:21559259

  15. High-Dose Chemotherapy with Autologous Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Rescue for Pediatric Brain Tumor Patients: A Single Institution Experience from UCLA

    PubMed Central

    Panosyan, Eduard H.; Ikeda, Alan K.; Chang, Vivian Y.; Laks, Dan R.; Reeb, Charles L.; Bowles, La Vette; Lasky, Joseph L.; Moore, Theodore B.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Dose-dependent response makes certain pediatric brain tumors appropriate targets for high-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic stem-cell rescue (HDCT-AHSCR). Methods. The clinical outcomes and toxicities were analyzed retrospectively for 18 consecutive patients ≤19 y/o treated with HDCT-AHSCR at UCLA (1999–2009). Results. Patients' median age was 2.3 years. Fourteen had primary and 4 recurrent tumors: 12 neural/embryonal (7 medulloblastomas, 4 primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and a pineoblastoma), 3 glial/mixed, and 3 germ cell tumors. Eight patients had initial gross-total and seven subtotal resections. HDCT mostly consisted of carboplatin and/or thiotepa ± etoposide (n = 16). Nine patients underwent a single AHSCR and nine ≥3 tandems. Three-year progression-free and overall survival probabilities were 60.5% ± 16 and 69.3% ± 11.5. Ten patients with pre-AHSCR complete remissions were alive/disease-free, whereas 5 of 8 with measurable disease were deceased (median followup: 2.3 yrs). Nine of 13 survivors avoided radiation. Single AHSCR regimens had greater toxicity than ≥3 AHSCR (P < .01). Conclusion. HDCT-AHSCR has a definitive, though limited role for selected pediatric brain tumors with poor prognosis and pretransplant complete/partial remissions. PMID:21559259

  16. Chemotherapy combined with high-dose extended-field radiotherapy for stage I extranodal nasal-type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jialin; Cao, Caineng; Zhu, Yuan; Liu, Peng; Liu, Luying; Lu, Ke; Zhang, Na; Zhou, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective The objective of the study was to evaluate the efficiency of chemotherapy (CT) combined with high-dose extended-field radiotherapy (RT) in stage I extranodal nasal-type natural killer/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL). Patients and methods Between January 2001 and November 2010, 103 stage I extranodal nasal-type NKTCL patients were retrospectively analyzed. Of these patients, 75 patients were treated by RT plus CT and 28 patients were treated by RT alone. CT included cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP), or CHOP-like regimen. Results The median follow-up time was 42.6 months (range, 7.4–126.7 months). For patients in the RT alone group, the 5-year estimated progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 67.0% and 71.4%, respectively. For patients in the RT + CT group, the 5-year estimated PFS and OS rates were 69.0% and 63.7%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, CT was an independent factor for PFS. Conclusion The doxorubicin-based CT combined with high-dose extended-field RT yielded promising outcomes for stage I extranodal nasal-type NKTCL, and CT was an independent factor for PFS. PMID:27785062

  17. High-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell support followed by post-transplant doxorubicin and taxol as initial therapy for metastatic breast cancer: hematopoietic tolerance and efficacy.

    PubMed

    deMagalhaes-Silverman, M; Hammert, L; Lembersky, B; Lister, J; Rybka, W; Ball, E

    1998-06-01

    A multistep HDC regimen was designed as first-line chemotherapy for MBC. Twenty-four patients with MBC and no previous chemotherapy for metastatic disease were treated with high-dose cyclophosphamide (5000 mg/m2), and etoposide (1000 mg/m2) (CyVP16), followed by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCs) were collected. Subsequently patients received cyclophosphamide (6000 mg/m2), thiotepa (500 mg/m2) and carboplatin (800 mg/m2) (CTCb) with hematopoietic rescue. Upon recovery from hematopoietic and gastrointestinal toxicity three cycles of doxorubicin (50 mg/m2) and taxol (150 mg/m2) were delivered. After CyVP16 42% of patients developed neutropenic fevers. There was one documented episode of bacteremia. Patients received CTCb 32 days after starting CyVP16. After CTCb the median number of days to ANC >5 x 10(9)/l was 10 and to a platelet count >20 x 10(9)/l was 14. Neutropenic fevers developed in 16 patients. There were no hemorrhagic episodes. A total of 69 cycles of doxorubicin and taxol were delivered (87% of planned). The median time from PBSC infusion to the first cycle was 38 days. The median time to the second cycle was 27 days and to the last cycle was 24 days. One patient developed congestive heart failure. Two episodes of neutropenic fevers were observed. No toxicity-related deaths were observed. Grafts are stable at 6 months post transplantation. This multistep regimen is feasible with acceptable toxicity. PMID:9674853

  18. Optimizing initial chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Mantripragada, Kalyan C; Safran, Howard

    2016-05-01

    The two combination chemotherapy regimens FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel represent major breakthroughs in the management of metastatic pancreatic cancer. Both regimens showed unprecedented survival advantage in the setting of front-line therapy. However, their application for treatment of patients in the community is challenging because of significant toxicities, thus limiting potential benefits to a narrow population of patients. Modifications to the dose intensity or schedule of those regimens improve their tolerability, while likely retaining survival advantage over single-agent chemotherapy. Newer strategies to optimize these two active regimens in advanced pancreatic cancer are being explored that can help personalize treatment to individual patients.

  19. Significance of PIK3CA Mutations in Patients with Early Breast Cancer Treated with Adjuvant Chemotherapy: A Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group (HeCOG) Study

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulou, Zoi; Kalogeras, Konstantine T.; Zagouri, Flora; Timotheadou, Eleni; Gogas, Helen; Pentheroudakis, George; Christodoulou, Christos; Koutras, Angelos; Bafaloukos, Dimitrios; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Papakostas, Pavlos; Charalambous, Elpida; Papadopoulou, Kyriaki; Varthalitis, Ioannis; Efstratiou, Ioannis; Zaramboukas, Thomas; Patsea, Helen; Scopa, Chrisoula D.; Skondra, Maria; Kosmidis, Paris; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Fountzilas, George

    2015-01-01

    Background The PI3K-AKT pathway is frequently activated in breast cancer. PIK3CA mutations are most frequently found in the helical (exon 9) and kinase (exon 20) domains of this protein. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of different types of PIK3CA mutations in combination with molecular biomarkers related to PI3K-AKT signaling in patients with early breast cancer. Methods Tumor tissue samples from 1008 early breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy in two similar randomized trials of HeCOG were examined. Tumors were subtyped with immunohistochemistry (IHC) and FISH for ER, PgR, Ki67, HER2 and androgen receptor (AR). PIK3CA mutations were analyzed by Sanger sequencing (exon 20) and qPCR (exon 9) (Sanger/qPCR mutations). In 610 cases, next generation sequencing (NGS) PIK3CA mutation data were also available. PIK3CA mutations and PTEN protein expression (IHC) were analyzed in luminal tumors (ER and/or PgR positive), molecular apocrine carcinomas (MAC; ER/PgR negative / AR positive) and hormone receptor (ER/PgR/AR) negative tumors. Results PIK3CA mutations were detected in 235/1008 tumors (23%) with Sanger/qPCR and in 149/610 tumors (24%) with NGS. Concordance between the two methods was good with a Kappa coefficient of 0.76 (95% CI 0.69–0.82). Lobular histology, low tumor grade and luminal A tumors were associated with helical domain mutations (PIK3CAhel), while luminal B with kinase domain mutations (PIK3CAkin). The overall incidence of PIK3CA mutations was higher in luminal as compared to MAC and hormone receptor negative tumors (p = 0.004). Disease-free and overall survival did not significantly differ with respect to PIK3CA mutation presence and type. However, a statistically significant interaction between PIK3CA mutation status and PTEN low protein expression with regard to prognosis was identified. Conclusions The present study did not show any prognostic significance of specific PIK3CA mutations in a large group of

  20. [Invasive thymoma successfully treated with high-dose chemotherapy followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplantation(PBSCT)].

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Y; Kubota, Y; Yokomura, I; Ueda, M; Hashimoto, S; Arimoto, T; Inaba, T; Shimazaki, C; Nakagawa, M; Toda, S

    1998-03-01

    A 42-year-old man was admitted with chest pain. A large mass in the anterior mediastinum was seen on a chest X-ray film and confirmed by CT. Surgery was performed, but the tumor was nonresectable because it had invaded the aorta and pulmonary artery, and had disseminated to the pericardium. Invasive thymoma (stage IVa) was diagnosed He initially received two courses of ADOC (50 mg/m2 of cisplatin, 40 mg/m2 of doxorubicin, 0.6 mg/m2 of vincristine, and 700 mg/m2 of cyclophosphamide) at 3-week intervals. Four weeks after the 2 causes of ADOC, he was given 300 mg/m2 of etoposide for five days followed by G-CSF subcutaneously for peripheral blood stem cell collection. After the two courses of ADOC, he received high-dose ICE (1.5 g/m2 of ifosfamide for four days, 400 mg/m2 of carboplatin for three days, and 200 mg/m2 of etoposide for five days) followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). He was given G-CSF after PBSCT, with subsequent rapid neutrophil and platelet recovery. The tumor diminished remarkably in size and complete remission was confirmed pathologically at subsequent thoractomy. Postoperatively, 50 Gy of irradiation was given. These observations suggest that high-dose ICE followed by PBSCT in combination with an ADOC regimen, surgery, and radiotherapy is highly effective and well tolerated in patients with advanced nonresectable thymoma.

  1. Doses and risks from uranium are not increased significantly by interactions with natural background photon radiation.

    PubMed

    Tanner, R J; Eakins, J S; Jansen, J T M; Harrison, J D

    2012-08-01

    The impact of depleted uranium (DU) on human health has been the subject of much conjecture. Both the chemical and radiological aspects of its behaviour in the human body have previously been investigated in detail, with the radiological impact being assumed to be linked to the alpha decay of uranium. More recently, it has been proposed that the accumulation in tissue of high-Z materials, such as DU, may give rise to enhanced local energy deposition in the presence of natural background photon radiation due to the high photoelectric interaction cross sections of high-Z atoms. It is speculated that, in addition to producing short-range photoelectrons, these events will be followed by intense Auger and Coster-Kronig electron emission, thereby causing levels of cell damage that are unaccounted for in conventional models of radiological risk. In this study, the physical and biological bases of these claims are investigated. The potential magnitudes of any effect are evaluated and discussed, and compared with the risks from other radiological or chemical hazards. Monte Carlo calculations are performed to estimate likely energy depositions due to the presence of uranium in human tissues in photon fields: whole body doses, organ doses in anthropomorphic phantoms and nano-/micro-dosimetric scenarios are each considered. The proposal is shown generally to be based on sound physics, but overall the impact on human health is expected to be negligible.

  2. The Potential for Bayesian Compressive Sensing to Significantly Reduce Electron Dose in High Resolution STEM Images

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Yang, Hao; Carin, Lawrence; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-02-11

    The use of high resolution imaging methods in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is limited in many cases by the sensitivity of the sample to the beam and the onset of electron beam damage (for example in the study of organic systems, in tomography and during in-situ experiments). To demonstrate that alternative strategies for image acquisition can help alleviate this beam damage issue, here we apply compressive sensing via Bayesian dictionary learning to high resolution STEM images. These experiments successively reduce the number of pixels in the image (thereby reducing the overall dose while maintaining the high resolution information) and show promising results for reconstructing images from this reduced set of randomly collected measurements. We show that this approach is valid for both atomic resolution images and nanometer resolution studies, such as those that might be used in tomography datasets, by applying the method to images of strontium titanate and zeolites. As STEM images are acquired pixel by pixel while the beam is scanned over the surface of the sample, these post acquisition manipulations of the images can, in principle, be directly implemented as a low-dose acquisition method with no change in the electron optics or alignment of the microscope itself.

  3. The impact of induction duration and the number of high-dose cycles on the long-term survival of women with metastatic breast cancer treated with high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue: an analysis of sequential phase I/II trials from the Dana-Farber/Beth Israel STAMP program.

    PubMed

    Elias, A D; Ibrahim, J; Richardson, P; Avigan, D; Joyce, R; Reich, E; McCauley, M; Wheeler, C; Frei, E

    2002-01-01

    III were 98, 62, and 39 months from the initiation of induction chemotherapy and 92, 55, and 36 months from last high-dose therapy, respectively. The patient characteristics upon entry into these trials were similar. Important differences were that only those patients achieving a partial response or better to induction therapy were enrolled and analyzed for trials I and II, but all patients were analyzed on an intent-to-treat basis for trial III, including those who did not receive intensification. The median event-free survival (EFS) times from induction chemotherapy were 13, 19, and 27 months for trials I, II, and III, respectively (III versus I + II, P = .0004; III versus I, P = .0005; III versus II, P = .005; II versus I, P = .25). The median overall survival (OS) times from induction chemotherapy were 30, 29, and 57 months for trials I, II, and III, respectively (III versus I + II, P = .002; III versus I, P = .003; III versus II, P = .009; II versus I, P = .47). By multivariate Cox regression, participation in the short induction/double transplantation trial III and having no prior adjuvant chemotherapy remained favorable prognostic factors for both EFS and OS. The presence of visceral disease shortened EFS, and hormone sensitivity was of borderline significance. No substantive differences in the characteristics of the patient populations between the 3 trials appeared to interact with outcomes. In conclusion, we found that single transplantation in responding patients after long induction achieves a small cohort of long-term survivors, similar to the results reported by other transplantation centers. Adding a cycle of single-agent high-dose melphalan in this context delayed median time to relapse but did not affect long-term EFS or OS. The double transplantation approach using CTCb and TxM early in the course of treatment was associated with the best EFS and overall survival and was safe, feasible, and tolerable. Treatment duration was only 14 weeks, and this

  4. The impact of induction duration and the number of high-dose cycles on the long-term survival of women with metastatic breast cancer treated with high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue: an analysis of sequential phase I/II trials from the Dana-Farber/Beth Israel STAMP program.

    PubMed

    Elias, A D; Ibrahim, J; Richardson, P; Avigan, D; Joyce, R; Reich, E; McCauley, M; Wheeler, C; Frei, E

    2002-01-01

    III were 98, 62, and 39 months from the initiation of induction chemotherapy and 92, 55, and 36 months from last high-dose therapy, respectively. The patient characteristics upon entry into these trials were similar. Important differences were that only those patients achieving a partial response or better to induction therapy were enrolled and analyzed for trials I and II, but all patients were analyzed on an intent-to-treat basis for trial III, including those who did not receive intensification. The median event-free survival (EFS) times from induction chemotherapy were 13, 19, and 27 months for trials I, II, and III, respectively (III versus I + II, P = .0004; III versus I, P = .0005; III versus II, P = .005; II versus I, P = .25). The median overall survival (OS) times from induction chemotherapy were 30, 29, and 57 months for trials I, II, and III, respectively (III versus I + II, P = .002; III versus I, P = .003; III versus II, P = .009; II versus I, P = .47). By multivariate Cox regression, participation in the short induction/double transplantation trial III and having no prior adjuvant chemotherapy remained favorable prognostic factors for both EFS and OS. The presence of visceral disease shortened EFS, and hormone sensitivity was of borderline significance. No substantive differences in the characteristics of the patient populations between the 3 trials appeared to interact with outcomes. In conclusion, we found that single transplantation in responding patients after long induction achieves a small cohort of long-term survivors, similar to the results reported by other transplantation centers. Adding a cycle of single-agent high-dose melphalan in this context delayed median time to relapse but did not affect long-term EFS or OS. The double transplantation approach using CTCb and TxM early in the course of treatment was associated with the best EFS and overall survival and was safe, feasible, and tolerable. Treatment duration was only 14 weeks, and this

  5. A matter of timing: identifying significant multi-dose radiotherapy improvements by numerical simulation and genetic algorithm search.

    PubMed

    Angus, Simon D; Piotrowska, Monika Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Multi-dose radiotherapy protocols (fraction dose and timing) currently used in the clinic are the product of human selection based on habit, received wisdom, physician experience and intra-day patient timetabling. However, due to combinatorial considerations, the potential treatment protocol space for a given total dose or treatment length is enormous, even for relatively coarse search; well beyond the capacity of traditional in-vitro methods. In constrast, high fidelity numerical simulation of tumor development is well suited to the challenge. Building on our previous single-dose numerical simulation model of EMT6/Ro spheroids, a multi-dose irradiation response module is added and calibrated to the effective dose arising from 18 independent multi-dose treatment programs available in the experimental literature. With the developed model a constrained, non-linear, search for better performing cadidate protocols is conducted within the vicinity of two benchmarks by genetic algorithm (GA) techniques. After evaluating less than 0.01% of the potential benchmark protocol space, candidate protocols were identified by the GA which conferred an average of 9.4% (max benefit 16.5%) and 7.1% (13.3%) improvement (reduction) on tumour cell count compared to the two benchmarks, respectively. Noticing that a convergent phenomenon of the top performing protocols was their temporal synchronicity, a further series of numerical experiments was conducted with periodic time-gap protocols (10 h to 23 h), leading to the discovery that the performance of the GA search candidates could be replicated by 17-18 h periodic candidates. Further dynamic irradiation-response cell-phase analysis revealed that such periodicity cohered with latent EMT6/Ro cell-phase temporal patterning. Taken together, this study provides powerful evidence towards the hypothesis that even simple inter-fraction timing variations for a given fractional dose program may present a facile, and highly cost-effecitive means

  6. [Principles of managing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting].

    PubMed

    Takiuchi, Hiroya; Kawabe, Shinichiro; Goto, Masahiro; Ota, Syunsuke; Kii, Takayuki; Tanaka, Toshimitsu; Nishitani, Hitoshi; Kuwakado, Shin; Katsu, Ken-ichi

    2006-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (emesis) can significantly affect a patient's quality of life, leading to poor compliance with further chemotherapy treatment. For patients treated with emetogenic chemotherapy, it is very important to prevent nausea and vomiting completely. The incidence and severity of nausea and/or vomiting in patients receiving chemotherapy are affected by numerous factors, including: 1) the specific chemotherapeutic agents used; 2) their dosage; 3) the schedule and route of administration; and 4) individual patient variability. Approximately 70 to 80% of all cancer patients receiving chemotherapy experience emesis, whereas 10% to 44% experience anticipatory emesis. The following general principles are recommended. 1) A 5-HT3 receptor antagonist should be administered prior to each day's 1st dose of moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. 2) Dexamethasone should be administered once daily either orally or intravenously for every day of moderately or highly-emetogenic chemotherapy and for 2-3 days after chemotherapy for regimens that are likely to cause significant delayed-emesis. 3) The most effective way to treat anticipatory nausea and/or vomiting is to prevent it by using optimal antiemetic therapy during every cycle of treatment.

  7. Prevalence of menstrual cycles and outcome of 50 pregnancies after high-dose chemotherapy and auto-SCT in non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphoma patients younger than 40 years.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, S; Youssef, I; Soudy, H; Elhassan, T A M; Rauf, S M; Maghfoor, I

    2015-12-01

    Data are limited regarding the prevalence of menstrual cycles and pregnancies after high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and auto-stem cell transplantation (SCT). Female patients who underwent HDC auto-SCT for non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin lymphoma (1997-2012) were reviewed. The selection criteria were as follows: (1) alive without disease 12 and 24 months after auto-SCT for menstrual cycles and pregnancy, respectively, (2) age <40 years at auto-SCT, and (3) no primary infertility. One-hundred and seventy-six females underwent single auto-SCT. Eighty-nine were eligible for menstrual cycles and pregnancy analysis. Median age at auto-SCT was 25 years (14-40 years), at pregnancy 27 years (20-37 years), median follow-up 65 months (range 24-190). Regular menstrual-cycles resumed in 56/89 patients (63%). Increasing age (P=0.02) and number of prior chemotherapy cycles (P=0.02) are associated with higher risk of amenorrhea. Forty patients tried to get pregnant, 26 (65%) became pregnant 50 times: 43 (86%) live birth, 7 (14%) miscarriage and 2/50 had birth defects. Twenty-four patients practiced breastfeeding (median duration 4 months (1-24 months)). Enough breast milk production was reported 62.5% vs 100% in those patients who did or did not receive above the diaphragm radiation therapy, respectively, (P=0.066). Our data highlights significantly higher than perceived incidence of menstrual cycle resumption, successful pregnancies and breastfeeding after HDC auto-SCT. PMID:26237168

  8. Tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell rescue in patients over 1 year of age with stage 4 neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Sung, K W; Lee, S H; Yoo, K H; Jung, H L; Cho, E J; Koo, H H; Lee, S K; Kim, J; Lim, D H; Suh, Y L; Kim, D W

    2007-07-01

    From June 1997 to August 2005, 52 consecutive newly diagnosed stage 4 neuroblastoma patients over 1 year of age were assigned to receive tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell rescue (HDCT/ASCR) as consolidation therapy. Fifty of the 52 patients underwent a first HDCT/ASCR and 44 patients underwent a second HDCT/ASCR. Eight patients (15.4%) died from treatment-related toxicity (seven during the second HDCT/ASCR). Total body irradiation (TBI) in the first HDCT/ASCR and a shorter interval (< 12 weeks) between the first and second HDCT/ASCR were associated with a higher rate of treatment-related death in the second HDCT/ASCR (P = 0.032 and 0.095, respectively). The tumor relapsed or progressed in 11 patients, and 33 patients remained event free with a median follow-up of 53 months (range 19-117) from diagnosis. The 5-year event-free survival (EFS) (+/- 95% confidence interval) for all 52 patients was 62.1+/-13.7%. The application of TBI and local radiotherapy, and a longer interval between the first and second HDCT/ASCR were independently associated with a better EFS (P = 0.026, 0.007 and 0.020, respectively). However, further studies will be needed to decrease the toxic death rate in the second HDCT/ASCR while reducing the relapse rate.

  9. High-dose chemotherapy for high-risk retinoblastoma: clinical course and outcome of 14 cases in the National Cancer Center, Japan.

    PubMed

    Yasui, N; Kawamoto, H; Fujiwara, M; Aihara, Y; Ogawa, C; Hosono, A; Suzuki, S

    2015-02-01

    The prognosis of high-risk retinoblastoma (RB) with extraocular disease, relapse, or invasion of the cut end of the optic nerve is extremely poor. Following the discontinuation of thiotepa production in Japan, BU- and melphalan (Mel)-based regimens have been used, followed by the standard treatment for neuroblastoma. This study retrospectively analyzed 14 high-risk RB patients who underwent high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) and hematopoietic SCT; 8 received a BU/Mel conditioning regimen and 6 received other regimens. The disease status at HDC was relapse in 8 patients and extraocular involvement in 5. All patients received peripheral blood stem cell infusion >1.5 × 10(6)/kg. Engraftment occurred within a median of 11 days (BU/Mel: 10-13, others: 9-13). Primary toxicities included mucositis (⩾grade 3) in 9 patients (4 with BU/Mel, 5 with others). Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) occurred in two 1-year-old patients in the BU/Mel group. There were no treatment-related deaths. Of 4 (2 with BU/Mel, 2 with others) patients with central nervous system (CNS) relapse after HDC, 3 died. In conclusion, the BU/Mel regimen may be feasible for high-risk RB under careful monitoring for VOD, particularly in younger patients. CNS relapse associated with a lethal prognosis occurred after all regimens; therefore, further evaluation of HDC efficacy for high-risk RB is required.

  10. Infectious Complications during Tandem High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Children with High-Risk or Recurrent Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji-Man; Lee, Ji Won; Yoo, Keon Hee; Kim, Yae-Jean; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed infectious complications during tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDCT/auto-SCT) in children and adolescents with high-risk or recurrent solid tumors. A total of 324 patients underwent their first HDCT/auto-SCT between October 2004 and September 2014, and 283 of them proceeded to their second HDCT/auto-SCT (a total of 607 HDCT/auto-SCTs). During the early transplant period of 607 HDCT/auto-SCTs (from the beginning of HDCT to day 30 post-transplant), bacteremia, urinary tract infection (UTI), respiratory virus infection, and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation occurred in 7.1%, 2.3%, 13.0%, and 2.5% of HDCT/auto-SCTs, respectively. The early transplant period of the second HDCT/auto-SCT had infectious complications similar to the first HDCT/auto-SCT. During the late transplant period of HDCT/auto-SCT (from day 31 to 1 year post-transplant), bacteremia, UTI, and VZV reactivation occurred in 7.5%, 2.5%, and 3.9% of patients, respectively. Most infectious complications in the late transplant period occurred during the first 6 months post-transplant. There were no invasive fungal infections during the study period. Six patients died from infectious complications (4 from bacterial sepsis and 2 from respiratory virus infection). Our study suggests that infectious complications are similar following second and first HDCT/auto-SCT in children. PMID:27627440

  11. Infectious Complications during Tandem High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Children with High-Risk or Recurrent Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young Bae; Yi, Eun Sang; Kang, Ji-Man; Lee, Ji Won; Yoo, Keon Hee; Kim, Yae-Jean; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed infectious complications during tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDCT/auto-SCT) in children and adolescents with high-risk or recurrent solid tumors. A total of 324 patients underwent their first HDCT/auto-SCT between October 2004 and September 2014, and 283 of them proceeded to their second HDCT/auto-SCT (a total of 607 HDCT/auto-SCTs). During the early transplant period of 607 HDCT/auto-SCTs (from the beginning of HDCT to day 30 post-transplant), bacteremia, urinary tract infection (UTI), respiratory virus infection, and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation occurred in 7.1%, 2.3%, 13.0%, and 2.5% of HDCT/auto-SCTs, respectively. The early transplant period of the second HDCT/auto-SCT had infectious complications similar to the first HDCT/auto-SCT. During the late transplant period of HDCT/auto-SCT (from day 31 to 1 year post-transplant), bacteremia, UTI, and VZV reactivation occurred in 7.5%, 2.5%, and 3.9% of patients, respectively. Most infectious complications in the late transplant period occurred during the first 6 months post-transplant. There were no invasive fungal infections during the study period. Six patients died from infectious complications (4 from bacterial sepsis and 2 from respiratory virus infection). Our study suggests that infectious complications are similar following second and first HDCT/auto-SCT in children. PMID:27627440

  12. Dose-intensive chemotherapy including rituximab is highly effective but toxic in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia: parallel study of 81 patients.

    PubMed

    Xicoy, Blanca; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Müller, Markus; García, Olga; Hoffmann, Christian; Oriol, Albert; Hentrich, Marcus; Grande, Carlos; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Esteve, Jordi; van Lunzen, Jan; Del Potro, Eloy; Knechten, Heribert; Brunet, Salut; Mayr, Christoph; Escoda, Lourdes; Schommers, Philipp; Alonso, Natalia; Vall-Llovera, Ferran; Pérez, Montserrat; Morgades, Mireia; González, José; Fernández, Angeles; Thoden, Jan; Gökbuget, Nicola; Hoelzer, Dieter; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Wyen, Christoph

    2014-10-01

    The results of intensive immunochemotherapy were analyzed in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia (BLL) in two cohorts (Spain and Germany). Alternating cycles of chemotherapy were administered, with dose reductions for patients over 55 years. Eighty percent of patients achieved remission, 11% died during induction, 9% failed and 7% died in remission. Four-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) probabilities were 72% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 62-82%) and 71% (95% CI: 61-81%). CD4 T-cell count < 200/μL and bone marrow involvement were associated with poor OS (hazard ratio [HR] 3.2 [1.2-8.3] and HR 2.7 [1.1-6.6]) and PFS (HR 3.5 [1.3-9.1] and HR 2.4 [1-5.7]), bone marrow involvement with poor disease-free survival (DFS) (HR 14.4 [1.7-119.7] and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score > 2 (odds ratio [OR] 11.9 [1.4-99.9]) with induction death. In HIV-related BLL, intensive immunochemotherapy was feasible and effective, but toxic. Prognostic factors were performance status, CD4 T-cell count and bone marrow involvement.

  13. Dose-intensive chemotherapy including rituximab is highly effective but toxic in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia: parallel study of 81 patients.

    PubMed

    Xicoy, Blanca; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Müller, Markus; García, Olga; Hoffmann, Christian; Oriol, Albert; Hentrich, Marcus; Grande, Carlos; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Esteve, Jordi; van Lunzen, Jan; Del Potro, Eloy; Knechten, Heribert; Brunet, Salut; Mayr, Christoph; Escoda, Lourdes; Schommers, Philipp; Alonso, Natalia; Vall-Llovera, Ferran; Pérez, Montserrat; Morgades, Mireia; González, José; Fernández, Angeles; Thoden, Jan; Gökbuget, Nicola; Hoelzer, Dieter; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Wyen, Christoph

    2014-10-01

    The results of intensive immunochemotherapy were analyzed in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia (BLL) in two cohorts (Spain and Germany). Alternating cycles of chemotherapy were administered, with dose reductions for patients over 55 years. Eighty percent of patients achieved remission, 11% died during induction, 9% failed and 7% died in remission. Four-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) probabilities were 72% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 62-82%) and 71% (95% CI: 61-81%). CD4 T-cell count < 200/μL and bone marrow involvement were associated with poor OS (hazard ratio [HR] 3.2 [1.2-8.3] and HR 2.7 [1.1-6.6]) and PFS (HR 3.5 [1.3-9.1] and HR 2.4 [1-5.7]), bone marrow involvement with poor disease-free survival (DFS) (HR 14.4 [1.7-119.7] and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) score > 2 (odds ratio [OR] 11.9 [1.4-99.9]) with induction death. In HIV-related BLL, intensive immunochemotherapy was feasible and effective, but toxic. Prognostic factors were performance status, CD4 T-cell count and bone marrow involvement. PMID:24397614

  14. Palifermin reduces infection rate and hyperfibrinogenemia in patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy based on beam or BU-thiothepa.

    PubMed

    Milone, G; Leotta, S; Cupri, A; Fauci, A L; Spina, P; Parisi, M; Berritta, D; Tripepi, G

    2014-09-01

    We performed a retrospective study in patients who underwent high-dose chemotherapy and auto-SCT because of haematological malignancies. Forty patients were treated with palifermin while 80 were controls selected after being matched for diagnosis and length of neutropenia. Patients treated with BEAM or BU-CY or THIO-CY (BEAM/BUS) displayed, after palifermin, a lower rate of severe oral mucositis (P=0.03). This beneficial effect of palifermin was not evident in the stratum of patients treated with high-dose melphalan (HD-PAM). After palifermin, we observed in the whole treated population a reduced rate of 'fever of unknown origin' (FUO, P=0.02) and of severe infections not related to Gram-positive bacteria (FUO, Gram-negative bacteremia or pneumonia) (P=0.003). This effect of palifermin on infections not related to Gram-positive bacteria was evident only in patients receiving BEAM/BUS (P=0.01) and not in patients treated with HD-PAM (P=0.11). Fibrinogen peak in plasma was found to be reduced after palifermin in the whole population (P=0.01) and in the stratum who received BEAM/BUS (P=0.02) but not in the stratum of HD-PAM. In conclusion, anti-infectious beneficial effects of palifermin are more evident in BEAM/BUS-treated patients and toward some types of infections. Reduction of fibrinogen level after palifermin suggests that this agent reduces not only the rate of infections but also their severity. PMID:25000456

  15. Combination Chemotherapy with Suboptimal Doses of Benznidazole and Pentoxifylline Sustains Partial Reversion of Experimental Chagas' Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Vilar-Pereira, Glaucia; Resende Pereira, Isabela; de Souza Ruivo, Leonardo Alexandre; Cruz Moreira, Otacilio; da Silva, Andrea Alice; Britto, Constança; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2016-07-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) progresses with parasite persistence, fibrosis, and electrical alterations associated with an unbalanced immune response such as high plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and nitric oxide (NO). Presently, the available treatments only mitigate the symptoms of CCC. To improve CCC prognosis, we interfered with the parasite load and unbalanced immune response using the trypanocidal drug benznidazole (Bz) and the immunoregulator pentoxifylline (PTX). C57BL/6 mice chronically infected with the Colombian strain of Trypanosoma cruzi and with signs of CCC were treated for 30 days with a suboptimal dose of Bz (25 mg/kg of body weight), PTX (20 mg/kg), or their combination (Bz plus PTX) and analyzed for electrocardiographic, histopathological, and immunological changes. Bz (76%) and Bz-plus-PTX (79%) therapies decreased parasite loads. Although the three therapies reduced myocarditis and fibrosis and ameliorated electrical alterations, only Bz plus PTX restored normal heart rate-corrected QT (QTc) intervals. Bz-plus-PTX-treated mice presented complementary effects of Bz and PTX, which reduced TNF expression (37%) in heart tissue and restored normal TNF receptor 1 expression on CD8(+) T cells, respectively. Bz (85%) and PTX (70%) therapies reduced the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS/NOS2) in heart tissue, but only Bz (58%) reduced NO levels in serum. These effects were more pronounced after Bz-plus-PTX therapy. Moreover, 30 to 50 days after treatment cessation, reductions of the prolonged QTc and QRS intervals were sustained in Bz-plus-PTX-treated mice. Our findings support the importance of interfering with the etiological agent and immunological abnormalities to improve CCC prognosis, opening an opportunity for a better quality of life for Chagas' disease (CD) patients. PMID:27161638

  16. Combination Chemotherapy with Suboptimal Doses of Benznidazole and Pentoxifylline Sustains Partial Reversion of Experimental Chagas' Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vilar-Pereira, Glaucia; Resende Pereira, Isabela; de Souza Ruivo, Leonardo Alexandre; Cruz Moreira, Otacilio; da Silva, Andrea Alice; Britto, Constança

    2016-01-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) progresses with parasite persistence, fibrosis, and electrical alterations associated with an unbalanced immune response such as high plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and nitric oxide (NO). Presently, the available treatments only mitigate the symptoms of CCC. To improve CCC prognosis, we interfered with the parasite load and unbalanced immune response using the trypanocidal drug benznidazole (Bz) and the immunoregulator pentoxifylline (PTX). C57BL/6 mice chronically infected with the Colombian strain of Trypanosoma cruzi and with signs of CCC were treated for 30 days with a suboptimal dose of Bz (25 mg/kg of body weight), PTX (20 mg/kg), or their combination (Bz plus PTX) and analyzed for electrocardiographic, histopathological, and immunological changes. Bz (76%) and Bz-plus-PTX (79%) therapies decreased parasite loads. Although the three therapies reduced myocarditis and fibrosis and ameliorated electrical alterations, only Bz plus PTX restored normal heart rate-corrected QT (QTc) intervals. Bz-plus-PTX-treated mice presented complementary effects of Bz and PTX, which reduced TNF expression (37%) in heart tissue and restored normal TNF receptor 1 expression on CD8+ T cells, respectively. Bz (85%) and PTX (70%) therapies reduced the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS/NOS2) in heart tissue, but only Bz (58%) reduced NO levels in serum. These effects were more pronounced after Bz-plus-PTX therapy. Moreover, 30 to 50 days after treatment cessation, reductions of the prolonged QTc and QRS intervals were sustained in Bz-plus-PTX-treated mice. Our findings support the importance of interfering with the etiological agent and immunological abnormalities to improve CCC prognosis, opening an opportunity for a better quality of life for Chagas' disease (CD) patients. PMID:27161638

  17. Randomized trials of high-dose chemotherapy in breast cancer: fraud, the press and the data (or lessons learned in medical policy governing clinical research).

    PubMed Central

    Antman, Karen

    2002-01-01

    High dose therapy for breast cancer remains controversial. Of the 15 randomized trials of high dose therapy in breast cancer reported to date, two South African studies have been discredited leaving 13 remaining studies. Mortality was consistently low, in the 0 to 2.5% range, except for the BCNU containing American Intergroup study, which had a 7.4% toxic mortality rate. Seven of the remaining 13 studies randomized fewer than 200 patients. Three of these small studies have significant differences in disease free survival, and a fourth study has a trend in favor of high dose therapy. The other three small studies cannot exclude a survival difference of 20%. Of the 6 remaining moderately large trials of 219 to 885 randomized patients, 5 are adjuvant studies and one included patients with metastatic disease. Of the five adjuvant trials, four have significant differences in relapse rate favoring the high dose arm, and the remaining study has a trend (with a high dose sequential single agent design rather than combination therapy as in the other studies). A planned subset analysis of the first 284 patients in the largest study funded by the Dutch insurance industry showed a significant advantage for high dose therapy. Given the 2-year median time to relapse and an addition 2-year median to death after relapse, the follow up for survival of 3-5 years on these studies is still short. In the only moderately sized metastatic trial from the National Cancer Institute of Canada with a very short median follow-up of 19 months, a significant difference in disease free survival has emerged, with no difference in survival. PMID:12053718

  18. Bevacizumab/high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem-cell transplant for poor-risk relapsed or refractory germ-cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Y.; Tu, S. -M.; Bassett, R.; Jones, R. B.; Gulbis, A. M.; Tannir, N.; Kingham, A.; Ledesma, C.; Margolin, K.; Holmberg, L.; Champlin, R.; Pagliaro, L.

    2015-01-01

    Background High-dose chemotherapy (HDC) using sequential cycles of carboplatin/etoposide is curative for relapsed germ-cell tumors (GCT). However, outcomes of high-risk patients in advanced relapse remain poor. We previously developed a new HDC regimen combining infusional gemcitabine with docetaxel/melphalan/carboplatin (GemDMC), with preliminary high activity in refractory GCT. Given the high vascular endothelial growth factor expression in metastatic GCT and the synergy between bevacizumab and chemotherapy, we studied concurrent bevacizumab and sequential HDC using GemDMC and ifosfamide/carboplatin/etoposide (ICE) in patients with poor-risk relapsed or refractory disease. Patients and methods Eligibility criteria included intermediate/high-risk relapse (Beyer Model), serum creatinine ≤1.8 mg/dl and adequate pulmonary/cardiac/hepatic function. Patients received sequential HDC cycles with bevacizumab preceding GemDMC (cycle 1) and ICE (cycle 2). The trial was powered to distinguish a target 50% 2-year relapse-free survival (RFS) from an expected 25% 2-year RFS in this population. Results We enrolled 43 male patients, median age 30 (20–49) years, with absolute refractory (N = 20), refractory (N = 17) or cisplatin-sensitive (N = 6) disease, after a median 3 (1–5) prior relapses. Disease status right before HDC was unresponsive (N = 24, progressive disease 22, stable disease 2), partial response with positive markers (PRm+) (N = 8), PRm− (N = 7) or complete response (N = 4). Main toxicities were mucositis and renal. Four patients (three with baseline marginal renal function) died from HDC-related complications. Tumor markers normalized in 85% patients. Resection of residual lesions (N = 13) showed necrosis (N = 4), mature teratoma (N = 2), necrosis/teratoma (N = 3) and viable tumor (N = 4). At median follow-up of 46 (9–84) months, the RFS and overall survival rates are 55.8% and 58.1%, respectively. Conclusions Sequential bevacizumab

  19. Induction cytotoxic chemotherapy: the significance of apparent complete clinical regression after using the Price Hill Schedule A protocol for squamous carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Shaw, H J

    1988-12-01

    A small group of 46 previously untreated patients out of about 260 in all who have received Price Hill Schedule A cytotoxic chemotherapy, achieved apparent complete clinical regression (ACCR) of their disease before local treatment. Forty patients were classified T3 or T4, over half having clinically positive nodes at the start of treatment. A determinate survival rate of 70 per cent disease free at three years was obtained and 74 per cent achieved quality relief of all symptoms. Two patients declined local treatment and survived three years disease free after chemotherapy alone. No recurrence has occurred to date in seven patients achieving apparent complete histological regression (ACHR) in their surgical specimens. Although ACCR does not automatically improve prognosis it is likely that it does enhance the complete remission rate, especially for those also achieving ACHR. Benefits to patients obtaining ACCR with this minimally toxic chemotherapy schedule are listed. PMID:2465362

  20. Preservation of immune effector cell function following administration of a dose-intense 5-fluorouracil-chemotherapy regimen.

    PubMed

    Weiner, L M; Hudes, G R; Kitson, J; Walczak, J; Watts, P; Litwin, S; O'Dwyer, P J

    1993-01-01

    In a phase II clinical trial of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) plus N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) therapy administration, a number of slowly developing clinical responses were observed. Because of this, a variety of immune parameters were sequentially studied in 21 patients on this trial. Of the 21 patients studied, 20 provided sufficient samples to compare baseline with subsequent values, 10 of the 20 patients responded to treatment. Responders and non-responders did not differ in any studied parameter at baseline. After 2 months of therapy, non-specific monocyte cytotoxicity (NSMC), antibody-dependent monocyte cytotoxicity (ADMC) and natural killer (NK) activity were higher in the entire study population, but these increases were not statistically significant. When responders and non-responders were evaluated separately, it was apparent that the trend was due solely to the changes observed in the responding patient population. When mean lysis values for each patient group were determined for each studied time point, it was possible to generate a mean area under the cytotoxicity/time curve (AUC) for each studied parameter. NSMC and ADMC did not differ in responders and non-responders. However, NK activity was significantly greater by mean AUC analysis (P = 0.006) in the responding group; NK activity was maintained in the responders, but decreased in non-responders. When lymphocyte and monocyte expression of the surface markers beta 2-microglobulin, HLA-DR, CD56, HNK-1, CD16 and interleukin-2 receptor were evaluated, there were no differences among responders and non-responders at baseline by mean AUC analysis or when comparing baseline with non-baseline values. It is concluded that although baseline immunological characteristics do not identify patients who are likely to respond to weekly 5FU and PALA, treatment is not associated with deleterious effects on the immune effector function parameters evaluated in this study, there being no effects on expression of a

  1. Preparation and clinical evaluation of a novel lozenge containing polaprezinc, a zinc-L-carnosine, for prevention of oral mucositis in patients with hematological cancer who received high-dose chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Ryo; Suzuki, Akio; Yamada, Yuto; Ishida, Masayuki; Shakui, Toshinobu; Kitagawa, Junichi; Hayashi, Hideki; Sugiyama, Tadashi; Takeuchi, Hirofumi; Tsurumi, Hisashi; Itoh, Yoshinori

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported that oral ingestion of polaprezinc, a zinc-L-carnosine, suspended in sodium alginate solution prevents oral mucositis in patients receiving radiotherapy or high-dose chemotherapy. In the present study, we developed a novel preparation of polaprezinc and evaluated clinical effect of the lozenge preparation in patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The preparation contained 18.75 mg polaprezinc in a tablet and showed an excellent uniformity and stability up to 24 weeks after storage under room temperature. The incidence rate of grade ≥ 2 oral mucositis was 74 % in patients without premedication, whereas the rate was remarkably reduced in patients receiving the suspension (23 %) or lozenge (13 %) of polaprezinc (P < 0.01). The use of non-opioid analgesic drugs such as anti-inflammatory agents and local anesthetics for oral pain was also greatly reduced by polaprezinc suspension or its lozenge (16 % for suspension and 13 % for lozenge compared with 89 % with no premedication, P < 0.01). These findings suggest that polaprezinc lozenge is simple to apply and highly effective for prevention of oral mucositis associated with high-dose chemotherapy for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27418192

  2. A case series of children with high-risk metastatic neuroblastoma treated with a novel treatment strategy consisting of postponed primary surgery until the end of systemic chemotherapy including high-dose chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hashii, Yoshiko; Kusafuka, Takeshi; Ohta, Hideaki; Yoneda, Akihiro; Osugi, Yuko; Kobayashi, Yasutsugu; Fukuzawa, Masahiro; Hara, Junichi

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the feasibility of a novel treatment strategy consisting of postponed primary surgery till the end of systemic chemotherapy including HDC without interruption by local therapy for neuroblastoma patients at a high risk for relapse. After induction chemotherapy, patients received double conditioning HDC consisting of thiotepa and melphalan. Radical surgery was applied to local lesions. Irradiation was not applied to any lesions. Eleven consecutive pediatric neuroblastoma patients were treated according to this strategy. Seven of 11 patients remained in complete remission for 21-171 months. This treatment strategy seems feasible and a further study is warranted.

  3. High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Children with High-Risk or Recurrent Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite increasing evidence that high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDCT/auto-SCT) might improve the survival of patients with high-risk or recurrent solid tumors, therapy effectiveness for bone and soft tissue sarcoma treatment remains unclear. This study retrospectively investigated the feasibility and effectiveness of HDCT/auto-SCT for high-risk or recurrent bone and soft tissue sarcoma. A total of 28 patients (18 high-risk and 10 recurrent) underwent single or tandem HDCT/auto-SCT between October 2004 and September 2014. During follow-up of a median 15.3 months, 18 patients exhibited disease progression and 2 died of treatment-related toxicities (1 veno-occlusive disease and 1 sepsis). Overall, 8 patients remained alive and progression-free. The 3-year overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) rates for all 28 patients were 28.7% and 26.3%, respectively. In the subgroup analysis, OS and EFS rates were higher in patients with complete or partial remission prior to HDCT/auto-SCT than in those with worse responses (OS, 39.1% vs. 0.0%, P = 0.002; EFS, 36.8% vs. 0.0%, P < 0.001). Therefore, careful selection of patients who can benefit from HDCT/auto-SCT and maximal effort to reduce tumor burden prior to treatment will be important to achieve favorable outcomes in patients with high-risk or recurrent bone and soft tissue sarcomas. PMID:27366002

  4. Dose-intensified chemotherapy alone or in combination with mogamulizumab in newly diagnosed aggressive adult T-cell leukaemia-lymphoma: a randomized phase II study.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takashi; Jo, Tatsuro; Takemoto, Shigeki; Suzushima, Hitoshi; Uozumi, Kimiharu; Yamamoto, Kazuhito; Uike, Naokuni; Saburi, Yoshio; Nosaka, Kisato; Utsunomiya, Atae; Tobinai, Kensei; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Ishitsuka, Kenji; Yoshida, Shinichiro; Taira, Naoya; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Imada, Kazunori; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Akinaga, Shiro; Tomonaga, Masao; Ueda, Ryuzo

    2015-06-01

    This multicentre, randomized, phase II study was conducted to examine whether the addition of mogamulizumab, a humanized anti-CC chemokine receptor 4 antibody, to mLSG15, a dose-intensified chemotherapy, further increases efficacy without compromising safety of patients with newly diagnosed aggressive adult T-cell leukaemia-lymphoma (ATL). Patients were assigned 1:1 to receive mLSG15 plus mogamulizumab or mLSG15 alone. The primary endpoint was the complete response rate (%CR); secondary endpoints included the overall response rate (ORR) and safety. The %CR and ORR in the mLSG15-plus-mogamulizumab arm (n = 29) were 52% [95% confidence interval (CI), 33-71%] and 86%, respectively; the corresponding values in the mLSG15 arm (n = 24) were 33% (95% CI, 16-55%) and 75%, respectively. Grade ≥ 3 treatment-emergent adverse events, including anaemia, thrombocytopenia, lymphopenia, leucopenia and decreased appetite, were observed more frequently (≥10% difference) in the mLSG15-plus-mogamulizumab arm. Several adverse events, including skin disorders, cytomegalovirus infection, pyrexia, hyperglycaemia and interstitial lung disease, were observed only in the mLSG15-plus-mogamulizumab arm. Although the combination strategy showed a potentially less favourable safety profile, a higher %CR was achieved, providing the basis for further investigation of this novel treatment for newly diagnosed aggressive ATL. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT01173887. PMID:25733162

  5. Effect of leuprolide acetate on ovarian function after cyclophosphamide-doxorubicin-based chemotherapy in premenopausal patients with breast cancer: results from a phase II randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Song, Guiping; Gao, Hui; Yuan, Zhixiang

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies provided inconclusive evidence for the effectiveness of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue on ovarian function protection against chemotherapy-induced genotoxicity in premenopausal patients. This study was designed to examine the efficacy of leuprolide acetate on ovarian function preservation in patients with breast cancer. A total of 220 patients were recruited in this prospective clinical trial and were assigned randomly to receive cyclophosphamide-doxorubicin-based chemotherapy only or chemotherapy plus leuprolide acetate. Resumption of menses or premenopausal levels of both follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and estradiol (E2) within 12 months after the end of chemotherapy were considered as effective ovarian preservation. A total of 183 patients were considered evaluable (94 in chemotherapy-only group and 89 in chemotherapy plus leuprolide acetate group). At the end of follow-up, 27 patients in chemotherapy group and 15 in chemotherapy plus leuprolide acetate group resumed menses; seven patients in chemotherapy group and 14 in chemotherapy plus leuprolide acetate group restored premenopausal levels of FSH and E2. The median time to resume menses was 9.2 months for patients in chemotherapy plus leuprolide acetate group and was not reached in chemotherapy-only group. In addition, our results demonstrated that age and chemotherapy doses made no significant difference in the occurrence of premature menopause. The leuprolide acetate treatment simultaneously with cyclophosphamide-doxorubicin-based chemotherapy reduced the risk of developing premature menopause in premenopausal patients with breast cancer.

  6. [Expression of adhesion molecules on CD34+ cells of BM and PB stem cell samples during high-dose chemotherapy combined with transplantation of autologous PB stem cells].

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Han, Xiao-Hong; Shi, Yuan-Kai; He, Xiao-Hui; Yang, Cheng; Ai, Bin

    2004-12-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the expressions of adhesion molecules such as CD54, CD49d and CD62L by CD34(+) cells sampled from different stages of bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB) before/after G-CSF mobilization and after transplantation through the direct labeling with three colour-immunofluorescence and flow cytometry, and to explore the differences in expression of adhesion molecules on CD34(+) cells from different origins and their clinical significance. Mononuclear cells collected from BM and PB before mobilization, after collection of stem cells and hematopoietic recostruction of BM at the end of transplantation were marked with CD54-FITC, CD49d-FITC and CD62L-FITC separately, as well as CD34-PE and CD45PerCE. 3-color fluorescene analysis was carried out by FACS. The expression differences of CD34(+) and adhesion molecules between BM and APBSC were compared. The results showed that expression differences of CD54, CD49d and cd62Lon CD34(+) cells belore mobilization, after collection and reconstraction of transplantation were not statiscally significant, the difference of CD54, CD49d and CD62L on CD34(+) between 1st and 2nd collections of hematopoietic stem cells also were not statiscally significant. In the collected APBSC, the expression level of CD34(+) CD49d(+) was significantly lower than those in BM before mobilization (P = 0.001). It is concluded that the method of chemotherapy combined with G-CSF mobilization can down-regulate CD49d expression in BM CD34(+) cells, thus can mobilize and move theirs into peripheral blood. After the reconstitution by transplantation, the expression of CD49d on CD34(+) cells tends to normal, the clinical significance needs to be elucidated by accumulation of much more cases.

  7. A Phase I/II Radiation Dose Escalation Study With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Inoperable Stages I to III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Phase I Results of RTOG 0117

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Moughan, Jennifer; Graham, Mary V.; Byhardt, Roger; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Fowler, Jack; Purdy, James A.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Gore, Elizabeth; Choy, Hak

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: In preparation for a Phase III comparison of high-dose versus standard-dose radiation therapy, this Phase I/II study was initiated to establish the maximum tolerated dose of radiation therapy in the setting of concurrent chemotherapy, using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included patients with histologically proven, unresectable Stages I to III non-small-cell lung cancer. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of paclitaxel, 50 mg/m{sup 2}, and carboplatin, AUC of 2, given weekly. The radiation dose was to be sequentially intensified by increasing the daily fraction size, starting from 75.25 Gy/35 fractions. Results: The Phase I portion of this study accrued 17 patients from 10 institutions and was closed in January 2004. After the initial 8 patients were accrued to cohort 1, the trial closed temporarily on September 26, 2002, due to reported toxicity. Two acute treatment-related dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were reported at the time: a case of grade 5 and grade 3 radiation pneumonitis. The protocol, therefore, was revised to de-escalate the radiation therapy dose (74 Gy/37 fractions). Patients in cohort 1 continued to develop toxicity, with 6/8 (75%) patients eventually developing grade >=3 events. Cohort 2 accrued 9 patients. There was one DLT, a grade 3 esophagitis, in cohort 2 in the first 5 patients (1/5 patients) and no DLTs for the next 2 patients (0/2 patients). Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was determined to be 74 Gy/37 fractions (2.0 Gy per fraction) using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent paclitaxel and carboplatin therapy. This dose level in the Phase II portion has been well tolerated, with low rates of acute and late lung toxicities.

  8. Improved survival rate in primary intracranial lymphoma treated by high-dose radiation and systemic vincristine-doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide-prednisolone chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shibamoto, Y; Tsutsui, K; Dodo, Y; Yamabe, H; Shima, N; Abe, M

    1990-05-01

    Thirty patients with histologically proven primary intracranial non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were treated at Kyoto University. Ten of them were treated prospectively with a radiation-chemotherapy protocol. All but four specimens were recently reexamined and classified according to the Working Formulation system. The predominant histologic types were diffuse large cell type, large cell immunoblastic type, and diffuse mixed small and large cell type, seen in 38%, 21%, and 21% of cases, respectively. Before 1980, 16 patients were treated with postoperative radiation without definite chemotherapy, and only one has survived more than 5 years. Local recurrence was the most common cause of failure. In 1981, the authors started a protocol in which four to six courses of systemic chemotherapy with vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and prednisolone (VEPA) was given after whole brain radiation (30-40 Gy) with a local boost up to 50 to 60 Gy. Eight patients completed this protocol, and all of them are alive at 16 to 100 months after diagnosis, with three patients surviving more than 5 years. Only one patient developed recurrence. On the other hand, six patients who did not complete or receive chemotherapy after 1981 are dead or alive with recurrence. Correlation between the Working Formulation subtype and prognosis was not clear because of the variety of treatment. Two patients receiving chemotherapy developed brain necrosis, which was fatal in one case, and the other two patients treated with the protocol are in a poor state without signs of recurrence. Chemotherapy may enhance the radiation effect on normal brain tissue as well as tumor. Combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy can improve the survival rate, but the optimal dosage needs to be investigated further.

  9. Chemotherapy and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health > Chemotherapy and Your Mouth Chemotherapy and Your Mouth Main Content Are You Being Treated With Chemotherapy ... Back to Top How Does Chemotherapy Affect the Mouth? Chemotherapy is the use of drugs to treat ...

  10. Discovery and Delivery of Synergistic Chemotherapy Drug Combinations to Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, Kathryn Militar

    Chemotherapy combinations for cancer treatments harbor immense therapeutic potentials which have largely been untapped. Of all diseases, clinical studies of drug combinations are the most prevalent in oncology, yet their effectiveness is disputable, as complete tumor regressions are rare. Our research has been devoted towards developing delivery vehicles for combinations of chemotherapy drugs which elicit significant tumor reduction yet limit toxicity in healthy tissue. Current administration methods assume that chemotherapy combinations at maximum tolerable doses will provide the greatest therapeutic effect -- a presumption which often leads to unprecedented side effects. Contrary to traditional administration, we have found that drug ratios rather than total cumulative doses govern combination therapeutic efficacy. In this thesis, we have developed nanoparticles to incorporate synergistic ratios of chemotherapy combinations which significantly inhibit cancer cell growth at lower doses than would be required for their single drug counterparts. The advantages of multi-drug incorporation in nano-vehicles are many: improved accumulation in tumor tissue via the enhanced permeation and retention effect, limited uptake in healthy tissue, and controlled exposure of tumor tissue to optimal synergistic drug ratios. To exploit these advantages for polychemotherapy delivery, two prominent nanoparticles were investigated: liposomes and polymer-drug conjugates. Liposomes represent the oldest class of nanoparticles, with high drug loading capacities and excellent biocompatibility. Polymer-drug conjugates offer controlled drug incorporations through reaction stoichiometry, and potentially allow for delivery of precise ratios. Here, we show that both vehicles, when armed with synergistic ratios of chemotherapy drugs, significantly inhibit tumor growth in an aggressive mouse breast carcinoma model. Furthermore, versatile drug incorporation methods investigated here can be broadly

  11. Convection-enhanced delivery of Ls-TPT enables an effective, continuous, low-dose chemotherapy against malignant glioma xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Saito, Ryuta; Krauze, Michal T; Noble, Charles O; Drummond, Daryl C; Kirpotin, Dmitri B; Berger, Mitchel S; Park, John W; Bankiewicz, Krystof S

    2006-07-01

    Treatment of malignant gliomas represents one of the most formidable challenges in oncology. The combination of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy yields median survivals of less than one year. Here we demonstrate the use of a minimally invasive surgical technique, convection-enhanced delivery (CED), for local administration of a novel nanoparticle liposome containing topotecan. CED of this liposomal topotecan (Ls-TPT) resulted in extended brain tissue retention (t1/2 = 1.5 days), whereas free topotecan was rapidly cleared (t1/2 = 0.1 days) after CED. The favorable pharmacokinetic profile of extended topotecan release for about seven days, along with biodistribution featuring perivascular accumulation of the nanoparticles, provided, in addition to the known topoisomerase I inhibition, an effective antiangiogenic therapy. In the rat intracranial U87MG tumor model, vascular targeting of Ls-TPT with CED was associated with reductions in laminin expression and vascular density compared to free topotecan or control treatments. A single CED treatment on day 7 showed that free topotecan conferred no survival benefit versus control. However, Ls-TPT produced a significant (P = 0.0002) survival benefit, with six of seven complete cures. Larger U87MG tumors, where CED of Ls-TPT on day 12 resulted in one of six cures, indicated the necessity to cover the entire tumor with the infused therapeutic agent. CED of Ls-TPT was also efficacious in the intracranial U251MG tumor model (P = 0.0005 versus control). We conclude that the combination of a novel nanoparticle Ls-TPT and CED administration was very effective in treating experimental brain tumors.

  12. γ-Herpesvirus load as surrogate marker of early death in HIV-1 lymphoma patients submitted to high dose chemotherapy and autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pratesi, Chiara; Zanussi, Stefania; Tedeschi, Rosamaria; Bortolin, Maria Teresa; Talamini, Renato; Rupolo, Maurizio; Scaini, Chiara; Basaglia, Giancarlo; Di Maso, Matteo; Mazzucato, Mario; Zanet, Ernesto; Tirelli, Umberto; Michieli, Mariagrazia; Carbone, Antonino; De Paoli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is a feasible procedure for human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) lymphoma patients, whose underlying disease and intrinsic HIV-1- and ASCT-associated immunodeficiency might increase the risk for γ-herpesvirus load persistence and/or reactivation. We evaluated this hypothesis by investigating the levels of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)- and Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-DNA levels in the peripheral blood of 22 HIV-1-associated lymphoma patients during ASCT, highlighting their relationship with γ-herpesvirus lymphoma status, immunological parameters, and clinical events. EBV-DNA was detected in the pre-treatment plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 12 (median 12,135 copies/mL) and 18 patients (median 417 copies/10(6) PBMCs), respectively; the values in the two compartments were correlated (r = 0.77, p = 0.0001). Only EBV-positive lymphomas showed detectable levels of plasma EBV-DNA. After debulking chemotherapy, plasma EBV-DNA was associated with lymphoma chemosensitivity (p = 0.03) and a significant higher mortality risk by multivariate Cox analysis adjusted for EBV-lymphoma status (HR, 10.46, 95% CI, 1.11-98.32, p = 0.04). After infusion, EBV-DNA was detectable in five EBV-positive lymphoma patients who died within six months. KSHV-DNA load was positive in only one patient, who died from primary effusion lymphoma. Fluctuations in levels of KSHV-DNA reflected the patient's therapy and evolution of his underlying lymphoma. Other γ-herpesvirus-associated malignancies, such as multicentric Castleman disease and Kaposi sarcoma, or end-organ complications after salvage treatment were not found. Overall, these findings suggest a prognostic and predictive value of EBV-DNA and KSHV-DNA, the monitoring of which could be a simple, complementary tool for the management of γ-herpesvirus-positive lymphomas in HIV-1 patients submitted to ASCT. PMID:25668032

  13. [Hypomagnesemia following chemotherapy of disseminated testicular tumors].

    PubMed

    Hida, S; Nishimura, K; Nishio, Y; Okada, Y; Okada, K; Yoshida, O

    1988-01-01

    Sixteen patients with metastatic testicular cancer were treated with combination chemotherapy including cisplatin (CDDP) at 3- to 4-week intervals for two to five courses. There was a sequential fall in serum magnesium with each course of therapy: 13 of the 16 patients (81%) became hypomagnesemic, and the median magnesium nadir was 1.67 mg/dl. Serum magnesium nadir levels gradually decreased according to the cumulative CDDP dose. Acute clinical effects of the hypomagnesemia were observed in 4 patients, 2 of them complained of neuromuscular disturbance in the extremities, one of cardiac arrhythmia, and the other of Raynaud's phenomenon. The median time to the onset of hypomagnesemia was 67 days and the duration of hypomagnesemia was 24 days. The creatinine clearance (Ccr) decreased gradually according to the cumulative CDDP dose, and the mean Ccr declined from 87.2 ml/min before therapy to 55.8 ml/min. In 3 out of 16 patients, an irreversible decrease to below 50 ml/min was seen after chemotherapy. In patients with normal renal function treated by VAB-6 regimen, creatinine clearance (Ccr) decreased transiently during each course of chemotherapy and returned to the pretreatment level during the interval. The mean creatinine clearance declined from 90.7 ml/min before therapy to 82.9 ml/min after three courses of induction chemotherapy. Urinary excretion of beta 2 microglobulin (beta 2MG) increased transiently before Ccr began to decrease during each course of chemotherapy. Serum potassium and calcium concentrations decreased transiently probably due to urinary losses but there was no significant relationship between hypopotassemia, hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Phase I trial of split-dose induction docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (TPF) chemotherapy followed by curative surgery combined with postoperative radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer (TISOC-1)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Induction chemotherapy (ICT) with docetaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil (TPF) followed by radiotherapy is an effective treatment option for unresectable locally advanced head and neck cancer. This phase I study was designed to investigate the safety and tolerability of a split-dose TPF ICT regimen prior to surgery for locally advanced resectable oral and oropharyngeal cancer. Methods Patients received TPF split on two dosages on day 1 and 8 per cycle for one or three 3-week cycles prior to surgery and postoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy. Docetaxel was escalated in two dose levels, 40 mg/m2 (DL 0) and 30 mg/m2 (DL −1), plus 40 mg/m2 cisplatin and 2000 mg/m2 fluorouracil per week using a 3 +3 dose escalation algorithm. Results Eighteen patients were enrolled and were eligible for toxicity and response. A maximum tolerated dose of 30 mg/m2 docetaxel per week was reached. The most common grade 3+ adverse event was neutropenia during ICT in 10 patients. Surgery reached R0 resection in all cases. Nine patients (50%) showed complete pathologic regression. Conclusions A split-dose regime of TPF prior to surgery is feasible, tolerated and merits additional investigation in a phase II study with a dose of 30 mg/m docetaxel per week. Trial registration number NCT01108042 (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier) PMID:23083061

  15. Impact of high-dose chemotherapy and autologous transplantation as first-line therapy on the survival of high-risk diffuse large B cell lymphoma patients: a single-center study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Inano, Shojiro; Iwasaki, Makoto; Iwamoto, Yoshihiro; Sueki, Yuki; Fukunaga, Akiko; Yanagita, Soshi; Arima, Nobuyoshi

    2014-02-01

    High-dose chemotherapy (HDT), together with autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT), plays an important role in the treatment of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), especially as second-line therapy. However, its significance in up-front settings remains to be elucidated. In our institute, patients with DLBCL in both the high-intermediate and high international prognostic index (IPI) groups initially underwent CHOP/R-CHOP treatment followed by HDT/ASCT at upfront settings between 2002 and 2011. We retrospectively analyzed 25 patients who were all treated with upfront HDT/ASCT. We excluded one patient who failed to undergo transplantation because of primary refractory disease from the analysis. The median follow-up was 77 months (range 17-110 months). Five-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 91.7 and 79.2 %, respectively, which were higher than the equivalents in previous studies. The OS and PFS in the high-risk group were lower than those in the high-intermediate group. Treatment-related mortalities or fatal complication were not observed. Our results confirm that HDT/ASCT for high-risk aggressive lymphoma is a feasible and promising therapy, but patients with high IPI continued to have poor prognoses; improvements in treatment strategy are clearly needed. Since HDT/ASCT is an aggressive treatment option associated with long-term complications, we need to identify patient groups that will gain the maximum benefit from HDT/ASCT in the upfront setting. PMID:24338743

  16. Impact of High-Dose Chemotherapy on The Ability to Deliver Subsequent Local–Regional Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B Protocol 9082

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Lawrence B.; Cirrincione, Constance; Fitzgerald, Thomas J.; Laurie, Frances; Glicksman, Arvin S.; Vredenburgh, James; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Crump, Michael; Richardson, Paul G.; Schuster, Michael W.; Ma, Jinli; Peterson, Bercedis L.; Norton, Larry; Seagren, Steven; Henderson, I. Craig; Hurd, David D.; Peters, William P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To report, from Cancer and Leukemia Group B Protocol 9082, the impact of high-dose cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, and BCNU (HD-CPB) vs. intermediate-dose CPB (ID-CPB) on the ability to start and complete the planned course of local–regional radiotherapy (RT) for women with breast cancer involving ≥10 axillary nodes. Methods and Materials From 1991 to 1998, 785 patients were randomized. The HD-CPB and ID-CPB arms were balanced regarding patient characteristics. The HD-CPB and ID-CPB arms were compared on the probability of RT initiation, interruption, modification, or incompleteness. The impact of clinical variables and interactions between variables were also assessed. Results Radiotherapy was initiated in 82% (325 of 394) of HD-CPB vs. 92% (360 of 391) of ID-CPB patients (p = 0.001). On multivariate analyses, RT was less likely given to patients who were randomized to HD treatment (odds ratio [OR] = 0 .38, p < 0.001), older (p = 0.005), African American (p = 0.003), postmastectomy (p = 0.02), or estrogen receptor positive (p = 0.03). High-dose treatment had a higher rate of RT interruption (21% vs. 12%, p = 0.001, OR = 2.05), modification (29% vs. 14%, p = 0.001, OR = 2.46), and early termination of RT (9% vs. 2%, p = 0.0001, OR = 5.35), compared with ID. Conclusion Treatment arm significantly related to initiation, interruption, modification, and early termination of RT. Patients randomized to HD-CPB were less likely to initiate RT, and of those who did, they were more likely to have RT interrupted, modified, and terminated earlier than those randomized to ID-CPB. The observed lower incidence of RT usage in African Americans vs. non–African Americans warrants further study. PMID:19747781

  17. Impact of High-Dose Chemotherapy on the Ability to Deliver Subsequent Local-Regional Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer: Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B Protocol 9082

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, Lawrence B.; Cirrincione, Constance M.S.; Fitzgerald, Thomas J.; Laurie, Frances; Glicksman, Arvin S.; Vredenburgh, James; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Crump, Michael; Richardson, Paul G.; Schuster, Michael W.; Ma Jinli; Peterson, Bercedis L.; Norton, Larry; Seagren, Steven

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To report, from Cancer and Leukemia Group B Protocol 9082, the impact of high-dose cyclophosphamide, cisplatin, and BCNU (HD-CPB) vs. intermediate-dose CPB (ID-CPB) on the ability to start and complete the planned course of local-regional radiotherapy (RT) for women with breast cancer involving >=10 axillary nodes. Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 1998, 785 patients were randomized. The HD-CPB and ID-CPB arms were balanced regarding patient characteristics. The HD-CPB and ID-CPB arms were compared on the probability of RT initiation, interruption, modification, or incompleteness. The impact of clinical variables and interactions between variables were also assessed. Results: Radiotherapy was initiated in 82% (325 of 394) of HD-CPB vs. 92% (360 of 391) of ID-CPB patients (p = 0.001). On multivariate analyses, RT was less likely given to patients who were randomized to HD treatment (odds ratio [OR] = 0 .38, p < 0.001), older (p = 0.005), African American (p = 0.003), postmastectomy (p = 0.02), or estrogen receptor positive (p = 0.03). High-dose treatment had a higher rate of RT interruption (21% vs. 12%, p = 0.001, OR = 2.05), modification (29% vs. 14%, p = 0.001, OR = 2.46), and early termination of RT (9% vs. 2%, p = 0.0001, OR = 5.35), compared with ID. Conclusion: Treatment arm significantly related to initiation, interruption, modification, and early termination of RT. Patients randomized to HD-CPB were less likely to initiate RT, and of those who did, they were more likely to have RT interrupted, modified, and terminated earlier than those randomized to ID-CPB. The observed lower incidence of RT usage in African Americans vs. non-African Americans warrants further study.

  18. Chemotherapy in Retinoblastoma: Current Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Yanık, Özge; Gündüz, Kaan; Yavuz, Kıvılcım; Taçyıldız, Nurdan; Ünal, Emel

    2015-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is the most common childhood malignant intraocular tumor. Although enucleation and external beam radiotherapy have been historically used, today the most commonly used eye-sparing approach is chemotherapy. Chemotherapy can be used in both intraocular and extraocular RB cases. Chemotherapeutic agents may be applied in different ways, including systemic, subconjunctival, intra-arterial and intravitreal routes. The main purposes of application of systemic therapy are to reduce the tumor size for local treatment (chemoreduction), or to reduce the risk of metastasis after enucleation surgery (adjuvant therapy). Intra-arterial chemotherapy with the current name “super-selective intra-arterial infusion therapy” could be applied as primary therapy in tumors confined to the retina or as a secondary method in tumor recurrence. The most important advantage of intra-arterial therapy is the prevention of systemic chemotherapy complications. Intravitreal chemotherapy is administered in the presence of persistent or recurrent vitreous seeding. The term “extraocular RB” includes orbital invasion and metastatic disease. Current treatment for orbital invasion is neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgical enucleation and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy after surgery. In metastatic disease, regional lymph node involvement, distant metastases, and/or central nervous system (CNS) involvement may occur. Among them, CNS involvement has the worst prognosis, remaining at almost 100% mortality. In metastatic disease, high-dose salvage chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell rescue therapy are the possible treatment options; radiotherapy could also be added to the protocol according to the side of involvement. PMID:27800245

  19. Impact of Drug Therapy, Radiation Dose, and Dose Rate on Renal Toxicity Following Bone Marrow Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Jonathan C.; Schultheiss, Timothy E. Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate a radiation dose response and to determine the dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors that influence the incidence of late renal toxicity following total body irradiation (TBI). Methods and Materials: A comprehensive retrospective review was performed of articles reporting late renal toxicity, along with renal dose, fractionation, dose rate, chemotherapy regimens, and potential nephrotoxic agents. In the final analysis, 12 articles (n = 1,108 patients), consisting of 24 distinct TBI/chemotherapy conditioning regimens were included. Regimens were divided into three subgroups: adults (age {>=}18 years), children (age <18 years), and mixed population (both adults and children). Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors significantly associated with late renal complications. Results: Individual analysis was performed on each population subgroup. For the purely adult population, the only significant variable was total dose. For the mixed population, the significant variables included total dose, dose rate, and the use of fludarabine. For the pediatric population, only the use of cyclosporin or teniposide was significant; no dose response was noted. A logistic model was generated with the exclusion of the pediatric population because of its lack of dose response. This model yielded the following significant variables: total dose, dose rate, and number of fractions. Conclusion: A dose response for renal damage after TBI was identified. Fractionation and low dose rates are factors to consider when delivering TBI to patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. Drug therapy also has a major impact on kidney function and can modify the dose-response function.

  20. Intensive chemotherapy as salvage treatment for solid tumors: focus on germ cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Selle, F.; Gligorov, J.; Richard, S.; Khalil, A.; Alexandre, I.; Avenin, D.; Provent, S.; Soares, D.G.; Lotz, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Germ cell tumors present contrasting biological and molecular features compared to many solid tumors, which may partially explain their unusual sensitivity to chemotherapy. Reduced DNA repair capacity and enhanced induction of apoptosis appear to be key factors in the sensitivity of germ cell tumors to cisplatin. Despite substantial cure rates, some patients relapse and subsequently die of their disease. Intensive doses of chemotherapy are used to counter mechanisms of drug resistance. So far, high-dose chemotherapy with hematopoietic stem cell support for solid tumors is used only in the setting of testicular germ cell tumors. In that indication, high-dose chemotherapy is given as the first or late salvage treatment for patients with either relapsed or progressive tumors after initial conventional salvage chemotherapy. High-dose chemotherapy is usually given as two or three sequential cycles using carboplatin and etoposide with or without ifosfamide. The administration of intensive therapy carries significant side effects and can only be efficiently and safely conducted in specialized referral centers to assure optimum patient care outcomes. In breast and ovarian cancer, most studies have demonstrated improvement in progression-free survival (PFS), but overall survival remained unchanged. Therefore, most of these approaches have been dropped. In germ cell tumors, clinical trials are currently investigating novel therapeutic combinations and active treatments. In particular, the integration of targeted therapies constitutes an important area of research for patients with a poor prognosis. PMID:25493378

  1. Phase I North Central Cancer Treatment Group Trial-N9923 of escalating doses of twice-daily thoracic radiation therapy with amifostine and with alternating chemotherapy in limited stage small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Garces, Yolanda I. . E-mail: garces.yolanda@Mayo.edu; Okuno, Scott H.; Schild, Steven E.; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.; Bot, Brian M.; Martens, John M.; Wender, Donald B.; Soori, Gamini S.; Moore, Dennis F.; Kozelsky, Timothy F.; Jett, James R.

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: The primary goal was to identify the maximum tolerable dose (MTD) of thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) that can be given with chemotherapy and amifostine for patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LSCLC). Methods and Materials: Treatment began with two cycles of topotecan (1 mg/m{sup 2}) Days 1 to 5 and paclitaxel (175 mg/m{sup 2}) Day 5 (every 3 weeks) given before and after TRT. The TRT began at 6 weeks. The TRT was given in 120 cGy fractions b.i.d. and the dose escalation (from 4,800 cGy, dose level 1, to 6,600 cGy, dose level 4) followed the standard 'cohorts of 3' design. The etoposide (E) (50 mg/day) and cisplatin (C) (3 mg/m{sup 2}) were given i.v. before the morning TRT and amifostine (500 mg/day) was given before the afternoon RT. This was followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI). The dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were defined as Grade {>=}4 hematologic, febrile neutropenia, esophagitis, or other nonhematologic toxicity, Grade {>=}3 dyspnea, or Grade {>=}2 pneumonitis. Results: Fifteen patients were evaluable for the Phase I portion of the trial. No DLTs were seen at dose levels 1 and 2. Two patients on dose level 4 experienced DLTs: 1 patient had a Grade 4 pneumonitis, dyspnea, fatigue, hypokalemia, and anorexia, and 1 patient had a Grade 5 hypoxia attributable to TRT. One of 6 patients on dose level 3 had a DLT, Grade 3 esophagitis. The Grade {>=}3 toxicities seen in at least 10% of patients during TRT were esophagitis (53%), leukopenia (33%), dehydration (20%), neutropenia (13%), and fatigue (13%). The median survival was 14.5 months. Conclusion: The MTD of b.i.d. TRT was 6000 cGy (120 cGy b.i.d.) with EP and amifostine.

  2. Induction chemotherapy in metastatic neuroblastoma--does dose influence response? A critical review of published data standards, options and recommendations (SOR) project of the National Federation of French Cancer Centres (FNCLCC).

    PubMed

    Pinkerton, C R; Blanc Vincent, M P; Bergeron, C; Fervers, B; Philip, T

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine, from a review of published data, whether in stage 4 neuroblastoma in children over 1 year of age, the dose or scheduling of induction chemotherapy influenced the response rate in distant metastases. Publications relating to induction chemotherapy since the introduction of cisplatin/epipodophyllotoxin combinations were identified using Medline, Current Contents and personal reference lists. Thirteen publications were identified which described 17 regimens involving 948 children. The doses and the scheduling of the various regimens were compared with a standard regimen OPEC (vincristine, cisplatin, teniposide, cyclophosphamide). These were correlated with the reported response rates in the bone marrow. Due to a lack of standardisation in the nature of restaging investigations, timing of restaging and definitions of response it was difficult to compare all studies. The complete response rate at distant metastases ranged from less than 40% to over 90%. For individual drugs; the comparative doses given in each course ranged up to 4.2 g/m(2) for cyclophosphamide, 280 mg/m(2) for cisplatin, 600 mg/m(2) for etoposide and 4.5 mg/m(2) for vincristine. There was no evidence of any positive correlation between response rate in the marrow and either the dose of any individual drug or the schedule used. In contrast to a previous study which included a number of older studies where disease assessment was even more variable, this analysis has failed to show any justification for the routine use of very intensive induction regimens in this disease. Such an approach should only be taken in the context of randomised trials in which timing and methods of reassessment can be standardised. Until such studies demonstrate superiority either in terms of response rate or progression-free survival lower morbidity regimens should remain the standard therapy. PMID:10974629

  3. The addition of rituximab to fludarabine and cyclophosphamide chemotherapy results in a significant improvement in overall survival in patients with newly diagnosed mantle cell lymphoma: results of a randomized UK National Cancer Research Institute trial

    PubMed Central

    Rule, Simon; Smith, Paul; Johnson, Peter W.M.; Bolam, Simon; Follows, George; Gambell, Joanne; Hillmen, Peter; Jack, Andrew; Johnson, Stephen; Kirkwood, Amy A; Kruger, Anton; Pocock, Christopher; Seymour, John F.; Toncheva, Milena; Walewski, Jan; Linch, David

    2016-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is an incurable and generally aggressive lymphoma that is more common in elderly patients. Whilst a number of different chemotherapeutic regimens are active in this disease, there is no established gold standard therapy. Rituximab has been used widely to good effect in B-cell malignancies but there is no evidence that it improves outcomes when added to chemotherapy in this disease. We performed a randomized, open-label, multicenter study looking at the addition of rituximab to the standard chemotherapy regimen of fludarabine and cyclophosphamide in patients with newly diagnosed mantle cell lymphoma. A total of 370 patients were randomized. With a median follow up of six years, rituximab improved the median progression-free survival from 14.9 to 29.8 months (P<0.001) and overall survival from 37.0 to 44.5 months (P=0.005). This equates to absolute differences of 9.0% and 22.1% for overall and progression-free survival, respectively, at two years. Overall response rates were similar, but complete response rates were significantly higher in the rituximab arm: 52.7% vs. 39.9% (P=0.014). There was no clinically significant additional toxicity observed with the addition of rituximab. Overall, approximately 18% of patients died of non-lymphomatous causes, most commonly infections. The addition of rituximab to fludarabine and cyclophosphamide chemotherapy significantly improves outcomes in patients with mantle cell lymphoma. However, these regimens have significant late toxicity and should be used with caution. This trial has been registered (ISRCTN81133184 and clinicaltrials.gov:00641095) and is supported by the UK National Cancer Research Network. PMID:26611473

  4. Understanding Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... you may get chemotherapy before a peripheral blood stem cell transplant. Fill this section in with your doctor or nurse. I am getting chemo ... can be given in these forms: An IV (intravenously) A shot (injection) into a muscle or other part of your body A pill ...

  5. Limited small cell lung cancer: prognostic significance of a complete response to the induction phase of chemotherapy followed by thoracic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, J G; Rosenstein, M M; Scher, H I; Fass, D E; Zelefsky, M J; Kris, M G

    1991-03-01

    Limited-stage small cell lung cancer is frequently treated with induction combination chemotherapy (ICC), followed by consolidation with thoracic irradiation. It has been suggested that patients who do not have a complete response to ICC are unlikely to have control of occult distant metastasis and consequently have such a poor prognosis that thoracic irradiation is unlikely to be of benefit. To examine this hypothesis, 48 patients treated on prospective protocols who achieved a complete response to ICC or subsequently to thoracic irradiation were analyzed. Twenty-four patients had a complete response to ICC (CR-ICC), and 24 subsequently converted to complete-response status after thoracic irradiation (CR-TI). The two groups had similar prognostic factors and treatment. Comparing CR-ICC and CR-TI patients, survival was 40% versus 26% at 2 years and 35% versus 4% at 5 years, respectively (P less than .05). Freedom from distant metastasis was 41% at 5 years for the CR-ICC patients and 8% for the CR-TI patients (P less than .05). A modest number of CR-TI patients were long-term survivors, suggesting a value for thoracic irradiation as consolidation therapy. PMID:1847240

  6. Incidence of and significant risk factors for aminoglycoside-associated nephrotoxicity in patients dosed by using individualized pharmacokinetic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bertino, J S; Booker, L A; Franck, P A; Jenkins, P L; Franck, K R; Nafziger, A N

    1993-01-01

    Incidence of and risk factors for aminoglycoside-associated nephrotoxicity (AAN) were evaluated in 1489 patients prospectively monitored with individualized pharmacokinetic monitoring (IPM). Incidence of AAN was 7.9% with individual (univariate) risk factors including advanced age, decreased albumin, poor nutritional status, pneumonia, concurrent furosemide, amphotericin B, vancomycin, cephalosporin, or piperacillin, intensive care unit treatment, leukemia, rapidly fatal illness, liver or renal disease, reduced aminoglycoside clearance, elevated initial steady-state trough concentration (Cminss), volume of distribution or half-life, duration of therapy, total dose, fever, male gender, shock, pleural effusion, and ascites. Multiple logistic regression revealed that Cminss, concurrent clindamycin, vancomycin, piperacillin, or cephalosporin, ascites, advanced age, male gender, decreased albumin, duration of therapy, and leukemia were significant independent risk factors for AAN. Positive predictive value of the model was 30.8%; negative predictive value was 91.7%. No identifiable risk factor alone or in combination was of sufficient sensitivity to reliably predict AAN, but use of IPM may lower the incidence of AAN. PMID:8418164

  7. What you think is not what they get: significant discrepancies between prescribed and administered doses of tube feeding.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Paulina W J H; Rasmussen-Conrad, Ellen L; Naber, Anton H J; Wanten, Geert J A

    2009-01-01

    Enteral tube feeding remains an indispensible strategy to treat disease-related malnutrition. In the present study we evaluated in clinical practice whether prescribed feeding volumes correspond with administered quantities and we highlight possible causes for discrepancies. During a 4-month observation period data from all patients fully depending on tube feeding (1.5-2.5 litres/d) were collected in a Dutch 900-bed academic hospital. The range for administered feeds to be adequate was set at 100 +/- 10% of the prescribed dose. Fifty-five patients (mean age 57 (SD 30) years) were included. Tube feeding was given continuously via pump (n 37) or drip (n 3), in portions (n 14) or by combined modes (n 1). Administered tube feeding amounts were significantly lower than prescribed in 40% of all patients (P < or = 0.001). The mean ratio of administered v. prescribed energy was 87 (SD 21) % (all modes), 85 (SD 24) % (pump), 94 (SD 12) % (portions) and 88.3 (SD 18.1) % (drip), respectively. The mean energy deficit amounted to 1089 kJ/d (range -7955 to +795). Only on intensive care unit wards did feeding administration meet the set goal. Feeding interruptions because of diagnostic or therapeutic procedures were the main reason for decreased intakes. Our findings show that many patients relying on tube feeding do not meet their nutritional goals during hospital stay. This problem can be addressed by adapting feeding schedules and the use of formulations with a higher energy density.

  8. High Dose Atorvastatin Associated with Increased Risk of Significant Hepatotoxicity in Comparison to Simvastatin in UK GPRD Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Alan T.; Johnson, Paul C. D.; Hall, Gillian C.; Ford, Ian; Mills, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Occasional risk of serious liver dysfunction and autoimmune hepatitis during atorvastatin therapy has been reported. We compared the risk of hepatotoxicity in atorvastatin relative to simvastatin treatment. Methods The UK GPRD identified patients with a first prescription for simvastatin [164,407] or atorvastatin [76,411] between 1997 and 2006, but with no prior record of liver disease, alcohol-related diagnosis, or liver dysfunction. Incident liver dysfunction in the following six months was identified by biochemical value and compared between statin groups by Cox regression model adjusting for age, sex, year treatment started, dose, alcohol consumption, smoking, body mass index and comorbid conditions. Results Moderate to severe hepatotoxicity [bilirubin >60μmol/L, AST or ALT >200U/L or alkaline phosphatase >1200U/L] developed in 71 patients on atorvastatin versus 101 on simvastatin. Adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] for all atorvastatin relative to simvastatin was 1.9 [95% confidence interval 1.4–2.6]. High dose was classified as 40–80mg daily and low dose 10–20mg daily. Hepatotoxicity occurred in 0.44% of 4075 patients on high dose atorvastatin [HDA], 0.07% of 72,336 on low dose atorvastatin [LDA], 0.09% of 44,675 on high dose simvastatin [HDS] and 0.05% of 119,732 on low dose simvastatin [LDS]. AHRs compared to LDS were 7.3 [4.2–12.7] for HDA, 1.4 [0.9–2.0] for LDA and 1.5 [1.0–2.2] for HDS. Conclusions The risk of hepatotoxicity was increased in the first six months of atorvastatin compared to simvastatin treatment, with the greatest difference between high dose atorvastatin and low dose simvastatin. The numbers of events in the analyses were small. PMID:26983033

  9. Curative cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Frei, E

    1985-12-01

    Cancer chemotherapy provides variably effective treatment for the majority of forms of human cancer and curative treatment for some 12 categories of cancer. Curative treatment is defined as the proportion of patients who survive beyond the time after which the risk of treatment failure approaches zero, i.e., the disease-free survival plateau. This progress has resulted from a closely integrated scientific effort, including drug development, pharmacology, preclinical modeling, experimental design with respect to clinical trials, quantitative criteria for response, and a series of clinical trials (initially in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia) in which the importance of complete remission, of dose and schedule, of sequencing chemotherapeutic agents, of pharmacological sanctuaries, and particularly of combination chemotherapy was studied. The principles derived from these studies, particularly those relating to combination chemotherapy, resulted in curative treatment for disseminated Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, pediatric solid tumors, testicular cancer, and limited small cell lung cancer. Many patients with certain stages of solid tumors, such as breast cancer and osteogenic sarcoma, are at high risk of having disseminated microscopic disease. Experimental studies indicate that treatment which is only partially effective against macroscopic disease is much more effective against microscopic tumors. Therefore chemotherapy is administered immediately following control of the primary tumor in patients at high risk of having disseminated microscopic disease, a treatment known as adjuvant chemotherapy. This program has been highly successful in increasing the cure rate in patients with pediatric solid tumors and in prolonging disease-free survival in patients with premenopausal breast cancer. Given dissemination of the technology, it is estimated that 15,000-30,000 patients per year are potentially curable in the United States. Curability of cancer

  10. Pulmonary Toxicity in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Treated With High-Dose (74 Gy) 3-Dimensional Conformal Thoracic Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy: A Secondary Analysis of Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) Trial 30105

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, Joseph K.; Stinchcombe, Thomas E.; Gu Lin; Wang Xiaofei; Morano, Karen; Bogart, Jeffrey A.; Crawford, Jeffrey C.; Socinski, Mark A.; Blackstock, A. William; Vokes, Everett E.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 30105 tested two different concurrent chemoradiotherapy platforms with high-dose (74 Gy) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) after two cycles of induction chemotherapy for Stage IIIA/IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to determine if either could achieve a primary endpoint of >18-month median survival. Final results of 30105 demonstrated that induction carboplatin and gemcitabine and concurrent gemcitabine 3D-CRT was not feasible because of treatment-related toxicity. However, induction and concurrent carboplatin/paclitaxel with 74 Gy 3D-CRT had a median survival of 24 months, and is the basis for the experimental arm in CALGB 30610/RTOG 0617/N0628. We conducted a secondary analysis of all patients to determine predictors of treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Methods and Materials: Patient, tumor, and treatment-related variables were analyzed to determine their relation with treatment-related pulmonary toxicity. Results: Older age, higher N stage, larger planning target volume (PTV)1, smaller total lung volume/PTV1 ratio, larger V20, and larger mean lung dose were associated with increasing pulmonary toxicity on univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that V20 and nodal stage as well as treatment with concurrent gemcitabine were associated with treatment-related toxicity. A high-risk group comprising patients with N3 disease and V20 >38% was associated with 80% of Grades 3-5 pulmonary toxicity cases. Conclusions: Elevated V20 and N3 disease status are important predictors of treatment related pulmonary toxicity in patients treated with high-dose 3D-CRT and concurrent chemotherapy. Further studies may use these metrics in considering patients for these treatments.

  11. A quantitative sensory analysis of peripheral neuropathy in colorectal cancer and its exacerbation by oxaliplatin chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Barbosa, Mariana; Kosturakis, Alyssa K; Eng, Cathy; Wendelschafer-Crabb, Gwen; Kennedy, William R; Simone, Donald A; Wang, Xin S; Cleeland, Charles S; Dougherty, Patrick M

    2014-11-01

    Peripheral neuropathy caused by cytotoxic chemotherapy, especially platins and taxanes, is a widespread problem among cancer survivors that is likely to continue to expand in the future. However, little work to date has focused on understanding this challenge. The goal in this study was to determine the impact of colorectal cancer and cumulative chemotherapeutic dose on sensory function to gain mechanistic insight into the subtypes of primary afferent fibers damaged by chemotherapy. Patients with colorectal cancer underwent quantitative sensory testing before and then prior to each cycle of oxaliplatin. These data were compared with those from 47 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers. Patients showed significant subclinical deficits in sensory function before any therapy compared with healthy volunteers, and they became more pronounced in patients who received chemotherapy. Sensory modalities that involved large Aβ myelinated fibers and unmyelinated C fibers were most affected by chemotherapy, whereas sensory modalities conveyed by thinly myelinated Aδ fibers were less sensitive to chemotherapy. Patients with baseline sensory deficits went on to develop more symptom complaints during chemotherapy than those who had no baseline deficit. Patients who were tested again 6 to 12 months after chemotherapy presented with the most numbness and pain and also the most pronounced sensory deficits. Our results illuminate a mechanistic connection between the pattern of effects on sensory function and the nerve fiber types that appear to be most vulnerable to chemotherapy-induced toxicity, with implications for how to focus future work to ameloirate risks of peripheral neuropathy. PMID:25183707

  12. MicroRNAs and Metabolites in Serum Change after Chemotherapy: Impact on Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jost, Edgar; Morin-Kensicki, Elizabeth; Goecke, Tamme W.; Bosio, Andreas; Rath, Björn; Brümmendorf, Tim H.; Bissels, Ute; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic regeneration after high dose chemotherapy necessitates activation of the stem cell pool. There is evidence that serum taken after chemotherapy comprises factors stimulating proliferation and self-renewal of CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) – however, the nature of these feedback signals is yet unclear. Here, we addressed the question if specific microRNAs (miRNAs) or metabolites are affected after high dose chemotherapy. Serum taken from the same patients before and after chemotherapy was supplemented for in vitro cultivation of HSPCs. Serum taken after chemotherapy significantly enhanced HSPC proliferation, better maintained a CD34+ immunophenotype, and stimulated colony forming units. Microarray analysis revealed that 23 miRNAs changed in serum after chemotherapy – particularly, miRNA-320c and miRNA-1275 were down-regulated whereas miRNA-3663-3p was up-regulated. miRNA-320c was exemplarily inhibited by an antagomiR, which seemed to increase proliferation. Metabolomic profiling demonstrated that 44 metabolites were less abundant, whereas three (including 2-hydroxybutyrate and taurocholenate sulphate) increased in serum upon chemotherapy. Nine of these metabolites were subsequently tested for effects on HSPCs in vitro, but none of them exerted a clear concentration dependent effect on proliferation, immunophenotype and colony forming unit formation. Taken together, serum profiles of miRNAs and metabolites changed after chemotherapy. Rather than individually, these factors may act in concert to recruit HSPCs into action for hematopoietic regeneration. PMID:26024523

  13. Rationale for combining immunotherapy with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dalgleish, Angus G

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy has usually been considered as an alternative to more traditional modalities. Moreover, it has previously been felt that chemotherapy is inherently immunosuppressive and not suitable for combining with immunotherapy. In this review, the concept of combining different modalities that result in cell death, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy, with immunotherapy is explored. Tumors actively cause immune suppression which can be reversed by their removal but when this is not possible, enhancing the immune response with nonspecific immune stimulation can enhance the response to other modalities, such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Additionally, several chemotherapy agents at low doses selectively inhibit regulatory and suppressor cells.

  14. [Chemotherapy of brain tumors].

    PubMed

    Kuratsu, J; Ushio, Y

    1994-10-01

    Despite recent attempts to improve chemotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of malignant gliomas, results remain limited and palliative. The development of effective chemotherapy for tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) is complicated in that the blood-brain barrier (B.B.B.) hampers the penetration of most drugs into the brain and cerebrospinal fluid. The factors governing delivery in the brain are the drug's molecular weight, lipophilicity and degree of ionization. Now the standard therapy for malignant glioma is maximal tumor resection followed by combination radiotherapy plus chemotherapy. Nitrosoureas are representative drugs which easily cross the B.B.B.. It has been shown that nitrosourea compounds have an additive effect to radiotherapy. The toxicity profile of nitrosoureas is leukocytopenia and thrombocytopenia as a dose-limiting factor. Furthermore, the great heterogeneity of malignant glioma tissues offered a rationale for the use of multiple drugs. Many studies were reported to show a substantial advantage for the multidrug regimen over control series utilizing single drugs alone. Despite clear examples of the effectiveness of chemotherapy, we are still far from improving the cure rate for the vast majority of patients with primary malignancies of the CNS. Further improvement in patient survival may depend upon understanding and manipulating the pathways that regulate aberrant growth in these tumors. The development of new anticancer agents, which are sensitive to malignant glioma and can reach a high concentration in glioma tissue, is warranted. PMID:7986118

  15. HIV chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Douglas D.

    2001-04-01

    The use of chemotherapy to suppress replication of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has transformed the face of AIDS in the developed world. Pronounced reductions in illness and death have been achieved and healthcare utilization has diminished. HIV therapy has also provided many new insights into the pathogenesis and the viral and cellular dynamics of HIV infection. But challenges remain. Treatment does not suppress HIV replication in all patients, and the emergence of drug-resistant virus hinders subsequent treatment. Chronic therapy can also result in toxicity. These challenges prompt the search for new drugs and new therapeutic strategies to control chronic viral replication.

  16. Chemotherapy for desmoid tumours in association with familial adenomatous polyposis: a report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Lisa; Blackstein, Martin; Berk, Terri; McLeod, Robin S.; Gallinger, Steven; Madlensky, Lisa; Cohen, Zane

    1996-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of chemotherapy for inoperable desmoid tumours associated with familial adenomatous polyposis. Design A review of three cases of unresectable desmoid tumours and of the literature on the subject. Setting The Steven Atanas Stavro Polyposis Registry at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto. Patients Three patients with symptomatic, unresectable desmoid tumours associated with familial adenomatous polyposis and unresponsive to conventional hormone therapy. Intervention A chemotherapy regimen of seven cycles of doxorubicin (dose ranging from 60 to 90 mg/m2) and dacarbazine (1000 mg/m2), followed by carboplatin (400 mg/m2) and dacarbazine. Outcome Measures Clinical improvement and tumour regression demonstrated by computed tomography. Results In each of the three cases significant tumour regression was seen clinically and radiologically. Conclusions Cytotoxic chemotherapy is an effective treatment for desmoid tumours associated with familial adenomatous polyposis. The chemotherapy should be started early in cases of symptomatic desmoid tumour unresponsive to conventional medical therapy. PMID:8640627

  17. Exhaling a budesonide inhaler through the nose results in a significant reduction in dose requirement of budesonide nasal spray in patients having asthma with rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, W A

    1999-01-01

    Budesonide, an inhaled corticosteroid is used routinely in the treatment of bronchial asthma and rhinitis. Although inhaled corticosteroids in therapeutic doses are unlikely to result in systemic side effects, there is as yet skepticism about their routine and prolonged use. The aim of this study was to determine whether budesonide inhalation through a metered dose inhaler, when exhaled through the nose could result in a reduction in the dose requirement of budesonide metered nasal spray in patients having perennial allergic asthma with rhinitis. This study was an open, parallel, comparative, crossover trial in which 49 young patients having perennial allergic asthma with rhinitis were divided into two groups and administered either a combination of budesonide metered dose inhaler with a budesonide nasal spray or a budesonide inhaler alone, which was to be exhaled through the nose. Both groups were later crossed over and weekly symptom scores and peak nasal inspiratory flow rates were monitored during each phase of the study. Finally, patients who volunteered from both groups were instructed to note the reduction in dose requirement of budesonide nasal spray while using a budesonide inhaler and exhaling it through the nose. The results of this study reveal that when a budesonide inhaler is exhaled through the nose, it results in an improvement in symptom scores and peak nasal inspiratory flow rates, which were significantly less than those obtained in the group using both a budesonide nasal spray and a metered dose inhaler. In addition, exhaling budesonide through the nose results in a 40.1% reduction in the dose requirement of a budesonide nasal spray, which is statistically significant (p < 0.001).

  18. Assessment of adherence to the guidelines for the management of nausea and vomiting induced by chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    França, Monique Sedlmaier; Usón, Pedro Luiz Serrano; Antunes, Yuri Philippe Pimentel Vieira; Prado, Bernard Lobato; Donnarumma, Carlos del Cistia; Mutão, Taciana Sousa; Rodrigues, Heloisa Veasey; del Giglio, Auro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To assess adherence of the prescribing physicians in a private cancer care center to the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline for antiemetic prophylaxis, in the first cycle of antineoplastic chemotherapy. Methods: A total of 139 chemotherapy regimens, of 105 patients, were evaluated retrospectively from 2011 to 2013. Results: We observed 78% of non-adherence to the guideline rate. The main disagreements with the directive were the prescription of higher doses of dexamethasone and excessive use of 5-HT3 antagonist for low risk emetogenic chemotherapy regimens. On univariate analysis, hematological malignancies (p=0.005), the use of two or more chemotherapy (p=0.05) and high emetogenic risk regimes (p=0.012) were factors statistically associated with greater adherence to guidelines. Treatment based on paclitaxel was the only significant risk factor for non-adherence (p=0.02). By multivariate analysis, the chemotherapy of high emetogenic risk most correlated with adherence to guideline (p=0.05). Conclusion: We concluded that the adherence to guidelines is greater if the chemotherapy regime has high emetogenic risk. Educational efforts should focus more intensely on the management of chemotherapy regimens with low and moderate emetogenic potential. Perhaps the development of a computer generated reminder may improve the adherence to guidelines. PMID:26154543

  19. Cure of a patient with profoundly chemotherapy-refractory primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma: role of rituximab, high-dose therapy, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nath, Shriram V; Seymour, John F

    2005-07-01

    Patients with primary large B-cell lymphomas of the mediastinum (PMBL) who suffer early relapse have a low likelihood of achieving a prolonged second remission with conventional salvage therapy. Here we describe the case of a 33-year-old woman with PMBL refractory to 6 lines of therapy before undergoing salvage therapy with rituximab, ifosfamide and etoposide followed by high-dose therapy, autologous transplantation, and sequential non-myeloablative allogeneic transplantation, who remains in ongoing complete remission for more than 39 months and is apparently cured. The specific roles of the components of the successful salvage therapy are discussed. PMID:16019561

  20. Effect of implementing a cancer chemotherapy order form on prescribing habits for parenteral antineoplastics.

    PubMed

    Pastel, D A; Fay, P; Lee, D

    1993-12-01

    Effect of implementing a cancer chemotherapy order form on prescribing habits for parenteral antineoplastics. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of a cancer chemotherapy order form improved prescriber inclusion of necessary prescription information to minimize errors for parenteral antineoplastics when compared to orders written on standard treatment-order forms. Standard treatment order forms and the newly developed chemotherapy order forms were examined for differences in completeness of the following 13 prescription components: diagnosis, height, weight, body surface area, start date and time, dosage (e.g., mg/m2), dose (mg), solution diluent (drips only) and volume (drips only), infusion rate (drips only), route (i.e., IV push or IV drip), frequency of administration, and total number of scheduled doses. The results demonstrate a significant improvement in completeness of necessary prescription information when cancer chemotherapy was ordered by physicians using a chemotherapy order form compared to a standard treatment order form. Importantly, the availability of various prescription components such as height, weight, and dosage may be used by the pharmacist to verify physicians' calculations of body surface area and dose and thereby reduce the chance of serious medication dosage errors. An additional benefit of the new form is a reduction in the time pharmacists spend clarifying orders.

  1. The potential for Bayesian compressive sensing to significantly reduce electron dose in high-resolution STEM images.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Andrew; Yang, Hao; Carin, Lawrence; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D

    2014-02-01

    The use of high-resolution imaging methods in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is limited in many cases by the sensitivity of the sample to the beam and the onset of electron beam damage (for example, in the study of organic systems, in tomography and during in situ experiments). To demonstrate that alternative strategies for image acquisition can help alleviate this beam damage issue, here we apply compressive sensing via Bayesian dictionary learning to high-resolution STEM images. These computational algorithms have been applied to a set of images with a reduced number of sampled pixels in the image. For a reduction in the number of pixels down to 5% of the original image, the algorithms can recover the original image from the reduced data set. We show that this approach is valid for both atomic-resolution images and nanometer-resolution studies, such as those that might be used in tomography datasets, by applying the method to images of strontium titanate and zeolites. As STEM images are acquired pixel by pixel while the beam is scanned over the surface of the sample, these postacquisition manipulations of the images can, in principle, be directly implemented as a low-dose acquisition method with no change in the electron optics or the alignment of the microscope itself.

  2. Clinical significance of a serum CA15-3 surge and the usefulness of CA15-3 kinetics in monitoring chemotherapy response in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Song; Park, Yeon Hee; Park, Min Jae; Chang, Myung Hee; Jun, Hyun Jung; Kim, Kyoung Ha; Ahn, Jin Seok; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Keunchil; Im, Young-Hyuck

    2009-11-01

    One hundred and twenty-two patients in whom the CA 15-3 level showed either a decline (92 patients) or an acute surge followed by a decline (30 patients) after chemotherapy were included. The clinical characteristics between the two groups and the CA 15-3 kinetics using receiver operating characteristic curves were analyzed. Patients with a surge had a significantly higher risk of disease progression than patients without a surge (P = 0.004; odds ratio 2.62; 95% CI 1.45-4.72). The clinicopathologic characteristics were significantly different between the two groups with respect to the distribution of ER, PR, and HER2 status, relapse-free survival, and the severity and extent of the involved organs. For patients with a surge, a CA 15-3 slope threshold > -0.0038 was chosen with a sensitivity of 80.0% and a specificity of 80.4%. The area under the curve was 0.847 (95% CI 0.771-0.906; P = 0.0001). A significant correlation between PFS and CA 15-3 slope was shown with Cox-regression modeling (P = 0.036; hazard ratio [HR], 2.1; 95% CI 1.01-4.14).These kinetics may serve as a good predictive marker of treatment response and response duration.

  3. Repeated dose (28-day) administration of silver nanoparticles of varied size and coating does not significantly alter the indigenous murine gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Wilding, Laura A; Bassis, Christine M; Walacavage, Kim; Hashway, Sara; Leroueil, Pascale R; Morishita, Masako; Maynard, Andrew D; Philbert, Martin A; Bergin, Ingrid L

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antimicrobials in a number of applications, including topical wound dressings and coatings for consumer products and biomedical devices. Ingestion is a relevant route of exposure for AgNPs, whether occurring unintentionally via Ag dissolution from consumer products, or intentionally from dietary supplements. AgNP have also been proposed as substitutes for antibiotics in animal feeds. While oral antibiotics are known to have significant effects on gut bacteria, the antimicrobial effects of ingested AgNPs on the indigenous microbiome or on gut pathogens are unknown. In addition, AgNP size and coating have been postulated as significantly influential towards their biochemical properties and the influence of these properties on antimicrobial efficacy is unknown. We evaluated murine gut microbial communities using culture-independent sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments following 28 days of repeated oral dosing of well-characterized AgNPs of two different sizes (20 and 110 nm) and coatings (PVP and Citrate). Irrespective of size or coating, oral administration of AgNPs at 10 mg/kg body weight/day did not alter the membership, structure or diversity of the murine gut microbiome. Thus, in contrast to effects of broad-spectrum antibiotics, repeat dosing of AgNP, at doses equivalent to 2000 times the oral reference dose and 100-400 times the effective in vitro anti-microbial concentration, does not affect the indigenous murine gut microbiome.

  4. Chemotherapy response as a prognosticator for survival in patients with limited squamous cell lung cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Eagan, R.T.; Fleming, T.R.; Lee, R.E.; Ingle, J.N.; Frytak, S.; Creagan, E.T.

    1980-07-01

    Twenty-two patients with limited unresectable squamous cell lung cancer were treated with 6 courses of combination chemotherapy consisting of cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, cisplatin, and bleomycin (CAP-Bleo) and short-course thoracic irradiation started after the first 4 weeks of chemotherapy. Of 20 patients with visible tumor who were treated with 4 weeks of chemotherapy alone, 10 (50%) had a tumor regression in that 4 week period and 10 did not. Those patients with tumor regression had significantly better progression free and overall survivals than did patients with no chemotherapy regressions (medians of 258 days vs. 136 days and 356 days vs. 150 days respectively). The original bleomycin dose had to be reduced by 50% primarily because of excessive radiation esophagitis that has not been reported with use of either the CAP regimen or bleomycin along in conjunction with thoracic irradiation. An initial chemotherapy regression seems to be a good prognosticator for progression-free and overall survival in patients with limited squamous cell lung cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  5. The Effect of Significant Tumor Reduction on the Dose Distribution in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Head-And-Neck Cancer: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mechalakos, James Lee, Nancy; Hunt, Margie; Ling, C. Clifton; Amols, Howard I.

    2009-10-01

    We present a unique case in which a patient with significant tissue loss was monitored for dosimetric changes using weekly cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. A previously treated nasopharynx patient presented with a large, exophytic, recurrent left neck mass. The patient underwent re-irradiation to 70 Gy using intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with shielding blocks over the spinal cord and brain stem. Weekly CBCT scans were acquired during treatment. Target contours and treatment fields were then transferred from the original treatment planning computed tomography (CT) to the CBCT scans and dose calculations were performed on all CBCT scans and compared to the planning doses. In addition, a 'research' treatment plan was created that assumed the patient had not been previously treated, and the above analysis was repeated. Finally, to remove the effects of setup error, the outer contours of 2 CBCT scans with significant tumor reductions were transferred to the planning scan and dose in the planning scan was recalculated. Planning treatment volume (PTV) decreased 45% during treatment. Spinal cord D05 differed from the planned value by 3.5 {+-} 9.8% (average + standard deviation). Mean dose to the oral cavity and D05 of the mandible differed from the planned value by 0.9 {+-} 2.1% and 0.6 {+-} 1.5%, respectively. Results for the research plan were comparable. Target coverage did not change appreciably (-0.2 {+-} 2.5%). When the planning scan was recalculated with the reduced outer contour from the CBCT, spinal cord D05 decreased slightly due to the reduction in scattered dose. Weekly imaging provided us the unique opportunity to use different methods to examine the dosimetric effects of an unusually large loss of tissue. We did not see that tissue loss alone resulted in a significant effect on the dose delivered to the spinal cord for this case, as most fluctuation was due to setup error. In the IGRT era, delivered dose distributions can be more

  6. Significance of including field non-uniformities such as the heel effect and beam scatter in the determination of the skin dose distribution during interventional fluoroscopic procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Vijay; Gill, Kamaljit; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2012-03-01

    The current version of the real-time skin-dose-tracking system (DTS) we have developed assumes the exposure is contained within the collimated beam and is uniform except for inverse-square variation. This study investigates the significance of factors that contribute to beam non-uniformity such as the heel effect and backscatter from the patient to areas of the skin inside and outside the collimated beam. Dose-calibrated Gafchromic film (XR-RV3, ISP) was placed in the beam in the plane of the patient table at a position 15 cm tube-side of isocenter on a Toshiba Infinix C-Arm system. Separate exposures were made with the film in contact with a block of 20-cm solid water providing backscatter and with the film suspended in air without backscatter, both with and without the table in the beam. The film was scanned to obtain dose profiles and comparison of the profiles for the various conditions allowed a determination of field non-uniformity and backscatter contribution. With the solid-water phantom and with the collimator opened completely for the 20-cm mode, the dose profile decreased by about 40% on the anode side of the field. Backscatter falloff at the beam edge was about 10% from the center and extra-beam backscatter decreased slowly with distance from the field, being about 3% of the beam maximum at 6 cm from the edge. Determination of the magnitude of these factors will allow them to be included in the skin-dose-distribution calculation and should provide a more accurate determination of peak-skin dose for the DTS.

  7. Significance of Including Field Non-Uniformities Such as the Heel Effect and Beam Scatter in the Determination of the Skin Dose Distribution during Interventional Fluoroscopic Procedures.

    PubMed

    Rana, Vijay; Gill, Kamaljit; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R

    2012-02-23

    The current version of the real-time skin-dose-tracking system (DTS) we have developed assumes the exposure is contained within the collimated beam and is uniform except for inverse-square variation. This study investigates the significance of factors that contribute to beam non-uniformity such as the heel effect and backscatter from the patient to areas of the skin inside and outside the collimated beam. Dose-calibrated Gafchromic film (XR-RV3, ISP) was placed in the beam in the plane of the patient table at a position 15 cm tube-side of isocenter on a Toshiba Infinix C-Arm system. Separate exposures were made with the film in contact with a block of 20-cm solid water providing backscatter and with the film suspended in air without backscatter, both with and without the table in the beam. The film was scanned to obtain dose profiles and comparison of the profiles for the various conditions allowed a determination of field non-uniformity and backscatter contribution. With the solid-water phantom and with the collimator opened completely for the 20-cm mode, the dose profile decreased by about 40% on the anode side of the field. Backscatter falloff at the beam edge was about 10% from the center and extra-beam backscatter decreased slowly with distance from the field, being about 3% of the beam maximum at 6 cm from the edge. Determination of the magnitude of these factors will allow them to be included in the skin-dose-distribution calculation and should provide a more accurate determination of peak-skin dose for the DTS.

  8. The effect of postoperative radiotherapy on the feasibility of optimal dose adjuvant CMF chemotheraphy in stage II breast carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkes, A.; Brufman, G.; Rizel, S.; Weshler, Z.; Biran, S.; Fuks, Z.

    1983-01-01

    The impact of a number of variables upon the effectiveness of adjuvant chemotherapy given to 87 patients with Stage II breast carcinoma was retrospectively analyzed. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil (CMF). Drugs were given in optimal doses (85% or more of the planned dose) to 17% of the patients; in intermediate doses (66 to 84% of the planned dose) to 50% of the patients; and in low doses (65% or less of the planned dose) to 33% of the patients. Myelosuppression was the main reason for giving intermediate or low doses. At a median follow-up of three years, 84% of all patients remain alive. Radiation therapy preceding chemotherapy was given to 70% of the patients, concomitant irradation and chemotherapy to 15%, and 13 patients (15%) received chemotheapy only. Of the 14 patients who received optimal doses of CMF, 12 (86%) also received radiation therapy. Disease-free survival at three years is similar for irradiated and nonirradiated patients, but the latter have a higher incidence of local recurrence (5% vs. 15%), although the difference is not statistically significant. Delay in the intiation of chemotherapy, mostly because of the administration of postoperative irradiation, adversely affected the probability and duration of disease-free survival, particulararly in premenopausal women in whom chemotherapy was started within more than 90 days of mastectomy. The administration of optimal doses of adjuvant chemotherapy should follow the primary treatment to the breast tumor as closely as possible. If radiation therapy is indicated as well, it should be delivered concomitantly with chemotherapy, given the feasibility of administering both modalities simultaneously, as demonstrated in this study.

  9. Clonal inventory screens uncover monoclonality following serial transplantation of MGMT P140K-transduced stem cells and dose-intense chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Frank A; Sorg, Ursula R; Appelt, Jens-Uwe; Lachmann, Nico; Bleier, Stephanie; Roeder, Ingo; Kleff, Veronika; Flasshove, Michael; Zeller, W Jens; Allgayer, Heike; von Kalle, Christof; Fruehauf, Stefan; Moritz, Thomas; Laufs, Stephanie

    2011-06-01

    Gene transfer of mutant O(6)-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT(P140K)) into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) protects hematopoiesis from alkylating agents and allows efficient in vivo selection of transduced HSCs. However, insertional mutagenesis, high regenerative stress associated with selection, and the genotoxic potential of alkylating drugs represent considerable risk factors for clinical applications of this approach. Therefore, we investigated the long-term effect of MGMT(P140K) gene transfer followed by repetitive, dose-intensive treatment with alkylating agents in a murine serial bone marrow transplant model and assessed clonality of hematopoiesis up to tertiary recipients. The substantial selection pressure resulted in almost completely transduced hematopoiesis in all cohorts. Ligation-mediated PCR and next-generation sequencing identified several repopulating clones carrying vector insertions in distinct genomic regions that were ∼ 9 kb of size (common integration sites). Beside polyclonal reconstitution in the majority of the mice, we also detected monoclonal or oligoclonal repopulation patterns with HSC clones showing vector insertions in the Usp10 or Tubb3 gene. Interestingly, neither Usp10, Tubb3, nor any of the genes located in common integration sites have been linked to clonal expansion in previous preclinical or clinical gene therapy trials. However, a considerable number of these genes are involved in DNA damage response and cell fate decision pathways following cytostatic drug application. Thus, in summary, our study advocates ligation-mediated PCR and next generation sequencing as an effective and reliable method to identify gene products associated with clonal survival in specific experimental settings such as chemoselection using alkylating agents.

  10. Evaluation of a novel automated protocol for the collection of peripheral blood stem cells mobilized with chemotherapy or chemotherapy plus G-CSF using the Fresenius AS104 cell separator.

    PubMed

    Pierelli, L; Menichella, G; Paoloni, A; Vittori, M; Foddai, M L; Serafini, R; Rumi, C; Mitschulat, H; Rossi, P L; Scambia, G

    1993-01-01

    Forty-seven peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collections were carried out on patients mobilized with chemotherapy and 63 on patients mobilized with chemotherapy plus G-CSF (Filgrastim), using the Fresenius AS104 cell separator and a novel automated PBSC collection protocol. As expected, cell yields were significantly higher in the series mobilized using chemotherapy plus G-CSF. The low platelet and red blood cell contamination permitted freezing of the apheresis product without further manipulation, other than plasma removal in both series. In patients mobilized with chemotherapy we obtained a MNC and a hemopoietic progenitor (CFU-GM, BFU-e, and CD34+ cells) collection efficiency comparable or superior to those reported by Bender (1992) with the Baxter CS3000 Plus after mobilization with cyclophosphamide. A significant decrease in MNC, BFU-e, and CD34+ cell collection efficiency was found in patients mobilized with chemotherapy plus G-CSF compared to those obtained in patients mobilized with chemotherapy alone. Ten patients achieved a prompt and stable engraftment after high dose chemotherapy and the infusion of cryopreserved PBSC collected using this protocol. Studies are in progress in order to improve MNC and hemopoietic progenitor collection efficiency in patients mobilized with G-CSF to obtain a graft in no more than one or two procedures.

  11. Effective T cell regeneration following high-dose chemotherapy rescued with CD34+ cell enriched peripheral blood progenitor cells in children.

    PubMed

    Heitger, A; Kern, H; Mayerl, D; Maurer, K; Nachbaur, D; Frühwirth, M; Fink, F M; Niederwieser, D

    1999-02-01

    The ex vivo enrichment for the CD34+ cell fraction of PBPC, while it retains the capacity to restore haematopoiesis and potentially reduces a contamination by tumour cells, implements a depletion of T cells. To test whether such a setting adversely affects T cell reconstitution, we monitored T cells in four paediatric patients after CD34+ selected PBPC transplantation. The dose of CD34+ cells, which were enriched to 74%, median, was 7.1 x 10(6)/kg, median, that of T cells was 0.071 x 10(6)/kg, median. The patients were homogenous with respect to features with a potential to effect T cell reconstitution (low median age, (35 years); stage IV malignant tumours in first CR, uncomplicated post-treatment course). The results of sequential FACS analyses showed that by 9 months after treatment all four patients had recovered (1) a normal T cell count (CD3+ cells 1434/microl, median); (2) a normal CD4+ cell count (816/microl, median), while CD8+ cells were recovered (>330/microl) already by 3 months; (3) a normal CD4/CD8 ratio (1.8, median), as a result of an augmented growth of CD4+ cells between 3 and 6 months (increase of CD4+ cells 4.9-fold, median, CD8+ cells 1.1-fold, median). Expansion of cells with a CD45RA+ phenotype (thymus-derived T cells) predominated; from 3 to 6 months the increase of CD4+/CD45RA+ T cells was 130-fold, that of CD4+/CD45RO+ cells was 1.7-fold; CD8+/CD45RA+ cells increased 9-fold, CD8+/CD45RO+ cells increased 2.1-fold, indicating effective thymopoiesis. The findings demonstrate that in paediatric patients the setting of HD-CTX rescued with autologous CD34+ selected PBPC per se is not predictive of an impaired T cell recovery. High thymic activity may be a key factor for the rapid restoration of T cells.

  12. Systemic chemotherapy in inoperable or metastatic bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Bamias, A; Tiliakos, I; Karali, M-D; Dimopoulos, M A

    2006-04-01

    Urothelial cancer is a common malignancy. The management of patients with recurrent disease after cystectomy or initially metastatic or unresectable disease represents a therapeutic challenge. Systemic chemotherapy prolongs survival but long-term survival remains infrequent. During recent years there has been improvement due to the use of novel chemotherapeutic agents, mainly gemcitabine and the taxanes. The long-considered-standard MVAC has been challenged by combinations showing more favourable toxicity profiles and equal (gemcitabine-cisplatin) or even improved (dose-dense, G-CSF-supported MVAC) efficacy. Specific interest has also been generated in specific groups of patients (elderly patients, patients with renal function impairment or comorbidities), who are not fit for the standard cisplatin-based chemotherapy but can derive significant benefit from carboplatin- or taxane-based treatment. Retrospective analyses have enabled the identification of groups of patients with different prognoses, who possibly require different therapeutic approaches. Modern chemotherapy offers a chance of long-term survival in patients without visceral metastases, possibly in combination with definitive local treatment. Finally, the progress of targeted therapies in other neoplasms seems to be reflected in advanced bladder cancer by recent studies indicating that biological agents can be combined with modern chemotherapy. The true role of such therapies is currently being evaluated. PMID:16303860

  13. Significance of low-dose radiation distribution in development of radiation pneumonitis after helical-tomotherapy-based hypofractionated radiotherapy for pulmonary metastases.

    PubMed

    Jo, In-Young; Kay, Chul-Seung; Kim, Ji-Yoon; Son, Seok-Hyun; Kang, Yong-Nam; Jung, Ji-Young; Kim, Ki-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Hypofractionated radiotherapy (HRT) is now commonly used for pulmonary malignancies, since a tumoricidal dose can be accurately delivered to the target without a consequential dose to adjacent normal tissues. However, radiation pneumonitis (RP) is still a major problem after HRT. To determine the significant parameters associated with developing RP, we retrospectively investigated data from patients with lung metastases treated with HRT using helical tomotherapy. A total of 45 patients were included in the study and the median age was 53 years old. The median prescriptive doses were 50 Gy to the internal target volume and 40 Gy to the planning target volume in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. RP was diagnosed by chest X-ray or computed tomography after HRT, and its severity was determined by CTCAE version 4.0. The incidence of symptomatic RP was 26.6%. Univariate analysis indicated that mean lung doses, V5, V10, V15, V20 and V25 were associated with the development of symptomatic RP (P < 0.05). However, multivariate analysis indicated that only V5 was associated with the development of symptomatic RP (P = 0.019). From the ROC curve, V5 was the most powerful predictor of symptomatic RP, and its AUC (area under curve) was 0.780 (P = 0.004). In addition, the threshold value of V5 for the development of symptomatic RP was 65%. A large distribution of low-dose radiation resulted in a higher risk of lung toxicity. So, to prevent symptomatic RP, it is recommended that the V5 be limited to <65%, in addition to considering conventional dosimetric factors. However, further clinical study must be undertaken in order to confirm this result.

  14. Pharmacogenomics in lung cancer chemotherapy: a review of what the oncologist should know.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, Chiara; Milano, Annalisa; Righini, Riccardo; Onesti, Concetta Elisa; Bassanelli, Maria; Falcone, Rosa; Paris, Ida; Lauro, Salvatore; Marchetti, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death around the world; the addition of chemotherapy to treatment of this disease has been shown to significantly increase progression-free survival and overall survival. Despite newer chemotherapies, it is important to personalize the care (treatment and dose) upon each single patient's susceptibility for controlling and reducing adverse side-effects, at best. The present review describes the current status of pharmacogenomics studies regarding germline DNA variants that may alter response and tolerability to chemotherapeutic agents used to treat lung cancer, including perspective studies.

  15. Significance of higher drug concentration in erythrocytes of mice infected with Schistosoma japonicum and treated orally with mefloquine at single doses.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yi; Xue, Jian; Jiang, Bin; Zhang, Hao-Bing; Xiao, Shu-Hua

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study is to understand the pharmacokinetic feature of mefloquine measured by erythrocytes and plasma in Schistosoma japonicum (S. j.)-infected mice and non-infected mice after oral administration of the drug at single doses. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was used to measure the plasma and erythrocyte concentrations of mefloquine at varying intervals posttreatment. Our results demonstrated that in non-infected mice treated orally with mefloquine at an ineffective dose of 50 mg/kg or effective dose of 200 mg/kg for 2-72 h, the erythrocyte-to-plasma ratios of mefloquine were 5.8-11.2 or 2-14.2. On the other hand, in S. j.-infected mice treated with the same single doses of the drug, the erythrocyte and plasma drug concentration ratios were 3.1-4.6 or 2.9-8.5, manifesting that either in infected mice or in non-infected mice that received oral mefloquine resulted in higher concentration of mefloquine in erythrocytes than that in plasma. Unexpectedly, under oral administration of mefloquine at a higher single dose of 200 mg/kg, the pharmacokinetic parameter C max values for plasma from S. j.-infected and non-infected mice were 1.6 ± 0.3 and 2.0 ± 0.4 μg/mL, respectively, which were below the determined in vitro LC50 (50 % lethal concentration) value of 4.93 μg/mL. Therefore, the plasma concentration of mefloquine may display a little effect against schistosomes during the treatment. Although the values of T 1/2 and AUC0-∞ for erythrocytes were significantly longer and higher in infected mice than those of corresponding non-infect mice that received the same single mefloqine dose of 50 mg/kg, the C max value was only 2.6 ± 0.4 μg/mL lower than the determined in vitro LC50, which may explain why this low single dose is ineffective against schistosomes in vivo. After administration of higher mefloquine dose of 200 mg/kg, the C max value for erythrocytes in infected mice was 30 % (7.4 ± 0

  16. Ondansetron: a pharmacoeconomic and quality-of-life evaluation of its antiemetic activity in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Plosker, G L; Milne, R J

    1992-10-01

    Ondansetron is more effective than high-dose metoclopramide in the prevention of acute nausea and vomiting due to highly emetogenic chemotherapy, and, unlike metoclopramide, is rarely associated with extrapyramidal effects. Pharmacoeconomic analyses have demonstrated that, in specified clinical settings, ondansetron (8mg 4-hourly for 3 doses or 8mg followed by 1 mg/h for 24 hours) is equally cost-effective as high-dose metoclopramide (3 mg/kg followed by 0.5 mg/kg/h for 8 hours) in the prophylaxis of emesis in patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy, at an acquisition cost 4- or 5-fold higher than that of the metoclopramide regimen. Furthermore, the combination of dexamethasone plus ondansetron has been shown to be more effective than ondansetron monotherapy in controlling emesis. In patients receiving high-dose ( greater than 50 mg/m2) cisplatin-based chemotherapy, antiemetic therapy with ondansetron (8mg intravenously as a single dose) plus dexamethasone (16mg total intravenous dose) was shown to be more cost-effective than the combination of high-dose metoclopramide (11 mg/kg total intravenous dose), dexamethasone (8mg intravenously as a single dose) plus lorazepam (1 to 1.5mg intravenously as a single dose). In a limited number of studies, quality-of-life scores, as assessed using the Rotterdam Symptom Checklist or the Functional Living Index--Emesis instrument, were significantly higher with ondansetron than with other antiemetic agents, including metoclopramide. Together, these results suggest that ondansetron, as an alternative to antiemetic regimens including high-dose metoclopramide, is appropriate cost-effective therapy for the prevention of acute nausea and vomiting in patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Ondansetron is effective in controlling acute emesis associated with moderately emetogenic chemotherapy, and its use in this clinical setting may best be reserved for patients who have not responded well to previous antiemetic

  17. Prevention of oral mucositis in patients treated with high-dose chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation: a randomised controlled trial comparing two protocols of dental care.

    PubMed

    Borowski, B; Benhamou, E; Pico, J L; Laplanche, A; Margainaud, J P; Hayat, M

    1994-01-01

    Between February 1986 and November 1989, 166 patients who were candidates for a bone marrow transplantation entered a randomised controlled clinical trial to compare limited oral hygiene care (LIM) and intensive oral hygiene care (INT) in the prevention of mucositis. Randomisation was stratified on the initial oral status (good vs. bad IOS). Intensive oral hygiene care included an initial treatment of dental lesions and tooth and gum brushing during aplasia. Limited oral hygiene care excluded preventive dental treatment and gingival and tooth brushing. Mucositis was classified as absent, mild, moderate or severe, according to the clinical aspects of the different sites in the mouth and to two scales of pain evaluation. Of the 150 evaluable patients (75 in each group), 134 developed moderate/severe mucositis (64 in the INT group and 70 in the LIM group) (log-rank test P < 0.02). The superiority of intensive oral care was observed both in patients with and without total body irradiation (TBI) and in patients with a good or bad IOS; the observed risk of mucositis was reduced by 70% in each of these four subgroups. Duration of moderate/severe mucositis was, although not significantly, lower in the INT group (17 days, S.D. = 12) than in the LIM group (19 days, S.D. = 13). The median time of mucositis occurrence was 11 days in the INT group and 9 days in the LIM group. Contrary to a widespread belief, the percentage of documented septicaemia was not higher in patients who underwent intensive oral care. We conclude that, although statistically significant, the superiority of intensive oral hygiene care is not clinically impressive.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8032307

  18. Management of Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Patients on Multiday Cisplatin Based Combination Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, Praveen; Einhorn, Lawrence; Albany, Costantine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of cisplatin based chemotherapy has revolutionized the treatment of germ cell tumors. A common side effect of multiday cisplatin chemotherapy is severe nausea and vomiting. Considerable progress has been made in the control of these side effects since the introduction of cisplatin based chemotherapy in the 1970s. Germ cell tumor which is a model for a curable neoplasm has also turned into an excellent testing ground to develop effective strategies to prevent chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in multiday cisplatin based regimens. The use of combination of a 5-hydroxytryptamine (HT)3 receptor antagonist, a neurokinin-1 (NK1) antagonist, and dexamethasone has greatly improved our ability to prevent and control acute and delayed CINV. Mechanism and pattern of CINV with multiday chemotherapy may differ from those in single day chemotherapy and therefore efficacy of antiemetic drugs as observed in single day chemotherapy may not be applicable. There are only few randomized clinical trials with special emphasis on multiday chemotherapy. Further studies are essential to determine the efficacy, optimal dose, and duration of the newer agents and combinations in multiday cisplatin based chemotherapy. PMID:26425563

  19. Management of Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Patients on Multiday Cisplatin Based Combination Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ranganath, Praveen; Einhorn, Lawrence; Albany, Costantine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction of cisplatin based chemotherapy has revolutionized the treatment of germ cell tumors. A common side effect of multiday cisplatin chemotherapy is severe nausea and vomiting. Considerable progress has been made in the control of these side effects since the introduction of cisplatin based chemotherapy in the 1970s. Germ cell tumor which is a model for a curable neoplasm has also turned into an excellent testing ground to develop effective strategies to prevent chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) in multiday cisplatin based regimens. The use of combination of a 5-hydroxytryptamine (HT)3 receptor antagonist, a neurokinin-1 (NK1) antagonist, and dexamethasone has greatly improved our ability to prevent and control acute and delayed CINV. Mechanism and pattern of CINV with multiday chemotherapy may differ from those in single day chemotherapy and therefore efficacy of antiemetic drugs as observed in single day chemotherapy may not be applicable. There are only few randomized clinical trials with special emphasis on multiday chemotherapy. Further studies are essential to determine the efficacy, optimal dose, and duration of the newer agents and combinations in multiday cisplatin based chemotherapy. PMID:26425563

  20. Impact of epoetin alfa in chemotherapy-associated anemia.

    PubMed

    Jilani, S M; Glaspy, J A

    1998-10-01

    Anemia associated with cancer and cytotoxic chemotherapy contributes adversely to the quality of life (QOL) of these patients. RBC transfusions have been the traditional treatment, but due to the associated risks, they are not routinely used to treat mild and moderate degrees of anemia Therapy with recombinant human erythropoietin ([EPO] epoetin alfa) in these patients has been effective for both prevention and treatment of anemia, and in decreasing transfusion requirements. More importantly, studies have shown that the addition of epoetin alfa therapy to the treatment of patients receiving cancer chemotherapy is associated with a significant increase in energy level, functional status, and overall QOL. Further studies will be required to define the most efficient and cost-effective dose and schedule of epoetin alfa during cancer chemotherapy, so that its benefits will be available to as many patients as possible. The most important studies will be focused on defining the relationship of dose to response, identifying early predictors of response, and determining cost-effectiveness.

  1. Endocrinological late effects after chemotherapy for testicular cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Berger, C. C.; Bokemeyer, C.; Schuppert, F.; Schmoll, H. J.

    1996-01-01

    Type and extent of endocrinological alterations were studied in long-term disease-free survivors after cisplatin-based chemotherapy for testicular cancer. A total of 63 patients with a median age of 30 (19-53) years, and median follow-up of 42 (16-128) months were included. Elevated serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were found in 63% of patients, 24% showed pathologically elevated luteinising hormone (LH) levels with normal and 10% with subnormal testosterone levels. The degree of gonadotropin elevation was highly significantly correlated with the cumulative platinum (P) dose. Patients treated with platinum-vinblastine-bleomycin regimens showed higher gonadotropin levels than those treated with platinum-etoposide-bleomycin. The adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), pathologically elevated in 68% of patients, was significantly correlated with the cumulative doses of chemotherapy (ctx) used and to the gonadotropin levels. Treatment variables, such as type and dose of cytotoxic agents used, as well as degree of gonadotropin elevation were further correlated with changes in oestron, testosterone and 17 alpha-OH-progesterone levels. Cholesterol levels were elevated in 32% of patients and significant interactions between the steroid hormone levels and cardiovascular risk factors could be shown. PMID:8624272

  2. Prognostic Significance of Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Dose-Escalated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine: Analysis of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Dose Escalation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M.; Schipper, Matthew; Zalupski, Mark M.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Abrams, Ross; Francis, Isaac R.; Khan, Gazala; Leslie, William; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Although established in the postresection setting, the prognostic value of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is less clear. We examined the prognostic utility of CA19-9 in patients with unresectable LAPC treated on a prospective trial of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients with unresectable LAPC were treated at the University of Michigan on a phase 1/2 trial of IMRT dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. CA19-9 was obtained at baseline and during routine follow-up. Cox models were used to assess the effect of baseline factors on freedom from local progression (FFLP), distant progression (FFDP), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Stepwise forward regression was used to build multivariate predictive models for each endpoint. Results: Thirty-eight patients were eligible for the present analysis. On univariate analysis, baseline CA19-9 and age predicted OS, CA19-9 at baseline and 3 months predicted PFS, gross tumor volume (GTV) and black race predicted FFLP, and CA19-9 at 3 months predicted FFDP. On stepwise multivariate regression modeling, baseline CA19-9, age, and female sex predicted OS; baseline CA19-9 and female sex predicted both PFS and FFDP; and GTV predicted FFLP. Patients with baseline CA19-9 ≤90 U/mL had improved OS (median 23.0 vs 11.1 months, HR 2.88, P<.01) and PFS (14.4 vs 7.0 months, HR 3.61, P=.001). CA19-9 progression over 90 U/mL was prognostic for both OS (HR 3.65, P=.001) and PFS (HR 3.04, P=.001), and it was a stronger predictor of death than either local progression (HR 1.46, P=.42) or distant progression (HR 3.31, P=.004). Conclusions: In patients with unresectable LAPC undergoing definitive chemoradiation therapy, baseline CA19-9 was independently prognostic even after established prognostic factors were controlled for, whereas CA19-9 progression

  3. A significant dose-dependent relationship between mercury exposure from dental amalgams and kidney integrity biomarkers: a further assessment of the Casa Pia children's dental amalgam trial.

    PubMed

    Geier, D A; Carmody, T; Kern, J K; King, P G; Geier, M R

    2013-04-01

    Dental amalgams are a commonly used dental restorative material. Amalgams are about 50% mercury (Hg), and Hg is known to significantly accumulate in the kidney. It was hypothesized that because Hg accumulates in the proximal tubules (PTs), glutathione-S-transferases (GST)-α (suggestive of kidney damage at the level of PT) would be expected to be more related to Hg exposure than GST-π (suggestive of kidney damage at the level of the distal tubules). Urinary biomarkers of kidney integrity were examined in children of 8-18 years old, with and without dental amalgam fillings, from a completed clinical trial (parent study). Our study determined whether there was a significant dose-dependent correlation between increasing Hg exposure from dental amalgams and GST-α and GST-π as biomarkers of kidney integrity. Overall, the present study, using a different and more sensitive statistical model than the parent study, revealed a statistically significant dose-dependent correlation between cumulative exposure to Hg from dental amalgams and urinary levels of GST-α, after covariate adjustment; where as, a nonsignificant relationship was observed with urinary levels of GST-π. Furthermore, it was observed that urinary GST-α levels increased by about 10% over the 8-year course of the study among individuals with an average exposure to amalgams among the study subjects from the amalgam group, in comparison with study subjects with no exposure to dental amalgams. The results of our study suggest that dental amalgams contribute to ongoing kidney damage at the level of the PTs in a dose-dependent fashion.

  4. Statins Dose-Dependently Exert Significant Chemopreventive Effects Against Various Cancers in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Chao; Hsu, Yi-Ping; Liu, Ju-Chi; Kao, Pai-Feng; Sung, Li-Chin; Lin, Chao-Feng; Hao, Wen-Rui; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with an increased cancer risk. We evaluated the chemopreventive effect of statins against all cancers in COPD patients and identified the statin with the strongest chemopreventive effect. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All patients diagnosed with COPD at health care facilities in Taiwan (n = 116,017) from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2012, were recruited. Each patient was followed to assess the following protective and risk factors for all cancers: age; sex; comorbidities (diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia) and the Charlson comorbidity index [CCI]); urbanization level; monthly income; and nonstatin drug use. The index date of statins use was the date of COPD confirmation. Propensity scores (PSs) were derived using a logistic regression model to estimate the effect of statins by considering the covariates predicting intervention (statins) receipt. To examine the dose-response relationship, we categorized statin use into four groups in each cohort (<28 [statin nonusers], 28-90, 91-365, and >365 cumulative defined daily dose). RESULTS: After PS adjustment for age, sex, CCI, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, urbanization level, and monthly income, we analyzed the all-cancer risk. The adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) for the all-cancer risk were lower among statin users than among statin nonusers (aHR = 0.46, 95% confidence interval: 0.43 to 0.50). The aHRs for the all-cancer risk were lower among patients using rosuvastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin, pravastatin, and fluvastatin than among statin nonusers (aHRs = 0.42, 0.55, 0.59, 0.66, and 0.78, respectively). Sensitivity analysis indicated that statins dose-dependently reduced the all-cancer risk. CONCLUSION: Statins dose-dependently exert a significant chemopreventive effect against various cancers in COPD patients. In particular, rosuvastatin has the strongest chemopreventive effect.

  5. Statins Dose-Dependently Exert Significant Chemopreventive Effects Against Various Cancers in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Chao; Hsu, Yi-Ping; Liu, Ju-Chi; Kao, Pai-Feng; Sung, Li-Chin; Lin, Chao-Feng; Hao, Wen-Rui; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with an increased cancer risk. We evaluated the chemopreventive effect of statins against all cancers in COPD patients and identified the statin with the strongest chemopreventive effect. PATIENTS AND METHODS: All patients diagnosed with COPD at health care facilities in Taiwan (n = 116,017) from January 1, 2001, to December 31, 2012, were recruited. Each patient was followed to assess the following protective and risk factors for all cancers: age; sex; comorbidities (diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia) and the Charlson comorbidity index [CCI]); urbanization level; monthly income; and nonstatin drug use. The index date of statins use was the date of COPD confirmation. Propensity scores (PSs) were derived using a logistic regression model to estimate the effect of statins by considering the covariates predicting intervention (statins) receipt. To examine the dose-response relationship, we categorized statin use into four groups in each cohort (<28 [statin nonusers], 28-90, 91-365, and >365 cumulative defined daily dose). RESULTS: After PS adjustment for age, sex, CCI, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, urbanization level, and monthly income, we analyzed the all-cancer risk. The adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) for the all-cancer risk were lower among statin users than among statin nonusers (aHR = 0.46, 95% confidence interval: 0.43 to 0.50). The aHRs for the all-cancer risk were lower among patients using rosuvastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin, pravastatin, and fluvastatin than among statin nonusers (aHRs = 0.42, 0.55, 0.59, 0.66, and 0.78, respectively). Sensitivity analysis indicated that statins dose-dependently reduced the all-cancer risk. CONCLUSION: Statins dose-dependently exert a significant chemopreventive effect against various cancers in COPD patients. In particular, rosuvastatin has the strongest chemopreventive effect. PMID:27698930

  6. An oral DNA vaccine against infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) encapsulated in alginate microspheres induces dose-dependent immune responses and significant protection in rainbow trout (Oncorrhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, Natalia A; Alonso, Marta; Saint-Jean, Sylvia Rodríguez; Perez-Prieto, Sara I

    2015-08-01

    Administered by intramuscular injection, a DNA vaccine (pIRF1A-G) containing the promoter regions upstream of the rainbow trout interferon regulatory factor 1A gene (IRF1A) driven the expression of the infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) glycoprotein (G) elicited protective immune responses in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). However, less laborious and cost-effective routes of DNA vaccine delivery are required to vaccinate large numbers of susceptible farmed fish. In this study, the pIRF1A-G vaccine was encapsulated into alginate microspheres and orally administered to rainbow trout. At 1, 3, 5, and 7 d post-vaccination, IHNV G transcripts were detected by quantitative real-time PCR in gills, spleen, kidney and intestinal tissues of vaccinated fish. This result suggested that the encapsulation of pIRF1A-G in alginate microparticles protected the DNA vaccine from degradation in the fish stomach and ensured vaccine early delivery to the hindgut, vaccine passage through the intestinal mucosa and its distribution thought internal and external organs of vaccinated fish. We also observed that the oral route required approximately 20-fold more plasmid DNA than the injection route to induce the expression of significant levels of IHNV G transcripts in kidney and spleen of vaccinated fish. Despite this limitation, increased IFN-1, TLR-7 and IgM gene expression was detected by qRT-PCR in kidney of vaccinated fish when a 10 μg dose of the oral pIRF1A-G vaccine was administered. In contrast, significant Mx-1, Vig-1, Vig-2, TLR-3 and TLR-8 gene expression was only detected when higher doses of pIRF1A-G (50 and 100 μg) were orally administered. The pIRF1A-G vaccine also induced the expression of several markers of the adaptive immune response (CD4, CD8, IgM and IgT) in kidney and spleen of immunized fish in a dose-dependent manner. When vaccinated fish were challenged by immersion with live IHNV, evidence of a dose-response effect of the oral vaccine could also

  7. Treatment of advanced head and neck cancer: multiple daily dose fractionated radiation therapy and sequential multimodal treatment approach.

    PubMed

    Nissenbaum, M; Browde, S; Bezwoda, W R; de Moor, N G; Derman, D P

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-eight patients with advanced head and neck cancer were entered into a randomised trial comparing chemotherapy (DDP + bleomycin) alone, multiple daily fractionated radiation therapy, and multimodality therapy consisting of chemotherapy plus multiple fractionated radiation therapy. Multimodal therapy gave a significantly higher response rate (69%) than either single-treatment modality. The use of a multiple daily dose fractionation allowed radiation therapy to be completed over 10 treatment days, and the addition of chemotherapy to the radiation treatment did not significantly increase toxicity. Patients receiving multimodal therapy also survived significantly longer (median 50 weeks) than those receiving single-modality therapy (median 24 weeks).

  8. Long-term results of dose-intensive chemotherapy with G-CSF support (TCC-NHL-91) for advanced intermediate-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: a review of 59 consecutive cases treated at a single institute.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Miyuki; Tsunoda, Saburo; Izumi, Tohru; Tanaka, Masaru; Katano, Susumu; Inoue, Koichi; Igarashi, Seiji; Hirabayashi, Kaoru; Furukawa, Yusuke; Ohmine, Ken; Sato, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Keiya; Kirito, Keita; Nagashima, Takahiro; Teramukai, Satoshi; Fukushima, Masanori; Kano, Yasuhiko

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the long-term outcome of very dose-intensive chemotherapy (TCC-NHL-91) for advanced intermediate-grade lymphoma, in which an eight-cycle regimen with 11 drugs was given with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) support (total 18 weeks). Fifty-nine patients were treated during February 1, 1991 and March 31, 2001 (median age: 48 years). Forty-three patients (73%) were in a high-intermediate risk or high-risk group (HI/H) according to the age-adjusted International Prognostic Index (aa-IPI). Forty-six patients received 7 or 8 cycles of therapy. Ten of 15 patients over age 60 stopped before 7 cycles. Forty-three patients with an initial bulky mass or a residual mass received involved-field radiation. Overall, 56 patients (95%) achieved complete remission (CR). Grade 4 hematotoxicity was observed in all patients. With a median follow-up of 128 months, the 10-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 76% and 61%, respectively. Neither aa-IPI risk factors nor the index itself was associated with response, OS, or PFS. One patient died of sepsis during the therapy and one died of secondary leukemia. This retrospective study suggests that the TCC-NHL-91 regimen achieves high CR, OS, and PFS in patients with advanced intermediate-grade lymphoma up to 60 years old and may be a valuable asset in the management of this disease. Further evaluation and prospective studies of the TCC-NHL-91 are warranted.

  9. Adjuvant chemotherapy and acute toxicity in hypofractionated radiotherapy for early breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kouloulias, Vassilis; Zygogianni, Anna; Kypraiou, Efrosini; Georgakopoulos, John; Thrapsanioti, Zoi; Beli, Ivelina; Mosa, Eftychia; Psyrri, Amanta; Antypas, Christos; Armbilia, Christina; Tolia, Maria; Platoni, Kalliopi; Papadimitriou, Christos; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos; Gennatas, Costas; Zografos, George; Kyrgias, George; Dilvoi, Maria; Patatoucas, George; Kelekis, Nikolaos; Kouvaris, John

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of chemotherapy to the acute toxicity of a hypofractionated radiotherapy (HFRT) schedule for breast cancer. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 116 breast cancer patients with T1, 2N0Mx. The patients received 3-D conformal radiotherapy with a total physical dose of 50.54 Gy or 53.2 Gy in 19 or 20 fractions according to stage, over 23-24 d. The last three to four fractions were delivered as a sequential tumor boost. All patients were monitored for acute skin toxicity according to the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. The maximum monitored value was taken as the final grading score. Multivariate analysis was performed for the contribution of age, chemotherapy and 19 vs 20 fractions to the radiation acute skin toxicity. RESULTS: The acute radiation induced skin toxicity was as following: grade I 27.6%, grade II 7.8% and grade III 2.6%. No significant correlation was noted between toxicity grading and chemotherapy (P = 0.154, χ2 test). The mean values of acute toxicity score in terms of chemotherapy or not, were 0.64 and 0.46 respectively (P = 0.109, Mann Whitney test). No significant correlation was also noted between acute skin toxicity and radiotherapy fractions (P = 0.47, χ2 test). According to univariate analysis, only chemotherapy contributed significantly to the development of acute skin toxicity but with a critical value of P = 0.05. However, in multivariate analysis, chemotherapy lost its statistical significance. None of the patients during the 2-years of follow-up presented any locoregional relapse. CONCLUSION: There is no clear evidence that chemotherapy has an impact to acute skin toxicity after an HFRT schedule. A randomized trial is needed for definite conclusions. PMID:25405195

  10. Intrathecal chemotherapy with ACNU for meningeal gliomatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, T. K.; Beuls, E.; Shimizu, K.; Koulousakis, A.; Sturm, V.

    1992-01-01

    ACNU [1-(4-amino-2-methyl-5-pyrimidinyl) methyl-3-(2-chloroethyl)-3-nitrosourea hydrochloride], one of the chloroethylnitrosoureas (CENUs), is believed to be effective against malignant glioma when intravenously or intrathecally administered. A rat model with meningeal gliomatosis (MG) induced by an intracisternal inoculation of rat C6 or 9L glioma cells was intrathecally and intravenously treated with ACNU in order to test the feasibility of intrathecal chemotherapy with ACNU in the treatment of meningeal gliomatosis. The median survival time (MST) of the animals was significantly prolonged when ACNU was intrathecally administered at dosages of 0.5 to 1.5 mg kg-1 in the early stages of MG, i.e. within 3 days after the tumour inoculation, whereas intravenous therapy with ACNU at a dose of 15 mg kg-1 did not exhibit any efficacy in the rats inoculated with C6 glioma cells (C6-MG). Intrathecal ACNU, however, at dosages of up to 1.5 mg kg-1 failed to demonstrate any therapeutic effect in the late stage of MG, i.e. 5 days after the tumour inoculation, except in the rats inoculated with 9L brain tumour cells (9L-MG). Intravenous chemotherapy with ACNU at a dose of 15 mg kg-1 extended the MST of the 9L-MG rats more significantly in the late stage of MG than in its early stage. This points to the feasibility of intrathecal ACNU in the treatment of meningeal gliomatosis in its early stages, but not in its late stages in which intravenous ACNU might be more effective than intrathecal treatment against MG of which the parenchyma has already been deeply invaded by the tumour. Images Figure 5 PMID:1457369

  11. Documentation of chemotherapy infusion preparation costs in academic- and community-based oncology practices.

    PubMed

    Brixner, Diana I; Oderda, Gary M; Nickman, Nancy A; Beveridge, Roy; Jorgenson, James A

    2006-03-01

    Significant changes in Medicare reimbursement for outpatient oncology services were proposed as part of the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003. The purpose of this study was to identify the "true cost" associated with drug-related handling for the preparation and delivery of chemotherapy doses to estimate the impact of changing reimbursement schema by Medicare. Two academic medical outpatient infusion centers and 2 community cancer centers provided data used to estimate all costs (excluding drug cost) associated with the preparation of chemotherapy doses. The data included both fixed costs (drug storage, space, equipment, and information resources) and variable costs (insurance management, inventory, waste management, pharmacy staff payroll, supplies, and shipping). The average cost for the preparation of chemotherapy doses across all sites was dollar 34.27 (range, dollar 32.08-dollar 41.23). A time-and-motion study was also performed to determine what tasks were conducted by pharmacy staff and how much time was spent in the preparation of the top 15 chemotherapeutic drugs and regimens used in the 4 sites. Data from the 4 centers was projected to show that if 3,990,495 million chemotherapy infusions were administered to a national Medicare population in 2003, when multiplied by the average cost of preparation for infusions determined by the current study (dollar 34.27), the estimated total annual cost to Medicare for chemotherapy preparation by pharmacists is dollar 136,754,263.65. The pharmacists spent most of their days (90% or more) performing tasks directly related to the preparation of these agents. These data provide scientific support for the consideration of appropriate reimbursement for chemotherapy services provided by pharmacists to Medicare beneficiaries. PMID:16507268

  12. Administration of chemotherapy in patients on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Kuo, James C; Craft, Paul S

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of patients on dialysis has increased and these patients present a challenge for chemotherapy administration when diagnosed with cancer. A consensus on the dosage and timing of different chemotherapeutic agents in relation to dialysis has not been established. We describe the pattern of care and treatment outcome for cancer patients on dialysis in our institution. The dataset from the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry of patients on dialysis who had a diagnosis of cancer was obtained and matched to the pharmacy records in our institution to identify patients who had received chemotherapy while on dialysis. Relevant clinical information including details of the dialysis regimen, chemotherapy administration and adverse events was extracted for analysis. Between July 1999 and July 2014, 21 patients on dialysis were included for analysis. Five (23.8%) received chemotherapy, most of which was administered before dialysis sessions. As a result of adverse events, one patient discontinued treatment; two other patients required dose reduction or treatment delay. Chemotherapy administration was feasible in cancer patients on dialysis, but chemotherapy usage was low. Better understanding of the altered pharmacokinetics in patients on dialysis may improve chemotherapy access and practice.

  13. Anticipatory vomiting in women receiving cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-FU (CMF) adjuvant chemotherapy for breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, P M; Fetting, J H; Nettesheim, K M; Abeloff, M D

    1982-08-01

    To determine the incidence of anticipatory vomiting (AV) and postchemotherapy nausea and vomiting (PCNV) in women receiving cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-FU (CMF) adjuvant chemotherapy for breast carcinoma, we studied 52 women randomized to two regimens (standard-dose and low-dose) of CMF. Charts were reviewed for the cycle of onset of AV and PCNV, the severity of PCNV, and relationships of these syndromes to CMF dose and protocol compliance. Among the 52 patients, AV occurred in 17 (33%), while PCNV was experienced by 46 (88%). Severe PCNV (defined as uncontrolled nausea and/or vomiting interfering with performance of daily activities) occurred in 22 of 52 (42%) women. Eighteen of 23 (78%) women receiving standard-dose CMF experienced severe PCNV, and 13 of these had AV. Patients in whom severe PCNV began before cycle 4 were more likely to develop AV than women in whom PCNV began later (P less than 0.01). Ten of 52 (19%) patients discontinued CMF adjuvant chemotherapy because of nausea and vomiting; seven of the ten (70%) were receiving standard-dose CMF and seven had experienced AV. This study demonstrates that both AV an PCNV are significant toxic effects that not only affect the quality of life of a woman receiving CMF chemotherapy for breast cancer but also limit the ability of the clinician to provide maximum therapy to woman at high risk of recurrence of breast carcinoma.

  14. Tuberculosis chemotherapy: current drug delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    du Toit, Lisa Claire; Pillay, Viness; Danckwerts, Michael Paul

    2006-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading killer of young adults worldwide and the global scourge of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis is reaching epidemic proportions. It is endemic in most developing countries and resurgent in developed and developing countries with high rates of human immunodeficiency virus infection. This article reviews the current situation in terms of drug delivery approaches for tuberculosis chemotherapy. A number of novel implant-, microparticulate-, and various other carrier-based drug delivery systems incorporating the principal anti-tuberculosis agents have been fabricated that either target the site of tuberculosis infection or reduce the dosing frequency with the aim of improving patient outcomes. These developments in drug delivery represent attractive options with significant merit, however, there is a requisite to manufacture an oral system, which directly addresses issues of unacceptable rifampicin bioavailability in fixed-dose combinations. This is fostered by the need to deliver medications to patients more efficiently and with fewer side effects, especially in developing countries. The fabrication of a polymeric once-daily oral multiparticulate fixed-dose combination of the principal anti-tuberculosis drugs, which attains segregated delivery of rifampicin and isoniazid for improved rifampicin bioavailability, could be a step in the right direction in addressing issues of treatment failure due to patient non-compliance. PMID:16984627

  15. Pegfilgrastim use during chemotherapy: current and future applications.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Todd; Densmore, John J

    2004-11-01

    Chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression is the most common dose-limiting side effect of cancer chemotherapy. Neutropenia is a serious risk with chemotherapy, associated with infectious complications, use of intravenous antibiotics, hospitalization, and even death. The occurrence of febrile neutropenia can lead to dose reductions and delay in subsequent cycles of chemotherapy that may have a detrimental affect on overall survival and disease-free survival. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) can reduce the duration of severe neutropenia, the incidence of febrile neutropenia, and allow planned dosing and timing of chemotherapy. Filgrastim is a G-CSF that has demonstrated benefit for the treatment and prophylaxis of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (CIN), but its short half-life requires repeated daily subcutaneous injection. Pegfilgrastim is a recombinant G-CSF created by attaching a polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecule to the filgrastim protein. Once-per-cycle dosing of pegfilgrastim has been evaluated in clinical trials using myelosuppressive chemotherapy in breast cancer, Hodgkin's lymphoma, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Trials have demonstrated that pegfilgrastim is comparable in safety and efficacy to filgrastim for decreasing the duration of severe neutropenia after chemotherapy in patients with nonmyeloid malignancy. This review will summarize recent clinical trial results and novel uses of pegfilgrastim.

  16. Taurine attenuates chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Islambulchilar, Mina; Asvadi, Iraj; Sanaat, Zohreh; Esfahani, Ali; Sattari, Mohammadreza

    2015-01-01

    Taurine has multiple physiological activities and it is decreased by chemotherapy. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of oral taurine supplementation on the incidence of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Forty young patients aged over 16 (range: 16-23 years) suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (all receiving same chemotherapy regimen) were recruited for the study at the beginning of maintenance course of their chemotherapy. The study population was randomized in a double-blind manner to receive either taurine or placebo (2 g per day orally, divided into two doses, taken 6 h after chemotherapeutic agents) for 6 months. Life quality and adverse effects including nausea and vomiting, taste and smell alterations, and weariness were assessed using a questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Pearson's Chi-square test. Of 40 participants, 32 finished the study (14 female and 18 male; mean age 19.2 ± 1.9 years). Four treatment and four placebo arm patients discontinued: one immigrated from the province, one died during the study, and six refused to continue. The results indicated that taurine-supplemented patients reported a significant (P < 0.05) improvement in chemotherapy-induced nausea and/or vomiting after taking taurine during study. Taurine significantly improved chemotherapy-induced taste and smell alterations (P < 0.05). Moreover, taurine significantly reduced weariness compared to placebo group (P < 0.05). This study showed that taurine co-administration decreased chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting during the maintenance therapy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:25323734

  17. Protection against chemotherapy-induced alopecia: targeting ATP-binding cassette transporters in the hair follicle?

    PubMed

    Haslam, Iain S; Pitre, Aaron; Schuetz, John D; Paus, Ralf

    2013-11-01

    Currently, efficacious treatments for chemotherapy-induced alopecia (hair loss) are lacking, and incidences of permanent hair loss following high-dose chemotherapy are on the increase. In this article, we describe mechanisms by which the pharmacological defense status of the hair follicle might be enhanced, thereby reducing the accumulation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and preventing or reducing hair loss and damage. We believe this could be achieved via the selective increase in ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expression within the hair follicle epithelium, following application of topical agonists for regulatory nuclear receptors. Clinical application would require the development of hair follicle-targeted formulations, potentially utilizing nanoparticle technology. This novel approach has the potential to yield entirely new therapeutic options for the treatment and management of chemotherapy-induced alopecia, providing significant psychological and physical benefit to cancer patients. PMID:24100054

  18. Protection against chemotherapy-induced alopecia: targeting ATP-binding cassette transporters in the hair follicle?

    PubMed

    Haslam, Iain S; Pitre, Aaron; Schuetz, John D; Paus, Ralf

    2013-11-01

    Currently, efficacious treatments for chemotherapy-induced alopecia (hair loss) are lacking, and incidences of permanent hair loss following high-dose chemotherapy are on the increase. In this article, we describe mechanisms by which the pharmacological defense status of the hair follicle might be enhanced, thereby reducing the accumulation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and preventing or reducing hair loss and damage. We believe this could be achieved via the selective increase in ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expression within the hair follicle epithelium, following application of topical agonists for regulatory nuclear receptors. Clinical application would require the development of hair follicle-targeted formulations, potentially utilizing nanoparticle technology. This novel approach has the potential to yield entirely new therapeutic options for the treatment and management of chemotherapy-induced alopecia, providing significant psychological and physical benefit to cancer patients.

  19. Schedule-Dependent Antiangiogenic and Cytotoxic Effects of Chemotherapy on Vascular Endothelial and Retinoblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Ursula; Mena, Hebe A.; Negrotto, Soledad; Arana, Eloisa; Pascual-Pasto, Guillem; Laurent, Viviana; Suñol, Mariona; Chantada, Guillermo L.; Carcaboso, Angel M.; Schaiquevich, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment of retinoblastoma involves using the maximum dose of chemotherapy that induces tumor control and is tolerated by patients. The impact of dose and schedule on the cytotoxicity of chemotherapy has not been studied. Our aim was to gain insight into the cytotoxic and antiangiogenic effect of the treatment scheme of chemotherapy used in retinoblastoma by means of different in vitro models and to evaluate potential effects on multi-drug resistance proteins. Two commercial and two patient-derived retinoblastoma cell types and two human vascular endothelial cell types were exposed to increasing concentrations of melphalan or topotecan in a conventional (single exposure) or metronomic (7-day continuous exposure) treatment scheme. The concentration of chemotherapy causing a 50% decrease in cell proliferation (IC50) was determined by MTT and induction of apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry. Expression of ABCB1, ABCG2 and ABCC1 after conventional or metronomic treatments was assessed by RT-qPCR. We also evaluated the in vivo response to conventional (0.6 mg/kg once a week for 2 weeks) and metronomic (5 days a week for 2 weeks) topotecan in a retinoblastoma xenograft model. Melphalan and topotecan were cytotoxic to both retinoblastoma and endothelial cells after conventional and metronomic treatments. A significant decrease in the IC50 (median, 13-fold; range: 3–23) was observed following metronomic chemotherapy treatment in retinoblastoma and endothelial cell types compared to conventional treatment (p<0.05). Metronomic topotecan or melphalan significantly inhibited in vitro tube formation in HUVEC and EPC compared to vehicle-treated cells (p<0.05). Both treatment schemes induced apoptosis and/or necrosis in all cell models. No significant difference was observed in the expression of ABCB1, ABCC1 or ABCG2 when comparing cells treated with melphalan or topotecan between treatment schedules at the IC50 or with control cells (p>0.05). In mice, continuous

  20. Schedule-Dependent Antiangiogenic and Cytotoxic Effects of Chemotherapy on Vascular Endothelial and Retinoblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Winter, Ursula; Mena, Hebe A; Negrotto, Soledad; Arana, Eloisa; Pascual-Pasto, Guillem; Laurent, Viviana; Suñol, Mariona; Chantada, Guillermo L; Carcaboso, Angel M; Schaiquevich, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment of retinoblastoma involves using the maximum dose of chemotherapy that induces tumor control and is tolerated by patients. The impact of dose and schedule on the cytotoxicity of chemotherapy has not been studied. Our aim was to gain insight into the cytotoxic and antiangiogenic effect of the treatment scheme of chemotherapy used in retinoblastoma by means of different in vitro models and to evaluate potential effects on multi-drug resistance proteins. Two commercial and two patient-derived retinoblastoma cell types and two human vascular endothelial cell types were exposed to increasing concentrations of melphalan or topotecan in a conventional (single exposure) or metronomic (7-day continuous exposure) treatment scheme. The concentration of chemotherapy causing a 50% decrease in cell proliferation (IC50) was determined by MTT and induction of apoptosis was evaluated by flow cytometry. Expression of ABCB1, ABCG2 and ABCC1 after conventional or metronomic treatments was assessed by RT-qPCR. We also evaluated the in vivo response to conventional (0.6 mg/kg once a week for 2 weeks) and metronomic (5 days a week for 2 weeks) topotecan in a retinoblastoma xenograft model. Melphalan and topotecan were cytotoxic to both retinoblastoma and endothelial cells after conventional and metronomic treatments. A significant decrease in the IC50 (median, 13-fold; range: 3-23) was observed following metronomic chemotherapy treatment in retinoblastoma and endothelial cell types compared to conventional treatment (p<0.05). Metronomic topotecan or melphalan significantly inhibited in vitro tube formation in HUVEC and EPC compared to vehicle-treated cells (p<0.05). Both treatment schemes induced apoptosis and/or necrosis in all cell models. No significant difference was observed in the expression of ABCB1, ABCC1 or ABCG2 when comparing cells treated with melphalan or topotecan between treatment schedules at the IC50 or with control cells (p>0.05). In mice, continuous

  1. Chemotherapy for intraperitoneal use: a review of hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy and early post-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    McPartland, Sarah; Detelich, Danielle; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal spread of tumors is a major problem in cancer management. Patients develop a marked deterioration in quality of life and shortened survival. This is in part due to bowel obstructions, marked ascites, and overall increase debilitation. Standard medical management has shown to be inadequate for the treatment of these problems. Surgery can palliate symptoms, however, it is unable to be complete at the microscopic level by a significant spillage of tumor cells throughout the abdomen. Chemotherapy can have some improvement in symptoms however it is short lived due to poor penetration into the peritoneal cavity. The role of intraperitoneal chemotherapy is to maximize tumor penetration and optimize cell death while minimizing systemic toxicity. Hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) and early post-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC) are two treatment methods that serve this role and have been shown to improve survival. This review will discuss different chemotherapies used for both of these treatment options. PMID:26941983

  2. Cognitive effects of chemotherapy-induced menopause in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Vearncombe, Katharine J; Rolfe, Margaret; Andrew, Brooke; Pachana, Nancy A; Wright, Margaret; Beadle, Geoffrey

    2011-11-01

    This study examined whether chemotherapy-induced menopause affects cognitive functioning in women with early breast cancer. The neuropsychological performance of 121 breast cancer patients (age M=49.62, SD=8.11, range=25.25-67.92) treated with chemotherapy was assessed pre-chemotherapy, as well as 1, 6, and 18 months post-chemotherapy completion. Linear mixed modeling was used to evaluate the data. Type of menopause (pre, chemotherapy-induced, and post menopause) was found to significantly interact with cognitive performance on two cognitive variables. Specifically, chemotherapy-induced menopausal women did not show any significant changes in performance on an abstract reasoning task, while the pre-menopausal and post-menopausal groups significantly improved over time. A significant interaction on a test of finger dexterity and coordination was also found, although inspection of the results indicated that this was due to a significant improvement in the pre-menopausal groups at 6 months post chemotherapy. After chemotherapy most cognitive variables showed improvements over time, although two indicators of verbal memory showed significant declines immediately after chemotherapy, with improvement by 18 months post completion. The current study found little evidence to suggest that chemotherapy-induced menopause broadly affects cognitive functioning after treatment administration. However, longer follow-up assessments are warranted to assess the long-term effects of combined chemotherapy and endocrine treatment.

  3. A Significant Statistical Advancement on the Predictive Values of ERCC1 Polymorphisms for Clinical Outcomes of Platinum-Based Chemotherapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Updated Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yali; Liu, Jie; Sun, Meili; Zhang, Zongpu; Liu, Chuanyong; Sun, Yuping

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is no definitive conclusion so far on the predictive values of ERCC1 polymorphisms for clinical outcomes of platinum-based chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We updated this meta-analysis with an expectation to obtain some statistical advancement on this issue. Methods. Relevant studies were identified by searching MEDLINE, EMBASE databases from inception to April 2015. Primary outcomes included objective response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). All analyses were performed using the Review Manager version 5.3 and the Stata version 12.0. Results. A total of 33 studies including 5373 patients were identified. ERCC1 C118T and C8092A could predict both ORR and OS for platinum-based chemotherapy in Asian NSCLC patients (CT + TT versus CC, ORR: OR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.67–0.94; OS: HR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.01–1.53) (CA + AA versus CC, ORR: OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.60–0.96; OS: HR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.06–1.75). Conclusions. Current evidence strongly indicated the prospect of ERCC1 C118T and C8092A as predictive biomarkers for platinum-based chemotherapy in Asian NSCLC patients. However, the results should be interpreted with caution and large prospective studies are still required to further investigate these findings. PMID:27057082

  4. Influence of coefficient of variation in determining significant difference of quantitative values obtained from 28-day repeated-dose toxicity studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Katsumi; Sakuratani, Yuki; Abe, Takemaru; Yamazaki, Kazuko; Nishikawa, Satoshi; Yamada, Jun; Hirose, Akihiko; Kamata, Eiichi; Hayashi, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand the influence of coefficient of variation (CV) in determining significant difference of quantitative values of 28-day repeated-dose toxicity studies, we examined 59 parameters of 153 studies conducted in accordance with Chemical Substance Control Law in 12 test facilities. Sex difference was observed in 12 parameters and 10 parameters showed large CV in females. The minimum CV was 0.74% for sodium. CV of electrolytes was comparatively small, whereas enzymes had large CV. Large differences in CV were observed for major parameters among 7-8 test facilities. The changes in CV were grossly classified into 11. Our study revealed that a statistical significant difference is usually detected if there is a difference of 7% in mean values between the groups and the groups have a CV of about 7%. A parameter with a CV as high as 30% may be significantly different, if the difference of the mean between the groups is 30%. It would be ideal to use median value to assess the treatment-related effect, rather than mean, when the CV is very high. We recommend using CV of the body weight as a standard to judge the adverse effect level.

  5. The role of induction chemotherapy before radiation therapy in non-operative management of stage III NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Green, M R

    1994-11-01

    Radiation therapy alone has been 'standard' management of patients with Stage III non-small cell lung cancer for several decades. Palliative benefits are routinely achieved but significant survival benefits have not been documented. Patterns of failure in Stage III patients emphasize the need to pursue better treatment for both local macroscopic disease and distant micrometastatic sites. Improved control in both areas will be necessary to meaningfully enhance outcome for the universe of Stage III NSCLC patients. Several randomized trials show a significant survival benefit when cisplatin-containing induction chemotherapy is administered prior to locoregional treatment. In the favorable subset of Stage III patients selected for study by CALGB, the surviving fraction at 2-5 years post-therapy was > or = 2-fold larger in the chemoradiation group than in the cohort treated with radiation alone. The French trial documented a significant decrease in distant metastases rate among the chemotherapy treated patients. In all the trials where patterns of failure are discussed, local disease persistence is the overwhelming rule. Future trials must evaluate improved induction chemotherapy approaches. Stage III patients are an ethical population in which to test induction therapy with new drug combinations randomized against already 'active' regimens for comparative efficacy. End points would be initial response rates, patterns of failure, and overall survival. The feasibility of high-dose chemotherapy regimens with growth factor and hematopoietic support followed by aggressive radiation must be tested. If feasible, trials randomizing high dose versus conventional dose induction programs within the context of sequential multimodality therapy should follow. Intensified radiation approaches such as hyperfractionation or CHART should be paired with active concurrent chemotherapy following induction chemotherapy alone. Pursuit of these approaches over the next several years will

  6. The role of induction chemotherapy before radiation therapy in non-operative management of stage III NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Green, M R

    1994-11-01

    Radiation therapy alone has been 'standard' management of patients with Stage III non-small cell lung cancer for several decades. Palliative benefits are routinely achieved but significant survival benefits have not been documented. Patterns of failure in Stage III patients emphasize the need to pursue better treatment for both local macroscopic disease and distant micrometastatic sites. Improved control in both areas will be necessary to meaningfully enhance outcome for the universe of Stage III NSCLC patients. Several randomized trials show a significant survival benefit when cisplatin-containing induction chemotherapy is administered prior to locoregional treatment. In the favorable subset of Stage III patients selected for study by CALGB, the surviving fraction at 2-5 years post-therapy was > or = 2-fold larger in the chemoradiation group than in the cohort treated with radiation alone. The French trial documented a significant decrease in distant metastases rate among the chemotherapy treated patients. In all the trials where patterns of failure are discussed, local disease persistence is the overwhelming rule. Future trials must evaluate improved induction chemotherapy approaches. Stage III patients are an ethical population in which to test induction therapy with new drug combinations randomized against already 'active' regimens for comparative efficacy. End points would be initial response rates, patterns of failure, and overall survival. The feasibility of high-dose chemotherapy regimens with growth factor and hematopoietic support followed by aggressive radiation must be tested. If feasible, trials randomizing high dose versus conventional dose induction programs within the context of sequential multimodality therapy should follow. Intensified radiation approaches such as hyperfractionation or CHART should be paired with active concurrent chemotherapy following induction chemotherapy alone. Pursuit of these approaches over the next several years will

  7. Outcomes for newly diagnosed patients with acute myeloid leukemia dosed on actual or adjusted body weight

    PubMed Central

    Bivona, Cory; Rockey, Michelle; Henry, Dave; Grauer, Dennis; Abhyankar, Sunil; Aljitawi, Omar; Ganguly, Siddhartha; McGuirk, Joseph; Singh, Anurag; Lin, Tara L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Data from solid tumor malignancies suggest that actual body weight (ABW) dosing improves overall outcomes. There is the potential to compromise efficacy when chemotherapy dosages are reduced, but the impact of dose adjustment on clinical response and toxicity in hematologic malignancies is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of utilizing a percent of ABW for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) induction chemotherapy dosing. Methods This retrospective, single-center study included 146 patients who received 7 + 3 induction (cytarabine and anthracycline) for treatment of AML. Study design evaluated the relationship between percentage of ABW dosing and complete response (CR) rates in patients newly diagnosed with AML. Results Percentage of ABW dosing did not influence CR rates in patients undergoing induction chemotherapy for AML (p = 0.83); nor did it influence rate of death at 30 days or relapse at 6 months (p = 0.94). When comparing patients dosed at 90–100 % of ABW compared to <90 % ABW, CR rates were not significantly different in patients classified as poor risk (p = 0.907). All favorable risk category patients obtained CR. Conclusions Preemptive dose reductions for obesity did not influence CR rates for patients with AML undergoing induction chemotherapy and did not influence the composite endpoint of death at 30 days or disease relapse at 6 months. PMID:26231954

  8. Prognostic nutritional index before adjuvant chemotherapy predicts chemotherapy compliance and survival among patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Katsuhiko; Okita, Riki; Saisho, Shinsuke; Yukawa, Takuro; Maeda, Ai; Nojima, Yuji; Nakata, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Background Adjuvant chemotherapy after the complete resection of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is now the standard of care. To improve survival, it is important to identify risk factors for the continuation of adjuvant chemotherapy. In this study, we analyzed chemotherapy compliance and magnitude of the prognostic impact of the prognostic nutritional index (PNI) before adjuvant chemotherapy. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of data from 106 patients who had received adjuvant chemotherapy. The adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of an oral tegafur agent (OT) or platinum-based chemotherapy (PB). The correlations between the PNI values and recurrence-free survival (RFS) were then evaluated. Results In the PB group, the percentage of patients who completed the four planned cycles of chemotherapy was not correlated with the PNI. In the OT group, however, a significant difference was observed in the percentage of patients who completed the planned chemotherapy according to the PNI before adjuvant chemotherapy. The RFS of patients with a PNI <50 before adjuvant chemotherapy was significantly poorer than that of the patients with a PNI ≥50. A multivariate analysis showed that nodal metastasis and PNI before chemotherapy were independent predictors of the RFS. However, PNI before surgery was not a predictor of the RFS. In the subgroup analysis, PNI before chemotherapy was independent predictor of the RFS in the OT group (P=0.019), but not in the PB group (P=0.095). Conclusion The PNI before adjuvant chemotherapy influenced the treatment compliance with the planned chemotherapy in the OT group, but not the PB group. In addition, a low PNI before adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with a poor RFS in a multivariate analysis, especially in the OT group. PMID:26504397

  9. Update on Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rampurwala, Murtuza M; Rocque, Gabrielle B; Burkard, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Although most women are diagnosed with early breast cancer, a substantial number recur due to persistent micro-metastatic disease. Systemic adjuvant chemotherapy improves outcomes and has advanced from first-generation regimens to modern dose-dense combinations. Although chemotherapy is the cornerstone of adjuvant therapy, new biomarkers are identifying patients who can forego such treatment. Neo-adjuvant therapy is a promising platform for drug development, but investigators should recognize the limitations of surrogate endpoints and clinical trials. Previous decades have focused on discovering, developing, and intensifying adjuvant chemotherapy. Future efforts should focus on customizing therapy and reducing chemotherapy for patients unlikely to benefit. In some cases, it may be possible to replace chemotherapy with treatments directed at specific genetic or molecular breast cancer subtypes. Yet, we anticipate that chemotherapy will remain a critical component of adjuvant therapy for years to come. PMID:25336961

  10. Inhaled chemotherapy in lung cancer: future concept of nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Chatzaki, Ekaterini; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Domvri, Kalliopi; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Goldberg, Eugene P; Karamanos, Nikos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Regional chemotherapy was first used for lung cancer 30 years ago. Since then, new methods of drug delivery and pharmaceuticals have been investigated in vitro, and in animals and humans. An extensive review of drug delivery systems, pharmaceuticals, patient monitoring, methods of enhancing inhaled drug deposition, safety and efficacy, and also additional applications of inhaled chemotherapy and its advantages and disadvantages are presented. Regional chemotherapy to the lung parenchyma for lung cancer is feasible and efficient. Safety depends on the chemotherapy agent delivered to the lungs and is dose-dependent and time-dependent. Further evaluation is needed to provide data regarding early lung cancer stages, and whether regional chemotherapy can be used as neoadjuvant or adjuvant treatment. Finally, inhaled chemotherapy could one day be administered at home with fewer systemic adverse effects. PMID:22619512

  11. The Interplay of Immunotherapy and Chemotherapy: Harnessing Potential Synergies

    PubMed Central

    Emens, Leisha A.; Middleton, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Although cancer chemotherapy has historically been considered immune suppressive, it is now accepted that certain chemotherapies can augment tumor immunity. The recent success of immune checkpoint inhibitors has renewed interest in immunotherapies, and in combining them with chemotherapy to achieve additive or synergistic clinical activity. Two major ways that chemotherapy promotes tumor immunity are by inducing immunogenic cell death as part of its intended therapeutic effect, and by disrupting strategies that tumors use to evade immune recognition. This second strategy in particular is dependent on the drug, its dose, and the schedule of chemotherapy administration in relation to antigen exposure or release. In this Cancer Immunology at the Crossroads article we focus on cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint blockade as a forum for reviewing preclinical and clinical data demonstrating the interplay between immunotherapy and chemotherapy. PMID:25941355

  12. WE-D-BRE-04: Modeling Optimal Concurrent Chemotherapy Schedules

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, J; Deasy, J O

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Concurrent chemo-radiation therapy (CCRT) has become a more common cancer treatment option with a better tumor control rate for several tumor sites, including head and neck and lung cancer. In this work, possible optimal chemotherapy schedules were investigated by implementing chemotherapy cell-kill into a tumor response model of RT. Methods: The chemotherapy effect has been added into a published model (Jeong et al., PMB (2013) 58:4897), in which the tumor response to RT can be simulated with the effects of hypoxia and proliferation. Based on the two-compartment pharmacokinetic model, the temporal concentration of chemotherapy agent was estimated. Log cell-kill was assumed and the cell-kill constant was estimated from the observed increase in local control due to concurrent chemotherapy. For a simplified two cycle CCRT regime, several different starting times and intervals were simulated with conventional RT regime (2Gy/fx, 5fx/wk). The effectiveness of CCRT was evaluated in terms of reduction in radiation dose required for 50% of control to find the optimal chemotherapy schedule. Results: Assuming the typical slope of dose response curve (γ50=2), the observed 10% increase in local control rate was evaluated to be equivalent to an extra RT dose of about 4 Gy, from which the cell-kill rate of chemotherapy was derived to be about 0.35. Best response was obtained when chemotherapy was started at about 3 weeks after RT began. As the interval between two cycles decreases, the efficacy of chemotherapy increases with broader range of optimal starting times. Conclusion: The effect of chemotherapy has been implemented into the resource-conservation tumor response model to investigate CCRT. The results suggest that the concurrent chemotherapy might be more effective when delayed for about 3 weeks, due to lower tumor burden and a larger fraction of proliferating cells after reoxygenation.

  13. Mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities

    PubMed Central

    Vichaya, Elisabeth G.; Chiu, Gabriel S.; Krukowski, Karen; Lacourt, Tamara E.; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Dantzer, Robert; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Walker, Adam K.

    2015-01-01

    While chemotherapeutic agents have yielded relative success in the treatment of cancer, patients are often plagued with unwanted and even debilitating side-effects from the treatment which can lead to dose reduction or even cessation of treatment. Common side effects (symptoms) of chemotherapy include (i) cognitive deficiencies such as problems with attention, memory and executive functioning; (ii) fatigue and motivational deficit; and (iii) neuropathy. These symptoms often develop during treatment but can remain even after cessation of chemotherapy, severely impacting long-term quality of life. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms responsible for the development of these behavioral toxicities, however, neuroinflammation is widely considered to be one of the major mechanisms responsible for chemotherapy-induced symptoms. Here, we critically assess what is known in regards to the role of neuroinflammation in chemotherapy-induced symptoms. We also argue that, based on the available evidence, neuroinflammation is unlikely the only mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. We evaluate two other putative candidate mechanisms. To this end we discuss the mediating role of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) activated in response to chemotherapy-induced cellular damage. We also review the literature with respect to possible alternative mechanisms such as a chemotherapy-induced change in the bioenergetic status of the tissue involving changes in mitochondrial function in relation to chemotherapy-induced behavioral toxicities. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie the emergence of fatigue, neuropathy, and cognitive difficulties is vital to better treatment and long-term survival of cancer patients. PMID:25954147

  14. Body weight changes in breast cancer patients following adjuvant chemotherapy and contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Sheng; Cai, Hui; Wang, Chang-Yan; Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Ming-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Weight gain commonly occurs in breast cancer patients who receive adjuvant chemotherapy. Weight gain may cause psychosocial stress and is associated with patient prognosis and survival. Several factors contributing to weight gain have been identified in Western populations. However, there was lack of information associated with body weight changes following adjuvant chemotherapy in Chinese breast cancer patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such study to be conducted in the Chinese population. A total of 98 patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy following a modified radical mastectomy were included in this study. Their weight was measured prior to the first and following the last cycle of chemotherapy. A weight gain, or loss, of >1 kg following adjuvant chemotherapy was considered to be significant. Cancer stage, treatment modalities, menopausal status and other clinical information were obtained through medical record review. The results revealed that the weight changes ranged from -11 to +9 kg, with a mean value of -0.4±4.4 kg. A total of 66.7% of the patients exhibited weight changes (34.6% gained >1 kg and 32.1% lost weight), whereas 33.3% of the patients maintained a stable weight (P<0.001). Patients aged ≤40 years [odds ratio (OR)=1.429, P=0.028], with a weight of ≥60 kg at diagnosis (OR=2.211, P=0.023), who received ≥4 cycles of chemotherapy (OR=1.591, P=0.039) and a total hormone dose of ≥200 mg (OR=2.75, P=0.013) exhibited a higher risk of weight gain. In conclusion, the body weight changes observed in Chinese breast cancer patient post-adjuvant chemotherapy were different from those observed among Western populations, represented predominantly by weight gain and were reflected by approximately equal percentages of weight gain, stable weight and weight loss. PMID:24649316

  15. Postoperative Chemotherapy Followed by Conformal Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy in High-Risk Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Quero, Laurent; Bouchbika, Zineb; Kouto, Honorine; Baruch-Hennequin, Valerie; Gornet, Jean-Marc; Munoz, Nicolas; Cojean-Zelek, Isabelle; Houdart, Remi; Panis, Yves; Valleur, Patrice; Aparicio, Thomas; Maylin, Claude; Hennequin, Christophe

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the efficacy, toxicity, and pattern of relapse after adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by three-dimensional irradiation and concomitant LV5FU2 chemotherapy (high-dose leucovorin and 5-fluorouracil bolus plus continuous infusion) in the treatment of completely resected high-risk gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of 52 patients with high-risk gastric cancer initially treated by total/partial gastrectomy and lymphadenectomy between January 2002 and June 2007. Median age was 54 years (range, 36-75 years). Postoperative treatment consisted of 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy was followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in the tumor bed and regional lymph nodes at 4500 cGy/25 fractions in association with concomitant chemotherapy. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of a 2-h infusion of leucovorin (200 mg/m Superscript-Two ) followed by a bolus of 5-fluorouracil (400 mg/m Superscript-Two ) and then a 44-h continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil (2400-3600 mg/m Superscript-Two ) given every 14 days, for three cycles (LV5FU2 protocol). Results: Five-year overall and disease-free survival were 50% and 48%, respectively. Distant metastases and peritoneal spread were the most frequent sites of relapse (37% each). After multivariate analysis, only pathologic nodal status was significantly associated with disease-free and overall survival. Acute toxicities were essentially gastrointestinal and hematologic. One myocardial infarction and one pulmonary embolism were also reported. Eighteen patients had a radiotherapy program interruption because of acute toxicity. All patients but 2 have completed radiotherapy. Conclusion: Postoperative cisplatin-based chemotherapy followed by conformal radiotherapy in association with concurrent 5-fluorouracil seemed to be feasible and resulted in successful locoregional control.

  16. Is there liability with chemotherapy following immediate breast construction?

    PubMed

    Yule, G J; Concannon, M J; Croll, G; Puckett, C L

    1996-04-01

    Review of 46 consecutive patients undergoing immediate breast reconstruction with tissue expanders and subsequent implant placement was conducted to assess the potential liability of adjuvant chemotherapy. Twenty-three patients required chemotherapy, while 23 did not. Critical comparison of complications and outcome of the two groups revealed no significant differences. Within the parameters of the study (avoidance of expansion or surgery during the period of chemotherapy), there appeared to be no disadvantage posed to the immediate reconstruction patient by adjuvant chemotherapy. We feel that this option can continue to be offered despite the anticipation of probable chemotherapy.

  17. SU-E-J-28: Gantry Speed Significantly Affects Image Quality and Imaging Dose for 4D Cone-Beam Computed Tomography On the Varian Edge Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Santoso, A; Song, K; Gardner, S; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 4D-CBCT facilitates assessment of tumor motion at treatment position. We investigated the effect of gantry speed on 4D-CBCT image quality and dose using the Varian Edge On-Board Imager (OBI). Methods: A thoracic protocol was designed using a 125 kVp spectrum. Image quality parameters were obtained via 4D acquisition using a Catphan phantom with a gating system. A sinusoidal waveform was executed with a five second period and superior-inferior motion. 4D-CBCT scans were sorted into 4 and 10 phases. Image quality metrics included spatial resolution, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), uniformity index (UI), Hounsfield unit (HU) sensitivity, and RMS error (RMSE) of motion amplitude. Dosimetry was accomplished using Gafchromic XR-QA2 films within a CIRS Thorax phantom. This was placed on the gating phantom using the same motion waveform. Results: High contrast resolution decreased linearly from 5.93 to 4.18 lp/cm, 6.54 to 4.18 lp/cm, and 5.19 to 3.91 lp/cm for averaged, 4 phase, and 10 phase 4DCBCT volumes respectively as gantry speed increased from 1.0 to 6.0 degs/sec. CNRs decreased linearly from 4.80 to 1.82 as the gantry speed increased from 1.0 to 6.0 degs/sec, respectively. No significant variations in UIs, HU sensitivities, or RMSEs were observed with variable gantry speed. Ion chamber measurements compared to film yielded small percent differences in plastic water regions (0.1–9.6%), larger percent differences in lung equivalent regions (7.5–34.8%), and significantly larger percent differences in bone equivalent regions (119.1–137.3%). Ion chamber measurements decreased from 17.29 to 2.89 cGy with increasing gantry speed from 1.0 to 6.0 degs/sec. Conclusion: Maintaining technique factors while changing gantry speed changes the number of projections used for reconstruction. Increasing the number of projections by decreasing gantry speed decreases noise, however, dose is increased. The future of 4DCBCT’s clinical utility relies on further

  18. Prevention of chemotherapy-induced ovarian damage.

    PubMed

    Roness, Hadassa; Kashi, Oren; Meirow, Dror

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the impact of cytotoxic drugs on the ovary have opened up new directions for the protection of the ovary from chemotherapy-induced damage. These advances have spurred the investigation of pharmacological agents to prevent ovarian damage at the time of treatment. Prevention of ovarian damage and follicle loss would provide significant advantages over existing fertility preservation techniques. This manuscript reviews new methods for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced ovarian damage, including agents that act on the PI3K/PTEN/Akt follicle activation pathway, apoptotic pathways, the vascular system, and other potential methods of reducing chemotherapy-induced ovotoxicity.

  19. Intrathecal chemotherapy. Selection of cytostatic agents.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, T; Yamada, R; Kanai, N; Kuroda, R; Ushio, Y; Higashi, H; Mogami, H

    1970-09-01

    Selection of cytostatic agents for intrathecal administration is the subject of this paper.Both the toxic side effects-destruction of blood-brain barrier and change of body weight-and the cytostatic effects on intracranially transplanted Yoshida ascites sarcoma were investigated of intrathecal administration of various cytostatic agents. As a result, it may be concluded that Methotrexate and Endoxan and lower dose of mitomycin C are suitable drugs for intrathecal chemotherapy.Based on these findings, clinical cases of malignant brain tumours were treated with intrathecal chemotherapy.Grateful acknowledgement is made to Professor Dennosuke Jinnai for his constant interest and guidance in this investigation.

  20. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy as Preoperative Treatment for Localized Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarty, Twisha; Crane, Christopher H.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Mansfield, Paul F.; Briere, Tina M.; Beddar, A. Sam; Mok, Henry; Reed, Valerie K.; Krishnan, Sunil; Delclos, Marc E.; Das, Prajnan

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate dosimetric parameters, acute toxicity, pathologic response, and local control in patients treated with preoperative intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for localized gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods: Between November 2007 and April 2010, 25 patients with localized gastric adenocarcinoma were treated with induction chemotherapy, followed by preoperative IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy and, finally, surgical resection. The median radiation therapy dose was 45 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in 18 patients, capecitabine in 3, and other regimens in 4. Subsequently, resection was performed with total gastrectomy in 13 patients, subtotal gastrectomy in 7, and other surgeries in 5. Results: Target coverage, expressed as the ratio of the minimum dose received by 99% of the planning target volume to the prescribed dose, was a median of 0.97 (range, 0.92-1.01). The median V{sub 30} (percentage of volume receiving at least 30 Gy) for the liver was 26%; the median V{sub 20} (percentage of volume receiving at least 20 Gy) for the right and left kidneys was 14% and 24%, respectively; and the median V{sub 40} (percentage of volume receiving at least 40 Gy) for the heart was 18%. Grade 3 acute toxicity developed in 14 patients (56%), including dehydration in 10, nausea in 8, and anorexia in 5. Grade 4 acute toxicity did not develop in any patient. There were no significant differences in the rates of acute toxicity, hospitalization, or feeding tube use in comparison to those in a group of 50 patients treated with preoperative three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. R0 resection was obtained in 20 patients (80%), and pathologic complete response occurred in 5 (20%). Conclusions: Preoperative IMRT for gastric adenocarcinoma was well tolerated, accomplished excellent target coverage and normal structure sparing, and led to appropriate

  1. Adult medulloblastoma: multiagent chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, H. S.; Chamberlain, M. C.; Glantz, M. J.; Wang, S.

    2001-01-01

    and 6 relapsed after completing all therapy at 18, 18, 26, 30, 40, and 48 months. The estimated median survival of all patients was 56 months (95% confidence interval, 27 to infinity) with 11 patients alive; for the Packer protocol, median survival was 36 months, and for the POG protocol, it was 57 months (P = 0.058). The hazard ratio was 0 (95% confidence interval, 0 to infinity). Toxicity during the Packer protocol was moderately severe, with only 1 of 10 patients able to complete all therapy. Two patients had severe abdominal pain during CSRT + vincristine, and 5 had peripheral neuropathy during vincristine therapy. Hearing loss (>20 dB) occurred in 7, neutropenia (<500 microl) in 6, thrombocytopenia (<50,000 microl) in 6, nephrotoxicity (>25% decrease by creatinine clearance) in 2, and decreased pulmonary function (diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide decrease >40%) in 1. On the POG protocol, only 1 patient had persistent nausea and vomiting, 2 had peripheral neuropathy, and 3 had hearing deficit (>20 dB) or tinnitus. The POG and Packer protocols did not have a statistically significant difference in relapse-free or overall survival because of the small sample size. The POG protocol seemed to have less nonhematologic toxicity. Adults on the Packer protocol appeared to have shorter median survival and greater toxicity than did children. To know whether adding adjuvant chemotherapy to craniospinal radiation in adult therapy increases relapse-free and overall survival, we must await the results of a larger randomized controlled clinical trial. PMID:11305414

  2. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy and pathologic response: a retrospective cohort

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, Diocésio Alves Pinto; Zucca-Matthes, Gustavo; Vieira, René Aloísio da Costa; de Andrade, Cristiane Thomaz de Aquino Exel; da Costa, Allini Mafra; Monteiro, Aurélio Julião de Castro; Lago, Lissandra Dal; Nunes, João Soares

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the complete pathologic response attained by patients diagnosed with locally advanced breast cancer submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy based on the doxorubicin/ cyclophosphamide regimen followed by paclitaxel. Methods: A retrospective cohort of patients with locally advanced breast cancer, admitted to the Hospital de Câncer de Barretos between 2006 and 2008 submitted to the doxorubicin/cyclophosphamide protocol followed by paclitaxel (4 cycles of doxorubicin 60mg/m2 and cyclophosphamide 600mg/m2 every 21 days; 4 cycles of paclitaxel 175mg/m2 every 21 days). The following variables were assessed: age, menopause, performance status, initial clinical staging, anthropometric data, chemotherapy (dose – duration), toxicity profile, post-treatment staging, surgery, pathologic complete response rate, disease-free survival, and pathological characteristics (type and histological degree, hormonal profile and lymph node involvement). Statistical analysis was performed using a 5% level of significance. Results: Of the 434 patients evaluated, 136 were excluded due to error in staging or because they had received another type of chemotherapy. Median age was 50 years, all with performance status 0-1. Median initial clinical size of tumor was 65mm and the median final clinical size of the tumor was 22mm. Fifty-one (17.1%) patients experienced a pathologic complete response. Those with a negative hormonal profile or who were triple-negative (negative Her-2 and hormonal profile) experienced a favorable impact on the pathologic complete response. Conclusion: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with doxorubicin/ cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel provided a pathologic complete response in the population studied in accordance with that observed in the literature. Triple-negative patients had a greater chance of attaining this response. PMID:24488382

  3. [The second-line chemotherapy for urological cancers].

    PubMed

    Miki, Tsuneharu; Mikami, Kazuya; Mizutani, Yoichi

    2005-01-01

    This review summarizes second-line chemotherapy for testicular cancer and urothelial cancer. For testicular cancer, the combination of bleomycin (BLM), etoposide (ETP), and cisplatin (CDDP) (BEP) is commonly used as an induction therapy. The combination of vinblastine (VLB), ifosfamide (IFM) and CDDP (VeIP) or ETP, IFM, and CDDP (VIP) is used for the second-line chemotherapy. When the efficacy of VeIP and VIP is not sufficient, high-dose chemotherapy or chemotherapy with new anticancer agents has been used for the second-line chemotherapy. High-dose chemotherapy showed long-term survival rates of 30-50%, but patients with testicular cancer resistance to CDDP have poor outcomes. Although new anticancer agents, such as paclitaxel (TXL), gemcitabine (GEM) and irinotecan have been introduced, further examinations are needed to evaluate these drugs. The combination of methotrexate, VLB, adriamycin, and CDDP (MVAC) is used as the standard chemotherapy for urothelial cancer. The outcomes of MVAC are favorable, but the duration of response is short and long-term survival cannot be expected. Recently, the efficacy of new anticancer agents including TXL and GEM against urothelial cancers has been demonstrated. Although TXL and GEM combination therapy as the second-line chemotherapy has some effects, more evidence needs to be accumulated to establish it as a second-line treatment.

  4. Virtual Reality: A Distraction Intervention for Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Susan M.; Hood, Linda E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To explore virtual reality (VR) as a distraction intervention to relieve symptom distress in adults receiving chemotherapy treatments for breast, colon, and lung cancer. Design Crossover design in which participants served as their own control. Setting Outpatient clinic at a comprehensive cancer center in the southeastern United States. Sample 123 adults receiving initial chemotherapy treatments. Methods Participants were randomly assigned to receive the VR distraction intervention during one chemotherapy treatment and then received no intervention (control) during an alternate matched chemotherapy treatment. The Adapted Symptom Distress Scale–2, Revised Piper Fatigue Scale, and State Anxiety Inventory were used to measure symptom distress. The Presence Questionnaire and an open-ended questionnaire were used to evaluate the subjects’ VR experience. The influence of type of cancer, age, and gender on symptom outcomes was explored. Mixed models were used to test for differences in levels of symptom distress. Main Research Variables Virtual reality and symptom distress. Findings Patients had an altered perception of time (p < 0.001) when using VR, which validates the distracting capacity of the intervention. Evaluation of the intervention indicated that patients believed the head-mounted device was easy to use, they experienced no cybersickness, and 82% would use VR again. However, analysis demonstrated no significant differences in symptom distress immediately or two days following chemotherapy treatments. Conclusions Patients stated that using VR made the treatment seem shorter and that chemotherapy treatments with VR were better than treatments without the distraction intervention. However, positive experiences did not result in a decrease in symptom distress. The findings support the idea that using VR can help to make chemotherapy treatments more tolerable, but clinicians should not assume that use of VR will improve chemotherapy

  5. Adjuvant chemotherapy in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Stell, P. M.; Rawson, N. S.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is presented of 23 trials of adjuvant chemotherapy in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. These were reviewed from the point of view of design of the trial, analysis of survival, response rates, meta-analysis, site of failure, toxicity and cost. The minimal increase in survival that could be detected ranged from 11 to 51%, with a median of 25%. No trial was big enough to detect the likely increase of survival, which is 5%. Many trials excluded some eligible patients before randomisation, the proportion being 21% in those series with details. A further 9% of treated patients were excluded from analysis. A response rate in four induction studies of 47% equated with a 6% increase in cancer mortality. Meta-analysis showed an insignificant overall improvement in cancer mortality of 0.5%. Induction chemotherapy, synchronous chemotherapy and induction/maintenance chemotherapy did not affect cancer mortality whereas synchronous/maintenance therapy did. Cisplatinum, methotrexate, bleomycin, 5-FU and a variety of other regimens did not affect the death rate from cancer, but the combination of VBM significantly increased it. Neither single agent nor combination chemotherapy produced a significant reduction of cancer deaths. The rate of locoregional failure was significantly lower in the treated arms, whereas the metastatic rate was similar in both arms. Only three papers gave full details of toxicity with grading: these showed a high toxicity rate. The mortality rate from chemotherapy in nine series averaged 6.5%. PMID:2140045

  6. Experimentally induced, synergistic late effects of a single dose of radiation and aging: significance in LKS fraction as compared with mature blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Yoko; Tsuboi, Isao; Nakachi, Kei; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Inoue, Tohru

    2015-03-01

    The number of murine mature blood cells recovered within 6 weeks after 2-Gy whole-body irradiation at 6 weeks of age, whereas in the case of the undifferentiated hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSC/HPC) compartment [cells in the lineage-negative, c-kit-positive and stem-cell-antigen-1-positive (LKS) fraction], the numerical differences between mice with and without irradiation remained more than a year, but conclusively the cells showed numerical recovery. When mice were exposed to radiation at 6 months of age, acute damages of mature blood cells were rather milder probably because of their maturation with age; but again, cells in the LKS fraction were specifically damaged, and their numerical recovery was significantly delayed probably as a result of LKS-specific cellular damages. Interestingly, in contrast to the recovery of the number of cells in the LKS fraction, their quality was not recovered, which was quantitatively assessed on the basis of oxidative-stress-related fluorescence intensity. To investigate why the recovery in the number of cells in the LKS fraction was delayed, expression levels of genes related to cellular proliferation and apoptosis of cells in the bone marrow and LKS fraction were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In the case of 21-month-old mice after radiation exposure, Ccnd1, PiK3r1 and Fyn were overexpressed solely in cells in the LKS fraction. Because Ccnd1and PiK3r1 upregulated by aging were further upregulated by radiation, single-dose radiation seemed to induce the acceleration of aging, which is related to the essential biological responses during aging based on a lifetime-dependent relationship between a living creature and xenobiotic materials.

  7. Chemotherapy agents and the induction of late lethal defects.

    PubMed

    Seymour, C B; Mothersill, C

    1991-01-01

    Radiation is now known to be capable of producing both lethal and non lethal lesions in a variety of mammalian cells which may not be expressed for several cell divisions after the initial insult. The mechanism by which such an effect occurs is unknown. Because of the possible implications for cancer treatment, if such an effect also occurred following chemotherapy exposure, cells were exposed to various cytotoxic chemotherapy agents with known and well characterised effects on DNA or other areas of cell function or structure. The results indicate that late lethal defects are not detectable after treatment with appropriate ranges of doses of cisplatinum, vincristine, BCNU or adriamycin, but that they are induced by Bleomycin and to a lesser extent by 5-Fluorouracil. Bleomycin is known to cause strand breaks and is regarded as a radiomimetic agent. 5-Fluorouracil may act by preventing efficient and faithful synthesis of DNA, allowing mutations to become integrated into the genome. The occurrence of lethal mutations with both these agents supports previous suggestions that error-prone repair of DNA base sequence abnormalities may be fundamental to the process of late lethal damage production in mammalian cells. The cloning efficiency of cells which survived exposure to Vincristine or BCNU over a wide dose range was found to be significantly increased; this may represent an adaptive response to the drugs.

  8. Prognostic significance of S100A4 expression in stage II and III colorectal cancer: results from a population-based series and a randomized phase III study on adjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Boye, Kjetil; Jacob, Havjin; Frikstad, Kari-Anne M; Nesland, Jahn M; Maelandsmo, Gunhild M; Dahl, Olav; Nesbakken, Arild; Flatmark, Kjersti

    2016-08-01

    Current clinical algorithms are unable to precisely predict which colorectal cancer patients would benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy, and there is a need for novel biomarkers to improve the selection of patients. The metastasis-promoting protein S100A4 predicts poor outcome in colorectal cancer, but whether it could be used to guide clinical decision making remains to be resolved. S100A4 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in primary colorectal carcinomas from a consecutively collected, population-representative cohort and a randomized phase III study on adjuvant 5-fluorouracil/levamisole. Sensitivity to treatment with 5-fluorouracil in S100A4 knockdown cells was investigated using 2D and 3D cell culture assays. Strong nuclear expression of S100A4 was detected in 19% and 23% of the tumors in the two study cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, nuclear immunoreactivity was associated with reduced relapse-free (P < 0.001 and P = 0.010) and overall survival (P = 0.046 and P = 0.006) in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, nuclear S100A4 was a predictor of poor relapse-free survival in the consecutive series (P = 0.002; HR 1.9), but not in the randomized study. Sensitivity to treatment with 5-fluorouracil was not affected by S100A4 expression in in vitro cell culture assays, and there was no indication from subgroup analyses in the randomized study that S100A4 expression was associated with increased benefit of adjuvant treatment with 5-fluorouracil/levamisole. The present study confirms that nuclear S100A4 expression is a negative prognostic biomarker in colorectal cancer, but the clinical utility in selection of patients for adjuvant fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy is limited. PMID:27273130

  9. Intermediate dose of imatinib in combination with chemotherapy followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation improves early outcome in paediatric Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL): results of the Spanish Cooperative Group SHOP studies ALL-94, ALL-99 and ALL-2005.

    PubMed

    Rives, Susana; Estella, Jesús; Gómez, Pedro; López-Duarte, Mónica; de Miguel, Purificación García; Verdeguer, Amparo; Moreno, Maria José; Vivanco, José Luis; Couselo, José Miguel; Fernández-Delgado, Rafael; Maldonado, Marisol; Tasso, María; López-Ibor, Blanca; Lendínez, Francisco; López-Almaraz, Ricardo; Uriz, Javier; Melo, Montserrat; Fernández-Teijeiro, Ana; Rodríguez, Isidoro; Badell, Isabel

    2011-09-01

    Philadelphia-chromosome acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (Ph+ ALL) is a subgroup of ALL with very high risk of treatment failure. We report here the results of the Sociedad Española de Hematología y Oncología Pediátricas (SEHOP/SHOP) in paediatric Ph+ ALL treated with intermediate-dose imatinib concurrent with intensive chemotherapy. The toxicities and outcome of these patients were compared with historical controls not receiving imatinib. Patients with Ph+ ALL aged 1-18years were enrolled in three consecutive ALL/SHOP trials (SHOP-94/SHOP-99/SHOP-2005). In the SHOP-2005 trial, imatinib (260mg/m(2) per day) was given on day-15 of induction. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) from a matched related or unrelated donor was scheduled in first complete remission (CR1). Forty-three patients were evaluable (22 boys, median age 6·8years, range, 1·2-15). Sixteen received imatinib whereas 27 received similar chemotherapy without imatinib. Seventeen of 27 and 15 of 16 patients in the non-imatinib and imatinib cohort, respectively, underwent HSCT in CR1. With a median follow-up of 109 and 39months for the non-imatinib and imatinib cohorts, the 3-year event-free survival (EFS) was 29·6% and 78·7%, respectively (P=0·01). These results show that, compared to historical controls, intermediate dose of imatinib given concomitantly with chemotherapy and followed by allogeneic HSCT markedly improved early EFS in paediatric Ph+ ALL.

  10. Robotic Stereotactic Radioablation Concomitant With Neo-Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Bahadoran, Phillipe; Lallement, Michel; Birtwisle-Peyrottes, Isabelle; Chapellier, Claire; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Courdi, Adel; Quielle-Roussel, Catherine; Thariat, Juliette; Ferrero, Jean-Marc

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Robotic stereotactic radioablation (RSR) allows stereotactic irradiation of thoracic tumors; however, it has never been used for breast tumors and may have a real potential. We conducted a Phase I study, including neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT), a two-level dose-escalation study (6.5 Gy x 3 fractions and 7.5 Gy x 3 fractions) using RSR and breast-conserving surgery followed by conventional radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: To define toxicity, we performed a dermatologic exam (DE) including clinical examination by two independent observers and technical examination by colorimetry, dermoscopy, and skin ultrasound. DE was performed before NACT (DE0), at 36 days (DE1), at 56 days (DE2), after the NACT treatment onset, and before surgery (DE3). Surgery was performed 4-8 weeks after the last chemotherapy session. A pathologic examination was also performed. Results: There were two clinical complete responses and four clinical partial responses at D56 and D85. Maximum tolerable dose was not reached. All patients tolerated RSR with no fatigue; 2 patients presented with mild pain after the third fraction of the treatment. There was no significant toxicity measured with ultrasound and dermoscopy tests. Postoperative irradiation (50 Gy) has been delivered without toxicity. Conclusion: The study showed the feasibility of irradiation with RSR combined with chemotherapy and surgery for breast tumors. There was no skin toxicity at a dose of 19.5 Gy or 22.5 Gy delivered in three fractions combined with chemotherapy. Lack of toxicity suggested that the dose could be increased further. Pathologic response was acceptable.

  11. Toxic optic neuropathy in the setting of docetaxel chemotherapy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To describe the first reported case of toxic optic neuropathy secondary to docetaxel (Taxotere®) chemotherapy. Case presentation A 53-year-old female presented with predominantly unilateral visual loss, but extensive bilateral visual field defects and bilateral optic nerve head swelling 2 weeks after first dose of docetaxel (Taxotere®) and trastuzumab (Herceptin®) chemotherapy for a left sided node-positive, HER2 positive breast cancer. Extensive investigation ruled out other causes of optic neuropathy. She was treated with high dose corticosteroids intravenously for 1 week then a tapering oral dose over 8 weeks. Visual field defects gradually resolved and visual acuity improved. Docetaxel chemotherapy was discontinued but targeted therapy with trastuzumab continued without further complication. Conclusion Docetaxel can cause a toxic optic neuropathy possibly due to an ischemic or neurotoxic mechanism at the optic nerve head. With cessation of docetaxel therapy and treatment with systemic corticosteroids, visual recovery can occur without significant residual visual deficit. PMID:24564293

  12. Increased nephrotoxicity of combination taxol and cisplatin chemotherapy in gynecologic cancers as compared to cisplatin alone.

    PubMed

    Merouani, A; Davidson, S A; Schrier, R W

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the increased nephrotoxicity of taxol and cisplatin combination chemotherapy in gynecologic cancers as compared to cisplatin alone, the medical records of 25 patients with gynecological cancers were reviewed for evaluation of nephrotoxicity after chemotherapy treatment. The data included age, serum creatinine, calculated creatinine clearance, initial and cumulative dose of cisplatin and taxol, primary site of the cancer, renal ultrasound and hydration protocols. Renal function was evaluated before, during and 6 months after chemotherapy. Renal dysfunction was defined as a greater than 25% decrease in creatinine clearance. Comparing 11 patients treated with taxol and cisplatin versus 14 treated with cisplatin alone, there was a significant difference in effect on renal function. Nine of 11 patients (81%) treated with the combination chemotherapy had a greater than 25% decrease in creatinine clearance while only 4 of the 14 patients (29%) treated with cisplatin alone had such a decrease in creatinine clearance (p < 0.004). The patients treated with the combination chemotherapy, however, received a higher dose of cisplatin (80.4 vs. 66.4 mg/m2, p < 0.02) and were treated longer (6.7 vs. 4.3 months, p < 0.002). Nevertheless, when the patients were matched for age, initial dose and cumulative dose of cisplatin, a higher frequency of nephrotoxicity persisted in patients treated with taxol and cisplatin as compared to cisplatin alone (72 as compared to 20%, p < 0.02). The patients in both groups were comparably hydrated; prerenal failure and urinary tract obstruction were excluded in all patients. Six months after completion of chemotherapy, a significantly lower creatinine clearance was still observed in patients treated with taxol and cisplatin combination therapy (46 vs. 76 ml/min, p < 0.01). In summary, a retrospective analysis of renal function in patients with gynecological cancers showed an increased nephrotoxicity in patients treated with taxol and

  13. Chemotherapy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... sample before beginning chemotherapy to evaluate kidney function. Giving your child plenty of fluids to drink will ... eating, after using the bathroom, and after touching animals. They shouldn't share cups or utensils with ...

  14. Chemotherapy in metastatic retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kingston, J E; Hungerford, J L; Plowman, P N

    1987-03-01

    Eleven children with metastatic retinoblastoma diagnosed during the period 1970-1984 were treated with chemotherapy. Short-term complete responses were observed in three children treated with a four-drug combination which included cisplatinum, and in one child treated with vincristine and cyclophosphamide. The median duration of survival of the 11 children receiving chemotherapy was nine months, whilst the median survival of 13 children with metastatic retinoblastoma who were not given chemotherapy was only 2.3 months (p = 0.06). This suggests that retinoblastoma is a chemosensitive tumour and therefore adjuvant chemotherapy may have a role in children with retinoblastoma who at diagnosis are thought to be at high risk of developing metastatic disease. PMID:3587892

  15. Single Low Dose Primaquine (0.25mg/kg) Does Not Cause Clinically Significant Haemolysis in G6PD Deficient Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bancone, Germana; Chowwiwat, Nongnud; Somsakchaicharoen, Raweewan; Poodpanya, Lalita; Moo, Paw Khu; Gornsawun, Gornpan; Kajeechiwa, Ladda; Thwin, May Myo; Rakthinthong, Santisuk; Nosten, Suphak; Thinraow, Suradet; Nyo, Slight Naw; Ling, Clare L.; Wiladphaingern, Jacher; Kiricharoen, Naw Lily; Moore, Kerryn A.; White, Nicholas J.; Nosten, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Background Primaquine is the only drug consistently effective against mature gametocytes of Plasmodium falciparum. The transmission blocking dose of primaquine previously recommended was 0.75mg/kg (adult dose 45mg) but its deployment was limited because of concerns over haemolytic effects in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. G6PD deficiency is an inherited X-linked enzymatic defect that affects an estimated 400 million people around the world with high frequencies (15–20%) in populations living in malarious areas. To reduce transmission in low transmission settings and facilitate elimination of P. falciparum, the World Health Organization now recommends adding a single dose of 0.25mg/kg (adult dose 15mg) to Artemisinin-based Combination Therapies (ACTs) without G6PD testing. Direct evidence of the safety of this low dose is lacking. Adverse events and haemoglobin variations after this treatment were assessed in both G6PD normal and deficient subjects in the context of targeted malaria elimination in a malaria endemic area on the North-Western Myanmar-Thailand border where prevalence of G6PD deficiency (Mahidol variant) approximates 15%. Methods and Findings The tolerability and safety of primaquine (single dose 0.25 mg base/kg) combined with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PPQ) given three times at monthly intervals was assessed in 819 subjects. Haemoglobin concentrations were estimated over the six months preceding the ACT + primaquine rounds of mass drug administration. G6PD deficiency was assessed with a phenotypic test and genotyping was performed in male subjects with deficient phenotypes and in all females. Fractional haemoglobin changes in relation to G6PD phenotype and genotype and primaquine round were assessed using linear mixed-effects models. No adverse events related to primaquine were reported during the trial. Mean fractional haemoglobin changes after each primaquine treatment in G6PD deficient subjects (-5

  16. Relative Contributions of Radiation and Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy to Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Hitchcock, Ying J. Tward, Jonathan D.; Szabo, Aniko; Bentz, Brandon G.; Shrieve, Dennis C.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the risk of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in patients with head-and-neck cancer and treated with radiation therapy (RT) or concomitant cisplatin-based chemoradiation, the relationship among SNHL and radiation dose to the cochlea, the use of two common cisplatin dose regimens. Methods and Materials: A total of 62 head-and-neck cancer patients treated with curative intent were included in this prospective study. Of the patients, 21 received RT alone, 27 received 40 mg/m{sup 2} weekly cisplatin, 13 received 100 mg/m{sup 2} every 3 weeks during RT, and 1 received RT with weekly epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor antibody. The effect of chemotherapy and RT dose on hearing was determined using a model that accounted for the age and variability between each ear for each patient. Results: We constructed a model to predict dose-dependent hearing loss for RT or cisplatin-based chemotherapy either alone or in combination. For patients only receiving RT, no significant hearing loss was found at doses to the cochlea of less than 40 Gy. Patients receiving 100 mg/m{sup 2} or 40 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin chemotherapy had an estimated +21.5 dB and +9.5 dB hearing loss at 8,000 Hz with low radiation doses (10 Gy), which rose to +38.4 dB and +18.9 dB for high radiation doses (40 Gy). Conclusions: Use of RT alone with doses of less than 40 Gy did not result in clinically significant hearing loss. High-frequency SNHL was profoundly damaged in patients who received concomitant cisplatin when doses of 100 mg/m{sup 2} were used. The threshold cochlear dose for hearing loss with cisplatin-based chemotherapy and RT was predicted to be 10 Gy. The inner ear radiation dose constraints and cisplatin dose intensity should be considered in the treatment of advanced head-and-neck cancer.

  17. Chemotherapy for Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Melissa A; Schuchter, Lynn M

    2016-01-01

    Prior to the recent therapeutic advances, chemotherapy was the mainstay of treatment options for advanced-stage melanoma. A number of studies have investigated various chemotherapy combinations in order to expand on the clinical responses achieved with single-agent dacarbazine, but these have not demonstrated an improvement in overall survival. Similar objective responses were observed with the combination of carboplatin and paclitaxel as were seen with single-agent dacarbazine. The combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy, known as biochemo-therapy, has shown high clinical responses; however, biochemo-therapy has not been shown to improve overall survival and resulted in increased toxicities. In contrast, palliation and long-term responses have been observed with localized treatment with isolated limb perfusion or infusion in limb-isolated disease. Although new, improved therapeutic options exist for first-line management of advanced-stage melanoma, chemotherapy may still be important in the palliative treatment of refractory, progressive, and relapsed melanoma. We review the various chemotherapy options available for use in the treatment and palliation of advanced-stage melanoma, discuss the important clinical trials supporting the treatment recommendations, and focus on the clinical circumstances in which treatment with chemotherapy is useful.

  18. Time-frequency analysis of transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions in children exposed to carboplatin chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Shaum; Bass, Johnnie; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Brennan, Rachel; Wilson, Matthew; Wu, Jianrong; Galindo, Carlos-Rodriguez; Paglialonga, Alessia; Tognola, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize and quantify time-frequency changes in transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) recorded in children diagnosed with retinoblastoma who were receiving carboplatin chemotherapy. A signal processing technique, the wavelet transform (WT), was used to analyze TEOAE waveforms in narrow-band frequency components. Ten children (aged 3-72 months) diagnosed with unilateral or bilateral retinoblastoma were enrolled in the study. TEOAEs were acquired from the children with linear sequences of 70 dB peak equivalent SPL clicks. After WT analysis, TEOAE energy, latency and normalized energy in the narrow-band frequency components were compared before and during carboplatin chemotherapy treatment (average dose 1693 mg/m2). On a group basis, no significant differences (p>0.05) in the TEOAE energy, latency or normalized energy before and after carboplatin treatment were observed. There were decreases in normalized energy on an individual basis in 10 out of 18 ears in the sample. Exposure to carboplatin chemotherapy did not cause significant changes in TEOAE energy, latency and normalized energy during treatment. However, long-term monitoring of hearing with measurements of TEOAEs is warranted, given the risks of delayed hearing loss in some children receiving carboplatin chemotherapy.

  19. Glutamine facilitates chemotherapy while reducing toxicity.

    PubMed

    Klimberg, V S; Nwokedi, E; Hutchins, L F; Pappas, A A; Lang, N P; Broadwater, J R; Read, R C; Westbrook, K C

    1992-01-01

    Dose intensification of chemotherapy is thought to increase survival. With recent advances in hemopoietic cell modulators such as granulocyte colony stimulating factor, the limiting toxicity of intensifying chemotherapeutic regimens has become the severity of the associated enterocolitis. In animal models, glutamine protects the host from methotrexate-induced enterocolitis. This study evaluates the effects of a glutamine-supplemented diet on the tumoricidal effectiveness of methotrexate. Sarcoma-bearing Fisher 344 rats (n = 30) were pair-fed an isocaloric elemental diet containing 1% glutamine or an isonitrogenous amount of glycine beginning on day 25 of the study. Rats from each group received two intraperitoneal injections of methotrexate (5 mg/kg) or saline on days 26 and 33 of the study. On day 40, rats were killed, tumor volume and weight were recorded, and tumor glutaminase activity and tumor morphometrics were measured. Blood was taken for arterial glutamine content, complete blood count, and blood culture. The gut was processed for glutaminase activity and synthesis phase of the deoxyribonucleic acid. In rats receiving methotrexate, the tumor volume loss was nearly doubled when glutamine was added to the diet. Significant differences in tumor glutaminase activity and morphometrics were not detected. The toxicity to the host was ameliorated. Significantly increased synthesis phase of deoxyribonucleic acid of the whole jejunum, decreased bacteremia, "sepsis," and mortality were demonstrated. Glutamine supplementation enhances the tumoricidal effectiveness of methotrexate while reducing its morbidity and mortality in this sarcoma rat model.

  20. Addition of an induction regimen of antiangiogenesis and antitumor immunity to standard chemotherapy improves survival in advanced malignancies.

    PubMed

    Lasalvia-Prisco, Eduardo; Goldschmidt, Pablo; Galmarini, Felipe; Cucchi, Silvia; Vázquez, Jesús; Aghazarian, Martha; Lasalvia-Galante, Eduardo; Golomar, Wilson; Gordon, William

    2012-12-01

    Studies have shown that cancer requires two conditions for tumor progression: cancer cell proliferation and an environment permissive to and conditioned by malignancy. Chemotherapy aims to control the number and proliferation of cancer cells, but it does not effectively control the two best-known conditions of the tumor-permissive environment: neoangiogenesis and tolerogenic immunity. Many malignant diseases exhibit poor outcomes after treatment with chemotherapy. Therefore, we investigated the potential benefits of adding an induction regimen of antiangiogenesis and antitumor immunity to chemotherapy in poor outcome disease. In a prospective, randomized trial, we included patients with advanced, unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinomas, non-small cell lung cancer, or prostate cancer. Two groups of each primary condition were compared: group 1 (G1), n = 30, was treated with the standard chemotherapy and used as a control, and group 2 (G2), n = 30, was treated with chemotherapy plus an induction regimen of antiangiogenesis and antitumor immunity. This induction regimen included a low dose of metronomic cyclophosphamide, a high dose of Cox-2 inhibitor, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, a sulfhydryl (SH) donor, and a hemoderivative that contained autologous tumor antigens released from patient tumors into the blood. After treatment, the G2 group demonstrated significantly longer survival, lower blood level of neoangiogenesis and immune-tolerance mediators, and higher blood levels of antiangiogenesis and antitumor immunity mediators compared with the G1 group. Toxicity and quality of life were not significantly different between the groups. In conclusion, in several advanced malignancies of different primary localizations, an increase in survival was observed by adding an induction regimen of antiangiogenesis and antitumor immunity to standard chemotherapy.

  1. A Pilot Study Evaluating Steroid-Induced Diabetes after Antiemetic Dexamethasone Therapy in Chemotherapy-Treated Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yusook; Han, Hye Sook; Lee, Hyo Duk; Yang, Jiyoul; Jeong, Jiwon; Choi, Moon Ki; Kwon, Jihyun; Jeon, Hyun-Jung; Oh, Tae-Keun; Lee, Ki Hyeong; Kim, Seung Taik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Dexamethasone is a mainstay antiemetic regimen for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the incidence of and factors associated with steroid-induced diabetes in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy with dexamethasone as an antiemetic. Materials and Methods Non-diabetic patients with newly diagnosed gastrointestinal cancer who received at least three cycles of highly or moderately emetogenic chemotherapy with dexamethasone as an antiemetic were enrolled. Fasting plasma glucose levels, 2-hour postprandial glucose levels, and hemoglobin A1C tests for the diagnosis of diabetes were performed before chemotherapy and at 3 and 6 months after the start of chemotherapy. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was used as an index for measurement of insulin resistance, defined as a HOMA-IR ≥ 2.5. Results Between January 2012 and November 2013, 101 patients with no history of diabetes underwent laboratory tests for assessment of eligibility; 77 of these patients were included in the analysis. Forty-five patients (58.4%) were insulin resistant and 17 (22.1%) developed steroid-induced diabetes at 3 or 6 months after the first chemotherapy, which included dexamethasone as an antiemetic. Multivariate analysis showed significant association of the incidence of steroid-induced diabetes with the cumulative dose of dexamethasone (p=0.049). Conclusion We suggest that development of steroid-induced diabetes after antiemetic dexamethasone therapy occurs in approximately 20% of non-diabetic cancer patients; this is particularly significant for patients receiving high doses of dexamethasone. PMID:26987397

  2. Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy (HIPEC) Methodology, Drugs and Bidirectional Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Valle, S J; Alzahrani, N A; Liauw, W; Sugarbaker, P H; Bhatt, A; Morris, D L

    2016-06-01

    Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) combined have been recognized as standard of care for treatment of a subset of patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). The aim of CRS is to eliminate all macroscopic disease through a series of visceral resections followed by targeting any residual microscopic disease with intraperitoneal chemotherapy, exposing the peritoneal surfaces to a high concentration of chemotherapy with a lower systemic toxicity. Different regimes of intraperitoneal chemotherapy include HIPEC, early postoperative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (EPIC) and bidirectional chemotherapy. The efficacy and modality of treatment with intraperitoneal chemotherapy is dependent on multiple factors including the chosen cytotoxic agent and its pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. There is no standardized methodology for intraperitoneal chemotherapy administration. This review will discuss the pharmacological principles of the various intraperitoneal chemotherapy techniques. PMID:27065705

  3. Acute Esophagus Toxicity in Lung Cancer Patients After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kwint, Margriet; Uyterlinde, Wilma; Nijkamp, Jasper; Chen, Chun; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Heuvel, Michel van den; Knegjens, Joost; Herk, Marcel van; Belderbos, Jose

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the dose-effect relation between acute esophageal toxicity (AET) and the dose-volume parameters of the esophagus after intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: One hundred thirty-nine patients with inoperable NSCLC treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy were prospectively analyzed. The fractionation scheme was 66 Gy in 24 fractions. All patients received concurrently a daily dose of cisplatin (6 mg/m Superscript-Two ). Maximum AET was scored according to Common Toxicity Criteria 3.0. Dose-volume parameters V5 to V70, D{sub mean} and D{sub max} of the esophagus were calculated. A logistic regression analysis was performed to analyze the dose-effect relation between these parameters and grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 AET. The outcome was compared with the clinically used esophagus V35 prediction model for grade {>=}2 after radical 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) treatment. Results: In our patient group, 9% did not experience AET, and 31% experienced grade 1 AET, 38% grade 2 AET, and 22% grade 3 AET. The incidence of grade 2 and grade 3 AET was not different from that in patients treated with CCRT using 3DCRT. The V50 turned out to be the most significant dosimetric predictor for grade {>=}3 AET (P=.012). The derived V50 model was shown to predict grade {>=}2 AET significantly better than the clinical V35 model (P<.001). Conclusions: For NSCLC patients treated with IMRT and concurrent chemotherapy, the V50 was identified as most accurate predictor of grade {>=}3 AET. There was no difference in the incidence of grade {>=}2 AET between 3DCRT and IMRT in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  4. Chemotherapy for Stage II Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Anna

    2015-12-01

    The adjuvant treatment of patients with stage II colon cancer is an area of controversy in medical oncology. Adjuvant chemotherapy aims to eradicate micrometastatic disease present at the time of surgery, preventing the development of distant metastatic disease and thereby curing those patients of their cancer. National and international guidelines for the adjuvant treatment of stage II colon cancer recommend a range of treatment options from observation to chemotherapy with single-agent or combination regimens, depending on the presence or absence of high-risk features (poorly differentiated histology, presence of lymphovascular invasion, presence of perineural invasion, report of < 12 lymph nodes, bowel obstruction, localized perforation, or positive margins). In the one prospective study designed to address the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in stage II colon cancer, a small but statistically significant benefit in overall survival was seen for those patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy; however, multiple meta-analyses and retrospective subgroup analyses have called these findings into question. Though there may be a role for adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with stage II colon cancer, its incremental benefit is small, at best, and comes with the risks of real and rarely fatal complications of chemotherapy. PMID:26648796

  5. Modification of chemotherapy by nitroimidazoles

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, D.W.

    1984-09-01

    The potentiation of chemotherapeutic agents by radiation sensitizers has been extensively studied for several years. There is little doubt that the effectiveness of certain anti-cancer drugs, primarily alkylating agents, can readily be enhanced both in vitro and in vivo through the addition of a sensitizer. While enhanced effects have been observed in certain critical normal tissues, in general most animal model studies have demonstrated a therapeutic gain at large sensitizer doses. This approach to combination therapies therefore appears promising. Yet many questions concerning the interaction between chemotherapeutic agents and radiosensitizers, particularly in the aspects of modification of chemotherapy by nitroimidazoles are reviewed and discussed. These address the importance in chemopotentiation of (i) hypoxia, (ii) alterations in DNA damage and/or repair, (iii) depletion of intracellular sulfhydryls and (iv) modification of drug pharmacokinetics.

  6. Effects of the polysaccharides extracted from Ganoderma lucidum on chemotherapy-related fatigue in mice.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Ming-Zi; Lin, Li-Zhu; Lv, Wen-Jiao; Zuo, Qian; Lv, Zhuo; Guan, Jie-Shan; Wang, Shu-Tang; Sun, Ling-Ling; Chen, Han-Rui; Xiao, Zhi-Wei

    2016-10-01

    The weight-loaded swimming capability, tumor growth, survival time and biochemical markers of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (GLPs) in a chemotherapy-related fatigue mouse model were tested in the present study. The results showed that the middle-dose GLPs (GLP-M) and the high-dose GLPs (GLP-H) could increase the exhausting swimming time, which was observed to decrease in the cisplatin control group(PCG) and the tumor control group (TCG).The GLP-M and the GLP-H had reduced serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-αand interleukin-6, which were up-regulated by cisplatin. Cisplatin and the presence of tumor significantly enhanced the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and inhibited the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the muscle. Administration of GLPs at a high dose decreased the levels of MDA and up-regulated the SOD activity. The high-dose GLPs+cisplatin group presented a decreased tendency of tumor volume and a lower tumor weight compared with PCG. Moreover, the mice in the GLP-M and GLP-H groups had longer survival times compared with the mice in the TCG and PCG.The levels of creatinine and serum blood urea nitrogen, which are up-regulated by cisplatin, were significantly reduced by GLP-M and GLP-H. Therefore, these results suggest that GLPs might improve chemotherapy-related fatigue via regulation of inflammatory responses, oxidative stress and reduction of nephrotoxicity. PMID:27208798

  7. Effects of the polysaccharides extracted from Ganoderma lucidum on chemotherapy-related fatigue in mice.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Ming-Zi; Lin, Li-Zhu; Lv, Wen-Jiao; Zuo, Qian; Lv, Zhuo; Guan, Jie-Shan; Wang, Shu-Tang; Sun, Ling-Ling; Chen, Han-Rui; Xiao, Zhi-Wei

    2016-10-01

    The weight-loaded swimming capability, tumor growth, survival time and biochemical markers of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (GLPs) in a chemotherapy-related fatigue mouse model were tested in the present study. The results showed that the middle-dose GLPs (GLP-M) and the high-dose GLPs (GLP-H) could increase the exhausting swimming time, which was observed to decrease in the cisplatin control group(PCG) and the tumor control group (TCG).The GLP-M and the GLP-H had reduced serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-αand interleukin-6, which were up-regulated by cisplatin. Cisplatin and the presence of tumor significantly enhanced the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and inhibited the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the muscle. Administration of GLPs at a high dose decreased the levels of MDA and up-regulated the SOD activity. The high-dose GLPs+cisplatin group presented a decreased tendency of tumor volume and a lower tumor weight compared with PCG. Moreover, the mice in the GLP-M and GLP-H groups had longer survival times compared with the mice in the TCG and PCG.The levels of creatinine and serum blood urea nitrogen, which are up-regulated by cisplatin, were significantly reduced by GLP-M and GLP-H. Therefore, these results suggest that GLPs might improve chemotherapy-related fatigue via regulation of inflammatory responses, oxidative stress and reduction of nephrotoxicity.

  8. Peripheral neuropathy induced by combination chemotherapy of docetaxel and cisplatin.

    PubMed Central

    Hilkens, P. H.; Pronk, L. C.; Verweij, J.; Vecht, C. J.; van Putten, W. L.; van den Bent, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Docetaxel, a new semisynthetic taxoid that has demonstrated promising activity as an antineoplastic agent, was administered in combination with cisplatin to 63 patients in a dose-escalating study. As both drugs were known to be potentially neurotoxic, peripheral neurotoxicity was prospectively assessed in detail. Neuropathy was evaluated by clinical sum-score for signs and symptoms and by measurement of the vibration perception threshold (VPT). The severity of neuropathy was graded according to the National Cancer Institute's 'Common Toxicity Criteria'. The docetaxel-cisplatin combination chemotherapy induced a predominantly sensory neuropathy in 29 (53%) out of 55 evaluable patients. At cumulative doses of both cisplatin and docetaxel above 200 mg m(-2), 26 (74%) out of 35 patients developed a neuropathy which was mild in 15, moderate in ten and severe in one patient. Significant correlations were present between both the cumulative dose of docetaxel and cisplatin and the post-treatment sum-score of neuropathy (P < 0.01) as well as the post-treatment VPT (P < 0.01). The neurotoxic effects of this combination were more severe than either cisplatin or docetaxel as single agent at similar doses. PMID:9020489

  9. Multiple-dose therapy with bovine colostrum confers significant protection against diarrhea in a mouse model of human rotavirus-induced gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, M; Yamamoto, M; Cairangzhuoma; Xijier; Yabe, T; Uchida, K; Kawasaki, M; Nakagomi, T; Nakagomi, O; Minamoto, N; Kanamaru, Y

    2013-02-01

    Rotavirus is the most important etiologic agent of severe gastroenteritis. Previously, we reported that skimmed and concentrated bovine late colostrum (SCBLC) obtained from normal unimmunized cows at 6 to 7d after parturition effectively prevented against human rotavirus (HRV)-induced severe gastroenteritis in vivo, when administered as a single dose 60 min before viral inoculation. In the present study, we examined the efficacy of multiple administrations of SCBLC at smaller dosages after viral inoculation in vivo. We demonstrate that multiple administrations within 24h after virus inoculation resulted in earlier recovery from diarrheal symptoms, in an administration frequency-dependent manner. Furthermore, we investigated whether isolated IgG anti-HRV activity in SCBLC was equivalent to that of IgG isolated from bovine mature milk as measured by in vitro activity assays. We found that IgG-containing fractions from SCBLC and mature milk exhibited approximately the same level of anti-HRV activity. We concluded that the SCBLC contains a high level of IgG against HRV-induced severe gastroenteritis, which will be possible to use in protective effects in immunocompromised hosts, such as children and the elderly. Multiple doses of SCBLC during the early stages of infection or lower dosage of SCBLC given as a single dose both resulted in relief of diarrheal symptoms. PMID:23200479

  10. Mitoxantrone-loaded albumin microspheres for localized intratumoral chemotherapy of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almond, Brett Anthony

    The safety and efficacy of conventional chemotherapy is limited by its toxicity. The direct intratumoral injection of free or microsphere-loaded antineoplastic drugs is a promising modality for the treatment of solid tumors. Intratumoral chemotherapy delivers high localized doses of cytotoxic drugs to the tumor tissues than does systemic (intravenous) chemotherapy and it decreases systemic drug concentrations and toxicities. The use of drug-loaded microspheres also provides a prolonged release of drug into the surrounding tumor tissues, increasing exposure of the neoplasm to therapeutic levels of the cytotoxic drug. Mitoxantrone and 5-fluorouracil-loaded albumin microspheres were synthesized. The microspheres were synthesized using a suspension crosslinking technique and a glutardehyde crosslinking agent. The particle-size distribution of the microspheres was controlled by adjusting the emulsion energy and the concentration of cellulose acetate butyrate, the emulsion stabilization agent. Both microsphere size and crosslink density (glutaraldehyde concentration) were found to affect the in vitro release of loaded drugs in in vitro infinite sink conditions. The in vivo efficacy and toxicity of intratumoral chemotherapy with free and microsphere-loaded mitoxantrone were evaluated in a 16/C murine mammary adenocarcinoma model. Intratumoral chemotherapy with free mitoxantrone significantly improved survival and decreased toxicity compared to intravenously delivered drug. The efficacy of two size distributions of mitoxantrone-loaded albumin microspheres, corresponding to mean diameters of 5 to 10 mum and 20 to 40 mum, were evaluated delivered both alone and in combination with free mitoxantrone. Intratumoral injection of mitoxantrone-loaded microspheres was found to allow the safe delivery of increased doses compared to free drug. The maximum tolerated doses were approximately 40 mg/kg compared to 12 mg/kg, respectively. Intratumoral chemotherapy using free and

  11. Adoptive T-cell therapy improves treatment of canine non-Hodgkin lymphoma post chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Colleen M; Sheppard, Sabina; Hartline, Cassie A; Huls, Helen; Johnson, Mark; Palla, Shana L; Maiti, Sourindra; Ma, Wencai; Davis, R Eric; Craig, Suzanne; Lee, Dean A; Champlin, Richard; Wilson, Heather; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2012-01-01

    Clinical observations reveal that an augmented pace of T-cell recovery after chemotherapy correlates with improved tumor-free survival, suggesting the add-back of T cells after chemotherapy may improve outcomes. To evaluate adoptive immunotherapy treatment for B-lineage non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), we expanded T cells from client-owned canines diagnosed with NHL on artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) in the presence of human interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21. Graded doses of autologous T cells were infused after CHOP chemotherapy and persisted for 49 days, homed to tumor, and significantly improved survival. Serum thymidine kinase changes predicted T-cell engraftment, while anti-tumor effects correlated with neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios and granzyme B expression in manufactured T cells. Therefore, chemotherapy can be used to modulate infused T-cell responses to enhance anti-tumor effects. The companion canine model has translational implications for human immunotherapy which can be readily exploited since clinical-grade canine and human T cells are propagated using identical approaches. PMID:22355761

  12. Marginal effects of glucose, insulin and insulin-like growth factor on chemotherapy response in endothelial and colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    VOLKOVA, EKATERINA; ROBINSON, BRIDGET A.; WILLIS, JINNY; CURRIE, MARGARET J.; DACHS, GABI U.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a major clinical issue for patients with colorectal cancer. Obesity has been associated with a poorer outcome and is a possible mechanism of resistance. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of obesity-related factors on the cell response to standard chemotherapy in stromal and colorectal cancer cells. Viability was measured following the treatment of colorectal cancer cell lines (WiDr and SW620) and stromal cells (human microvascular endothelial cells) in vitro with 5-fluorouracil, irinotecan and oxaliplatin under obesity-related conditions [elevated levels of insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and glucose] and compared with non-elevated conditions. Obesity-related conditions alone increased cell viability and in selected cases, accumulation of the transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor-1. However, these conditions did not consistently increase resistance to the chemotherapy agents tested. The combination of IGF-1 and extremely low-dose chemotherapy significantly induced cell viability in WiDr colorectal cancer cells. These in vitro results may have clinical importance in an environment of increasing rates of obesity and colorectal cancer, and the frequent under-dosing of obese cancer patients. PMID:24396438

  13. SU-E-J-66: Significant Anatomical and Dosimetric Changes Observed with the Pharyngeal Constrictor During Head and Neck Radiotherapy Elicited From Daily Deformable Image Registration and Dose Accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumarasiri, A; Siddiqui, F; Liu, C; Kamal, M; Fraser, C; Chetty, I; Kim, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the anatomical changes and associated dosimetric consequences to the pharyngeal constrictor (PC) that occurs during head and neck radiotherapy (H&N RT). Methods: A cohort of 13 oro-pharyngeal cancer patients, who had daily CBCT’s for localization, was retrospectively studied. On every 5th CBCT, PC was manually delineated by a radiation oncologist. The anterior-posterior PC thickness was measured at the C3 level. Delivered dose to PC was estimated by calculating daily doses on CBCT’s, and accumulating to corresponding planning CT images. For accumulation, a parameter-optimized B- spline-based deformable image registration algorithm (Elastix) was used, in conjunction with an energy-mass mapping dose transfer algorithm. Mean and maximum dose (Dmean, Dmax) to PC was determined and compared with corresponding planned quantities. Results: The mean (±standard deviation) volume increase (ΔV) and thickness increase (Δt) over the course of 35 total fractions were 54±33% (11.9±7.6 cc), and 63±39% (2.9±1.9 mm), respectively. The resultant cumulative mean dose increase from planned dose to PC (ΔDmean) was 1.4±1.3% (0.9±0.8 Gy), while the maximum dose increase (ΔDmax) was 0.0±1.6% (0.0±1.1 Gy). Patients with adaptive replanning (n=6) showed a smaller mean dose increase than those without (n=7); 0.5±0.2% (0.3±0.1 Gy) vs. 2.2±1.4% (1.4±0.9 Gy). There was a statistically significant (p<0.0001) strong correlation between ΔDmean and Δt (Pearson coefficient r=0.78), and a moderate-to-strong correlation (r=0.52) between ΔDmean and ΔV. Correlation between ΔDmean and weight loss ΔW (r=0.1), as well as ΔV and ΔW (r=0.2) were negligible. Conclusion: Patients were found to undergo considerable anatomical changes to pharyngeal constrictor during H&N RT, resulting in non-negligible dose deviations from intended dose. Results are indicative that pharyngeal constrictor thickness, measured at C3 level, is a good predictor for the dose change to

  14. Human circulating plasma DNA significantly decreases while lymphocyte DNA damage increases under chronic occupational exposure to low-dose gamma-neutron and tritium β-radiation.

    PubMed

    Korzeneva, Inna B; Kostuyk, Svetlana V; Ershova, Liza S; Osipov, Andrian N; Zhuravleva, Veronika F; Pankratova, Galina V; Porokhovnik, Lev N; Veiko, Natalia N

    2015-09-01

    The blood plasma of healthy people contains cell-fee (circulating) DNA (cfDNA). Apoptotic cells are the main source of the cfDNA. The cfDNA concentration increases in case of the organism's cell death rate increase, for example in case of exposure to high-dose ionizing radiation (IR). The objects of the present research are the blood plasma and blood lymphocytes of people, who contacted occupationally with the sources of external gamma/neutron radiation or internal β-radiation of tritium N = 176). As the controls (references), blood samples of people, who had never been occupationally subjected to the IR sources, were used (N = 109). With respect to the plasma samples of each donor there were defined: the cfDNA concentration (the cfDNA index), DNase1 activity (the DNase1 index) and titre of antibodies to DNA (the Ab DNA index). The general DNA damage in the cells was defined (using the Comet assay, the tail moment (TM) index). A chronic effect of the low-dose ionizing radiation on a human being is accompanied by the enhancement of the DNA damage in lymphocytes along with a considerable cfDNA content reduction, while the DNase1 content and concentration of antibodies to DNA (Ab DNA) increase. All the aforementioned changes were also observed in people, who had not worked with the IR sources for more than a year. The ratio cfDNA/(DNase1×Ab DNA × TM) is proposed to be used as a marker of the chronic exposure of a person to the external low-dose IR. It was formulated the assumption that the joint analysis of the cfDNA, DNase1, Ab DNA and TM values may provide the information about the human organism's cell resistivity to chronic exposure to the low-dose IR and about the development of the adaptive response in the organism that is aimed, firstly, at the effective cfDNA elimination from the blood circulation, and, secondly - at survival of the cells, including the cells with the damaged DNA. PMID:26113293

  15. Pegylated filgrastim is comparable with filgrastim as support for commonly used chemotherapy regimens: a multicenter, randomized, crossover phase 3 study.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuan-Kai; Chen, Qiang; Zhu, Yun-Zhong; He, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Hua-Qing; Jiang, Ze-Fei; Chang, Jian Hua; Liu, Yun-Peng; Wang, An-Lan; Luo, De-Yun; Zhang, Yang; Ke, Xiao-Yan; Li, Wei-Lian; Zhang, Wei-Jing; Wang, Xiu-Wen; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Wang, Jian-Min; Liu, Xiao-Qing

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of a single subcutaneous injection of pegylated filgrastim with daily filgrastim as a prophylaxis for neutropenia induced by commonly used chemotherapy regimens. Fifteen centers enrolled 337 chemotherapy-naive cancer patients with normal bone marrow function. All patients randomized into AOB and BOA arms received two cycles of chemotherapy. Patients received a single dose of pegylated filgrastim 100 µg/kg in cycle 1 (AOB) or cycle 2 (BOA) and daily doses of filgrastim 5 µg/kg/day in cycle 1 (BOA) or cycle 2 (AOB). Efficacy and safety parameters were recorded. The primary end point was the rate of protection against grade 4 neutropenia after chemotherapy [defined as the rate at which the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) remained >0.5×10(9)/l throughout the entire cycle]. Ninety-four percent of patients receiving pegylated filgrastim or filgrastim did not develop grade 4 neutropenia. The incidence of ANC<1.0×10(9)/l was 16.0% (50/313) after support with either pegylated filgrastim or filgrastim. The incidences of febrile neutropenia and antibiotic administration were similar in both groups. Notably, faster ANC recovery was observed with pegylated filgrastim support. The ANC nadir was also earlier with pegylated filgrastim (day 7) support than with filgrastim support (day 9), although the depth of nadir was not significantly different. A single subcutaneous injection of pegylated filgrastim 100 μg/kg provided adequate and safe neutrophil support comparable with daily subcutaneous injections of unmodified filgrastim 5 μg/kg/day in patients receiving commonly used standard-dose mild-to-moderate myelosuppressive chemotherapy regimens.

  16. Modeling Combined Chemotherapy and Particle Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Durante, Marco; Tommasino, Francesco; Yamada, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is the only cancer for which deaths are predicted to increase in 2014 and beyond. Combined radiochemotherapy protocols using gemcitabine and hypofractionated X-rays are ongoing in several clinical trials. Recent results indicate that charged particle therapy substantially increases local control of resectable and unresectable pancreas cancer, as predicted from previous radiobiology studies considering the high tumor hypoxia. Combination with chemotherapy improves the overall survival (OS). We compared published data on X-ray and charged particle clinical results with or without adjuvant chemotherapy calculating the biological effective dose. We show that chemoradiotherapy with protons or carbon ions results in 1 year OS significantly higher than those obtained with other treatment schedules. Further hypofractionation using charged particles may result in improved local control and survival. A comparative clinical trial using the standard X-ray scheme vs. the best current standard with carbon ions is crucial and may open new opportunities for this deadly disease. PMID:26217585

  17. Clinical and histopathological evaluation of the effect of addition of immunotherapy with Mw vaccine to standard chemotherapy in borderline leprosy.

    PubMed

    Kamal, R; Natrajan, M; Katoch, K; Arora, M

    2012-01-01

    This study reports detailed analysis of clinical parameters and clearance of granuloma in borderline leprosy patients treated with immunotherapy and chemotherapy. It aims to assess the additive effect of immunotherapy (Mwvaccine) with standard MDT on clinical status of untreated borderline leprosy cases and on granuloma fraction of untreated borderline leprosy cases. Patients attending the OPD were serially recruited in two groups. A total of 150 cases in one treatment (trial) group (Mw vaccine plus MDT) and 120 cases in another treatment (control) group (MDT only) of border line leprosy have been included. After the formal written consent, detailed clinical examination, charting, smear examination of all untreated borderline patients of both groups was done, biopsies were taken from the active lesions of all patients of both groups at start of therapy and every six month thereafter till the completion of therapy. The same procedure was repeated every six months during the follow-up period. Standard MDT was given to all the patients of both groups according to type of disease. Mw vaccine 0.1 ml (0.5 x 10(9) bacilli) was injected intra-dermally at the start of therapy and every six months in addition to chemotherapy to the treatment group. The BT cases were followed up after 6 doses of MDT and 2 doses of Mw vaccine, and, the BB, BL cases were followed up after 24 doses of MDT plus 5 doses of Mw vaccine. Clinically, greater and faster improvement was observed in all the clinical parameters, faster attainment of smear negativity and two episodes of lepra reaction occurred in cases treated with combined chemotherapy and immunotherapy, as compared to controls (chemotherapy alone) wherein clinical improvement was slower in all parameters, slower attainment of smear negativity in bacillary index and seven showed the occurrence of reactions, histipathologically in addition to more rapid clearance of granuloma in immunotherapy treated group, a significant finding was an

  18. Chemotherapy, cognitive impairment and hippocampal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, J; Prust, M; Kaiser, J

    2015-11-19

    Cancer therapies can be associated with significant central nervous system (CNS) toxicity. While radiation-induced brain damage has been long recognized both in pediatric and adult cancer patients, CNS toxicity from chemotherapy has only recently been acknowledged. Clinical studies suggest that the most frequent neurotoxic adverse effects associated with chemotherapy include memory and learning deficits, alterations of attention, concentration, processing speed and executive function. Preclinical studies have started to shed light on how chemotherapy targets the CNS both on cellular and molecular levels to disrupt neural function and brain plasticity. Potential mechanisms include direct cellular toxicity, alterations in cellular metabolism, oxidative stress, and induction of pro-inflammatory processes with subsequent disruption of normal cellular and neurological function. Damage to neural progenitor cell populations within germinal zones of the adult CNS has been identified as one of the key mechanisms by which chemotherapy might exert long-lasting and progressive neurotoxic effects. Based on the important role of the hippocampus for maintenance of brain plasticity throughout life, several experimental studies have focused on the study of chemotherapy effects on hippocampal neurogenesis and associated learning and memory. An increasing body of literature from both animal studies and neuroimaging studies in cancer patients suggests a possible relationship between chemotherapy induced hippocampal damage and the spectrum of neurocognitive deficits and mood alterations observed in cancer patients. This review aims to briefly summarize current preclinical and neuroimaging studies that are providing a potential link between the neurotoxic effects of chemotherapy and hippocampal dysfunction, highlighting challenges and future directions in this field of investigation.

  19. Chemotherapy, cognitive impairment and hippocampal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, J; Prust, M; Kaiser, J

    2015-11-19

    Cancer therapies can be associated with significant central nervous system (CNS) toxicity. While radiation-induced brain damage has been long recognized both in pediatric and adult cancer patients, CNS toxicity from chemotherapy has only recently been acknowledged. Clinical studies suggest that the most frequent neurotoxic adverse effects associated with chemotherapy include memory and learning deficits, alterations of attention, concentration, processing speed and executive function. Preclinical studies have started to shed light on how chemotherapy targets the CNS both on cellular and molecular levels to disrupt neural function and brain plasticity. Potential mechanisms include direct cellular toxicity, alterations in cellular metabolism, oxidative stress, and induction of pro-inflammatory processes with subsequent disruption of normal cellular and neurological function. Damage to neural progenitor cell populations within germinal zones of the adult CNS has been identified as one of the key mechanisms by which chemotherapy might exert long-lasting and progressive neurotoxic effects. Based on the important role of the hippocampus for maintenance of brain plasticity throughout life, several experimental studies have focused on the study of chemotherapy effects on hippocampal neurogenesis and associated learning and memory. An increasing body of literature from both animal studies and neuroimaging studies in cancer patients suggests a possible relationship between chemotherapy induced hippocampal damage and the spectrum of neurocognitive deficits and mood alterations observed in cancer patients. This review aims to briefly summarize current preclinical and neuroimaging studies that are providing a potential link between the neurotoxic effects of chemotherapy and hippocampal dysfunction, highlighting challenges and future directions in this field of investigation. PMID:26086545

  20. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 02-29: A Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Full-Dose Radiation Therapy Followed by Surgical Resection and Consolidative Therapy for Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Carcinoma of the Lung

    SciTech Connect

    Suntharalingam, Mohan; Paulus, Rebecca; Edelman, Martin J.; Krasna, Mark; Burrows, Whitney; Gore, Elizabeth; Wilson, Lynn D.; Choy, Hak

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate mediastinal nodal clearance (MNC) rates after induction chemotherapy and concurrent, full-dose radiation therapy (RT) in a phase II trimodality trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0229). Patients and Methods: Patients (n=57) with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (pathologically proven N2 or N3) were eligible. Induction chemotherapy consisted of weekly carboplatin (AUC = 2.0) and paclitaxel 50 mg/m{sup 2}. Concurrent RT was prescribed, with 50.4 Gy to the mediastinum and primary tumor and a boost of 10.8 Gy to all gross disease. The mediastinum was pathologically reassessed after completion of chemoradiation. The primary endpoint of the study was MNC, with secondary endpoints of 2-year overall survival and postoperative morbidity/mortality. Results: The grade 3/4 toxicities included hematologic 35%, gastrointestinal 14%, and pulmonary 23%. Forty-three patients (75%) were evaluable for the primary endpoint. Twenty-seven patients achieved the primary endpoint of MNC (63%). Thirty-seven patients underwent resection. There was a 14% incidence of grade 3 postoperative pulmonary complications and 1 30-day, postoperative grade 5 toxicity (3%). With a median follow-up of 24 months for all patients, the 2-year overall survival rate was 54%, and the 2-year progression-free survival rate was 33%. The 2-year overall survival rate was 75% for those who achieved nodal clearance, 52% for those with residual nodal disease, and 23% for those who were not evaluable for the primary endpoint (P=.0002). Conclusions: This multi-institutional trial confirms the ability of neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation with full-dose RT to sterilize known mediastinal nodal disease.

  1. A Clinical Prediction Model to Assess Risk for Chemotherapy-Related Hospitalization in Patients Initiating Palliative Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Gabriel A.; Kansagra, Ankit J.; Rao, Sowmya R.; Weitzman, James I.; Linden, Erica A.; Jacobson, Joseph O.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Chemotherapy-related hospitalizations in patients with advanced cancer are common, distressing, and costly. Methods to identify patients at high risk of chemotherapy toxic effects will permit development of targeted strategies to prevent chemotherapy-related hospitalizations. OBJECTIVE To demonstrate the feasibility of using readily available clinical data to assess patient-specific risk of chemotherapy-related hospitalization. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Nested case-control study conducted from January 2003 through December 2011 at the Mass General/North Shore Cancer Center, a community-based cancer center in north eastern Massachusetts. The parent cohort included 1579 consecutive patients with advanced solid-tumor cancer receiving palliative-intent chemotherapy. Case patients (n = 146) included all patients from the parent cohort who experienced a chemotherapy-related hospitalization. Controls (n = 292) were randomly selected from 1433 patients who did not experience a chemotherapy-related hospitalization. EXPOSURES Putative risk factors for chemotherapy-related hospitalization—including patient characteristics, treatment characteristics, and pretreatment laboratory values—were abstracted from medical records. Multivariable logistic regression was used to model the patient-specific risk of chemotherapy-related hospitalization. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Chemotherapy-related hospitalization, as adjudicated by the oncology clinical care team within a systematic quality-assessment program. RESULTS A total of 146 (9.2%) of 1579 patients from the parent cohort experienced a chemotherapy-related hospitalization. In multivariate regression, 7 variables were significantly associated with chemotherapy-related hospitalization: age, Charlson comorbidity score, creatinine clearance, calcium level, below-normal white blood cell and/or platelet count, polychemotherapy (vs monotherapy), and receipt of camptothecin chemotherapy. The median predicted risk of

  2. Preexisting antitumor immunity augments the antitumor effects of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingbing; Feng, Dongdong; Yu, Lynda X; Tsung, Kangla; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2013-06-01

    Efficacy of cancer chemotherapy is generally believed to be the result of direct drug killing of tumor cells. However, increased tumor cell killing does not always lead to improved efficacy. Herein, we demonstrate that the status of antitumor immunity at the time of chemotherapy treatment is a critical factor affecting the therapeutic outcome in that tumor-bearing mice that possess preexisting antitumor immunity respond to chemotherapy much better than those that do not. Enhancing antitumor immunity before or at the time of chemotherapy-induced antigen release increases subsequent response to chemotherapy significantly. By in vitro and in vivo measurements of antitumor immunity, we found a close correlation between the intensity of antitumor immunity activated by chemotherapy and the efficacy of treatment. Immune intervention with interleukin-12 during the early phase of chemotherapy-induced immune activation greatly amplifies the antitumor response, often resulting in complete tumor eradication not only at the chemo-treated local site, but also systemically. These findings provide additional evidence for an immune-mediated antitumor response to chemotherapy. Further, our results show that timely immune modification of chemotherapy-activated antitumor immunity can result in enhanced antitumor-immune response and complete tumor eradication.

  3. Preexisting antitumor immunity augments the antitumor effects of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingbing; Feng, Dongdong; Yu, Lynda X; Tsung, Kangla; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2013-06-01

    Efficacy of cancer chemotherapy is generally believed to be the result of direct drug killing of tumor cells. However, increased tumor cell killing does not always lead to improved efficacy. Herein, we demonstrate that the status of antitumor immunity at the time of chemotherapy treatment is a critical factor affecting the therapeutic outcome in that tumor-bearing mice that possess preexisting antitumor immunity respond to chemotherapy much better than those that do not. Enhancing antitumor immunity before or at the time of chemotherapy-induced antigen release increases subsequent response to chemotherapy significantly. By in vitro and in vivo measurements of antitumor immunity, we found a close correlation between the intensity of antitumor immunity activated by chemotherapy and the efficacy of treatment. Immune intervention with interleukin-12 during the early phase of chemotherapy-induced immune activation greatly amplifies the antitumor response, often resulting in complete tumor eradication not only at the chemo-treated local site, but also systemically. These findings provide additional evidence for an immune-mediated antitumor response to chemotherapy. Further, our results show that timely immune modification of chemotherapy-activated antitumor immunity can result in enhanced antitumor-immune response and complete tumor eradication. PMID:23595208

  4. Innovative therapies: intraoperative intracavitary chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Michael Y; Sugarbaker, David J

    2004-11-01

    Both phase I studies demonstrated that high-dose cisplatin can be delivered safely with acceptable complication rates. The maximum tolerated doses of 225 mg/m2 and 250 mg/m2 cisplatin, respectively, are higher than any other published report of intrapleural cisplatin. The intrapleural cisplatin doses reported in other trials have been 80 mg/m2, 100 mg/m2, and 200 mg/m2. Despite the use of high-dose intraoperative chemotherapy, the group of 50 patients who underwent EPP experienced mortality and morbidity comparable to the contemporaneous group of 41 patients who did not participate in the protocol, except for increased rates of deep venous thrombosis and diaphragmatic patch failure. The 44 patients who underwent P/D experienced a slightly higher mortality rate and creatinine toxicity rate than the first phase I trial. Given the demographics of this patient cohort (higher age, lower FEV1, and inability to withstand pneumonectomy because of limited cardiopulmonary reserve), however, the mortality and morbidity rates seem acceptable. The pharmacologic data from both studies support our hypothesis that high regional doses of cisplatin can be delivered with less systemic absorption than can be achieved with intravenous administration (data not shown). With the maximum tolerated dose of intracavitary cisplatin and safety of intraoperative administration after surgical resection firmly established by these phase I trials, we are prepared to implement phase II and III studies of EPP and P/D with intraoperative cisplatin lavage. We aim to monitor tumor recurrence and patient survival prospectively and compare these results with historic controls. We also intend to document prospectively the morbidity and mortality of the treatment protocols. Finally, we plan to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of cisplatin by measuring tissue and perfusate levels of active and inactive cisplatin. By approaching the problem of local recurrence after resection of MPM in a careful and methodical

  5. Protective Role of Silymarin on Hepatic and Renal Toxicity Induced by MTX Based Chemotherapy in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hagag, Adel A.; Elgamsy, Mohamed A.; El-Asy, Hassan M.; Mabrouk, Maaly M.

    2016-01-01

    Background ALL is the most common childhood malignancy. The children with ALL are treated with methotrexate (MTX) based chemotherapy protocols. MTX causes unpredictable serious hepatic and renal side effects. Silymarin has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities and stimulates tissue regeneration. This study aims to evaluate the protective effects of Silymarin on MTX-based chemotherapy-induced Hepatic and renal toxicity in children with ALL. Patients and Methods 80 children with newly diagnosed ALL were enrolled in the study. They were randomly divided into two groups. Group I included 40 children with ages ranging from 4–13 years and the mean age of 6.85± 2.89 years, who received Silymarin 420 mg/day in 3 divided doses for one week after each MTX dose. Group II included 40 children, with ages ranging from 4–12 years and the mean age of 7.30±2.6 years, who received placebo for one week after MTX therapy. For all patients liver functions including serum bilirubin, total proteins, albumin, globulin and albumin-globulin ratio, alkaline phosphatase, ALT and AST, prothrombin time and activity and renal functions including blood urea and serum creatinine, serum cystatin C and urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase were done to assess hepatic and renal toxicity before and after chemotherapy. Results There were no significant differences between group I and II as regard liver and renal functions before chemotherapy. After chemotherapy, there were significantly higher values of ALT and AST and alkaline phosphatase, and significantly lower Prothrombin activity in group II compared with group I. No significant differences between group I and II were found in total bilirubin, serum protein, and albumin levels. There was significantly lower blood urea, serum creatinine, and cystatin C and urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase in group I compared with group II. Conclusion Silymarin improved some hepatic and renal functions in children with ALL who received MTX

  6. Protective Role of Silymarin on Hepatic and Renal Toxicity Induced by MTX Based Chemotherapy in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hagag, Adel A.; Elgamsy, Mohamed A.; El-Asy, Hassan M.; Mabrouk, Maaly M.

    2016-01-01

    Background ALL is the most common childhood malignancy. The children with ALL are treated with methotrexate (MTX) based chemotherapy protocols. MTX causes unpredictable serious hepatic and renal side effects. Silymarin has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities and stimulates tissue regeneration. This study aims to evaluate the protective effects of Silymarin on MTX-based chemotherapy-induced Hepatic and renal toxicity in children with ALL. Patients and Methods 80 children with newly diagnosed ALL were enrolled in the study. They were randomly divided into two groups. Group I included 40 children with ages ranging from 4–13 years and the mean age of 6.85± 2.89 years, who received Silymarin 420 mg/day in 3 divided doses for one week after each MTX dose. Group II included 40 children, with ages ranging from 4–12 years and the mean age of 7.30±2.6 years, who received placebo for one week after MTX therapy. For all patients liver functions including serum bilirubin, total proteins, albumin, globulin and albumin-globulin ratio, alkaline phosphatase, ALT and AST, prothrombin time and activity and renal functions including blood urea and serum creatinine, serum cystatin C and urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase were done to assess hepatic and renal toxicity before and after chemotherapy. Results There were no significant differences between group I and II as regard liver and renal functions before chemotherapy. After chemotherapy, there were significantly higher values of ALT and AST and alkaline phosphatase, and significantly lower Prothrombin activity in group II compared with group I. No significant differences between group I and II were found in total bilirubin, serum protein, and albumin levels. There was significantly lower blood urea, serum creatinine, and cystatin C and urinary N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase in group I compared with group II. Conclusion Silymarin improved some hepatic and renal functions in children with ALL who received MTX

  7. Influence of definitive radiation therapy for primary breast cancer on ability to deliver adjuvant chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lippman, M.E.; Edwards, B.K.; Findlay, P.; Danforth, D.W. Jr.; MacDonald, H.; D'Angelo, T.; Gorrell, C.

    1986-01-01

    Primary radiotherapy as a means of managing stage I and II breast cancer is receiving increasing attention. In a prospectively randomized trial comparing modified radical mastectomy to lumpectomy followed by definitive radiotherapy, we evaluated whether radiotherapy has a deleterious effect on the ability to administer adjuvant doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide to patients with histologically positive axillary lymph nodes. All patients were treated with an identical regimen, and doses were escalated to the same degree until myelosuppression occurred. There were no significant differences in the amount of chemotherapy administered to either treatment group. Patients in both groups received approximately 100% of the predicted dose of doxorubicin and approximately 117% of the predicted dose of cyclophosphamide. At present, we have no evidence that there are differences in recurrence rates as a function of the quantity of drug received, although longer follow-up is required.

  8. Clinical overview of metronomic chemotherapy in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Munzone, Elisabetta; Colleoni, Marco

    2015-11-01

    Over 15 years ago, low-dose metronomic chemotherapy was shown to induce disease control in patients with advanced-stage breast cancer with a lower incidence of adverse events compared with conventional maximum tolerated dose chemotherapy. Good response rates have been seen in heavily pre-treated patients for whom limited treatment options are available. Most patients prefer oral therapy and metronomic chemotherapy is a convenient alternative in patients with advanced-stage disease in which minimal toxicity and good tumour control are the overall aims of treatment. The addition of metronomic protocols to standard neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimens has produced promising pathological complete response rates. Ongoing trials including the SYSUCC-001 trial in patients with triple-negative breast cancer and the IBCSG 22-00 trial that is assessing a cyclophosphamide-methotrexate maintenance regimen after standard adjuvant therapy in hormone receptor-negative disease, will clarify the value of adding this approach to conventional therapies. The low cost associated with metronomic chemotherapy represents an opportunity for the utilization of this treatment option, especially in developing countries, and poses a challenge for the launch of large trials sponsored by industry. Using breast cancer as the principal example, we discuss the key clinical advances in this area, including new trial design, appropriate patient and end point selection, as well as the evolving rationale for metronomic chemotherapy combinations.

  9. Toxicity profile and clinical outcomes in locally advanced head and neck cancer patients treated with induction chemotherapy prior to concurrent chemoradiation.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eric C; Genden, Eric M; Misiukiewicz, Krzysztof; Som, Peter M; Kostakoglu, Lale; Chen, Chien-Ting; Packer, Stuart; Kao, Johnny

    2012-02-01

    The use of induction chemotherapy prior to chemoradiation for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (LA-HNSCC) remains controversial. We explored whether toxicity from induction chemotherapy influenced the delivery of concurrent chemoradiation. Among 171 consecutive previously unirradiated patients with HNSCC treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation, we identified 66 patients with stage III-IVB head and neck carcinoma who were treated with induction chemotherapy prior to planned chemoradiation. The most common induction regimen was docetaxel, cisplatin and 5-FU (TPF; 80%) for 2 to 3 cycles. Mean radiation dose was 72 Gy (range, 36-75 Gy). Concurrent chemotherapy regimens included cisplatin (26%), cetuximab (5%) and 5-fluorouracil/hydroxyurea (65%)-based regimens. At a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 9-56 months), the 2-year locoregional control and distant control rates were 85 and 86%, respectively. The 2-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 74 and 80%, respectively. Although there were no grade 5 toxicities during induction chemotherapy, 26% of patients required hospitalization for adverse events, including 5% needing intensive care. The most common high grade adverse events were grade 4 neutropenia (21%) and neutropenic fever (17%). Six percent of patients were unable to tolerate concurrent chemotherapy. The 2-year disease-free survival was significantly higher in patients able to complete induction and concurrent chemoradiation as planned (83 vs. 27%, p<0.001). Induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiation results in promising survival rates in our cohort of advanced head and neck carcinoma patients. Due to severe toxicities in a subset of patients, this strategy is only recommended in selected high-risk patients who are carefully followed by an experienced multidisciplinary team. PMID:22020564

  10. Preventing medication errors in cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M R; Anderson, R W; Attilio, R M; Green, L; Muller, R J; Pruemer, J M

    1996-04-01

    Recommendations for preventing medication errors in cancer chemotherapy are made. Before a health care provider is granted privileges to prescribe, dispense, or administer antineoplastic agents, he or she should undergo a tailored educational program and possibly testing or certification. Appropriate reference materials should be developed. Each institution should develop a dose-verification process with as many independent checks as possible. A detailed checklist covering prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, and administration should be used. Oral orders are not acceptable. All doses should be calculated independently by the physician, the pharmacist, and the nurse. Dosage limits should be established and a review process set up for doses that exceed the limits. These limits should be entered into pharmacy computer systems, listed on preprinted order forms, stated on the product packaging, placed in strategic locations in the institution, and communicated to employees. The prescribing vocabulary must be standardized. Acronyms, abbreviations, and brand names must be avoided and steps taken to avoid other sources of confusion in the written orders, such as trailing zeros. Preprinted antineoplastic drug order forms containing checklists can help avoid errors. Manufacturers should be encouraged to avoid or eliminate ambiguities in drug names and dosing information. Patients must be educated about all aspects of their cancer chemotherapy, as patients represent a last line of defense against errors. An interdisciplinary team at each practice site should review every medication error reported. Pharmacists should be involved at all sites where antineoplastic agents are dispensed. Although it may not be possible to eliminate all medication errors in cancer chemotherapy, the risk can be minimized through specific steps. Because of their training and experience, pharmacists should take the lead in this effort. PMID:8697025

  11. [Scalp cooling for chemotherapy-induced alopecia].

    PubMed

    Komen, Marion M C; Smorenburg, Carolien H; van den Hurk, Corina J G; Nortier, J W R Hans

    2011-01-01

    Alopecia is a very common side effect of cytostatic therapy and is considered one of the most emotionally distressing effects. To prevent alopecia scalp cooling is currently used in some indications in medical oncology in 59 hospitals in the Netherlands. The success of scalp cooling depends on various factors such as type of chemotherapy, dose, infusion time, number of treatment cycles and combinations of drugs. In general, scalp cooling is well tolerated. The reported side-effects are headache, coldness, dizziness and sometimes claustrophobia. An increase in the risk of scalp metastases has not been demonstrated. Proceeding from the South Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Centre a national working group is put together in order to draw up a national guideline for chemotherapy-induced alopecia. PMID:22085565

  12. Curcumin inhibits cancer stem cell phenotypes in ex vivo models of colorectal liver metastases, and is clinically safe and tolerable in combination with FOLFOX chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    James, Mark I; Iwuji, Chinenye; Irving, Glen; Karmokar, Ankur; Higgins, Jennifer A; Griffin-Teal, Nicola; Thomas, Anne; Greaves, Peter; Cai, Hong; Patel, Samita R; Morgan, Bruno; Dennison, Ashley; Metcalfe, Matthew; Garcea, Giuseppe; Lloyd, David M; Berry, David P; Steward, William P; Howells, Lynne M; Brown, Karen

    2015-08-10

    In vitro and pre-clinical studies have suggested that addition of the diet-derived agent curcumin may provide a suitable adjunct to enhance efficacy of chemotherapy in models of colorectal cancer. However, the majority of evidence for this currently derives from established cell lines. Here, we utilised patient-derived colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) to assess whether curcumin may provide added benefit over 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) in cancer stem cell (CSC) models. Combination of curcumin with FOLFOX chemotherapy was then assessed clinically in a phase I dose escalation study. Curcumin alone and in combination significantly reduced spheroid number in CRLM CSC models, and decreased the number of cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDH(high)/CD133(-)). Addition of curcumin to oxaliplatin/5-FU enhanced anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in a proportion of patient-derived explants, whilst reducing expression of stem cell-associated markers ALDH and CD133. The phase I dose escalation study revealed curcumin to be a safe and tolerable adjunct to FOLFOX chemotherapy in patients with CRLM (n = 12) at doses up to 2 grams daily. Curcumin may provide added benefit in subsets of patients when administered with FOLFOX, and is a well-tolerated chemotherapy adjunct.

  13. Curcumin inhibits cancer stem cell phenotypes in ex vivo models of colorectal liver metastases, and is clinically safe and tolerable in combination with FOLFOX chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    James, Mark I.; Iwuji, Chinenye; Irving, Glen; Karmokar, Ankur; Higgins, Jennifer A.; Griffin-Teal, Nicola; Thomas, Anne; Greaves, Peter; Cai, Hong; Patel, Samita R.; Morgan, Bruno; Dennison, Ashley; Metcalfe, Matthew; Garcea, Giuseppe; Lloyd, David M.; Berry, David P.; Steward, William P.; Howells, Lynne M.; Brown, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In vitro and pre-clinical studies have suggested that addition of the diet-derived agent curcumin may provide a suitable adjunct to enhance efficacy of chemotherapy in models of colorectal cancer. However, the majority of evidence for this currently derives from established cell lines. Here, we utilised patient-derived colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) to assess whether curcumin may provide added benefit over 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX) in cancer stem cell (CSC) models. Combination of curcumin with FOLFOX chemotherapy was then assessed clinically in a phase I dose escalation study. Curcumin alone and in combination significantly reduced spheroid number in CRLM CSC models, and decreased the number of cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDHhigh/CD133−). Addition of curcumin to oxaliplatin/5-FU enhanced anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in a proportion of patient-derived explants, whilst reducing expression of stem cell-associated markers ALDH and CD133. The phase I dose escalation study revealed curcumin to be a safe and tolerable adjunct to FOLFOX chemotherapy in patients with CRLM (n = 12) at doses up to 2 grams daily. Curcumin may provide added benefit in subsets of patients when administered with FOLFOX, and is a well-tolerated chemotherapy adjunct. PMID:25979230

  14. Absence of a significant pharmacokinetic interaction between atorvastatin and fenofibrate: a randomized, crossover, study of a fixed-dose formulation in healthy Mexican subjects

    PubMed Central

    Patiño-Rodríguez, Omar; Martínez-Medina, Rosa María; Torres-Roque, Irma; Martínez-Delgado, Maricela; Mares-García, América Susana; Escobedo-Moratilla, Abraham; Covarrubias-Pinedo, Amador; Arzola-Paniagua, Angélica; Herrera-Torres, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Several clinical trials have substantiated the efficacy of the co-administration of statins like atorvastatin (ATO) and fibrates. Without information currently available about the interaction between the two drugs, a pharmacokinetic study was conducted to investigate the effect when both drugs were co-administered. The purpose of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic profile of tablets containing ATO 20 mg, or the combination of ATO 20 mg with fenofibrate (FNO) 160 mg administered to healthy Mexican volunteers. This was a randomized, two-period, two-sequence, crossover study; 36 eligible subjects aged between 20–50 years were included. Blood samples were collected up to 96 h after dosing, and pharmacokinetic parameters were obtained by non-compartmental analysis. Adverse events were evaluated based on subject interviews and physical examinations. Area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) and maximum plasma drug concentration (Cmax) were measured for ATO as the reference and ATO and FNO as the test product for bioequivalence design. The estimation computed (90% confidence intervals) for ATO and FNO combination versus ATO for Cmax, AUC0-t and AUC0-∞, were 102,09, 125,95, and 120,97%, respectively. These results suggest that ATO and FNO have no relevant clinical-pharmacokinetic drug interaction. PMID:25688207

  15. MAPK-ERK activation in kidney of male rats chronically fed ochratoxin A at a dose causing a significant incidence of renal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Marin-Kuan, M. Nestler, S.; Verguet, C.; Bezencon, C.; Piguet, D.; Delatour, T.; Mantle, P.; Cavin, C.; Schilter, B.

    2007-10-15

    Kidney samples of male Fischer 344 (F-344) rats fed a carcinogenic dose of OTA over 7 days, 21 days and 12 months were analysed for various cell signalling proteins known to be potentially involved in chemical carcinogenicity. OTA was found to increase the phosphorylation of atypical-PKC. This was correlated with a selective downstream activation of the MAP-kinase extracellular regulated kinases isoforms 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and of their substrates ELK1/2 and p90RSK. Moreover, analysis of effectors acting upstream of PKC indicated a possible mobilisation of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (lGFr) and phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1) system. An increased histone deacetylase (HDAC) enzymatic activity associated with enhanced HDAC3 protein expression was also observed. These findings are potentially relevant with respect to the understanding of OTA nephrocarcinogenicity. HDAC-induced gene silencing has previously been shown to play a role in tumour development. Furthermore, PKC and the MEK-ERK MAP-kinase pathways are known to play important roles in cell proliferation, cell survival, anti-apoptotic activity and renal cancer development.

  16. Chemotherapy-Induced Changes in Cardiac Capillary Permeability Measured by Fluorescent Multiple Indicator Dilution

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Fernandez, Alicia; Carvajal, Denny A.; Lei, Tingjun; McGoron, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Anthracyclines cause severe irreversible cardiac toxicity. The study of changes in cardiac permeability with chemotherapy could enhance the understanding of mechanisms behind cardiac damage, and provide useful information to evaluate anthracycline cardiotoxicity. Thirty-six rats (12 Sprague-Dawley, 12 Wistar, 12 Fischer-344) were randomly assigned to control (n= 21) or doxorubicin (n = 15), and injected i.p. with a cumulative dose of 18 mg/kg doxorubicin in saline (vehicle) or vehicle over 12 days. Echocardiography was performed at baseline and on day 11. An isolated heart experiment was done on day 12 to obtain perfused heart pressure values, and to measure cardiac capillary permeability using a Texas Red/sodium fluorescein multiple indicator dilution method. Control animals had significantly lower average permeability-surface-area-products (0.035±0.013 cm3/s) than doxorubicin animals (0.066±0.023 cm3/s), PSP±SD, p<0.001. These permeability changes correlated with significant functional changes. There was a significant decline in cardiac function with a deleterious effect of chemotherapy on fractional shortening (p<0.001), left ventricular developed pressure (p<0.001), contractility (p<0.001), and relaxation (p=0.02). Based on our results, cardiac capillary permeability changes can be detected after in vivo chemotherapy treatment using our fluorescent multiple indicator dilution technique, and may provide valuable information in evaluating cardiotoxicity of novel drugs. PMID:25224075

  17. Dose response and factors related to interstitial pneumonitis after bone marrow transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Sampath, Sagus; Schultheiss, Timothy E. . E-mail: schultheiss@coh.org; Wong, Jeffrey

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) and chemotherapy are common components of conditioning regimens for bone marrow transplantation. Interstitial pneumonitis (IP) is a known regimen-related complication. Using published data of IP in a multivariate logistic regression, this study sought to identify the parameters in the bone marrow transplantation conditioning regimen that were significantly associated with IP and to establish a radiation dose-response function. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of articles that reported IP incidence along with lung dose, fractionation, dose rate, and chemotherapy regimen. In the final analysis, 20 articles (n = 1090 patients), consisting of 26 distinct TBI/chemotherapy regimens, were included in the analysis. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine dosimetric and chemotherapeutic factors that influenced the incidence of IP. Results: A logistic model was generated from patients receiving daily fractions of radiation. In this model, lung dose, cyclophosphamide dose, and the addition of busulfan were significantly associated with IP. An incidence of 3%-4% with chemotherapy-only conditioning regimens is estimated from the models. The {alpha}/{beta} value of the linear-quadratic model was estimated to be 2.8 Gy. The dose eliciting a 50% incidence, D {sub 50}, for IP after 120 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide was 8.8 Gy; in the absence of chemotherapy, the estimated D {sub 50} is 10.6 Gy. No dose rate effect was observed. The use of busulfan as a substitute for radiation is equivalent to treating with 14.8 Gy in 4 fractions with 50% transmission blocks shielding the lung. The logistic regression failed to find a model that adequately fit the multiple-fraction-per-day data. Conclusions: Dose responses for both lung radiation dose and cyclophosphamide dose were identified. A conditioning regimen of 12 Gy TBI in 6 daily fractions induces an IP incidence of about 11% in the absence of lung shielding

  18. S-phase induction by interleukin-6 followed by chemotherapy in patients with refractory multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    de Nully Brown, P; Jensen, P O; Diamant, M; Mortensen, B T; Hovgaard, D; Gimsing, P; Nissen, N I

    1998-11-01

    The plasma cell labeling index (PCLI) in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) is relatively low and this has been associated with the low rate of remission following chemotherapy. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) has been demonstrated to be a major growth factor of myeloma cells. In order to increase the S-phase proportion of myeloma cells, which might increase the sensitivity to chemotherapy, we gave rhIL-6 followed by chemotherapy to 15 myeloma patients with refractory disease. A total of 25 treatment cycles were administered since ten patients had two cycles. The rhIL-6 dose was 2.5 (n = 3), 5.0 (n = 6) and 10.0 microg/kg (n = 6) by subcutaneous injection once daily for 5 days and chemotherapy was administered on the last day of rhIL-6 injection. The effect of rhIL-6 treatment on labeling index (LI) was heterogeneous, but no statistically significant change was noted for this particular group as a whole. In two patients an increase (mean 7.7%) in LI of mononuclear bone marrow cells during the rhIL-6 treatment was demonstrated and in one patient a decrease of 2.8% was seen. Assessment of PCLI demonstrated an increase of 2.9% in one out of six patients and a decrease of 1.9% in one out of six patients. None of the 15 patients achieved remission according to standard criteria. During the rhIL-6 treatment, 14 of the 15 patients developed mild constitutional adverse events (AE) well known in patients treated with IL-6, and none of the AE in the subsequent chemotherapy phase were related to IL-6. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that rhIL-6 can be administered safely to patients with refractory MM, but the cell cycle recruitment approach was not sufficiently effective to be of clinical value.

  19. Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia among pediatric cancer patients in Egypt: Risks and consequences

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Mohamed; Hassan, Tamer; Sakr, Hanan; Karam, Nehad; Rahman, Doaa Abdel; Shahbah, Doaa; Zakaria, Marwa; Fehr, Sahbaa

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced neutropenia (CIN) is the major dose-limiting toxicity of systemic chemotherapy and it is associated with significant morbidity, mortality and treatment cost. The aim of the present study was to identify the risk factors that may predispose pediatric cancer patients who receive myelosuppressive chemotherapy to CIN and associated sequelae. A total of 113 neutropenia episodes were analyzed and the risk factors for CIN were classified as patient-specific, disease-specific and regimen-specific, while the consequences of CIN were divided into infectious and dose-modifying sequelae. The risks and consequences were analyzed to target high-risk patients with appropriate preventive strategies. Among our patients, 28% presented with a single neutropenia attack, while 72% experienced recurrent attacks during their treatment cycles. The mean absolute neutrophil count was 225.5±128.5 ×109/l (range, 10–497 ×109/l), starting 14.2±16.3 days (range, 2–100 days) after the onset of chemotherapy and resolving within 11.2±7.3 days, either with (45.1%) or without (54.9%) granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). No significant association was observed between any patient characteristics or disease stage and the risk for CIN. However, certain malignancies, such as acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), neuroblastoma and Burkitt's lymphoma, and certain regimens, such as induction block for ALL and acute myelocytic leukemia, exerted the most potent myelotoxic effect, with severe and prolonged episodes of neutropenia. G-CSF significantly shortened the duration of the episodes and enhanced bone marrow recovery. Febrile neutropenia was the leading complication among our cases (73.5%) and was associated with several documented infections, particularly mucositis (54.9%), respiratory (45.1%), gastrointestinal tract (38.9%) and skin (23.9%) infections. A total of 6% of our patients succumbed to infection-related complications. Neutropenia was responsible for treatment

  20. Preradiation chemotherapy may improve survival in pediatric diffuse intrinsic brainstem gliomas: Final results of BSG 98 prospective trial

    PubMed Central

    Frappaz, Didier; Schell, Matthias; Thiesse, Philippe; Marec-Bérard, Perrine; Mottolese, Carmine; Perol, David; Bergeron, Christophe; Philip, Thierry; Ricci, Anne Claire; Galand-Desme, Sophie; Szathmari, Alexandru; Carrie, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Radiation therapy remains the only treatment that provides clinical benefit to children with diffuse brainstem tumors. Their median survival, however, rarely exceeds 9 months. The authors report a prospective trial of front-line chemotherapy aimed at delaying radiation until time of clinical progression. The aim was to investigate the possibility that radiotherapy would maintain its activity in children whose disease progressed after chemotherapy. Twenty-three patients took part in this protocol, the BSG 98 protocol, which consisted of frontline chemotherapy alternating hematotoxic and nonhematotoxic schedules. Each cycle included three courses delivered monthly; the first course was 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea– cisplatin, and the second and third were high-dose methotrexate. Three patients underwent one cycle; 5 patients each, two and three cycles; and 10 patients, four cycles. Twenty of the 23 patients eventually received local radiation therapy. A historical cohort of 14 patients who received at least local radiation therapy served as controls. Four patients experienced severe iatrogenic infections, and 11 patients required platelet transfusions. Median survival increased significantly in patients participating in the protocol compared to that in the historical controls (17 months, 95% confidence interval [CI], 10–23 months, vs. 9 months, 95% CI, 8–10 months; p = 0.022), though hospitalization was prolonged (57 vs. 25 days, p = 0.001). Although frontline chemotherapy alternating hematotoxic and nonhematotoxic schedules significantly increases overall median survival, its cost from infection and hospitalization deserves honest discussion with the children and their parents. PMID:18577561

  1. Chemotherapy for small cell lung cancer: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Syed Mustafa; Zekri, Jamal

    2012-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy is the current strategy of choice for treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Platinum containing combination regimens are superior to non-platinum regimens in limited stage-SCLC and possibly also in extensive stage-SCLC as first and second-line treatments. The addition of ifosfamide to platinum containing regimens may improve the outcome but at the price of increased toxicity. Suboptimal doses of chemotherapy result in inferior survival. Early intensified, accelerated and high-dose chemotherapy gave conflicting results and is not considered a standard option outside of clinical trials. A number of newer agents have provided promising results when used in combination regimens, for example, gemcitabine, irinotecan and topotecan. However, more studies are required to appropriately evaluate them. There is a definitive role for radiotherapy in LD-SCLC. However, timing and schedule are subject to further research. Novel approaches are currently being investigated in the hope of improving outcome. PMID:25992206

  2. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) in patients receiving neoadjuvant and adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy for breast cancer: incidence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Waks, Adrienne G; Tolaney, Sara M; Galar, Alicia; Arnaout, Amal; Porter, Julie B; Marty, Francisco M; Winer, Eric P; Hammond, Sarah P; Baden, Lindsey R

    2015-11-01

    Opportunistic infection with Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) has not been recognized as a significant complication of early-stage breast cancer treatment. However, we have observed an increase in PCP incidence among patients receiving chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Herein we identify risk factors for and calculate incidence of PCP in this population. We identified all cases of PCP at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital (DFCI/BWH) from 1/1/2000 to 12/31/2013 in patients with stage I-III breast cancer treated with an adriamycin/cyclophosphamide (AC)-containing regimen. Nineteen cases of PCP in non-metastatic breast cancer patients were identified. All patients with PCP were diagnosed after receipt of either three or four cycles of AC chemotherapy on a dose-dense schedule. Patients who developed PCP were treated with median 16.4 mg prednisone equivalents/day as nausea prophylaxis for a median 64 days. The overall incidence of PCP among 2057 patients treated with neoadjuvant or adjuvant dose-dense AC for three or more cycles was 0.6 % (95 % confidence interval 0.3-1.0 %). No PCP was diagnosed in 1001 patients treated with non-dose-dense AC. There was one death from PCP. Women receiving dose-dense AC chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer are at risk for PCP. Administering the same chemotherapy and corticosteroid dose over an 8-week versus 12-week non-dose-dense schedule appears to have created a novel infectious vulnerability. Replacing dexamethasone with alternative anti-emetics may mitigate this risk.

  3. Influence of Obesity on Efficacy and Toxicity of Induction Chemotherapy in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Andrew; Othus, Megan; McQuary, Amy; Chi, Mary; Estey, Elihu

    2015-01-01

    Background Increased body mass index (BMI) is associated with increased risk of treatment-related complications and inferior overall survival in children and adolescents with AML. The growing proportion of the general population who are obese raises the dilemma of whether the pharmacokinetic differences in obese patients necessitate chemotherapy dosage adjustments. This also poses the question of whether obese patients experience differing outcomes or toxicities with chemotherapy. Objective We are retrospectively evaluating the association between percentage of ideal body weight (IBW) and complete remission (CR) among newly diagnosed, previously untreated AML patients. We also describe secondary objectives including associations between IBW and overall survival (OS), platelet and neutrophil recovery, and incidence of grade 3-4 hematologic and nonhematologic toxic effects. Additionally, we characterize the dosing strategies used for induction chemotherapy in obese patients with AML at a single institution. Methods This is a retrospective study of obesity and its impact on outcome in 63 newly diagnosed, previously untreated adults with AML receiving standard induction chemotherapy with 7 + 3 from 2006 to 2010. Results The median percentage of ideal body weight was 121% (range 86-246%). Thirty-five percent of patients were obese (≥ 130% IBW). Controlling for history of prior malignancies, FLT3-ITD status, and NPM1, obesity was not associated with CR (odds ratio [OR] = 0.97, p=0.88), OS (hazard ratio=0.48, p=0.52), platelet recovery by 30 days (OR=1.14, p=0.52), or neutrophil recovery by 30 days (OR=1.12, p=0.60). Among obese patients, CR rates were not significantly different comparing patients not dose adjusted to patients with obesity-related adjustments (CR=86% vs. 67%, p=0.55) Conclusion In this study population, obesity was not an independent prognostic factor of outcome or toxicity. Empiric dose reductions based on obesity did not result is significantly

  4. A combination of spatial and recursive temporal filtering for noise reduction when using region of interest (ROI) fluoroscopy for patient dose reduction in image guided vascular interventions with significant anatomical motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Khobragade, P.; Ionita, C.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2015-03-01

    Because x-ray based image-guided vascular interventions are minimally invasive they are currently the most preferred method of treating disorders such as stroke, arterial stenosis, and aneurysms; however, the x-ray exposure to the patient during long image-guided interventional procedures could cause harmful effects such as cancer in the long run and even tissue damage in the short term. ROI fluoroscopy reduces patient dose by differentially attenuating the incident x-rays outside the region-of-interest. To reduce the noise in the dose-reduced regions previously recursive temporal filtering was successfully demonstrated for neurovascular interventions. However, in cardiac interventions, anatomical motion is significant and excessive recursive filtering could cause blur. In this work the effects of three noise-reduction schemes, including recursive temporal filtering, spatial mean filtering, and a combination of spatial and recursive temporal filtering, were investigated in a simulated ROI dose-reduced cardiac intervention. First a model to simulate the aortic arch and its movement was built. A coronary stent was used to simulate a bioprosthetic valve used in TAVR procedures and was deployed under dose-reduced ROI fluoroscopy during the simulated heart motion. The images were then retrospectively processed for noise reduction in the periphery, using recursive temporal filtering, spatial filtering and a combination of both. Quantitative metrics for all three noise reduction schemes are calculated and are presented as results. From these it can be concluded that with significant anatomical motion, a combination of spatial and recursive temporal filtering scheme is best suited for reducing the excess quantum noise in the periphery. This new noise-reduction technique in combination with ROI fluoroscopy has the potential for substantial patient-dose savings in cardiac interventions.

  5. Does chemotherapy improve survival in high-risk stage I and II Merkel cell carcinoma of the skin?

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, Michael G. . E-mail: michael_poulsen@health.qld.gov.au; Rischin, Danny; Porter, Ian; Walpole, Euan; Harvey, Jennifer; Hamilton, Chris; Keller, Jacqui; Tripcony, Lee

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The effectiveness of synchronous carboplatin, etoposide, and radiation therapy in improving survival was evaluated by comparison of a matched set of historic control subjects with patients treated in a prospective Phase II study that used synchronous chemotherapy and radiation and adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: Patients were included in the analysis if they had disease localized to the primary site and nodes, and they were required to have at least one of the following high-risk features: recurrence after initial therapy, involved nodes, primary size greater than 1 cm, or gross residual disease after surgery. All patients who received chemotherapy were treated in a standardized fashion as part of a Phase II study (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group TROG 96:07) from 1997 to 2001. Radiation was delivered to the primary site and nodes to a dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks, and synchronous carboplatin (AUC 4.5) and etoposide, 80 mg/m{sup 2} i.v. on Days 1 to 3, were given in Weeks 1, 4, 7, and 10. The historic group represents a single institution's experience from 1988 to 1996 and was treated with surgery and radiation alone, and patients were included if they fulfilled the eligibility criteria of TROG 96:07. Patients with occult cutaneous disease were not included for the purpose of this analysis. Because of imbalances in the prognostic variables between the two treatment groups, comparisons were made by application of Cox's proportional hazard modeling. Overall survival, disease-specific survival, locoregional control, and distant control were used as endpoints for the study. Results: Of the 102 patients who had high-risk Stage I and II disease, 40 were treated with chemotherapy (TROG 96:07) and 62 were treated without chemotherapy (historic control subjects). When Cox's proportional hazards modeling was applied, the only significant factors for overall survival were recurrent disease, age, and the presence of residual disease

  6. Neoadjuvant and Adjuvant Chemotherapy of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mallmann, Peter; Mallmann, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is indicated in patients who can tolerate the side effects of a chemotherapy and with preoperative presentation of one of the following clinical risk situations: bulky disease with a maximal tumor diameter of > 4 cm, suspicious lymph nodes in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT) scan or endosonography, histopathologically confirmed lymph node metastasis, or histopathologically documented risk factors such as G3 and L1V1. A neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery should be performed with cisplatin at a dosage of > 25 mg/m2 per week and an application interval of < 14 days. The previously published data suggests an improved rate of complete resection and reduced incidences of positive lymph nodes and parametric infiltration. Accordingly, the percentage of patients in need for adjuvant radiochemotherapy after operation can be significantly reduced. Some studies demonstrated a prolongation of progression-free and overall survival. Following the previously published studies, adjuvant chemotherapy after operation or after radiochemotherapy has no significant effect on the overall survival and, following the current guidelines, should be avoided. PMID:27614740

  7. Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Rectal Cancer after Chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Boustani, J; Caubet, M; Bosset, J-F

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this overview was to investigate whether adjuvant chemotherapy has a favourable effect on the outcome of patients with rectal cancer who had preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy. A review of randomised clinical trials that allocated patients between fluorouracil-based and observation or between fluorouracil-based and oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy was carried out, including their corresponding meta-analyses. None of the five randomised trials has shown a significant benefit of fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy for overall survival or disease-free survival. Also, the three corresponding meta-analyses failed to show a benefit of adjuvant treatment. Of three randomised trials - two phase III and one phase II with a 3-year disease-free survival end point - two showed a small benefit of adding oxaliplatin to fluorouracil, one failed. The corresponding meta-analyses showed that the pooled difference was not significant. In conclusion, the use of postoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy with or without oxaliplatin in patients with rectal cancer after preoperative (chemo)radiotherapy is not scientifically proven.

  8. [Salivation in children during anticancer chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Popruzhenko, T V; Boris, S P

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to assess the needs and options for salivation management in children treated with antileukemic chemotherapy. In a preliminary cross-sectional study the saliva flow rate and viscosity were evaluated in 75 leukemic children that received chemotherapy with methotrexate in low dose (44 people, 44 episode, group 1), or in high-dose (31 people, 42 episode, group 2), and in 25 healthy children (group 3). Then, 26 children were randomly divided into two groups in the 70 episodes course of high-dosed chemotherapy, and received acetylcysteine (A) or only standard oral management (S) for 1-10 day of treatment. Parameters of salivation and children performance (Lansky et al.) were evaluated. Mann-Whitney U-test was used for analysis. In group 1, 2 and 3 the flow rate (Me [LQ/HQ]) was 0.5 [0.3; 0.8]; 0.9 [0.6; 1.2] and 0.5 [0.3; 0.6] ml/min respectively (p1-3>0.05; p<0.01; p1-2<0.05). Viscosity levels in group 1, 2 and 3 were 2.75 [3.67; 3.67], 10.05 [5.3; 26.0] and 3.9 [2.7; 6.5] unites respectively (p1-3>0.05; p2, 3<0.01; p1, 2<0.01). In group A and S the flow rate was 2.7 [0.5; 4.1] and 0.4 [0.1; 2.2] ml/min (р<0.05); viscosity was 1.5 [1.2; 4.1] and 6.4 [5.3; 8.1] unites (р<0.001), performance Lansky index was 80 [65; 90] and 70 [60; 80] (р<0.01) respectively. Salivation dysfunction complicates the chemotherapy with high-dosed methotrexate in children: it is indicated by high viscosity combined with elevated flow rate. Acetylcysteine normalizes saliva viscosity and improves children's performance.

  9. Attenuation effect of Abnormal Savda Munziq on liver and heart toxicity caused by chemotherapy in mice

    PubMed Central

    AIKEMU, AINIWAER; AMAT, NURMUHAMAT; YUSUP, ABDIRYIM; SHAN, LIANLIAN; QI, XINWEI; UPUR, HALMURAT

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal Savda Munziq (ASMq), an Uighur medicine formula commonly used in the treatment of cancer, has been speculated to possess antioxidative and antiproliferative effects, and to regulate immune activity. The present study was designed to systematically elucidate the toxicity-reducing activity of ASMq in mice undergoing combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The mice were divided into normal (saline, 10 ml/kg) and doxorubicin + 5-FU groups (doxorubicin, 2.5 mg/kg; 5-FU, 10 mg/kg on alternate days). In addition, three groups received different doses of ASMq (2, 4 and 8 g/kg), in addition to doxorubicin (2.5 mg/kg) and 5-FU (10 mg/kg) treatment on alternate days. The histology of the heart and liver, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations in heart homogenate, and various biochemical parameters of the liver were evaluated. Compared with the normal control group, ASMq dose-dependently improved a number of variables, including body weight, liver index, transaminase and total protein, and partially normalized liver and cardiac pathology. ASMq restored activities of defense antioxidant enzymes SOD and GSH-Px towards normal levels, and decreased MDA concentration in dose-dependent manner. These results demonstrated that ASMq provides significant protection against doxorubicin + 5-FU combination induced hepatotoxicity and cardiotoxicity. Further studies are required to determine the effects of ASMq against doxorubicin + 5-FU-induced toxicity during chemotherapy in vivo. PMID:27347066

  10. Thoracic and elective brain irradiation with concomitant or delayed multiagent chemotherapy in the treatment of localized small cell carcinoma of the lung: a randomized prospective study by the Southeastern Cancer Study Group. [X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, C.A.; Krauss, S.; Bartolucci, A.A.; Durant, J.R.; Lowenbraun, S.; Salter, M.M.; Storaasli, J.; Kellermeyer, R.; Comas, F.

    1981-05-15

    A prospective randomized study was carried out to compare the effectiveness of concomitant or delayed multiagent chemotherapy combined with irradiation to the primary tumor and regional lymph nodes and to the brain in a group of 70 patients with histologically proven small cell undifferentiated carcinoma of the lung. Complete and partial response in both groups was comparable, and the overall survival was comparable. However, relapse-free survival was significantly higher in patients receiving concomitant chemotherapy and irradiation in comparison with the radiotherapy alone group. Disease-free survival was higher in the concomitant chemotherapy-radiotherapy patients, although survival was not significantly modified, probably because of suboptimal chemotherapy. The incidence of distant metastasis was slightly lower in the chemotherapy groups. Brain metastases were noted in 7% of the patients in both groups. Increased intrathoracic recurrences were noted in patients with lower doses of irradiation. The study emphasizes the need for intensive chemotherapy and adequate radiation therapy to improve survival of patients with small cell undifferentiated carcinoma of the lung.

  11. Induction Chemotherapy with Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil in Advanced Head and Neck Cancers: A Short Term Response Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Raghavendra; Shenoy, Vijendra; Hegde, Mahesh Chandra; Prasad, Vishnu; Prasad, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Background Considering the uprising number of Head and neck cancer in the state with limited options of medical and surgical treatment, the focus of this study involved on chemotherapy in advanced Head and neck cancers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of combination of Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil (PF) as induction chemotherapy in patients in locally advanced squamous cell cancer of head and neck. Materials and Methods Forty four patients with previously untreated stage III -IV advanced and inoperable cases were included in this prospective study. Induction chemotherapy consisted of 3 cycles of Cisplatin 100mg/mt2 as infusion on day 1, 5-Fluorouracil of 750mg/mt2 on day 2, 5-Fluorouracil of 1000mg/mt2 as infusion on day 3 in an inpatient basis. Cycles were repeated with an interval of 21 days. Patients were evaluated within a period of 3 weeks at the end of completion of third cycle of chemotherapy. Post chemotherapy local therapy was individualized based on the response, site and stage of the tumour. Results Out of 44 eligible and evaluable patients, major dominance was noted in male group constituting 68%. After induction chemotherapy 58.8% of stage III experienced stable response, & 44% had partial response. In stage IV, 44% showed a stable response and 33.3% had partial response. But in comparison to primary tumour response and nodal response, which had a significant clinical response, the overall response of malignancy with respect to stage and site specificity was clinically insignificant. Moderate adverse reaction was noted in 47.6% and 42.1% had mild reactions. Majority of patients experienced grade 3 adverse events, of which anaemia in females and leucopenia in males pre-dominated. Conclusion With the use of cisplatin and 5-FU as induction chemotherapy agents in advanced and inoperable squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck, a distinct benefit was seen in stabilizing the tumour from progression. But achieving a significant

  12. Metronomic Chemotherapy for Metastatic Breast Cancer – a Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Banys-Paluchowski, M.; Schütz, F.; Ruckhäberle, E.; Krawczyk, N.; Fehm, T.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is generally administered in high doses followed by a treatment-free period to give the body needful time to recover. This “maximum tolerated dose” approach results in high response rates. However, long periods between therapy cycles can lead to development of resistance mechanisms and consequently disease progression. One of the most interesting alternative strategies is metronomic chemotherapy. This concept relies on the continuous administration of chemotherapy at low doses and aims at targeting endothelial cells in the tumor bed as well. Recently, metronomic chemotherapy has been incorporated into the recommendations issued by the German AGO expert panel (www.ago-online.de). A systematic review of PubMed/Medline, ClinicalTrials.gov, the European Clinical Trials Database (EudraCT) and the Cochrane Database was conducted. In the present review, we discuss the current evidence on metronomic chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer. PMID:27239061

  13. [Chemotherapies of negative schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Petit, M; Dollfus, S

    1991-01-01

    Five years ago, Goldberg claimed that negative symptoms of schizophrenia do respond to neuroleptics. This apparent discovery is, in fact, a very common way of thinking for European schools of psychiatry, specially the French one guided by Delay and Deniker. Initially focused on reserpine and some alerting phenothiazines such as thioproperazine, this opinion has been extended to benzamides in the 1970s. The analysis of the publications devoted to this point indicates that several drugs are actually considered as potent disinhibitors (i.e. active on negative symptoms of schizophrenia): Phenothiazines: As shown in the controlled studies by Itil (1971), Poirier-Littré (1988), fluphenazine and pipotiazine improve the BPRS anergia factor and the SANS score. Butyrophenones: The first description of the "imipramine like" effect of trifluperidol by Janssen (1959) initiated the studies by Gallant (1960), Fox (1963). They compared trifluperidol at low doses versus haloperidol and chlorpromazine at medium and high doses, BPRS anergia factor improved only at low doses. Diphenylbutylpiperidines (DPBP): Meltzer's review (1986) concluded to the efficacy of such drugs on negative symptoms appearing as a specific biochemical relationship effect. A definite analysis about doses leads to a very different interpretation: DPBP low doses and only low doses improved negative symptoms as much as some low doses of phenothiazines. On the opposite, DPBP, phenothiazines and butyrophenones high doses are inefficient.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1683624

  14. Circumventing Tumor Resistance to Chemotherapy by Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xing-Jie; Chen, Chunying; Zhao, Yuliang; Wang, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    Patient relapse and metastasis of malignant cells is very common after standard cancer treatment with surgery, radiation, and/or chemotherapy. Chemotherapy, a cornerstone in the development of present day cancer therapy, is one of the most effective and potent strategies to treat malignant tumors. However, the resistance of cancer cells to the drugs remains a significant impediment to successful chemotherapy. An additional obstacle is the inability of chemotherapeutic drugs to selectively target tumor cells. Almost all the anticancer agents have severe side effects on normal tissues and organs. The toxicity of currently available anticancer drugs and the inefficiency of chemotherapeutic treatments, especially for advanced stages of the disease, have limited the optimization of clinical drug combinations and effective chemotherapeutic protocols. Nanomedicine allows the release of drugs by biodegradation and self-regulation of nanomaterials in vitro and in vivo. Nanotechnologies are characterized by effective drug encapsulation, controllable self-assembly, specificity and biocompatibility as a result of their own material properties. Nanotechnology has the potential to overcome current chemotherapeutic barriers in cancer treatment, because of the unique nanoscale size and distinctive bioeffects of nanomaterials. Nanotechnology may help to solve the problems associated with traditional chemotherapy and multidrug resistance. PMID:19949937

  15. The curability of advanced cancers with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Boh-Seng, Y

    1981-07-01

    The tremendous progress that has been made in the chemotherapy of malignant diseases since the early 1950's has enabled the cure of a significant number of cancers such as chloriocarcinoma, Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, the acute leukaemias, testicular carcinoma, and many childhood cancers such as rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilm's tumor, Ewing's sarcoma, ovarian cancer, and retinoblastoma. As a result, the mortality from cancers has dropped by 15% for persons under the age of 45 years and even more for those under 30 years of age. Many other metastatic cancers can now be successfully controlled with chemotherapy and, ultimately, more will be added to the growing list of curable cancers. The chemotherapeutic agents responsible for the cures of some cancers include asparaginase, actinomycin D, Adriamycin, bleomycin, cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, cytosine arabinoside, 5-fluorouracil, 6-mercaptopurine, methotrexate, nitrogen mustard, prednisone, procarbazine, and vincristine. The discovery of new effective drugs such as AMSA and anthracenedione promises to improve the success rates obtained with present therapy. Chemotherapy is indicated for every patient who has metastatic cancer, since virtually every patient can receive some palliation from such therapy, while for some patients chemotherapy holds the promise of prolongation of life or even cure.

  16. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for radioinduced osteosarcoma of the extremity: The Rizzoli experience in 20 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Bacci, Gaetano . E-mail: gaetano.bacci@ior.it; Longhi, Alessandra; Forni, Cristiana R.N.; Fabbri, Nicola; Briccoli, Antonio; Barbieri, Enza; Mercuri, Mario; Balladelli, Alba B.A.; Ferrari, Stefano; Picci, Piero

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: Evaluate treatment and outcome of 20 patients with radioinduced osteosarcoma (RIO). Because of previous primary tumor treatment, RIO protocols were different from others we used for non-RIO. Patients and Methods: Between 1983 and 1998, we treated 20 RIO patients, ages 4-36 years (mean 16 years), with chemotherapy (two cycles before surgery, three postoperatively). The first preoperative cycle consisted of high-dose Methotrexate (HDMTX)/Cisplatinum (CDP)/Adriamycin (ADM) and the second of HDMTX/CDP/Ifosfamide (IFO). The three postoperative treatments were performed with cycles of MTX/CDP; IFO was used as single agent per cycle repeated three times. Results: Two patients received palliative treatment because their osteosarcoma remained unresectable after preoperative chemotherapy. The remaining 18 patients had surgery (7 amputations, 11 resections); histologic response to preoperative chemotherapy was good in 8 patients, poor in 10. At a mean follow-up of 11 years (range, 7-22 years), 9 patients remained continuously disease-free, 10 died from osteosarcoma and 1 died from a third neoplasm (myeloid acute leukemia). These results are not significantly different from those achieved in 754 patients with conventional osteosarcoma treated in the same period with protocols used for conventional treatment. However, this later group had an 18% 3-year event-free survival after treatment of relapse vs. 0% in the RIO group. Conclusion: Treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy RIO seem to have an outcome that is not significantly different from that of comparable patients with conventional primary high grade osteosarcoma (5-year event-free survival: 40% vs. 60%, p = NS; 5-year overall survival 40% vs. 67%, p < 0.00008.

  17. Treatment of Dexamethasone-Induced Hiccup in Chemotherapy Patients by Methylprednisolone Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gyeong-Won; Oh, Sung Yong; Kang, Myoung Hee; Park, Se Hoon; Hwang, In Gyu; Yi, Seong Yoon; Choi, Young Jin; Ji, Jun Ho; Lee, Ha Yeon; Bruera, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Background. Dexamethasone-induced hiccup (DIH) is an underrecognized symptom in patients with cancer, and little information is available about its treatment. The aims of this study were to investigate the feasibility of methylprednisolone rotation as treatment and to confirm the male predominance among those with cancer who experienced DIH during chemotherapy. Methods. Persons with cancer who experienced hiccups during chemotherapy treatment and who were receiving treatment with dexamethasone were presumed to have DIH. The following algorithmic practice was implemented for antiemetic corticosteroid use: rotation from dexamethasone to methylprednisolone in the next cycle and dexamethasone re-administration in the second cycle of chemotherapy after recognition of hiccups to confirm DIH. All other antiemetics except corticosteroid remained unchanged. Patients (n = 40) were recruited from eight cancer centers in Korea from September 2012 to April 2013. Data were collected retrospectively. Results. Hiccup intensity (numeric rating scale [NRS]: 5.38 vs. 0.53) and duration (68.44 minutes vs. 1.79 minutes) were significantly decreased after rotation to methylprednisolone, while intensity of emesis was not increased (NRS: 2.63 vs. 2.08). Median dose of dexamethasone and methylprednisolone were 10 mg and 50 mg, respectively. Thirty-four (85%) of 40 patients showed complete resolution of hiccups after methylprednisolone rotation in the next cycle. Of these 34 patients, 25 (73.5%) had recurrence of hiccups after dexamethasone re-administration. Compared with baseline values, hiccup intensity (NRS: 5.24 vs. 2.44) and duration (66.43 minutes vs. 22.00 minutes) were significantly attenuated after dexamethasone re-administration. Of the 40 eligible patients, 38 (95%) were male. Conclusion. DIH during chemotherapy could be controlled without losing antiemetic potential by replacing dexamethasone with methylprednisolone. We also identified a male predominance of DIH. Further

  18. In situ injection of phenylboronic acid based low molecular weight gels for efficient chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenxia; Liang, Yan; Peng, Xinyu; Hu, Yalong; Zhang, Longgui; Wu, Huayue; He, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Injectable low molecular weight gels (LMWGs) based on the derivatives of phenylboronic acid were prepared and used as substrates for efficient in situ chemotherapy. The gelators as well as LMWGs were characterized by (1)H NMR, UV-vis, FTIR, MS and SEM. Anticancer drug doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) was encapsulated in the gels. The rheological properties and rapid recovery capability of both blank and drug-loaded gels were tested. The LMWGs were non-toxic to both 3T3 fibroblasts and 4T1 breast cancer cells. The gels were formed rapidly after injected in vivo. The in vivo anticancer activities of DOX-loaded LMWGs were investigated in breast cancer bearing mice. The intratumoral injection of DOX loaded LMWGs with dose of 30 mg/kg revealed that the gels could coat around the tumor tissues to release DOX sustainingly and maintain effective DOX concentration for chemotherapy. The systemic toxicity of DOX was reduced significantly with the in situ administration of LMWGs formulations. The injectable LMWGs exhibited excellent therapeutic efficacy and low side effects in local chemotherapy. PMID:27497056

  19. Drug scheduling of cancer chemotherapy based on natural actor-critic approach.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Inkyung; Park, Jooyoung

    2011-11-01

    Recently, reinforcement learning methods have drawn significant interests in the area of artificial intelligence, and have been successfully applied to various decision-making problems. In this paper, we study the applicability of the NAC (natural actor-critic) approach, a state-of-the-art reinforcement learning method, to the drug scheduling of cancer chemotherapy for an ODE (ordinary differential equation)-based tumor growth model. ODE-based cancer dynamics modeling is an active research area, and many different mathematical models have been proposed. Among these, we use the model proposed by de Pillis and Radunskaya (2003), which considers the growth of tumor cells and their interaction with normal cells and immune cells. The NAC approach is applied to this ODE model with the goal of minimizing the tumor cell population and the drug amount while maintaining the adequate population levels of normal cells and immune cells. In the framework of the NAC approach, the drug dose is regarded as the control input, and the reward signal is defined as a function of the control input and the cell populations of tumor cells, normal cells, and immune cells. According to the control policy found by the NAC approach, effective drug scheduling in cancer chemotherapy for the considered scenarios has turned out to be close to the strategy of continuing drug injection from the beginning until an appropriate time. Also, simulation results showed that the NAC approach can yield better performance than conventional pulsed chemotherapy. PMID:21839140

  20. Olanzapine for the prevention and treatment of chronic nausea and chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    PubMed

    Navari, Rudolph M

    2014-01-01

    Olanzapine is an atypical antipsychotic agent of the thiobenzodiazepine class. It blocks multiple neurotransmitter receptors including dopaminergic at D1, D2, D3, D4 brain receptors, serotonergic at 5-HT2a, 5-HT2c, 5-HT3, 5-HT6 receptors, catecholamines at alpha1 adrenergic receptors, acetylcholine at muscarinic receptors, and histamine at H1 receptors. Olanzapine has five times the affinity for 5-HT2 receptors than D2 receptors and has been used to treat schizophrenia and delirium. Olanzapine's activity at multiple receptors, particularly at the D2, 5-HT2c, and 5-HT3 receptors which appear to be involved in nausea and emesis, has prompted its use in the treatment of nausea and vomiting refractory to standard antiemetics. Case reports and formal clinical trials have demonstrated its efficacy in the treatment of chronic nausea, the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and emesis, and the treatment of breakthrough chemotherapy-induced nausea and emesis. Phase II and phase III clinical trials have demonstrated that there is a significant improvement in nausea when olanzapine is added to guideline directed prophylactic antiemetic agents 5-HT3 receptor antagonists and tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonists in patients receiving moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy Common side effects of olanzapine when used over a period of months include weight gain as well as an association with the onset of diabetes mellitus, but these effects have not been seen with short term use of daily doses of less than one week.

  1. Equivalent chemotherapy efficacy against leukemia in mice treated with topical vasoconstrictors to prevent cancer therapy side effects.

    PubMed

    Graul-Conroy, Amanda; Hicks, Emily J; Fahl, William E

    2016-06-15

    Topically applied vasoconstrictor is a new strategy to prevent oral mucositis and alopecia, two complications of chemotherapy and stem-cell transplant. We sought to determine whether mice treated with topical vasoconstrictor minutes before chemotherapy to suppress L1210 leukemia would develop a vasoconstrictor-induced L1210 cell sanctuary, and with it, significantly worse survival outcomes. B6D2F1 mice received 10(4) mouse L1210 leukemia cells via retro-orbital intravenous injection and were then divided into treatment groups, which included: (i) no further treatment, (ii) a single, sub-curative, intraperitoneal dose of cyclophosphamide (90 µg/gm bw) 24 hr after L1210 cell inoculation, (iii) topical epinephrine (25-400 mM) to clipped dorsal backs 20 min before cyclophosphamide or (iv) orotopical phenylephrine (16-130 mM), epinephrine (10 mM) or norepinephrine (25 mM) 20 min before cyclophosphamide. All mice were then followed until day of death. Differences in median survival time and percent survival between mice receiving cyclophosphamide alone and mice treated with either orotopical phenylephrine, epinephrine or norepinephrine; or topical epinephrine before cyclophosphamide were not significantly different. A discernible leukemia sanctuary was not created by topical vasoconstrictor treatment prior to chemotherapy; there was no significant difference in leukemia progression between untreated mice and those treated with either orotopical or topical vasoconstrictor before chemotherapy. We have opened a Phase I/IIa dose escalation trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of orotopical phenylephrine in preventing oral mucositis in subjects undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant conditioning with cyclophosphamide plus total body irradiation. This could provide a cost-effective and convenient method to prevent oral mucositis.

  2. Pre-irradiation with low-dose 12C6+ beam significantly enhances the efficacy of AdCMV-p53 gene therapy in human non-small lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing; Zhang, Hong; Li, Wenjian; Li, Qiang; Zhou, Guangming; Xie, Yi; Hao, Jifang; Min, Fengling; Zhou, Qingming; Duan, Xin

    2007-04-01

    The combination of ionizing radiation and gene therapy has been investigated. However, there are very few reports about the combination of heavy-ion irradiation and gene therapy. To determine if the pre-exposure to low-dose heavy ion beam enhances the suppression of AdCMV-p53 on non-small lung cancer (NSLC), the cells pre-irradiated or non-irradiated were infected with 20, 40 MOI of AdCMV-p53. Survival fraction and the relative biology effect (RBE) were determined by clonogenic assay. The results showed that the proportions of p53 positive cells in 12C6+ beam induced AdCMV-p53 infected cells were more than 90%, which were significantly more than those in γ-ray induced AdCMV-p53 infected cells. The pre-exposure to low-dose 12C6+ beam significantly prevented the G0/G1 arrest and activated G2/M checkpoints. The pre-exposure to 12C6+ beam significantly improved cell to apoptosis. RBEs for the 12C6+ + AdCMV-p53 infection groups were 30% 60%, 20% 130% and 30% 70% more than those for the 12C6+-irradiated only, AdCMV-p53 infected only, and γ-irradiation induced AdCMVp53 infected groups, respectively. The data suggested that the pre-exposure to low-dose 12C6+ beam significantly promotes exogenous p53 expression in NSLC, and the suppression of AdCMV-p53 gene therapy on NSLC.

  3. Pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of APF530 (extended-release granisetron) in patients receiving moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy: results of two Phase II trials

    PubMed Central

    Gabrail, Nashat; Yanagihara, Ronald; Spaczyński, Marek; Cooper, William; O’Boyle, Erin; Smith, Carrie; Boccia, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite advances with new therapies, a significant proportion of patients (>30%) suffer delayed-onset chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) despite use of antiemetics. APF530 is a sustained-release subcutaneous (SC) formulation of granisetron for preventing CINV. APF530 pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy were studied in two open-label, single-dose Phase II trials (C2005-01 and C2007-01, respectively) in patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Methods In C2005-01, 45 patients received APF530 250, 500, or 750 mg SC (granisetron 5, 10, or 15 mg, respectively). In C2007-01, 35 patients were randomized to APF530 250 or 500 mg SC. Injections were given 30 to 60 minutes before single-day moderately emetogenic chemotherapy or highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Plasma granisetron was measured from predose to 168 hours after study drug administration. Safety and efficacy were also evaluated. Results APF530 pharmacokinetics were dose proportional, with slow absorption and elimination of granisetron after a single SC dose. Median time to maximum plasma concentration and half-life were similar for APF530 250 and 500 mg in both trials, with no differences between the groups receiving moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Exposure to granisetron was maintained at a therapeutic level over the delayed-onset phase, at least 168 hours. Adverse events in both trials were as expected for granisetron; injection site reactions (eg, erythema and induration) were predominantly mild and seen in ≤20% of patients. Complete responses (no emesis, with no rescue medication) were obtained in the acute, delayed, and overall phases in ≥80% and ≥75% of patients in both trials with the 250 and 500 mg doses, respectively. Conclusion After a single injection of APF530, there were dose-proportional pharmacokinetics and sustained concentrations of granisetron over 168 hours. The 250 and 500 mg doses were well tolerated

  4. Clinical Study on Prospective Efficacy of All-Trans Acid, Realgar-Indigo Naturalis Formula Combined with Chemotherapy as Maintenance Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lu-Qun, Wang; Hao, Li; Xiao-Peng, He; Fang-Lin, Li; Ling-Ling, Wang; Xue-Liang, Chen; Ming, Hou

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To test the efficiency and safety of sequential application of retinoic acid (ATRA), Realgar-Indigo naturalis formula (RIF) and chemotherapy (CT) were used as the maintenance treatment in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Methods. This was a retrospective study of 98 patients with newly diagnosed APL who accepted two different maintenance treatments. After remission induction and consolidation chemotherapy according to their Sanz scores, patients received two different kinds of maintenance scheme. The first regimen was using ATRA, RIF, and standard dose of CT sequentially (ATRA/RIF/CT regimen), while the second one was using ATRA and low dose of chemotherapy with methotrexate (MTX) plus 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) alternately (ATRA/CTlow regimen). The OS, DFS, relapse rate, minimal residual disease, and adverse reactions in two groups were monitored and evaluated. Results. ATRA/RIF/CT regimen could effectively reduce the chance of relapse in different risk stratification of patients, but there was no significant difference in 5-year DFS rate and OS rate between the two groups. Besides, the patients in the experimental group suffered less severe adverse reactions than those in the control group. Conclusions. The repeated sequential therapeutic regimen to APL with ATRA, RIF, and chemotherapy is worth popularizing for its high effectiveness and low toxicity. PMID:24963332

  5. Xanthogranulomatous Appendicitis Mimicking Residual Burkitt's Lymphoma After Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Soomin; Choi, Sung-Eun; Kim, Yu Ri; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Sohn, Seung-Kook

    2016-01-01

    The case of a 23-year-old female treated with aggressive high-dose therapy for Burkitt's lymphoma is reported. A positron emission tomography and computed tomography scan after completion of chemotherapy revealed a residual hypermetabolic lesion in the right pelvic cavity. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging scan showed circumferential wall thickening at the tip of the appendix. A laparoscopic exploration and appendectomy were performed, and a pathologic examination of the resected appendix revealed xanthogranulomatous appendicitis. This is a rare case of a xanthogranulomatous appendicitis mimicking remnant Burkitt's lymphoma after completion of chemotherapy. PMID:27218100

  6. Quantitative changes in skin composition parameters due to chemotherapy in breast cancer patients: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Danbee; Kim, Im-Ryung; Im, Young Hyuck; Park, Yeon Hee; Ahn, Jin Seok; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin; Park, Hyeokgon; Kim, Eunjoo; Lee, Hae Kwang; Lee, Dong-Youn; Cho, Juhee

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate objective changes in water content, sebum content, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and melanin due to breast cancer chemotherapy, and their association with subjective symptoms. Prospective cohort study of 61 patients 18 years of age or older with a postoperative diagnosis of stage I-III breast cancer, who received adjuvant chemotherapy between February and September 2012 at an outpatient breast cancer clinic in Korea. Objective skin parameters, measured using a noninvasive bioengineering device, and patient-reported dryness and dullness were assessed before chemotherapy, after two cycles of chemotherapy, and 1, 3, and 6 months after completion of chemotherapy. Water content (-6.5 %), sebum (-75.5 %), and TEWL (-22.4 %) significantly decreased during chemotherapy compared to pre-chemotherapy levels (all p values <0.001). These parameters were lowest at 1 month after completion of chemotherapy and recovered thereafter but did not return to baseline levels after 6 months of follow-up. Melanin increased during chemotherapy with respect to pre-chemotherapy levels (8.4 %; p < 0.001) but decreased from the first month after completion of chemotherapy through the end of follow-up (-17.1 %; p < 0.001). The patterns of skin changes were similar in patients with or without hormone therapy. Most of patients reported dryness (57.9 %) and dullness (49.1 %) after chemotherapy, and patient-reported dryness was significantly associated with decreased sebum content. Chemotherapy-induced substantial changes in objective skin composition parameters. These changes persisted after 6 months from completion of chemotherapy and were associated with patient-reported symptoms. Additional research is needed to translate these findings into interventions for improving the dermatologic quality of life of breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  7. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cancer stem cell hypothesis inspired our search for a novel chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize cancer stem cell enrichment methods, the search for new efficient drugs, and the delivery of drugs targeting cancer stem cells. We also discuss cancer stem cell hierarchy complexity and the corresponding combination therapy for both cancer stem and non-stem cells. Learning from cancer stem cells may reveal novel strategies for chemotherapy in the future.

  8. Chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiguang; Lv, Lin; Yang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Conventional chemotherapy is the main treatment for cancer and benefits patients in the form of decreased relapse and metastasis and longer overall survival. However, as the target therapy drugs and delivery systems are not wholly precise, it also results in quite a few side effects, and is less efficient in many cancers due to the spared cancer stem cells, which are considered the reason for chemotherapy resistance, relapse, and metastasis. Conventional chemotherapy limitations and the cancer stem cell hypothesis inspired our search for a novel chemotherapy targeting cancer stem cells. In this review, we summarize cancer stem cell enrichment methods, the search for new efficient drugs, and the delivery of drugs targeting cancer stem cells. We also discuss cancer stem cell hierarchy complexity and the corresponding combination therapy for both cancer stem and non-stem cells. Learning from cancer stem cells may reveal novel strategies for chemotherapy in the future. PMID:26045975

  9. [Combined Chemotherapy with Radiation was Tolerable and Effective Treatment in Female Octogenarian Patients with Urethral Cancer -Two Case Reports].

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Takashi; Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Nagi, Shoji; Hagiwara, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Kentaro; Tsumura, Hideyasu; Yoshida, Kazunari; Iwamura, Masatsugu

    2016-07-01

    We report two octogenarian patients with primary urethral cancer treated with chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy. An 85-year-old female presented with perineal bleeding. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a locally advanced tumor in the urethra. Biopsy was performed and pathologic findings demonstrated squamous cell carcinoma. After receiving one cycle of a half dose of gemcitabine and nedaplatin, the patient received external beam radiation therapy with gemcitabine and nedaplatin treatment followed by two more cycles of chemotherapy. Complete response was achieved. An 87-year-old female presented with vaginal bleeding. MRIrevealed locally advanced urethral tumor with bilateral inguinal lymph node metastases. Scratch and urine cytology of tumor demonstrated squamous cell carcinoma. After the same treatment as in case 1, primary cancer and lymph node metastases were significantly decreased. There have been no signs of recurrence or progression after treatment, and no severe adverse events in either patient during 53 and 26 months'follow up, respectively. PMID:27569355

  10. The protective role of the immunomodulator AS101 against chemotherapy-induced alopecia studies on human and animal models.

    PubMed

    Sredni, B; Xu, R H; Albeck, M; Gafter, U; Gal, R; Shani, A; Tichler, T; Shapira, J; Bruderman, I; Catane, R; Kaufman, B; Whisnant, J K; Mettinger, K L; Kalechman, Y

    1996-01-01

    The immunomodulator AS101 has been demonstrated to exhibit radioprotective and chemoprotective effects in mice. Following phase-I studies, preliminary results from phase-II clinical trials on non-small-cell-lung-cancer patients showed a reduction in the severity of alopecia in patients treated with AS101 in combination with chemotherapy. To further substantiate these findings, the present study was extended to include 58 patients treated either with the optimal dose of 3 mg/m2 AS101 combined with carboplatin and VP-16, or with chemotherapy alone. As compared with patients treated with chemotherapy alone, there was a significant decrease in the level of alopecia in patients receiving the combined therapy. The newly developed rat model was used to elucidate the protective mechanism involved in this effect. We show that significant prevention of chemotherapy-induced alopecia is obtained in rats treated with Ara-C combined with AS101, administered i.p. or s.c. or applied topically to the dorsal skin. We show that this protection by AS101 is mediated by macrophage-derived factors induced by AS101. Protection by AS101 can be ascribed, at least in part, to IL-1, since treatment of rats with IL-1 RA largely abrogated the protective effect of AS101. Moreover, we demonstrate that in humans there is an inverse correlation between the grade of alopecia and the increase in IL-1 alpha. In addition, protection by AS101 could be related to PGE2 secretion, since injection of indomethacin before treatment with AS101 and Ara-C partly abrogated the protective effect of AS101. To assess the ability of AS101 to protect against chemotherapy-induced alopecia, phase-II clinical trials have been initiated with cancer patients suffering from various malignancies.

  11. Pioneers in Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neha; Rodrigues, Camilla; Soman, Rajeev

    2015-09-01

    "If we are not careful, we soon will be in the post-antibiotic era, and for some patients and some microbes we are already there"- Tom Friedan Antibiotics revolutionized medicine in the 20th century. The era of antibacterial chemotherapy began in 1907 with the discovery of arsphenamine, first synthesized by Alferd Bertheim and Paul Ehrlich in 1907, used to treat syphilis. The first systemically active antibiotic, Prontosil was discovered in 1933 by Gerhard Domagk, for which he was awarded the 1939 Nobel Prize. Fleming's accidental discovery and isolation of penicillin in September 1928 marked the start of modern antibiotics. It was a discovery that changed the course of history and saved millions of lives. PMID:27608881

  12. Carotidynia after anticancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Maruoka, Shuichiro; Takahashi, Noriaki; Hashimoto, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Carotidynia is characterised by inflammation limited to the common carotid artery, which has been recognised as a distinct disease entity by advanced vascular imaging. Although most cases of carotidynia are idiopathic, we herein present a case of carotidynia after anticancer chemotherapy. A 64-year-old male patient received docetaxel followed by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for the treatment of lung squamous carcinoma. After the treatment, bilateral cervical pain developed. Vascular imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and ultrasonography, showed characteristics specific for carotidynia. Although there was no strong confirmation using tests such as a challenge test, our observations suggest that docetaxel or G-CSF could be a causative drug triggering carotidynia. PMID:25273942

  13. Pioneers in Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neha; Rodrigues, Camilla; Soman, Rajeev

    2015-09-01

    "If we are not careful, we soon will be in the post-antibiotic era, and for some patients and some microbes we are already there"- Tom Friedan Antibiotics revolutionized medicine in the 20th century. The era of antibacterial chemotherapy began in 1907 with the discovery of arsphenamine, first synthesized by Alferd Bertheim and Paul Ehrlich in 1907, used to treat syphilis. The first systemically active antibiotic, Prontosil was discovered in 1933 by Gerhard Domagk, for which he was awarded the 1939 Nobel Prize. Fleming's accidental discovery and isolation of penicillin in September 1928 marked the start of modern antibiotics. It was a discovery that changed the course of history and saved millions of lives.

  14. Patient Comprehension and Attitudes toward Maintenance Chemotherapy for Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, David E.; Hamann, Heidi A.; Rasco, Drew W.; Woodruff, Sharon; Craddock Lee, Simon J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Maintenance chemotherapy is a recently approved approach to the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We sought to gain insight into patients’ perceptions of maintenance chemotherapy using qualitative methods. Methods We conducted thematic content analysis of focus groups at a freestanding cancer center and at an associated safety-net county hospital. Patients with advanced NSCLC who had started but not yet completed first-line platinum doublet chemotherapy were provided visual and written explanations of maintenance chemotherapy before being guided in group discussion. Results Key themes to emerge for consideration of maintenance chemotherapy included (1) survival benefits, disease control, and “buying time”; (2) the importance of “doing something”; (3) quality of life concerns; (4) the role of provider opinion/preference; and (5) the importance of logistics. Conclusions Patients undergoing first-line chemotherapy for advanced NSCLC were able to understand the concept of maintenance chemotherapy, distinguish it from traditional treatment paradigms, identify pros and cons of this approach, and convey reasons for considering it. Practice Implications Advances in oncology care that alter therapy modalities and delivery may significantly impact patient perceptions and treatment experiences. Clinical team members may wish to elicit treatment preferences of first-line patients through clinical discussions that anticipate these considerations. PMID:22632736

  15. Chemotherapy or radiation-induced oral mucositis.

    PubMed

    Lalla, Rajesh V; Saunders, Deborah P; Peterson, Douglas E

    2014-04-01

    Oral mucositis is a significant toxicity of systemic chemotherapy and of radiation therapy to the head and neck region. The morbidity of oral mucositis can include pain, nutritional compromise, impact on quality of life, alteration in cancer therapy, risk for infection, and economic costs. Management includes general symptomatic support and targeted therapeutic interventions for the prevention or treatment of oral mucositis. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines are available to guide clinicians in the selection of effective management strategies.

  16. [Systemic chemotherapy for transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelium].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, J; Retz, M; Hack, M; Siemer, S; Stöckle, M

    2003-10-01

    Moderate activity of systemic chemotherapy for advanced urothelial cancer has been reported for more than 30 years. Only with the advent of potent combination therapy in the mid eighties of the past century clinically significant response rates as well as prolonged survival has been documented. This review summarizes seven Phase-III trials of systemic chemotherapy for advanced urothelial carcinoma as well as results from adjuvant and neoadjuvant Phase-III trials for muscle-invasive bladder cancer including the most recent reports.

  17. A rare case of chemotherapy induced reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome in a patient of acute lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sankhe, Shilpa; Kamath, Namita; Sahu, Arpita

    2015-01-01

    Neurotoxic reactions of chemotherapy occur frequently and are often dose limiting side effects of chemotherapy. It is important to differentiate these various nonneoplastic effects from metastases, or sometimes even from each other, since the therapeutic approach differs accordingly. To arrive at a definitive and comprehensive diagnosis, the radiologist should integrate imaging findings, clinical signs, and laboratory results together. Here we present a unique case of chemotherapy induced reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome in a 13-year-old patient of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  18. Assessment of the Radiation-Equivalent of Chemotherapy Contributions in 1-Phase Radio-chemotherapy Treatment of Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Plataniotis, George A.; Dale, Roger G.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To estimate the radiation equivalent of the chemotherapy contribution to observed complete response rates in published results of 1-phase radio-chemotherapy of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: A standard logistic dose–response curve was fitted to data from radiation therapy-alone trials and then used as the platform from which to quantify the chemotherapy contribution in 1-phase radio-chemotherapy trials. Two possible mechanisms of chemotherapy effect were assumed (1) a fixed radiation-independent contribution to local control; or (2) a fixed degree of chemotherapy-induced radiosensitization. A combination of both mechanisms was also considered. Results: The respective best-fit values of the independent chemotherapy-induced complete response (CCR) and radiosensitization (s) coefficients were 0.40 (95% confidence interval −0.07 to 0.87) and 1.30 (95% confidence interval 0.86-1.70). Independent chemotherapy effect was slightly favored by the analysis, and the derived CCR value was consistent with reports of pathologic complete response rates seen in neoadjuvant chemotherapy-alone treatments of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The radiation equivalent of the CCR was 36.3 Gy. Conclusion: Although the data points in the analyzed radio-chemotherapy studies are widely dispersed (largely on account of the diverse range of chemotherapy schedules used), it is nonetheless possible to fit plausible-looking response curves. The methodology used here is based on a standard technique for analyzing dose-response in radiation therapy-alone studies and is capable of application to other mixed-modality treatment combinations involving radiation therapy.

  19. Impact of Toceranib/Piroxicam/Cyclophosphamide Maintenance Therapy on Outcome of Dogs with Appendicular Osteosarcoma following Amputation and Carboplatin Chemotherapy: A Multi-Institutional Study

    PubMed Central

    Mathie, Tamra; Stingle, Nicole; Portela, Roberta; Pennell, Michael L.; Clifford, Craig A.; Rosenberg, Mona P.; Vail, David M.; Williams, Laurel E.; Cronin, Kim L.; Wilson-Robles, Heather; Borgatti, Antonella; Henry, Carolyn J.; Bailey, Dennis B.; Locke, Jennifer; Northrup, Nicole C.; Crawford-Jakubiak, Martin; Gill, Virginia L.; Klein, Mary K.; Ruslander, David M.; Thamm, Doug H.; Phillips, Brenda; Post, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Background We hypothesized that the addition of toceranib to metronomic cyclophosphamide/piroxicam therapy would significantly improve disease-free interval (DFI) and overall survival (OS) in dogs with appendicular osteosarcoma (OSA) following amputation and carboplatin chemotherapy. Methods and Findings This was a randomized, prospective clinical trial in which dogs with OSA free of gross metastatic disease (n = 126) received carboplatin chemotherapy (4 doses) following amputation. On study entry, dogs were randomized to receive piroxicam/cyclophosphamide with or without toceranib (n = 63 each) after completing chemotherapy. Patient demographics were not significantly different between both groups. During or immediately following carboplatin chemotherapy, 32 dogs (n = 13 toceranib; n = 19 control) developed metastatic disease, and 13 dogs left the study due to other medical conditions or owner preference. Following carboplatin chemotherapy, 81 dogs (n = 46 toceranib; n = 35 control) received the metronomic treatment; 35 dogs (n = 20 toceranib; n = 15 control) developed metastatic disease during the maintenance therapy, and 26 dogs left the study due to other medical conditions or owner preference. Nine toceranib-treated and 11 control dogs completed the study without evidence of metastatic disease 1-year following amputation. Toceranib-treated dogs experienced more episodes of diarrhea, neutropenia and weight loss than control dogs, although these toxicities were low-grade and typically resolved with supportive care. More toceranib-treated dogs (n = 8) were removed from the study for therapy-associated adverse events compared to control dogs (n = 1). The median DFI for control and toceranib treated dogs was 215 and 233 days, respectively (p = 0.274); the median OS for control and toceranib treated dogs was 242 and 318 days, respectively (p = 0.08). The one year survival rate for control dogs was 35% compared to 38% for dogs receiving toceranib. Conclusions The

  20. The translocator protein (TSPO) ligand PK11195 induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest and sensitizes to chemotherapy treatment in pre- and post-relapse neuroblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mendonça-Torres, Maria C; Roberts, Stephen S

    2013-04-01

    High-risk neuroblastoma (NB) has a poor prognosis. Even with intensive myeloablative chemotherapy, relapse is common and almost uniformly fatal, and new treatments are needed. Translocator protein 18kDa (TSPO) ligands have been studied as potential new therapeutic agents in many cancers, but not in NB. We studied the effects of TSPO ligands on cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis using paired cell lines derived from the same patient at the time of initial surgery and again after development of progressive disease or relapse post-chemotherapy. We found that TSPO expression was significantly increased 2- to 10-fold in post-relapse cell lines compared with pre-treatment lines derived from the same individual. Subsequently, these cell lines were treated with the specific TSPO ligand 1-(2-chlorophenyl-N-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide (PK11195) (0-160µM) as a single agent, with cytotoxic chemotherapy agents alone (carboplatin, etoposide or melphalan), or with combinations of PK11195 and chemotherapy drugs. We found that PK11195 inhibited proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, induced apoptosis and caused G 1/S cell cycle arrest in all tested NB cell lines at micromolar concentrations. In addition, PK11195 significantly decreased mRNA expression of the chemotherapy resistance efflux pumps ABCA3, ABCB1 and ABCC1 in two post-relapse NB cell lines. We also found that pre-treatment with PK11195 sensitized these cell lines to treatment with cytotoxic chemotherapy agents. These results suggest that PK11195 alone or in combination with standard chemotherapeutic drugs warrants further study for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  1. [INTRAVENOUS CHEMOTHERAPY VERSUS INTRAPERITONEAL CHEMOTHERAPY IN ADVANCED OVARIAN CANCER: UPDATE ON THE SITUATION WORLDWIDE AND IN ISRAEL].

    PubMed

    Binyamin, Sivan; Segev, Yakir; Auslender, Ron; Bitterman, Arie; Lavie, Ofer

    2015-09-01

    Ovarian cancer is the second in incidence and the first cause of death. As much as 70% of ovarian cancer patients are diagnosed with advanced disease. The standard treatment of advanced ovarian cancer is a combination of primary optimal debulking (POD) followed by a combined adjuvant chemotherapy treatment. Another optional treatment includes neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by optimal debulking and then adjuvant chemotherapy. The common adjuvant chemotherapy includes a combination of platinum and taxol compounds given intravenously. Other possible treatments which had been evaluated in the past decades include a combination of chemotherapy given intravenously and intraperitoneally. The rationale behind delivering the chemotherapy intraperitoneally is to provide a much higher concentrations of cytotoxic agents in the peritoneal cavity and to reduce the systemic side effects. A number of randomized trials have shown that the combination of IV and IP chemotherapy entails a survival advantage. Most studies included treatment based on cisplatin treatments with/ without taxol given intravenously versus a combined treatment (intravenously and intraperitoneally) of those agents. An advantage of up to 8 months in disease-free survival and 11 months in overall survival was noted in the IP group. On the other hand, this treatment led to a higher rate of side effects, including abdominal pain, electrolyte imbalance and catheter related complications. Despite the inconsistency in the treatment protocols between the different trials comparing intravenous and intra-peritoneal treatment, one cannot ignore the statistical significance between the groups, for disease-free survival and overall survival. That is why, when addressing patients who completed optimal surgery, one needs to conduct a thorough evaluation regarding the complementary chemotherapy treatment. Due to the broad side effect profile, special notice should be taken as to the patient's age, medical history, and

  2. Organized Pneumonia Secondary to Increasing Doses of Temozolomide

    PubMed Central

    Consuegra Vanegas, Angélica; Matachana Martínez, María; Cordero Lorenzana, Lourdes; Vidal García, Iria; Montero Martínez, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and chemotherapy have a role in the control of tumor growth, progression, and recurrence in high-grade gliomas. Temozolomide has been incorporated as the main chemotherapy agent for managing these tumors. Here, we present a case of a patient who developed a severe organizing pneumonia after increasing doses of temozolomide for a high-grade glioma. PMID:26487994

  3. Chemotherapy-Induced Amenorrhea – An Update

    PubMed Central

    Liedtke, C.; Kiesel, L.

    2012-01-01

    Because of the heterogeneity in the definition of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea (CIA) there are distinct differences in the literature with regard to its incidence as well as its dependence on various influencing factors. The occurrence of CIA varies greatly depending on the applied chemotherapy. The pathogenesis of CIA is especially based on a reduction of ovarian reserves. Various sonographic and biochemical factors can be used to exclude or confirm CIA. This is particularly important when an endocrine therapy with tamoxifen is not possible and the use of aromatase inhibitors is under consideration. CIA and especially the frequently thereby resulting early menopause can lead to pronounced restrictions in the quality of life of the affected patients, not least due to the resulting infertility. On the other hand, various studies have shown that CIA may have a positive prognostic significance. Thus, the identification of measures to prevent CIA (for example, through the use of GnRH analogues) is of particular importance. PMID:26640289

  4. The effect of training during treatment with chemotherapy on muscle strength and endurance capacity: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Van Moll, Christel C A; Schep, Goof; Vreugdenhil, Art; Savelberg, Hans H C M; Husson, Olga

    2016-05-01

    Background Treatment of cancer with chemotherapy decreases endurance capacity and muscle strength. Training during chemotherapy might prevent this. There are no clear guidelines concerning which type of training and which training dose are effective. This review aims to gain insight into the different training modalities during chemotherapy and the effects of such training to improve endurance capacity and muscle strength in order to obtain the knowledge to compose a future training program which trains cancer patients in the most effective way. Material and methods A systematic search of PubMed was carried out. In total, 809 studies of randomized controlled trials studying the effects of training during chemotherapy on endurance capacity and muscle strength were considered. Only 14 studies met all the inclusion criteria. The studies were assessed on methodological quality by using Cochrane criteria for randomized controlled trials. Results The quality of the studies was generally poor and the study populations varied considerably as the training programs were very heterogeneous. Variables of endurance capacity reported beneficial effects in 10 groups (59%). Increases due to training ranged from 8% to 31%. Endurance capacity decreased in nine of 13 control groups (69%), which ranged from 1% to 32%. Muscle strength improved significantly in 17 of 18 intervention groups (94%), ranging from 2% to 38%. Muscle strength also improved in 11 of 14 control groups (79%), but this increase was only minimal, ranging from 1.3% to 6.5%. Conclusions This review indicates that training during chemotherapy may help in preventing the decrease in muscle strength and endurance capacity. It is important to know which training intensity and duration is the most effective in training cancer patients, to provide a training program suitable for every cancer patient. Training should be based on good research and should be implemented into international guidelines and daily practice. More

  5. Dosimetric Evaluation and Treatment Outcome of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy After Doxorubicin-Based Chemotherapy for Primary Mediastinal Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Li-Ming; Li, Ye-Xiong; Fang, Hui; Jin, Jing; Wang, Wei-Hu; Wang, Shu-Lian; Liu, Yue-Ping; Song, Yong-Wen; Liu, Qing-Feng; Chen, Bo; Qi, Shu-Nan; Ren, Hua; Dai, Jian-Rong

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: The value of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after doxorubicin-based chemotherapy in primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMBCL) is unknown. We assessed the dosimetric parameters, treatment outcomes, and toxicity of IMRT in PMBCL. Methods and Materials: Forty-one PMBCL patients underwent mediastinal IMRT after doxorubicin-based chemotherapy. Thirty-eight patients had stage I-II disease, and 3 patients had stage III-IV disease. Most patients presented with bulky mediastinal disease (65.9%) and local invasion (82.9%). The dose-volume histograms of the target volume and critical normal structures were evaluated. Results: The average planning target volume (PTV) mean dose was 39 Gy. Only 0.5% and 1.4% of the PTV received <90% and <95% of the prescribed dose, respectively, indicating excellent target coverage. The median mean lung dose and percentage lung volume receiving 20 Gy (V20) were 16.3 Gy and 30.6%. The 5-year overall survival (OS) and local control (LC) were 95.1% and 89.8%. After chemotherapy, consolidation radiation therapy in patients with complete/partial response resulted in significantly better survival than salvage radiation therapy in patients with stable/progressive disease (3-year OS 100% vs 75%; 3-year LC 96.6% vs 62.5%). No grade 4 or 5 acute or late toxicities occurred. Conclusions: Mediastinal IMRT after doxorubicin-based chemotherapy can be safely and efficiently delivered, and it provides favorable outcomes in PMBCL patients with a large target volume and high-risk features.

  6. Cutaneous side effects of chemotherapy in pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Ceylan, Can; Kantar, Mehmet; Tuna, Arzu; Ertam, Ilgen; Aksoylar, Serap; Günaydın, Aslı; Çetingül, Nazan

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric oncology patients can present with various skin lesions related to both primary disease and immunosuppressive treatments. This study aimed to evaluate the cutaneous side effects of chemotherapy in pediatric oncology patients. Sixty-five pediatric oncology patients who were scheduled to undergo chemotherapy from May 2011 to May 2013 were included in the study. Three patients were excluded from the results, as 2 patients died during treatment and 1 patient withdrew from the study; therefore, a total of 62 patients were evaluated for mucocutaneous findings. Patients were grouped according to their oncological diagnoses and a statistical analysis was performed. There was no statistical significance in the incidence of cutaneous side effects of chemotherapy among the different diagnostic groups. Awareness among dermatologists of the possible cutaneous side effects of chemotherapy in pediatric patients and their causes can promote early diagnosis and treatment in this patient population.

  7. Influenza vaccination in children with cancer receiving chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Cecinati, Valerio; Russo, Fabio Giovanni; Principi, Nicola

    2009-06-01

    Influenza has a significant clinical impact on pediatric cancer patients because it causes frequent febrile episodes and respiratory tract infections, possibly severe complications, delays in chemotherapy administration and even death, all of which supports the importance of prevention and the widespread use of influenza vaccination. Results from clinical studies show that influenza vaccination can be considered safe in children undergoing chemotherapy and, although weaker than in healthy children, the immune response seems to be sufficient in patients with leukemia or solid tumors even if it is less in children receiving chemotherapy than in those who are not. However, there is an urgent need for universally accepted guidelines concerning the type of vaccine that leads to the best immunological results, the number of administrations, and their timing in relation to the severity of immunosuppression and chemotherapy schedules. Such recommendations, together with a clear demonstration of vaccine efficacy, are also needed to increase influenza vaccination coverage in this high-risk category of patients.

  8. [Recent advance in chemotherapy for advanced colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Aiba, K

    1996-04-01

    Chemotherapy for advanced colorectal cancer is reviewed stressing the historical development of combination chemotherapy and the application of a new idea called biochemical modulation based upon a preclinical biochemical and molecular pharmacological rationale. While 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is a key drug for more than three decades, many a combination chemotherapy with 5-FU and other drugs such as methyl-CCNU, vincristine, streptozocin, mitomycin C and so on has been studied extensively only to show no significant improvement compared with monotherapy with 5-FU. Recently, the mechanisms of 5-FU action have been recognized more in detail biochemically, and it enabled us to try the drug in a more optimal way. For example, bolus i.v. infusion of 5-FU can produce a response rate of around 10% to 15% at most for advanced colorectal cancer. On the other hand, a more continuous mode of i.v. infusion, typically known as protracted i.v. infusion lasting up to 6 weeks or more, can produce the response rate of up to 40%. The difference underlying the mechanisms of action in these typical two administrative methods is that the main target can be RNA-directed cytotoxicity in the bolus type infusion and it can be shifted toward DNA-directed cytotoxicity in the continuous type infusion through the inhibition of thymidylate synthase (TS) enzyme activity which is relevant to DNA de novo synthesis. More importantly, investigations using clinical materials imply that DNA-directed cytotoxicity may be more relevant in a clinical setting, showing consistent findings between bench-top experiments and the clinical outcome. Given a precise knowledge about the mechanisms of 5-FU action, we could have developed a new type combination chemotherapy called biochemical modulation which manipulates non-cytotoxic agents or cytotoxic agents in non-cytotoxic level as modulators enhancing cytotoxicity of 5-FU biochemically. Among modulators, leucovorin (LV) has been shown to have a pivotal role in

  9. A New mouthwash for Chemotherapy Induced Stomatitis

    PubMed Central

    Miranzadeh, Sedigheh; Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Soleymanpoor, Leyla; Ehsani, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Stomatitis is a disturbing side-effect of chemotherapy that disturbs patients and causes difficulties in patient’s drinking, eating and talking, and may results in infection and bleeding. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effect of Yarrow distillate in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced stomatitis. Patients and Methods: This randomized controlled trial study was conducted during 2013. The study population consisted of all cancer patients with chemotherapy-induced oral stomatitis referred to Shahid Beheshti Medical Center, Kashan, Iran. The data collection instrument had two-part; a demographic part and another part recording the severity of the stomatitis at the first, seventh, and 14th days of the intervention based on a WHO criteria checklist in 2005. In this study, 56 patients diagnosed with cancer were randomly assigned into control and experimental groups in similar blocks according to their stomatitis severity. The experimental group gargled 15 mL of a routine solution mixed with Yarrow distillate 4 times a day for 14 days while the control group gargled 15 mL of routine solution. The severity of stomatitis was assessed at the beginning of the intervention, and then after 7 and 14 days of the study. Data were analyzed using chi-square and Fisher exact test, Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis, and Friedman tests using SPSS 11.5 software. Results: At first, the median score of stomatitis in the experimental group was 2.50 that significantly reduced to 1 and 0 in days 7 and 14 of the intervention, respectively (P value < 0.001). However, in the control group, the median score of stomatitis was 2.50, which significantly increased to 3 in days 7 and 14 (P value < 0.001). Conclusions: Yarrow distillate-contained solution reduced stomatitis severity more than the routine solution. Therefore, we suggest using it in patients with chemotherapy-induced stomatitis. PMID:25699281

  10. Chemotherapy for Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs may be used as well, including cisplatin, dacarbazine (DTIC), docetaxel (Taxotere ® ), gemcitabine (Gemzar ® ), methotrexate, oxaliplatin, paclitaxel (Taxol ® ), ... such as: MAID (mesna, Adriamycin [doxorubicin], ifosfamide, and dacarbazine). Chemotherapy drugs kill cancer cells but also damage ...

  11. Interaction of 2-Gy Equivalent Dose and Margin Status in Perioperative High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Moreno, Marta; Gaztanaga, Miren; San Julian, Mikel; Alcalde, Juan; Jurado, Matias

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To determine patient, tumor, and treatment factors predictive of local control (LC) in a series of patients treated with either perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy (PHDRB) alone (Group 1) or with PHDRB combined with external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (Group 2). Patient and Methods: Patients (n = 312) enrolled in several PHDRB prospective Phase I-II studies conducted at the Clinica Universidad de Navarra were analyzed. Treatment with PHDRB alone, mainly because of prior irradiation, was used in 126 patients to total doses of 32 Gy/8 b.i.d. or 40 Gy/10 b.i.d. treatments after R0 or R1 resections. Treatment with PHDRB plus EBRT was used in 186 patients to total doses of 16 Gy/4 b.i.d. or 24 Gy/6 b.i.d. treatments after R0 or R1 resections along with 45 Gy of EBRT with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Results: No dose-margin interaction was observed in Group 1 patients. In Group 2 patients there was a significant interaction between margin status and 2-Gy equivalent (Eq2Gy) dose (p = 0.002): (1) patients with negative margins had 9-year LC of 95.7% at Eq2Gy = 62.9Gy; (2) patients with close margins of >1 mm had 9-year LC of 92.4% at Eq2Gy = 72.2Gy, and (3) patients with positive/close <1-mm margins had 9-year LC of 68.0% at Eq2Gy = 72.2Gy. Conclusions: Two-gray equivalent doses {>=}70 Gy may compensate the effect of close margins {>=}1 mm but do not counterbalance the detrimental effect of unfavorable (positive/close <1 mm) resection margins. No dose-margin interaction is observed in patients treated at lower Eq2Gy doses {<=}50 Gy with PHDRB alone.

  12. [Chemotherapy for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Rauchenwald, Michael; De Santis, Maria; Fink, Eleonore; Höltl, Wolfgang; Kramer, Gero; Marei, Isabella-Carolina; Neumann, Hans-Jörg; Reissigl, Andreas; Schmeller, Nikolaus; Stackl, Walter; Hobisch, Alfred; Krainer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    For many years the benefit of chemotherapy in patients with prostate cancer was thought to be limited to palliation of late-stage disease, and thus this treatment option only became involved in patient care towards the end of the disease process, if at all. However, two landmark phase-III trials with docetaxel-based therapy (TAX 327 and Southwest Oncology Group, SWOG, 9916) have shown a survival benefit for patients with hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) thus prompting a change in patterns of care. With raising interest for chemotherapeutic options and clinical trials for new drugs and new indications (neoadjuvant therapy, adjuvant therapy, increasing PSA levels after local treatment, and hormone sensitive cancer) under way our goal was to review within the context of a multidisciplinary team the available evidence and explore the standard for the medical treatment of prostate cancer outside of clinical trials. We are carefully evaluating the current treatment recommendations based on the available evidence and highlight potential future treatment options but also discuss important clinical topics (treatment until progression versus the advantage of chemo holidays, definition of particular patient subgroups and potential second line options) for which there are no clear cut answers to date. The role and importance of radiotherapy, biphosphonate treatment and the medical management of pain and side effects is also discussed. The multitude of treatment options for patients with advanced prostate cancer clearly asks for a close collaboration between urologists, medical oncologists and radiation therapists. PMID:18726672

  13. Adherence and Persistence With Oral Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Older Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer in CALGB 49907: Adherence Companion Study 60104

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, Ann H.; Archer, Laura; Kornblith, Alice B.; Gralow, Julie; Grenier, Debjani; Perez, Edith; Wolff, Antonio C.; Wang, Xiaofei; Kastrissios, Helen; Berry, Donald; Hudis, Clifford; Winer, Eric; Muss, Hyman

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Patient adherence is critical in evaluating the effectiveness of an oral therapy. We sought to measure adherence among women randomly assigned to capecitabine in a preplanned substudy of a multicenter clinical trial. Patients and Methods Cancer and Leukemia Group B study CALGB 49907 was a randomly assigned trial comparing standard chemotherapy versus oral chemotherapy with capecitabine in patients age 65 years or older with early-stage breast cancer. We used microelectronic monitoring system (MEMS) caps on participants' capecitabine bottles to record pill bottle openings. Capecitabine was given in two divided daily doses for 14 consecutive days of a 21-day cycle for six cycles. Adherence was calculated as the number of doses taken divided by doses expected, taking into account toxicity-related dosing changes. A participant was defined as adherent if 80% or more of expected doses were recorded by MEMS. Results Overall, 161 patients were enrolled. Median age was 71 years (range, 65 to 89 years); 124 patients (83%) persisted with capecitabine to completion of planned protocol therapy. Adherence was 78% across all cycles, and adherence did not vary by cycle (P = .32). Twenty-five percent of participants took fewer than 80% of expected doses and were nonadherent. In a logistic regression model, participants with node-negative disease (P = .01) and mastectomy (P = .01) were more likely to be nonadherent. Adherence was not related to age, tumor stage, or hormone receptor status. Adherence was not significantly associated with relapse-free survival or grade 3 or 4 toxicity. Conclusion Most older women with early-stage breast cancer were adherent to short-term oral chemotherapy in a randomized clinical trial. Age was not associated with adherence. PMID:20368559

  14. Chemotherapy of leprosy.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Surajit Kumar

    2004-12-01

    The WHO MDT regimens have proved highly successful in preventing relapse of leprosy cases. It has indirectly lad to marked reduction in prevalence of disabilities. For PB leprosy, rifampicin 600 mg monthly and 100 mg dapsone daily for a total of 6 months therapy is required. For MB leprosy clofazimine 300 mg once monthly, supervised and 50 mg daily self administered is added. For single skin lesion the current WHO recommendation is 600 mg rifampicin + 400 mg ofloxacin + 100 mg minocycline given as a single dose for adults. Dose adjustment for children and clinical information have been discussed in a nutshell. A number of trials are going on, some are yet to be completed which do offer the prospect of perhaps simplifying therapy and improving with shorter duration.

  15. [Experimental study on chemotherapy of acute glanders].

    PubMed

    Iliukhin, V I; Rotov, K A; Senina, T V; Snatenkov, E A; Tikhonov, S N; Plekhanova, N G; Kulikova, A S; Shubnikova, E V; Korol', E V; Nekhezina, M O

    2012-01-01

    Glanders is a zoonotic infection inducing acute forms of the disease (pneumonia, sepsis) in humans and animals under certain conditions, which even with the use of modern chemotherapy have unfavourable prognosis. Insufficient of efficacy of antibiotics with in vitro low MIC for planktonic bacterial suspension of Burkholderia mallei in chemotherapy of acute forms of glanders was due to the capacity of the pathogen for intracellular survival and formation of biofilms. Under such conditions the susceptibility of B. mallei to antibiotics lowered by several orders of magnitude. Chemotherapy of the glanders acute forms in animals usually provided only an increase of the lifespan, while among the survivors there was recorded a high relapse rate. More favourable outcomes were observed with the use of in vitro effective antibiotics in the form of clathrate compounds or especially liposomal forms. In the experiments with golden hamsters the survival rate reached 100% in 1000 Dlm infection even with the treatment onset by meropenem liposomal form 48 hours after the infection. Chemotherapeutics in the liposomal form significantly lowered resistance of B. mallei in both the experiments with a suspension of planktonic organisms and the use of bacteria interned in eukaryotic cells (Tetrahymena pyriformis).

  16. Systemic Treatment Safety Symposium 2014: Oral Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Simanovski, V.; Kaizer, L.; Wright, M.; Rae, E.; Ahmad, N.; Creber, K.; Green, E.; Vu, K.; Kukreti, V.; Krzyzanowska, M.K.

    2014-01-01

    The second Systemic Treatment Safety Symposium, which took place February 21, 2014, in Toronto, aimed to identify opportunities for improving the delivery of systemic cancer treatment in Ontario based on regional needs, while providing a venue for collaboration and knowledge-sharing. The agenda included a series of panel sessions followed by discussions, presentations of regional improvement projects and results, and breakout sessions. Based on the discussion that took place at the symposium, a provincial goal of zero handwritten or verbal oral chemotherapy orders by June 30, 2015, has now been established, and regions will be provided with funding for safe prescribing initiatives to support achievement of that aim. Building on the lessons learned from the 2014 System Treatment Safety Symposium, a common measurement strategy will be identified, and Cancer Care Ontario (cco) will also support the work by identifying the recommended key elements of a safe oral chemotherapy prescription. Additionally, cco will identify areas for improving systemic treatment computerized prescriber order entry systems to better enable prescribing of oral agents within such systems. Among the most prominent of the lessons learned during the symposium was the importance of having a focused topic (such as oral chemotherapy) while maintaining a province-wide scope. Another significant takeaway was that attendees appreciate the opportunity to hear from colleagues across the province about the work underway in various regions. Future safety symposia will also explore opportunities for enhanced engagement with participants through greater use of technology.

  17. The impact of pharmacist certification on the quality of chemotherapy in Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shinya; Sakurai, Hiroomi; Kawasumi, Kenji; Tahara, Makoto; Saito, Shinichiro; Endo, Kazushi

    2016-10-01

    Background In the Japanese healthcare system, board certification not only maintains the quality of daily practice but is also required for hospitals to receive healthcare reimbursement. To date, no data on the effects of the board certification system in Japanese hospitals have been reported. Objective We performed a survey to clarify the impact of pharmacist certification on the quality of chemotherapy. Setting A nationwide mailing survey was conducted in Japan. Method We surveyed oncology pharmacists from 388 cancer designated hospitals (DHs) and 984 randomly selected general hospitals (GHs). Main outcome measure Multivariate analysis of factors for compliance with standard cancer chemotherapy to clarify the impact of pharmacist certification on the quality of chemotherapy. Results The response rate was 70.6 % (274/388) at the DHs and 43.4 % (428/984) at the GHs. Of the 13 different regimens, 66.1 % (181/274) of DHs and 64.7 % (277/428) of GHs reported having experienced either improper doses or intervals of drug administration. The median number of improper regimens was 1 at both the DHs (range 0-15) and GHs (range 0-22). We identified two groups of hospitals, those with two or more improper regimens and those with one improper regimen or less. Univariate analysis showed significant differences in the number of DHs (p < 0.01), performance of more than 10 chemotherapies per day (p < 0.05), presence of more than 400 beds (p < 0.01) and the professional qualifications of oncology pharmacists or medical oncologists. From multivariate analysis, significant differences were observed in certifications from the Japanese Society of Pharmacy Healthcare and Sciences certified Senior Oncology Pharmacist (odds ratio 0.29, p < 0.01) and the Japanese Society of Medical Oncology certified oncologist (odds ratio 0.48, p < 0.01). Conclusion Board certification was more prevalent in the designated (cancer specialist) hospitals than general hospitals and adherence to

  18. Hematopoietic stem cell compartment: Acute and late effects of radiation therapy an chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mauch, P.; Constine, L.; Greenberger, J.

    1995-03-30

    The bone marrow is an important dose-limiting cell renewal tissue for chemotherapy, wide-field irradiation, and autologous bone marrow transplantion. Over the past 5-10 years a great deal has been discovered about the hematopoietic stem cell compartment. Although the toxicity associated with prolonged myelosuppression continue to limit the wider use of chemotherapy and irradiation, ways are being discovered to circumvent this toxicity such as with the increasing use of cytokines. This review describes what is known of how chemotherapy and irradiation damage stem cells and the microenvironment, how cytokines protect hematopoietic cells from radiation damage and speed marrow recovery after chemotherapy or marrow transplantation, and how various types of blood marrow cells contribute to engraftment and long-term hematopoiesis after high doses of cytotoxic agents and/or total body irradiation. 167 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Dose of Prophylactic Platelet Transfusions and Prevention of Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Slichter, Sherrill J.; Kaufman, Richard M.; Assmann, Susan F.; McCullough, Jeffrey; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Strauss, Ronald G.; Gernsheimer, Terry B.; Ness, Paul M.; Brecher, Mark E.; Josephson, Cassandra D.; Konkle, Barbara A.; Woodson, Robert D.; Ortel, Thomas L.; Hillyer, Christopher D.; Skerrett, Donna L.; McCrae, Keith R.; Sloan, Steven R.; Uhl, Lynne; George, James N.; Aquino, Victor M.; Manno, Catherine S.; McFarland, Janice G.; Hess, John R.; Leissinger, Cindy; Granger, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND We conducted a trial of prophylactic platelet transfusions to evaluate the effect of platelet dose on bleeding in patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. METHODS We randomly assigned hospitalized patients undergoing hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation or chemotherapy for hematologic cancers or solid tumors to receive prophylactic platelet transfusions at a low dose, a medium dose, or a high dose (1.1×1011, 2.2×1011, or 4.4×1011 platelets per square meter of body-surface area, respectively), when morning platelet counts were 10,000 per cubic millimeter or lower. Clinical signs of bleeding were assessed daily. The primary end point was bleeding of grade 2 or higher (as defined on the basis of World Health Organization criteria). RESULTS In the 1272 patients who received at least one platelet transfusion, the primary end point was observed in 71%, 69%, and 70% of the patients in the low-dose group, the medium-dose group, and the high-dose group, respectively (differences were not significant). The incidences of higher grades of bleeding, and other adverse events, were similar among the three groups. The median number of platelets transfused was significantly lower in the low-dose group (9.25×1011) than in the medium-dose group (11.25×1011) or the high-dose group (19.63×1011) (P = 0.002 for low vs. medium, P<0.001 for high vs. low and high vs. medium), but the median number of platelet transfusions given was significantly higher in the low-dose group (five, vs. three in the medium-dose and three in the high-dose group; P<0.001 for low vs. medium and low vs. high). Bleeding occurred on 25% of the study days on which morning platelet counts were 5000 per cubic millimeter or lower, as compared with 17% of study days on which platelet counts were 6000 to 80,000 per cubic millimeter (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS Low doses of platelets administered as a prophylactic transfusion led to a decreased number of platelets transfused per patient but an

  20. Improved outcome of adult Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia with rituximab and chemotherapy: report of a large prospective multicenter trial

    PubMed Central

    Walewski, Jan; Döhner, Hartmut; Viardot, Andreas; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Spiekermann, Karsten; Serve, Hubert; Dührsen, Ulrich; Hüttmann, Andreas; Thiel, Eckhard; Dengler, Jolanta; Kneba, Michael; Schaich, Markus; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G. H.; Beck, Joachim; Hertenstein, Bernd; Reichle, Albrecht; Domanska-Czyz, Katarzyna; Fietkau, Rainer; Horst, Heinz-August; Rieder, Harald; Schwartz, Stefan; Burmeister, Thomas; Gökbuget, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    This largest prospective multicenter trial for adult patients with Burkitt lymphoma/leukemia aimed to prove the efficacy and feasibility of short-intensive chemotherapy combined with the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab. From 2002 to 2011, 363 patients 16 to 85 years old were recruited in 98 centers. Treatment consisted of 6 5-day chemotherapy cycles with high-dose methotrexate, high-dose cytosine arabinoside, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, ifosphamide, corticosteroids, and triple intrathecal therapy. Patients >55 years old received a reduced regimen. Rituximab was given before each cycle and twice as maintenance, for a total of 8 doses. The rate of complete remission was 88% (319/363); overall survival (OS) at 5 years, 80%; and progression-free survival, 71%; with significant difference between adolescents, adults, and elderly patients (OS rate of 90%, 84%, and 62%, respectively). Full treatment could be applied in 86% of the patients. The most important prognostic factors were International Prognostic Index (IPI) score (0-2 vs 3-5; P = .0005), age-adjusted IPI score (0-1 vs 2-3; P = .0001), and gender (male vs female; P = .004). The high cure rate in this prospective trial with a substantial number of participating hospitals demonstrates the efficacy and feasibility of chemoimmunotherapy, even in elderly patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00199082. PMID:25359988

  1. Long-Term Neurotoxicity of Chemotherapy in Adolescents and Young Adults Treated for Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Sean; Latoufis, Christos; Eagle, Karen; Ash, Catherine M.; Fowler, Clare; Souhami, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To study the long-term neurotoxicity of chemotherapy in adolescents and young adults treated for bone and soft tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods. Thirty-six adolescents and young adults (median age 17 years) were examined following chemotherapy for bone and soft tissue sarcomas. Twenty-nine (29/36) had received cisplatin (median 400 mg/m2), 15/36 ifosfamide (median 20 g/m2), and 12/36 vincristine (median 16 mg). Neurotoxicity was assessed at a median of 8 months (range, 1–54 months) after completion of chemotherapy by clinical examination, nerve conduction studies, audiograms and autonomic function tests. The same nerve conduction studies were carried out in 20 normal volunteers to define normal ranges in this age group. Results. Sixteen patients (44%) had a significant reduction in deep tendon reflexes, and this clinical parameter correlated well with abnormalities detected in nerve conduction studies. Vibration perception threshold (VPT) was raised in 20/36 patients (55%) and this was the most sensitive single test in the assessment of neuropathy. There was a significant correlation between VPT and cumulative cisplatin dose received in mg/m-2 (r=0.607, p<0.01). Ten of 29 patients (35%) had abnormal nerve conduction studies with a pattern characteristic of sensory axonal neuropathy. No patient complained of auditory symptoms, but minor high tone hearing loss was detected by audiograms in 5/28 patients who had received cisplatin. No patients had symptoms of autonomic neuropathy, but autonomic function tests showed minor abnormalities in 4/22 patients tested, and all had received cisplatin. Conclusions. This study demonstrates significant, although asymptomatic, long-term neurotoxicity of cisplatin in adolescents and young adults receiving chemotherapy for bone and soft tissue sarcomas. Follow-up studies are planned to assess whether these neurological deficits improve with time. PMID:18521240

  2. Effects of interleukin-3 following chemotherapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. A prospective, controlled phase I/II study.

    PubMed

    Hovgaard, D J; Nissen, N I

    1995-02-01

    The effect of rhIL-3 was investigated in 32 patients with newly diagnosed non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a phase I/II trial. All patients received 6 cycles of standard CHOP chemotherapy, and each patient was his own control where rhIL-3 was given as a daily s.c. injection for 14 days (day 2-15) in cycle 2 and 4, while cycle 1 and 3 were control cycles. Five dose levels were examined (0.5 - 1 - 5 - 7.5 - 10 micrograms/kg). Compared to the other more lineage-specific hemopoietic growth factors G- and GM-CSF, the effect of rhIL-3 on the hemopoiesis was less dramatic and more delayed, i.e. the most apparent effect was observed in the 2 weeks of treatment. Thus, the neutrophil counts from days 15 to 22 following CHOP were significantly raised and the duration of neutropenia was shorter (significantly only at 10 micrograms/kg), while the nadir values were unaffected. Platelet recovery from days 12-22 was significantly increased and nadir values occurred earlier compared to control cycles, but were only increased in some subsets. Other cell populations affected moderately in the recovery period were eosinophils and monocytes. Reticulocytes increased, but no effect on hemoglobin or RBC transfusion requirement was noted. Only moderate adverse reactions occurred such as fever, chills, flushing of the face and flu-like symptoms. There was no evidence of stimulation of tumor growth. Most significant, the rhIL-3 treatment at all but the lowest dose levels led to an improved tolerance to chemotherapy, as indicated by a decline in number of delayed cycles. A conclusion concerning the role of rhIL-3 as post-chemotherapy adjuvant should await studies using rhIL-3 in combination with more lineage-restricted hemopoietic growth factors.

  3. [Clinical Response of Metastatic Colon Cancer to Chemotherapy with S-1 and Oxaliplatin - A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Tomonori; Yata, Yoshihiro; Yonenaga, Yoshikuni; Hanaki, Kouji; Mise, Masahiro; Higaside, Shunichi; Kanda, Yuuji; Noda, Hideki

    2015-06-01

    Chemotherapy with S-1 and oxaliplatin is a new treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer. We present the first case of S-1, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab therapy in our hospital. The patient was a 69-year-old woman with ascending colon cancer and multiple lung and liver metastases. She tended to suffer from constipation; stenoses at the cecum and colon cancer were detected by colon fiberscopy. Following surgical resection of the primary tumor, the patient received systemic chemotherapy with S-1, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab. Following chemotherapy, CT showed no cancer in the lung and cancer reduction in the liver or dissemination. The patient had diarrhea and no appetite at first, so we reduced the oxaliplatin dose by 80%. After reduction of the oxaliplatin dose, we could treat the patient with S-1 and oxaliplatin continuously with no toxicity. S-1 and oxaliplatin chemotherapy is cost-effective, and has less toxicity than other chemotherapies, if proper measures are taken. It seemed to have a non-inferior response rate and disease control compared to other chemotherapies, such as FOLFOX. Thus, this chemotherapy is a valid choice for metastatic colorectal cancer.

  4. Review of hematological indices of cancer patients receiving combined chemotherapy & radiotherapy or receiving radiotherapy alone.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Saman

    2016-09-01

    We observed the outcomes of chemotherapy with radiotherapy (CR) or radiotherapy (RT) alone for cancer patients of larynx, breast, blood and brain origins through complete blood count (CBC). Following were more depressed in CR patients: mean corpuscular hemoglobin-MCH & lymphocytes-LYM, hematocrit, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration-MCHC, hemoglobin-HB and red blood cells-RBC. In RT patients, following were more depressed: LYM, MCH and MCHC. Overall, in all cancer patients, the lymphocytes were depressed 52%. There existed a significant difference between white blood cells and RBC in both CR and RT patients. A significant moderate negative correlation is found in HB with the dose range 30-78 (Gray) given to the CR cancer patients. More number of CBC parameters affected in patients treated with CR and RT; but in less percentage as compared to patients who treated with RT alone. The cancer patients suffered from anemia along with immune modulations from the treatments. PMID:27423975

  5. Comparison of outcomes in mixed phenotype acute leukemia patients treated with chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation versus chemotherapy alone.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hong; Xu, Yang; Liu, Liming; Yan, Lingzhi; Jin, Zhengming; Tang, Xiaowen; Han, Yue; Fu, Zhengzheng; Qiu, Huiying; Sun, Aining; Wu, Depei

    2016-06-01

    The optimal treatment approach for mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) remains unknown, and prognostic factors for treatment outcomes need to be identified. In this study, 66 patients diagnosed with MPAL according to criteria published by the WHO in 2008 were retrospectively assessed to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment and identify predictive variables. Five patients died of severe infection after the first induction chemotherapy, 29 received alloHSCT after induction (HSCT group), and 32 received only chemotherapy (chemotherapy group). The 3-year OS and DFS estimates for the entire cohort were 45% and 38%, respectively, and the 3-year OS differed significantly between the HSCT and chemotherapy-only groups (77% versus 16%). Using multivariate analyses, we identified disease burden as a prognostic factor for transplantation outcome, with the 3-year OS being 80% among patients who achieved remission and only 45% among patients in cases of nonremission. Our results indicate that alloHSCT after chemotherapy offers a survival advantage compared with chemotherapy only, and patients in remission before transplantation may experience a better outcome. PMID:27088964

  6. An Immune-Modulating Diet in Combination with Chemotherapy Prevents Cancer Cachexia by Attenuating Systemic Inflammation in Colon 26 Tumor-Bearing Mice.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kentaro; Sasayama, Akina; Takahashi, Takeshi; Yamaji, Taketo

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is characterized by muscle wasting caused partly by systemic inflammation. We previously demonstrated an immune-modulating diet (IMD), an enteral diet enriched with immunonutrition and whey-hydrolyzed peptides, to have antiinflammatory effects in some experimental models. Here, we investigated whether the IMD in combination with chemotherapy could prevent cancer cachexia in colon 26 tumor-bearing mice. Forty tumor-bearing mice were randomized into 5 groups: tumor-bearing control (TB), low dose 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and standard diet (LF/ST), low dose 5-FU and IMD (LF/IMD), high dose 5-FU and standard diet (HF/ST) and high dose 5-FU and IMD (HF/IMD). The ST and IMD mice received a standard diet or the IMD ad libitum for 21 days. Muscle mass in the IMD mice was significantly higher than that in the ST mice. The LF/IMD in addition to the HF/ST and HF/IMD mice preserved their body and carcass weights. Plasma prostaglandin E2 levels were significantly lower in the IMD mice than in the ST mice. A combined effect was also observed in plasma interleukin-6, glucose, and vascular endothelial growth factor levels. Tumor weight was not affected by different diets. In conclusion, the IMD in combination with chemotherapy prevented cancer cachexia without suppressing chemotherapeutic efficacy.

  7. Abnormal Myocardial Strain Indices in Children Receiving Anthracycline Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, Ricardo H; Ghazi, Payam; Reddy, S Chandra-Bose; Thompson, Patrick; Cui, Qiqiong; Castro, Jacqueline; Okcu, Mehmet F; Jefferies, John Lynn

    2015-12-01

    Anthracycline chemotherapy (AC) is associated with impaired left ventricular (LV) systolic function. LV ejection fraction (EF %) obtained by two-dimensional echocardiography is the current gold standard for detection and monitoring of LV systolic function. However, dependence on LVEF has been shown to be unreliable due to its inherent limitations. Speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) measures myocardial strain and is a sensitive method to detect LV systolic dysfunction with demonstrated utility in such detection in adult and pediatric cohort studies. Compare myocardial strain indices derived by STE with LVEF to detect ACT-induced LV systolic dysfunction. Prospective, cross-sectional measurements of LV myocardial strain indices derived from STE with LVEF. Pediatric cohort of 25 patients (pts): 17 females, eight males with a mean age 9.8 ± 5.8 years, who received anthracyclines (AC); median cumulative dose ≥150 ± 124.4 mg/m(2), range 60-450 mg/m(2) showing normal LV end-diastolic diameter (mm) and normal LVEF (≥55 %) underwent STE to obtain LV myocardial strain indices: strain and strain rate. The inter- and intraobserver variability for the strain indices was 5 %. Fifteen of 25 pts (60 %) showed abnormal global longitudinal peak systolic strain (GLPSS) and 19/25 pts (76 %) showed abnormal peak circumferential strain (PCS) compared to age-matched controls (p = 0.005). In contrast, no significant differences was observed in either indices with the dose of AC. Likewise, no significant changes in the systolic or diastolic strain rate were noted with the dose of AC (r (2) = 0.0076 for peak E, r (2) = 0.072 for peak A, p = NS). GLPSS and PCS were diminished and, however, correlated poorly with the cumulative dose of AC. These observations indicate an early onset of LV systolic dysfunction by the strain indices in pts who continue to show a normal LVEF implying presence of occult LV systolic dysfunction. These novel strain indices may assist in

  8. Long term outcomes in patients with intracranial germinomas: a single institution experience of irradiation with or without chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Jun A; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Shirahata, Mitsuaki; Hashimoto, Nobuo

    2008-06-01

    Complete remission can be achieved soon after irradiation in patients with intracranial germinoma. This study aimed to analyze the follow-up outcome of intracranial germinoma patients. About 39 intracranial germinoma patients (29 males and 10 females; average age, 15 years; range, 7-27 years) treated at Kyoto University Hospital from 1978 to 2004 were included in the study group. Six patients had multifocal disease at initial diagnosis, and 10 had human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG)-producing tumors. Thirteen patients were treated with craniospinal axis irradiation, 6 with whole-brain irradiation, 17 with whole-ventricle irradiation, and 3 with local field irradiation. Since 1997, 15 patients were treated with reduced-dose whole-ventricle irradiation (median, 23.4 Gy; range, 20.4-27 Gy) followed by a local boost (median, 40.8 Gy; range, 36-54 Gy) combined with chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 94 months (18 months to 25 years). The 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates of the entire group were 97 and 90%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates of the entire group were 91 and 87%, respectively. The 8-year OS and PFS in 15 patients treated by whole-ventricle irradiation combined with chemotherapy were 100% and 92%, respectively. Four patients had recurrences within a median period of 59.5 months (51-85 months). All relapses occurred outside the radiation fields. Tumor site, tumor size, HCG production, multifocal disease and radiation dose to the primary site or whole ventricle did not significantly affect PFS. All initial recurrences of intracranial germinoma occurred at the distant site out of the radiation field. Our data suggested that reduced doses to the whole ventricle, combined with chemotherapy, should be sufficiently effective in patients with intracranial germinoma.

  9. Bone Marrow Recovery and Subsequent Chemotherapy Following Radiolabeled Anti-Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Monoclonal Antibody J591 in Men with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tagawa, Scott T.; Akhtar, Naveed H.; Nikolopoulou, Anastasia; Kaur, Gurveen; Robinson, Brian; Kahn, Renee; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Nanus, David M.; Bander, Neil H.

    2013-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has demonstrated efficacy with acceptable toxicity leading to approval in non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, but has been slower to develop for the treatment of advanced solid tumors. Prostate cancer (PC) represents a good candidate for RIT based upon high exposure to circulating antibodies at common disease sites with a specific, highly expressed cell-surface antigen of prostate-specific membrane antigen. Four phase I and II trials utilizing 177Lu- or 90Y-J591 have been reported. Long-term toxicity and chemotherapy administration was analyzed. As expected, the only serious toxicity observed was myelosuppression. Grade 4 thrombocytopenia occurred in 33.3% without significant hemorrhage and grade 4 neutropenia occurred in 17.3% with 0.07% febrile neutropenia. Nearly all subjects (97.3%) recovered to grade 0 or 1 platelets and all had complete neutrophil recovery. The majority (81.3%) received chemotherapy at any time, with 61.3% receiving chemotherapy following RIT. Ten subjects underwent bone marrow biopsies at some point in their disease course following RIT for low counts; all had diffuse PC infiltration without evidence of myelodysplasia or leukemia. As expected, myelosuppression occurs following therapeutic doses of RIT for men with metastatic castration-resistant PC. However, toxicity is predictable and self-limited, with the majority of patients who do not refuse able to receive cytotoxic chemotherapy following RIT. PMID:23986881

  10. Bone marrow recovery and subsequent chemotherapy following radiolabeled anti-prostate-specific membrane antigen monoclonal antibody j591 in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Scott T; Akhtar, Naveed H; Nikolopoulou, Anastasia; Kaur, Gurveen; Robinson, Brian; Kahn, Renee; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Goldsmith, Stanley J; Nanus, David M; Bander, Neil H

    2013-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has demonstrated efficacy with acceptable toxicity leading to approval in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, but has been slower to develop for the treatment of advanced solid tumors. Prostate cancer (PC) represents a good candidate for RIT based upon high exposure to circulating antibodies at common disease sites with a specific, highly expressed cell-surface antigen of prostate-specific membrane antigen. Four phase I and II trials utilizing (177)Lu- or (90)Y-J591 have been reported. Long-term toxicity and chemotherapy administration was analyzed. As expected, the only serious toxicity observed was myelosuppression. Grade 4 thrombocytopenia occurred in 33.3% without significant hemorrhage and grade 4 neutropenia occurred in 17.3% with 0.07% febrile neutropenia. Nearly all subjects (97.3%) recovered to grade 0 or 1 platelets and all had complete neutrophil recovery. The majority (81.3%) received chemotherapy at any time, with 61.3% receiving chemotherapy following RIT. Ten subjects underwent bone marrow biopsies at some point in their disease course following RIT for low counts; all had diffuse PC infiltration without evidence of myelodysplasia or leukemia. As expected, myelosuppression occurs following therapeutic doses of RIT for men with metastatic castration-resistant PC. However, toxicity is predictable and self-limited, with the majority of patients who do not refuse able to receive cytotoxic chemotherapy following RIT.

  11. miR-638 is a new biomarker for outcome prediction of non-small cell lung cancer patients receiving chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fang; Lou, Jian-fang; Cao, Yan; Shi, Xin-hui; Wang, Peng; Xu, Jian; Xie, Er-fu; Xu, Ting; Sun, Rui-hong; Rao, Jian-yu; Huang, Pu-wen; Pan, Shi-yang; Wang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding RNAs, mediate gene expression by either cleaving target mRNAs or inhibiting their translation. They have key roles in the tumorigenesis of several cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of miR-638 in the evaluation of NSCLC patient prognosis in response to chemotherapy. First, we detected miR-638 expression levels in vitro in the culture supernatants of the NSCLC cell line SPC-A1 treated with cisplatin, as well as the apoptosis rates of SPC-A1. Second, serum miR-638 expression levels were detected in vivo by using nude mice xenograft models bearing SPC-A1 with and without cisplatin treatment. In the clinic, the serum miR-638 levels of 200 cases of NSCLC patients before and after chemotherapy were determined by quantitative real-time PCR, and the associations of clinicopathological features with miR-638 expression patterns after chemotherapy were analyzed. Our data helped in demonstrating that cisplatin induced apoptosis of the SPC-A1 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner accompanied by increased miR-638 expression levels in the culture supernatants. In vivo data further revealed that cisplatin induced miR-638 upregulation in the serum derived from mice xenograft models, and in NSCLC patient sera, miR-638 expression patterns after chemotherapy significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis. Moreover, survival analyses revealed that patients who had increased miR-638 levels after chemotherapy showed significantly longer survival time than those who had decreased miR-638 levels. Our findings suggest that serum miR-638 levels are associated with the survival of NSCLC patients and may be considered a potential independent predictor for NSCLC prognosis. PMID:25952770

  12. miR-638 is a new biomarker for outcome prediction of non-small cell lung cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Lou, Jian-fang; Cao, Yan; Shi, Xin-hui; Wang, Peng; Xu, Jian; Xie, Er-fu; Xu, Ting; Sun, Rui-hong; Rao, Jian-yu; Huang, Pu-wen; Pan, Shi-yang; Wang, Hong

    2015-05-08

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding RNAs, mediate gene expression by either cleaving target mRNAs or inhibiting their translation. They have key roles in the tumorigenesis of several cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of miR-638 in the evaluation of NSCLC patient prognosis in response to chemotherapy. First, we detected miR-638 expression levels in vitro in the culture supernatants of the NSCLC cell line SPC-A1 treated with cisplatin, as well as the apoptosis rates of SPC-A1. Second, serum miR-638 expression levels were detected in vivo by using nude mice xenograft models bearing SPC-A1 with and without cisplatin treatment. In the clinic, the serum miR-638 levels of 200 cases of NSCLC patients before and after chemotherapy were determined by quantitative real-time PCR, and the associations of clinicopathological features with miR-638 expression patterns after chemotherapy were analyzed. Our data helped in demonstrating that cisplatin induced apoptosis of the SPC-A1 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner accompanied by increased miR-638 expression levels in the culture supernatants. In vivo data further revealed that cisplatin induced miR-638 upregulation in the serum derived from mice xenograft models, and in NSCLC patient sera, miR-638 expression patterns after chemotherapy significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis. Moreover, survival analyses revealed that patients who had increased miR-638 levels after chemotherapy showed significantly longer survival time than those who had decreased miR-638 levels. Our findings suggest that serum miR-638 levels are associated with the survival of NSCLC patients and may be considered a potential independent predictor for NSCLC prognosis.

  13. Ginger as a miracle against chemotherapy-induced vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Yekta, Zohreh Parsa; Ebrahimi, Seyyed Meisam; Hosseini, Mostafa; Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht; Sedighi, Sanambar; Surmaghi, Mohammad-Hosein Salehi; Madani, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Background: Vomiting is one of the most prevalent side effects of chemotherapy in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ginger plant on chemotherapy-induced vomiting, since the previous studies were somehow imperfect and have provided controversial results. Materials and Methods: This randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted on 80 women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy and suffering from vomiting in Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran, Iran, between July and December 2009. During a convenience sampling the participants were randomly allocated into treatment and placebo groups after taking a written informed consent. Two groups were matched based on the age and emetic risk of chemotherapy drugs. The treatment group received 250 mg ginger powder capsules (Zintoma) and placebo group 250 mg starch capsules 4 times a day (1 g/day) for 6 days since 3 days before chemotherapy session. A two-part self-made questionnaire was used to assess the effect of ginger. Patients completed the instrument every day. Then by STATA software version 8, the gathered data were analyzed using Fisher’s exact, Kruskal-Wallis, and Chi-square tests. Results: The 2 groups had no significant age differences and were matched (ginger: 41.8±8.4 vs placebo: 45.1±10, P = 0.1). Vomiting cases were significantly lower in ginger group at anticipatory (P = 0.04), acute (P = 0.04), and delayed (P = 0.003) phases. Also, heartburn was the only and venial reported side effect (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Taking ginger capsules (for 6 days since 3 days before chemotherapy) accompanied by the routine antiemetic treatment could relieve chemotherapy-induced vomiting in all phases. PMID:23853643

  14. Phase II Trial Assessing the Ability of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy With or Without Second-Look Surgery to Eliminate Measurable Disease for Nongerminomatous Germ Cell Tumors: A Children's Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Stewart; Bouffet, Eric; Fisher, Paul G.; Allen, Jeffrey C.; Robertson, Patricia L.; Chuba, Paul J.; Donahue, Bernadine; Kretschmar, Cynthia S.; Zhou, Tianni; Buxton, Allen B.; Pollack, Ian F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This phase II trial evaluated the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy with or without second-look surgery before craniospinal irradiation on response rates and survival outcomes in children with newly diagnosed nongerminomatous germ cell tumors. Patients and Methods Induction chemotherapy consisted of six cycles of carboplatin/etoposide alternating with ifosfamide/etoposide. Patients demonstrating less than complete response after induction chemotherapy were encouraged to undergo second-look surgery. Patients who did not achieve complete response or partial response after chemotherapy with or without second-look surgery proceeded to high-dose chemotherapy with thiotepa and etoposide and autologous peripheral blood stem-cell rescue before craniospinal irradiation. Results The study included 102 patients treated between January 2004 and July 2008. Median age was 12 years, and 76% were male; 53.9% had pineal region masses, and 23.5% had suprasellar lesions. Sixty-nine percent of patients achieved complete response or partial response with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. At 5 years, event-free survival was 84% ± 4% (SE) and overall survival was 93% ± 3%. During the median follow-up of 5.1 years, 16 patients recurred or progressed, with seven deaths after relapse. No deaths were attributed to therapy-related toxicity. Relapse occurred at the site of primary disease in 10 patients, at a distant site in three patients, or both in one patient. In two patients, progression was detected by marker increase alone. Increased serum α-fetoprotein was a negative prognostic variable. Histologic subtype and increase of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin were not significantly correlated with worse outcomes. Conclusion Neoadjuvant chemotherapy with or without second-look surgery achieved high response rates contributing to excellent survival outcomes in children with newly diagnosed nongerminomatous germ cell tumors. This regimen should be included as a backbone for further

  15. Lumbar reservoir for intrathecal chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dyck, P

    1985-06-15

    The Ommaya ventricular reservoir has been the standby of intrathecal chemotherapy for more than a decade, in spite of some specific drawbacks. A general anaesthetic is often required. The scalp must be shaven. Ventricular puncture may not always be easy and keeping the ventricular catheter patent is sometimes difficult. Hence the author has adapted a commercially available lumbar peritoneal shunt system to function as a lumbar intrathecal reservoir. The procedure is simple and can be performed expeditiously under local anaesthesia. To date, eight cases have received intrathecal chemotherapy by this means. PMID:3838918

  16. The cell-adhesion and signaling molecule PECAM-1 is a molecular mediator of resistance to genotoxic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bergom, Carmen; Goel, Reema; Paddock, Cathy; Gao, Cunji; Newman, Debra K; Matsuyama, Shigemi; Newman, Peter J

    2006-12-01

    Defects in the regulation of apoptotic pathways have been implicated in the emergence of cancers resistant to chemotherapy-induced cell death. Identification of novel signaling molecules that influence cell survival has the potential to facilitate the development of new cancer therapies. The cell adhesion and signaling molecule, PECAM-1, is expressed in many hematopoietic and endothelial cell malignancies, and has previously been shown to suppress mitochondrial-dependent, Bax-mediated apoptosis. The ability of PECAM-1 to influence tumor cell survival following exposure to chemotherapeutic agents, however, is not known. Here we show that, when overexpressed in HEK293 and REN mesothelioma cells, PECAM-1 confers resistance to apoptosis induced by the DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agent, etoposide. Surprisingly, PECAM-1-mediated cytoprotection was found to be largely independent of its ability to form a signaling complex with the protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2, as virtually no tyrosine phosphorylation of, or SHP-2 association with, PECAM-1 could be detected after etoposide treatment. Furthermore, PECAM-1 retained its ability to protect against chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in cells with SHP-2 levels significantly reduced using SHP-2-specific siRNA, and in cells in which Erk1/2--a downstream effector of SHP-2--had been inhibited. Finally, to determine whether endogenous PECAM-1 confers resistance to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in lymphoid malignancies and endothelial cells, we used a lentiviral vector to stably express PECAM-1-specific siRNA in the Jurkat leukemia cell line and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). siRNA-expressing Jurkat cells with a 70% reduction of PECAM-1 expression were significantly more sensitive to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. HUVECs with PECAM-1 expression reduced 75% were also markedly more sensitive to chemotherapy-induced cell death. Taken together, these data demonstrate that endogenous PECAM-1 expression on lymphoid

  17. Administration of Concurrent Vaginal Brachytherapy During Chemotherapy for Treatment of Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagar, Himanshu; Boothe, Dustin; Parikh, Amar; Yondorf, Menachem; Parashar, Bhupesh; Gupta, Divya; Holcomb, Kevin; Caputo, Thomas; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Wernicke, A. Gabriella

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the tolerability and toxicity of administering vaginal brachytherapy (VB) concurrently during chemotherapy compared with the sequential approach for patients with endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis of 372 surgically staged patients with endometrial cancer American Joint Committee on Cancer 2009 stages I to IV treated with adjuvant postoperative radiation therapy (RT) at our institution from 2001 to 2012 was conducted. All patients received VB + external beam RT (EBRT) + 6 cycles of adjuvant carboplatin- and paclitaxel-based chemotherapy. The VB mean dose was 15.08 Gy (range, 15-20 Gy), with 3 to 4 weekly applications, and the EBRT mean dose was 45 Gy delivered with 3-dimensional or intensity modulated RT techniques. Hematologic, gastrointestinal (GI), and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were assessed by Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) and compared between sequential and concurrent chemotherapy and VB schedules. Results: Among patients who received RT and adjuvant chemotherapy, 180 of 372 patients (48%) received RT sandwiched between cycles 3 and 4 of chemotherapy. A separate group of 192 patients (52%) were treated with VB during the first 3 cycles of chemotherapy, with a weekly application on nonchemotherapy days, and received the EBRT portion in a sandwiched fashion. Patients treated with VB during chemotherapy had a decreased overall treatment time by 4 weeks (P<.001; 95% confidence interval: 3.99-4.02) and sustained no difference in CTC-graded acute hematologic, GI, or GU toxicities in comparison with the patients treated with VB and chemotherapy in a sequential manner (P>.05). CTC grade 3 or 4 hematologic, GI, and GU toxicities were zero. Conclusions: VB during chemotherapy is well tolerated, decreases overall treatment time, and does not render more toxicity than the sequential regimen.

  18. Transarterial Infusion Chemotherapy Using Cisplatin-Lipiodol Suspension With or Without Embolization for Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Aikata, Hiroshi Takaki, Shintaro; Katamura, Yoshio; Hiramatsu, Akira; Waki, Koji; Takahashi, Shoichi; Hieda, Masashi; Toyota, Naoyuki; Ito, Katsuhide; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2009-07-15

    We evaluate the long-term prognosis and prognostic factors in patients treated with transarterial infusion chemotherapy using cisplatin-lipiodol (CDDP/LPD) suspension with or without embolization for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Study subjects were 107 patients with HCC treated with repeated transarterial infusion chemotherapy alone using CDDP/LPD (adjusted as CDDP 10mg/LPD 1ml). The median number of transarterial infusion procedures was two (range, one to nine), the mean dose of CDDP per transarterial infusion chemotherapy session was 30 mg (range, 5.0-67.5 mg), and the median total dose of transarterial infusion chemotherapy per patient was 60 mg (range, 10-390 mg). Survival rates were 86% at 1 year, 40% at 3 years, 20% at 5 years, and 16% at 7 years. For patients with >90% LPD accumulation after the first transarterial infusion chemotherapy, rates were 98% at 1 year, 60% at 3 years, and 22% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis identified >90% LPD accumulation after the first transarterial infusion chemotherapy (p = 0.001), absence of portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT; p < 0.001), and Child-Pugh class A (p = 0.012) as independent determinants of survival. Anaphylactic shock was observed in two patients, at the fifth transarterial infusion chemotherapy session in one and the ninth in the other. In conclusion, transarterial infusion chemotherapy with CDDP/LPD appears to be a useful treatment option for patients with unresectable HCC without PVTT and in Child-Pugh class A. LPD accumulation after the first transarterial infusion chemotherapy is an important prognostic factor. Careful consideration should be given to the possibility of anaphylactic shock upon repeat infusion with CDDP/LPD.

  19. Chemotherapy in advanced bladder cancer: current status and future

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Bladder cancer occurs in the majority of cases in males. It represents the seventh most common cancer and the ninth most common cause of cancer deaths for men. Transitional cell carcinoma is the most predominant histological type. Bladder cancer is highly chemosensitive. In metastatic setting, chemotherapy based on cisplatin should be considered as standard treatment of choice for patients with good performance status (0-1) and good renal function-glomerular filtration rate (GFR) > 60 mL/min. The standard treatment is based on cisplatin chemotherapy regimens type MVAC, HD-MVAC, gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) or dose dense GC. In unfit patients, carboplatin based regimes; gemcitabine plus carboplatin or methotrexate plus carboplatin plus vinblastine (MCAVI) are reasonable options. The role of targeted therapies when used alone, or in combination with chemotherapy, or in maintenance, was evaluated; targeting angiogenesis seem to be very promising. The purpose of this literature review is to highlight the role of chemotherapy in the management of advanced transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. PMID:21906310

  20. Prevention and management of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting.

    PubMed

    Moradian, Saeed; Howell, Doris

    2015-05-01

    Nausea and vomiting are among the most frequently experienced toxic side-effects associated with chemotherapy. Although nausea and vomiting can result from surgery or radiotherapy, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) is potentially the most severe and most distressing. Estimates regarding the incidence of CINV vary depending on the treatment administered and individual patient characteristics.The impact of CINV on quality of life (QoL) and daily activities is considerable. Pharmacological treatments are considered routine for CINV. Clinical guidelines now recommend that patients receiving moderate emetic chemotherapy (MEC) regimens be preferentially treated with palonosetron, the 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonist, in combination with dexamethasone. In addition, it has shown that single-dose fosaprepitant is equivalent to the standard 3-day aprepitant regimen (the neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor antagonist). Despite these advances in antiemetic management, approximately 50% of patients receiving chemotherapy still experience nausea and/or vomiting. Further improvements are still desirable, particularly in the prevention and treatment of delayed CINV. Non-pharmacological interventions can be possible adjuncts to standard anti-emetic therapy. Using new technologies to collect patient-reported outcomes may improve the accuracy of assessment, provide a better picture of the patient's experience of these symptoms, and provide a means to simultaneously monitor symptoms, educate patients, and collect longitudinal data.

  1. The role of additional chemotherapy with oral UFT in intravenous combination chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil for human gastric cancer xenograft lines of well- and poorly- differentiated adenocarcinomas transplanted in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Tseng, C C; Nio, Y; Tsubono, M; Kawabata, K; Masai, Y; Hayashi, H; Fukumoto, M; Tobe, T

    1992-01-01

    In order to assess the role of maintenance chemotherapy with the oral anticancer agent UFT, a mixture of uracil and futraful, in the intensive intravenous chemotherapy for gastric cancer, nude mice transplanted with human gastric cancer xenografts were treated with intravenous 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin (CDDP), alone or in combination, with or without the oral anticancer agent UFT. UFT was given at its maximal clinical dose of 10 mg/kg of body weight daily for 2 weeks, while 5-FU and/or CDDP was intravenously administered at the dose of 20 mg/kg and 1.8 mg/kg of body weight respectively once a week, alone or in combination, for two weeks. The results revealed that 5-FU or CDDP alone were ineffective for both GC-YN, a well differentiated adenocarcinoma line, and GC-SF, a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma line; however, UFT was effective for GC-SF. In combinations, only the three-agent combination 5-FU + CDDP + UFT (FPU) was effective for GC-YN; however, all the two-agent combinations and FPU were effective for GC-SF. FPU significantly suppressed the growth of GC-YN much more than all the other treatment groups. In contrast, although all combinations as well as UFT alone were effective for GC-SF, there was no significant difference among these effective groups. Moreover, no side effects were noted in combined use of UFT. This study suggests that oral UFT as a maintenance treatment may be beneficial in the combination chemotherapy for human gastric cancer.

  2. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Memory Changes

    MedlinePlus

    ... C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Memory Changes What is causing these changes? Your doctor ... thinking or remembering things Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Memory Changes Get help to remember things. Write down ...

  3. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Swelling (Fluid Retention)

    MedlinePlus

    ... ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Swelling (Fluid retention) “My hands and feet were swollen and ... at one time. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Swelling (Fluid retention) Weigh yourself. l Weigh yourself at the ...

  4. Intra-arterial infusion of radiosensitizer (BUdR) combined with hypofractionated irradiation and chemotherapy for primary treatment of osteogenic sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Goffinet, D.R.; Donaldson, S.S.; Bagshaw, M.A.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1985-01-01

    Combined modality treatment was given in nine patients of osteogenic sarcoma wherein the tumor was unresectable because of location or amputation was refused. This alternative to massive surgery comprised hypofractionated irradiation, intra-arterial infusion of the radiosensitizer 5'-bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) and adjuvant systemic chemotherapy. Local control was achieved in seven of the nine patients. Four survived, all without evidence of disease at 6, 7.1, 8.8, and 10.5 years after completion of irradiation. Pulmonary metastases developed in six patients - of whom one survives, following high-dose pulmonary irradiation and additional chemotherapy. Significant soft-tissue injury occurred in five patients. On the basis of our experience, the authors believe that new approaches using modifications of external beam irradiation with different fractionation schedules or better radiosensitizing compounds may hold promise for patients with non-resectable osteosarcoma.

  5. Low-level laser therapy for the prevention of low salivary flow rate after radiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Gonnelli, Fernanda Aurora Stabile; Palma, Luiz Felipe; Giordani, Adelmo José; Deboni, Aline Lima Silva; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Segreto, Roberto Araújo; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether low-level laser therapy can prevent salivary hypofunction after radiotherapy and chemotherapy in head and neck cancer patients. Materials and Methods We evaluated 23 head and neck cancer patients, of whom 13 received laser therapy and 10 received clinical care only. An InGaAlP laser was used intra-orally (at 660 nm and 40 mW) at a mean dose of 10.0 J/cm2 and extra-orally (at 780 nm and 15 mW) at a mean dose of 3.7 J/cm2, three times per week, on alternate days. Stimulated and unstimulated sialometry tests were performed before the first radiotherapy and chemotherapy sessions (N0) and at 30 days after the end of treatment (N30). Results At N30, the mean salivary flow rates were significantly higher among the laser therapy patients than among the patients who received clinical care only, in the stimulated and unstimulated sialometry tests (p = 0.0131 and p = 0.0143, respectively). Conclusion Low-level laser therapy, administered concomitantly with radiotherapy and chemotherapy, appears to mitigate treatment-induced salivary hypofunction in patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:27141130

  6. Significant decline in pneumonia admission rate after the introduction of routine 2+1 dose schedule heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in children under 5 years of age in Kielce, Poland.

    PubMed

    Patrzałek, M; Albrecht, P; Sobczynski, M

    2010-07-01

    This study was performed to estimate the effect of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) on the pneumonia admission rate in children younger than 5 years of age, after the introduction of routine 2+1 dose schedule immunization. We compared the pneumonia admission rate (number of cases per 1,000 population) 2 years before and 2 years after the introduction of PCV7 in 2006. Only children with radiologically confirmed pneumonia were analyzed. The vaccination rate in the analyzed periods was around 99%. In the period preceding the implementation of PCV7, the average pneumonia admission rate was 41.48/1,000 and 6.15/1,000 for 1-year-old and 2-4-year-old children, respectively. Statistical analysis showed a significant fall in this rate in two consecutive years after PCV7 implementation (p < 0.0000001 for 1-year-old and p = 0.011 for 2-4-year-old children, respectively). In the first year of vaccination, the admission number decreased in these two groups by about 65 and 23%, respectively. In the second year, only a few percent fall in the admission rate was noted. In children younger than 2 years of age, the age group targeted for vaccination, pneumonia-related healthcare utilization declined substantially following PCV7 introduction. These results suggest that PCV7 may play an important role in reducing the burden of pneumonia in Poland.

  7. Chemotherapy of human african trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Cyrus J