Science.gov

Sample records for dose evaluation program

  1. LUDEP: A Lung Dose Evaluation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Birchall, A.; Bailey, M.R. ); James, A.C. )

    1990-06-01

    A Task Group of the ICRP is currently reviewing its dosimetric model for the respiratory tract with the aim of producing a more comprehensive and realistic model which can be used both for dosimetry and bioassay purposes. This in turn requires deposition, clearance, and dosimetry to be treated in a more detailed manner in than in the current model. In order to examine the practical application and radiological implications of the proposed model, a microcomputer program has been developed in a modular form so that changes can be easily included as the model develops. LUDEP (Lung Dose Evaluation Program) is a user-friendly menu-driven program which can be operated on any IBM-compatible PC. It enables the user to calculate (a) doses to each region of the respiratory tract and all other body organs, and (b) excretion rates and retention curves for bioassay purposes. 11 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Evaluation of High Performance Converters Under Low Dose Rate Total Ionizing Dose (TID) Testing for NASA Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Ashok K.; Sahu, Kusum

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the results of low dose rate (0.01-0.18 rads(Si)/sec) total ionizing dose (TID) tests performed on several types of high performance converters. The parts used in this evaluation represented devices such as a high speed flash converter, a 16-bit ADC and a voltage-to-frequency converter.

  3. Validating Dose Uncertainty Estimates Produced by AUTODIRECT: An Automated Program to Evaluate Deformable Image Registration Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hojin; Chen, Josephine; Phillips, Justin; Pukala, Jason; Yom, Sue S; Kirby, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Deformable image registration is a powerful tool for mapping information, such as radiation therapy dose calculations, from one computed tomography image to another. However, deformable image registration is susceptible to mapping errors. Recently, an automated deformable image registration evaluation of confidence tool was proposed to predict voxel-specific deformable image registration dose mapping errors on a patient-by-patient basis. The purpose of this work is to conduct an extensive analysis of automated deformable image registration evaluation of confidence tool to show its effectiveness in estimating dose mapping errors. The proposed format of automated deformable image registration evaluation of confidence tool utilizes 4 simulated patient deformations (3 B-spline-based deformations and 1 rigid transformation) to predict the uncertainty in a deformable image registration algorithm's performance. This workflow is validated for 2 DIR algorithms (B-spline multipass from Velocity and Plastimatch) with 1 physical and 11 virtual phantoms, which have known ground-truth deformations, and with 3 pairs of real patient lung images, which have several hundred identified landmarks. The true dose mapping error distributions closely followed the Student t distributions predicted by automated deformable image registration evaluation of confidence tool for the validation tests: on average, the automated deformable image registration evaluation of confidence tool-produced confidence levels of 50%, 68%, and 95% contained 48.8%, 66.3%, and 93.8% and 50.1%, 67.6%, and 93.8% of the actual errors from Velocity and Plastimatch, respectively. Despite the sparsity of landmark points, the observed error distribution from the 3 lung patient data sets also followed the expected error distribution. The dose error distributions from automated deformable image registration evaluation of confidence tool also demonstrate good resemblance to the true dose error distributions. Automated

  4. Development of a patient-specific 3D dose evaluation program for QA in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Suk; Chang, Kyung Hwan; Cao, Yuan Jie; Shim, Jang Bo; Yang, Dae Sik; Park, Young Je; Yoon, Won Sup; Kim, Chul Yong

    2015-03-01

    We present preliminary results for a 3-dimensional dose evaluation software system ( P DRESS, patient-specific 3-dimensional dose real evaluation system). Scanned computed tomography (CT) images obtained by using dosimetry were transferred to the radiation treatment planning system (ECLIPSE, VARIAN, Palo Alto, CA) where the intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) nasopharynx plan was designed. We used a 10 MV photon beam (CLiX, VARIAN, Palo Alto, CA) to deliver the nasopharynx treatment plan. After irradiation, the TENOMAG dosimeter was scanned using a VISTA ™ scanner. The scanned data were reconstructed using VistaRecon software to obtain a 3D dose distribution of the optical density. An optical-CT scanner was used to readout the dose distribution in the gel dosimeter. Moreover, we developed the P DRESS by using Flatform, which were developed by our group, to display the 3D dose distribution by loading the DICOM RT data which are exported from the radiotherapy treatment plan (RTP) and the optical-CT reconstructed VFF file, into the independent P DRESS with an ioniz ation chamber and EBT film was used to compare the dose distribution calculated from the RTP with that measured by using a gel dosimeter. The agreement between the normalized EBT, the gel dosimeter and RTP data was evaluated using both qualitative and quantitative methods, such as the isodose distribution, dose difference, point value, and profile. The profiles showed good agreement between the RTP data and the gel dosimeter data, and the precision of the dose distribution was within ±3%. The results from this study showed significantly discrepancies between the dose distribution calculated from the treatment plan and the dose distribution measured by a TENOMAG gel and by scanning with an optical CT scanner. The 3D dose evaluation software system ( P DRESS, patient specific dose real evaluation system), which were developed in this study evaluates the accuracies of the three-dimensional dose

  5. Standardized radiological dose evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, V.L.; Stahlnecker, E.

    1996-05-01

    Following the end of the Cold War, the mission of Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site changed from production of nuclear weapons to cleanup. Authorization baseis documents for the facilities, primarily the Final Safety Analysis Reports, are being replaced with new ones in which accident scenarios are sorted into coarse bins of consequence and frequency, similar to the approach of DOE-STD-3011-94. Because this binning does not require high precision, a standardized approach for radiological dose evaluations is taken for all the facilities at the site. This is done through a standard calculation ``template`` for use by all safety analysts preparing the new documents. This report describes this template and its use.

  6. SU-E-T-86: Comparison of Two Commercially Available Programs for the Evaluation of Delivered Daily Dose Using Cone Beam CT (CBCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Tuohy, R; Bosse, C; Mavroidis, P; Shi, Z; Crownover, R; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this study, two commercially available programs were compared for the evaluation of delivered daily dose using cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods: Thirty (n=30) patients previously treated in our clinic (10 prostate, 10 SBRT lung and 10 abdomen) were used in this study. The patients' plans were optimized and calculated using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. The daily CBCT scans were imported into Velocity and RayStation along with the corresponding planning CTs, structure sets and 3D dose distributions for each patient. The organs at risk (OAR) were contoured on each CBCT by the prescribing physician and were included in the evaluation of the daily delivered dose. Each CBCT was registered to the planning CT, once with rigid registration and then again, separately, with deformable registration. After registering each CBCT, the dose distribution from the planning CT was overlaid and the dose volume histograms (DVH) for the OAR and the planning target volumes (PTV) were calculated. Results: For prostate patients, we observed daily volume changes for the OARs. The DVH analysis for those patients showed variation in the sparing of the OARs while PTV coverage remained virtually unchanged using both Velocity and RayStation systems. Similar results were observed for abdominal patients. In contrast, for SBRT lung patients, the DVH for the OARs and target were comparable to those from the initial treatment plan. Differences in organ volume and organ doses were also observed when comparing the daily fractions using deformable and rigid registrations. Conclusion: By using daily CBCT dose reconstruction, we proved PTV coverage for prostate and abdominal targets is adequate. However, there is significant dosimetric change for the OARs. For lung SBRT patients, the delivered daily dose for both PTV and OAR is comparable to the planned dose with no significant differences.

  7. A dose error evaluation study for 4D dose calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milz, Stefan; Wilkens, Jan J.; Ullrich, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that respiration induced motion is not negligible for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy. The intrafractional breathing induced motion influences the delivered dose distribution on the underlying patient geometry such as the lung or the abdomen. If a static geometry is used, a planning process for these indications does not represent the entire dynamic process. The quality of a full 4D dose calculation approach depends on the dose coordinate transformation process between deformable geometries. This article provides an evaluation study that introduces an advanced method to verify the quality of numerical dose transformation generated by four different algorithms. The used transformation metric value is based on the deviation of the dose mass histogram (DMH) and the mean dose throughout dose transformation. The study compares the results of four algorithms. In general, two elementary approaches are used: dose mapping and energy transformation. Dose interpolation (DIM) and an advanced concept, so called divergent dose mapping model (dDMM), are used for dose mapping. The algorithms are compared to the basic energy transformation model (bETM) and the energy mass congruent mapping (EMCM). For evaluation 900 small sample regions of interest (ROI) are generated inside an exemplary lung geometry (4DCT). A homogeneous fluence distribution is assumed for dose calculation inside the ROIs. The dose transformations are performed with the four different algorithms. The study investigates the DMH-metric and the mean dose metric for different scenarios (voxel sizes: 8 mm, 4 mm, 2 mm, 1 mm 9 different breathing phases). dDMM achieves the best transformation accuracy in all measured test cases with 3-5% lower errors than the other models. The results of dDMM are reasonable and most efficient in this study, although the model is simple and easy to implement. The EMCM model also achieved suitable results, but the approach requires a more complex

  8. UNIT CURIE DOSE EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Hang, P

    2008-04-14

    The development of radiological consequence lookup tables for postulated releases of radionuclides commonly used at Savannah River Site (SRS) and other Department of Energy (DOE) facilities requires the use of the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS)/MACCS2. MACCS2 users input site-specific data: such as stack or ground release, building wake effects, boundary distance from release source, and site-specific meteorological data. MACCS2 also allows the input of more general data such as plume rise and wet and/or dry deposition. The acceptance of such inputs gives the MACCS2 program a broad spectrum of uses at participating DOE facilities. The MACCS2 outputs are converted to an excel spreadsheet to facilitate fast and accurate results for various accident scenarios. Consequence lookup tables can be employed to determine the effects of radiological accident scenarios before they occur. The data is then used by DOE facilities to create regulations and controls to prepare for worst-case scenarios.

  9. Superficial dose evaluation of four dose calculation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ying; Yang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Zhen; Qiu, Xiaoping; Lv, Zhiping; Lei, Mingjun; Liu, Gui; Zhang, Zijian; Hu, Yongmei

    2017-08-01

    Accurate superficial dose calculation is of major importance because of the skin toxicity in radiotherapy, especially within the initial 2 mm depth being considered more clinically relevant. The aim of this study is to evaluate superficial dose calculation accuracy of four commonly used algorithms in commercially available treatment planning systems (TPS) by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and film measurements. The superficial dose in a simple geometrical phantom with size of 30 cm×30 cm×30 cm was calculated by PBC (Pencil Beam Convolution), AAA (Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm), AXB (Acuros XB) in Eclipse system and CCC (Collapsed Cone Convolution) in Raystation system under the conditions of source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm and field size (FS) of 10×10 cm2. EGSnrc (BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc) program was performed to simulate the central axis dose distribution of Varian Trilogy accelerator, combined with measurements of superficial dose distribution by an extrapolation method of multilayer radiochromic films, to estimate the dose calculation accuracy of four algorithms in the superficial region which was recommended in detail by the ICRU (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement) and the ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection). In superficial region, good agreement was achieved between MC simulation and film extrapolation method, with the mean differences less than 1%, 2% and 5% for 0°, 30° and 60°, respectively. The relative skin dose errors were 0.84%, 1.88% and 3.90%; the mean dose discrepancies (0°, 30° and 60°) between each of four algorithms and MC simulation were (2.41±1.55%, 3.11±2.40%, and 1.53±1.05%), (3.09±3.00%, 3.10±3.01%, and 3.77±3.59%), (3.16±1.50%, 8.70±2.84%, and 18.20±4.10%) and (14.45±4.66%, 10.74±4.54%, and 3.34±3.26%) for AXB, CCC, AAA and PBC respectively. Monte Carlo simulation verified the feasibility of the superficial dose measurements by multilayer Gafchromic films. And the rank

  10. Dose tracking and dose auditing in a comprehensive computed tomography dose-reduction program.

    PubMed

    Duong, Phuong-Anh; Little, Brent P

    2014-08-01

    Implementation of a comprehensive computed tomography (CT) radiation dose-reduction program is a complex undertaking, requiring an assessment of baseline doses, an understanding of dose-saving techniques, and an ongoing appraisal of results. We describe the role of dose tracking in planning and executing a dose-reduction program and discuss the use of the American College of Radiology CT Dose Index Registry at our institution. We review the basics of dose-related CT scan parameters, the components of the dose report, and the dose-reduction techniques, showing how an understanding of each technique is important in effective auditing of "outlier" doses identified by dose tracking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [PIC Program Evaluation Forms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, N. J.

    These 4 questionnaires are designed to elicit teacher and parent evaluations of the Prescriptive Instruction Center (PIC) program. Included are Teacher Evaluation of Program Effectiveness (14 items), M & M Evaluation of Program Implementation (methods and materials specialists; 11 items), Teacher Evaluation of Program Effectiveness--Case Study…

  12. Experimental evaluation of neutron dose in radiotherapy patients: Which dose?

    SciTech Connect

    Romero-Expósito, M. Domingo, C.; Ortega-Gelabert, O.; Gallego, S.; Sánchez-Doblado, F.

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The evaluation of peripheral dose has become a relevant issue recently, in particular, the contribution of secondary neutrons. However, after the revision of the Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, there has been a lack of experimental procedure for its evaluation. Specifically, the problem comes from the replacement of organ dose equivalent by the organ-equivalent dose, being the latter “immeasurable” by definition. Therefore, dose equivalent has to be still used although it needs the calculation of the radiation quality factor Q, which depends on the unrestricted linear energy transfer, for the specific neutron irradiation conditions. On the other hand, equivalent dose is computed through the radiation weighting factor w{sub R}, which can be easily calculated using the continuous function provided by the recommendations. The aim of the paper is to compare the dose equivalent evaluated following the definition, that is, using Q, with the values obtained by replacing the quality factor with w{sub R}. Methods: Dose equivalents were estimated in selected points inside a phantom. Two types of medical environments were chosen for the irradiations: a photon- and a proton-therapy facility. For the estimation of dose equivalent, a poly-allyl-diglicol-carbonate-based neutron dosimeter was used for neutron fluence measurements and, additionally, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain the energy spectrum of the fluence in each point. Results: The main contribution to dose equivalent comes from neutrons with energy higher than 0.1 MeV, even when they represent the smallest contribution in fluence. For this range of energy, the radiation quality factor and the radiation weighting factor are approximately equal. Then, dose equivalents evaluated using both factors are compatible, with differences below 12%. Conclusions: Quality factor can be replaced by the radiation weighting factor in the evaluation of dose

  13. Experimental evaluation of neutron dose in radiotherapy patients: Which dose?

    PubMed

    Romero-Expósito, M; Domingo, C; Sánchez-Doblado, F; Ortega-Gelabert, O; Gallego, S

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of peripheral dose has become a relevant issue recently, in particular, the contribution of secondary neutrons. However, after the revision of the Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, there has been a lack of experimental procedure for its evaluation. Specifically, the problem comes from the replacement of organ dose equivalent by the organ-equivalent dose, being the latter "immeasurable" by definition. Therefore, dose equivalent has to be still used although it needs the calculation of the radiation quality factor Q, which depends on the unrestricted linear energy transfer, for the specific neutron irradiation conditions. On the other hand, equivalent dose is computed through the radiation weighting factor wR, which can be easily calculated using the continuous function provided by the recommendations. The aim of the paper is to compare the dose equivalent evaluated following the definition, that is, using Q, with the values obtained by replacing the quality factor with wR. Dose equivalents were estimated in selected points inside a phantom. Two types of medical environments were chosen for the irradiations: a photon- and a proton-therapy facility. For the estimation of dose equivalent, a poly-allyl-diglicol-carbonate-based neutron dosimeter was used for neutron fluence measurements and, additionally, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain the energy spectrum of the fluence in each point. The main contribution to dose equivalent comes from neutrons with energy higher than 0.1 MeV, even when they represent the smallest contribution in fluence. For this range of energy, the radiation quality factor and the radiation weighting factor are approximately equal. Then, dose equivalents evaluated using both factors are compatible, with differences below 12%. Quality factor can be replaced by the radiation weighting factor in the evaluation of dose equivalent in radiotherapy environments simplifying the

  14. Beyond the Dose-Limiting Toxicity Period: Dermatologic Adverse Events of Patients on Phase 1 Trials of the Cancer Therapeutics Evaluation Program

    PubMed Central

    Drilon, Alexander; Eaton, Anne A.; Schindler, Katja; Gounder, Mrinal M.; Spriggs, David R.; Harris, Pamela; Ivy, S. Percy; Iasonos, Alexia; Lacouture, Mario E.; Hyman, David M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Dermatologic adverse events (AEs) can be key determinants of overall drug tolerability and of the maximum tolerated and recommended phase 2 doses in phase 1 trials. The authors present the largest dedicated analysis of dermatologic AEs on phase 1 trials to date. METHODS Data from a prospectively maintained database of patients with solid tumors who were enrolled onto Cancer Therapeutics Evaluation Program (CTEP)-sponsored phase 1 trials of cytotoxic or molecularly targeted agents (MTAs) from 2000 to 2010 were analyzed. Cumulative incidence, site, and type of drug-related dermatologic AEs were described and compared. The timing of worst drug-related dermatologic AEs was summarized. RESULTS In total, 3517 patients with solid tumors and 6165 unique, drug-related dermatologic AEs were analyzed, including 1545 patients on MTA-only trials, 671 on cytotoxic-only trials, and 1392 on combination MTA and cytotoxic trials. Of 1270 patients who had drug-related dermatologic events, the timing of the worst AE was as follows: 743 (cycle 1), 303 (cycle 2), and 224 (cycle 3 or later). Although the cumulative incidence of grade ≥3 drug-related AEs increased to 2.4% by cycle 6, it was only 1.6% at the end of cycle 1. The cumulative incidence of drug-related AEs was highest in patients who received MTA-only therapy (P <.001) and differed by dose level (P <.001). In patients who received MTA-only therapy, drug-related AEs were most common for combination kinase inhibitor-containing therapy (P <.001). CONCLUSIONS A substantial proportion of drug-related dermatologic AEs occur after the traditional dose-limiting toxicity monitoring period of phase 1 clinical trials. Future designs should account for late toxicities. PMID:26916138

  15. Beyond the dose-limiting toxicity period: Dermatologic adverse events of patients on phase 1 trials of the Cancer Therapeutics Evaluation Program.

    PubMed

    Drilon, Alexander; Eaton, Anne A; Schindler, Katja; Gounder, Mrinal M; Spriggs, David R; Harris, Pamela; Ivy, S Percy; Iasonos, Alexia; Lacouture, Mario E; Hyman, David M

    2016-04-15

    Dermatologic adverse events (AEs) can be key determinants of overall drug tolerability and of the maximum tolerated and recommended phase 2 doses in phase 1 trials. The authors present the largest dedicated analysis of dermatologic AEs on phase 1 trials to date. Data from a prospectively maintained database of patients with solid tumors who were enrolled onto Cancer Therapeutics Evaluation Program (CTEP)-sponsored phase 1 trials of cytotoxic or molecularly targeted agents (MTAs) from 2000 to 2010 were analyzed. Cumulative incidence, site, and type of drug-related dermatologic AEs were described and compared. The timing of worst drug-related dermatologic AEs was summarized. In total, 3517 patients with solid tumors and 6165 unique, drug-related dermatologic AEs were analyzed, including 1545 patients on MTA-only trials, 671 on cytotoxic-only trials, and 1392 on combination MTA and cytotoxic trials. Of 1270 patients who had drug-related dermatologic events, the timing of the worst AE was as follows: 743 (cycle 1), 303 (cycle 2), and 224 (cycle 3 or later). Although the cumulative incidence of grade ≥3 drug-related AEs increased to 2.4% by cycle 6, it was only 1.6% at the end of cycle 1. The cumulative incidence of drug-related AEs was highest in patients who received MTA-only therapy (P < .001) and differed by dose level (P < .001). In patients who received MTA-only therapy, drug-related AEs were most common for combination kinase inhibitor-containing therapy (P < .001). A substantial proportion of drug-related dermatologic AEs occur after the traditional dose-limiting toxicity monitoring period of phase 1 clinical trials. Future designs should account for late toxicities. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  16. Program Evaluation Particularly Responsive Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stake, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the author talks about some recent developments in the methodology of program evaluation and about what he calls "responsive evaluation." He discusses two models for program evaluation, namely (1) informal study or self-study; and (2) the pretest/posttest model. Then, he describes an approach that he has been working on, which will…

  17. Program Evaluation: Resource Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayden, David L.

    Intended for administrators and evaluators, the manual identifies models useful in evaluating special education programs in Maryland. An introduction to program evaluation, defines the concept of educational program evaluation, notes its purpose, and addresses its current status in the field of special education. Chapter 2 goes into greater depth…

  18. Gifted Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumeister, Kristie Speirs; Burney, Virginia Hays

    2012-01-01

    Faced with significant budget challenges, many districts cannot afford to hire an outside consultant to conduct a formal evaluation of their gifted programs. As an interim solution, districts may wish to conduct their own in-house program evaluation. "Gifted Program Evaluation: A Handbook for Administrators and Coordinators" is designed to assist…

  19. Evaluating Occupational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, James P.

    1987-01-01

    Stresses the importance of evaluating occupational programs on a regular basis. Offers a brief explanation of the approaches to program evaluation taken at the Dallas County Community College District (TX), South Puget Sound Community College (WA), and Triton College (IL). Offers a list of references on program evaluation. (CBC)

  20. Gifted Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumeister, Kristie Speirs; Burney, Virginia Hays

    2012-01-01

    Faced with significant budget challenges, many districts cannot afford to hire an outside consultant to conduct a formal evaluation of their gifted programs. As an interim solution, districts may wish to conduct their own in-house program evaluation. "Gifted Program Evaluation: A Handbook for Administrators and Coordinators" is designed to assist…

  1. Evaluating social marketing programs.

    PubMed

    1988-01-01

    Contraceptive social marketing programs (CSM) which use commercial marketing techniques and distribution networks to sell contraceptives at subsidized prices, have become an important source of contraceptives in many developing countries. However, research is needed to determine the extent to which CSM programs are recruiting new users or simply serving as an alternate source for those who already use contraceptives. 1st begun in India in 1967, today CSM programs are selling contraceptives in more than 20 countries, mostly selling condoms because they do not require medical supervision or usually have to be registered with governments as a pharmaceutical product. Most also sell oral contraceptives. Advertising is used to promote the program, both brand and generic, about family planning and the advantages of small families. In some countries only generic promotion is permitted. A CSM program begins with research on the marketplace and needs of potential customers, including baseline studies, group discussions, and personal interviews. Monitoring is done by market research on usage, acceptability and adequacy of distribution. Focus groups and surveys are also used. Evaluation methodologies are similar to those used in program planning and monitoring, including consumer intercept surveys and tracking studies. Program impact is an area often neglected, probably because of the unusual relationship between the private and public sectors that occurs in CSM. Couple-years of protection is the common measurement of impact, estimated from sales data (13 cycles of pills or 100 condoms or doses of spermicide/year is assumed to prevent conception). This method can be used to assess the contributions of different methods and distribution systems and to compare their cost-effectiveness by calculating the cost per couple-year of protection provided. Limitations on this measurement method are inability to discriminate sporadic use from careful compliance; sales may be substitutes

  2. Language Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Language program evaluation is a pragmatic mode of inquiry that illuminates the complex nature of language-related interventions of various kinds, the factors that foster or constrain them, and the consequences that ensue. Program evaluation enables a variety of evidence-based decisions and actions, from designing programs and implementing…

  3. Language Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Language program evaluation is a pragmatic mode of inquiry that illuminates the complex nature of language-related interventions of various kinds, the factors that foster or constrain them, and the consequences that ensue. Program evaluation enables a variety of evidence-based decisions and actions, from designing programs and implementing…

  4. SU-E-J-92: Validating Dose Uncertainty Estimates Produced by AUTODIRECT, An Automated Program to Evaluate Deformable Image Registration Accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H; Chen, J; Pouliot, J; Pukala, J; Kirby, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Deformable image registration (DIR) is a powerful tool with the potential to deformably map dose from one computed-tomography (CT) image to another. Errors in the DIR, however, will produce errors in the transferred dose distribution. We have proposed a software tool, called AUTODIRECT (automated DIR evaluation of confidence tool), which predicts voxel-specific dose mapping errors on a patient-by-patient basis. This work validates the effectiveness of AUTODIRECT to predict dose mapping errors with virtual and physical phantom datasets. Methods: AUTODIRECT requires 4 inputs: moving and fixed CT images and two noise scans of a water phantom (for noise characterization). Then, AUTODIRECT uses algorithms to generate test deformations and applies them to the moving and fixed images (along with processing) to digitally create sets of test images, with known ground-truth deformations that are similar to the actual one. The clinical DIR algorithm is then applied to these test image sets (currently 4) . From these tests, AUTODIRECT generates spatial and dose uncertainty estimates for each image voxel based on a Student’s t distribution. This work compares these uncertainty estimates to the actual errors made by the Velocity Deformable Multi Pass algorithm on 11 virtual and 1 physical phantom datasets. Results: For 11 of the 12 tests, the predicted dose error distributions from AUTODIRECT are well matched to the actual error distributions within 1–6% for 10 virtual phantoms, and 9% for the physical phantom. For one of the cases though, the predictions underestimated the errors in the tail of the distribution. Conclusion: Overall, the AUTODIRECT algorithm performed well on the 12 phantom cases for Velocity and was shown to generate accurate estimates of dose warping uncertainty. AUTODIRECT is able to automatically generate patient-, organ- , and voxel-specific DIR uncertainty estimates. This ability would be useful for patient-specific DIR quality assurance.

  5. Program Fighter - An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, David G.; Fowler, Wallace T.

    Described is a computer program for the sizing of subsonic and supersonic fighters which has been adapted for use in an aerospace engineering design course. Following a description of the program, an evaluation of its use in the university is presented. It is concluded that computer programs for the conceptual design of aerospace vehicles can play…

  6. Evaluating Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Priscilla M.

    2014-01-01

    Well-implemented afterschool programs can promote a range of positive learning and developmental outcomes. However, not all research and evaluation studies have shown the benefits of participation, in part because programs and their evaluation were out of sync. This chapter provides practical guidance on how to foster that alignment between…

  7. Evaluating Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Priscilla M.

    2014-01-01

    Well-implemented afterschool programs can promote a range of positive learning and developmental outcomes. However, not all research and evaluation studies have shown the benefits of participation, in part because programs and their evaluation were out of sync. This chapter provides practical guidance on how to foster that alignment between…

  8. Evaluating Federal Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eva L., Ed.

    A series of papers was developed by the authors as part of their deliberations as members of the National Research Council's Committee of Program Evaluation in Education. The papers provide a broad range of present evaluative thinking. The conflict between preferences in evaluation methodology comes through in these papers. The selections include:…

  9. Evaluating a Development Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantzreb, Arthur C.

    Problems in evaluating the success of an institutional resource development program are examined and suggestions are offered for effective assessment. Such a program is seen as a sequence of events in the artful management of people, from the planning stage to obtaining a financial commitment in writing from persons who want to share their assets…

  10. WRAP program evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrey, S. and Associates, Newton, MA )

    1990-01-01

    The Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership,'' or WRAP program, is a fuel-blind conservation program designed to assist Northeast Utilities' low-income customers to use energy safely and efficiently. Innovative with respect to its collaborative approach and its focus on utilizing and strengthening the existing low-income weatherization service delivery network, the WRAP program offers an interesting model to other utilities which traditionally have relied on for-profit energy service contractors and highly centralized program implementation structures. This evaluation of the WRAP program is designed to: (1) Review the continuing relevance of the demand-side management option screening methodology for determining program configuration for services delivery, including rural populations; (2) locate and analyze recent additions to the energy conservation literature, data and information that bear on design of the WRAP program; and (3) through interviews assess participant impressions of the collaborative process used to plan, develop and implement the WRAP process.

  11. Evaluating the program.

    PubMed

    Waltz, C F

    1989-05-01

    This chapter presents a discussion of the specific steps undertaken when the Waltz approach is employed for the evaluation of nursing programs. Discussion is organized in terms of: (1) who is responsible for the evaluation; (2) why the evaluation is conducted, (3) what is evaluated, (4) how judgments are made on the basis of findings, (5) how the evaluation proceeds, (6) when evaluation occurs, (7) reporting and recording findings and results, and (8) evaluating the evaluation. Specific strategies and techniques for developing and implementing the Master Plan for Evaluation and for managing the conduct of the ongoing evaluation are described. Specific topics regarding "who" include the following: establishing and maintaining the internal evaluator role, operationalizing the internal evaluator role, ethical and political aspects of the role, essential characteristics of internal evaluators, maintaining an outsider perspective in the insider role, and determining significant others to be involved. In the section on "why," attention is given to explaining the purposes for the evaluation and identifying the potential audiences for results. Regarding "what," the focus is on examining program inputs, processes, outcomes, and the setting in which the evaluation occurs, rendering goals and objectives measurable, and explicating questions of concern to the respective audiences. Attention in the section on "how" emphasizes the following: establishing a procedure for decision making, constructing a variable matrix, categorizing evaluation activities, assigning responsibility for evaluation activities using responsibility charting, determining the cost of evaluation activities via engineering cost analysis, and establishing priorities. Gantt Charts are discussed in terms of "when," and essential components and considerations in reporting and recording are elaborated. Meta-evaluation, evaluating the evaluation, is discussed as it relates to the Master Plan, the implementation

  12. Crisis intervention: program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Simington, J A; Cargill, L; Hill, W

    1996-11-01

    Crisis intervention is based upon crisis theory and is defined as a short-term active mode of therapy that focuses on solving the client's immediate problem and reestablishing psychological equilibrium. The crisis intervention program was the first phase in the development of a broader mental health program with advancement decisions being based upon evaluation results of this initial phase. An evaluation methodology using the Stufflebeam Goal-Stakeholder Model (1980) was designed and implemented. A satisfaction survey was conducted to develop a database relative to the program's process. The Mental Health Category Measure, and the Crisis Call Outcome Rating Scale were used to capture outcome data. Analysis of the qualitative and quantitative data indicate that stakeholders are satisfied with the program. outcome data demonstrates that the program produces the intended outcomes. Triangulation, a method of comparing the qualitative and quantitative findings revealed consistency, and thus provides confidence in the accuracy of the findings.

  13. [< Early stimulation > programs evaluation].

    PubMed

    Bonnier, C

    2007-09-01

    Early intervention include educational and neuroprotection strategies. Early educational strategies are based on the cerebral plasticity concept. Neuroprotection, initially reserved for molecules preventing cell death phenomena, can be extended now to all actions promoting harmonious development and preventing handicaps, and include organisational, therapeutic and environmental aspects. Early stimulation programs have been first devised in United States for vulnerable children who belong to an unfavorable socio-economic category ; positive effects were recorded in school failure rates and social problems ; programs have also been launched in several countries for premature infants and infants with a low birth weight, population exposed to a high risk of deficiencies. The programs are targetted either to the child, or to the parents, or combined to provide assistance for both the child and the parents. The programs given the best evaluation are NIDCAP Program in Sweden (Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program), intended for babies < 1500 g in neonatal intensive care units, then a longitudinal, multisite program, known as IHDP (Infant Health and Development Program). It was launched in United States for infants < 37 weeks or < 2500 g. Results show that combined parent-child programs are the most useful. Effects on parent- child relationships and on child's cognitive development are especially effective if stimulation is maintained and when mothers have a low level of education.

  14. [A program devoted to dose and quality in mammography (DQM)].

    PubMed

    Rimondi, O; Gambaccini, M; Indovina, P; Candini, G

    1986-03-01

    Radiological units present different exposure values, (even by a factor 100), for the same radiological examination unless special programs are performed in order to optimize the examinations and to reduce variations. The program named DQM, mentioned in the Circular n. 62 of the Ministry of Health, is planned for mammographic optimization. The steps of the programme are: a) collection of the working parameters in each unit, b) dose and image quality evaluation, c) communication of the results and suggestion for corrective actions. The practical aspects of the program and the results of measurements in 65 mammographic units are presented and discussed. The importance of the Quality Assurance, performed by radiologists and physicists is underlined.

  15. DOSESCREEN: a computer program to aid dose placement

    Treesearch

    Kimberly C. Smith; Jacqueline L. Robertson

    1984-01-01

    Careful selection of an experimental design for a bioassay substantially improves the precision of effective dose (ED) estimates. Design considerations typically include determination of sample size, dose selection, and allocation of subjects to doses. DOSESCREEN is a computer program written to help investigators select an efficient design for the estimation of an...

  16. MRM Evaluation Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, James C.

    1998-01-01

    This is an interim report on the current output of the MRM evaluation research program. During 1998 this research program has used new and existing data to create an important tool for the development and improvement of "maintenance resource management" (MRM). Thousands of surveys completed by participants in airline MRM training and/or behavior change programs have, for the first time, been consolidated into a panel of "MRM Attitudes and Opinion Profiles." These profiles can be used to compare the attitudes about decision making and communication in any given company at any stage in its MRM program with attitudes of a large sample of like employees during a similar period in their MRM involvement. This panel of comparison profiles for attitudes and opinions is a tool to help audit the effectiveness of a maintenance human factors program. The profile panel is the first of several tools envisioned for applying the information accumulating in MRM databases produced as one of the program's long range objectives.

  17. The Perils of Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Samuel

    1982-01-01

    In reacting to five recent books on program evaluation, eight evaluation perils are discussed: poor preparation of evaluations, programs with unrealistic goals, the mix-up of models, interpersonal conflicts, the morass of measurement, answering evaluation questions, the secondary evaluator as sniper, and hostility from program staff. (CM)

  18. Effective Reaction Evaluation in Evaluating Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sung Heum; Pershing, James A.

    1999-01-01

    The following dimensions for effective reaction evaluations as a tool in training program evaluations are described: program objective(s)/content; program materials; delivery methods/technologies; instructor/facilitator; instructional activities; program time/length; training environment; planned action/transfer expectation;…

  19. Evaluation of Complex Programs Using Participatory Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duhon, Karen; And Others

    Summaries are presented of papers from a symposium entitled "The Evaluation of Complex Programs Using Participatory Evaluation" that focused on a comprehensive school service program in a south Texas alternative high school. "Theoretical Framework and Objectives" explores the problems of evaluating such programs. Problems…

  20. Automated size-specific CT dose monitoring program: Assessing variability in CT dose

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson, Olav; Li Xiang; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The potential health risks associated with low levels of ionizing radiation have created a movement in the radiology community to optimize computed tomography (CT) imaging protocols to use the lowest radiation dose possible without compromising the diagnostic usefulness of the images. Despite efforts to use appropriate and consistent radiation doses, studies suggest that a great deal of variability in radiation dose exists both within and between institutions for CT imaging. In this context, the authors have developed an automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT and used this program to assess variability in size-adjusted effective dose from CT imaging. Methods: The authors radiation dose monitoring program operates on an independent health insurance portability and accountability act compliant dosimetry server. Digital imaging and communication in medicine routing software is used to isolate dose report screen captures and scout images for all incoming CT studies. Effective dose conversion factors (k-factors) are determined based on the protocol and optical character recognition is used to extract the CT dose index and dose-length product. The patient's thickness is obtained by applying an adaptive thresholding algorithm to the scout images and is used to calculate the size-adjusted effective dose (ED{sub adj}). The radiation dose monitoring program was used to collect data on 6351 CT studies from three scanner models (GE Lightspeed Pro 16, GE Lightspeed VCT, and GE Definition CT750 HD) and two institutions over a one-month period and to analyze the variability in ED{sub adj} between scanner models and across institutions. Results: No significant difference was found between computer measurements of patient thickness and observer measurements (p= 0.17), and the average difference between the two methods was less than 4%. Applying the size correction resulted in ED{sub adj} that differed by up to 44% from effective dose estimates

  1. Program Evaluation: The Key to Quality Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lawrence J.

    Part of a volume which explores current issues in service delivery to infants and toddlers (ages birth to 3) with handicapping conditions, this chapter presents program evaluation as a comprehensive process comprising three phases: input, process, and output. Three program evaluation models are summarized: Tyler's objective model, Scriven's…

  2. Program Theory Evaluation: Logic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brousselle, Astrid; Champagne, Francois

    2011-01-01

    Program theory evaluation, which has grown in use over the past 10 years, assesses whether a program is designed in such a way that it can achieve its intended outcomes. This article describes a particular type of program theory evaluation--logic analysis--that allows us to test the plausibility of a program's theory using scientific knowledge.…

  3. Program Theory Evaluation: Logic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brousselle, Astrid; Champagne, Francois

    2011-01-01

    Program theory evaluation, which has grown in use over the past 10 years, assesses whether a program is designed in such a way that it can achieve its intended outcomes. This article describes a particular type of program theory evaluation--logic analysis--that allows us to test the plausibility of a program's theory using scientific knowledge.…

  4. Model Program Evaluations. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Safe Schools Initiative Division, 2002

    2002-01-01

    There are probably thousands of programs and courses intended to prevent or reduce violence in this nation's schools. Evaluating these many programs has become a problem or goal in itself. There are now many evaluation programs, with many levels of designations, such as model, promising, best practice, exemplary and noteworthy. "Model program" is…

  5. Measuring Success: Evaluating Educational Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Yael

    2010-01-01

    This paper reveals a new evaluation model, which enables educational program and project managers to evaluate their programs with a simple and easy to understand approach. The "index of success model" is comprised of five parameters that enable to focus on and evaluate both the implementation and results of an educational program. The…

  6. Comprehensive Plan for Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orange County Public Schools, Orlando, FL. Testing and Program Evaluation Section.

    The evaluation plans for the Orange County Public Schools, Orlando, Florida, are summarized. Both instructional programs and support services are assessed, to determine the effectiveness of the programs as well as their value. Evaluations are planned and conducted by the Program Evaluation Section, using the Educational Planning and Resource…

  7. Program Evaluation: Accelerating Retained Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juneau, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this program evaluation was to evaluate the first year of an acceleration program that allowed students who were retained a grade level for not performing on academic level in early elementary school an opportunity to rejoin their age appropriate class. The primary focus of the evaluation was to evaluate the effectiveness of an…

  8. Program Evaluation: Accelerating Retained Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juneau, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this program evaluation was to evaluate the first year of an acceleration program that allowed students who were retained a grade level for not performing on academic level in early elementary school an opportunity to rejoin their age appropriate class. The primary focus of the evaluation was to evaluate the effectiveness of an…

  9. Radiation dose reduction in multidetector CT in fracture evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jung Woo; Park, Hee Jin; Lee, So Yeon; Rho, Myung Ho; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Choi, Yoon Jung; Kim, Mi Sung

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate whether multidetector CT with low-dose radiation (low-dose CT) of joints can be useful when evaluating fractures. Our study included CT scans of 398 patients, 103 shoulder cases, 109 wrist cases, 98 pelvis cases and 88 ankle cases. There were 191 females and 207 males. The low-dose CTs were performed using identical voltage and parameters with the exception of decreased (half of standard dose) tube current. Low-dose and standard-dose images were compared with regards to objective image quality, subjective evaluation of image quality and diagnostic performance for the fractures. There was no significant difference of image noise between standard-dose CT and low-dose CT in every joint (p > 0.05). Each mean value of subjective score did not show significant difference according to the dosage of the CT scan. There were no statistically significant differences in the sensitivity (96-100%), specificity (95.2-100%) or accuracy (97.9-100%) between standard-dose CT and low-dose CT (p values, 0.1336-1.000). The evaluation of extremities for fractures using low-dose CT can reduce radiation exposure by about 50% compared with standard-dose CT without affecting image quality or diagnostic performance. Advances in knowledge: Low-dose CT of the extremities (shoulder, pelvis, ankle and wrist) can reduce radiation dose by about 50% compared with standard-dose CT and does not significantly affect image quality or diagnostic performance in fracture detection.

  10. Evaluation of Turkish Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durmuscelebi, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the new Turkish education program that has been being implemented since 2005 gradually in light of teacher suggestions. The study has been done in scanning model. In this study which has been conducted with the purpose of evaluating the newly prepared Turkish education programs, the program has been tried to be…

  11. Program Evaluation Know-How

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Protheroe, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    In the assessment-driven environment of today's schools, questions about effectiveness and impact on student learning often focus on the school as a whole. An often-missed piece is taking a critical look at specific programs and approaches. Program evaluation is a tool that can help do this. Program evaluation can help to answer a range of…

  12. Two Feathers Endowment Scholarship Program: Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Alexandra

    2004-01-01

    The Saint Paul Foundation contracted with the Wilder Research Center to conduct an evaluation of their Two Feathers Scholarship Program. The Two Feathers Scholarship Program is funded through the Two Feathers Endowment, which is one part of the Foundation's SpectrumTrust. SpectrumTrust is a unique partnership between communities of color and The…

  13. Diabetes Education. Program Evaluation Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IOX Assessment Associates, Culver City, CA.

    Intended as a resource for individuals wishing to evaluate diabetes education programs, this handbook, one of a series of seven, provides a collection of measuring devices that can improve the quality of such evaluations. Chapter 1 introduces the handbook's contents and outlines evaluation related issues specific to diabetes education programs.…

  14. Global 2000 Program. Program Evaluation--Formative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuler, Debra

    The Global 2000 project was a 3-year project aimed at improving literacy in five Massachusetts manufacturing companies. At four of the five Global 2000 program sites, an external evaluator conducted focus groups and open-ended interviews with members of the projects' employee involvement teams, previous students, and teachers. The evaluator also…

  15. Program Evaluation Resources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These resources list tools to help you conduct evaluations, find organizations outside of EPA that are useful to evaluators, and find additional guides on how to do evaluations from organizations outside of EPA.

  16. Prescribing and evaluating target dose in dose-painting treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Katrin; Specht, Lena; Aznar, Marianne C; Rasmussen, Jacob H; Bentzen, Søren M; Vogelius, Ivan R

    2014-09-01

    Assessment of target dose conformity in multi-dose-level treatment plans is challenging due to inevitable over/underdosage at the border zone between dose levels. Here, we evaluate different target dose prescription planning aims and approaches to evaluate the relative merit of such plans. A quality volume histogram (QVH) tool for history-based evaluation is proposed. Twenty head and neck cancer dose-painting plans with five prescription levels were evaluated, as well as clinically delivered simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) plans from 2010 and 2012. The QVH tool was used for target dose comparison between groups of plans, and to identify and improve a suboptimal dose-painting plan. Comparison of 2010 and 2012 treatment plans with the QVH tool demonstrated that 2012 plans have decreased underdosed volume at the expense of increased overdosed volume relative to the 2010 plans. This shift had not been detected previously. One suboptimal dose-painting plan was compared to the 'normal zone' of the QVH tool and could be improved by re-optimization. The QVH tool provides a method to assess target dose conformity in dose-painting and multi-dose-level plans. The tool can be useful for quality assurance of multi-center trials, and for visualizing the development of treatment planning in routine clinical practice.

  17. Evaluation of the Brownfields Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Evaluation of 2003-2008 Brownfields Assessment, Revolving Loan Fund, and Cleanup Grants is the first national program evaluation of the outcomes, efficiencies, and economic benefits produced by Brownfields grants.

  18. American Airlines LOFT evaluation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, D.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a test program to evaluate recurrent training LOFT and a three-legged scenario used for the evaluation are highlighted. The test guidelines set up and the questionnaires sent to crew member participants are examined.

  19. Evaluation of Public School Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welty, Gordon

    This article outlines the procedures followed in program evaluation in Pittsburgh public schools. A program design is obtained by asking the field staff a series of specific questions. As the staff interact, problems about the program are resolved. The consensus achieved is the basis for standardization of activities in the field. The next step in…

  20. Employer Evaluation of Occupational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Lynn H.; Piland, William E.

    In an effort to meet the need for a more comprehensive program evaluation, staff at Moraine Valley Community College developed a questionnaire and interview schedule to obtain feedback from employers concerning career programs. Questionnaires were sent to all employers who hired graduates of occupational programs between 1969-71; over 80% returned…

  1. Language Arts Program Evaluation: 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Margaret Perea

    In accordance with the Albuquerque (New Mexico) Public Schools' curriculum planning process, a language arts program evaluation was conducted during the 1986-87 school year in order: (1) to provide a comprehensive overview of the language arts program; (2) to determine if the language arts program meets the needs of students and parents; and (3)…

  2. Negotiated Program Evaluation in Spain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saez Brezmes, Maria J.; Carretero, Antonio J.

    A concise overview is provided of the history of evaluation, focusing on educational evaluation, followed by some observations on program evaluation in Spain and possible future developments. Evaluation was a new concept in Spain at the end of the Franco era, at a time when its development was beginning to gain momentum in the United States. The…

  3. Transportation Department Program Evaluation, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Des Moines Public Schools, IA.

    In addition to the regular transportation of students to school, the Transportation Department of the Des Moines (Iowa) Independent Community School District provides transportation for alternative and special education programs, field trips, and after-school activities. The context evaluation (program description), input evaluation (staffing and…

  4. Multiple Activities Program: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omaha Public Schools, NE.

    This is an evaluation report of the Multiple Activities Program, an ESEA Title I Program conducted in the Omaha Public Schools from September 1969 to September 1970. The report is designed as an adaptation of the C.I.P.P. evaluation model (context, input, process, and product). The needs, objectives, activities, and success of each strand within…

  5. Academic Challenge Program: Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harty, Harold; And Others

    The evaluation report by Bartholomew Consolidated School Corporation (Columbus, Indiana) describes findings concerning what works and what does not work in the Academic Challenge Program, a gifted and talented education program at the elementary and middle school levels. A corollary purpose of the report is to share the evaluation plan itself,…

  6. Guidance for training program evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    An increased concern about the training of nuclear reactor operators resulted from the incident at TMI-2 in 1979. Purpose of this guide is to provide a general framework for the systematic evaluation of training programs for DOE Category-A reactors. The primary goal of such evaluations is to promote continuing quality improvements in the selection, training and qualification programs.

  7. Collective dose as a performance measure for occupational radiation protection programs: Issues and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, D.J.; Harty, R.; Hickey, E.E.; Martin, J.B.; Peffers, M.S.; Kathren, R.L.

    1998-07-01

    Collective dose is one of the performance measures used at many US Department of Energy (DOE) contractor facilities to quantitatively assess the objectives of the radiation protection program. It can also be used as a management tool to improve the program for keeping worker doses as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Collective dose is used here to mean the sum of all total effective dose equivalent values for all workers in a specified group over a specified time. It is often used as a surrogate estimate of radiological risk. In principle, improvements in radiation protection programs and procedures will result in reduction of collective dose, all other things being equal. Within the DOE, most frequently, a single collective dose number, which may or may not be adjusted for workload and other factors, is used as a performance measure for a contractor. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the use of collective dose as a performance measure for ALARA programs at DOE sites.

  8. Evaluation of shipping doses and compositions for vitrified waste

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.; Vogel, R.

    1996-06-01

    Shipments of radioactive materials must adhere to dose limits specified in the Code of Federal Regulations. This paper discusses methods for evaluating shipping doses of vitrified waste. A methodology was developed for evaluating the change in vitrification composition required to maintain shipping dose rates within limits. The point kernel codes QAD and Microshield were used to evaluate dose equivalent rates from specified waste forms and radioactivity measurements. The Origen code was utilized to provide the gamma-ray activity as a function of time from isotopic activity measurements. This gamma-ray activity served as source input for QAD. Microshield developed its own source from the given isotopic activities.

  9. The use of linear programming in optimization of HDR implant dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Jozsef, Gabor; Streeter, Oscar E; Astrahan, Melvin A

    2003-05-01

    The introduction of high dose rate brachytherapy enabled optimization of dose distributions to be used on a routine basis. The objective of optimization is to homogenize the dose distribution within the implant while simultaneously satisfying dose constraints on certain points. This is accomplished by varying the time the source dwells at different locations. As the dose at any point is a linear function of the dwell times, a linear programming approach seems to be a natural choice. The dose constraints are inherently linear inequalities. Homogeneity requirements are linearized by minimizing the maximum deviation of the doses at points inside the implant from a prescribed dose. The revised simplex method was applied for the solution of this linear programming problem. In the homogenization process the possible source locations were chosen as optimization points. To avoid the problem of the singular value of the dose at a source location from the source itself we define the "self-contribution" as the dose at a small distance from the source. The effect of varying this distance is discussed. Test cases were optimized for planar, biplanar and cylindrical implants. A semi-irregular, fan-like implant with diverging needles was also investigated. Mean central dose calculation based on 3D Delaunay-triangulation of the source locations was used to evaluate the dose distributions. The optimization method resulted in homogeneous distributions (for brachytherapy). Additional dose constraints--when applied--were satisfied. The method is flexible enough to include other linear constraints such as the inclusion of the centroids of the Delaunay-triangulation for homogenization, or limiting the maximum allowable dwell time.

  10. Foreign Language Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirshner, Sheldon G.

    In order to assess the foreign language programs currently offered by Oakton Community College (OCC), a three-part investigation was undertaken in 1974. First, to examine grade distribution and drop-out rate, the records of students enrolled in language courses were compared with the records of the total student body. During the spring, summer and…

  11. Program Fighter: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, David G.; Fowler, Wallace T.

    A computer program for the sizing of subsonic and supersonic fighter planes was adapted for use in an aerospace engineering course at the University of Texas at Austin. FIGHTER uses classroom notation and separate subroutines for different disciplines to implement the conceptual design process. Input consists of a set of design variables and a set…

  12. Evaluating Workplace Education Program Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhart, Jennifer

    This guide, which is intended for project directors, coordinators, and other professional staff involved in developing and delivering workplace education programs, explains the workplace education evaluation process, the main approaches to evaluation, and considerations in selecting appropriate evaluation instruments. Discussed first are the…

  13. "Language for Writing": Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martella, Ronald C.; Waldron-Soler, Kathleen M.

    2005-01-01

    This evaluation investigated the effects of the "Language for Writing" program. Ten classrooms were involved including 201 students at the beginning of the project. Posttest scores were obtained for 126 students. This evaluation was conducted over 2 years. Evaluation I was conducted over a 5-month period from January 2003 to May 2003. Evaluation…

  14. Developing Successful Arts Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidl, Kent

    1994-01-01

    Compared to other subject areas, the arts seem more difficult to classify and evaluate. However, the arts' methods and content place them at the forefront of evaluation techniques that are beginning to permeate academic subject areas. Effective evaluation of arts programs depends not on principals' artistic expertise but on their ability to manage…

  15. Evaluating State Advanced Technology Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Irwin

    1988-01-01

    Evaluation of state advanced technology programs has begun in response to budget reviews. Issues include: (1) political and institutional contexts of evaluation; (2) technical issues concerning outcome specifications, use of process indicators, and dependence on self-reported assessments; and (3) use of evaluation in policy making. (TJH)

  16. DOSIS: a Monte Carlo simulation program for dose related studies in mammography.

    PubMed

    Delis, H; Spyrou, G; Panayiotakis, G; Tzanakos, G

    2005-06-01

    Dosimetric studies in mammography are addressed by means of a Monte Carlo simulation program. The core of this program (DOSIS: dosimetry simulation studies) is a simulation model developed using FORTRAN 90, enriched with a graphical user interface developed in MS Visual Basic. User defined mammographic technique parameters affecting breast dose are imported to the simulation model and the produced results are provided by means of both absolute (surface dose, exposure at detector plane) and relative quantities (percentage depth dose, isodose curves). The program functionality has been demonstrated in the evaluation of various mammographic examination techniques. Specifically, the influence of tube voltage and filtration on the surface dose and the exposure at detector plane has been studied utilizing a water phantom. Increase of tube voltage from 25 to 30 kVp for a Mo/Mo system resulted in a 42% decrease of the surface dose for a thick breast (6 cm), without changing the exposure at the detector plane. Use of 1.02 mm Al filter for a W anode system operating at 30 kVp resulted in a 19.1% decrease of the surface dose delivered to a 5 cm water equivalent breast. Overall, W/Al systems appear to have improved dosimetric performance, resulting up to a 65% decrease of surface dose compared to Mo/Mo systems, for identical exposures at the detector plane and breast thicknesses.

  17. FY08 VPP Program Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Dossett, Sharon D.

    2008-01-01

    The Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) is a recognized third-party certification of worker safety and health program excellence, based on industry best practices that focus on management leadership and employee involvement, as well as other safety and health program elements. This Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) VPP Program Evaluation is the FY-2008 report of the PNNL VPP Steering Committee regarding the status of VPP at PNNL. It is an update of the previous annual report dated January, 2007 and was completed in January 2008. An annual evaluation of the status of VPP is required of all sites that participate in the DOE-VPP. This report provides a detailed summary of the PNNL VPP Steering Committee’s evaluation of program performance and documents both strengths and improvement opportunities related to the various aspects of the VPP model.

  18. A method for the evaluation of dose-effect data utilizing a programmable calculator.

    PubMed

    Carmines, E L; Carchman, R A; Borzelleca, J F

    1980-08-01

    A program for the calculation of the median effective dose (ED50) and the slope of the dose-effect line was developed for a programmable calculator. The method employed approximated the solution described by Bliss. Experimental data were evaluated and compared to both hand calculated results and results of other computer methods. This method produced results which differed from other computer methods by less than 1 percent. This program provided information necessary for the test for parallelism and estimate of relative potency of two dose-effect lines.

  19. Program Evaluation: Some Federal Imperatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ann M.

    1979-01-01

    A major problem faced in program evaluation of vocational education is the lack of a national manpower policy. This concern involves workers' acquiring and developing occupational skills which are needed by society and demanded by employers. Federal legislation specifications spell out program requirements which educators must keep in mind. (CT)

  20. High-dose secondary calibration laboratory accreditation program

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, J.C.

    1993-12-31

    There is a need for high-dose secondary calibration laboratories to serve the multi-billion dollar radiation processing industry. This need is driven by the desires of industry for less costly calibrations and faster calibration-cycle response time. Services needed include calibration irradiations of routine processing dosimeters and the supply of reference standard transfer dosimeters for irradiation in the production processing facility. In order to provide measurement quality assurance and to demonstrate consistency with national standards, the high-dose secondary laboratories would be accredited by means of an expansion of an existing National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program. A laboratory performance criteria document is under development to implement the new program.

  1. User's manual for biosphere and dose simulation program (Biodose)

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, J.J.; Bogar, G.P.

    1980-01-04

    This user's manual describes the BIOsphere Transport and DOSE program (BIODOSE) prepared for, and delivered to, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) by the Analytic Sciences Corporation (TASC). BIODOSE simulates the transport of radionuclides in surface water systems and the resulting concentration of nuclides in the food chain. It includes the prediction of human dosage risks for individuals and for populations resulting from release of radionuclides into surface water or well water. The BIODOSE program was designed for easy use, including standard defaults and a flexible input scheme.

  2. Development of Dose Volume Histogram Analysis Program and Its Clinical Implementation.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yumiko; Hayashi, Naoki; Yada, Ryuichi; Nozue, Masashi; Yamamoto, Shoichi

    2016-08-01

    Dose volume histogram (DVH) is one of the methods for evaluating the feasibility of radiotherapy plans. It is difficult to thoroughly comprehend an evaluation of each plan at a glance and to give a concise presentation of the case at conference. In this study, we provide a useful program that will fulfill such a purpose on a clinical setting. We have revised our protocols of radiotherapy planning, developed the program using Visual Basic 2010, which could facilitate an evaluation of DVH, and used it for checking plans and presentation at case conference. Since our DVH analysis program shows a result of DVH in a simple way, such as "OK (Okay)" or "NG (No good)", we can promptly comprehend the results of each radiotherapy plan at ease. This program easily tells us accordance between plans and protocols. We found this program useful and worth spreading.

  3. Developing a dose-volume histogram computation program for brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Panitsa, E; Rosenwald, J C; Kappas, C

    1998-08-01

    A dose-volume histogram (DVH) computation program was developed for brachytherapy treatment planning in an attempt to benefit from the DVH's ability to present graphically information on 3D dose distributions. The program is incorporated into a planning system that utilizes a pair of orthogonal radiographs to localize the radiation sources. DVHs are calculated for the volume of tissue enclosed by an isodose surface (e.g. half the value of the reference isodose). The calculation algorithm is based on a non-uniform random sampling that gives a denser point distribution at the centre of the implants. Our program was tested and proved to be fast enough for clinical use and sufficiently accurate (i.e. computation time of 20 s and less than 2% relative error for one point source, for 100,000 calculation points). The accuracy improves when a larger calculation point number is used, but the computation time also increases proportionally. The DVH is presented in the form of a simple graph or table, or as Anderson's 'natural' DVH graph. The cumulative DVH tables can be used to extract a series of indexes characterizing the homogeneity and the dose levels of the distribution in the treatment volume and the surrounding tissues. If a reference plan is available, the DVH results can be assessed relative to the reference plan's DVH.

  4. Evaluation of Genetic Factors for Warfarin Dose Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Michael D.; Berg, Richard L.; Zhang, Kai Qi; Glurich, Ingrid; Schmelzer, John R.; Yale, Steven H.; Vidaillet, Humberto J.; Burmester, James K.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Warfarin is a commonly prescribed anticoagulant drug used to prevent thromboses that may arise as a consequence of orthopedic and vascular surgery or underlying cardiovascular disease. Warfarin is associated with a notoriously narrow therapeutic window where small variations in dosing may result in hemorrhagic or thrombotic complications. To ultimately improve dosing of warfarin, we evaluated models for stable maintenance dose that incorporated both clinical and genetic factors. Method: A model was constructed by evaluating the contribution to dosing variability of the following clinical factors: age, gender, body surface area, and presence or absence of prosthetic heart valves or diabetes. The model was then sequentially expanded by incorporating polymorphisms of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9; vitamin K 2,3 epoxide reductase complex, subunit 1 (VKORC1); gamma carboxylase; factor VII; and apolipoprotein (Apo) E genes. Results: Of genetic factors evaluated in the model, CYP2C9 and VKORC1 each contributed substantially to dose variability, and together with clinical factors explained 56% of the individual variability in stable warfarin dose. In contrast, gamma carboxylase, factor VII and Apo E polymorphisms contributed little to dose variability. Conclusion: The importance of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 to patient-specific dose of warfarin has been confirmed, while polymorphisms of gamma carboxylase, factor VII and Apo E genes did not substantially contribute to predictive models for stable warfarin dose. PMID:17456829

  5. A Strategy for Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leinhardt, Gaea

    This paper proposes a strategy for in-house evaluations in the context of an educational research and development facility. The obstacles in conducting an evaluation of colleagues' programs are discussed; these fall into two categories. First, there is a set of problems that relate to conflicts inherent in judging the work of a colleague without…

  6. National Dairy Genetic Evaluation Program

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The National Dairy Genetic Evaluation Program is a continuation of ongoing USDA collaboration with the U.S. dairy industry on genetic evaluation of dairy cattle since 1908. Data are provided by dairy records processing centers (yield, health, pedigree, and reproduction traits), breed registry societ...

  7. Evaluation of image and dose according to I-dose technique when performing a CT scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, S. W.; Lee, H. K.; Cho, J. H.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we applied the iterative reconstruction technique to improve image quality (I-dose) and evaluated its usability by analyzing the quality of the resulting image and evaluating the dose. To perform the scans, we fixed the uniform module (CTP 486's section) 4 on the table of the computed tomography (CT) device with the American association of physicists in medicine (AAPM) phantom and located it in the center where the X-rays could be generated by using a razor beam. Then, we set up the conditions of 120 kilovoltage peak (kVp), 150 milliampere second (mAs), collimation 4 × 0.625 mm, and a standard YA (Y-Sharp) filter. Next, we formed two groups: Group A in which I-dose was not applied and Group B in which I-dose was applied. According to the rod in the middle, after fixing the location of (A) at 12 o'clock, (B) at 3 o'clock, (C) at 6 o'clock, and (D) at 9 o'clock to evaluate the image quality, the CT number was measured and the noise level was analyzed. Using the AAPM phantom with doses of 50, 100, 200, 250, and 300 mAs by 80, 100, and 120 kVp, a dose analysis was performed. After scanning, the CT numbers and noise level were measured 20 times as a function of the I-dose levels (1-7). After applying I-dose at 6, 9, 12, and 3 o'clock, when a higher I-dose was applied, a lower noise level was measured. As a result, it was found that when applying I-dose to the AAPM phantom, the higher the level of I-dose, the lower the level of noise. When applying I-dose, the dose can be reduced by 60%. When I-dose is applied when taking CT scans in a clinical study, it is possible to lower the dose and lower the noise level.

  8. A method to evaluate dose errors introduced by dose mapping processes for mass conserving deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, C.; Hugo, G.; Salguero, F. J.; Saleh-Sayah, N.; Weiss, E.; Sleeman, W. C.; Siebers, J. V.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: To present a method to evaluate the dose mapping error introduced by the dose mapping process. In addition, apply the method to evaluate the dose mapping error introduced by the 4D dose calculation process implemented in a research version of commercial treatment planning system for a patient case. Methods: The average dose accumulated in a finite volume should be unchanged when the dose delivered to one anatomic instance of that volume is mapped to a different anatomic instance--provided that the tissue deformation between the anatomic instances is mass conserving. The average dose to a finite volume on image S is defined as d{sub S}=e{sub s}/m{sub S}, where e{sub S} is the energy deposited in the mass m{sub S} contained in the volume. Since mass and energy should be conserved, when d{sub S} is mapped to an image R(d{sub S{yields}R}=d{sub R}), the mean dose mapping error is defined as {Delta}d{sub m}=|d{sub R}-d{sub S}|=|e{sub R}/m{sub R}-e{sub S}/m{sub S}|, where the e{sub R} and e{sub S} are integral doses (energy deposited), and m{sub R} and m{sub S} are the masses within the region of interest (ROI) on image R and the corresponding ROI on image S, where R and S are the two anatomic instances from the same patient. Alternatively, application of simple differential propagation yields the differential dose mapping error, {Delta}d{sub d}=|({partial_derivative}d/{partial_derivative}e)*{Delta}e+({partial_derivative}d/{partial_derivative}m)*{Delta}m|=|((e{sub S}-e{sub R})/m{sub R})-((m{sub S}-m{sub R})/m{sub R}{sup 2})*e{sub R}|={alpha}|d{sub R}-d{sub S}| with {alpha}=m{sub S}/m{sub R}. A 4D treatment plan on a ten-phase 4D-CT lung patient is used to demonstrate the dose mapping error evaluations for a patient case, in which the accumulated dose, D{sub R}={Sigma}{sub S=0}{sup 9}d{sub S{yields}R}, and associated error values ({Delta}D{sub m} and {Delta}D{sub d}) are calculated for a uniformly spaced set of ROIs. Results: For the single sample patient dose

  9. A method to evaluate dose errors introduced by dose mapping processes for mass conserving deformations

    PubMed Central

    Yan, C.; Hugo, G.; Salguero, F. J.; Saleh-Sayah, N.; Weiss, E.; Sleeman, W. C.; Siebers, J. V.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To present a method to evaluate the dose mapping error introduced by the dose mapping process. In addition, apply the method to evaluate the dose mapping error introduced by the 4D dose calculation process implemented in a research version of commercial treatment planning system for a patient case. Methods: The average dose accumulated in a finite volume should be unchanged when the dose delivered to one anatomic instance of that volume is mapped to a different anatomic instance—provided that the tissue deformation between the anatomic instances is mass conserving. The average dose to a finite volume on image S is defined as dS¯=es/mS, where eS is the energy deposited in the mass mS contained in the volume. Since mass and energy should be conserved, when dS¯ is mapped to an image R(dS→R¯=dR¯), the mean dose mapping error is defined as Δdm¯=|dR¯-dS¯|=|eR/mR-eS/mS|, where the eR and eS are integral doses (energy deposited), and mR and mS are the masses within the region of interest (ROI) on image R and the corresponding ROI on image S, where R and S are the two anatomic instances from the same patient. Alternatively, application of simple differential propagation yields the differential dose mapping error, Δdd¯=|∂d¯∂e*Δe+∂d¯∂m*Δm|=|(eS-eR)mR-(mS-mR)mR2*eR|=α|dR¯-dS¯| with α=mS/mR. A 4D treatment plan on a ten-phase 4D-CT lung patient is used to demonstrate the dose mapping error evaluations for a patient case, in which the accumulated dose, DR¯=∑S=09dS→R¯, and associated error values (ΔDm¯ and ΔDd¯) are calculated for a uniformly spaced set of ROIs. Results: For the single sample patient dose distribution, the average accumulated differential dose mapping error is 4.3%, the average absolute differential dose mapping error is 10.8%, and the average accumulated mean dose mapping error is 5.0%. Accumulated differential dose mapping errors within the gross tumor volume (GTV) and planning target volume (PTV) are lower, 0

  10. A method to evaluate dose errors introduced by dose mapping processes for mass conserving deformations.

    PubMed

    Yan, C; Hugo, G; Salguero, F J; Saleh-Sayah, N; Weiss, E; Sleeman, W C; Siebers, J V

    2012-04-01

    To present a method to evaluate the dose mapping error introduced by the dose mapping process. In addition, apply the method to evaluate the dose mapping error introduced by the 4D dose calculation process implemented in a research version of commercial treatment planning system for a patient case. The average dose accumulated in a finite volume should be unchanged when the dose delivered to one anatomic instance of that volume is mapped to a different anatomic instance-provided that the tissue deformation between the anatomic instances is mass conserving. The average dose to a finite volume on image S is defined as d(S)=e(s)/m(S), where e(S) is the energy deposited in the mass m(S) contained in the volume. Since mass and energy should be conserved, when d(S) is mapped to an image R(d(S→R)=d(R)), the mean dose mapping error is defined as Δd(m)=|d(R)-d(S)|=|e(R)/m(R)-e(S)/m(S)|, where the e(R) and e(S) are integral doses (energy deposited), and m(R) and m(S) are the masses within the region of interest (ROI) on image R and the corresponding ROI on image S, where R and S are the two anatomic instances from the same patient. Alternatively, application of simple differential propagation yields the differential dose mapping error, Δd(d)=|∂d∂e*Δe+∂d∂m*Δm|=|(e(S)-e(R))m(R)-(m(S)-m(R))m(R) (2)*e(R)|=α|d(R)-d(S)| with α=m(S)/m(R). A 4D treatment plan on a ten-phase 4D-CT lung patient is used to demonstrate the dose mapping error evaluations for a patient case, in which the accumulated dose, D(R)=∑(S=0) (9)d(S→R), and associated error values (ΔD(m) and ΔD(d)) are calculated for a uniformly spaced set of ROIs. For the single sample patient dose distribution, the average accumulated differential dose mapping error is 4.3%, the average absolute differential dose mapping error is 10.8%, and the average accumulated mean dose mapping error is 5.0%. Accumulated differential dose mapping errors within the gross tumor volume (GTV) and planning target volume (PTV

  11. Radiation dose of CT coronary angiography in clinical practice: objective evaluation of strategies for dose optimization.

    PubMed

    Yerramasu, Ajay; Venuraju, Shreenidhi; Atwal, Satvir; Goodman, Dennis; Lipkin, David; Lahiri, Avijit

    2012-07-01

    CT coronary angiography (CTCA) is an evolving modality for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. Radiation burden associated with CTCA has been a major concern in the wider application of this technique. It is important to reduce the radiation dose without compromising the image quality. To estimate the radiation dose of CTCA in clinical practice and evaluate the effect of dose-saving algorithms on radiation dose and image quality. Effective radiation dose was measured from the dose-length product in 616 consecutive patients (mean age 58 ± 12 years; 70% males) who underwent clinically indicated CTCA at our institution over 1 year. Image quality was assessed subjectively using a 4-point scale and objectively by measuring the signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios in the coronary arteries. Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to identify factors independently associated with radiation dose. Mean effective radiation dose of CTCA was 6.6 ± 3.3 mSv. Radiation dose was significantly reduced by dose saving algorithms such as 100 kV imaging (-47%; 95% CI, -44% to -50%), prospective gating (-35%; 95% CI, -29% to -40%) and ECG controlled tube current modulation (-23%; 95% CI, -9% to -34%). None of the dose saving algorithms were associated with a significant reduction in mean image quality or the frequency of diagnostic scans (P = non-significant for all comparisons). Careful application of radiation-dose saving algorithms in appropriately selected patients can reduce the radiation burden of CTCA significantly, without compromising the image quality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Deception in Program Evaluation Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-31

    guard for its possibility and take proactive steps to reduce the possibility of deceit. These range from the use of open and transparent feedback to... portfolio .” 14 In such a situation, where an evaluator will ultimately try to determine the effects and influences of a program on the outcome or... feedback to ensuring the independence of assessors to red cells identifying possible vulnerabilities. As long as the stakes in a program

  13. Evaluation of effective dose with chest digital tomosynthesis system using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dohyeon; Jo, Byungdu; Lee, Youngjin; Park, Su-Jin; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-03-01

    Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) system has recently been introduced and studied. This system offers the potential to be a substantial improvement over conventional chest radiography for the lung nodule detection and reduces the radiation dose with limited angles. PC-based Monte Carlo program (PCXMC) simulation toolkit (STUK, Helsinki, Finland) is widely used to evaluate radiation dose in CDT system. However, this toolkit has two significant limits. Although PCXMC is not possible to describe a model for every individual patient and does not describe the accurate X-ray beam spectrum, Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) simulation describes the various size of phantom for individual patient and proper X-ray spectrum. However, few studies have been conducted to evaluate effective dose in CDT system with the Monte Carlo simulation toolkit using GATE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate effective dose in virtual infant chest phantom of posterior-anterior (PA) view in CDT system using GATE simulation. We obtained the effective dose at different tube angles by applying dose actor function in GATE simulation which was commonly used to obtain the medical radiation dosimetry. The results indicated that GATE simulation was useful to estimate distribution of absorbed dose. Consequently, we obtained the acceptable distribution of effective dose at each projection. These results indicated that GATE simulation can be alternative method of calculating effective dose in CDT applications.

  14. Hanford Site Annual Report Radiological Dose Calculation Upgrade Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, Sandra F.

    2010-02-28

    Operations at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, result in the release of radioactive materials to offsite residents. Site authorities are required to estimate the dose to the maximally exposed offsite resident. Due to the very low levels of exposure at the residence, computer models, rather than environmental samples, are used to estimate exposure, intake, and dose. A DOS-based model has been used in the past (GENII version 1.485). GENII v1.485 has been updated to a Windows®-based software (GENII version 2.08). Use of the updated software will facilitate future dose evaluations, but must be demonstrated to provide results comparable to those of GENII v1.485. This report describes the GENII v1.485 and GENII v2.08 dose exposure, intake, and dose estimates for the maximally exposed offsite resident reported for calendar year 2008. The GENII v2.08 results reflect updates to implemented algorithms. No two environmental models produce the same results, as was again demonstrated in this report. The aggregated dose results from 2008 Hanford Site airborne and surface water exposure scenarios provide comparable dose results. Therefore, the GENII v2.08 software is recommended for future offsite resident dose evaluations.

  15. Estimation of quantal dose response of drugs by the Spearman-Karber method: a computer program written in BASIC.

    PubMed

    Fung, K P; Wong, T W

    1989-01-01

    Quantal-dose response is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology. The best known variables are the median effective dose and the median lethal dose. These are measured according to the frequency of dichotomous response of the subjects being studied. The Spearman-Karber method is a simple and convenient algorithm to evaluate these indices. A highly portable computer program in BASIC language is also included for the convenience of computation.

  16. Dose evaluation of organs at risk (OAR) cervical cancer using dose volume histogram (DVH) on brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif Wibowo, R.; Haris, Bambang; Inganatul Islamiyah, dan

    2017-05-01

    Brachytherapy is one way to cure cervical cancer. It works by placing a radioactive source near the tumor. However, there are some healthy tissues or organs at risk (OAR) such as bladder and rectum which received radiation also. This study aims to evaluate the radiation dose of the bladder and rectum. There were 12 total radiation dose data of the bladder and rectum obtained from patients’ brachytherapy. The dose of cervix for all patients was 6 Gy. Two-dimensional calculation of the radiation dose was based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) points or called DICRU while the 3-dimensional calculation derived from Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) on a volume of 2 cc (D2cc). The radiation dose of bladder and rectum from both methods were analysed using independent t test. The mean DICRU of bladder was 4.33730 Gy and its D2cc was4.78090 Gy. DICRU and D2cc bladder did not differ significantly (p = 0.144). The mean DICRU of rectum was 3.57980 Gy and 4.58670 Gy for D2cc. The mean DICRU of rectum differed significantly from D2cc of rectum (p = 0.000). The three-dimensional method radiation dose of the bladder and rectum was higher than the two-dimensional method with ratios 1.10227 for bladder and 1.28127 for rectum. The radiation dose of the bladder and rectum was still below the tolerance dose. Two-dimensional calculation of the bladder and rectum dose was lower than three-dimension which was more accurate due to its calculation at the whole volume of the organs.

  17. Evaluation of Sheltered Employment Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgarten, Allan; And Others

    The report evaluates the functions and effectiveness of sheltered workshops for handicapped students in Minnesota. The initial chapter reviews the history of the workshops, discusses participation in state workshops, describes programs and services of vocational rehabilitation, and summarizes funding of rehabilitation facilities. A chapter on…

  18. Evaluating Experiences in Adolescent Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebhardt-Seele, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Asserts that in developing Erdkinder, Montessori programs for adolescents, practitioners should use Montessori's principles of scientific pedagogy to establish methods for evaluating existing adolescent experiments. Suggests ways to apply criterion of normalization, and that "healing of deviations" comes from observing aspects like inner…

  19. Program Evaluation Grant. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quadco Rehabilitation Center, Inc., Stryker, OH.

    The purpose of the project was to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of those rehabilitation facilities which were utilized by the Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission (RSC) through the development, installation, and utilization of a program evaluation system and a management information system. The two systems were developed and…

  20. Effective Teaching Training. Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderburg, Arne S.; Shainline, Michael

    Workshops for teachers given under the Effective Teaching Training (ETT) program of the Albuquerque (New Mexico) Public Schools were evaluated. Based on the Upland Model of Effective Teaching, ETT will be extended to all teachers and administrators in the district by the end of the 1988-89 school year. Interviews, workshop ratings, and…

  1. Custodians/Security Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ennis, Bob

    The Custodians/Security Department is a support service of the Des Moines (Iowa) Independent Community School District. Responsibilities of the department do not stop with the care of the facility, but extend to providing a clean, safe environment for all who use school facilities. Program evaluation in the 1993-94 school year reveals a total…

  2. Clinical implementation and evaluation of the Acuros dose calculation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chenyu; Combine, Anthony G; Bednarz, Greg; Lalonde, Ronald J; Hu, Bin; Dickens, Kathy; Wynn, Raymond; Pavord, Daniel C; Saiful Huq, M

    2017-09-01

    The main aim of this study is to validate the Acuros XB dose calculation algorithm for a Varian Clinac iX linac in our clinics, and subsequently compare it with the wildely used AAA algorithm. The source models for both Acuros XB and AAA were configured by importing the same measured beam data into Eclipse treatment planning system. Both algorithms were validated by comparing calculated dose with measured dose on a homogeneous water phantom for field sizes ranging from 6 cm × 6 cm to 40 cm × 40 cm. Central axis and off-axis points with different depths were chosen for the comparison. In addition, the accuracy of Acuros was evaluated for wedge fields with wedge angles from 15 to 60°. Similarly, variable field sizes for an inhomogeneous phantom were chosen to validate the Acuros algorithm. In addition, doses calculated by Acuros and AAA at the center of lung equivalent tissue from three different VMAT plans were compared to the ion chamber measured doses in QUASAR phantom, and the calculated dose distributions by the two algorithms and their differences on patients were compared. Computation time on VMAT plans was also evaluated for Acuros and AAA. Differences between dose-to-water (calculated by AAA and Acuros XB) and dose-to-medium (calculated by Acuros XB) on patient plans were compared and evaluated. For open 6 MV photon beams on the homogeneous water phantom, both Acuros XB and AAA calculations were within 1% of measurements. For 23 MV photon beams, the calculated doses were within 1.5% of measured doses for Acuros XB and 2% for AAA. Testing on the inhomogeneous phantom demonstrated that AAA overestimated doses by up to 8.96% at a point close to lung/solid water interface, while Acuros XB reduced that to 1.64%. The test on QUASAR phantom showed that Acuros achieved better agreement in lung equivalent tissue while AAA underestimated dose for all VMAT plans by up to 2.7%. Acuros XB computation time was about three times faster than AAA for VMAT plans, and

  3. Evaluation of patient dose in some mammography centres in Iran.

    PubMed

    Paknyat, A; Samarin, E Rostam Pour; Jeshvaghane, N Ahmadi; Paydar, R; Fasaei, B; Karamloo, A; Khosravi, H R; Deevband, M R

    2011-09-01

    High diagnostic sensitivity and specificity while maintaining the least dose to the patient is the ideal mammography. The objective of this work was to evaluate patient dose and image quality of mammograms to propose corrective actions. The image quality for 1242 patient in 7 mammography facilities in Tehran city was evaluated based on selected image quality criteria using a three-point scale. Clinical image quality, the entrance surface air kerma, the average glandular dose and optical density of films for standard PMMA phantom of 4.5 cm thickness were evaluated. The results showed that up to 72 % of mammograms were in good condition to be diagnosed, and only about 3.4 % of the images were unacceptable or with suboptimal quality. The entrance surface air kerma values were in the range of 3.8-10.5 mGy, average glandular dose 0.5-1.8 mGy and optical density of films 0.74-2.03. The image quality evaluation after correction actions, periodic image quality evaluation and using the correct equipment certainly will improve patient dose.

  4. Radiobiological evaluation of low dose-rate prostate brachytherapy implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaup, Courtney James

    Low dose-rate brachytherapy is a radiation therapy treatment for men with prostate cancer. While this treatment is common, the use of isotopes with varying dosimetric characteristics means that the prescription level and normal organ tolerances vary. Additionally, factors such as prostate edema, seed loss and seed migration may alter the dose distribution within the prostate. The goal of this work is to develop a radiobiological response tool based on spatial dose information which may be used to aid in treatment planning, post-implant evaluation and determination of the effects of prostate edema and seed migration. Aim 1: Evaluation of post-implant prostate edema and its dosimetric and biological effects. Aim 2: Incorporation of biological response to simplify post-implant evaluation. Aim 3: Incorporation of biological response to simplify treatment plan comparison. Aim 4: Radiobiologically based comparison of single and dual-isotope implants. Aim 5: Determine the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of seed disappearance and migration.

  5. Evaluation of Programs: Reading Carol H. Weiss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Msila, Vuyisile; Setlhako, Angeline

    2013-01-01

    Carol Weiss did much to enhance the role of evaluation in her writings. Her work shows evaluators what affects their roles as they evaluate programs. Furthermore, her theory of change spells out the complexities involved in program evaluation. There are various processes involved in the evaluation of programs. The paper looks at some of the…

  6. Avertable dose intervention applied in emergency response dose evaluation system for nuclear emergency preparedness in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chung-hsin; Teng, Jen-hsin; Yang, Yung-muh; Chang, Bor-jing

    2010-06-01

    In Taiwan the new guides for the nuclear emergency public protective action were laid down by the Atomic Energy Council (AEC) of Executive Yuan, Taiwan, ROC on July 15th, 2005. The main modifications of the guides are that the avertable dose is applied as the intervention levels and suggests the public protective actions. The emergency response dose evaluation system named RPDOSE, which was developed in 2005, was employed in this work to enhance the capability of the avertable dose evaluation for the villages in the emergency planning zone (EPZ). The period of the long-term weather forecasting data was extended from 4 to 8 days to satisfy the requirement of avertable dose computing. According to the intervention levels, the RPDOSE system is used to calculate the avertable dose and suggest appropriate public protective actions such as sheltering, evacuation or iodine prophylaxis as well as the proposed acting times for each village in the EPZ. This system was employed and examined in the annual nuclear emergency exercise of 2008 in the Maanshan nuclear power plant.

  7. Comparison of effective radiation doses from X-ray, CT, and PET/CT in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma using a dose monitoring program

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeun Yoon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Myung-Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the use of a dose monitoring program for calculating and comparing the diagnostic radiation doses in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. METHODS We retrospectively reviewed diagnostic and therapeutic imaging studies performed on pediatric patients with neuroblastoma from 2003 to 2014. We calculated the mean effective dose per exam for X-ray, conventional computed tomography (CT), and CT of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) from the data collected using a dose monitoring program (DoseTrack group) since October 2012. Using the data, we estimated the cumulative dose per person and the relative dose from each modality in all patients (Total group). The effective dose from PET was manually calculated for all patients. RESULTS We included 63 patients with a mean age of 3.2±3.5 years; 28 had a history of radiation therapy, with a mean irradiated dose of 31.9±23.2 Gy. The mean effective dose per exam was 0.04±0.19 mSv for X-ray, 1.09±1.11 mSv for CT, and 8.35±7.45 mSv for CT of PET/CT in 31 patients of the Dose-Track group. The mean estimated cumulative dose per patient in the Total group was 3.43±2.86 mSv from X-ray (8.5%), 7.66±6.09 mSv from CT (19.1%), 18.35±13.52 mSv from CT of PET/CT (45.7%), and 10.71±10.05 mSv from PET (26.7%). CONCLUSION CT of PET/CT contributed nearly half of the total cumulative dose in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. The radiation dose from X-ray was not negligible because of the large number of X-ray images. A dose monitoring program can be useful for calculating radiation doses in patients with cancer. PMID:27306659

  8. Comparison of effective radiation doses from X-ray, CT, and PET/CT in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma using a dose monitoring program.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeun Yoon; Shin, Hyun Joo; Kim, Myung Joon; Lee, Mi-Jung

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the use of a dose monitoring program for calculating and comparing the diagnostic radiation doses in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. We retrospectively reviewed diagnostic and therapeutic imaging studies performed on pediatric patients with neuroblastoma from 2003 to 2014. We calculated the mean effective dose per exam for X-ray, conventional computed tomography (CT), and CT of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) from the data collected using a dose monitoring program (DoseTrack group) since October 2012. Using the data, we estimated the cumulative dose per person and the relative dose from each modality in all patients (Total group). The effective dose from PET was manually calculated for all patients. We included 63 patients with a mean age of 3.2±3.5 years; 28 had a history of radiation therapy, with a mean irradiated dose of 31.9±23.2 Gy. The mean effective dose per exam was 0.04±0.19 mSv for X-ray, 1.09±1.11 mSv for CT, and 8.35±7.45 mSv for CT of PET/CT in 31 patients of the DoseTrack group. The mean estimated cumulative dose per patient in the Total group was 3.43±2.86 mSv from X-ray (8.5%), 7.66±6.09 mSv from CT (19.1%), 18.35±13.52 mSv from CT of PET/CT (45.7%), and 10.71±10.05 mSv from PET (26.7%). CT of PET/CT contributed nearly half of the total cumulative dose in pediatric patients with neuroblastoma. The radiation dose from X-ray was not negligible because of the large number of X-ray images. A dose monitoring program can be useful for calculating radiation doses in patients with cancer.

  9. Abdominal pediatric cancer surveillance using serial computed tomography: evaluation of organ absorbed dose and effective dose.

    PubMed

    Lam, Diana; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L; McGahan, John P; Stern, Robin; Boone, John M

    2011-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is used extensively in cancer diagnosis, staging, evaluation of response to treatment, and in active surveillance for cancer reoccurrence. A review of CT technology is provided, at a level of detail appropriate for a busy clinician to review. The basis of x-ray CT dosimetry is also discussed, and concepts of absorbed dose and effective dose (ED) are distinguished. Absorbed dose is a physical quantity (measured in milligray [mGy]) equal to the x-ray energy deposited in a mass of tissue, whereas ED uses an organ-specific weighting method that converts organ doses to ED measured in millisieverts (mSv). The organ weighting values carry with them a measure of radiation risk, and so ED (in mSv) is not a physical dose metric but rather is one that conveys radiation risk. The use of CT in a cancer surveillance protocol was used as an example of a pediatric patient who had kidney cancer, with surgery and radiation therapy. The active use of CT for cancer surveillance along with diagnostic CT scans led to a total of 50 CT scans performed on this child in a 7-year period. It was estimated that the patient received an average organ dose of 431 mGy from these CT scans. By comparison, the radiation therapy was performed and delivered 50.4 Gy to the patient's abdomen. Thus, the total dose from CT represented only 0.8% of the patient's radiation dose. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A randomized controlled trial of a multi-dose bystander intervention program using peer education theater.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Sarah; Winter, Samantha C; Palmer, Jane E; Postmus, Judy L; Peterson, N Andrew; Zucker, Sharon; Koenick, RuthAnne

    2015-08-01

    This article reports findings from a longitudinal, experimental evaluation of a peer education theater program, Students Challenging Realities and Educating Against Myths (SCREAM) Theater. This study examines the impact of SCREAM Theater on a range of bystander-related outcomes (i.e. bystander intentions, bystander efficacy, perception of friend norms and bystander behaviors) in situations involving sexual violence and whether there was a differential impact of the program by participant sex. First-year college students completed three waves of surveys (pretest, first post-test and second post-test). All participants received one dose of the intervention during summer orientation after the pretest. After the first post-test, participants were randomly assigned to receive two additional doses, or to a control condition, in which they received no additional doses. Students in both one- and three-dose groups reported a number of positive increases. Overall, an intent-to-treat analysis (n = 1390) indicated three doses of the intervention during the first semester of college resulted in better outcomes than the one-time intervention during summer orientation alone. Although both male and female students' scores increased during the study period, female students consistently scored higher than male students on each outcome. The findings suggest that peer education theater holds promise for bystander intervention education on college campuses.

  11. The Evaluation Handbook: Guidelines for Evaluating Dropout Prevention Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smink, Jay; Stank, Peg

    This manual, developed in an effort to take the mysticism out of program evaluation, discusses six phases of the program evaluation process. The introduction discusses reasons for evaluation, process and outcome evaluation, the purpose of the handbook, the evaluation process, and the Sequoia United School District Dropout Prevention Program. Phase…

  12. 7 CFR 22.307 - Program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Program evaluation. 22.307 Section 22.307 Agriculture... Governments § 22.307 Program evaluation. The Department of Agriculture is responsible for continuous program evaluation to determine if individual projects and the entire program is cost effective in terms of...

  13. 7 CFR 22.307 - Program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Program evaluation. 22.307 Section 22.307 Agriculture... Governments § 22.307 Program evaluation. The Department of Agriculture is responsible for continuous program evaluation to determine if individual projects and the entire program is cost effective in terms of...

  14. 7 CFR 22.307 - Program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Program evaluation. 22.307 Section 22.307 Agriculture... Governments § 22.307 Program evaluation. The Department of Agriculture is responsible for continuous program evaluation to determine if individual projects and the entire program is cost effective in terms of...

  15. Feedback Improvement in Automatic Program Evaluation Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skupas, Bronius

    2010-01-01

    Automatic program evaluation is a way to assess source program files. These techniques are used in learning management environments, programming exams and contest systems. However, use of automated program evaluation encounters problems: some evaluations are not clear for the students and the system messages do not show reasons for lost points.…

  16. Evaluation of metal trace detachment from dosing pumps using PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Omar; Mejia, Jorge; Laloy, Julie; Alpan, Lütfiye; Toussaint, Olivier; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Lucas, Stéphane

    2014-07-01

    Metal trace detachment evaluation is essential for instruments destined for pharmaceutical applications, such as pumps. Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) was used to determine and quantify metal traces originated from stainless steel and ceramic dosing pumps. Metal traces were quantified from either distilled water samples or cellulose filters in two tests: a short-term test of 16 h mimicking a daily cycle of a dosing pump for industrial applications, and a long-term test of 9 days evaluating the pump wearing. The main result is that ceramic dosing pumps present lower metal detachment than stainless steel counterparts. Traces of Si and Al were found originating from pieces around the pumps (pipes and joints).

  17. Principles of protection: a formal approach for evaluating dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Wikman-Svahn, Per; Peterson, Martin; Hansson, Sven Ove

    2006-03-01

    One of the central issues in radiation protection consists in determining what weight should be given to individual doses in relation to collective or aggregated doses. A mathematical framework is introduced in which such assessments can be made precisely in terms of comparisons between alternative distributions of individual doses. In addition to evaluation principles that are well known from radiation protection, a series of principles that are derived from parallel discussions in moral philosophy and welfare economics is investigated. A battery of formal properties is then used to investigate the evaluative principles. The results indicate that one of the new principles, bilinear prioritarianism, may be preferable to current practices, since it satisfies efficiency-related properties better without sacrificing other desirable properties.

  18. Summary of the National Toxicology Program's report of the endocrine disruptors low-dose peer review.

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, Ronald; Lucier, George; Wolfe, Mary; Hall, Roxanne; Stancel, George; Prins, Gail; Gallo, Michael; Reuhl, Kenneth; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Brown, Terry; Moore, John; Leakey, Julian; Haseman, Joseph; Kohn, Michael

    2002-01-01

    At the request of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), the National Toxicology Program organized an independent and open peer review to evaluate the scientific evidence on low-dose effects and nonmonotonic dose-response relationships for endocrine-disrupting chemicals in mammalian species. For this peer review, "low-dose effects" referred to biologic changes that occur in the range of human exposures or at doses lower than those typically used in the standard testing paradigm of the U.S. EPA for evaluating reproductive and developmental toxicity. The demonstration that an effect is adverse was not required because in many cases the long-term health consequences of altered endocrine function during development have not been fully characterized. A unique aspect of this peer review was the willing submission of individual animal data by principal investigators of primary research groups active in this field and the independent statistical reanalyses of selected parameters prior to the peer review meeting by a subpanel of statisticians. The expert peer-review panel (the panel) also considered mechanistic data that might influence the plausibility of low-dose effects and identified study design issues or other biologic factors that might account for differences in reported outcomes among studies. The panel found that low-dose effects, as defined for this review, have been demonstrated in laboratory animals exposed to certain endocrine-active agents. In some cases where low-dose effects have been reported, the findings have not been replicated. The shape of the dose-response curves for reported effects varied with the end point and dosing regimen and were low-dose linear, threshold-appearing, or nonmonotonic. The findings of the panel indicate that the current testing paradigm used for assessments of reproductive and developmental toxicity should be revisited to see whether changes are needed regarding dose selection, animal-model selection, age when

  19. Evaluation and assessment of education programs

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, M.L.

    1994-04-01

    To ensure quality products, the Department of Energy is emphasizing the evaluation and assessment of education programs. In response, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is preparing its program managers to conduct formative evaluations of each education program. In preparation for designing evaluation tools the program managers have been exposed to an assessment guide that will broaden their knowledge of writing goals and objectives. Data collected will support the design of evaluation tools created by each of the program managers.

  20. SU-E-T-455: Impact of Different Independent Dose Verification Software Programs for Secondary Check

    SciTech Connect

    Itano, M; Yamazaki, T; Kosaka, M; Kobayashi, N; Yamashita, M; Ishibashi, S; Higuchi, Y; Tachibana, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: There have been many reports for different dose calculation algorithms for treatment planning system (TPS). Independent dose verification program (IndpPro) is essential to verify clinical plans from the TPS. However, the accuracy of different independent dose verification programs was not evident. We conducted a multi-institutional study to reveal the impact of different IndpPros using different TPSs. Methods: Three institutes participated in this study. They used two different IndpPros (RADCALC and Simple MU Analysis (SMU), which implemented the Clarkson algorithm. RADCALC needed the input of radiological path length (RPL) computed by the TPSs (Eclipse or Pinnacle3). SMU used CT images to compute the RPL independently from TPS). An ion-chamber measurement in water-equivalent phantom was performed to evaluate the accuracy of two IndpPros and the TPS in each institute. Next, the accuracy of dose calculation using the two IndpPros compared to TPS was assessed in clinical plan. Results: The accuracy of IndpPros and the TPSs in the homogenous phantom was +/−1% variation to the measurement. 1543 treatment fields were collected from the patients treated in the institutes. The RADCALC showed better accuracy (0.9 ± 2.2 %) than the SMU (1.7 ± 2.1 %). However, the accuracy was dependent on the TPS (Eclipse: 0.5%, Pinnacle3: 1.0%). The accuracy of RADCALC with Eclipse was similar to that of SMU in one of the institute. Conclusion: Depending on independent dose verification program, the accuracy shows systematic dose accuracy variation even though the measurement comparison showed a similar variation. The variation was affected by radiological path length calculation. IndpPro with Pinnacle3 has different variation because Pinnacle3 computed the RPL using physical density. Eclipse and SMU uses electron density, though.

  1. A Four-step Approach for Evaluation of Dose Additivity

    EPA Science Inventory

    A four step approach was developed for evaluating toxicity data on a chemical mixture for consistency with dose addition. Following the concepts in the U.S. EPA mixture guidance (EPA 2000), toxicologic interaction for a defined mixture (all components known) is departure from a c...

  2. A Four-step Approach for Evaluation of Dose Additivity

    EPA Science Inventory

    A four step approach was developed for evaluating toxicity data on a chemical mixture for consistency with dose addition. Following the concepts in the U.S. EPA mixture guidance (EPA 2000), toxicologic interaction for a defined mixture (all components known) is departure from a c...

  3. Evaluation of MatriXX for IMRT and VMAT dose verifications in peripheral dose regions

    SciTech Connect

    Han Zhaohui; Ng, Sook Kien; Bhagwat, Mandar S.; Lyatskaya, Yulia; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2010-07-15

    conversion of the raw signals to MatriXX software data for low doses. Angular dependence is defined as the dose response of MatriXX at different gantry angles. Up to 8% difference in detector response has been observed between 0 deg. and 180 deg. Possible sources of these errors are discussed and a correction method is suggested. With corrections, MatriXX shows good agreement with the ion chamber in all cases involving different gantry and/or MLC dynamics, as well as the clinical plans. For both primary and peripheral doses, MatriXX shows dose linearity down to 2 cGy with an accuracy of within 1% of the local dose. Conclusions: The performance of MatriXX has been systematically evaluated in the peripheral dose regions. Major sources of error associated with MatriXX are identified and a correction method is suggested. This method has been successfully tested using both experimental and clinical plans. In all cases, good agreements between MatriXX and an ion chamber are achieved after corrections. The authors conclude that with proper corrections, MatriXX can be reliably used for peripheral dose measurements within the ranges studied.

  4. Beers-Fick criteria and drugs available through the Farmácia Dose Certa program.

    PubMed

    Lucchetti, Giancarlo; Lucchetti, Alessandra Lamas Granero; Pires, Sueli Luciano; Gorzoni, Milton Luiz

    2011-01-06

    Farmácia Dose Certa is a program available in the State of São Paulo that is a national reference for providing drugs free of charge to the population. Elderly people receiving care deserve special attention regarding drugs that are appropriate for their age group. The objective was to assess the drugs in the program considered to be inappropriate for the elderly. Descriptive study evaluating free drug distribution in the State of São Paulo, Brazil. Following the criteria proposed by Beers and Fick (drugs or drug classes that should be avoided among elderly people, independent of the diagnosis or clinical condition, because of the high risk of side effects and because other, safer drugs are available), the drugs in the Farmácia Dose Certa program that might be inappropriate for elderly people and the levels of evidence for each drug included were assessed. Among the available drugs, 10 (25.6%) were included within the Beers-Fick criteria. The drugs selected were: amitriptyline, cimetidine, diazepam, digoxin, fluoxetine, methyldopa, nifedipine, promethazine, thioridazine and ferrous sulfate. The list of drugs available within the Farmácia Dose Certa program may be considered appropriate for the general population, but not completely for the elderly population. Adjusting this list to the pharmacological aspects of aging will reduce the risks of drug interactions, falls, mental confusion and excessive sedation that result from drugs that are considered inappropriate for consumption by elderly people.

  5. Planning Evaluation through the Program Life Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheirer, Mary Ann; Mark, Melvin M.; Brooks, Ariana; Grob, George F.; Chapel, Thomas J.; Geisz, Mary; McKaughan, Molly; Leviton, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Linking evaluation methods to the several phases of a program's life cycle can provide evaluation planners and funders with guidance about what types of evaluation are most appropriate over the trajectory of social and educational programs and other interventions. If methods are matched to the needs of program phases, evaluation can and should…

  6. 42 CFR 491.11 - Program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Program evaluation. 491.11 Section 491.11 Public... Certification; and FQHCs Conditions for Coverage § 491.11 Program evaluation. (a) The clinic or center carries out, or arranges for, an annual evaluation of its total program. (b) The evaluation includes review...

  7. 42 CFR 491.11 - Program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Program evaluation. 491.11 Section 491.11 Public... Certification; and FQHCs Conditions for Coverage § 491.11 Program evaluation. (a) The clinic or center carries out, or arranges for, an annual evaluation of its total program. (b) The evaluation includes review...

  8. 42 CFR 491.11 - Program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Program evaluation. 491.11 Section 491.11 Public... Certification; and FQHCs Conditions for Coverage § 491.11 Program evaluation. (a) The clinic or center carries out, or arranges for, an annual evaluation of its total program. (b) The evaluation includes review...

  9. 42 CFR 491.11 - Program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Program evaluation. 491.11 Section 491.11 Public... Certification; and FQHCs Conditions for Coverage § 491.11 Program evaluation. (a) The clinic or center carries out, or arranges for, an annual evaluation of its total program. (b) The evaluation includes review...

  10. Planning Evaluation through the Program Life Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheirer, Mary Ann; Mark, Melvin M.; Brooks, Ariana; Grob, George F.; Chapel, Thomas J.; Geisz, Mary; McKaughan, Molly; Leviton, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Linking evaluation methods to the several phases of a program's life cycle can provide evaluation planners and funders with guidance about what types of evaluation are most appropriate over the trajectory of social and educational programs and other interventions. If methods are matched to the needs of program phases, evaluation can and should…

  11. 42 CFR 491.11 - Program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Program evaluation. 491.11 Section 491.11 Public... Certification; and FQHCs Conditions for Coverage § 491.11 Program evaluation. (a) The clinic or center carries out, or arranges for, an annual evaluation of its total program. (b) The evaluation includes review...

  12. A Program Evaluation of a Seminar Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Robert Dale, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    When students do not score well on standardized tests, their school can suffer. In an attempt to improve standardized test scores, a district placed students into a program called Seminar to help them work on weak areas of content through personalized instruction. The purpose of this project study was to assess if the Seminar program had a…

  13. ENergy and Power Evaluation Program

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    In the late 1970s, national and international attention began to focus on energy issues. Efforts were initiated to design and test analytical tools that could be used to assist energy planners in evaluating energy systems, particularly in developing countries. In 1984, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned Argonne National Laboratory`s Decision and Information Sciences Division (DIS) to incorporate a set of analytical tools into a personal computer-based package for distribution in developing countries. The package developed by DIS staff, the ENergy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP), covers the range of issues that energy planners must face: economic development, energy demand projections, supply-and-demand balancing, energy system expansion, and environmental impact analysis. Following the original DOE-supported development effort, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), with the assistance from the US Department of State (DOS) and the US Department of Energy (DOE), provided ENPEP training, distribution, and technical support to many countries. ENPEP is now in use in over 60 countries and is an international standard for energy planning tools. More than 500 energy experts have been trained in the use of the entire ENPEP package or some of its modules during the international training courses organized by the IAEA in collaboration with Argonne`s Decision and Information Sciences (DIS) Division and the Division of Educational Programs (DEP). This report contains the ENPEP program which can be download from the internet. Described in this report is the description of ENPEP Program, news, forums, online support and contacts.

  14. Strain gage system evaluation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolleris, G. W.; Mazur, H. J.; Kokoszka, E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A program was conducted to determine the reliability of various strain gage systems when applied to rotating compressor blades in an aircraft gas turbine engine. A survey of current technology strain gage systems was conducted to provide a basis for selecting candidate systems for evaluation. Testing and evaluation was conducted in an F 100 engine. Sixty strain gage systems of seven different designs were installed on the first and third stages of an F 100 engine fan. Nineteen strain gage failures occurred during 62 hours of engine operation, for a survival rate of 68 percent. Of the failures, 16 occurred at blade-to-disk leadwire jumps (84 percent), two at a leadwire splice (11 percent), and one at a gage splice (5 percent). Effects of erosion, temperature, G-loading, and stress levels are discussed. Results of a post-test analysis of the individual components of each strain gage system are presented.

  15. 5 CFR 9701.107 - Program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... procedures for evaluating the regulations in this part and their implementation. DHS will provide designated... the design and results of program evaluations. (b) Involvement of employee representatives under...

  16. PME Guidelines for Program Development/Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dock, Stephen

    In a Program Development and Evaluation model, guidelines are presented for program directors at Delaware County Community College. Based on the premise that the process of developing programs is essentially that of evaluating programs, the model includes the following steps for both processes: (1) involve the appropriate publics; (2) identify…

  17. LEA Title VII Program Evaluations. Panel Presentations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balu, Raj

    These panel presentations focus on LEA Title VII Program Evaluations. Raj Balu, an administrator of bilingual programs in Chicago presents information regarding the bilingual education program in the Chicago public schools, as well as information on Title VII programs and what kind of evaluation is being done. Jesus Salazar, who is currently…

  18. Problems in evaluating radiation dose via terrestrial and aquatic pathways.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, B E; Soldat, J K; Schreckhise, R G; Watson, E C; McKenzie, D H

    1981-12-01

    This review is concerned with exposure risk and the environmental pathways models used for predictive assessment of radiation dose. Exposure factors, the adequacy of available data, and the model subcomponents are critically reviewed from the standpoint of absolute error propagation. Although the models are inherently capable of better absolute accuracy, a calculated dose is usually overestimated by from two to six orders of magnitude, in practice. The principal reason for so large an error lies in using "generic" concentration ratios in situations where site specific data are needed. Major opinion of the model makers suggests a number midway between these extremes, with only a small likelihood of ever underestimating the radiation dose. Detailed evaluations are made of source considerations influencing dose (i.e., physical and chemical status of released material); dispersal mechanisms (atmospheric, hydrologic and biotic vector transport); mobilization and uptake mechanisms (i.e., chemical and other factors affecting the biological availability of radioelements); and critical pathways. Examples are shown of confounding in food-chain pathways, due to uncritical application of concentration ratios. Current thoughts of replacing the critical pathways approach to calculating dose with comprehensive model calculations are also shown to be ill-advised, given present limitations in the comprehensive data base. The pathways models may also require improved parametrization, as they are not at present structured adequately to lend themselves to validation. The extremely wide errors associated with predicting exposure stand in striking contrast to the error range associated with the extrapolation of animal effects data to the human being.

  19. Program evaluation of Protovation Camp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Laurel Lynell Martin

    The purpose of this program evaluation was to determine the extent to which Protovation Camp utilized the combined resources of multiple institutions to impact student learning in science, technology, engineering, and math. The partnership consisted of multiple institutions: the university, providing graduate students to facilitate inquiry-based lessons; the science center, allowing the use of their facilities and resources; and the elementary school, contributing rising third through fifth grade campers. All of these components were examined. The mixed-methods approach used post hoc quantitative data for campers, which consisted of pre-test and post-test scores on the Test of Science-Related Attitudes (TOSRA), the Draw-A-Scientist Test, and content tests based on the camp activities. Additionally, TOSRA scores and current survey results for the graduate students were used along with qualitative data collected from plusdelta charts to determine the impact of participation in Protovation Camp on teachers and students. Results of the program evaluation indicated that when students were taught inquiry-based lessons that ignite wonder, both their attitudes toward science and their knowledge about science improved. An implication for teacher preparation programs was that practicing inquiry-based lessons on actual students (campers) was an important component for teachers (graduate students) as they prepare to positively impact student learning in their own classrooms. Immediate feedback from the campers in the form of pre-test and post-test scores and from peers on plusdelta charts allowed the graduate students the opportunity to make needed adjustments to improve effectiveness before using the lesson with a new set of campers or later in their own classrooms. Keywords. Teacher preparation, Inquiry-based instruction, STEM instructions, University and museum partnerships

  20. Experimental evaluation of a MOSFET dosimeter for proton dose measurements.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Ryosuke; Nishio, Teiji; Miyagishi, Tomoko; Hirano, Eriko; Hotta, Kenji; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2006-12-07

    The metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter has been widely studied for use as a dosimeter for patient dose verification. The major advantage of this detector is its size, which acts as a point dosimeter, and also its ease of use. The commercially available TN502RD MOSFET dosimeter manufactured by Thomson and Nielsen has never been used for proton dosimetry. Therefore we used the MOSFET dosimeter for the first time in proton dose measurements. In this study, the MOSFET dosimeter was irradiated with 190 MeV therapeutic proton beams. We experimentally evaluated dose reproducibility, linearity, fading effect, beam intensity dependence and angular dependence for the proton beam. Furthermore, the Bragg curve and spread-out Bragg peak were also measured and the linear-energy transfer (LET) dependence of the MOSFET response was investigated. Many characteristics of the MOSFET response for proton beams were the same as those for photon beams reported in previous papers. However, the angular MOSFET responses at 45, 90, 135, 225, 270 and 315 degrees for proton beams were over-responses of about 15%, and moreover the MOSFET response depended strongly on the LET of the proton beam. This study showed that the angular dependence and LET dependence of the MOSFET response must be considered very carefully for quantitative proton dose evaluations.

  1. 5 CFR 9701.107 - Program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Program evaluation. 9701.107 Section 9701... RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM General Provisions § 9701.107 Program evaluation. (a) DHS will establish... the design and results of program evaluations. (b) Involvement of employee representatives under...

  2. The Three Phases of Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hass, Glen

    The emphasis on and the importance of evaluation have been addressed by program planners for the past 60 years. Evaluation strategies have broadened from the Tylerian approach, which focuses on specific objectives, to more investigation using indicators as measures of program success. Evaluation is important during the development of a program and…

  3. Apollo Photograph Evaluation (APE) programming manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, I. J.

    1974-01-01

    This document describes the programming techniques used to implement the equations of the Apollo Photograph Evaluation (APE) program on the UNIVAC 1108 computer and contains detailed descriptions of the program structure, a User's Guide section to provide the necessary information for proper operation of the program, and information for the assessment of the program's adaptability to future problems.

  4. Evaluation of Dose Distribution in Intensity Modulated Radiosurgery for Lung Cancer under Condition of Respiratory Motion

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Mee Sun; Jeong, Jae-Uk; Nam, Taek-Keun; Ahn, Sung-Ja; Chung, Woong-Ki; Song, Ju-Young

    2016-01-01

    The dose of a real tumor target volume and surrounding organs at risk (OARs) under the effect of respiratory motion was calculated for a lung tumor plan, based on the target volume covering the whole tumor motion range for intensity modulated radiosurgery (IMRS). Two types of IMRS plans based on simulated respiratory motion were designed using humanoid and dynamic phantoms. Delivery quality assurance (DQA) was performed using ArcCHECK and MapCHECK2 for several moving conditions of the tumor and the real dose inside the humanoid phantom was evaluated using the 3DVH program. This evaluated dose in the tumor target and OAR using the 3DVH program was higher than the calculated dose in the plan, and a greater difference was seen for the RapidArc treatment than for the standard intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with fixed gantry angle beams. The results of this study show that for IMRS plans based on target volume, including the whole tumor motion range, tighter constraints of the OAR should be considered in the optimization process. The method devised in this study can be applied effectively to analyze the dose distribution in the real volume of tumor target and OARs in IMRT plans targeting the whole tumor motion range. PMID:27648949

  5. Evaluation of NASA space grant consortia programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenberg, Martin A.

    1990-01-01

    The meaningful evaluation of the NASA Space Grant Consortium and Fellowship Programs must overcome unusual difficulties: (1) the program, in its infancy, is undergoing dynamic change; (2) the several state consortia and universities have widely divergent parochial goals that defy a uniform evaluative process; and (3) the pilot-sized consortium programs require that the evaluative process be economical in human costs less the process of evaluation comprise the effectiveness of the programs they are meant to assess. This paper represents an attempt to assess the context in which evaluation is to be conducted, the goals and limitations inherent to the evaluation, and to recommend appropriate guidelines for evaluation.

  6. Dose-Response Effects of the Text4baby Mobile Health Program: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Peter E; Szekely, Daniel R; Bihm, Jasmine W; Murray, Elizabeth A; Snider, Jeremy; Abroms, Lorien C

    2015-01-01

    Background Mobile health (mHealth) is growing rapidly, but more studies are needed on how to optimize programs, including optimal timing of messaging, dose of exposure, and value of interactive features. This study evaluates final outcomes of text4baby (a text message service for pregnant and postpartum women) from a randomized trial performed in a population of pregnant female soldiers and family members. Objective The study aims were to evaluate (1) treatment effects and (2) dose-response effects of text4baby on behavioral outcomes compared to control (no text4baby) condition. Methods The study was a randomized trial of text4baby at Madigan Army Medical Center. Female military health beneficiaries who met inclusion criteria were eligible for the study. Participants provided consent, completed a baseline questionnaire, and then were randomized to enroll in text4baby or not. They were followed up at 3 time points thereafter through delivery of their baby. Generalized estimating equation models were used to evaluate outcomes. We examined treatment effects and the effects of higher doses of text4baby messages on outcomes. Results We report descriptive statistics including dosage of text messages delivered. The main finding was a significant effect of high exposure to text4baby on self-reported alcohol consumption postpartum (OR 0.212, 95% CI 0.046-0.973, P=.046), as measured by the question “Since you found out about your pregnancy, have you consumed alcoholic beverages?” The text4baby participants also reported lower quantities of alcohol consumed postpartum. Conclusions Studies of text4baby have helped to build the mHealth evidence base. The effects of text4baby offer lessons for future scalable mHealth programs and suggest the need to study dose-response effects of these interventions. PMID:25630361

  7. Comp Plan: A computer program to generate dose and radiobiological metrics from dose-volume histogram files

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, Lois Charlotte; Miller, Julie-Anne; Kumar, Shivani; Whelan, Brendan M.; Vinod, Shalini K.

    2012-10-01

    Treatment planning studies often require the calculation of a large number of dose and radiobiological metrics. To streamline these calculations, a computer program called Comp Plan was developed using MATLAB. Comp Plan calculates common metrics, including equivalent uniform dose, tumor control probability, and normal tissue complication probability from dose-volume histogram data. The dose and radiobiological metrics can be calculated for the original data or for an adjusted fraction size using the linear quadratic model. A homogeneous boost dose can be added to a given structure if desired. The final output is written to an Excel file in a format convenient for further statistical analysis. Comp Plan was verified by independent calculations. A lung treatment planning study comparing 45 plans for 7 structures using up to 6 metrics for each structure was successfully analyzed within approximately 5 minutes with Comp Plan. The code is freely available from the authors on request.

  8. Design of the EXercise Intervention after Stem cell Transplantation (EXIST) study: a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of an individualized high intensity physical exercise program on fitness and fatigue in patients with multiple myeloma or (non-) Hodgkin's lymphoma treated with high dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The use of high-dose chemotherapy combined with autologous stem cell transplantation has improved the outcome of hematologic malignancies. Nevertheless, this treatment can cause persistent fatigue and a reduced global quality of life, role and physical function. Physical exercise interventions may be beneficial for physical fitness, fatigue and quality of life. However, the trials conducted so far to test the effects of physical exercise interventions in this group of patients were of poor to moderate methodological quality and economic evaluations are lacking. Hence there is need for a rigorous, appropriately controlled assessment of the effectiveness of exercise programs in these patients. The aims of the present study are (1) to determine the effectiveness of an individualized high intensity strength and interval training program with respect to physiological and psychological health status in patients with multiple myeloma or (non-)Hodgkin's lymphoma who have recently undergone high dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation; and (2) to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of this program. Methods A multicenter, prospective, single blind randomized controlled trial will be performed. We aim to recruit 120 patients within an inclusion period of 2 years at 7 hospitals in the Netherlands. The patients will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: (1) intervention plus usual care; or (2) usual care. The intervention consists of an 18-week individualized supervised high-intensity exercise program and counselling. The primary outcomes (cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle strength and fatigue) and secondary outcomes are assessed at baseline, at completion of the intervention and at 12 months follow-up. Discussion The strengths of this study include the solid trial design with clearly defined research groups and standardized outcome measures, the inclusion of an economic evaluation and the inclusion of both resistance and endurance

  9. Evaluation of the Emergency Response Dose Assessment System(ERDAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Randolph J.; Lambert, Winifred C.; Manobianco, John T.; Taylor, Gregory E.; Wheeler, Mark M.; Yersavich, Ann M.

    1996-01-01

    The emergency response dose assessment system (ERDAS) is a protype software and hardware system configured to produce routine mesoscale meteorological forecasts and enhanced dispersion estimates on an operational basis for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC)/Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS) region. ERDAS provides emergency response guidance to operations at KSC/CCAS in the case of an accidental hazardous material release or an aborted vehicle launch. This report describes the evaluation of ERDAS including: evaluation of sea breeze predictions, comparison of launch plume location and concentration predictions, case study of a toxic release, evaluation of model sensitivity to varying input parameters, evaluation of the user interface, assessment of ERDA's operational capabilities, and a comparison of ERDAS models to the ocean breeze dry gultch diffusion model.

  10. SSME Streamtube Evaluation Program (SSTEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, William D.; Vaughan, David A.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical model of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) called SSME Streamtube Evaluation Program (SSTEP) has been developed based upon the assumption that the propellant flows through the main combustion chamber can be represented by a bundle of parallel streamtubes. The motivation for the development of SSTEP lies in the desire to gain a basic understanding of the engine performance effects of several common SSME hardware modifications. Specifically, this model has been used to evaluate the changes in performance due to boundary layer coolant hole enlargement, LOX post plugging, acoustic cavity elimination, baffle removal, and main combustion chamber coolant leakage. The results show a good general agreement with the available test data suggesting at least a qualitative agreement between SSTEP modeling and actual engine performance. Through the use of several adjustment factors, which represent relaxations of the SSTEP formulation assumptions, it is shown that the test data can be very closely matched and that SSTEP can be used as a performance prediction tool.

  11. SU-E-T-161: Evaluation of Dose Calculation Based On Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, T; Nakazawa, T; Saitou, Y; Nakata, A; Yano, M; Tateoka, K; Fujimoto, K; Sakata, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to convert pixel values in cone-beam CT (CBCT) using histograms of pixel values in the simulation CT (sim-CT) and the CBCT images and to evaluate the accuracy of dose calculation based on the CBCT. Methods: The sim-CT and CBCT images immediately before the treatment of 10 prostate cancer patients were acquired. Because of insufficient calibration of the pixel values in the CBCT, it is difficult to be directly used for dose calculation. The pixel values in the CBCT images were converted using an in-house program. A 7 fields treatment plans (original plan) created on the sim-CT images were applied to the CBCT images and the dose distributions were re-calculated with same monitor units (MUs). These prescription doses were compared with those of original plans. Results: In the results of the pixel values conversion in the CBCT images,the mean differences of pixel values for the prostate,subcutaneous adipose, muscle and right-femur were −10.78±34.60, 11.78±41.06, 29.49±36.99 and 0.14±31.15 respectively. In the results of the calculated doses, the mean differences of prescription doses for 7 fields were 4.13±0.95%, 0.34±0.86%, −0.05±0.55%, 1.35±0.98%, 1.77±0.56%, 0.89±0.69% and 1.69±0.71% respectively and as a whole, the difference of prescription dose was 1.54±0.4%. Conclusion: The dose calculation on the CBCT images achieve an accuracy of <2% by using this pixel values conversion program. This may enable implementation of efficient adaptive radiotherapy.

  12. Evaluation of dose reduction and image quality in CT colonography: comparison of low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction and routine-dose CT with filtered back projection.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Koichi; Fujiwara, Masanori; Kanazawa, Hidenori; Mogi, Tomohiro; Iida, Nao; Mitsushima, Toru; Lefor, Alan T; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2015-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the radiation dose and image quality comparing low-dose CT colonography (CTC) reconstructed using different levels of iterative reconstruction techniques with routine-dose CTC reconstructed with filtered back projection. Following institutional ethics clearance and informed consent procedures, 210 patients underwent screening CTC using automatic tube current modulation for dual positions. Examinations were performed in the supine position with a routine-dose protocol and in the prone position, randomly applying four different low-dose protocols. Supine images were reconstructed with filtered back projection and prone images with iterative reconstruction. Two blinded observers assessed the image quality of endoluminal images. Image noise was quantitatively assessed by region-of-interest measurements. The mean effective dose in the supine series was 1.88 mSv using routine-dose CTC, compared to 0.92, 0.69, 0.57, and 0.46 mSv at four different low doses in the prone series (p < 0.01). Overall image quality and noise of low-dose CTC with iterative reconstruction were significantly improved compared to routine-dose CTC using filtered back projection. The lowest dose group had image quality comparable to routine-dose images. Low-dose CTC with iterative reconstruction reduces the radiation dose by 48.5 to 75.1% without image quality degradation compared to routine-dose CTC with filtered back projection. • Low-dose CTC reduces radiation dose ≥ 48.5% compared to routine-dose CTC. • Iterative reconstruction improves overall CTC image quality compared with FBP. • Iterative reconstruction reduces overall CTC image noise compared with FBP. • Automated exposure control with iterative reconstruction is useful for low-dose CTC.

  13. Right timing in formative program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jori; Freeman, Melissa; Roulston, Kathy

    2014-08-01

    Since many educational researchers and program developers have limited knowledge of formative evaluation, formative data may be underutilized during the development and implementation of an educational program. The purpose of this article is to explain how participatory, responsive, educative, and qualitative approaches to formative evaluation can facilitate a partnership between evaluators and educational researchers and program managers to generate data useful to inform program implementation and improvement. This partnership is critical, we argue, because it enables an awareness of when to take appropriate action to ensure successful educational programs or "kairos". To illustrate, we use examples from our own evaluation work to highlight how formative evaluation may facilitate opportune moments to (1) define the substance and purpose of a program, (2) develop understanding and awareness of the cultural interpretations of program participants, and (3) show the relevance of stakeholder experiences to program goals.

  14. Evaluation of a low-dose neonatal chest radiographic system

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, E.M.; Kirks, D.R.; Strife, J.L.; Henry, G.C.; Kereiakes, J.G.

    1988-11-01

    A new low-dose chest radiographic system for use in the neonatal nursery was evaluated. This test system, composed of a Du Pont Kevlar fiber-front cassette, Quanta fast-detail screen, Cronex 4L film (wide latitude), and additional yttrium filtration (0.1 mm), reduced the radiation dose in neonatal chest radiography by 69% (0.9 vs 2.9 mrad (0.009 vs 0.029 mGy)) as compared with a conventional system without added yttrium filtration; the thyroid dose was reduced by 76% (0.9 vs 3.7 mrad (0.009 vs 0.037 mGy)). The cumulative dose reduction was achieved through a combination of factors, including (1) beam hardening by the added yttrium filter, (2) increased X-ray transmission through the Kevlar cassette, and (3) a fast film-screen combination. Scatter radiation at distances of 1 and 6 ft. (0.3 and 1.8 m) was negligible for both systems. Image sharpness was compared for the conventional system with and without added yttrium filtration and for the Kevlar system with yttrium. Although sharpness of bony detail was unchanged by adding yttrium filtration to the conventional system, a decrease in sharpness was noted with the Kevlar system. Because image sharpness was affected in the test system, we are not using the Kevlar-Cronex 4L system for mobile chest radiography in the neonatal intensive care unit, despite dose reductions. However, further study is recommended to determine if there is a slower film-screen combination with yttrium filtration that will not degrade image sharpness.

  15. Problems in evaluating radiation dose via terrestrial and aquatic pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, B E; Soldat, J K; Schreckhise, R G; Watson, E C; McKenzie, D H

    1981-01-01

    This review is concerned with exposure risk and the environmental pathways models used for predictive assessment of radiation dose. Exposure factors, the adequacy of available data, and the model subcomponents are critically reviewed from the standpoint of absolute error propagation. Although the models are inherently capable of better absolute accuracy, a calculated dose is usually overestimated by from two to six orders of magnitude, in practice. The principal reason for so large an error lies in using "generic" concentration ratios in situations where site specific data are needed. Major opinion of the model makers suggests a number midway between these extremes, with only a small likelihood of ever underestimating the radiation dose. Detailed evaluations are made of source considerations influencing dose (i.e., physical and chemical status of released material); dispersal mechanisms (atmospheric, hydrologic and biotic vector transport); mobilization and uptake mechanisms (i.e., chemical and other factors affecting the biological availability of radioelements); and critical pathways. Examples are shown of confounding in food-chain pathways, due to uncritical application of concentration ratios. Current thoughts of replacing the critical pathways approach to calculating dose with comprehensive model calculations are also shown to be ill-advised, given present limitations in the comprehensive data base. The pathways models may also require improved parametrization, as they are not at present structured adequately to lend themselves to validation. The extremely wide errors associated with predicting exposure stand in striking contrast to the error range associated with the extrapolation of animal effects data to the human being. PMID:7037381

  16. Scatterometry evaluation of focus-dose effects of EUV structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasari, Prasad; Kritsun, Oleg; Li, Jie; Volkman, Catherine; Hu, Jiangtao; Liu, Zhuan

    2013-04-01

    CD and shape control of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) structures is critical to ensure patterning performance at the 10 nm technology node and beyond. The optimum focus/dose control by EUV scanner is critical for CD uniformity, and the scanner depends on reliable and rapid metrology feedback to maintain control. The latest advances in scatterometry such as ellipsometry (SE), reflectometry (NISR), and Mueller matrix (MM) offers complete pattern profile, critical dimensions (CD), side-wall angles, and dimensional characterization. In this study, we will present the evaluation results of CD uniformity and focus dose sensitivity of line and space EUV structures at the limit of current ASML NXE 3100 scanner printability and complex 3D EUV structures. The results will include static and dynamic precision and CD-SEM correlation data.

  17. Maryland Community Colleges 1980 Program Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Board for Community Colleges, Annapolis.

    This report contains qualitative evaluations of 48 programs throughout the Maryland community college system, as well as a statewide evaluation of Teacher Education transfer programs. A summary of the Teacher Education programs is presented first, in which the purpose and role of teacher education in the community college, enrollment trends,…

  18. 7 CFR 22.307 - Program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Program evaluation. 22.307 Section 22.307 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture RURAL DEVELOPMENT COORDINATION Roles and Responsibilities of State Governments § 22.307 Program evaluation. The Department of Agriculture is responsible for continuous program...

  19. 7 CFR 22.307 - Program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program evaluation. 22.307 Section 22.307 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture RURAL DEVELOPMENT COORDINATION Roles and Responsibilities of State Governments § 22.307 Program evaluation. The Department of Agriculture is responsible for continuous program...

  20. Maryland Community Colleges 1980 Program Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Board for Community Colleges, Annapolis.

    This report contains qualitative evaluations of 48 programs throughout the Maryland community college system, as well as a statewide evaluation of Teacher Education transfer programs. A summary of the Teacher Education programs is presented first, in which the purpose and role of teacher education in the community college, enrollment trends,…

  1. Technology Assessment and Roadmap for the Emergency Radiation Dose Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Turteltaub, K W; Hartman-Siantar, C; Easterly, C; Blakely, W

    2005-10-03

    A Joint Interagency Working Group (JIWG) under the auspices of the Department of Homeland Security Office of Research and Development conducted a technology assessment of emergency radiological dose assessment capabilities as part of the overall need for rapid emergency medical response in the event of a radiological terrorist event in the United States. The goal of the evaluation is to identify gaps and recommend general research and development needs to better prepare the Country for mitigating the effects of such an event. Given the capabilities and roles for responding to a radiological event extend across many agencies, a consensus of gaps and suggested development plans was a major goal of this evaluation and road-mapping effort. The working group consisted of experts representing the Departments of Homeland Security, Health and Human Services (Centers for Disease Control and the National Institutes of Health), Food and Drug Administration, Department of Defense and the Department of Energy's National Laboratories (see appendix A for participants). The specific goals of this Technology Assessment and Roadmap were to: (1) Describe the general context for deployment of emergency radiation dose assessment tools following terrorist use of a radiological or nuclear device; (2) Assess current and emerging dose assessment technologies; and (3) Put forward a consensus high-level technology roadmap for interagency research and development in this area. This report provides a summary of the consensus of needs, gaps and recommendations for a research program in the area of radiation dosimetry for early response, followed by a summary of the technologies available and on the near-term horizon. We then present a roadmap for a research program to bring present and emerging near-term technologies to bear on the gaps in radiation dose assessment and triage. Finally we present detailed supporting discussion on the nature of the threats we considered, the status of technology

  2. Energy-efficient buildings program evaluations. Volume 2: Evaluation summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A.D.; Mayi, D.; Edgemon, S.D.

    1997-04-01

    This document presents summaries of code and utility building program evaluations reviewed as the basis for the information presented in Energy-Efficient Buildings Program Evaluations, Volume 1: Findings and Recommendations, DOE/EE/OBT-11569, Vol. 1. The main purpose of this volume is to summarize information from prior evaluations of similar programs that may be useful background for designing and conducting an evaluation of the BSGP. Another purpose is to summarize an extensive set of relevant evaluations and provide a resource for program designers, mangers, and evaluators.

  3. Safe motherhood program evaluation: theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Milne, Lesley; Scotland, Graham; Tagiyeva-Milne, Nargiz; Hussein, Julia

    2004-01-01

    Debate on the evaluation of safe motherhood programs has mainly focused on the outcome or process measure to be used. Less attention is paid to the application of different approaches to evaluation. This article reviews current theories of evaluation and provides examples of the extent to which these theories have been applied in the actual practice of evaluation. Most evaluations use multiple methods and approaches, but the rationale and intention behind these choices are often not made explicit. Factors are identified that need to be taken into consideration when planning and conducting safe motherhood program evaluations. Safe motherhood programs are complex interventions, requiring evaluation by different theoretical approaches and multiple methods. Awareness of these approaches will allow health professionals to plan for evaluation and to use evaluation findings more effectively. If cognizant of the different approaches to evaluation, evaluation frameworks can be developed to improve assessment of the effectiveness of these programs.

  4. Evaluation of a variable dose acquisition methodology for breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Mini; Gifford, Howard; O'Connor, Michael; Glick, Stephen

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the recently proposed variable dose (VD) acquisition scheme that has been hypothesized to overcome the limitations of microcalcification detection in breast tomosynthesis. In this acquisition methodology, approximately half of the total dose is used for one central projection. This central projection view is similar to a conventional mammogram and used to detect microcalcifications. The other half of the total dose is split among the rest of the projection views. These variable dose projection data are then reconstructed and the 3D slices are used for detection of masses. This novel acquisition methodology can potentially overcome the current limitations with microcalcification detection in breast tomosynthesis (BT) and may result in faster and more accurate detection of both microcalcifications and masses. Having access to both a conventional mammogram (i.e., the central projection) and tomosynthesis slices would also act as a bridge for radiologists who are used to viewing single projection images. In the current study, a comparison of microcalcification detection accuracy obtained using VD and conventional BT was conducted. A realistic computer simulation was used to model the realistic noise and blur encountered in BT systems. The simulation used a compressed breast phantom, modeled using CT images of compressed mastectomy specimens. Localization receiver operating characteristic (LROC) analysis was performed for detecting microcalcifications of size ranging from 147 microns to 178 microns. The results suggested higher microcalcification detection and localization accuracy using the VD technique. The complete study will also consist of evaluating detection of masses for the two strategies.

  5. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Study of ALARA programs. Status 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Dionne, B.J.; Meinhold, C.B.; Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1992-08-01

    This report provides the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors with information that will be useful for reducing occupational radiation doses at DOE`s nuclear facilities. In 1989 and 1990, health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) ALARA Center visited twelve DOE contractor facilities with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). The health physicists interviewed radiological safety staff, engineers, and training personnel who were responsible for dose control. The status of ALARA practices at the major contractor facilities was compared with the requirements and recommendation in DOE Order 5480.11 ``Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers`` and PNL-6577 ``Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Reducing Radiation Exposure to Levels that are as Low as Reasonably Achievable.`` The information and data collected are described and examples of successful practices are presented. The findings on the status of the DOE Contractor ALARA Programs are summarized and evaluated. In addition, the supplement to this report contains examples of good-practice documents associated with implementing the major elements of a formally documented ALARA program for a major DOE contractor facility.

  6. Differential program evaluation model in child protection.

    PubMed

    Lalayants, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Increasingly attention has been focused to the degree to which social programs have effectively and efficiently delivered services. Using the differential program evaluation model by Tripodi, Fellin, and Epstein (1978) and by Bielawski and Epstein (1984), this paper described the application of this model to evaluating a multidisciplinary clinical consultation practice in child protection. This paper discussed the uses of the model by demonstrating them through the four stages of program initiation, contact, implementation, and stabilization. This organizational case study made a contribution to the model by introducing essential and interrelated elements of a "practical evaluation" methodology in evaluating social programs, such as a participatory evaluation approach; learning, empowerment and sustainability; and a flexible individualized approach to evaluation. The study results demonstrated that by applying the program development model, child-protective administrators and practitioners were able to evaluate the existing practices and recognize areas for program improvement.

  7. Hanford Dose Overview Program. Comparison of AIRDOS-EPA and Hanford site dose codes

    SciTech Connect

    Aaberg, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

    1985-11-01

    Radiation dose commitments for persons in the Hanford environs calculated using AIRDOS-EPA were compared with those calculated using a suite of Hanford codes: FOOD, PABLM, DACRIN, and KRONIC. Dose commitments to the population and to the maximally exposed individual (MI) based on annual releases of eight radionuclides from the N-Reactor, were calculated by these codes. Dose commitments from each pathway to the total body, lung, thyroid, and lower large intestine (LLI) are given for the population and MI, respectively. 11 refs., 25 tabs.

  8. A study evaluating the dependence of the patient dose on the CT dose change in a SPECT/CT scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Ho-Sung; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Shin, Jae-Woo

    2012-07-01

    This study assessed ways of reducing the patient dose by examining the dependence of the patient dose on the CT (computed tomography) dose in a SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)/CT scan. To measure the patient dose, we used Precedence 16 SPECT/CT along with a phantom for the CT dose measurement (CT dose phantom kit for adult's head and body, Model 76-414-4150), a 100-mm ionization chamber (CT Ion Chamber) and an X-ray detector (Victoreen Model 4000M+). In addition, the patient dose was evaluated under conditions similar to those for an actual examination using an ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) dosimetry calculator in the Monte Carlo simulation method. The experimental method involved the use of a CT dose phantom to measure the patient dose under different CT conditions (kVp and mAs) to determine the CTDI (CT dose index) under each condition. An ImPACT dosimetry calculator was also used to measure CTDIw (CT dose index water ), CTDIv (CT dose index volume ), DLP (dose-length product), and effective dose. According to the patient dose measurements using the CT dose phantom, the CTDI showed an approximately 54 fold difference between when the maximum (140 kVp and 250 mAs) and the minimum dose (90 kVp and 25 mAs) was used. The CTDI showed a 4.2 fold difference between the conditions (120 kVp and 200 mAs) used mainly in a common CT scan and the conditions (120 kVp and 50 mAs) used mainly in a SPECT/CT scan. According to the measurement results using the dosimetry calculator, the effective dose showed an approximately 35 fold difference between the conditions for the maximum and the minimum doses, as in the case with the CT dose phantom. The effective dose showed a 4.1 fold difference between the conditions used mainly in a common CT scan and those used mainly in a SPECT/CT scan. This study examined the patient dose by reducing the CT dose in a SPECT/CT scan. As various examinations can be conducted due to the development of

  9. Evaluation of a Cardiovascular Education Pilot Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fang, Wei Li

    1980-01-01

    A Virginia elementary-secondary school blood pressure education program is described and evaluated. Evidence presented indicates that participants' cardiovascular knowledge levels increased significantly as a result of program participation. (JMF)

  10. The Evaluation of an Employee Assistance Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gam, John; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Presents the results of an evaluative study of an employee assistance program sponsored by the Russell Corporation, an apparel manufacturing firm. Results suggested that the program is beneficial in terms of both productivity enhancement and humanitarianism. (Author)

  11. Evaluating Doctoral Programs in Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuendorf, Kimberly A.; Skalski, Paul D.; Atkin, David

    The present study was designed to assess perceptions of (1) the quality of American graduate programs in communication; (2) the qualities that communication scholars deem important in a communication Ph.D. program; and (3) the adequacy of the number of Ph.D. programs stressing specific specialties in communication. An online survey of 221 United…

  12. Evaluation of Florida's STEP Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Health and Rehabilitative Services, Tallahassee.

    Project STEP (Short Term Elective Program) is an outdoor-educational program that, through teaching wilderness survival skills and affording a necessity for their use, provides juvenile delinquents with a feeling of self-reliance and self-worth. The program is designed for committed youths, primarily males, at least 13 to 14 years of age, but…

  13. Educators Exchange: A Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, William B.

    The Educators Exchange Program (EEP) was established under a training and educational exchange agreement reached by California's San Diego Community College District (SDCCD) and the republic of Mexico. In the program, the District provided a 4-week technological training program to faculty at Centros de Capacitacion Tecnologica Industrial…

  14. Evaluation of the NYCTF Program as an Alternative Certification Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Judith

    The New York City Teaching Fellows (NYCTF) program was established in August 2000 as an alternative certification program to try to fill the void for certified teachers in SURR (Schools Under Registration Review) schools, since a disproportionate number of teachers at SURR schools are not certified. To evaluate the success of the program, a…

  15. 5 CFR 9901.107 - Program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Program evaluation. 9901.107 Section 9901.107 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT AND LABOR RELATIONS... PERSONNEL SYSTEM (NSPS) General Provisions § 9901.107 Program evaluation. The Secretary will evaluate...

  16. Peter H. Rossi: Formative for Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipsey, Mark W.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the significant contributions of Peter H. Rossi to the field of program evaluation. It was the publication of "Evaluation: A Systematic Approach" by Peter Rossi, Howard Freeman, and Sonia Rosenbaum in 1979 that most emphatically marked the point at which program evaluation had clearly consolidated as a distinct field of…

  17. Policies & Practices: Strategies for Evaluating Your Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilford, Sara

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author gives steps on evaluating programs. The first step is to demystify the concept with the staff. The next step is to clarify the evaluation procedure. Among other things, the author gives ideas on developing an internal evaluation as well as setting program goals.

  18. Evaluation of Prevention Programs for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valente, Ernest, Jr.; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    This article focuses on the formal evaluation of large-scale preventive interventions promoting positive mental health in children and adolescents, using examples of conduct problems. The state of the art in program evaluation is discussed based on quantitative evaluations of mental illness prevention programs. The article reviews current thinking…

  19. Evaluating Federal Social Programs: An Uncertain Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitan, Sar A.; Wurzburg, Gregory K.

    This study of the federal government's evaluation of social programs indicates that it is virtually impossible to establish a bias-free, valid, and reliable system of inquiry to determine the effects of social programs. Divided into five chapters, the document examines the aspirations and limitations of evaluations, methodology, evaluation in the…

  20. Strategies for Evaluating Undergraduate Degree Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle, James P.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating higher education degree programs is an arduous task. This paper suggests innovative strategies for addressing four types of challenges that commonly occur during program evaluation: identifying theoretical models for evaluation, balancing potentially conflicting standards, accommodating faculty differences, and aligning courses.…

  1. Program Evaluation: Two Management-Oriented Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alford, Kenneth Ray

    2010-01-01

    Two Management-Oriented Samples details two examples of the management-oriented approach to program evaluation. Kenneth Alford, a doctorate candidate at the University of the Cumberlands, details two separate program evaluations conducted in his school district and seeks to compare and contrast the two evaluations based upon the characteristics of…

  2. 5 CFR 9901.107 - Program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program evaluation. 9901.107 Section 9901.107 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT AND LABOR RELATIONS... PERSONNEL SYSTEM (NSPS) General Provisions § 9901.107 Program evaluation. The Secretary will evaluate...

  3. Library Programs. Evaluating Federally Funded Public Library Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.

    Following an introduction by Betty J. Turock, nine reports examine key issues in library evaluation: (1) "Output Measures and the Evaluation Process" (Nancy A. Van House) describes measurement as a concept to be understood in the larger context of planning and evaluation; (2) "Adapting Output Measures to Program Evaluation"…

  4. A Program Evaluation Tool for Dual Enrollment Transition Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigal, Meg; Dwyre, Amy; Emmett, Joyce; Emmett, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the development and use of a program evaluation tool designed to support self-assessment of college-based dual enrollment transition programs serving students with intellectual disabilities between the ages of 18-21 in college settings. The authors describe the need for such an evaluation tool, outline the areas addressed by…

  5. Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: evaluation of PTV coverage and dose conformity.

    PubMed

    Hädinger, Ulrich; Thiele, Wibke; Wulf, Jörn

    2002-01-01

    During the past few years the concept of cranial stereotactic radiotherapy has been successfully extended to extracranial tumoral targets. In our department, hypofractionated treatment of tumours in lung, liver, abdomen, and pelvis is performed in the Stereotactic Body Frame (ELEKTA Instrument AB) since 1997. We present the evaluation of 63 consecutively treated targets (22 lung, 21 liver, 20 abdomen/pelvis) in 58 patients with respect to dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) as well as conformity of the dose distribution. The mean PTV coverage was found to be 96.3% +/- 2.3% (lung), 95.0% +/- 4.5% (liver), and 92.1% +/- 5.2% (abdomen/pelvis). For the so-called conformation number we obtained values of 0.73 +/- 0.09 (lung), 0.77 +/- 0.10 (liver), and 0.70 +/- 0.08 (abdomen/pelvis). The results show that highly conformal treatment techniques can be applied also in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. This is primarily due to the relatively simple geometrical shape of most of the targets. Especially lung and liver targets turned out to be approximately spherically/cylindrically shaped, so that the dose distribution can be easily tailored by rotational fields.

  6. Scoping calculation for components of the cow-milk dose pathway for evaluating the dose contribution from iodine-131. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ikenberry, T.A.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations have been undertaken to evaluate The absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 001) examined the contributions of the various exposure pathways associated with environmental transport and accumulation of iodine-131 in the pasture-cow-milk pathway. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants and adult from (1) the ingestion by dairy cattle of various feedstuffs (pasturage, silage, alfalfa hay, and grass hay) in four different feeding regimes; (2) ingestion of soil by dairy cattle; (3) ingestion of stared feed on which airborne iodine-131 had been deposited; and (4) inhalation of airborne iodine-131 by dairy cows.

  7. Using portfolio evaluation for program outcome assessment.

    PubMed

    Kear, Mavra E; Bear, Mary

    2007-03-01

    Portfolio evaluation is an efficient and effective strategy to objectively demonstrate the accomplishment of program objectives using students' perceptions of their academic experiences. A portfolio evaluation tool was developed to quantitatively measure students' perceptions of their achievement of the nursing program's goals and objectives. Data were collected from a convenience sample of 26 portfolio evaluations. Reliability testing showed the tool has high interrater reliability, with Cohen's Kappa >0.80 for most items. Individual achievement of program goals and objectives ranged from 53.6% to 100%. These data will be used in the next formative evaluation of the curriculum to revise program objectives and correspondneing course objectives and assignments.ty

  8. Evaluation of Rectal Dose During High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Cervical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, Rajib Lochan; Reddy, Palreddy Yadagiri; Rao, Ramakrishna; Muralidhar, Kanaparthy R.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.

    2011-01-01

    High-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) for carcinoma of the uterine cervix often results in high doses being delivered to surrounding organs at risk (OARs) such as the rectum and bladder. Therefore, it is important to accurately determine and closely monitor the dose delivered to these OARs. In this study, we measured the dose delivered to the rectum by intracavitary applications and compared this measured dose to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements rectal reference point dose calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS). To measure the dose, we inserted a miniature (0.1 cm{sup 3}) ionization chamber into the rectum of 86 patients undergoing radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma. The response of the miniature chamber modified by 3 thin lead marker rings for identification purposes during imaging was also characterized. The difference between the TPS-calculated maximum dose and the measured dose was <5% in 52 patients, 5-10% in 26 patients, and 10-14% in 8 patients. The TPS-calculated maximum dose was typically higher than the measured dose. Our study indicates that it is possible to measure the rectal dose for cervical carcinoma patients undergoing HDR-ICBT. We also conclude that the dose delivered to the rectum can be reasonably predicted by the TPS-calculated dose.

  9. Proton Computed Tomography: iterative image reconstruction and dose evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Civinini, C.; Bonanno, D.; Brianzi, M.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Maccioni, G.; Pallotta, S.; Randazzo, N.; Scaringella, M.; Romano, F.; Sipala, V.; Talamonti, C.; Vanzi, E.; Bruzzi, M.

    2017-01-01

    Proton Computed Tomography (pCT) is a medical imaging method with a potential for increasing accuracy of treatment planning and patient positioning in hadron therapy. A pCT system based on a Silicon microstrip tracker and a YAG:Ce crystal calorimeter has been developed within the INFN Prima-RDH collaboration. The prototype has been tested with a 175 MeV proton beam at The Svedberg Laboratory (Uppsala, Sweden) with the aim to reconstruct and characterize a tomographic image. Algebraic iterative reconstruction methods (ART), together with the most likely path formalism, have been used to obtain tomographies of an inhomogeneous phantom to eventually extract density and spatial resolutions. These results will be presented and discussed together with an estimation of the average dose delivered to the phantom and the dependence of the image quality on the dose. Due to the heavy computation load required by the algebraic algorithms the reconstruction programs have been implemented to fully exploit the high calculation parallelism of Graphics Processing Units. An extended field of view pCT system is in an advanced construction stage. This apparatus will be able to reconstruct objects of the size of a human head making possible to characterize this pCT approach in a pre-clinical environment.

  10. How To Design a Program Evaluation. Program Evaluation Kit, 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitz-Gibbon, Carol Taylor; Morris, Lynn Lyons

    The evaluation design, which prescribes when and from whom to gather data, is described as significant because it can lend credibility to evaluation results. The objectives of this booklet are to aid the evaluator in: choosing a design; putting it into operation; and analyzing and reporting the data. Examples include both formative and summative…

  11. Evaluation of GaAs low noise and power MMIC technologies to neutron, ionizing dose and dose rate effects

    SciTech Connect

    Derewonko, H.; Bosella, A.; Pataut, G.; Perie, D.; Pinsard, J.L.; Sentubery, C.; Verbeck, C.; Bressy, P.; Augier, P.

    1996-06-01

    An evaluation program of Thomson CSF-TCS GaAs low noise and power MMIC technologies to 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence levels, up to 1 {times} 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}, ionizing 1.17--1.33 MeV CO{sup 60} dose levels in excess of 200 Mrad(GaAs) and dose rate levels reaching 1.89 {times} 10{sup 11} rad(GaAs)/s is presented in terms of proper components and parameter choices, DC/RF electrical measurements and test methods under irradiation. Experimental results are explained together with drift analyses of electrical parameters that have determined threshold limits of component degradations. Modelling the effects of radiation on GaAs components relies on degradation analysis of active layer which appears to be the most sensitive factor. MMICs degradation under neutron fluence was simulated from irradiated FET data. Finally, based on sensitivity of technological parameters, rad-hard design including material, technology and MMIC design enhancement is discussed.

  12. Development of an online automatic computed radiography dose data mining program: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Ng, Curtise K C; Sun, Zhonghua

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have reported the computed radiography (CR) dose creep problem and therefore the need to have monitoring processes in place in clinical departments. The objective of this study is to provide a better technological solution to implement a regular CR dose monitoring process. An online automatic CR dose data mining program which can be applied to different systems was developed based on freeware and existing softwares in the Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) server. The program was tested with 69 CR images. This preliminary study shows that the program addresses the major weaknesses of some existing studies including involvement of manual procedures in the monitoring process and being only applicable to a single manufacturer's CR images. The proposed method provides an efficient and effective solution to implement a CR dose monitoring program regularly in busy clinical departments to regulate the dose creep problem so as to reinforce the 'As Low As Reasonably Achievable' (ALARA) principle.

  13. Continuing evaluation of bipolar linear devices for total dose bias dependency and ELDRS effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, S. S.; Gorelick, J. J.; Yui, C. C.; Rax, B. G.; Wiedeman, M. D.

    2003-01-01

    We present results of continuing efforts to evaluate total dose bias dependency and ELDRS effects in bipolar linear microcircuits. Several devices were evaluated, each exhibiting moderate to significant bias and/or dose rate dependency.

  14. Continuing evaluation of bipolar linear devices for total dose bias dependency and ELDRS effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, Steven S.; Gorelick, Jerry L.; Yui, Candice; Rax, Bernard G.; Wiedeman, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    We present results of continuing efforts to evaluate total dose bias dependency and ELDRS effects in bipolar linear microcircuits. Several devices were evaluated, each exhibiting moderate to significant bias and/or dose rate dependency.

  15. Improving Accreditor's Evaluation of Experiential Learning Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeton, Morris T.

    1980-01-01

    Principles of good practice in assessing experiential learning include better self-evaluation of the learning outcomes of experiential components, systematic program auditing, and training of external evaluators. (SK)

  16. Intensive Time Out Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Mary; Parks, Stephen

    The New Brunswick (Canada) Youth Treatment Program is a community-based intervention strategy for conduct disordered youth in New Brunswick. The Program's Intensive Time Out (ITO) is a strategy to eliminate unacceptable behaviors. It is recommended within the school setting for children from 6 to 11 years of age, and is designed to reverse the…

  17. Philadelphia's Parkway Program: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wofford, Joan; Ross, Joanne

    The Parkway Program is the prototype school-without-walls created by the School District of Philadelphia in 1967. The program presently consists of four units of approximately 200 students (chosen by lottery from throughout the city), ten teachers, ten to 12 interns, and a Unit Head and administrative assistant housed in four separate non-school…

  18. A linear programming model for optimizing HDR brachytherapy dose distributions with respect to mean dose in the DVH-tail

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, Åsa; Larsson, Torbjörn; Tedgren, Åsa Carlsson

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Recent research has shown that the optimization model hitherto used in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy corresponds weakly to the dosimetric indices used to evaluate the quality of a dose distribution. Although alternative models that explicitly include such dosimetric indices have been presented, the inclusion of the dosimetric indices explicitly yields intractable models. The purpose of this paper is to develop a model for optimizing dosimetric indices that is easier to solve than those proposed earlier.Methods: In this paper, the authors present an alternative approach for optimizing dose distributions for HDR brachytherapy where dosimetric indices are taken into account through surrogates based on the conditional value-at-risk concept. This yields a linear optimization model that is easy to solve, and has the advantage that the constraints are easy to interpret and modify to obtain satisfactory dose distributions.Results: The authors show by experimental comparisons, carried out retrospectively for a set of prostate cancer patients, that their proposed model corresponds well with constraining dosimetric indices. All modifications of the parameters in the authors' model yield the expected result. The dose distributions generated are also comparable to those generated by the standard model with respect to the dosimetric indices that are used for evaluating quality.Conclusions: The authors' new model is a viable surrogate to optimizing dosimetric indices and quickly and easily yields high quality dose distributions.

  19. A linear programming model for optimizing HDR brachytherapy dose distributions with respect to mean dose in the DVH-tail.

    PubMed

    Holm, Åsa; Larsson, Torbjörn; Tedgren, Åsa Carlsson

    2013-08-01

    Recent research has shown that the optimization model hitherto used in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy corresponds weakly to the dosimetric indices used to evaluate the quality of a dose distribution. Although alternative models that explicitly include such dosimetric indices have been presented, the inclusion of the dosimetric indices explicitly yields intractable models. The purpose of this paper is to develop a model for optimizing dosimetric indices that is easier to solve than those proposed earlier. In this paper, the authors present an alternative approach for optimizing dose distributions for HDR brachytherapy where dosimetric indices are taken into account through surrogates based on the conditional value-at-risk concept. This yields a linear optimization model that is easy to solve, and has the advantage that the constraints are easy to interpret and modify to obtain satisfactory dose distributions. The authors show by experimental comparisons, carried out retrospectively for a set of prostate cancer patients, that their proposed model corresponds well with constraining dosimetric indices. All modifications of the parameters in the authors' model yield the expected result. The dose distributions generated are also comparable to those generated by the standard model with respect to the dosimetric indices that are used for evaluating quality. The authors' new model is a viable surrogate to optimizing dosimetric indices and quickly and easily yields high quality dose distributions.

  20. PABLM: a computer program to calculate accumulated radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Soldat, J.K.

    1980-03-01

    A computer program, PABLM, was written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. This report contains details of mathematical models used and calculational procedures required to run the computer program. Radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment may be calculated from deposition on the soil or plants during an atmospheric or liquid release, or from exposure to residual radionuclides in the environment after the releases have ended. Radioactive decay is considered during the release of radionuclides, after they are deposited on the plants or ground, and during holdup of food after harvest. The radiation dose models consider several exposure pathways. Doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. The doses calculated are accumulated doses from continuous chronic exposure. A first-year committed dose is calculated as well as an integrated dose for a selected number of years. The equations for calculating internal radiation doses are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and MPC's of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated water and soil are calculated using the basic assumption that the contaminated medium is large enough to be considered an infinite volume or plane relative to the range of the emitted radiations. The equations for calculations of the radiation dose from external exposure to shoreline sediments include a correction for the finite width of the contaminated beach.

  1. A computer program for calculation of approximate embryo/fetus radiation dose in nuclear medicine applications.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Tuncay; Sönmez, Bircan

    2012-04-01

    In this study, we aimed to make a computer program that calculates approximate radiation dose received by embryo/fetus in nuclear medicine applications. Radiation dose values per MBq-1 received by embryo/fetus in nuclear medicine applications were gathered from literature for various stages of pregnancy. These values were embedded in the computer code, which was written in Fortran 90 program language. The computer program called nmfdose covers almost all radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine applications. Approximate radiation dose received by embryo/fetus can be calculated easily at a few steps using this computer program. Although there are some constraints on using the program for some special cases, nmfdose is useful and it provides practical solution for calculation of approximate dose to embryo/fetus in nuclear medicine applications. None declared.

  2. Evaluation of a Child Health Associate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dungy, Claiborne I.; Sander, Daryl L.

    1977-01-01

    The staff of the University of Colorado Child Health Associate Program critically reviewed the effectiveness of the program's structure and content during an intensive two-day seminar. Focus was on basic and clinical sciences, psychosocial skills, and proficiency testing, and the evaluations were used to improve the program. (Editor/LBH)

  3. Evaluating the BK 21 Program. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seong, Somi; Popper, Steven W.; Goldman, Charles A.; Evans, David K.; Grammich, Clifford A.

    2008-01-01

    The Brain Korea 21 program (BK21), an effort to improve Korean universities and research, has attracted a great deal of attention in Korea, producing the need to understand how well the program is meeting its goals. RAND developed a logic model for identifying program goals and dynamics, suggested quantitative and qualitative evaluation methods,…

  4. Developmenal Writing Program: Annual Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Susan D.; And Others

    The Hillsborough County (Florida) Developmental Writing Program (DWGP) was implemented in grades four to six during the 1983-84 school year. The DWP was evaluated to determine the degree of classroom implementation and program effectiveness. Many instructional innovations resulted from program implementation. Students exhibited improved writing…

  5. Evaluating the BK 21 Program. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seong, Somi; Popper, Steven W.; Goldman, Charles A.; Evans, David K.; Grammich, Clifford A.

    2008-01-01

    The Brain Korea 21 program (BK21), an effort to improve Korean universities and research, has attracted a great deal of attention in Korea, producing the need to understand how well the program is meeting its goals. RAND developed a logic model for identifying program goals and dynamics, suggested quantitative and qualitative evaluation methods,…

  6. Evaluation of a Comprehensive Juvenile Delinquency Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Howard; And Others

    This paper discribes a comprehensive juvenile delinquency diversion program serving a poverty community in a large urban center, and attempts to evaluate the problems and effects of the program. The target population was primarily minority-group truants, aged 10-15, who had been in trouble with the authorities. The program included recreational…

  7. New Teacher Induction: A Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, J. Warren

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative program evaluation was to examine the impact a two-year new teacher induction program had on teachers' feelings of support, satisfaction, and self-efficacy. The program purports that higher feelings of support, satisfaction, and self-efficacy in teachers will lead to lower teacher attrition. In turn, research shows…

  8. Miramar College Program Evaluation: Fire Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriyama, Bruce; Brumley, Leslie

    Qualitative and quantitative data are presented in this evaluation of the curricular, personnel, and financial status of Miramar College's program in fire sciences. The report first provides the results of an interview with the program chairperson, which sought information on program objectives and goals and their determination, the extent to…

  9. Evaluating Mentoring Programs. P/PV Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Jean Baldwin

    2009-01-01

    This methodological brief is designed to provide both program operators and researchers with practical advice about how to assess a program's implementation and impact. Adapted from an article that first appeared in "The Handbook of Youth Mentoring" (DuBois and Karcher, ed. 2005), the brief focuses on the evaluation of mentoring programs, but the…

  10. Evaluating Math Drill and Practice Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnorr, Janice M.; Semmel, Dorothy S.

    1986-01-01

    General guidelines for a process evaluation of software for a specific subject and grade include: (1) Specify instructional objectives and list desired software program characteristics; (2) Access and review descriptions of programs (information sources for math programs are listed); (3) Preview software; and (4) Compare and make purchase…

  11. Evaluation of various approaches for assessing dose indicators and patient organ doses resulting from radiotherapy cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Rampado, Osvaldo Giglioli, Francesca Romana; Rossetti, Veronica; Ropolo, Roberto; Fiandra, Christian; Ragona, Riccardo

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate various approaches for assessing patient organ doses resulting from radiotherapy cone-beam CT (CBCT), by the use of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements in anthropomorphic phantoms, a Monte Carlo based dose calculation software, and different dose indicators as presently defined. Methods: Dose evaluations were performed on a CBCT Elekta XVI (Elekta, Crawley, UK) for different protocols and anatomical regions. The first part of the study focuses on using PCXMC software (PCXMC 2.0, STUK, Helsinki, Finland) for calculating organ doses, adapting the input parameters to simulate the exposure geometry, and beam dose distribution in an appropriate way. The calculated doses were compared to readouts of TLDs placed in an anthropomorphic Rando phantom. After this validation, the software was used for analyzing organ dose variability associated with patients’ differences in size and gender. At the same time, various dose indicators were evaluated: kerma area product (KAP), cumulative air-kerma at the isocenter (K{sub air}), cone-beam dose index, and central cumulative dose. The latter was evaluated in a single phantom and in a stack of three adjacent computed tomography dose index phantoms. Based on the different dose indicators, a set of coefficients was calculated to estimate organ doses for a range of patient morphologies, using their equivalent diameters. Results: Maximum organ doses were about 1 mGy for head and neck and 25 mGy for chest and pelvis protocols. The differences between PCXMC and TLDs doses were generally below 10% for organs within the field of view and approximately 15% for organs at the boundaries of the radiation beam. When considering patient size and gender variability, differences in organ doses up to 40% were observed especially in the pelvic region; for the organs in the thorax, the maximum differences ranged between 20% and 30%. Phantom dose indexes provided better correlation with organ

  12. DITTY - a computer program for calculating population dose integrated over ten thousand years

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Peloquin, R.A.; Strenge, D.L.

    1986-03-01

    The computer program DITTY (Dose Integrated Over Ten Thousand Years) was developed to determine the collective dose from long term nuclear waste disposal sites resulting from the ground-water pathways. DITTY estimates the time integral of collective dose over a ten-thousand-year period for time-variant radionuclide releases to surface waters, wells, or the atmosphere. This document includes the following information on DITTY: a description of the mathematical models, program designs, data file requirements, input preparation, output interpretations, sample problems, and program-generated diagnostic messages.

  13. Industrial R&D Program Evaluation Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, David P.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The history of research and development (R&D) and its evaluation within the 3M Company are traced as an example of the progression of the use of evaluation and evaluation techniques. Scoring methods, cost-benefit analysis, and risk analysis have been among the most frequently used program evaluation methods. (SLD)

  14. Industrial R&D Program Evaluation Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, David P.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The history of research and development (R&D) and its evaluation within the 3M Company are traced as an example of the progression of the use of evaluation and evaluation techniques. Scoring methods, cost-benefit analysis, and risk analysis have been among the most frequently used program evaluation methods. (SLD)

  15. Ethical Issues in Evaluating Educational Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straton, Ralph G.

    1977-01-01

    Five ethical issues concerning evaluation studies are discussed: identification of the study's audiences, choices of variables and information sources, cost effectiveness of instrument and procedures, rights of subjects and program personnel to confidentiality, and relationships between the evaluator and program sponsors, participants, and…

  16. Evaluating Title I Parent Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurchak, Mary Jane; Stix, Susan

    This booklet describes the goals and organization of many early childhood Title I (ECT-I) parent programs and suggests evaluation methods. The information is intended for program planners, evaluation personnel, and teachers. Only activities that involve parents in the education of their child so as to improve his academic competence are discussed.…

  17. Evaluation of a Bullying Prevention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallford, Abby; Borntrager, Cameo; Davis, Joanne L.

    2006-01-01

    In order to address the federal "No Child Left Behind Act", the state of Oklahoma required that all public schools address the problem of bullying. Although numerous anti-bullying programs exist, few have been evaluated to determine their effectiveness. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of one such program,…

  18. Program Development and Evaluation: A Modeling Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Donald W.; Corgiat, RayLene

    A model of program development and evaluation was developed at Genesee Community College, utilizing a system theory/process of deductive and inductive reasoning to ensure coherence and continuity within the program. The model links activities to specific measurable outcomes. Evaluation checks and feedback are built in at various levels so that…

  19. Cost Analysis for Educational Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haller, Emil J.

    Concerned with the problem of determining program costs as part of the evaluation process, this article helps the practitioner arrive at useful conceptions of the term "cost" and procedures for assessing the costs of an educational program. Its purpose is to help design costing procedures for evaluation situations that are commonly encountered. An…

  20. Year-Round Education Program: Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serow, Robert; And Others

    In 1991, graduate students at North Carolina State University conducted an evaluation of the first 2 years of the Year-Round Education (YRE) Program of the Wake County Public School System. The evaluation involved surveys of 350 parents and 42 teachers that assessed their satisfaction with the program, and brief group interviews with 12 randomly…

  1. Evaluating Educational Programs: A Comparative Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montagne, Michael

    1982-01-01

    A comparative design for the evaluation of educational programs employing both quantitative and qualitative methods gathers information about program characteristics and consequences. The dual-track design provides separate results that are compared and produce a complete evaluation effort. (Author/CM)

  2. The Whys and Hows of Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tener, Robert

    2009-01-01

    An evaluation is designed to judge the worth of a program in regards to whether or not it should be continued, modified, or eliminated. Program evaluations can be performed either by those inside or outside of the organization, and can occur pre-implementation, during implementation, or at the end of a time period. There are many models or methods…

  3. Critical Issues in Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Richard F.

    1984-01-01

    Five issues that emerge in most evaluation processes and that have direct consequences for use of results are identified: the dilemma of multiple purposes, the value of criteria, overscheduling, the linkage between evaluation and decision-making, and evaluating process effectiveness. (Author/MLW)

  4. Dose evaluation of an NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter using gamma index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yuan-Jen; Lin, Jing-Quan; Hsieh, Bor-Tsung; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Chen, Chin-Hsing

    2014-11-01

    An N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel dosimeter has great potential in clinical applications. However, its three-dimensional dose distribution must be assessed. In this work, a quantitative evaluation of dose distributions was performed to evaluate the NIPAM polymer gel dosimeter using gamma analysis. A cylindrical acrylic phantom filled with NIPAM gel measuring 10 cm (diameter) by 10 cm (height) by 3 mm (thickness) was irradiated by a 4×4 cm2 square light field. The irradiated gel phantom was scanned using an optical computed tomography (optical CT) scanner (OCTOPUS™, MGS Research, Inc., Madison, CT, USA) at 1 mm resolution. The projection data were transferred to an image reconstruction program, which was written using MATLAB (The MathWorks, Natick, MA, USA). The program reconstructed the image of the optical density distribution using the algorithm of a filter back-projection. Three batches of replicated gel phantoms were independently measured. The average uncertainty of the measurements was less than 1%. The gel was found to have a high degree of spatial uniformity throughout the dosimeter and good temporal stability. A comparison of the line profiles of the treatment planning system and of the data measured by optical CT showed that the dose was overestimated in the penumbra region because of two factors. The first is light scattering due to changes in the refractive index at the edge of the irradiated field. The second is the edge enhancement caused by free radical diffusion. However, the effect of edge enhancement on the NIPAM gel dosimeter is not as significant as that on the BANG gel dosimeter. Moreover, the dose uncertainty is affected by the inaccuracy of the gel container positioning process. To reduce the uncertainty of 3D dose distribution, improvements in the gel container holder must be developed.

  5. Results of comparative assessment of US and Foreign Nuclear Power Plant dose experience and dose reduction programs

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, J.W.; Horan, J.R.; Dionne, B.J.

    1984-01-01

    Based on data evaluated to date it is clear that US plants have higher collective dose equivalents per reactor and per MW-y generated than most other countries. Factors which contribute to low doses include: (1) minimization of cobalt in primary system components exposed to water, (2) careful control of primary system oxygen and pH, (3) good primary system water purity to minimize corrosion product formation, (4) careful plant design, layout and component segration and shielding, (5) management interest and commitment, (6) minimum number of workers and in-depth worker training, (7) use of special tools, and (8) plant standardization. It should be pointed out that reductions in exposure are more difficult and costly in plants already built and operating. The cost-effectiveness of dose reduction efforts at US plants should be carefully evaluated before recommendations are made concerning existing plants.

  6. Method for the evaluation of a average glandular dose in mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Okunade, Akintunde Akangbe

    2006-04-15

    This paper concerns a method for accurate evaluation of average glandular dose (AGD) in mammography. At different energies, the interactions of photons with tissue are not uniform. Thus, optimal accuracy in the estimation of AGD is achievable when the evaluation is carried out using the normalized glandular dose values, g(x,E), that are determined for each (monoenergetic) x-ray photon energy, E, compressed breast thickness (CBT), x, breast glandular composition, and data on photon energy distribution of the exact x-ray beam used in breast imaging. A generalized model for the values of g(x,E) that is for any arbitrary CBT ranging from 2 to 9 cm (with values that are not whole numbers inclusive, say, 4.2 cm) was developed. Along with other dosimetry formulations, this was integrated into a computer software program, GDOSE.FOR, that was developed for the evaluation of AGD received from any x-ray tube/equipment (irrespective of target-filter combination) of up to 50 kVp. Results are presented which show that the implementation of GDOSE.FOR yields values of normalized glandular dose that are in good agreement with values obtained from methodologies reported earlier in the literature. With the availability of a portable device for real-time acquisition of spectra, the model and computer software reported in this work provide for the routine evaluation of AGD received by a specific woman of known age and CBT.

  7. Process evaluation of European 'Healthy Stadia' program.

    PubMed

    Roncarolo, F; Lanati, N; Philpott, M; Drygas, W; Ruszkowska, J; Ireland, R; Tenconi, M T

    2015-12-01

    Healthy Stadia (HS) is a European public health pilot-program started in 2007 to support sports stadia in promoting the health of people who work and visit sports stadia, as well as inhabitants of the surrounding communities. The aim of this study is to describe the process evaluation of the program, from its beginning in July 2007 to December 2009, in order to assess the feasibility and sustainability of an HS network across Europe. The program involved nine associate partners involved in the coordination of activities at a local level, in the recruitment of stadia, in the development of specific program tasks and in the dissemination of the program at a national level. The activities of associate partners were evaluated through structured questionnaires administered every 6 months. The questionnaire response rate from associate partners was 77.8% for the first and third evaluations and 88.9% for the second and fourth evaluations. According to the evaluation's results, several good practices such as alcohol prevention policies and those supporting people with disabilities were implemented in stadia over the course of the program. Conversely, practices supporting mental health and green transport were generally not achieved. The implemented activities mainly involved staff and visitors. Lack of human and economic resources, especially toward the end of the program, was considered the principal challenge for program development. In conclusion, the process evaluation presented the feasibility of the HS program and the development of health promoting practices in sport stadia over time.

  8. Vaginal dose assessment in image-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: Can we really rely on dose-point evaluation?

    PubMed

    Limkin, Elaine Johanna; Dumas, Isabelle; Rivin Del Campo, Eleonor; Chargari, Cyrus; Maroun, Pierre; Annède, Pierre; Petit, Claire; Seisen, Thomas; Doyeux, Kaya; Tailleur, Anne; Martinetti, Florent; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Haie-Meder, Christine; Mazeron, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Although dose-volume parameters in image-guided brachytherapy have become a standard, the use of posterior-inferior border of the pubic symphysis (PIBS) points has been recently proposed in the reporting of vaginal doses. The aim was to evaluate their pertinence. Nineteen patients who received image-guided brachytherapy after concurrent radiochemotherapy were included. Per treatment, CT scans were performed at Days 2 and 3, with reporting of the initial dwell positions and times. Doses delivered to the PIBS points were evaluated on each plan, considering that they were representative of one-third of the treatment. The movements of the applicator according to the PIBS point were analysed. Mean prescribed doses at PIBS -2, PIBS, PIBS +2 were, respectively, 2.23 ± 1.4, 6.39 ± 6.6, and 31.85 ± 36.06 Gy. Significant differences were observed between the 5 patients with vaginal involvement and the remaining 14 at the level of PIBS +2 and PIBS: +47.60 Gy and +7.46 Gy, respectively (p = 0.023 and 0.03). The variations between delivered and prescribed doses at PIBS points were not significant. However, at International commission on radiation units and measurements rectovaginal point, the delivered dose was decreased by 1.43 ± 2.49 Gy from the planned dose (p = 0.019). The delivered doses at the four points were strongly correlated with the prescribed doses with R(2) ranging from 0.93 to 0.95. The movements of the applicator in regard of the PIBS point assessed with the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine coordinates were insignificant. The doses evaluated at PIBS points are not impacted by intrafractional movements. PIBS and PIBS +2 dose points allow distinguishing the plans of patients with vaginal infiltration. Further studies are needed to correlate these parameters with vaginal morbidity. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Maximizing the Impact of Program Evaluation: A Discrepancy-Based Process for Educational Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantor, Jeffrey A.

    This paper describes a formative/summative process for educational program evaluation, which is appropriate for higher education programs and is based on M. Provus' Discrepancy Evaluation Model and the principles of instructional design. The Discrepancy Based Methodology for Educational Program Evaluation facilitates systematic and detailed…

  10. Maximizing the Impact of Program Evaluation: A Discrepancy-Based Process for Educational Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantor, Jeffrey A.

    This paper describes a formative/summative process for educational program evaluation, which is appropriate for higher education programs and is based on M. Provus' Discrepancy Evaluation Model and the principles of instructional design. The Discrepancy Based Methodology for Educational Program Evaluation facilitates systematic and detailed…

  11. Use of Responsive Evaluation in Statewide Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Marjorie

    1976-01-01

    A summer school program stressing basic skills for migrant children in a rural Illinois community was assessed according to Stake's responsive evaluation model. Informal communication, program activities, audience needs, and participant values were emphasized in this case study. This evaluation method provided useful information for the state's…

  12. Use of Responsive Evaluation in Statewide Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, Marjorie

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the utilization of Stake's theory of responsive evaluation by a unit in state government charged with the evaluation of the Illinois Migrant Program. Through interviews with state and local Title I staff, we were able to discover program purposes and concerns and to later conceptualize these concerns into…

  13. Practical strategies for nursing education program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lewallen, Lynne Porter

    2015-01-01

    Self-evaluation is required for institutions of higher learning and the nursing programs within them. The literature provides information on evaluation models and instruments, and descriptions of how specific nursing education programs are evaluated. However, there are few discussions in the nursing education literature of the practical aspects of nursing education program evaluation: how to get started, how to keep track of data, who to involve in data collection, and how to manage challenging criteria. This article discusses the importance of program evaluation in the academic setting and provides information on practical ways to organize the evaluation process and aggregate data, and strategies for gathering data from students, graduates, alumni, and employers of graduates.

  14. QUEST: A Model Transfer Program and Evaluation of QUEST Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holohan, Ronald J.

    These reports describe and evaluate Illinois Central College's Quality Undergraduate Education for Student Transfers (QUEST) program. The core of the program is to develop in students 15 competencies identified as essential to an educated person: communication skills, mathematics skills, appreciation of physical well-being, understanding of the…

  15. Strategies for Evaluating Complex Environmental Education Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, V.

    2011-12-01

    Evidence for the effectiveness of environmental education programs has been difficult to establish for many reasons. Chief among them are the lack of clear program objectives and an inability to conceptualize how environmental education programs work. Both can lead to evaluations that make claims that are difficult to substantiate, such as significant changes in student achievement levels or behavioral changes based on acquisition of knowledge. Many of these challenges can be addressed by establishing the program theory and developing a logic model. However, claims of impact on larger societal outcomes are difficult to attribute solely to program activities. Contribution analysis may offer a promising method for addressing this challenge. Rather than attempt to definitively and causally link a program's activities to desired results, contribution analysis seeks to provide plausible evidence that can reduce uncertainty regarding the 'difference' a program is making to observed outcomes. It sets out to verify the theory of change behind a program and, at the same time, takes into consideration other influencing factors. Contribution analysis is useful in situations where the program is not experimental-there is little or no scope for varying how the program is implemented-and the program has been funded on the basis of a theory of change. In this paper, the author reviews the feasibility of using contribution analysis as a way of evaluating the impact of the GLOBE program, an environmental science and education program. Initially conceptualized by Al Gore in 1995, the program's implementation model is based on worldwide environmental monitoring by students and scientists around the globe. This paper will make a significant and timely contribution to the field of evaluation, and specifically environmental education evaluation by examining the usefulness of this analysis for developing evidence to assess the impact of environmental education programs.

  16. Evaluating an intern/residency program.

    PubMed

    Hogan, M J

    1992-07-01

    When faced with the task of program evaluation, many directors of medical education may find themselves overwhelmed. This article presents suggestions for conducting an evaluation, including the six basic elements to consider before embarking on such an undertaking. With an emphasis on selecting a model framework as a guide for conducting a program evaluation, this article examines one model--Stufflebeam's CIPP model--in depth.

  17. Online Evaluation Programs: Benefits and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Richard E.; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu; Petereit, Daniel G.; Eschiti, Valerie; Krebs, Linda U.; Pingatore, Noel L.

    2012-01-01

    Patient navigation programs are increasing throughout the USA, yet some evaluation measures are too vague to determine what and how navigation functions. Through collaborative efforts an online evaluation program was developed. The goal of this evaluation program is to make data entry accurate, simple, and efficient. This comprehensive program includes major components on staff, mentoring, committees, partnerships, grants/studies, products, dissemination, patient navigation, and reports. Pull down menus, radio buttons, and check boxes are incorporated whenever possible. Although the program has limitations, the benefits of having access to current, up-to-date program data 24/7 are worth overcoming the challenges. Of major benefit is the ability of the staff to tailor summary reports to provide anonymous feedback in a timely manner to community partners and participants. The tailored data are useful for the partners to generate summaries for inclusion in new grant applications. PMID:22447646

  18. Evaluation of the Arkansas Tobacco Settlement Program

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Dana; Tharp-Gilliam, Shannah; Dubowitz, Tamara; Yu, Hao; Lovejoy, Susan L.; Phillips, Andrea; Engberg, John

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Tobacco Settlement Proceeds Act, a referendum passed by Arkansans in the November 2000 election, invests Arkansas' share of the tobacco Master Settlement Agreement funds in seven health-related programs. RAND was contracted to perform a comprehensive evaluation of the progress of the seven programs in fulfilling their missions, as well as the effects of the programs on smoking and other health-related outcomes. This article discusses the Arkansas Tobacco Settlement Commission's activities and its responses to recommendations by RAND in the earlier evaluation reports and documents continued activity and progress by the seven funded programs for 2008 and 2009. The article evaluates the progress of each of the funded programs, including assessing progress in achieving programmatic goals and tracking the programs' activities and indicators. It also updates trends in outcome measures developed to monitor the effects of the funded programs on smoking and other health-related outcomes. Finally, it provides both program-specific and statewide recommendations for future program activities and funding, including ongoing strategic planning, developing evaluation measures, collaboration with other programs, and sustaining funding and growth. PMID:28083260

  19. Effective Evaluation for CETA Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, Paul W.; McGough, Robert L.

    This monograph is one of 12 that address various topics in the area of CETA/education linkages. They were designed to provide those individuals interested in the development and implementation of CETA/education linkages with information that will serve to enhance the quality of existing programs and facilitate the efficient and effective…

  20. Evaluating Workplace English Language Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekkens, Kristin; Winke, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Companies across the United States provide workplace English classes to non-native-English-speaking employees to increase productivity, retention, and on-the-job safety. Institutions that financially support the programs often require evidence of learning through standardized tests as a prerequisite for continued funding. However, the tests…

  1. ACTION Live: Using Process Evaluation to Describe Implementation of a Worksite Wellness Program

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Carolyn C.; Lai, Yen-Ling; Rice, Janet; Rose, Diego; Webber, Larry S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Process evaluation is a necessary component of randomized controlled field trials. This is a descriptive paper that reviews process evaluation for the ACTION Wellness Program for Elementary School Personnel. Methods Methods included self-report by participants, documentation by program staff, and school administrator report. Variables evaluated were program dose, fidelity and reach, exposure to materials and activities, and school factors that could influence program implementation and/or outcomes. Results Dose and exposure were high across intervention schools and intervention years. Reach was variable across schools and activities. Schools on the East Bank of the Mississippi River generally had slightly better reach than schools on the West Bank. Some nutrition activities had higher levels of participation than physical activities. Conclusions High program dose reflected good effort and cooperation by program staff and schools. A disconnect between exposure and reach showed that high exposure did not always translate to high participation. PMID:20061882

  2. FY-2007 PNNL Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Program Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Patrick A.; Fisher, Julie A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Isern, Nancy G.; Madson, Vernon J.; Meicenheimer, Russell L.; Pugh, Ray; Schneirla, Keri A.; Shockey, Loretta L.; Tinker, Mike R.

    2008-08-15

    This document reports the results of the FY-2007 PNNL VPP Program Evaluation, which is a self-assessment of the operational and programmatic performance of the Laboratory related to worker safety and health. The report was compiled by a team of worker representatives and safety professionals who evaluated the Laboratory's worker safety and health programs on the basis of DOE-VPP criteria. The principle elements of DOE's VPP program are: Management Leadership, Employee Involvement, Worksite Analysis, Hazard Prevention and Control, and Safety and Health Training.

  3. PNNL FY2005 DOE Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Program Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Patrick A.; Madson, Vernon J.; Isern, Nancy G.; Haney, Janice M.; Fisher, Julie A.; Goheen, Steven C.; Gulley, Susan E.; Reck, John J.; Collins, Drue A.; Tinker, Mike R.; Walker, Landon A.; Wynn, Clifford L.

    2005-01-31

    This document reports the results of the FY 2005 PNNL VPP Program Evaluation, which is a self-assessment of the operational and programmatic performance of the Laboratory related to worker safety and health. The report was compiled by a team of worker representatives and safety professionals who evaluated the Laboratory's worker safety and health programs on the basis of DOE-VPP criteria. The principle elements of DOE's VPP program are: Management Leadership, Employee Involvement, Worksite Analysis, Hazard Prevention and Control, and Safety and Health Training.

  4. A Commentary on: "A History of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 1998-2008".

    PubMed

    Brooks, Antone L

    2015-04-01

    This commentary provides a very brief overview of the book "A History of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 1998-2008" ( http://lowdose.energy.gov ). The book summarizes and evaluates the research progress, publications and impact of the U.S. Department of Energy Low Dose Radiation Research Program over its first 10 years. The purpose of this book was to summarize the impact of the program's research on the current thinking and low-dose paradigms associated with the radiation biology field and to help stimulate research on the potential adverse and/or protective health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. In addition, this book provides a summary of the data generated in the low dose program and a scientific background for anyone interested in conducting future research on the effects of low-dose or low-dose-rate radiation exposure. This book's exhaustive list of publications coupled with discussions of major observations should provide a significant resource for future research in the low-dose and dose-rate region. However, because of space limitations, only a limited number of critical references are mentioned. Finally, this history book provides a list of major advancements that were accomplished by the program in the field of radiation biology, and these bulleted highlights can be found in last part of chapters 4-10.

  5. The US Department of Energy Personnel Dosimetry Evaluation and Upgrade Program

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, L.G.; Stroud, C.M.; Swinth, K.L.; Vallario, E.J.

    1987-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Personnel Dosimetry Evaluation and Upgrade Program is designed to identify and evaluate dosimetry deficiencies and to conduct innovative research and development programs that will improve overall capabilities, thus ensuring that DOE can comply with applicable standards and regulations for dose measurement. To achieve these goals, two programs were initiated to evaluate and upgrade beta measurement and neutron dosimetry. 3 refs.

  6. Guidance Program Evaluation: What's Out There?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Juliet V.; Grisdale, George A.

    1975-01-01

    This article reviews a number of guidance evaluation materials and programs presently in use in terms of Stufflebeam's CIPP model. Some materials were simple evaluation instruments; others were as comprehensive as process guides for the planning, development, and application of a complete systems approach evaluation. (Author)

  7. A Framework for Evaluating Correctional Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yonai, Barbara A.

    1992-01-01

    This evaluation matrix considers three aspects: (1) evaluation focus (purpose/rationale, context, audience); (2) evaluation design (questions, methods, data sources, analysis, reporting); and (3) management (personnel, timeline, costs). Application to six elements (participant, instructor, course, curriculum, program, project) is illustrated. (SK)

  8. Establishing Essential Competencies for Program Evaluators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevahn, Laurie; King, Jean A.; Ghere, Gail; Minnema, Jane

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a comprehensive taxonomy of essential competencies for program evaluators. First, the authors provide a rationale for developing evaluator competencies, along with a brief history of the initial development and validation of the taxonomy of essential evaluator competencies in King, Stevahn, Ghere, and Minnema (2001). Second,…

  9. A Model for Evaluating Title 1 Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rost, Paul; And Others

    Albuquerque's Title I evaluation staff is in the process of generating a comprehensive local evaluation design because it considers the federally required product evaluation unsatisfactory. The required mean-gain comparisons were extended beyond the dimension of program to the dimensions of school, grade, and Title I instructor. This evaluation…

  10. Theory Underlying a National Teacher Evaluation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taut, Sandy; Santelices, Veronica; Araya, Carolina; Manzi, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes a study conducted to explicate the multiple theories underlying Chile's national teacher evaluation program. These theories will serve as the basis for evaluating the intended consequences of this evaluation system, while not losing sight of emerging unintended consequences. We first analyzed legal and policy documents and then…

  11. Program Evaluation Strategies for Substance Abuse Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, William B.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in program evaluation for substance abuse prevention efforts. Included in this review is a discussion of approaches to process, outcome, and impact evaluation. Evaluation designs are reviewed with attention given to topics such as recruitment and retention of sites and participants, defining interventions,…

  12. Theory Underlying a National Teacher Evaluation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taut, Sandy; Santelices, Veronica; Araya, Carolina; Manzi, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes a study conducted to explicate the multiple theories underlying Chile's national teacher evaluation program. These theories will serve as the basis for evaluating the intended consequences of this evaluation system, while not losing sight of emerging unintended consequences. We first analyzed legal and policy documents and then…

  13. Programming software for usability evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.L.; Allen, H.W.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the work completed for a portion of the User Interface Testbed for Technology Packaging (UseIT) project. The authors present software methods for programming systems to record and view interactions with a graphical user interface. A brief description of the human factors design process is presented. The software methods exploit features available in the X Window System and the operating system for Windows{trademark} 95 and Windows{trademark} NT{reg_sign}.

  14. Evaluation of a low-dose progestagen as a contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, R; Hayashi, M; Kamouchi, Y; Yamanaka, K

    1971-01-01

    In order to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a low-dose progestagen oral contraceptive, 46 women were administered 0.25 mg daily of a synthetic gestagen, R-2453 (17alpha-methyl delta 9-19 norprogesterone) for 1-12 months for a total of 189 cycles. The pill was found to be safe and completely effective with no pregnancies occurring in the study group. The length of the bleeding cycle was found to be prolonged under this treatment, to an average of 40 days . Bleeding duration and amount were generally the same as those before treatment, except in 3 cases where irregular bleeding prompted discontinuance of the pill use. Basal body temperature patterns were measured and found to be atypical biphasic in 17.3% of the cases, high temperature monophasic in 47.2%, and irregular in 34.6%. Routine blood, kidney and liver function tests were normal. Pregnandiol excretion before withdrawal bleeding was low in all but 1 case. Cervical mucus was also low and no crystal formation was observed. In the nidation menstrual stage the endometrial glands were few in number and adenomeres were small in size. In glandular cells, supranuclear vacuoles were found and interstices were coarse and edematous. Histological examinations in the implantation phase showed some alterations but their relationship to the contraceptive mechanism of this pill is not clear. Low-dose progestagens appear to be highly effective contraceptive agents that do not suppress ovulatory activity but their prescription must take careful note of dosage and formulas.

  15. Evaluating Voucher Programs: The Milwaukee Parental Choice Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witte, John F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper is the first summary of two studies and 10 years of evaluating the Milwaukee Parental Choice (voucher) Program (MPCP). This paper discusses school voucher evaluations in general terms and how these studies are carried out. The paper outlines the types of studies completed in "Study I" and "Study II" and the results…

  16. An economic analysis of the current universal 2-dose measles-mumps-rubella vaccination program in the United States.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fangjun; Reef, Susan; Massoudi, Mehran; Papania, Mark J; Yusuf, Hussain R; Bardenheier, Barbara; Zimmerman, Laura; McCauley, Mary M

    2004-05-01

    To evaluate the economic impact of the current 2-dose measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination program in the United States, a decision tree-based analysis was conducted with population-based vaccination coverage and disease incidence data. All costs were estimated for a hypothetical US birth cohort of 3803295 infants born in 2001. The 2-dose MMR vaccination program was cost-saving from both the direct cost and societal perspectives compared with the absence of MMR vaccination, with net savings (net present value) from the direct cost and societal perspectives of US dollars 3.5 billion and US dollars 7.6 billion, respectively. The direct and societal benefit-cost ratios for the MMR vaccination program were 14.2 and 26.0. Analysis of the incremental benefit-cost of the second dose showed that direct and societal benefit-cost ratios were 0.31 and 0.49, respectively. Varying the proportion of vaccines purchased and administered in the public versus the private sector had little effect on the results. From both perspectives under even the most conservative assumptions, the national 2-dose MMR vaccination program is highly cost-beneficial and results in substantial cost savings.

  17. PACKAGING CERTIFICATION PROGRAM METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING DOSE RATES FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITIES IN SHIPPING PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.

    2012-05-09

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that small amounts of hazardous materials, in this case radioactive materials (RAM), are significantly less hazardous than large amounts of the same materials. This paper describes a methodology designed to estimate an SGQ for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a package compliant with 10 CFR Part 71 external radiation level limits regulations. These regulations require packaging for the shipment of radioactive materials, under both normal and accident conditions, to perform the essential functions of material containment, subcriticality, and maintain external radiation levels within the specified limits. By placing the contents in a helium leak-tight containment vessel, and limiting the mass to ensure subcriticality, the first two essential functions are readily met. Some isotopes emit sufficiently strong photon radiation that small amounts of material can yield a large dose rate outside the package. Quantifying the dose rate for a proposed content is a challenging issue for the SGQ approach. It is essential to quantify external radiation levels from several common gamma and neutron sources that can be safely placed in a specific packaging, to ensure compliance with federal regulations. The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) Methodology for Determining Dose Rate for Small Gram Quantities in Shipping Packagings provides bounding shielding calculations that define mass limits compliant with 10 CFR 71.47 for a set of proposed SGQ isotopes. The approach is based on energy superposition with dose response calculated for a set of spectral groups for a baseline physical packaging configuration. The methodology includes using the MCNP radiation transport code to evaluate a family of neutron and photon spectral groups using the 9977 shipping package and its associated shielded containers as the base case. This results in a set of multipliers for 'dose per particle' for

  18. A software technology evaluation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novaes-Card, David N.

    1985-01-01

    A set of quantitative approaches is presented for evaluating software development methods and tools. The basic idea is to generate a set of goals which are refined into quantifiable questions which specify metrics to be collected on the software development and maintenance process and product. These metrics can be used to characterize, evaluate, predict, and motivate. They can be used in an active as well as passive way by learning form analyzing the data and improving the methods and tools based upon what is learned from that analysis. Several examples were given representing each of the different approaches to evaluation. The cost of the approaches varied inversely with the level of confidence in the interpretation of the results.

  19. SU-E-T-50: A Multi-Institutional Study of Independent Dose Verification Software Program for Lung SBRT

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, D; Takahashi, R; Kamima, T; Baba, H; Yamamoto, T; Kubo, Y; Ishibashi, S; Higuchi, Y; Takahashi, H; Tachibana, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The accuracy of dose distribution depends on treatment planning system especially in heterogeneity-region. The tolerance level (TL) of the secondary check using the independent dose verification may be variable in lung SBRT plans. We conducted a multi-institutional study to evaluate the tolerance level of lung SBRT plans shown in the AAPM TG114. Methods: Five institutes in Japan participated in this study. All of the institutes used a same independent dose verification software program (Simple MU Analysis: SMU, Triangle Product, Ishikawa, JP), which is Clarkson-based and CT images were used to compute radiological path length. Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA), Pencil Beam Convolution with modified Batho-method (PBC-B) and Adaptive Convolve (AC) were used for lung SBRT planning. A measurement using an ion-chamber was performed in a heterogeneous phantom to compare doses from the three different algorithms and the SMU to the measured dose. In addition to it, a retrospective analysis using clinical lung SBRT plans (547 beams from 77 patients) was conducted to evaluate the confidence limit (CL, Average±2SD) in dose between the three algorithms and the SMU. Results: Compared to the measurement, the AAA showed the larger systematic dose error of 2.9±3.2% than PBC-B and AC. The Clarkson-based SMU showed larger error of 5.8±3.8%. The CLs for clinical plans were 7.7±6.0 % (AAA), 5.3±3.3 % (AC), 5.7±3.4 % (PBC -B), respectively. Conclusion: The TLs from the CLs were evaluated. A Clarkson-based system shows a large systematic variation because of inhomogeneous correction. The AAA showed a significant variation. Thus, we must consider the difference of inhomogeneous correction as well as the dependence of dose calculation engine.

  20. Lessons learned from IRIS EPO program evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taber, J.; Hubenthal, M.

    2012-12-01

    Evaluating the overall impact of EPO programs that include activities ranging from formal education through broad public outreach, is a complex issue. The impact of education activities targeted at narrowly defined audiences is generally easier to quantify than the national impact of outreach activities conducted by a relatively small program. For educational activities, our approach has been to leverage the best-practices identified through research and to continuously assess the individual elements internally with the intention of making improvements based on the data generated and the existing research. By constructing our elements on the best practices identified by the research community we feel that internal formative evaluation is a valid means to determine if an activity is effective, particularly when the results are compared to similar programs. For example, effective practices of professional development are well documented in the literature. As a result, this allows us to shape our programs and our evaluations to monitor elements that have been identified as key by the educational research community. Further, such actions allow us to avoid allocating significant resources with the intention of pinning down direct causal relationships between our programs and consumers, when similar interventions (conducted by others) have already shown such relationships. Ongoing review by an EPO advisory committee also provides regular oversight of program impact. While we find internal and external formative evaluation extremely useful in shaping the program and documenting its impact, we also recognize the value of a summative evaluation process. For example, an external summative evaluation of the IRIS EPO program was conducted in 2009, followed by an external panel review, as part of the regular review of IRIS programs. We found that the most valuable part of the external evaluation was our preparation, including clarifying the goals of each of the elements of the

  1. Challenges in evaluating rural health programs.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Joyce; Webb, John

    2002-01-01

    Complex community-based prevention programs are being held to scientific evidence of their effectiveness and rural public health departments that implement such programs often are not equipped to evaluate them. Rural public health departments are fettered by small budgets, small staffs, and less access to evaluation experts and similar resources. Community-based health promotion programs can include complex designs that may work differently in rural areas and evaluation of rural programs can be hampered by lack of control groups and the instability of results from small populations. The University of Kentucky has entered into a contract with the state Department for Public Health to implement an internal, participatory model of evaluation. In this model, the university evaluation expert trains local public health department staff in technical skills for program evaluation and acts as mentor and technical consultant to local public health departments on an ongoing basis. Through training and site visits, this model is one approach to addressing the challenges of evaluating rural health promotion programs.

  2. The Process of Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Maanen, John

    1979-01-01

    The model presented forces us to view evaluation from two interdependent perspectives: conceptual and operational. Conceptual processes consist of planning, implementation, measurement, and decision making; operational processes consist of specifying, measuring and comparing objectives against a standard. (Available from: Grantsmanship Center,…

  3. Environmental Compliance. Program Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fardig, Diane

    This report provides formative-evaluation information about the processes followed by Florida's Orange County Public Schools (OCPS) to comply with national, state, and local governmental environmental regulations. Specifically, the report examines the effectiveness of the Environmental Compliance (EC) team, which monitors OCPS response to…

  4. The Process of Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Maanen, John

    1979-01-01

    The model presented forces us to view evaluation from two interdependent perspectives: conceptual and operational. Conceptual processes consist of planning, implementation, measurement, and decision making; operational processes consist of specifying, measuring and comparing objectives against a standard. (Available from: Grantsmanship Center,…

  5. Evaluating pain education programs: An integrated approach

    PubMed Central

    Dubrowski, Adam; Morin, Marie-Paule

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of educational programs and assessment of learning are essential to maintain high-standard health science education, which includes pain education. Current models of program evaluations applied to the education of the health professions, such as the Kirkpatrick model, are mainly outcome based. More recently, efforts have been made to examine other process-based models such as the Context Input Process Product model. The present article proposes an approach that integrates both outcome- and process-based models with models of clinical performance assessment to provide a deeper understanding of a program function. Because assessment instruments are a critical part of program evaluation, it is suggested that standardization and rigour should be used in their selection, development and adaptation. The present article suggests an alternative to currently used models in pain education evaluation. PMID:22184548

  6. 5 CFR 9701.107 - Program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....107 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM General Provisions § 9701.107 Program evaluation. (a) DHS will...

  7. 5 CFR 9701.107 - Program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ....107 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM General Provisions § 9701.107 Program evaluation. (a) DHS will...

  8. Evaluating the Georgia Master Naturalist Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildreth, Lauren; Mengak, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the Georgia Master Naturalist Program using an online survey. Survey participation was voluntary, and the survey addressed areas such as satisfaction, volunteerism, and future training. The program received high scores from survey respondents. They appreciated training on native plants, environmental awareness, and ecological…

  9. Program Review/Evaluation Policy and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Northwestern Community Coll., Rangely.

    At Colorado Northwestern Community College (CNCC), all educational programs, as well as student services and support functions, are formally reviewed/evaluated in depth at least once every five years. This nine-part outline, providing a step-by-step description of the program review process at CNCC, includes the following sections: (1) the value…

  10. Evaluation of Six School Effectiveness Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Dorren Rafael

    School effectiveness programs were evaluated at six urban schools (five elementary and one junior high schools) in Louisiana for the 1986-87 school year. Focus was on providing principals with information to improve their school effectiveness programs for the 1987-88 school year. Subjects were 3,006 students, for whom scores on the California…

  11. Evaluating and Selecting Sport Management Undergraduate Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuneen, Jacquelyn; Sidwell, M. Joy

    1998-01-01

    States that the accelerated growth of sport management undergraduate programs that began in the 1980s has continued into the current decade. There are currently 180 sport management major programs in American colleges and universities. Describes the sports management approval process and suggests useful strategies to evaluate sport management…

  12. Evaluating and Selecting Sport Management Undergraduate Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuneen, Jacquelyn; Sidwell, M. Joy

    1998-01-01

    States that the accelerated growth of sport management undergraduate programs that began in the 1980s has continued into the current decade. There are currently 180 sport management major programs in American colleges and universities. Describes the sports management approval process and suggests useful strategies to evaluate sport management…

  13. Early Fives Program Evaluation: Farmington Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peper, H. Robert

    An evaluation of the Early Fives program of the Farmington (Michigan) Public Schools is reported. This extra-year program began in the 1980-81 school year. By the 1982-83 school year, tuition was no longer charged, and a systematic screening effort was implemented. Each Early Fives classroom contains a maximum of 15 children with a certified…

  14. Evaluation of Kentucky's Extended School Services Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meehan, Merrill L.; Cowley, Kimberly S.; Schumacher, Debbie; Hauser, Brenda

    The Extended School Services (ESS) program was established in 1990 as part of the Kentucky Education Reform Act. The program extends the school day, week, or year for students at risk of academic failure, providing them with additional instructional time to help them meet academic goals. An evaluation of ESS in 2001 utilized statewide surveys and…

  15. Advisory Committee Evaluation of Vocational Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orr, William T., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Program advisory committees in vocational education have traditionally been charged with the responsibility of evaluating programs for the purpose of keeping them up to date with business and industry practices and current technology. Rapid technological development and accountability requirements have led to state mandates that the advisory…

  16. Targeted Mentoring: Evaluation of a Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Carolyn A.; Harold, Rena D.; Ahmedani, Brian K.; Cramer, Elizabeth P.

    2009-01-01

    "Targeted mentoring" refers to mentoring aimed at a particular population. This article presents the evaluation of a mentoring program for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons in social work education. Forty-three mentors and proteges responded to a survey regarding their program experiences. The results highlight the need for…

  17. Regional Medical Program; Guidelines for Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Gary S., And Others

    This set of guidelines was written to provide a systematic explanation of the process of evaluation applied to Regional Medical Programs, as required by Public Law 89-239. Goals of the programs are the improvement of health care of patients suffering from heart disease, cancer, stroke and related diseases and improvement in the practice of health…

  18. Evaluating the Georgia Master Naturalist Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildreth, Lauren; Mengak, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the Georgia Master Naturalist Program using an online survey. Survey participation was voluntary, and the survey addressed areas such as satisfaction, volunteerism, and future training. The program received high scores from survey respondents. They appreciated training on native plants, environmental awareness, and ecological…

  19. Program Evaluation for Policy-Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehmeyer, Lillian B.

    1979-01-01

    The evaluation design described was used to aid the governing board to reach a policy decision about expanding the California Early Childhood Education program (renamed the School Improvement Program) in the Lafayette School District. Descriptions of procedures, question formats, audiences involved, and results are included. (MH)

  20. Alternative Learning Programs Evaluation: Part 1 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Accountability Services/Research.

    In North Carolina, Alternative Learning Programs (ALP) is a designation applied to a variety of activities, locations, and student characteristics. This report focuses on descriptive information about the state's ALP efforts, teachers, and the students they serve. Two hundred and fifteen schools and programs met the evaluation criteria as ALPs.…

  1. Early Fives Program Evaluation: Farmington Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peper, H. Robert

    An evaluation of the Early Fives program of the Farmington (Michigan) Public Schools is reported. This extra-year program began in the 1980-81 school year. By the 1982-83 school year, tuition was no longer charged, and a systematic screening effort was implemented. Each Early Fives classroom contains a maximum of 15 children with a certified…

  2. Evaluating School Violence Programs. Urban Diversity Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaxman, Erwin, Ed.

    The essays in this collection review information, resources, and guidelines on the basic principles of internal evaluations of school violence programs. This information can help staff with program definition, planning, implementation, continuous improvement, and measurement of outcomes. "Introduction" (Erwin Flaxman) examines types of…

  3. Evaluating Individualized Reading Programs: A Bayesian Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Martha

    Simple Bayesian approaches can be applied to answer specific questions in evaluating an individualized reading program. A small reading and study skills program located in the counseling center of a major research university collected and compiled data on student characteristics such as class, number of sessions attended, grade point average, and…

  4. 1994 Ergonomics Program Quality Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Longbotham, L.; Miller, D.P.

    1995-06-01

    A telephone survey was conducted to evaluate the quality of service provided to the primary customers of the Corporate Ergonomics Group (CEG). One hundred clients who received services between October 1993 and June 1994 were asked questions on their expectations, implementation of ergonomic recommendations, follow-ups, time required, productivity improvements, symptom alleviation, and satisfaction. Suggestions on how processes could be improved were also solicited. In general, recommendations are being implemented, worksite evaluations are going smoothly, and customers are satisfied with the process. The CEG was pleased to learn that half of the people who implemented recommendations experienced improvements in productivity, and four out of five symptomatic customers experienced partial or complete relief. Through analysis of the data and by studying clients` suggestions for process improvement, the CEG has developed a strategy for changing and improving current procedures and practices. These plans can be found in the last section of this report.

  5. Evaluation of Effective Dose During Abdominal Three-Dimensional Imaging for Three Flat-Panel-Detector Angiography Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Kidouchi, Takashi; Yamamoto, Asako; Masumoto, Tomohiko; Ozaki, Yutaka

    2011-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effective dose during abdominal three-dimensional (3D) imaging on phantoms and estimate the dose-area product (DAP) for effective dose conversion factors for three types of angiographic units. Three-dimensional imaging was performed for three sizes (small, medium, large) of human-shaped phantoms using three types of angiographic units (Allura Xper FD20/10, INNOVA 4100, AXIOM Artis dTA). We calculated 25 organ doses and effective doses using Monte Carlo technique for the three phantoms with a program for a personal computer. As benchmark studies to back up the results by Monte Carlo technique, we measured the organ doses directly on the small phantom using radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters. The DAP value increased as the phantom size increased. The organ doses and the effective doses during the 3D imaging increased as the phantom size increased. The effective doses for the small phantom by Monte Carlo technique were 1.9, 2.2, and 2.1 mSv for the Allura Xper FD20/10, INNOVA 4100, and AXIOM Artis dTA, respectively, while those by direct measurement were 1.6, 2.0, and 2.6 mSv. The effective doses to DAP ratios by Monte Carlo technique were 0.37-0.45, 0.26-0.32, and 0.13-0.15 (mSv Gy{sup -1}cm{sup -2}) for the Allura Xper FD20/10, INNOVA 4100, and AXIOM Artis dTA, respectively. In conclusion, the effective doses during 3D imaging and the dose-to-DAP ratios differ among angiographic units, and the effective dose can be estimated using a proper conversion factor for each angiographic unit.

  6. EVALUATION OF THYROID RADIATION DOSE USING CONE BEAM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY.

    PubMed

    Setti da Rocha, Anna Silvia Penteado; de Mello Aguiar, Guilherme; Tulio, Ana Paula; Ditzel, Alessandra S; Filipov, Danielle

    2017-07-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) became common in various dental specialties over the past decade. This technology is used by dental professionals regarding the investigation of maxillofacial structures. Due to the diagnostic quality and possibility of 3D view, this method has become an additional method of human exposure to ionizing radiation. This study aims to evaluate the amount of ionizing radiation absorbed by thyroid gland using CBCT. Measurements were performed by LiF dosimeters (TLD-100), positioned on a phantom for head and neck, which was irradiated by Newtom 3G-CBCT. The average of phantom surface radiation dose at the thyroid gland was 0.48 mGy. The data obtained during this study are suitable to reference values; therefore, it is important to recall that the as low as reasonably achievable principle must be applied in all procedures, thereby safeguarding the patient and also the professional. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. The human dimension of program evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, E.L.

    1993-05-01

    Social science issues play an important role in the evaluation of demand-side management (DSM) programs. In the very early years of DSM program evaluation in the United States, there was a fair amount of social science research applied to the behavioral aspects of energy efficiency. Since the mid-1980s, however, there has been a heavy emphasis on impact evaluation, technical measurement, and engineering methodologies. Although some have articulated the need to integrate behavioral research into energy evaluation, most emphasis has tended to center on the technical/engineering aspects. Increasingly, however, the realization is growing that it is necessary to integrate important behavioral variables into impact evaluation techniques. In addition, it is being further recognized that behavioral research questions are central to a number of critical evaluation issues: e.g., design of samples for evaluation studies, net energy savings, self-selection bias, free riders and free drivers, persistence of energy savings, process evaluation, and market impact evaluation. Finally, it is increasingly being realized that the utilization of evaluation results relies heavily on behavioral factors. Social science researchers should be poised to expect a greatly expanded role of behavioral research in evaluation. As new techniques are developed and perfected, as the results of impact evaluations become more abundant, and as the gap between technical energy savings potential and realized savings becomes more visible, research regarding the ``human dimension`` of program evaluation will be crucial. This paper provides an overview of the human dimension of program evaluation and focuses on key evaluation issues in demand-side management which will require the use of social science research for addressing these issues.

  8. Evaluating the Online Pathway to Graduation Program. Evaluation Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Huafang; McGaughey, Trisha A.

    2013-01-01

    This brief describes an evaluation of the "Online Pathway to Graduation" (OPTG) program in Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS) during the 2012-2013 school year. The OPTG program provides students who participate in an alternative learning opportunity to earn course credits and graduate from high school. The purposes of the…

  9. Do intervention fidelity and dose influence outcomes? Results from the move to improve worksite physical activity program.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mark G; Basta, Tania B; Bynum, Bethany H; DeJoy, David M; Vandenberg, Robert J; Dishman, Rod K

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the implementation of the Move to Improve worksite physical activity program using a four step framework that includes the following: (i) defining the active ingredients, (ii) using good methods to measure implementation, (iii) monitoring implementation and (iv) relating implementation to outcomes. The intervention active ingredients consisted of a goal setting behavior change program, a team competition and environmental supports. Intervention fidelity and dose were measured by surveys administered to site co-ordinators, team captains and employees. Implementation was monitored by the use of biweekly assessments that tracked individual physical activity levels and through weekly reports of the project director and site co-ordinators. Latent growth modeling was conducted to determine whether intervention outcomes were affected by site implementation (i.e. fidelity) and/or participation by employees (i.e. dose). Results showed high levels of intervention fidelity, moderate to high levels of intervention dose delivered and moderate levels of the intervention dose received. Level of implementation affected the degree of change in vigorous physical activity (Mean = 5.4 versus 2.2; chi(2) = 4.9, df = 1), otherwise outcome measures were unaffected by fidelity and dose. These findings suggest that practitioners should focus more energy assuring that the core components are fully implemented and be less concerned about the level of participation.

  10. Evaluation of enzyme dose and dose-frequency in ameliorating substrate accumulation in MPS IIIA Huntaway dog brain.

    PubMed

    King, Barbara; Marshall, Neil; Beard, Helen; Hassiotis, Sofia; Trim, Paul J; Snel, Marten F; Rozaklis, Tina; Jolly, Robert D; Hopwood, John J; Hemsley, Kim M

    2015-03-01

    Intracerebrospinal fluid (CSF) infusion of replacement enzyme is under evaluation for amelioration of disease-related symptoms and biomarker changes in patients with the lysosomal storage disorder mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPS IIIA; www.clinicaltrials.gov ; NCT#01155778; #01299727). Determining the optimal dose/dose-frequency is important, given the invasive method for chronically supplying recombinant protein to the brain, the main site of symptom generation. To examine these variables, we utilised MPS IIIA Huntaway dogs, providing recombinant human sulphamidase (rhSGSH) to young pre-symptomatic dogs from an age when MPS IIIA dog brain exhibits significant accumulation of primary (heparan sulphate) and secondary (glycolipid) substrates. Enzyme was infused into CSF via the cisterna magna at one of two doses (3 mg or 15 mg/infusion), with the higher dose supplied at two different intervals; fortnightly or monthly. Euthanasia was carried out 24 h after the final injection. Dose- and frequency-dependent reductions in heparan sulphate were observed in CSF and deeper layers of cerebral cortex. When we examined the amount of immunostaining of the general endo/lysosomal marker, LIMP-2, or quantified activated microglia, the higher fortnightly dose resulted in superior outcomes in affected dogs. Secondary lesions such as accumulation of GM3 ganglioside and development of GAD-reactive axonal spheroids were treated to a similar degree by both rhSGSH doses and dose frequencies. Our findings indicate that the lower fortnightly dose is sub-optimal for ameliorating existing and preventing further development of disease-related pathology in young MPS IIIA dog brain; however, increasing the dose fivefold but halving the frequency of administration enabled near normalisation of disease-related biomarkers.

  11. Staff Development Programs: A Guide to Evaluation. The Program Evaluation Guides for Schools Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullins, Terry W.

    This book is part of a seven-volume series for evaluating programs and services in today's K-12 schools. It details strategies to evaluate staff-development programs, focusing on the use of formative evaluation. Following the introduction, six vignettes illustrating the application of the strategies to real-life experiences are presented. They…

  12. Industrial Assessment Center Program Impact Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.A.

    2000-01-26

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Program. The purpose of this program is to conduct energy, waste, and productivity assessments for small to medium-sized industrial firms. Assessments are conducted by 30 university-based industrial assessment centers. The purpose of this project was to evaluate energy and cost savings attributable to the assessments, the trained alumni, and the Websites sponsored by this program. How IAC assessments, alumni, and Web-based information may influence industrial energy efficiency decision making was also studied. It is concluded that appreciable energy and cost savings may be attributed to the IAC Program and that the IAC Program has resulted in more active and improved energy-efficiency decision making by industrial firms.

  13. Evaluation of absorbed dose in Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaeva, Gayane; Djuraeva, Gulnara; Kim, Andrey; Koblik, Yuriy; Kulabdullaev, Gairatulla; Rakhmonov, Turdimukhammad; Saytjanov, Shavkat

    2015-02-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT) is used for treatment of radioresistant malignant tumors. The absorbed dose in GdNCT can be divided into four primary dose components: thermal neutron, fast neutron, photon and natural gadolinium doses. The most significant is the dose created by natural gadolinium. The amount of gadolinium at the irradiated region is changeable and depends on the gadolinium delivery agent and on the structure of the location where the agent is injected. To de- fine the time dependence of the gadolinium concentration ρ(t) in the irradiated region the pharmacokinetics of gadolinium delivery agent (Magnevist) was studied at intratumoral injection in mice and intramuscular injection in rats. A polynomial approximation was applied to the experimental data and the influence of ρ(t) on the relative change of the absorbed dose of gadolinium was studied.

  14. Rigorous Evaluations of Faculty Development Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucsera, John V.; Svinicki, Marilla

    2010-01-01

    Prior research has called for rigorous evaluations of programs designed to improve college teaching, mostly in response to the missing literature supporting its practice. The purpose of this review was to explore whether such evaluations have taken place since the last examination in 1991. From a systematic review of nine leading publication…

  15. Program Evaluation: Who Should Do It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bale, Richard N.

    A central question to evaluative research at all levels is, Who should do it? In evaluating drug abuse programs three groups might be involved: treatment personnel, administrative or research personnel, and outside research professionals. This paper presents some advantages and disadvantages to the involvement of each of these groups within the…

  16. Evaluating Programs for Strengthening Teaching and Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teacher Incentive Fund, US Department of Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Education (ED) expects all Teacher Incentive Fund (TIF) grantees to conduct an evaluation of their programs. Experience with earlier rounds of TIF grants has shown that evaluations can provide valuable information for managing and improving TIF-supported activities, as well as evidence that these activities have had a…

  17. Second Language Proficiency Assessment and Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunan, David

    A discussion of the role of second language proficiency assessment in the evaluation of language programs argues that for four reasons, the use of proficiency is inappropriate as a central element in evaluation. The reasons are: (1) the construct of proficiency has not been operationalized in a way that enables it to be used usefully; (2)…

  18. Special Education Program Evaluation: 1996-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeschke, Thomas A.

    This evaluation report presents data on the special education program in the Des Moines (Iowa) public schools. The school district's mission statement is followed by a context evaluation, which finds that more than 8,000 Des Moines students receive special education services on either a daily or short-term basis throughout the year. Also noted is…

  19. Evaluation Model for Career Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byerly, Richard L.; And Others

    A study was conducted to provide and test an evaluative model that could be utilized in providing curricular evaluation of the various career programs. Two career fields, dental assistant and auto mechanic, were chosen for study. A questionnaire based upon the actual job performance was completed by six groups connected with the auto mechanics and…

  20. Organizational Structures that Support Internal Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambur, Michael T.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter explores how the structure of large complex organizations such as Cooperative Extension affects their ability to support internal evaluation of their programs and activities. Following a literature review of organizational structure and its relation to internal evaluation capacity, the chapter presents the results of interviews with…

  1. Organizational Structures that Support Internal Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambur, Michael T.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter explores how the structure of large complex organizations such as Cooperative Extension affects their ability to support internal evaluation of their programs and activities. Following a literature review of organizational structure and its relation to internal evaluation capacity, the chapter presents the results of interviews with…

  2. Maryland Community Colleges 1982 Program Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Board for Community Colleges, Annapolis.

    As part of an annual statewide evaluation process, quantitative information on community college programs is reviewed by the Maryland State Board for Community Colleges. Subsequently, a qualitative assessment is conducted by individual community colleges in response to specific questions raised by the Board. This report contains evaluations of 48…

  3. Comparison of linear and nonlinear programming approaches for "worst case dose" and "minmax" robust optimization of intensity-modulated proton therapy dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Zaghian, Maryam; Cao, Wenhua; Liu, Wei; Kardar, Laleh; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Mohan, Radhe; Lim, Gino

    2017-03-01

    Robust optimization of intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) takes uncertainties into account during spot weight optimization and leads to dose distributions that are resilient to uncertainties. Previous studies demonstrated benefits of linear programming (LP) for IMPT in terms of delivery efficiency by considerably reducing the number of spots required for the same quality of plans. However, a reduction in the number of spots may lead to loss of robustness. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the performance in terms of plan quality and robustness of two robust optimization approaches using LP and nonlinear programming (NLP) models. The so-called "worst case dose" and "minmax" robust optimization approaches and conventional planning target volume (PTV)-based optimization approach were applied to designing IMPT plans for five patients: two with prostate cancer, one with skull-based cancer, and two with head and neck cancer. For each approach, both LP and NLP models were used. Thus, for each case, six sets of IMPT plans were generated and assessed: LP-PTV-based, NLP-PTV-based, LP-worst case dose, NLP-worst case dose, LP-minmax, and NLP-minmax. The four robust optimization methods behaved differently from patient to patient, and no method emerged as superior to the others in terms of nominal plan quality and robustness against uncertainties. The plans generated using LP-based robust optimization were more robust regarding patient setup and range uncertainties than were those generated using NLP-based robust optimization for the prostate cancer patients. However, the robustness of plans generated using NLP-based methods was superior for the skull-based and head and neck cancer patients. Overall, LP-based methods were suitable for the less challenging cancer cases in which all uncertainty scenarios were able to satisfy tight dose constraints, while NLP performed better in more difficult cases in which most uncertainty scenarios were hard to meet

  4. Handbook of evaluation of utility DSM programs

    SciTech Connect

    Hirst, E.; Reed, J.; Bronfman, B.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Hicks, E.; Hirst, E.; Hoffman, M.; Keating, K.; Michaels, H.; Nadel, S.; Peters, J.; Reed, J.; Saxonis, W.; Schoen, A.; Violette, D.

    1991-12-01

    Program evaluation has become a central issue in the world of utility integrated resource planning. The DSM programs that utilities were operating to meet federal requirements or to improve customer relations are now becoming big business. DSM is being considered an important resource in a utility`s portfolio of options. In the last five years, the amount of money that utilities have invested in DSM has grown exponentially in most regulatory jurisdictions. Market analysts are now talking about DSM being a $30 billion industry by the end of the decade. If the large volume of DSM-program investments was not enough to highlight the importance of evaluation, then the introduction of regulatory incentives has really focused the spotlight. This handbook was developed through a process that involved many of those people who represent the diverse constituencies of DSM-program evaluation. We have come to recognize the many technical disciplines that must be employed to evaluate DSM programs. An analysis might start out based on the principles of utility load research to find out what happened, but a combination of engineering and statistical methods must be used to ``triangulate`` an estimate of what would have happened without the program. The difference, of course, is that elusive but prized result of evaluation: what happened as the direct result of the DSM program. Technical performance of DSM measures is not the sole determinant of the answer, either. We also recognize the importance of such behavioral attributes of DSM as persistence and free ridership. Finally, DSM evaluation is meaningless without attention to planning an approach, communicating results to relevant decision-makers, and focusing as much on the process as the impacts of the program. These topics are all covered in this handbook.

  5. Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) evaluation. Volume 1: Process evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Sandahl, L.J.; Ledbetter, M.R.; Chin, R.I.; Lewis, K.S.; Norling, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted this study for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) Evaluation. This report documents the SERP formation and implementation process, and identifies preliminary program administration and implementation issues. The findings are based primarily on interviews with those familiar with the program, such as utilities, appliance manufacturers, and SERP administrators. These interviews occurred primarily between March and April 1995, when SERP was in the early stages of program implementation. A forthcoming report will estimate the preliminary impacts of SERP within the industry and marketplace. Both studies were funded by DOE at the request of SERP Inc., which sought a third-party evaluation of its program.

  6. Evaluation of Activity Concentration Values and Doses due to the Transport of Low Level Radioactive Material

    SciTech Connect

    Rawl, Richard R; Scofield, Patricia A; Leggett, Richard Wayne; Eckerman, Keith F

    2010-04-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiated an international Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to evaluate the safety of transport of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). This report presents the United States contribution to that IAEA research program. The focus of this report is on the analysis of the potential doses resulting from the transport of low level radioactive material. Specific areas of research included: (1) an examination of the technical approach used in the derivation of exempt activity concentration values and a comparison of the doses associated with the transport of materials included or not included in the provisions of Paragraph 107(e) of the IAEA Safety Standards, Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, Safety Requirements No. TS-R-1; (2) determination of the doses resulting from different treatment of progeny for exempt values versus the A{sub 1}/A{sub 2} values; and (3) evaluation of the dose justifications for the provisions applicable to exempt materials and low specific activity materials (LSA-I). It was found that the 'previous or intended use' (PIU) provision in Paragraph 107(e) is not risk informed since doses to the most highly exposed persons (e.g., truck drivers) are comparable regardless of intended use of the transported material. The PIU clause can also have important economic implications for co-mined ores and products that are not intended for the fuel cycle but that have uranium extracted as part of their industrial processing. In examination of the footnotes in Table 2 of TS-R-1, which identifies the progeny included in the exempt or A1/A2 values, there is no explanation of how the progeny were selected. It is recommended that the progeny for both the exemption and A{sub 1}/A{sub 2} values should be similar regardless of application, and that the same physical information should be used in deriving the limits. Based on the evaluation of doses due to the transport of low-level NORM

  7. Planning for Evaluation's Future: Undergraduate Students' Interest in Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaVelle, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Undergraduate students are a potential pool of future evaluators, but little is known about their level of interest in pursuing a career in program evaluation (PE). This two-stage study collected survey data on 249 undergraduate students' knowledge, interest, and attitudes toward various descriptions of PE. Qualitative analysis indicated…

  8. Evaluation of in vivo low-dose mouse irradiation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, S. J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H.; Kye, Y.-U.; Kim, J. K.; Son, T. G.; Lee, M. W.; Jeong, D. H.; Yang, K. M.; Nam, S.-H.; Kang, Y.-R.

    2016-03-01

    This study aims to develop a facility that can irradiate subjects with a desired low dose, which can be used to assess the biological effects of low-dose radiation. We develop a single-occupancy mouse-cage and shelf system with adjustable geometric parameters, such as the distances and angles of the cages relative to the collimator. We assess the irradiation-level accuracy using two measurement methods. First, we calculate the angle and distance of each mouse cage relative to the irradiator. We employ a Monte Carlo n-particle simulation for all of the cages at a given distance from the radiation source to calculate the air kerma and the relative absorbed dose in the in-house designed shelving system; these are found to be approximately 0.108 and 0.109 Gy, respectively. Second, we measure the relative absorbed dose using glass dosimeters inserted directly into the heads and bodies of the mice. For a conventional irradiation system, the irradiation measurements show a maximum discrepancy of 42% between the absorbed and desired doses, whereas a discrepancy of only 6% from the desired dose is found for the designed mouse apartment system. In addition, multi-mouse cages are shown to yield to significantly greater differences in the mouse head and body relative absorbed doses, compared to the discrepancies found for single-occupancy cages in the conventional irradiation system. Our findings suggest that the in-house shelving system has greater reliability for the biological analysis of the effects of low-dose radiation.

  9. A Comprehensive Evaluation of a Lifelong Learning Program: Program 60.

    PubMed

    Park, Jee Hoon; Lee, KyongWeon; Dabelko-Schoeny, Holly

    2016-09-28

    Lifelong learning programs meet older adults' educational needs and further support their health and well-being leading to more successful aging. In particular, university-based lifelong learning programs have provided older adults with opportunities to not only develop skills and knowledge but also expand new social networks with people of different ages. This study evaluated a university-based lifelong learning program, Program 60, to identify the relationships between participants' experiences in the program and their quality of life. An online survey was employed, and 107 participants completed the self-report survey. The participants reported that classes helped increase their emotional satisfaction and that they enjoyed taking classes with younger students. Their experiences in the program reliably predicted psychological and social elements of their quality of life (p = .004 and p = .019, respectively). Study results provide helpful information for the development of lifelong learning programs that are responsive to the increasing demands of older adults. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. 14 CFR 150.33 - Evaluation of programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Evaluation of programs. 150.33 Section 150... Compatibility Programs § 150.33 Evaluation of programs. (a) The FAA conducts an evaluation of each noise compatibility program and, based on that evaluation, either approves or disapproves the program. The...

  11. 14 CFR 150.33 - Evaluation of programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Evaluation of programs. 150.33 Section 150... Compatibility Programs § 150.33 Evaluation of programs. (a) The FAA conducts an evaluation of each noise compatibility program and, based on that evaluation, either approves or disapproves the program. The...

  12. 14 CFR 150.33 - Evaluation of programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Evaluation of programs. 150.33 Section 150... Compatibility Programs § 150.33 Evaluation of programs. (a) The FAA conducts an evaluation of each noise compatibility program and, based on that evaluation, either approves or disapproves the program. The...

  13. Dose audit and evaluation of work practices during barium procedures using digital radiography techniques.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Roshan S; Augustine, Philomina; Aparna, I; Raj, D Victor

    2004-10-01

    Effective dose and organ doses during barium procedures performed using digital radiography machines were estimated and the related work practices were evaluated. Measured values of dose area product (DAP) were used for the calculation of effective doses. One hundred and thirty eight patients undergoing barium procedures were included in the study. The use of additional 0.2 mm copper filter during barium procedures effectively reduced patient doses. The effective dose during barium swallow procedure varied from 0.03 mSv to 3.5 mSv; during barium meal it varied from 0.18 mSv to 2.62 mSv; and during barium enema it varied from 0.56 mSv to 4.24 mSv. Dose auditing was done on the basis of patient doses, imaging techniques and image quality. Selection of optimized exposure factors imparted lower dose to patients during barium procedures.

  14. Evaluating obstetrical residency programs using patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Asch, David A; Nicholson, Sean; Srinivas, Sindhu; Herrin, Jeph; Epstein, Andrew J

    2009-09-23

    Patient outcomes have been used to assess the performance of hospitals and physicians; in contrast, residency programs have been compared based on nonclinical measures. To assess whether obstetrics and gynecology residency programs can be evaluated by the quality of care their alumni deliver. A retrospective analysis of all Florida and New York obstetrical hospital discharges between 1992 and 2007, representing 4 906 169 deliveries performed by 4124 obstetricians from 107 US residency programs. Nine measures of maternal complications from vaginal and cesarean births reflecting laceration, hemorrhage, and all other complications after vaginal delivery; hemorrhage, infection, and all other complications after cesarean delivery; and composites for vaginal and cesarean deliveries and for all deliveries regardless of mode. Obstetricians' residency program was associated with substantial variation in maternal complication rates. Women treated by obstetricians trained in residency programs in the bottom quintile for risk-standardized major maternal complication rates had an adjusted complication rate of 13.6%, approximately one-third higher than the 10.3% adjusted rate for women treated by obstetricians from programs in the top quintile (absolute difference, 3.3%; 95% confidence interval, 2.8%-3.8%). The rankings of residency programs based on each of the 9 measures were similar. Adjustment for medical licensure examination scores did not substantially alter the program ranking. Obstetrics and gynecology training programs can be ranked by the maternal complication rates of their graduates' patients. These rankings are stable across individual types of complications and are not associated with residents' licensing examination scores.

  15. [Evaluation of Mexican 'Sicalidad' health quality program].

    PubMed

    Rivera-Buendía, Frida; Bello-Chavolla, Omar Y; Zubieta-Zavala, Adriana; Hernández-Ramírez, Luz; Zepeda-Tena, Carolina; Durán-Arenas, Luis

    2015-01-01

    To analize the implementation of the Sistema Integral de Calidad en Salud (Sicalidad) program of the Ministry of Health in the 2011. The study follows a cross sectional design, hybrid, with a qualitative and quantitative components. A cluster probabilístic sample was used with two stages. A total of 3 034 interviews were carried out in 13 states to evaluate the implementation of the eight components of the Sicalidad program. General indexes of performance (GIP) were formulated for structure process and satisfaction of users, physicians and nurses with the program. The GIP with the lower score was accreditation of health facilities with a range of scores between 25.4 and 28% in the medical units evaluated; The highest range of scores was in the component of nosocomial infection prevention between 78.3 and 92%. In brief the Sicalidad components evaluated suggest problems with both structure and critical process elements in the implementation of the quality initiatives.

  16. Medical research and evaluation facility and studies supporting the Medical Chemical Defense Program. Time and dose response characterization of the prevention of HD-induced NAD+ depletion and HD-induced cytotoxicity by niacinamide and niacin. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, C.T.; Johnson, J.B.; Blank, J.A.; Menton, R.G.; Starner, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    Studies were conducted under this task to Assess the time and concentration dependent nature of niacinamide (NM) protection against HD-induced NAD+ depletion and cytotoxicity. The HD concentrations used assess the time dependent nature of cytotoxicity and NAD+ depletion, and the impact of NM and niacin (NI) treatment were 13,62, 101, and 171 mu-M HD. Three concentrations of NM and NI were (0.01,0.1 and 1 mM) selected by USAMRICD for evaluation at 2, 4,8, 12, 16,20,24,48, and 72 hours after exposure to HD. Cytotoxicity and total culture NAD+ content were assessed. NAD+ concentrations following the addition of 1 mM NM frequently were significantly greater than those observed for the HD-exposed controls especially at 171mu-M HD. Multiple addition of NM had little protective effect relative to that by provided by pretreatment alone. At the 171mu-M HD concentration, the single addition of NM provided marginal but statistically significant (p<=0.05) protection. Comparisons of the different NM addition modes yielded mixed results, but usually the number of viable cells was greater with multiple additions of NM. NI did not provide protection against HD-induced NAD+ depletion or cytotoxicity.

  17. Evaluation of low energy electron beam dose application by means of a portable optical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reitzig, Manuela; Winkler, Martin; Härtling, Thomas; Röder, Olaf; Opitz, Jörg

    2014-11-01

    We present our recent development concerning the evaluation of a low energy dose application to electron beam responding materials with a simple portable optical device. Electron beam irradiation is a promising option to sterilize sensitive and high performance products or surfaces at a low temperature and without moisture. Especially in the fields of the food industry and medicine, regulations regarding sterility are increasingly tightened. Because of this, a secure proof for electron-beam-assisted sterilization is required. However, no nondestructive and in situ method exists up until now. Our approach to provide a secure proof of sterilization is to place a suitable marker material based on rare-earth-doped phosphors inside or on the top of the packaging material of the respective product. Upon electron irradiation the marker material changes its luminescence properties as a function of the applied energy dose. We verified the energy dependence by means of time-resolved measurements of the luminescence decay of an upconversion phosphor with a portable optical device. In our experimental realization, short laser pulses in the near-infrared range are triggered by a microcontrol unit (MCU) and excite the marker material. The light emitted by the marker is collected in the range between 400 and 1100 nm via a silicon photodiode, processed by the MCU, and analyzed in a Labview program via a single-exponential fit. As a main result, we observe an increasing reduction of the luminescence lifetime with higher dose applications.

  18. The Houston Community College Eligible Legalized Alien Program. Evaluation Program. Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaman, Don F.; Cuellar, Sylvia

    The Houston Community College (Texas) program (TOTAL ACCESS) designed in response to the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, is described and evaluated. The program offers classes to eligible aliens (97% Hispanic Americans from Mexico, El Salvador, and Guatemala) wishing to pursue the educational program required for legalization. Program…

  19. Handbook for Evaluating Drug and Alcohol Prevention Programs: Staff/Team Evaluation of Prevention Programs (STEPP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, J. David; Nederhood, Britt

    This handbook was developed for the purpose of providing drug and alcohol prevention program managers with a comprehensive yet easy-to-use tool to help their evaluation efforts. The handbook emphasizes program staff members working together as a team. It provides instruments and activities for determining program effectiveness, as well as…

  20. Multicentre evaluation of a novel vaginal dose reporting method in 153 cervical cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Westerveld, Henrike; de Leeuw, Astrid; Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Dankulchai, Pittaya; Oosterveld, Bernard; Oinam, Arun; Hudej, Robert; Swamidas, Jamema; Lindegaard, Jacob; Tanderup, Kari; Pötter, Richard; Kirisits, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Recently, a vaginal dose reporting method for combined EBRT and BT in cervical cancer patients was proposed. The current study was to evaluate vaginal doses with this method in a multicentre setting, wherein different applicators, dose rates and protocols were used. In a subset of patients from the EMBRACE study, vaginal doses were evaluated. Doses at the applicator surface left/right and anterior/posterior and at 5mm depth were measured. In addition, the dose at the Posterior-Inferior Border of Symphysis (PIBS) vaginal dose point and PIBS±2cm, corresponding to the mid and lower vagina, was measured. 153 patients from seven institutions were included. Large dose variations expressed in EQD2 with α/β=3Gy were seen between patients, in particular at the top left and right vaginal wall (median 195 (range 61-947)Gy/178 (61-980)Gy, respectively). At 5mm depth, doses were 98 (55-212)Gy/91 (54-227)Gy left/right, and 71 (51-145)Gy/67 (49-189)Gy anterior/posterior, respectively. The dose at PIBS and PIBS±2cm was 41 (3-81)Gy, 54 (32-109)Gy and 5 (1-51)Gy, respectively. At PIBS+2cm (mid vagina) dose variation was coming from BT. The variation at PIBS-2cm (lower vagina) was mainly dependent on EBRT field border location. This novel method for reporting vaginal doses coming from EBRT and BT through well-defined dose points gives a robust representation of the dose along the vaginal axis. In addition, it allows comparison of vaginal dose between patients from different centres. The doses at the PIBS points represent the doses at the mid and lower parts of the vagina. Large variations in dose throughout the vagina were observed between patients and centres. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluating Youth Development Programs: Progress and Promise

    PubMed Central

    Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2016-01-01

    Advances in theories of adolescent development and positive youth development have greatly increased our understanding of how programs and practices with adolescents can impede or enhance their development. In this paper the authors reflect on the progress in research on youth development programs in the last two decades, since possibly the first review of empirical evaluations by Roth, Brooks-Gunn, Murray, and Foster (1998). The authors use the terms Version 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 to refer to changes in youth development research and programs over time. They argue that advances in theory and descriptive accounts of youth development programs (Version 2.0) need to be coupled with progress in definitions of youth development programs, measurement of inputs and outputs that incorporate an understanding of programs as contexts for development, and stronger design and evaluation of programs (Version 3.0). The authors also advocate for an integration of prevention and promotion research, and for use of the term youth development rather than positive youth development. PMID:28077922

  2. Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project Building 2 public dose evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.

    1996-05-01

    Building 2 on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) site, which is operated by Rust Geotech, is part of the GJPO Remedial Action Program. This report describes measurements and modeling efforts to evaluate the radiation dose to members of the public who might someday occupy or tear down Building 2. The assessment of future doses to those occupying or demolishing Building 2 is based on assumptions about future uses of the building, measured data when available, and predictive modeling when necessary. Future use of the building is likely to be as an office facility. The DOE sponsored program, RESRAD-BUILD, Version. 1.5 was chosen for the modeling tool. Releasing the building for unrestricted use instead of demolishing it now could save a substantial amount of money compared with the baseline cost estimate because the site telecommunications system, housed in Building 2, would not be disabled and replaced. The information developed in this analysis may be used as part of an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) cost/benefit determination regarding disposition of Building 2.

  3. Incorporation of functional imaging data in the evaluation of dose distributions using the generalized concept of equivalent uniform dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miften, Moyed M.; Das, Shiva K.; Su, Min; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2004-05-01

    Advances in the fields of IMRT and functional imaging have greatly increased the prospect of escalating the dose to highly active or hypoxic tumour sub-volumes and steering the dose away from highly functional critical structure regions. However, current clinical treatment planning and evaluation tools assume homogeneous activity/function status in the tumour/critical structures. A method was developed to incorporate tumour/critical structure heterogeneous functionality in the generalized concept of equivalent uniform dose (EUD). The tumour and critical structures functional EUD (FEUD) values were calculated from the dose-function histogram (DFH), which relates dose to the fraction of total function value at that dose. The DFH incorporates flouro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) functional data for tumour, which describes the distribution of metabolically active tumour clonogens, and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion data for critical structures. To demonstrate the utility of the method, the lung dose distributions of two non-small cell lung caner patients, who received 3D conformal external beam radiotherapy treatment with curative intent, were evaluated. Differences between the calculated lungs EUD and FEUD values of up to 50% were observed in the 3D conformal plans. In addition, a non-small cell lung cancer patient was inversely planned with a target dose prescription of 76 Gy. Two IMRT plans (plan-A and plan-B) were generated for the patient based on the CT, FDG-PET and SPECT treatment planning images using dose-volume objective functions. The IMRT plans were generated with the goal of achieving more critical structures sparing in plan-B than plan-A. Results show the target volume EUD in plan-B is lower than plan-A by 5% with a value of 73.31 Gy, and the FEUD in plan-B is lower than plan-A by 2.6% with a value of 75.77 Gy. The FEUD plan-B values for heart and lungs were lower than plan-A by 22% and 18%, respectively

  4. Evaluation plan for the Weatherization Assistance Program

    SciTech Connect

    Beschen, D.A. ); Brown, M.A. )

    1991-08-01

    The most recent national evaluation of the impacts of the US Department of Energy (DOE)'s Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) was completed in 1984 based on consumption data for households weatherized in 1981. WAP regulations and operations have changed substantially over the last decade, and new opportunities are on the horizon. DOE recognizes the need for a more current national level evaluation of the program and has developed a plan for conducting the evaluation with the support of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The national WAP evaluation as currently proposed has seven major goals: (1) estimate the energy saved by the program -- one, two, and three years after participation; (2) assess nonenergy impacts, such as comfort, safety, and housing affordability; (3) assess program cost effectiveness; (4) analyze factors which influence energy savings, nonenergy impacts, and cost effectiveness; (5) describe the WAP network's capabilities and the innovative weatherization technologies and procedures it has employed; (6) characterize the WAP-eligible population and the federal and non-federal funds that haven been used to meet its weatherization needs; and, (7) identify promising WAP opportunities for the future. The data collection, analyses, and reports are to be completed in phases between 1991 and 1993. The evaluation methodologies vary by fuel type, housing type, and climate zone. The analysis of energy savings and cost effectiveness will be based primarily on weather-normalized, retrospective utility billing records (collected for pre- and postretrofit years). 12 refs., 8 figs.

  5. ZATPAC: a model consortium evaluates teen programs.

    PubMed

    Owen, Kathryn; Murphy, Dana; Parsons, Chris

    2009-09-01

    How do we advance the environmental literacy of young people, support the next generation of environmental stewards and increase the diversity of the leadership of zoos and aquariums? We believe it is through ongoing evaluation of zoo and aquarium teen programming and have founded a consortium to pursue those goals. The Zoo and Aquarium Teen Program Assessment Consortium (ZATPAC) is an initiative by six of the nation's leading zoos and aquariums to strengthen institutional evaluation capacity, model a collaborative approach toward assessing the impact of youth programs, and bring additional rigor to evaluation efforts within the field of informal science education. Since its beginning in 2004, ZATPAC has researched, developed, pilot-tested and implemented a pre-post program survey instrument designed to assess teens' knowledge of environmental issues, skills and abilities to take conservation actions, self-efficacy in environmental actions, and engagement in environmentally responsible behaviors. Findings from this survey indicate that teens who join zoo/aquarium programs are already actively engaged in many conservation behaviors. After participating in the programs, teens showed a statistically significant increase in their reported knowledge of conservation and environmental issues and their abilities to research, explain, and find resources to take action on conservation issues of personal concern. Teens also showed statistically significant increases pre-program to post-program for various conservation behaviors, including "I talk with my family and/or friends about things they can do to help the animals or the environment," "I save water...," "I save energy...," "When I am shopping I look for recycled products," and "I help with projects that restore wildlife habitat."

  6. Patient doses and dosimetric evaluations in interventional cardiology.

    PubMed

    Bor, Dogan; Olğar, Turan; Toklu, Türkay; Cağlan, Ayça; Onal, Elif; Padovani, Renato

    2009-03-01

    Interventional cardiological examinations may be associated with excessive radiation exposures which may cause skin injuries and higher probabilities of stochastic effects. Dose-area product (DAP) and skin doses of 325 patients were measured using alternative dosimetric techniques for different cardiological examinations. Data were collected from five different systems with the involvement of 11 cardiologists. All these dosimetric information has been collected separately for each of 10 projections together with the exposure parameters of X-ray systems. Mean DAP values measured with a transparent ion chamber were 49.1 Gy cm(2), 66.8 Gy cm(2), 106.9 Gy cm(2) and 124.7 Gy cm(2), respectively, for coronary angiography (CA), percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) or stent (PT-SI), coronary angiography and/or PTCA and/or stent (CA-PT-SI), and ablation examinations. Radiochromic films, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and point measurement of air kerma (AK) were carried out for skin dose assessments. Skin doses of 23 patients measured with radiochromic films were found to be between 2 Gy and 6 Gy. Although the complexity of the procedures was the major reason for these excessive doses, considerable contributions of high X-ray output of some fluoroscopy units were also noticed. In addition to the direct measurement of DAP, alternative DAP values were also determined from the skin dose measurement techniques; exposed areas were summed on digitized radiochromic films in one technique, The product of AK reading with X-ray field size measured at the patient entrance using slow X-ray films was taken as another DAP. Good correlations were found among the DAP results and also between the entrance skin doses calculated from AK measurements and direct DAP readings (R(2)=0.91). A trigger DAP value of 130 Gy cm(2) for the 2 Gy of skin doses was derived from this relationship. Collection of dosimetric data for each projection was also investigated regarding a

  7. Theory underlying a national teacher evaluation program.

    PubMed

    Taut, Sandy; Santelices, Verónica; Araya, Carolina; Manzi, Jorge

    2010-11-01

    The paper describes a study conducted to explicate the multiple theories underlying Chile's national teacher evaluation program. These theories will serve as the basis for evaluating the intended consequences of this evaluation system, while not losing sight of emerging unintended consequences. We first analyzed legal and policy documents and then interviewed fourteen representatives of the four stakeholder groups involved in the program's design and implementation, in order to gain insight into their respective conceptions of the program's functioning and intended effects. The results show that, as to be expected and despite the long and difficult negotiation process that preceded implementation of this program, multiple political stakeholders still view the program's intended effects differently. However, there was substantial overlap regarding a number of intended effects, such as building the capacity of, and triggering change in, teachers with shortcomings, and informing the selection of new teachers and facilitating the exit of unsatisfactory teachers from the system. It was difficult to get interviewees to talk about how exactly these intended effects are supposed to be achieved. The paper draws conclusions regarding theory elaboration process involving multiple stakeholders in a highly political context.

  8. SU-E-T-374: Evaluation and Verification of Dose Calculation Accuracy with Different Dose Grid Sizes for Intracranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Han, C; Schultheiss, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, we aim to evaluate the effect of dose grid size on the accuracy of calculated dose for small lesions in intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and to verify dose calculation accuracy with radiochromic film dosimetry. Methods: 15 intracranial lesions from previous SRS patients were retrospectively selected for this study. The planning target volume (PTV) ranged from 0.17 to 2.3 cm{sup 3}. A commercial treatment planning system was used to generate SRS plans using the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique using two arc fields. Two convolution-superposition-based dose calculation algorithms (Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm and Acuros XB algorithm) were used to calculate volume dose distribution with dose grid size ranging from 1 mm to 3 mm with 0.5 mm step size. First, while the plan monitor units (MU) were kept constant, PTV dose variations were analyzed. Second, with 95% of the PTV covered by the prescription dose, variations of the plan MUs as a function of dose grid size were analyzed. Radiochomic films were used to compare the delivered dose and profile with the calculated dose distribution with different dose grid sizes. Results: The dose to the PTV, in terms of the mean dose, maximum, and minimum dose, showed steady decrease with increasing dose grid size using both algorithms. With 95% of the PTV covered by the prescription dose, the total MU increased with increasing dose grid size in most of the plans. Radiochromic film measurements showed better agreement with dose distributions calculated with 1-mm dose grid size. Conclusion: Dose grid size has significant impact on calculated dose distribution in intracranial SRS treatment planning with small target volumes. Using the default dose grid size could lead to under-estimation of delivered dose. A small dose grid size should be used to ensure calculation accuracy and agreement with QA measurements.

  9. Evaluation of effective dose in region-of-interest neuroimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, Kamaljit K.

    We used small field-of-view (FOV) region-of-interest (ROI) imaging for integral dose reduction and to improve image quality by reducing scatter and providing increased resolution. We quantify the reduction of effective dose (ED) realized when using ROI techniques in neuroimaging. Microangiographic fluoroscopic (MAF) detector being used to provide improved visualization of fine detail in the treatment volume during neurointerventional procedures and in ROI cone-beam CT. Using PCXMC (STUK, Helsinki, Finland), the ED was calculated for the 3.6x3.6-cm FOV of the MAF, for the 20x20-cm FOV of the Varian PaxScan 2020 FPD and for a 20x3.6-cm FOV as used in dual detector ROI CBCT for circle of Willis. Substantial reduction in effective dose per detector exposure is realized using ROI techniques in neuroimaging. This reduction would allow the dose in the ROI to be increased over an order of magnitude to provide increased contrast resolution without increasing the stochastic risk to the patient compared to full-FOV imaging.

  10. A two-stage sequential linear programming approach to IMRT dose optimization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao H; Meyer, Robert R; Wu, Jianzhou; Naqvi, Shahid A; Shi, Leyuan; D’Souza, Warren D

    2010-01-01

    The conventional IMRT planning process involves two stages in which the first stage consists of fast but approximate idealized pencil beam dose calculations and dose optimization and the second stage consists of discretization of the intensity maps followed by intensity map segmentation and a more accurate final dose calculation corresponding to physical beam apertures. Consequently, there can be differences between the presumed dose distribution corresponding to pencil beam calculations and optimization and a more accurately computed dose distribution corresponding to beam segments that takes into account collimator-specific effects. IMRT optimization is computationally expensive and has therefore led to the use of heuristic (e.g., simulated annealing and genetic algorithms) approaches that do not encompass a global view of the solution space. We modify the traditional two-stage IMRT optimization process by augmenting the second stage via an accurate Monte-Carlo based kernel-superposition dose calculations corresponding to beam apertures combined with an exact mathematical programming based sequential optimization approach that uses linear programming (SLP). Our approach was tested on three challenging clinical test cases with multileaf collimator constraints corresponding to two vendors. We compared our approach to the conventional IMRT planning approach, a direct-aperture approach and a segment weight optimization approach. Our results in all three cases indicate that the SLP approach outperformed the other approaches, achieving superior critical structure sparing. Convergence of our approach is also demonstrated. Finally, our approach has also been integrated with a commercial treatment planning system and may be utilized clinically. PMID:20071764

  11. Development and validation of a fast voxel-based dose evaluation system in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cheng-Chang; Lin, Hsin-Hon; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Dong, Shang-Lung; Wu, Jay; Ni, Yu-Ching; Jan, Meei-Ling

    2014-11-01

    PET imaging has been widely used in the detection and staging of malignancies and the evaluation of patient-specific dosimetry for PET scans is important in nuclear medicine. However, patient-specific dosimetry can be estimated only by Monte Carlo methods which are usually time-consuming. The purpose of this study is to develop a fast dose evaluation system namely SimDOSE. SimDOSE is a Monte Carlo code embedded in SimSET with a dose scoring routine to record the deposited energy of the photons and electrons. Fluorine-18 is one of the most commonly used radionuclides that decay predominantly by positron emission. Only a 635 keV (Emax) positron and two annihilation photons should be concerned in F-18 radiation dosimetry, hence simulation is relatively simple. To evaluate the effects of resolution, an F-18 point source placed in a 20 cm diameter sphere filled with water was simulated by SimDOSE and GATE v6.1. Grid sizes of 1 mm, 3 mm, and 5 mm were tested and each was simulated with a total of 107 decays. The resultant dose distribution functions were compared. Dose evaluation on ORNL phantom was also performed to validate the accuracy of SimDOSE. The grid size of phantom was set as 3 mm and the number of decays was 107. The S-values of liver computed by SimDOSE were compared with GATE and OLINDA (Organ Level INternal Dose Assessment) for 11C, 15O, and 18F.Finally, the CPU time of simulations was compared between SimDOSE and GATE. The dose profiles show the absorption doses located 3 mm outside the center are similar between SimDOSE and GATE. However, 71% (19%) difference of the center dose between SimDOSE and GATE are observed for 1 mm (3 mm) grid. The differences of the profile lie in the assumption in SimDOSE that all kinetic energies of electrons are locally absorbed. The ratios of S values of (SimDOSE/OLINDA) range from 0.95 to 1.11 with a mean value of 1.02±0.043. To compare simulation time from SimDOSE to GATE for calculation of 1 mm, 3 mm, 5 mm gird point

  12. Evaluation of an Online Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Sharon; Camilli, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the evaluation of an online mentoring program for preparing pre-service elementary teachers at a small liberal arts college is described. An intervention was created to investigate the effects of online mentoring with preservice teachers, where mentoring is defined as a reciprocal relationship formed between an experienced teacher…

  13. Implications of Accountability for Educational Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruger, W. Stanley

    The concept of accountability in education has two primary concerns: the responsibility to provide effective educational programs and the responsibility to employ efficiently the resources allocated for this purpose. These concerns are fundamental to an evaluation procedure based on the principle of accountability. The establishment in 1967 of new…

  14. Research Evaluation of a Foster Grandparent Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltz, Rosalyn

    1989-01-01

    Effects on the personal development of participants in the Foster Grandparent Program (FGP) are evaluated. In a series of studies conducted at the Detroit FGP, foster grandparenting positively influenced the children's social, verbal, and intellectual development. Positive outcomes for the older participants included life satisfaction, adjustment,…

  15. Evaluation of the Training Development Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Deborah C.; And Others

    Both formative and summative evaluations were used to guide development and appraise outcomes of a model college/public service agency collaborative effort to develop an inservice, onsite, volunteer training program for Office of Environmental Affairs (OEA) employees. Assessment procedures included interviews with Training Development Program…

  16. Self-Assessment, Program Evaluation, and Renewal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badiali, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Never before in the history of the teaching profession has there been such a need for comprehensive evaluation of all teacher preparation programs, most especially professional development schools (PDSs). This need is driven not only by the pressures of the age of accountability, but also by the need for the PDS movement to act ethically and…

  17. An Evaluation of the NAMI Basics Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brister, Teri; Cavaleri, Mary A.; Olin, S. Serene; Shen, Sa; Burns, Barbara J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly E.

    2012-01-01

    This brief report describes results from an evaluation of NAMI Basics, a peer-delivered family education program for family caregivers of children and adolescents with mental illness. Over six classes, family members are given information (e.g. education about mental illness and treatments), skills training (e.g. family communication skills) and…

  18. The Crabapple Experience: Insights from Program Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Randy; Wisenbaker, Joe

    2000-01-01

    An evaluation of a Georgia middle school's multi-age grouping program revealed significant progress regarding student self-esteem, achievement, community building, and teacher collaboration. The Crabapple experience illustrates how one model of student-centered, developmentally appropriate, and integrated learning can benefit middle-level…

  19. Improved Elements of a Network Evaluation Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    3145 Short Title of Work: Improved Elements of a Network Evaluation Program t UNCLASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF TI1S PACE ’When Dese Entered...acquiring and installing at the Project Office a dedicated computer terminal and graphics system. The complete system was installed during March, 1981

  20. Evaluation of Florida's Eckerd Wilderness Camp Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Health and Rehabilitative Services, Tallahassee.

    This report evaluates year-long wilderness camping rehabilitation program for juvenile delinquents believed "emotionally problemed." The remote camps teach through an experience curriculum encompassing daily camping style tasks, with integration of experience via three-day home visits every six weeks followed by written reports by…

  1. EPA'S SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION (SITE) PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1986, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agen- cy`s Offices of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER), and the Office of Research and Develop- ment (ORD) established a technology research, dem- onstration, and evaluation program to promote the development and use of alterna...

  2. South African Education Program: An Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladd, Florence C.

    Consequences of participation in the South African Education Program, which enabled 290 South Africans to study in the United States between 1979 and 1985, were evaluated. Attention was directed to outcomes of participation and the educational experience and intellectual and social growth experienced by the students and alumni, who were Black…

  3. Problems, Perplexities, and Politics of Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Gail Thierbach

    All educational evaluations share common problems, perplexities, and political considerations. Logistic problems include incomplete definition of purpose, unclear timelines and personnel allocations, inadequate support services, and the lack of a program plan. Interpersonal dynamics and conflicts plus unwieldy committee structures are perplexities…

  4. Behavioral patterns of environmental performance evaluation programs.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanxin; Mauerhofer, Volker

    2016-11-01

    During the past decades numerous environmental performance evaluation programs have been developed and implemented on different geographic scales. This paper develops a taxonomy of environmental management behavioral patterns in order to provide a practical comparison tool for environmental performance evaluation programs. Ten such programs purposively selected are mapped against the identified four behavioral patterns in the form of diagnosis, negotiation, learning, and socialization and learning. Overall, we found that schemes which serve to diagnose environmental abnormalities are mainly externally imposed and have been developed as a result of technical debates concerning data sources, methodology and ranking criteria. Learning oriented scheme is featured by processes through which free exchange of ideas, mutual and adaptive learning can occur. Scheme developed by higher authority for influencing behaviors of lower levels of government has been adopted by the evaluated to signal their excellent environmental performance. The socializing and learning classified evaluation schemes have incorporated dialogue, participation, and capacity building in program design. In conclusion we consider the 'fitness for purpose' of the various schemes, the merits of our analytical model and the future possibilities of fostering capacity building in the realm of wicked environmental challenges. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. School District Finances: Program Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Office of the Legislative Auditor, St. Paul. Program Evaluation Div.

    This report describes financial and staffing trends in Minnesota's public-school districts. The report arose from legislators' concerns about budget problems that caused many school officials to eliminate academic programs and trim other expenses. The following questions are addressed in the evaluation: How has public school enrollment changed…

  6. Evaluation of Quality Assurance Programs for Externships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruskiewicz, Joseph

    1982-01-01

    The procedures of the Pennsylvania College of Optometry's Office of External Educational Programs are reviewed to show how quality assurance techniques can be categorized. The format was designed to evaluate quality assurance procedures for both the educational and service aspects of eye care. (MLW)

  7. The Emergency School Assistance Program: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Friends Service Committee, Washington, DC.

    This report, prepared by a group of private organizations concerned with the problems of race, education, and poverty, is an evaluation of the first months of the administration of the Emergency School Assistance Program (ESAP). The report is based upon personal visits to nearly 300 school districts receiving ESAP grants by attorneys and other…

  8. Teaching Program Evaluation on Interactive Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Keith; Steinhauser, Jim; Newman, Isadore

    This paper describes a five-session course entitled "Program Evaluation," which was taught via interactive television in the summer of 2002 to 68 doctoral and master's students in 5 of 6 locations throughout New Mexico. Students received a 4-hour lecture and then participated in off-line activities directed by the instructor. Problems in distance…

  9. Magnet Schools Assistance Program (MSAP). Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Janet; Donley, Jan

    The Magnet Schools Assistance Program (MSAP) was designed to eliminate and prevent minority group isolation in targeted magnet schools in the Wake County (North Carolina) Public School System; this evaluation report examines factors that relate to achieving the MSAP goals and objectives. Parent survey data were used to determine whether increased…

  10. Special Education: Program Evaluation, 1993-94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeschke, Thomas A.

    This report evaluates the special education instructional programs of the Des Moines (Iowa) Public Schools. It begins with a school district mission statement and special education mission statement. The report examines Des Moines' history of serving students with disabilities, its policies and regulations, enrollment by disability, and types of…

  11. An Evaluation of the NAMI Basics Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brister, Teri; Cavaleri, Mary A.; Olin, S. Serene; Shen, Sa; Burns, Barbara J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly E.

    2012-01-01

    This brief report describes results from an evaluation of NAMI Basics, a peer-delivered family education program for family caregivers of children and adolescents with mental illness. Over six classes, family members are given information (e.g. education about mental illness and treatments), skills training (e.g. family communication skills) and…

  12. Maryland Community Colleges 1983 Program Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nespoli, Lawrence A.

    As part of an annual statewide evaluation process, quantitative information on community college programs is reviewed by the Maryland State Board for Community Colleges. Subsequently, a qualitative assessment is conducted by a selected individual community colleges in response to specific questions raised by the Board. This report contains the…

  13. Community Jobs Outcomes Assessment & Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Annette; Burchfield, Erin; Sommers, Paul

    Unemployment wage data were evaluated to assess employment, job retention, and wage progression for graduates of Community Jobs (CJ), a short-term public job creation program for the hard to employ in the state of Washington. The following were among the findings: (1) 66% of all participants were employed after graduating from CJ; (2) 53% were…

  14. An Evaluation of the Nurturing Program: SAFEchild.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, Wendy; Reeth, Janice; VanDyk, Pam; Herrera, Olga; Hasinger, Ron

    SAFEchild is a non-profit community service agency providing parenting information, education, and support to parents, children, and the community in the prevention of child abuse and neglect. This evaluation provides information to SAFEchild on the impact of the Nurturing Program on past participants. Staff were interested in determining…

  15. State Energy Efficiency Program Evaluation Inventory

    EIA Publications

    2013-01-01

    The focus of this inventory, some of which has been placed into a searchable spreadsheet, is to support the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and to research cost information in state-mandated energy efficiency program evaluations – e.g., for use in updating analytic and modeling assumptions used by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).

  16. The Vale rangeland rehabilitation program: an evaluation.

    Treesearch

    Harold F. Heady

    1988-01-01

    This manuscript discusses the initiation, execution, and outcome of an 11-year (1962-1972) rangeland rehabilitation program in southeastern Oregon. Res. Bull. PNW-RB-070 (1977) is updated with 1986 measurements and evaluations of vegetational conditions, wildlife, recreational use, livestock grazing, and management of public rangelands. The mix of multiple uses has...

  17. Evaluating Workplace ESL Instructional Programs. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Miriam; Saccomano, Mark

    With the increase in workplace English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) literacy education programs, there is a need to assess whether the attention given to improving basic skills and English language proficiency has made a change in the participant and in the workplace. Such evaluations often use both qualitative and quantitative measures of program…

  18. Quantitative evaluation by measurement and modeling of the variations in dose distributions deposited in mobile targets.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imad; Alsbou, Nesreen; Taguenang, Jean-Michel; Ahmad, Salahuddin

    2017-03-03

    The objective of this study is to quantitatively evaluate variations of dose distributions deposited in mobile target by measurement and modeling. The effects of variation in dose distribution induced by motion on tumor dose coverage and sparing of normal tissues were investigated quantitatively. The dose distributions with motion artifacts were modeled considering different motion patterns that include (a) motion with constant speed and (b) sinusoidal motion. The model predictions of the dose distributions with motion artifacts were verified with measurement where the dose distributions from various plans that included three-dimensional conformal and intensity-modulated fields were measured with a multiple-diode-array detector (MapCheck2), which was mounted on a mobile platform that moves with adjustable motion parameters. For each plan, the dose distributions were then measured with MapCHECK2 using different motion amplitudes from 0-25 mm. In addition, mathematical modeling was developed to predict the variations in the dose distributions and their dependence on the motion parameters that included amplitude, frequency and phase for sinusoidal motions. The dose distributions varied with motion and depended on the motion pattern particularly the sinusoidal motion, which spread out along the direction of motion. Study results showed that in the dose region between isocenter and the 50% isodose line, the dose profile decreased with increase of the motion amplitude. As the range of motion became larger than the field length along the direction of motion, the dose profiles changes overall including the central axis dose and 50% isodose line. If the total dose was delivered over a time much longer than the periodic time of motion, variations in motion frequency and phase do not affect the dose profiles. As a result, the motion dose modeling developed in this study provided quantitative characterization of variation in the dose distributions induced by motion, which

  19. Promoting Healthy Adolescents: Synthesis of Youth Development Program Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Jodie; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Murray, Lawrence; Foster, William

    1998-01-01

    Defines youth development programs and reviews the program evaluation literature. Discusses (1) positive-behavior focused competency/asset enhancing programs, (2) problem-behavior focused competency/asset enhancing programs, and (3) resistance skills-based prevention programs. Includes an appendix of detailed summaries of 15 program evaluations.…

  20. Evaluation of UW's Pre-MAP Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, John P.; Garner, Sarah M.; Tremmel, Michael J.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Agol, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The University of Washington Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) has been recruiting and training underrepresented undergraduates in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) since 2005. We discuss results from our formal evaluation of Pre-MAP. Pre-MAP students come from a large variety of math backgrounds, and we have found that Pre-MAP students that initially place into lower math courses as freshmen are more successful at completing a STEM degree than the general population of UW undergraduates. Pre-MAP students also perform well academically compared both with the overall UW population and with STEM students regardless of their initial math placement. We will also briefly discuss recommendations for other programs analogous to Pre-MAP based on our evaluation. This evaluation was supported by NSF AST-1009314.

  1. Dose or content? Effectiveness of pain rehabilitation programs for patients with chronic low back pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Waterschoot, Franka P C; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Hollak, Niek; de Vries, Haitze J; Geertzen, Jan H B; Reneman, Michiel F

    2014-01-01

    We sought to systematically analyze the influence of dose of pain rehabilitation programs (PRPs) for patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) on disability, work participation, and quality of life (QoL). Literature searches were performed in PubMed, Cochrane Library, Cinahl, and Embase up to October 2012, using MeSH terms, other relevant terms and free-text words. Randomized controlled trials in English, Dutch, and German, analyzing the effect of PRPs, were included. One of the analyzed interventions had to be a PRP. Outcomes should be reported regarding disability, work participation, or QoL. To analyze dose, the number of contact hours should be reported. Two reviewers independently selected titles, abstracts, and full-text articles on the basis of inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data were extracted and risk of bias was assessed. Effect sizes (ES) were calculated for each intervention, and influence of dose variables was analyzed by a mixed model analysis. Eighteen studies were identified, reporting a wide variety of dose variables and contents of PRPs. Analyses showed that evaluation moment, number of disciplines, type of intervention, duration of intervention in weeks, percentage of women, and age influenced the outcomes of PRPs. The independent effect of dose variables could not be distinguished from content because these variables were strongly associated. Because dose variables were never studied separately or reported independently, we were not able to disentangle the relationship between dose, content, and effects of PRPs on disability, work participation, and QoL. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Integrating Program Theory and Systems-Based Procedures in Program Evaluation: A Dynamic Approach to Evaluate Educational Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grammatikopoulos, Vasilis

    2012-01-01

    The current study attempts to integrate parts of program theory and systems-based procedures in educational program evaluation. The educational program that was implemented, called the "Early Steps" project, proposed that physical education can contribute to various educational goals apart from the usual motor skills improvement. Basic…

  3. Integrating Program Theory and Systems-Based Procedures in Program Evaluation: A Dynamic Approach to Evaluate Educational Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grammatikopoulos, Vasilis

    2012-01-01

    The current study attempts to integrate parts of program theory and systems-based procedures in educational program evaluation. The educational program that was implemented, called the "Early Steps" project, proposed that physical education can contribute to various educational goals apart from the usual motor skills improvement. Basic…

  4. Facilitating Local Implementation of Special Education Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danielson, Louis C.; Greenburg, David E.

    1987-01-01

    Eight school districts assessed the applicability of a total of four evaluation models: Massachusetts Special Education Programs Evaluation Model, California Statewide Cooperative Program Evaluation Model for Special Education Programs, Systems Framework for Special Education Program Evaluation, and SPEED/SMA (Special Education Total Program…

  5. Facilitating Local Implementation of Special Education Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danielson, Louis C.; Greenburg, David E.

    1987-01-01

    Eight school districts assessed the applicability of a total of four evaluation models: Massachusetts Special Education Programs Evaluation Model, California Statewide Cooperative Program Evaluation Model for Special Education Programs, Systems Framework for Special Education Program Evaluation, and SPEED/SMA (Special Education Total Program…

  6. Evaluating Alternative High Schools: Program Evaluation in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinds, Drew Samuel Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Alternative high schools serve some of the most vulnerable students and their programs present a significant challenge to evaluate. Determining the impact of an alternative high school that serves mostly at-risk students presented a significant research problem. Few studies exist that dig deeper into the characteristics and strategies of…

  7. Evaluating Alternative High Schools: Program Evaluation in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinds, Drew Samuel Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Alternative high schools serve some of the most vulnerable students and their programs present a significant challenge to evaluate. Determining the impact of an alternative high school that serves mostly at-risk students presented a significant research problem. Few studies exist that dig deeper into the characteristics and strategies of…

  8. Economic evaluation of genomic breeding programs.

    PubMed

    König, S; Simianer, H; Willam, A

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare a conventional dairy cattle breeding program characterized by a progeny testing scheme with different scenarios of genomic breeding programs. The ultimate economic evaluation criterion was discounted profit reflecting discounted returns minus discounted costs per cow in a balanced breeding goal of production and functionality. A deterministic approach mainly based on the gene flow method and selection index calculations was used to model a conventional progeny testing program and different scenarios of genomic breeding programs. As a novel idea, the modeling of the genomic breeding program accounted for the proportion of farmers waiting for daughter records of genotyped young bulls before using them for artificial insemination. Technical and biological coefficients for modeling were chosen to correspond to a German breeding organization. The conventional breeding program for 50 test bulls per year within a population of 100,000 cows served as a base scenario. Scenarios of genomic breeding programs considered the variation of costs for genotyping, selection intensity of cow sires, proportion of farmers waiting for daughter records of genotyped young bulls, and different accuracies of genomic indices for bulls and cows. Given that the accuracies of genomic indices are greater than 0.70, a distinct economic advantage was found for all scenarios of genomic breeding programs up to factor 2.59, mainly due to the reduction in generation intervals. Costs for genotyping were negligible when focusing on a population-wide perspective and considering additional costs for herdbook registration, milk recording, or keeping of bulls, especially if there is no need for yearly recalculation of effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms. Genomic breeding programs generated a higher discounted profit than a conventional progeny testing program for all scenarios where at least 20% of the inseminations were done by genotyped young bulls without

  9. "The Program Evaluation Standards": How to Assess Evaluations of Educational Programs, 2nd Edition [Book Review].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier, Deborah M.

    1994-01-01

    The "Program Evaluation Standards" supplies a useful framework for generating questions to raise about any evaluation plan or evaluation report to assess its pros and cons. It is a valuable "how-to" for graduate students and professionals. This second edition incorporates changes in the field in the last decade. (SLD)

  10. Economic value evaluation in disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Magnezi, Racheli; Reicher, Sima; Shani, Mordechai

    2008-05-01

    Chronic disease management has been a rapidly growing entity in the 21st century as a strategy for managing chronic illnesses in large populations. However, experience has shown that disease management programs have not been able to demonstrate their financial value. The objectives of disease management programs are to create quality benchmarks, such as principles and guidelines, and to establish a uniform set of metrics and a standardized methodology for evaluating them. In order to illuminate the essence of disease management and its components, as well as the complexity and the problematic nature of performing economic calculations of their profitability and value, we collected data from several reports that dealt with the economic intervention of disease management programs. The disease management economic evaluation is composed of a series of steps, including the following major categories: data/information technology, information generation, assessment/recommendations, actionable customer plans, and program assessment/reassessment. We demonstrate the elements necessary for economic analysis. Disease management is one of the most innovative tools in the managed care environment and is still in the process of being defined. Therefore, objectives should include the creation of quality measures, such as principles and guidelines, and the establishment of a uniform set of metrics and a standardized methodology for evaluating them.

  11. AIDE II Integrated Design Evaluation program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Richard V.

    1993-06-01

    The AIDE computer program (Aerojet's Integrated Design Evaluation) derives from the industry's earliest design optimization program for establishing propulsion requirements for Polaris. It is used to establish design requirements, solid rocket motor operating conditions, design details, and evaluate design alternatives for propulsion systems optimized to meet a wide range of systems requirements. AIDE uses detailed component design subroutines (when possible) to make preliminary designs. The program does in minutes what a large number of designers would take weeks to do. AIDE (or previous versions) have been used on every major solid rocket study/hardware program at Aerojet for the past 35 years. The versatility of AIDE was demonstrated in our SICBM work. Our first SICBM contract with AFRPL was to perform design optimization studies and evaluate alternative concepts in systems definition. It was then used to select optimum operating conditions for each of the three stages for which Aerojet submitted proposals. After winning a development contract, it was used during the next two years for sensitivity and trade studies refining our second stage SICBM design.

  12. Fatigue Sensor Evaluation Program Laboratory Test Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-01

    Evaluation Program", Work Statement, Cessna Report 31HE-6918-213, Addendum H, Revision J, 2 June 1972. 1.2 BACKGROUND The A-37 Aircraft Structural...34 ’: « •IIIS ......... li : « rtrtintr : •* M» c f M i H ::::::;:• ;:« ...j . .... ..:. •f’ ::.::::: ^::|:::: n» VH ft;; ** ViH ! * 1 - •• •-•• ; i...Program", Work Statement, Cessna Report 318E-6918-213, Addendum H, Revision J, 2 June 1972. 2. Micro-Measurements Product Bulletin PB-103-2, dated 1973

  13. Mentoring children of prisoners: program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bruster, Belinda E; Foreman, Kim

    2012-01-01

    This program evaluation explores Seton Youth Shelters, Mentoring Children's Prisoners (MCP) Program. The following questions were research: (a) Where are the children residing, (b) Are mentoring services effective, (c) How are the children faring emotionally and psychologically, and (d) How often and what form of communication do they use. The findings reveal that youth participating in MCP have an increased interest in school, better relationships with their family, and find speaking to someone about everyday issues or problems helpful. Family members report a positive change in the youth attitude, increase interest in school, completion of homework, and greater interest in their well-being.

  14. Evaluation of administered dose using portal images in craniospinal irradiation of pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Carina Marques; Calçada, Raquel; Rodrigues, Sofia; Barragán, Juan Antonio; Sá, Ana Cravo; Macedo, Ana Paula; de Fátima Monsanto, Maria

    2017-03-21

    This study aimed to assess the administered dose based on portal imaging in craniospinal pediatric irradiation by evaluating cases in which portal images did or did not account for the total administered dose. We also intended to calculate the mean increase in total administered dose. Data were collected from General University Hospital Gregorio Marañón; we evaluated the total dose administered, total dose planned, number of portal images per treatment and corresponding monitor units of two different groups: one in which the dose from portal images is deducted from the total administered dose (D), and another in which it was not (N). We used descriptive statistics to analyze the collected data, including the mean and respective standard deviation. We used the Shapiro-Wilk and Spearman rank correlation coefficient tests and estimated the linear regression coefficients. Patients in group D received a mean dose of 29.00 ± 10.28 cGy based on the verification portal images, a quantity that was deducted from the planned dose to match the total administered dose. Patients in group N received a mean dose of 41.50 ± 30.53 cGy, which was not deducted from the planned dose, evidencing a mean increase of 41.50 ± 30.55 cGy over the total administered dose. The acquisition of the set-up verification portal images, without their inclusion in the total administered dose, reflects an average increase in total dose for craniospinal irradiation of pediatric patients. Subtraction of the monitor units used to acquire the verification images is recommended.

  15. SU-E-P-03: Implementing a Low Dose Lung Screening CT Program Meeting Regulatory Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    LaFrance, M; Marsh, S; O'Donnell, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To provide information pertaining to IROC Houston QA Center's (RPC) credentialing process for institutions participating in NCI-sponsored clinical trials. Purpose: Provide guidance to the Radiology Departments with the intent of implementing a Low Dose CT Screening Program using different CT Scanners with multiple techniques within the framework of the required state regulations. Method: State Requirements for the purpose of implementing a Low Dose CT Lung Protocol required working with the Radiology and Pulmonary Department in setting up a Low Dose Screening Protocol designed to reduce the radiation burden to the patients enrolled. Radiation dose measurements (CTDIvol) for various CT manufacturers (Siemens16, Siemens 64, Philips 64, and Neusoft128) for three different weight based protocols. All scans were reviewed by the Radiologist. Prior to starting a low dose lung screening protocol, information had to be submitted to the state for approval. Performing a Healing Arts protocol requires extensive information. This not only includes name and address of the applicant but a detailed description of the disease, the x-ray examination and the population to be examined. The unit had to be tested by a qualified expert using the technique charts. The credentials of all the operators, the supervisors and the Radiologists had to be submitted to the state. Results: All the appropriate documentation was sent to the state for review. The measured results between the Low Dose Protocol versus the default Adult Chest Protocol showed that there was a dose reduction of 65% for small (100-150 lb.) patient, 75% for the Medium patient (151-250 lbs.), and a 55% reduction for the Large patient ( over 250 lbs.). Conclusion: Measured results indicated that the Low Dose Protocol indeed lowered the screening patient's radiation dose and the institution was able to submit the protocol to the State's regulators.

  16. Program Evaluation for Sexually Transmitted Disease Programs: In Support of Effective Interventions.

    PubMed

    Carter, Marion W

    2016-02-01

    Program evaluation is a key tool for gathering evidence about the value and effectiveness of sexually transmitted disease (STD) prevention programs and interventions. Drawing from published literature, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention evaluation framework, and program examples, this article lays out some of the key principles of program evaluation for STD program staff. The purpose is to offer STD program staff a stronger basis for talking about, planning, conducting, and advocating for evaluation within their respective program contexts.

  17. U.S. EPA Superfund Program's Policy for Risk and Dose Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Stuart

    2008-01-15

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI) has primary responsibility for implementing the long-term (non-emergency) portion of a key U.S. law regulating cleanup: the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, CERCLA, nicknamed 'Superfund'. The purpose of the Superfund program is to protect human health and the environment over the long term from releases or potential releases of hazardous substances from abandoned or uncontrolled hazardous waste sites. The focus of this paper is on risk and dose assessment policies and tools for addressing radioactively contaminated sites by the Superfund program. EPA has almost completed two risk assessment tools that are particularly relevant to decommissioning activities conducted under CERCLA authority. These are the: 1. Building Preliminary Remediation Goals for Radionuclides (BPRG) electronic calculator, and 2. Radionuclide Outdoor Surfaces Preliminary Remediation Goals (SPRG) electronic calculator. EPA developed the BPRG calculator to help standardize the evaluation and cleanup of radiologically contaminated buildings at which risk is being assessed for occupancy. BPRGs are radionuclide concentrations in dust, air and building materials that correspond to a specified level of human cancer risk. The intent of SPRG calculator is to address hard outside surfaces such as building slabs, outside building walls, sidewalks and roads. SPRGs are radionuclide concentrations in dust and hard outside surface materials. EPA is also developing the 'Radionuclide Ecological Benchmark' calculator. This calculator provides biota concentration guides (BCGs), also known as ecological screening benchmarks, for use in ecological risk assessments at CERCLA sites. This calculator is intended to develop ecological benchmarks as part of the EPA guidance 'Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Process for Designing and Conducting Ecological Risk

  18. Evaluation of otolaryngology residency program websites.

    PubMed

    Svider, Peter F; Gupta, Amar; Johnson, Andrew P; Zuliani, Giancarlo; Shkoukani, Mahdi A; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Folbe, Adam J

    2014-10-01

    Prior to applying or interviewing, most prospective applicants turn to the Internet when evaluating residency programs, making maintenance of a comprehensive website critical. While certain "intangibles" such as reputation may not be communicated effectively online, residency websites are invaluable for conveying other aspects of a program. Prior analyses have reported that certain criteria such as research experience and didactics are important considerations for applicants. To evaluate the comprehensiveness of otolaryngology residency websites. Review of otolaryngology residency program websites. Websites of 99 civilian residency programs were searched for the presence of 23 criteria. Presence of 23 criteria for application process, incentives, instruction, research, clinical training, and other. Only 5 programs contained at least three-quarters of the criteria analyzed; on average programs reported less than 50% of information sought. Among the 99 residency program websites, a description of the following criteria was noted: comprehensive faculty listing (88%), didactics (80%), contact e-mail (77%), current residents (74%), description of facilities (70%), intern schedule (70%), research requirements (69%), otolaryngology rotation schedule (64%), other courses (61%), ERAS (Electronic Residency Application Service) link (55%), year-to-year responsibility progression (47%), call schedule (40%), active/past research projects (37%), area information (34%), message from the program director (33%) or chair (23%), selection criteria (30%), salary (directly on site) (23%), surgical statistics (18%), parking (9%), and meal allowance (7%). The mean (SD) percentage present of factors encompassing "clinical training" was 55% (23%), significantly higher than the mean (SD) percentage of factors covered under the "incentives" category (19% [11%]; P = .01). The proportion of overall criteria present on websites did not differ on organizing programs by region (range, 42

  19. Minimum criticality dose evaluation for the Irradiated Fuel Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.S.

    1999-09-01

    The Irradiated Fuel Storage Facility (IFSF) is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory within the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The mission of the facility is to provide safe dry storage for various types of irradiated fuels. Included are fuel elements such as irradiated ATR, EBR, MTR, Fort St. Vrain, TRIGA, and ROVER Parka fuels. Fuels requiring dry storage are received at the IFSF in fuel-shipping casks. At the facility receiving dock, the casks are removed from the transport vehicle, positioned in a cask transport car, and moved into the fuel-handling cave. Several functions are performed in the fuel-handling cave, including transferring fuel from shipping casks to storage canisters, preparing fuel elements for storage and processing. The minimum postulated criticality dose calculations were performed for the cask-receiving and fuel-handling areas to place criticality alarm system (CAS) detectors. The number of fissions for the minimum accident of concern is based on a dose of 20-rad air at 2 m in 1 min. The eigenvalue calculations were first performed to determine the size of the critical source. Then, two sets of fixed-source calculations were followed to calculate contributions from neutron and capture gamma rays and from prompt gamma rays. Two sets of MCNP calculations involved point and spherical critical sources. Validity of the Monte Carlo results was tested against ANISN deterministic calculations. The flux-to-dose conversion factors are based on ANSI/ANS-6.1.1-1977. All of the MCNP runs used continuous-energy ENDF/B-V cross sections. The BUGLE-80 cross-section library was used for the ANISN calculations.

  20. CT Radiation Dose Optimization and Tracking Program at a Large Quaternary-Care Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Goenka, Ajit H; Dong, Frank; Wildman, Bonnie; Hulme, Katie; Johnson, Paul; Herts, Brian R

    2015-07-01

    The authors report the implementation and outcomes of a CT radiation dose optimization and tracking program at a large quaternary-care health care system. A committee reviewed, optimized, and released standardized imaging protocols for the most common CT examinations across the health system. Volume CT dose index and dose-length product (DLP) diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) were established, with the goal of decreasing the percentage of outliers (CT scans with DLPs greater than the established DRLs) to <5% of tracked CT examinations. Baseline radiation dose data were manually extracted for 5% of total examinations. A semiautomated process to analyze all DLP data was then implemented to monitor outliers. The baseline percentage of outliers was slightly higher than 10% for pediatric scans but nearly 26.5% for adult scans. Over the first year, after standardized protocols were distributed, the percentage of outliers decreased for pediatric brain (from 22% to 6%), adult brain (from 23% to 3%), and adult chest (from 22% to 11%) examinations. Over the next 2 years, after the dose-tracking program was implemented, the percentage of outliers decreased for adult (brain, from 3% to 1%; chest, from 11% to 1%; abdomen, from 24% to 1%) and pediatric (brain, from 6% to 2%; chest, from 11% to 0%; abdomen, from 7% to 1%) examinations. The reported CT protocol optimization and dose-tracking program enabled a sustainable reduction in the proportion of CT examinations being performed above established DRLs from as high as 26% to <1% over a period of 2 years. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of gamma analysis parameters on dose evaluation using Gafchromic EBT2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seu-Ran; Park, Ji-Yeon; Suh, Tae-Suk; Park, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Jung, Won-Gyun

    2012-10-01

    To recommend optimal gamma analysis parameters (grid size and search range) for detecting dose errors, we evaluated the impact of gamma models and parameters on dose verification in volumetric modulated fields. Delivered doses were verified under open, 45° wedged, and volumetric modulated fields for prostate, anal, head and neck, and brain cancer by using Gafchromic EBT2 films for gamma evaluation. Two gamma models (a conventional method and a modified method to compensate for unintended dose errors caused by misalignments between reference and evaluated matrixes) were employed. The variation in the detected dose errors was evaluated in each gamma model for different grid sizes (0.5, 1, and 2 mm) and search ranges (1, 2, and 4 mm) applied to determine distant-to-agreement. The dose discrepancy of each evaluation was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated using a pass ratio in analysis software developed in-house. The modified gamma model with a small search range and grid size showed a higher pass ratio than the conventional model in volumetric modulated arc therapy. The pass ratio for 2 mm grid size decreased by over 40% as compared to that for 1 mm grid size. The pass ratio decreased by more than 30% as the search range was increased from 1 mm to 4 mm. Therefore, 1 mm grid size and 1 mm search range may be appropriate to evaluate dose errors in modulated fields after using the modified gamma model.

  2. Compression force and radiation dose in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program.

    PubMed

    Waade, Gunvor G; Sanderud, Audun; Hofvind, Solveig

    2017-03-01

    Compression force is used in mammography to reduce breast thickness and by that decrease radiation dose and improve image quality. There are no evidence-based recommendations regarding the optimal compression force. We analyzed compression force and radiation dose between screening centers in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP), as a first step towards establishing evidence-based recommendations for compression force. The study included information from 17 951 randomly selected screening examinations among women screened with equipment from four different venors at fourteen breast centers in the NBCSP, January-March 2014. We analyzed the applied compression force and radiation dose used on craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral-oblique (MLO) view on left breast, by breast centers and vendors. Mean compression force used in the screening program was 116N (CC: 108N, MLO: 125N). The maximum difference in mean compression force between the centers was 63N for CC and 57N for MLO. Mean radiation dose for each image was 1.09mGy (CC: 1.04mGy, MLO: 1.14mGy), varying from 0.55mGy to 1.31mGy between the centers. Compression force alone had a negligible impact on radiation dose (r(2)=0.8%, p=<0.001). We observed substantial variations in mean compression forces between the breast centers. Breast characteristics and differences in automated exposure control between vendors might explain the low association between compression force and radiation dose. Further knowledge about different automated exposure controls and the impact of compression force on dose and image quality is needed to establish individualised and evidence-based recommendations for compression force. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of Dose Homogeneity in Cone-Beam Breast Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Mettivier, Giovanni; Costa, Matilde; Lanconelli, Nico; Ianiro, Anna; Pugliese, Mariagabriella; Quarto, Maria; Russo, Paolo

    2017-01-10

    The aim of this study is to determine, via measurements on phantoms and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, the dose distribution of absorbed dose in a cone-beam breast computed tomography scan. The absorbed dose volume distribution was measured inside a polyethylene cylindrical phantom, simulating adipose breast tissue, using LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescence dosimeters. A reasonable agreement (between 2 and 8%) between the simulated and measured data was observed. The 3D distribution of absorbed dose was evaluated at 40, 60 and 80 kV in a phantom simulating a pendant breast. MC simulations indicate a significantly lower spread of volume dose than in mammography. The dose variation along the radial distance in the simulated phantoms was in the range of 4‒14%. These findings might be useful when devising models for breast imaging dose assessment that take into account the uneven distribution of the glandular mass in the breast volume.

  4. K-12 Music Program Evaluation. Report Number 90-239.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svengalis, Judith N.; Johnson, Virginia

    This paper summarizes an evaluation of the kindergarten through grade 12 music program of the Des Moines (Iowa) Independent Community School District. Major topics include: the music program's purpose, context evaluation, input evaluation, process evaluation, product evaluation, and future plans. The music program offers required music in…

  5. Targeted Mentoring: Evaluation of a Program.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Carolyn A; Harold, Rena D; Ahmedani, Brian K; Cramer, Elizabeth P

    2009-01-01

    Targeted mentoring refers to mentoring aimed at a particular population. This article presents the evaluation of a mentoring program for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons in social work education. Forty-three mentors and protégés responded to a survey regarding their program experiences. The results highlight the need for targeted mentoring, although some disparities of experience for mentors and protégés in this program are apparent. In general, mentors felt positive about participating, giving back to the LGBT community, and were more satisfied with their experiences than were the protégés, who were looking for more specific types of instrumental and psychosocial support.

  6. Inhaled toxic agents: An evaluation of dose. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, L.M.

    1993-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for the absorption of gases or vapors in the respiratory tract for use in determining the dose of inhaled gases and vapors to the airways of an individual and to extrapolate doses from animals to human subjects. The physical and chemical properties of the gas or vapor determine its absorption and must be considered in extrapolation between species. The method developed depends on determining the dimensions of the airspace surrounding each turbinate and assumes the airspace is geometrically similar to an annulus or a duct. The method may be used to quantify regional variability in airway dimensions of a population. Casted models of air passages made from cadavers were also studied and found to differ significantly from those of living human subjects. The extrapolations made using these cadaver models may not accurately reveal the flow and deposition rates found in living persons. Measurements which were made from hand traced images of airway dimensions were significantly different from measurements made with an image analyzer in which the digital data containing the scanned images were downloaded to the analyzer.

  7. Evaluation of Patient Doses from Verification Techniques in Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Dufek, Vladimir; Horakova, Ivana; Novak, Leos; Koncek, Ondrej; Richter, Vit; Janeckova, Lenka

    2010-01-05

    The purpose of this work was an evaluation of organ doses and effective doses from kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans and from pairs of orthogonal kV image projections for two different treatment sites (a head and a pelvis). Measurements of organ doses were performed in an anthropomorphic rando phantom by means of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). Irradiations were performed using on-board imager (OBI) and X-ray volume imaging (XVI) systems.

  8. [Health economic evaluation of disease management programs].

    PubMed

    Greiner, W

    2006-01-01

    Disease management has become an important element in the improvement of care for people with chronic illnesses and has become embedded in the discussion on health policy in recent years. The approach has been introduced very differently to the health systems worldwide. Since 1 January 2003 accredited disease management programs (DMPs) have been a part of the risk structure compensation scheme of the German statutory health insurance. This is seen as the first step to a morbidity orientation of the risk structure compensation. DMPs have to be evaluated according the German Social Law, especially whether the objectives of the programs and the criteria for inclusion of the patients have been met and the quality of care for the patients is insured. The criteria for evaluation are threefold: medical issues, economic issues and subjective quality of life of the patients. Due to the immense amounts of data which can be expected the evaluation of the German DMPs is a huge logistical challenge. Until now not very much is known about the data quality. The evaluation is focused on the perspective of the sickness funds as e.g. information about indirect cost is not collected. In the article the methods for evaluation are described and critically discussed.

  9. Evaluation of a stalled airfoil analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, C. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Stalled Airfoil Analysis Program (SAAP) is a computer code for predicting the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil up to, and beyond, stall. SAAP is presently evaluated through comparisons with experiments and with two other theoretical methods over an extensive range of airfoils and Reynolds number conditions. SAAP modeled drag more accurately than either of the other methods, and at angles of attack below stall yielded a smoother lift variation with angle of attack.

  10. Evaluation program for secondary spacecraft cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christy, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    The life cycle test of secondary spacecraft electric cells is discussed. The purpose of the tests is to insure that all cells put into the life cycle test meet the required specifications. The evaluation program gathers statistical information concerning cell performance characteristics and limitations. Weaknesses in cell design which are discovered during the tests are reported to research facilities in order to increase the service life of the cells.

  11. Evaluation metrics of educational programs for teachers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Gwendolyn D.

    1995-01-01

    A system for evaluating the teacher programs and services in the Education Services Branch was developed. The primary stakeholder was interested in determining the worth or usefulness of these services to educators. Therefore, two instruments were developed to collect the data. One questionnaire was administered. Data was collected, analyzed and reported. The other questionnaire was pilot tested and will be administered to teachers during the school year.

  12. MILDOS - A Computer Program for Calculating Environmental Radiation Doses from Uranium Recovery Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Strange, D. L.; Bander, T. J.

    1981-04-01

    The MILDOS Computer Code estimates impacts from radioactive emissions from uranium milling facilities. These impacts are presented as dose commitments to individuals and the regional population within an 80 km radius of the facility. Only airborne releases of radioactive materials are considered: releases to surface water and to groundwater are not addressed in MILDOS. This code is multi-purposed and can be used to evaluate population doses for NEPA assessments, maximum individual doses for predictive 40 CFR 190 compliance evaluations, or maximum offsite air concentrations for predictive evaluations of 10 CFR 20 compliance. Emissions of radioactive materials from fixed point source locations and from area sources are modeled using a sector-averaged Gaussian plume dispersion model, which utilizes user-provided wind frequency data. Mechanisms such as deposition of particulates, resuspension. radioactive decay and ingrowth of daughter radionuclides are included in the transport model. Annual average air concentrations are computed, from which subsequent impacts to humans through various pathways are computed. Ground surface concentrations are estimated from deposition buildup and ingrowth of radioactive daughters. The surface concentrations are modified by radioactive decay, weathering and other environmental processes. The MILDOS Computer Code allows the user to vary the emission sources as a step function of time by adjustinq the emission rates. which includes shutting them off completely. Thus the results of a computer run can be made to reflect changing processes throughout the facility's operational lifetime. The pathways considered for individual dose commitments and for population impacts are: • Inhalation • External exposure from ground concentrations • External exposure from cloud immersion • Ingestioo of vegetables • Ingestion of meat • Ingestion of milk • Dose commitments are calculated using dose conversion factors, which are ultimately based

  13. Career Teacher Program Evaluation. Final Report. Volume I: The Career Teacher Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CONSAD Research Corp., Pittsburgh, PA.

    This first volume of the evaluation of the Career Teacher Program describes the background of the program, the purpose of the evaluation, a description of the evaluation methodology, the results and findings of implementing the methodology, program outcomes, and conclusions and recommendations for the program. The program was designed to improve…

  14. A Qualitative Program Evaluation of a Structured Leadership Mentoring Program at a Large Aerospace Corporation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teller, Romney P.

    2011-01-01

    The researcher utilized a qualitative approach to conduct a program evaluation of the organization where he is employed. The study intended to serve as a program evaluation for the structured in-house mentoring program at a large aerospace corporation (A-Corp). This program evaluation clarified areas in which the current mentoring program is…

  15. A Qualitative Program Evaluation of a Structured Leadership Mentoring Program at a Large Aerospace Corporation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teller, Romney P.

    2011-01-01

    The researcher utilized a qualitative approach to conduct a program evaluation of the organization where he is employed. The study intended to serve as a program evaluation for the structured in-house mentoring program at a large aerospace corporation (A-Corp). This program evaluation clarified areas in which the current mentoring program is…

  16. National Evaluation of the Weatherization Assistance Program: Preliminary Evaluation Plan for Program Year 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Ternes, Mark P; Schweitzer, Martin; Tonn, Bruce Edward; Schmoyer, Richard L; Eisenberg, Joel Fred

    2007-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Weatherization Assistance Program was created by Congress in 1976 under Title IV of the Energy Conservation and Production Act. The purpose and scope of the Program as currently stated in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 10CFR 440.1 is 'to increase the energy efficiency of dwellings owned or occupied by low-income persons, reduce their total residential expenditures, and improve their health and safety, especially low-income persons who are particularly vulnerable such as the elderly, persons with disabilities, families with children, high residential energy users, and households with high energy burden' (Code of Federal Regulations, 2005). DOE sponsored a comprehensive evaluation of the Program in the early 1990's to provide policy makers and program implementers with up-to-date and reliable information they needed for effective decision making and cost-effective operations. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) managed the five part study which was based primarily on data from Program Year (PY) 1989 and supplemented by data from 1991-92 (Brown, Berry, and Kinney, 1994). In more recent years, ORNL has conducted four metaevaluations of the Program's energy savings using studies conducted by individual states between the years 1990-1996 (Berry, 1997), 1996-1998 (Schweitzer and Berry, 1999), 1993-2002 (Berry and Schweitzer, 2003), and 1993-2005 (Schweitzer, 2005). DOE announced through its Weatherization Program Notice 05-1 (DOE, 2004) that it would undertake a new national evaluation of the Program because the Program that was evaluated comprehensively in the early 1990's is vastly different from the Program of today. The Program has incorporated new funding sources, management principles, audit procedures, and energy-efficiency measures in response to findings and recommendations resulting from the 1989 National Evaluation, the Weatherization Plus strategic planning process, and other federal, state, and local initiatives

  17. Medication Exposure in Pregnancy Risk Evaluation Program.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Susan E; Davis, Robert L; Cheetham, T Craig; Cooper, William O; Li, De-Kun; Amini, Thushi; Beaton, Sarah J; Dublin, Sascha; Hammad, Tarek A; Pawloski, Pamala A; Raebel, Marsha A; Smith, David H; Staffa, Judy A; Toh, Sengwee; Dashevsky, Inna; Haffenreffer, Katherine; Lane, Kimberly; Platt, Richard; Scott, Pamela E

    2012-10-01

    To describe a program to study medication safety in pregnancy, the Medication Exposure in Pregnancy Risk Evaluation Program (MEPREP). MEPREP is a multi-site collaborative research program developed to enable the conduct of studies of medication use and outcomes in pregnancy. Collaborators include the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and researchers at the HMO Research Network, Kaiser Permanente Northern and Southern California, and Vanderbilt University. Datasets have been created at each site linking healthcare data for women delivering an infant between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2008 and infants born to these women. Standardized data files include maternal and infant characteristics, medication use, and medical care at 11 health plans within 9 states; birth certificate data were obtained from the state departments of public health. MEPREP currently involves more than 20 medication safety researchers and includes data for 1,221,156 children delivered to 933,917 mothers. Current studies include evaluations of the prevalence and patterns of use of specific medications and a validation study of data elements in the administrative and birth certificate data files. MEPREP can support multiple studies by providing information on a large, ethnically and geographically diverse population. This partnership combines clinical and research expertise and data resources to enable the evaluation of outcomes associated with medication use during pregnancy.

  18. Medication Exposure in Pregnancy Risk Evaluation Program

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Susan E.; Davis, Robert L.; Cheetham, T. Craig; Cooper, William O.; Li, De-Kun; Amini, Thushi; Beaton, Sarah J.; Dublin, Sascha; Hammad, Tarek A.; Pawloski, Pamala A.; Raebel, Marsha A.; Smith, David H.; Staffa, Judy A.; Toh, Sengwee; Dashevsky, Inna; Haffenreffer, Katherine; Lane, Kimberly; Platt, Richard; Scott, Pamela E.

    2011-01-01

    To describe a program to study medication safety in pregnancy, the Medication Exposure in Pregnancy Risk Evaluation Program (MEPREP). MEPREP is a multi-site collaborative research program developed to enable the conduct of studies of medication use and outcomes in pregnancy. Collaborators include the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and researchers at the HMO Research Network, Kaiser Permanente Northern and Southern California, and Vanderbilt University. Datasets have been created at each site linking healthcare data for women delivering an infant between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2008 and infants born to these women. Standardized data files include maternal and infant characteristics, medication use, and medical care at 11 health plans within 9 states; birth certificate data were obtained from the state departments of public health. MEPREP currently involves more than 20 medication safety researchers and includes data for 1,221,156 children delivered to 933,917 mothers. Current studies include evaluations of the prevalence and patterns of use of specific medications and a validation study of data elements in the administrative and birth certificate data files. MEPREP can support multiple studies by providing information on a large, ethnically and geographically diverse population. This partnership combines clinical and research expertise and data resources to enable the evaluation of outcomes associated with medication use during pregnancy. PMID:22002179

  19. Evaluation of a bystander education program.

    PubMed

    Amar, Angela Frederick; Sutherland, Melissa; Kesler, Erin

    2012-12-01

    Sexual and partner violence are widespread problems on college campuses. By changing attitudes, beliefs, and behavior, bystander education programs have been found to prevent sexual and partner violence and improve the responses of peers to survivors. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of a bystander education program that was adapted to a specific university setting. A convenience sample of 202, full-time undergraduate students aged 18-22 years participated in the bystander education program and completed pre- and post-test measures of attitudes related to sexual and partner violence and willingness to help. Paired sample t-tests were used to examine changes in scores between pre- and post-test conditions. After the program, participants' reported decreased rape myth acceptance and denial of interpersonal violence, and increased intention to act as a bystander and an increased sense of responsibility to intervene. Mental health nurses can use principles of bystander education in violence prevention programs and in providing support to survivors.

  20. SIMS analysis: Development and evaluation program summary

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G.S.; Appelhans, A.D.; Ingram, J.C.; Delmore, J.E.; Dahl, D.A.

    1996-11-01

    This report provides an overview of the ``SIMS Analysis: Development and Evaluation Program``, which was executed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory from mid-FY-92 to the end of FY-96. It should be noted that prior to FY-1994 the name of the program was ``In-Situ SIMS Analysis``. This report will not go into exhaustive detail regarding program accomplishments, because this information is contained in annual reports which are referenced herein. In summary, the program resulted in the design and construction of an ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometer (IT-SIMS), which is capable of the rapid analysis of environmental samples for adsorbed surface contaminants. This instrument achieves efficient secondary ion desorption by use of a molecular, massive ReO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} primary ion particle. The instrument manages surface charge buildup using a self-discharging principle, which is compatible with the pulsed nature of the ion trap. The instrument can achieve high selectivity and sensitivity using its selective ion storage and MS/MS capability. The instrument was used for detection of tri-n-butyl phosphate, salt cake (tank cake) characterization, and toxic metal speciation studies (specifically mercury). Technology transfer was also an important component of this program. The approach that was taken toward technology transfer was that of component transfer. This resulted in transfer of data acquisition and instrument control software in FY-94, and ongoing efforts to transfer primary ion gun and detector technology to other manufacturers.

  1. 76 FR 9786 - NIOSH Dose Reconstruction Program Ten-Year Review-Phase I Report on Customer Service; Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention NIOSH Dose Reconstruction Program Ten-Year... review and comment on the draft publication, ``NIOSH Dose Reconstruction Program Ten-Year Review--Phase...

  2. Antipsychotic treatment dosing profile in patients with schizophrenia evaluated with electronic monitoring (MEMS®).

    PubMed

    Acosta, Francisco J; Ramallo-Fariña, Yolanda; Bosch, Esperanza; Mayans, Teresa; Rodríguez, Carlos J; Caravaca, Ana

    2013-05-01

    Although the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS®) device offers accurate information on treatment dosing profile, such profile has never been studied in patients with schizophrenia. Enhancing our knowledge on this issue would help in developing intervention strategies to improve adherence to antipsychotic treatment in these patients. 74 outpatients with schizophrenia were monitored with the MEMS device for a 3-month period, for evaluation of antipsychotic treatment dosing profile, possible influence of medication schedule-related variables, adherence to treatment--considering dose intake within prescribed timeframes--and possible Hawthorne's effect of using the MEMS device. Dose-omission gaps occurred in 18.7% of monitoring days, most frequently during weekends, almost significantly. Almost one-third of prescribed doses were taken out of prescribed time. Neither the prescribed number of daily doses nor the indicated time of the day for dose intake (breakfast, dinner), were associated with correct antipsychotic dosing. Excess-dose was rare in general, and more frequent out of prescribed dose timeframe. No Hawthorne's effect was found for the MEMS device. Adherence reached only 35% according to a definition that included dose intake within prescribed timeframes. Antipsychotic treatment dosing was considerably irregular among patients with schizophrenia. Strategies to reduce dose-omission gaps and increase dosing within prescribed timeframes seem to be necessary. Gaining knowledge on precise oral antipsychotic dosing profiles or the influence of schedule-related variables may be useful to design strategies towards enhancing adherence. There appears to be no Hawthorne's effect associated with the use of MEMS devices in outpatients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Gifted Education and National Standards: A K-5 Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwell-Braun, Debra A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a program evaluation of a K-5 Gifted Education Program. Program evaluation addressed how well the gifted education program studied met the National Association of Gifted Children standards. In addition, this study included stakeholder perceptions of the current gifted education program K-5. This program…

  4. Aluminum adjuvant dose guidelines in vaccine formulation for preclinical evaluations.

    PubMed

    Vecchi, Simone; Bufali, Simone; Skibinski, David A G; O'Hagan, Derek T; Singh, Manmohan

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) salt-based adjuvants are present in a large variety of licensed vaccines and their use is widely considered for formulations in clinical trials. Although the regulatory agencies have clearly stated the acceptable levels of Al salts in vaccines for human use, there are no general indications for preclinical research. This brief commentary reviews the current status of Al concentrations in licensed vaccines, the related potential toxicity in preclinical species, and proposes a general guideline for selection of suitable Al salt levels in preclinical models, focusing on the formulation development for recombinant protein antigens. A table with conversion factors is included in order to provide a tool for calculation of doses with different Al salts. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Mathematical phantoms for evaluation of age-specific internal dose

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, M.

    1980-01-01

    A series of mathematical phantoms representing children has been developed for use with photon transport codes. These phantoms, patterned after the Fisher-Snyder adult phantom, consist of simple mathematical expressions for the boundaries of the major organs and body sections. The location and shape of the organs are consistent with drawings depicting developmental anatomy, with the organ volumes assigned such that the masses at the various ages conform closely with the data presented in Reference Man. The explicit mathematical expressions for the various ages overcome the potential misrepresentation of organ sizes that occurred in phantoms derived from simple mathematical transformations of the adult phantom. Female breast tissue has been added to the phantoms, including the adult, now allowing assessment of doses to this organ.

  6. Radiation exposure and dose evaluation in intraoral dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Poppe, B; Looe, H K; Pfaffenberger, A; Eenboom, F; Chofor, N; Sering, M; Rühmann, A; Poplawski, A; Willborn, K

    2007-01-01

    In this study, dose area product measurements have been performed to propose diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in intraoral dental radiology. Measurements were carried out at 60 X-ray units for all types of intraoral examinations performed in clinical routine. The third quartile values calculated range from 26.2 to 87.0 mGy cm(2). The results showed that there exists a large difference between the patient exposures among different dental facilities. It was also observed that dentists working with faster film type or higher tube voltage are not always associated with lower exposure. The study demonstrated the necessity to have the DRLs laid out as guidelines in dental radiology.

  7. EVALUATING QUANTITATIVE FORMULAS FOR DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT OF CHEMICAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessment formulas are often distinguished from dose-response models by being rough but necessary. The evaluation of these rough formulas is described here, using the example of mixture risk assessment. Two conditions make the dose-response part of mixture risk assessment d...

  8. EVALUATING QUANTITATIVE FORMULAS FOR DOSE-RESPONSE ASSESSMENT OF CHEMICAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessment formulas are often distinguished from dose-response models by being rough but necessary. The evaluation of these rough formulas is described here, using the example of mixture risk assessment. Two conditions make the dose-response part of mixture risk assessment d...

  9. Content-Responsive Program Evaluation: An Integrated Preservice Example.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costner, Kelly M.; Wagner, Sigrid; Owens, Douglas T.

    This paper discusses the lack of and the need for program evaluation models for mathematics education and points out generic approaches to program evaluation. This project attempts to develop a mathematical approach to program evaluation that can be applied to an integrated preservice program for mathematics, science, and technology education…

  10. 7 CFR 3405.22 - Evaluation of program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Evaluation of program. 3405.22 Section 3405.22... AGRICULTURE HIGHER EDUCATION CHALLENGE GRANTS PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 3405.22 Evaluation of program. Grantees should be aware that CSREES may, as a part of its own program evaluation...

  11. 7 CFR 3405.22 - Evaluation of program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Evaluation of program. 3405.22 Section 3405.22... AGRICULTURE HIGHER EDUCATION CHALLENGE GRANTS PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 3405.22 Evaluation of program. Grantees should be aware that NIFA may, as a part of its own program evaluation activities,...

  12. 7 CFR 3405.22 - Evaluation of program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Evaluation of program. 3405.22 Section 3405.22... AGRICULTURE HIGHER EDUCATION CHALLENGE GRANTS PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 3405.22 Evaluation of program. Grantees should be aware that NIFA may, as a part of its own program evaluation activities,...

  13. 7 CFR 3405.22 - Evaluation of program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Evaluation of program. 3405.22 Section 3405.22... AGRICULTURE HIGHER EDUCATION CHALLENGE GRANTS PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 3405.22 Evaluation of program. Grantees should be aware that NIFA may, as a part of its own program evaluation activities,...

  14. 78 FR 19725 - Merchant Mariner Medical Evaluation Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Merchant Mariner Medical Evaluation Program AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice... mariner medical evaluation program. Section 718 of the Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2012 directed the...'s merchant mariner medical evaluation program and alternatives to the program. Congress specifically...

  15. Scoping calculation for components of the cow-milk dose pathway for evaluating the dose contribution from iodine-131

    SciTech Connect

    Ikenberry, T.A.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations have been undertaken to evaluate The absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 001) examined the contributions of the various exposure pathways associated with environmental transport and accumulation of iodine-131 in the pasture-cow-milk pathway. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants and adult from (1) the ingestion by dairy cattle of various feedstuffs (pasturage, silage, alfalfa hay, and grass hay) in four different feeding regimes; (2) ingestion of soil by dairy cattle; (3) ingestion of stared feed on which airborne iodine-131 had been deposited; and (4) inhalation of airborne iodine-131 by dairy cows.

  16. Patient dosimetry activities in the United States: the nationwide evaluation of X-ray trends (NEXT) and tissue dose handbooks.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, O H; Stern, S H; Spelic, D C

    1999-01-01

    In the United States the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in collaboration with the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) and state and local government agencies surveys clinical facilities about X-ray system air kerma and ancillary data related to patient dosimetry for a variety of diagnostic X-ray examinations. The survey program is known as the Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT). The survey utilizes reference patient-equivalent phantoms in the collection of comprehensive technical information. With knowledge of the skin-entrance air kerma, specific tissue doses can be calculated. An overview of NEXT and previously published FDA tissue dose handbooks for diagnostic X-ray examinations is presented.

  17. Evaluation of initial dofetilide dosing recommendation based on actual body weight in overweight and obese patients.

    PubMed

    Cao, D X; Kohatsu, A; Eng, L; Mei, K; Dinh, J; Mok, I; Moreau, N; Le, A; Shin, J

    2015-12-01

    The dofetilide label recommends using actual body weight (ABW) to calculate the Cockcroft-Gault creatinine clearance (CrCl) for the determination of the initial dose; however, few studies have attempted to evaluate this dosing recommendation in overweight and obese patients. We evaluated whether the current dofetilide dosing recommendation based on ABW is appropriate in overweight and obese patients. This is a retrospective cohort study conducted at two large academic medical centres in the United States on overweight and obese patients (body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m(2)) who were newly started on dofetilide based on ABW. Patients were categorized into (i) the different-dose group if their CrCl calculated based on the ideal body weight (IBW) resulted in a lower initial dofetilide dose compared with ABW-based CrCl and (ii) the same-dose group if they would have the same initial dose based on IBW and ABW. The primary outcome was dofetilide dose reduction or discontinuation due to prolongation of the corrected QT interval during the first 3 days of dofetilide therapy. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors predicting the risk of primary outcome. Of the 132 patients included in the study, 29 (22·0%) were in the different-dose group and 40 (30·3%) had the primary outcome. The per cent of patients with the primary outcome was not statistically significantly different between the different-dose and same-dose groups (37·9% vs. 28·2%; P = 0·31). Diabetes mellitus was a significant predictor for the primary outcome (odds ratio 2·54; 95% confidence interval 1·05-6·15). Our study provides the evidence on the safety of the current dofetilide dosing recommendation in overweight and obese populations in clinical practice. Current ABW-based dofetilide dosing is reasonable in overweight and obese patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Evaluation of uncertainty predictions and dose output for model-based dose calculations for megavoltage photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    Olofsson, Joergen; Nyholm, Tufve; Georg, Dietmar; Ahnesjoe, Anders; Karlsson, Mikael

    2006-07-15

    In many radiotherapy clinics an independent verification of the number of monitor units (MU) used to deliver the prescribed dose to the target volume is performed prior to the treatment start. Traditionally this has been done by using methods mainly based on empirical factors which, at least to some extent, try to separate the influence from input parameters such as field size, depth, distance, etc. The growing complexity of modern treatment techniques does however make this approach increasingly difficult, both in terms of practical application and in terms of the reliability of the results. In the present work the performance of a model-based approach, describing the influence from different input parameters through actual modeling of the physical effects, has been investigated in detail. The investigated model is based on two components related to megavoltage photon beams; one describing the exiting energy fluence per delivered MU, and a second component describing the dose deposition through a pencil kernel algorithm solely based on a measured beam quality index. Together with the output calculations, the basis of a method aiming to predict the inherent calculation uncertainties in individual treatment setups has been developed. This has all emerged from the intention of creating a clinical dose/MU verification tool that requires an absolute minimum of commissioned input data. This evaluation was focused on irregular field shapes and performed through comparison with output factors measured at 5, 10, and 20 cm depth in ten multileaf collimated fields on four different linear accelerators with varying multileaf collimator designs. The measurements were performed both in air and in water and the results of the two components of the model were evaluated separately and combined. When compared with the corresponding measurements the resulting deviations in the calculated output factors were in most cases smaller than 1% and in all cases smaller than 1.7%. The

  19. Process Evaluation of a Workers' Health Surveillance Program for Meat Processing Workers.

    PubMed

    van Holland, Berry J; Brouwer, Sandra; de Boer, Michiel R; Reneman, Michiel F; Soer, Remko

    2016-07-30

    Objective To evaluate the implementation process of a workers' health surveillance (WHS) program in a Dutch meat processing company. Methods Workers from five plants were eligible to participate in the WHS program. The program consisted of four evaluative components and an intervention component. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used to evaluate seven process aspects. Data were gathered by interviews with stakeholders, participant questionnaires, and from registries of the company and occupational health service. Results Two recruitment strategies were used: open invitation or automatic participation. Of the 986 eligible workers, 305 participated in the program. Average reach was 53 %. Two out of five program components could not be assessed on dose delivered, dose received and fidelity. If components were assessable, 85-100 % of the components was delivered, 66-100 % of the components was received by participants, and fidelity was 100 %. Participants were satisfied with the WHS program (mean score 7.6). Contextual factors that facilitated implementation were among others societal developments and management support. Factors that formed barriers were program novelty and delayed follow-up. Conclusion The WHS program was well received by participants. Not all participants were offered the same number of program components, and not all components were performed according to protocol. Deviation from protocol is an indication of program failure and may affect program effectiveness.

  20. SADDE (Scaled Absorbed Dose Distribution Evaluator): A code to generate input for VARSKIN

    SciTech Connect

    Reece, W.D.; Miller, S.D.; Durham, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    The VARSKIN computer code has been limited to the isotopes for which the scaled absorbed dose distributions were provided by the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee or to data that could be interpolated from isotopes that had similar spectra. This document describes the methodology to calculate the scaled absorbed dose distribution data for any isotope (including emissions by the daughter isotopes) and its implementation by a computer code called SADDE (Scaled Absorbed Dose Distribution Evaluator). The SADDE source code is provided along with input examples and verification calculations. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Evaluation of NASA's Mars Public Engagement Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viotti, M.; Bowman, C.

    2014-12-01

    From 2009-2014, NASA's Mars Public Engagement (MPE) Program developed and implemented project-level logic models and associated impacts and indicators tables using the NSF's "Framework for Evaluating Impacts of Informal Science Education Projects" (Friedman, 2008) as a key guiding document. This Framework was selected given the national-expert-level evaluation committee who synthesized evaluation in a way that allows project-to-project comparisons in key areas of measurable change, while also allowing variation for appropriate project-specific measures and outcomes. These logic models, revisited and refined annually, provide guidance for all measures developed, tested, and implemented with MPE projects, including the Mars Student Imaging Project (MSIP), the Imagine Mars Project, and Mars Educator Professional Development. Project questionnaires were developed, tested, refined, retested, and finalized following standard procedures outlined in Converse & Presser (1986), Dillman, Smyth, & Christian (2009), Krosnick & Presser (2010), and Presser, et al. (2004). Interview questions were drafted, reviewed by project staff, and revised following established interview question development guidelines (e.g., Kvale, 1996; Maxwell, 2005; Maykut & Morehouse, 1994; Strauss & Corbin, 1998). For MSIP final projects, a rubric guided by Lantz (2004) was developed to evaluate systematically the quality and completeness of the final projects. We will discuss our instruments as well as the important issue of nonresponse error, which is relevant to a wide range of NASA programs because most data is collected from customers who are voluntary participants, as opposed to grantees who must report as a condition of their grant. NASA programs that consider data and report results from voluntary samples must be cautious about claims or decisions based on those data. We will discuss the ways in which we consider and address this challenge.

  2. AAAS Communicating Science Program: Reflections on Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braha, J.

    2015-12-01

    The AAAS Center for Public Engagement (Center) with science builds capacity for scientists to engage public audiences by fostering collaboration among natural or physical scientists, communication researchers, and public engagement practitioners. The recently launched Leshner Leadership Institute empowers cohorts of mid-career scientists to lead public engagement by supporting their networks of scientists, researchers, and practitioners. The Center works closely with social scientists whose research addresses science communication and public engagement with science to ensure that the Communicating Science training program builds on empirical evidence to inform best practices. Researchers ( Besley, Dudo, & Storkdieck 2015) have helped Center staff and an external evaluator develop pan instrument that measures progress towards goals that are suggested by the researcher, including internal efficacy (increasing scientists' communication skills and confidence in their ability to engage with the public) and external efficacy (scientists' confidence in engagement methods). Evaluation results from one year of the Communicating Science program suggest that the model of training yields positive results that support scientists in the area that should lead to greater engagement. This talk will explore the model for training, which provides a context for strategic communication, as well as the practical factors, such as time, access to public engagement practitioners, and technical skill, that seems to contribute to increased willingness to engage with public audiences. The evaluation program results suggest willingness by training participants to engage directly or to take preliminary steps towards engagement. In the evaluation results, 38% of trained scientists reported time as a barrier to engagement; 35% reported concern that engagement would distract from their work as a barrier. AAAS works to improve practitioner-researcher-scientist networks to overcome such barriers.

  3. Evaluation of nonrigid registration models for interfraction dose accumulation in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, Guillaume; Orban de Xivry, Jonathan; Fekkes, Stein; Dekker, Andre; Macq, Benoit; Lambin, Philippe; Elmpt, Wouter van

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: Interfraction dose accumulation is necessary to evaluate the dose distribution of an entire course of treatment by adding up multiple dose distributions of different treatment fractions. This accumulation of dose distributions is not straightforward as changes in the patient anatomy may occur during treatment. For this purpose, the accuracy of nonrigid registration methods is assessed for dose accumulation based on the calculated deformations fields. Methods: A phantom study using a deformable cubic silicon phantom with implanted markers and a cylindrical silicon phantom with MOSFET detectors has been performed. The phantoms were deformed and images were acquired using a cone-beam CT imager. Dose calculations were performed on these CT scans using the treatment planning system. Nonrigid CT-based registration was performed using two different methods, the Morphons and Demons. The resulting deformation field was applied on the dose distribution. For both phantoms, accuracy of the registered dose distribution was assessed. For the cylindrical phantom, also measured dose values in the deformed conditions were compared with the dose values of the registered dose distributions. Finally, interfraction dose accumulation for two treatment fractions of a patient with primary rectal cancer has been performed and evaluated using isodose lines and the dose volume histograms of the target volume and normal tissue. Results: A significant decrease in the difference in marker or MOSFET position was observed after nonrigid registration methods (p<0.001) for both phantoms and with both methods, as well as a significant decrease in the dose estimation error (p<0.01 for the cubic phantom and p<0.001 for the cylindrical) with both methods. Considering the whole data set at once, the difference between estimated and measured doses was also significantly decreased using registration (p<0.001 for both methods). The patient case showed a slightly underdosed planning target volume

  4. Evaluating school capacity to implement new programs.

    PubMed

    Roberts-Gray, Cynthia; Gingiss, Phyllis M; Boerm, Melynda

    2007-08-01

    An eight-factor survey-based Bayesian model (Bridge-It) for assessing school capacity to implement health and education programs was tested in secondary analyses of data from 47 schools in the Texas Tobacco Prevention Initiative (TTPI). Bridge-It was used during the pre-implementation phase and again at mid-course of the TTPI 2 years later. Achieved implementation status was evaluated in follow-up almost 4 years after the start of the TTPI. The Bridge-It score aggregated across all eight of the capacity factors predicted both quality of adherence to the Guidelines for School Programs to Prevent Tobacco Use and Addiction and quantity of implementing activity. The school-based leadership factor was an independent predictor of quality of adherence whereas the facilitation processes factor predicted quantity of implementing activity. Integration of Bridge-It, or comparable multi-attribute tools, into the planning and evaluation of school-centered programs can increase understanding of factors that influence implementation and provide guidance for capacity building.

  5. Dose evaluation of selective collimation effect in cephalography by measurement and Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boram; Shin, Gwisoon; Kang, Sunjung; Shin, Boram; Back, Ilhong; Park, Hyok; Park, Changseo; Lee, Jeongwoo; Lee, Wonho; Choi, Jonghak; Park, Ryeonghwang; Kim, Youhyun

    2012-01-01

    Recently, simulations based on the Monte Carlo code have been increasingly applied for physics phenomena, patient dose and quality assurance of radiation systems. The objective of this study was to use Monte Carlo simulation and measurement to verify dose and dose reduction in cephalography. The collimator was constructed with 3-mm thick lead plate, and attached to the tube head to remove regions of disinterest in the radiation field. A digital phantom patient was constructed to evaluate patient dose. In addition, detectors of pixel size 1×1 cm² and 0.1×0.1 cm² were constructed to check collimator location. The effective dose according to International Commission on Radiological Protection 103 was calculated with and without collimation. The effective doses for simulation with and without collimation were 5.09 and 11.32 µSv, respectively. The results of the calculated effective dose show 61.7 % reduction of field area and 55 % of effective dose. The Monte Carlo simulation is a good evaluation tool for patient dose.

  6. Methodological Consideration in Evaluating Year-Round Educational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinkle, Dennis E.

    The evaluation methodologies used in the 1960s to evaluate various ESEA programs were shown to be inappropriate and inadequate for the evaluation of year-round educational programs. Due to their complexity and the various levels of decision-making, YRE programs require consideration of contemporary evaluation methodology. Due consideration is the…

  7. Program Instrumentation: A Technique for Evaluating Educational Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergeron, Bryan P.

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of educational software evaluation highlights an evaluation based on program instrumentation of a medical school simulation program. Evaluation strategies are discussed; evaluation techniques, including interviews, questionnaires, and observation are described; and implications of the results of the program instrumentation for the…

  8. 7 CFR 3405.22 - Evaluation of program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Evaluation of program. 3405.22 Section 3405.22... Supplementary Information § 3405.22 Evaluation of program. Grantees should be aware that CSREES may, as a part of its own program evaluation activities, carry out in-depth evaluations of assisted activities....

  9. Supporting parenting of infants: evaluating outcomes for parents and children in a community-based program.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, M Angeles; Dasi, Carmen; Ruiz, Juan Carlos

    2013-04-01

    This research presents an evaluation of the intervention dose-effect of the Parent-Child Psychological Support Program (PCPS). The PCPS is a universal community-based program to support parenting, during the first 18 months, and to promote protective adaptive systems in children through a schedule of quarterly office-based appointments, starting at 3 months of age. Generally children attend for six visits. When the Program opens in a particular area, parents of all children under 18 months are invited. The different ages of the children who are joining present a unique opportunity to obtain groups to evaluate the program dose-effect using a cohort-sequential design. This dose-effect on parent and infant outcomes was examined by: (1) self-report of parental sense of competence and factors negatively affecting their parenting and (2) the quality of the child's attachment, using Ainsworth's Strange Situation Test. The study was based on 594 families. Results showed dose effects for parental sense of competence, in the parental self-efficacy dimension. The proportion of securely attached children was significantly higher in groups with medium and high program dose. These results were obtained after considering the effect on the parent and child outcomes of two socio-demographic factors that showed differences among the groups under study: single parenthood and working at home. In the variables under study the PCPS, serving a socially deprived area, showed dose effects. The evaluation strategy can be useful for evaluators and planners working with universal programs that offer a longitudinal service.

  10. Dose evaluation in criticality accident conditions using transient critical facilities fueled with a fissile solution.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Tonoike, K; Miyoshi, Y

    2004-01-01

    Neutron dose measurement and evaluation techniques in criticality accident conditions using a thermo luminescence dosemeter (TLD) was studied at the Transient Experiment Critical Facility (TRACY) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). In the present approach, the absorbed dose is derived from the ambient dose equivalent measured with a TLD, using the appropriate conversion factor given by computation. Using this technique, the neutron dose around the SILENE reactor of the Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) of France was measured in the Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison Exercise (June 10-21, 2002) organized by OECD/NEA and IRSN. In this exercise, the gamma dose was also measured with a TLD. In this report, measurements and evaluation results at TRACY and SILENE are presented.

  11. An evaluation of organ dose modulation on a GE optima CT660-computed tomography scanner.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Matthew T; Loader, Robert J; Stevens, Gregory C; Rowles, Nick P

    2016-05-08

    Organ Dose Modulation or ODM (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) was evaluated to characterize changes in CTDIvol, image noise, effective dose, and organ dose saving to patients. Three separate investigations were completed: a tube current modulation phantom was scanned with and without ODM, a CTDIvol phantom was scanned with ODM, and Monte Carlo simulations were performed. ODM was found to reduce the CTDIvol by approximately 20% whilst increasing the noise by approximately 14%. This was reflected in the dose distribution, where the anterior peripheral dose was reduced by approximately 40% whilst the identical poste-rior dose remained largely unaffected. Enabling ODM for the entire scan would reduce the effective dose by approximately 24%; however, this saving reduces to 5% if the images are matched for CTDIvol. These savings mostly originated from reductions in dose to the stomach, breasts, colon, bladder, and liver. ODM has the effect of a global reduction in CTDIvol with an associated increase in image noise. The benefit of ODM was found to be reduced when the dose-saving contribution from the reduced CTDIvol was removed. Given that there is a higher contribution to effective dose throughout the body from the anterior projections, consideration should be given to applying ODM throughout.

  12. Evaluation of the accuracy of fetal dose estimates using TG-36 data

    SciTech Connect

    Kry, Stephen F.; Starkschall, George; Antolak, John A.; Salehpour, Mohammad

    2007-04-15

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group 36 report (TG-36) provides guidelines for managing radiation therapy of pregnant patients. Included in the report are data that can be used to estimate the dose to the fetus. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of these fetal dose estimates as compared to clinically measured values. TG-36 calculations were performed and compared with measurements of the fetal dose made in vivo or in appropriately-designed phantoms. Calculation and measurement data was collected for eight pregnant patients who underwent radiation therapy at the MD Anderson Cancer Center as well as for several fetal dose studies in the literature. The maximum measured unshielded fetal dose was 47 cGy, which was 1.5% of the prescription dose. For all cases, TG-36 calculations and measured fetal doses differed by up to a factor of 3--the ratio of the calculated to measured dose ranged from 0.34 to 2.93. On average, TG-36 calculations underestimated the measured dose by 31%. No significant trends in the relationship between the calculated and measured fetal doses were found based on the distance from, or the size of, the treatment field.

  13. Comparison of different MC techniques to evaluate BNCT dose profiles in phantom exposed tovarious neutron fields.

    PubMed

    Durisi, E; Koivunoro, H; Visca, L; Borla, O; Zanini, A

    2010-03-01

    The absorbed dose in BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy) consists of several radiation components with different physical properties and biological effectiveness. In order to assess the clinical efficacy of the beams, determining the dose profiles in tissues, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are used. This paper presents a comparison between dose profiles calculated in different phantoms using two techniques: MC radiation transport code, MCNP-4C2 and BNCT MC treatment planning program, SERA (simulation environment for radiotherapy application). In this study MCNP is used as a reference tool. A preliminary test of SERA is performed using six monodirectional and monoenergetic beams directed onto a simple water phantom. In order to deeply investigate the effect of the different cross-section libraries and of the dose calculation methodology, monoenergetic and monodirectional beams directed toward a standard Snyder phantom are simulated. Neutron attenuation curves and dose profiles are calculated with both codes and the results are compared.

  14. Clean Technology Evaluation & Workforce Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Patricia Glaza

    2012-12-01

    The overall objective of the Clean Technology Evaluation portion of the award was to design a process to speed up the identification of new clean energy technologies and match organizations to testing and early adoption partners. The project was successful in identifying new technologies targeted to utilities and utility technology integrators, in developing a process to review and rank the new technologies, and in facilitating new partnerships for technology testing and adoption. The purpose of the Workforce Development portion of the award was to create an education outreach program for middle & high-school students focused on clean technology science and engineering. While originally targeting San Diego, California and Cambridge, Massachusetts, the scope of the program was expanded to include a major clean technology speaking series and expo as part of the USA Science & Engineering Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

  15. Evaluation of radiation dose to anthropomorphic paediatric models from positron-emitting labelled tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-03-01

    PET uses specific molecules labelled with positron-emitting radionuclides to provide valuable biochemical and physiological information. However, the administration of radiotracers to patients exposes them to low-dose ionizing radiation, which is a concern in the paediatric population since children are at a higher cancer risk from radiation exposure than adults. Therefore, radiation dosimety calculations for commonly used positron-emitting radiotracers in the paediatric population are highly desired. We evaluate the absorbed dose and effective dose for 19 positron-emitting labelled radiotracers in anthropomorphic paediatric models including the newborn, 1-, 5-, 10- and 15-year-old male and female. This is achieved using pre-calculated S-values of positron-emitting radionuclides of UF-NCI paediatric phantoms and published biokinetic data for various radiotracers. The influence of the type of anthropomorphic model, tissue weight factors and direct human- versus mouse-derived biokinetic data on the effective dose for paediatric phantoms was also evaluated. In the case of 18F-FDG, dosimetry calculations of reference paediatric patients from various dose regimens were also calculated. Among the considered radiotracers, 18F-FBPA and 15O-water resulted in the highest and lowest effective dose in the paediatric phantoms, respectively. The ICRP 103 updated tissue-weighting factors decrease the effective dose in most cases. Substantial differences of radiation dose were observed between direct human- versus mouse-derived biokinetic data. Moreover, the effect of using voxel- versus MIRD-type models on the calculation of the effective dose was also studied. The generated database of absorbed organ dose and effective dose for various positron-emitting labelled radiotracers using new generation computational models and the new ICRP tissue-weighting factors can be used for the assessment of radiation risks to paediatric patients in clinical practice. This work also contributes

  16. Fetus absorbed dose evaluation in head and neck radiotherapy procedures of pregnant patients.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Etieli C; da Rosa, Luiz Antonio R; Batista, Delano Valdivino S

    2015-06-01

    In this work the head and neck cancer treatment of a pregnant patient was experimentally simulated. A female anthropomorphic Alderson phantom was used and the absorbed dose to the fetus was evaluated protecting the patient's abdomen with a 7cm lead layer and using no abdomen shielding. The target volume dose was 50Gy. The fetus doses evaluated with and without the lead shielding were, respectively, 0.52±0.039 and 0.88±0.052cGy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of the neutron spectrum and dose assessment around the venus reactor.

    PubMed

    Coeck, Michèle; Vermeersch, Fernand; Vanhavere, Filip

    2005-01-01

    An assessment of the neutron field near the VENUS reactor is made in order to evaluate the neutron dose to the operators, particularly in an area near the reactor shielding and in the control room. Therefore, a full MCNPX model of the shielding geometry was developed. The source term used in the simulation is derived from a criticality calculation done beforehand. Calculations are compared to routine neutron dose rate measurements and show good agreement. The MCNPX model developed easily allows core adaptations in order to evaluate the effect of future core configuration on the neutron dose to the operators.

  18. An Evaluation of State Energy Program Accomplishments: 2002 Program Year

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, M.

    2005-07-13

    SEP activities performed by the states during the 2002 program year, based on primary data provided by the states themselves. This is the second systematic evaluation of SEP accomplishments performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for DOE. A report documenting the findings of the first study was published in January 2003 (Schweitzer et.al., 2003).

  19. Evaluation of a single dose versus a divided dose regimen of amoxycillin in treatment of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae infection in pigs.

    PubMed

    Lauritzen, B; Lykkesfeldt, J; Friis, C

    2005-08-01

    The theory of a time-dependent effect of amoxycillin was examined in a model of porcine Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (Ap)-infection using clinically relevant dosage regimens. Twenty hours after infection of fourteen pigs, when clinical signs of pneumonia were present, one group of pigs received a single dose of amoxycillin (20 mg/kg, i.m.), whereas another group received four doses of 5 mg/kg injected at 8-h intervals. A similar AUC of the plasma amoxycillin concentration versus time curve was obtained in the two groups, whereas the maximum concentration was threefold higher using the single high dose. Plasma amoxycillin was above the MIC for twice as long using the fractionated dosage scheme. The condition of the animals was evaluated by clinical and haematological observations combined with quantification of biochemical infection markers: C-reactive protein, zinc and ascorbic acid. Within 48 h of treatment, the pigs in both treatment groups recovered clinically. No significant differences in the time-course of clinical observations or plasma concentrations of the biomarkers of infection were observed between the two treatments. In conclusion, the efficacy of these two dosage regimens of amoxycillin was not significantly different in treatment of acute Ap-infection in pigs.

  20. The Know Your Body program: a review of evaluation studies.

    PubMed Central

    Resnicow, K.; Cross, D.; Wynder, E.

    1993-01-01

    Know Your Body is a comprehensive school health promotion program for kindergarten through six grades, initially developed in the 1970s by the American Health Foundation. The impact of the KYB program has been evaluated in three field trials, the results of which have been reviewed in this article. Across the three studies, at 3-year follow-up, consistent positive intervention effects were reported for systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, smoking, HDL-cholesterol, and health knowledge. Results for total blood cholesterol, fitness score, heart-healthy snacks, fruit/vegetable intake, whole milk intake, and health attitudes were mixed. For body mass index, triceps skinfold, all remaining dietary variables, self-esteem/self-efficacy, and locus of control no significant effects were observed. Overall, significant treatment effects were reported for 19 of the 40 variables assessed at 3-year follow-up, an effects ratio of 48%. Consistent positive results at 5-year follow-up were reported for smoking and health knowledge. Mixed results were obtained for total blood cholesterol, diastolic blood pressure, and percent kilocalories from saturated fat. Consistent null results were reported for HDL-cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, triceps skinfold, fitness score, percentage kilocalories from fat, cholesterol intake, and fiber intake. Overall, significant treatment effects were reported for 7 of 36 variables at 5-year follow-up, an effects ratio of 19%. Although reported program effects were largely mixed, they seem consistent with other health education evaluations. Null results may have been related to insufficient teacher implementation as well as weaknesses in design and assessment. Additional research is needed to determine the effect of the program on a broader range of outcomes, to what degree increasing the "dose" produces larger and more enduring treatment effects, and the relative impact of the various components that comprise the

  1. A computer program to evaluate optical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Innes, D.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program is used to evaluate a 25.4 cm X-ray telescope at a field angle of 20 minutes of arc by geometrical analysis. The object is regarded as a point source of electromagnetic radiation, and the optical surfaces are treated as boundary conditions in the solution of the electromagnetic wave propagation equation. The electric field distribution is then determined in the region of the image and the intensity distribution inferred. A comparison of wave analysis results and photographs taken through the telescope shows excellent agreement.

  2. Production Risk Evaluation Program (PREP) - summary

    SciTech Connect

    Kjeldgaard, E.A.; Saloio, J.H.; Vannoni, M.G.

    1997-03-01

    Nuclear weapons have been produced in the US since the early 1950s by a network of contractor-operated Department of Energy (DOE) facilities collectively known as the Nuclear Weapon Complex (NWC). Recognizing that the failure of an essential process might stop weapon production for a substantial period of time, the DOE Albuquerque Operations office initiated the Production Risk Evaluation Program (PREP) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to assess quantitatively the potential for serious disruptions in the NWC weapon production process. PREP was conducted from 1984-89. This document is an unclassified summary of the effort.

  3. Three-dimensional dose evaluation in breast cancer patients to define decision criteria for adaptive radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zegers, Catharina M L; Baeza, Jose A; van Elmpt, Wouter; Murrer, Lars H P; Verhoeven, Karolien; Boersma, Liesbeth; Verhaegen, Frank; Nijsten, Sebastiaan M J J G

    2017-08-29

    Dose-guided adaptive radiation therapy (DGART) is the systematic evaluation and adaptation of the dose delivery during treatment for an individual patient. The aim of this study is to define quantitative action levels for DGART by evaluating changes in 3D dose metrics in breast cancer and correlate them with clinical expert evaluation. Twenty-three breast cancer treatment plans were evaluated, that were clinically adapted based on institutional IGRT guidelines. Reasons for adaptation were variation in seroma, hematoma, edema, positioning or problems using voluntary deep inspiration breath hold. Sixteen patients received a uniform dose to the breast (clinical target volume 1; CTV1). Six patients were treated with a simultaneous integrated boost to CTV2. The original plan was copied to the CT during treatment (re-CT) or to the stitched cone-beam CT (CBCT). Clinical expert evaluation of the re-calculated dose distribution and extraction of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters were performed. The extreme scenarios were evaluated, assuming all treatment fractions were given to the original planning CT (pCT), re-CT or CBCT. Reported results are mean ± SD. DVH results showed a mean dose (Dmean) difference between pCT and re-CT of -0.4 ± 1.4% (CTV1) and -1.4 ± 2.1% (CTV2). The difference in V95% was -2.6 ± 4.4% (CTV1) and -9.8 ± 8.3% (CTV2). Clinical evaluation and DVH evaluation resulted in a recommended adaptation in 17/23 or 16/23 plans, respectively. Applying thresholds on the DVH parameters: Dmean CTV, V95% CTV, Dmax, mean lung dose, volume exceeding 107% (uniform dose) or 90% (SIB) of the prescribed dose enabled the identification of patients with an assumed clinically relevant dose difference, with a sensitivity of 0.89 and specificity of 1.0. Re-calculation on CBCT imaging identified the same plans for adaptation as re-CT imaging. Clinical expert evaluation can be related to quantitative DVH parameters on re-CT or CBCT imaging to select

  4. PGMO 5, Program execution and evaluation: Unit 5 of the program management technical skills training program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-11-01

    This document is made up of a series of technical notes, workshops, and view-graph hard copies. The first note describes general policy concerning DOE program management. The second note is a description of NASA program and project management. The next two notes describe the results of studies of research and development evaluation activities inside and outside DOE. Since there is no DOE-wide R and D evaluation system, these notes provide a background view of how program managers and field managers might function in program evaluation. The final note is a copy of the DOE CSCSC Implementation Guide, which describes how earned value analysis is accomplished in various project and operating situations in the field.

  5. Evaluation and measurements of radioactive air emission and off-site doses at SLAC.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ivy; Liu, James; Tran, Henry

    2013-08-01

    SLAC, a high-energy (GeV) electron accelerator facility, performs experimental and theoretical research using high-energy electron and/or positron beams that can produce secondary neutron and gamma radiation when beam losses occur. Radioactive gas production (mainly C, N, O, Ar) and release is one of the environmental protection program issues. U.S. DOE Order 458.1 requires that 40 CFR 61 Subpart H's NESHAP requirements be followed. These regulations prescribe a total dose limit of 0.1 mSv y to the Maximally Exposed Individual (MEI) of the general public, a requirement for a continuous air monitoring system if a release point within a facility can cause > 1 × 10 mSv y to the MEI, and a requirement for periodic confirmatory measurements for minor sources which give releases that contribute ≤ 1 × 10 mSv y to the MEI. At SLAC, all air release points for current operations are evaluated to be minor sources. This paper describes SLAC's evaluation following NESHAP requirements; measurements using the Air Monitoring Station (AMS) as periodic confirmatory measurements are also discussed.

  6. Small Commercial Program DOE Project: Impact evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Bathgate, R.; Faust, S. )

    1992-08-12

    In 1991, Washington Electric Cooperative (WEC) implemented a Department of Energy grant to conduct a small commercial energy conservation project. The small commercial Mom, and Pop'' grocery stores within WEC's service territory were selected as the target market for the project. Energy Solid Waste Consultant's (E SWC) Impact Evaluation is documented here. The evaluation was based on data gathered from a variety of sources, including load profile metering, kWh submeters, elapsed time indicators, and billing histories. Five stores were selected to receive measures under this program: Waits River General Store, Joe's Pond Store, Hastings Store, Walden General Store, and Adamant Cooperative. Specific measures installed in each store and description of each are included.

  7. Space station solar array technology evaluation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bischof, F. V.

    1973-01-01

    The results of all the major program phases of the program are reported. All goals of the program, which are listed were successfully accomplished and are briefly described. A complete list is included of all drawings generated during this program.

  8. Evaluation of H*(10) using the developed spherical type neutron dose monitor.

    PubMed

    Bhuiya, S H; Yamanishi, H; Uda, T

    2010-10-01

    An instrument for evaluating the neutron ambient dose equivalent has been developed. It has the characteristic of uniform response to wide energy of neutrons. The monitor is four-layered spherically shaped, based on moderation and absorption of neutrons. Neutron dose can be evaluated from the linear combination of three specific responses of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), which are located at three depths in the moderator. TLDs were arranged between layers of two consecutive depths on 12 radial axes at even intervals so that the monitor is equally sensitive to all directions of neutrons. In order to verify the usefulness of dose evaluation by the monitor, irradiation experiments were conducted at the FRS, JAEA. The D2O-moderated 252Cf was used for the calibration of the monitor. Experiments were also conducted by using two neutron sources of 252Cf bare and 241Am-Be. As a result, the evaluated dose for each irradiation was obtained close to the actual irradiated dose. It was confirmed that the method of dose evaluation by the developed monitor can be applied to practical neutron fields where the distance of neutron source is unknown.

  9. Evaluating Which Dose-Function Metrics Are Most Critical for Functional-Guided Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Faught, Austin M; Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Zhang, Jingjing; Miften, Moyed; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy

    2017-09-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) computed tomography (CT) ventilation imaging is increasingly being used to calculate lung ventilation and implement functional-guided radiation therapy in clinical trials. There has been little exhaustive work evaluating which dose-function metrics should be used for treatment planning and plan evaluation. The purpose of our study was to evaluate which dose-function metrics best predict for radiation pneumonitis (RP). Seventy lung cancer patients who underwent 4D CT imaging and pneumonitis grading were assessed. Pretreatment 4D CT scans of each patient were used to calculate ventilation images. We evaluated 3 types of dose-function metrics that combined the patient's 4D CT ventilation image and treatment planning dose distribution: (1) structure-based approaches; (2) image-based approaches using the dose-function histogram; and (3) nonlinear weighting schemes. Log-likelihood methods were used to generate normal tissue complication probability models predicting grade 3 or higher (ie, grade 3+) pneumonitis for all dose-function schemes. The area under the curve (AUC) was used to assess the predictive power of the models. All techniques were compared with normal tissue complication probability models based on traditional, total lung dose metrics. The most predictive models were structure-based approaches that focused on the volume of functional lung receiving ≥20 Gy (AUC, 0.70). Probabilities of grade 3+ RP of 20% and 10% correspond to V20 (percentage of volume receiving ≥20 Gy) to the functional subvolumes of 26.8% and 9.3%, respectively. Imaging-based analysis with the dose-function histogram and nonlinear weighted ventilation values yielded AUCs of 0.66 and 0.67, respectively, when we evaluated the percentage of functionality receiving ≥20 Gy. All dose-function metrics outperformed the traditional dose metrics (mean lung dose, AUC of 0.55). A full range of dose-function metrics and functional thresholds was examined. The

  10. Assessing and Evaluating Continuing Education Programs: Why and How?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Michael K.

    2003-01-01

    Outlines factors to consider in assessing and evaluating continuing education programs and elaborates on seven questions to guide the process: purpose, audience, who should evaluate, what to evaluate, evaluation criteria, methods, and reporting of results. (Contains 15 references.) (SK)

  11. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM - TECHNOLOGY PROFILES 4th Edition

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program evaluates new and promising treatment technologies for cleanup of hazardous waste sites. The program was created to encourage the development and routine use of innovative treatment technologies. As a result, the SI...

  12. 7 CFR 3402.24 - Evaluation of program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... program. Grantees should be aware that HEP may, as a part of its own program evaluation activities, carry... should be prepared to cooperate with evaluators retained by HEP to analyze both the institutional context...

  13. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM - TECHNOLOGY PROFILES - SEVENTH EDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program evaluates new and promising treatment and monitoring and measurement technologies for cleanup of hazardous waste sites. The program was created to encourage the development and routine use of innovative treatment techn...

  14. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM TECHNOLOGY PROFILES: SIXTH EDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program evaluates new and promising treatment and monitoring and measurement technologies for cleanup of hazardous waste sites. The program was created to encourage the development and routine use of innovative treatment techn...

  15. The SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION program - Technology Profiles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program was created to evaluate new and promising treatment technologies for cleanup at hazardous waste sites. The mission of the SITE program is to encourage the development and routine use of innovative treatment technologie...

  16. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM - TECHNOLOGY PROFILES - SEVENTH EDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program evaluates new and promising treatment and monitoring and measurement technologies for cleanup of hazardous waste sites. The program was created to encourage the development and routine use of innovative treatment techn...

  17. SUPERFUND INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION PROGRAM - TECHNOLOGY PROFILES 4th Edition

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program evaluates new and promising treatment technologies for cleanup of hazardous waste sites. The program was created to encourage the development and routine use of innovative treatment technologies. As a result, the SI...

  18. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program, 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J.; Myers, J.; Martin, M.L.; Milligan, D.J.; Sobocinski, R.W.; Lipponer, P.P.J.; Belski, D.S.

    1993-09-01

    The data presented in this report are the result of Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) during 1991. These BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the WIPP. When excavations began at the WIPP in 1982, small brine seepages (weeps) were observed on the walls. Brine studies began as part of the Site Validation Program and were formalized as a program in its own right in 1985. During nine years of observations (1982--1991), evidence has mounted that the amount of brine seeping into the WIPP excavations is limited, local, and only a small fraction of that required to produce hydrogen gas by corroding the metal in the waste drums and waste inventory. The data through 1990 is discussed in detail and summarized by Deal and others (1991). The data presented in this report describes progress made during the calendar year 1991 and focuses on four major areas: (1) quantification of the amount of brine seeping across vertical surfaces in the WIPP excavations (brine ``weeps); (2) monitoring of brine inflow, e.g., measuring brines recovered from holes drilled downward from the underground drifts (downholes), upward from the underground drifts (upholes), and from subhorizontal holes; (3) further characterization of brine geochemistry; and (4) preliminary quantification of the amount of brine that might be released by squeezing the underconsolidated clays present in the Salado Formation.

  19. Evaluation of exposure dose to patients undergoing catheter ablation procedures--a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Seguchi, S; Aoyama, T; Koyama, S; Kawaura, C; Fujii, K

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate entrance skin dose (ESD), organ dose and effective dose to patients undergoing catheter ablation for cardiac arrhythmias, based on the dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom. ESD values associated with mean fluoroscopy time and digital cine frames were in a range of 0.12-0.30 Gy in right anterior oblique (RAO) and 0.05-0.40 Gy in left anterior oblique (LAO) projection, the values which were less than a threshold dose of 2 Gy for the onset of skin injury. Organs that received high doses in ablation procedures were lung, followed by bone surface, esophagus, liver and red bone marrow. Doses for lung were 24.8-122.7 mGy, and effective doses were 7.9-34.8 mSv for mean fluoroscopy time of 23.4-92.3 min and digital cine frames of 263-511. Conversion coefficients of dose-area product (DAP) to ESD were 8.7 mGy/(Gy cm(2)) in RAO and 7.4 mGy/(Gy cm(2)) in LAO projection. The coefficients of DAP to the effective dose were 0.37 mSv/(Gy cm(2)) in RAO, and 0.41 mSv/(Gy cm(2)) in LAO projection. These coefficients enabled us to estimate patient exposure in real time by using monitored values of DAP.

  20. 40 CFR 51.353 - Network type and program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Network type and program evaluation. 51... Requirements § 51.353 Network type and program evaluation. Basic and enhanced I/M programs can be centralized... of vehicle registration and driver's licenses, or tax and fee collections. (b) (c) Program...

  1. 40 CFR 51.353 - Network type and program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Network type and program evaluation. 51... Requirements § 51.353 Network type and program evaluation. Basic and enhanced I/M programs can be centralized... of vehicle registration and driver's licenses, or tax and fee collections. (b) (c) Program...

  2. 7 CFR 3406.29 - Evaluation of program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Evaluation of program. 3406.29 Section 3406.29... AGRICULTURE 1890 INSTITUTION CAPACITY BUILDING GRANTS PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 3406.29 Evaluation of program. Grantees should be aware that CSREES may, as a part of its own program...

  3. 7 CFR 3406.29 - Evaluation of program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Evaluation of program. 3406.29 Section 3406.29... AGRICULTURE 1890 INSTITUTION CAPACITY BUILDING GRANTS PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 3406.29 Evaluation of program. Grantees should be aware that NIFA may, as a part of its own program...

  4. 7 CFR 3406.29 - Evaluation of program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Evaluation of program. 3406.29 Section 3406.29... AGRICULTURE 1890 INSTITUTION CAPACITY BUILDING GRANTS PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 3406.29 Evaluation of program. Grantees should be aware that NIFA may, as a part of its own program...

  5. 40 CFR 51.353 - Network type and program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Network type and program evaluation. 51... Requirements § 51.353 Network type and program evaluation. Basic and enhanced I/M programs can be centralized... of vehicle registration and driver's licenses, or tax and fee collections. (b) (c) Program...

  6. 7 CFR 3406.29 - Evaluation of program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Evaluation of program. 3406.29 Section 3406.29... AGRICULTURE 1890 INSTITUTION CAPACITY BUILDING GRANTS PROGRAM Supplementary Information § 3406.29 Evaluation of program. Grantees should be aware that NIFA may, as a part of its own program...

  7. 40 CFR 51.353 - Network type and program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Network type and program evaluation. 51... Requirements § 51.353 Network type and program evaluation. Basic and enhanced I/M programs can be centralized... of vehicle registration and driver's licenses, or tax and fee collections. (b) (c) Program...

  8. Testing of a Program Evaluation Model: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagler, Phyllis J.; Marson, Arthur A.

    A program evaluation model developed by Moraine Park Technical Institute (MPTI) is described in this report. Following background material, the four main evaluation criteria employed in the model are identified as program quality, program relevance to community needs, program impact on MPTI, and the transition and growth of MPTI graduates in the…

  9. The Cost-Income Compenent of Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Norris

    Cost-income studies are designed to serve two functions in instructional program evaluation. First, they act as the indicator of the economic value of a program. This economic value in conjunction with the other educational values needed in program evaluation allow for the most realistic appraisal of program worth. Second, if the studies show a…

  10. Testing of a Program Evaluation Model: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagler, Phyllis J.; Marson, Arthur A.

    A program evaluation model developed by Moraine Park Technical Institute (MPTI) is described in this report. Following background material, the four main evaluation criteria employed in the model are identified as program quality, program relevance to community needs, program impact on MPTI, and the transition and growth of MPTI graduates in the…

  11. 40 CFR 51.353 - Network type and program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Network type and program evaluation. 51... Requirements § 51.353 Network type and program evaluation. Basic and enhanced I/M programs can be centralized... of vehicle registration and driver's licenses, or tax and fee collections. (b) (c) Program...

  12. Gifted and Talented Education Grades K-12 Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Galen W.

    This description of the gifted education program of the Des Moines (Iowa) public schools is organized into five sections: (1) context evaluation, (2) input evaluation, (3) process evaluation, (4) product evaluation, and (5) future planning. The context evaluation section notes that the state-mandated programs provide services to students…

  13. Error Reduction Program. [combustor performance evaluation codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, S. A.; Chiappetta, L. M.; Gosman, A. D.

    1985-01-01

    The details of a study to select, incorporate and evaluate the best available finite difference scheme to reduce numerical error in combustor performance evaluation codes are described. The combustor performance computer programs chosen were the two dimensional and three dimensional versions of Pratt & Whitney's TEACH code. The criteria used to select schemes required that the difference equations mirror the properties of the governing differential equation, be more accurate than the current hybrid difference scheme, be stable and economical, be compatible with TEACH codes, use only modest amounts of additional storage, and be relatively simple. The methods of assessment used in the selection process consisted of examination of the difference equation, evaluation of the properties of the coefficient matrix, Taylor series analysis, and performance on model problems. Five schemes from the literature and three schemes developed during the course of the study were evaluated. This effort resulted in the incorporation of a scheme in 3D-TEACH which is usuallly more accurate than the hybrid differencing method and never less accurate.

  14. Maine Migrant Program: 1997-1998 Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazinet, Suzanne C., Ed.

    The Maine Department of Education contracts with local educational agencies to administer the Maine Migrant Education Program. The program's overall mission is to provide the support necessary for migrant children to achieve Maine's academic standards. In 1997-98, 73 local migrant programs served 9,838 students, and 63 summer programs served 1,769…

  15. SU-E-I-28: Evaluating the Organ Dose From Computed Tomography Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, T; Araki, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate organ doses from computed tomography (CT) using Monte Carlo (MC) calculations. Methods: A Philips Brilliance CT scanner (64 slice) was simulated using the GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) based on the EGSnrc user code. The X-ray spectra and a bowtie filter for MC simulations were determined to coincide with measurements of half-value layer (HVL) and off-center ratio (OCR) profile in air. The MC dose was calibrated from absorbed dose measurements using a Farmer chamber and a cylindrical water phantom. The dose distribution from CT was calculated using patient CT images and organ doses were evaluated from dose volume histograms. Results: The HVLs of Al at 80, 100, and 120 kV were 6.3, 7.7, and 8.7 mm, respectively. The calculated HVLs agreed with measurements within 0.3%. The calculated and measured OCR profiles agreed within 3%. For adult head scans (CTDIvol) =51.4 mGy), mean doses for brain stem, eye, and eye lens were 23.2, 34.2, and 37.6 mGy, respectively. For pediatric head scans (CTDIvol =35.6 mGy), mean doses for brain stem, eye, and eye lens were 19.3, 24.5, and 26.8 mGy, respectively. For adult chest scans (CTDIvol=19.0 mGy), mean doses for lung, heart, and spinal cord were 21.1, 22.0, and 15.5 mGy, respectively. For adult abdominal scans (CTDIvol=14.4 mGy), the mean doses for kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and spinal cord were 17.4, 16.5, 16.8, 16.8, and 13.1 mGy, respectively. For pediatric abdominal scans (CTDIvol=6.76 mGy), mean doses for kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and spinal cord were 8.24, 8.90, 8.17, 8.31, and 6.73 mGy, respectively. In head scan, organ doses were considerably different from CTDIvol values. Conclusion: MC dose distributions calculated by using patient CT images are useful to evaluate organ doses absorbed to individual patients.

  16. 40 CFR 145.12 - Requirements for compliance evaluation programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for compliance evaluation programs. (a) State programs shall have procedures for receipt, evaluation... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requirements for compliance evaluation programs. 145.12 Section 145.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  17. 40 CFR 145.12 - Requirements for compliance evaluation programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for compliance evaluation programs. (a) State programs shall have procedures for receipt, evaluation... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Requirements for compliance evaluation programs. 145.12 Section 145.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  18. 40 CFR 145.12 - Requirements for compliance evaluation programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for compliance evaluation programs. (a) State programs shall have procedures for receipt, evaluation... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Requirements for compliance evaluation programs. 145.12 Section 145.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  19. 40 CFR 145.12 - Requirements for compliance evaluation programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for compliance evaluation programs. (a) State programs shall have procedures for receipt, evaluation... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Requirements for compliance evaluation programs. 145.12 Section 145.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  20. 42 CFR 485.729 - Condition of participation: Program evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition of participation: Program evaluation. 485... participation: Program evaluation. The organization has procedures that provide for a systematic evaluation of its total program to ensure appropriate utilization of services and to determine whether...

  1. Program Evaluation Interest and Skills of School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astramovich, Randall L.

    2017-01-01

    School counselors participated in a study examining their program evaluation interest and skills. Findings suggest that school counselors understand the importance of program evaluation, yet they may lack the skills and confidence to successfully engage in program evaluation activities. Professional development training may be an important method…

  2. A Program Evaluation Model for Migrant Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Fresno.

    This technical report outlines the evaluation methodology used to conduct the 1984-85 High School Equivalency Programs/College Assistance for Migrant Programs (HEP/CAMP) National Evaluation Project, with special emphasis upon how this methodology might be adapted to meet evaluation requirements of local HEP and CAMP programs. Section 1 describes…

  3. An Introduction to Course and/or Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zohrabi, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Program and/or course evaluation is, in fact, one of the essential aspects of any curriculum. It is a kind of quality control in which various aspects of an instructional program are explored. Program evaluation is an attempt in which different elements of a given curriculum are scrutinized in depth. To this end, an evaluator makes every effort to…

  4. 40 CFR 145.12 - Requirements for compliance evaluation programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for compliance evaluation programs. (a) State programs shall have procedures for receipt, evaluation... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements for compliance evaluation programs. 145.12 Section 145.12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  5. K-12 Social Science. Program Evaluation. Agenda 93-225.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Carol S.

    This document is an evaluation of the social science program in the Des Moines (Iowa) Public Schools. The program is a traditional instructional program that grows conceptually with the student and is designed to meet the needs of students and society. The elementary program meets state guidelines and is the expanding horizon program researched…

  6. Evaluation of Three Computer-Assisted Instruction Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suppes, Patrick; Morningstar, Mona

    This technical report is concerned with the evaluation of three Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) Programs - The Drill-and practice Program in Elementary School Mathematics, The Brentwood Tutorial Mathematics Program, and the Russian Program. Among the results reported were (1) the drill-and-practice mathematics program used in Mississippi and…

  7. Evaluation of a Demonstration Program for Postsecondary Hospitality Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weis, Susan F.

    A three-phase program evaluation effort employing comparison groups and a pre-post test design indicate formative guidelines for programs revision and summative results indicative of the effectiveness of a demonstration associate degree program for hospitality education. Program effectiveness is defined in terms of the program's enrollment of…

  8. [Evaluation of absorbed doses of ionizing radiation by milk teeth enamel in children living in the Belarus Republic].

    PubMed

    Mel'nichenko, E M; Kushner, A N; Miliutin, A A; Mashevskiĭ, A A; Muravskiĭ, V A

    2002-01-01

    Mean doses of ionizing radiation, absorbed by children in the Byelarus Republic, were evaluated by EPR dosimetry of tableted samples of milk teeth enamel. A relationship between the doses absorbed by the children and density of radionuclide contamination of the territory of residence was detected. Based on the mean absorbed doses, doses which can be absorbed during 70 years of life were estimated.

  9. Estimating the Effects of Astronaut Career Ionizing Radiation Dose Limits on Manned Interplanetary Flight Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Rojdev, Kristina; Valle, Gerard D.; Zipay, John J.; Atwell, William S.

    2013-01-01

    The Hybrid Inflatable DSH combined with electric propulsion and high power solar-electric power systems offer a near TRL-now solution to the space radiation crew dose problem that is an inevitable aspect of long term manned interplanetary flight. Spreading program development and launch costs over several years can lead to a spending plan that fits with NASA's current and future budgetary limitations, enabling early manned interplanetary operations with space radiation dose control, in the near future while biomedical research, nuclear electric propulsion and active shielding research and development proceed in parallel. Furthermore, future work should encompass laboratory validation of HZETRN calculations, as previous laboratory investigations have not considered large shielding thicknesses and the calculations presented at these thicknesses are currently performed via extrapolation.

  10. A Monte Carlo study on dose distribution evaluation of Flexisource 192Ir brachytherapy source

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Majid; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Haghparast, Abbas; Zare, Naser; Ahmadi Moghaddas, Toktam

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to evaluate the dose distribution of the Flexisource 192Ir source. Background Dosimetric evaluation of brachytherapy sources is recommended by task group number 43 (TG. 43) of American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). Materials and methods MCNPX code was used to simulate Flexisource 192Ir source. Dose rate constant and radial dose function were obtained for water and soft tissue phantoms and compared with previous data on this source. Furthermore, dose rate along the transverse axis was obtained by simulation of the Flexisource and a point source and the obtained data were compared with those from Flexiplan treatment planning system (TPS). Results The values of dose rate constant obtained for water and soft tissue phantoms were equal to 1.108 and 1.106, respectively. The values of the radial dose function are listed in the form of tabulated data. The values of dose rate (cGy/s) obtained are shown in the form of tabulated data and figures. The maximum difference between TPS and Monte Carlo (MC) dose rate values was 11% in a water phantom at 6.0 cm from the source. Conclusion Based on dosimetric parameter comparisons with values previously published, the accuracy of our simulation of Flexisource 192Ir was verified. The results of dose rate constant and radial dose function in water and soft tissue phantoms were the same for Flexisource and point sources. For Flexisource 192Ir source, the results of TPS calculations in a water phantom were in agreement with the simulations within the calculation uncertainties. Furthermore, the results from the TPS calculation for Flexisource and MC calculation for a point source were practically equal within the calculation uncertainties. PMID:25949224

  11. Novel Radiobiological Gamma Index for Evaluation of 3-Dimensional Predicted Dose Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Sumida, Iori; Yamaguchi, Hajime; Kizaki, Hisao; Aboshi, Keiko; Tsujii, Mari; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiko; Yamada, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Seo, Yuji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To propose a gamma index-based dose evaluation index that integrates the radiobiological parameters of tumor control (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Methods and Materials: Fifteen prostate and head and neck (H&N) cancer patients received intensity modulated radiation therapy. Before treatment, patient-specific quality assurance was conducted via beam-by-beam analysis, and beam-specific dose error distributions were generated. The predicted 3-dimensional (3D) dose distribution was calculated by back-projection of relative dose error distribution per beam. A 3D gamma analysis of different organs (prostate: clinical [CTV] and planned target volumes [PTV], rectum, bladder, femoral heads; H&N: gross tumor volume [GTV], CTV, spinal cord, brain stem, both parotids) was performed using predicted and planned dose distributions under 2%/2 mm tolerance and physical gamma passing rate was calculated. TCP and NTCP values were calculated for voxels with physical gamma indices (PGI) >1. We propose a new radiobiological gamma index (RGI) to quantify the radiobiological effects of TCP and NTCP and calculate radiobiological gamma passing rates. Results: The mean RGI gamma passing rates for prostate cases were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.03–.001). The mean RGI gamma passing rates for H&N cases (except for GTV) were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.001). Differences in gamma passing rates between PGI and RGI were due to dose differences between the planned and predicted dose distributions. Radiobiological gamma distribution was visualized to identify areas where the dose was radiobiologically important. Conclusions: RGI was proposed to integrate radiobiological effects into PGI. This index would assist physicians and medical physicists not only in physical evaluations of treatment delivery accuracy, but also in clinical evaluations of predicted dose distribution.

  12. Evaluation of patient effective doses in CT urography, intravenous urography and renal scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Hamza, Y; Sulieman, A; Abuderman, A; Alzimami, K; Omer, H

    2015-07-01

    Imaging of the renal system is performed with different techniques depending mainly on clinical symptoms and signs. This study intended to evaluate patient effective doses undergoing renal scintigraphy (technetium-99m-diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic acid), computed tomography urography (CTU) and intravenous urography (IVU). A total of 60 patients were evaluated using Orbiter 37 Gamma camera single head, dual-slice CT scanner and conventional X-ray machine with computed radiography (CR) processing unit. Patients effective dose were estimated using the administered activity, DosCal software and dose length product value for renal scan, IVU and CTU procedures, respectively. Patients' effective doses during renal scan, CTU and IVU procedures were 0.78 ± 0.18, 2.53 ± 0.94 and 1.81 ± 0.20 mSv, in that order. Patients were exposed to a higher effective dose during CTU compared with other two procedures. Patient doses depend on the size of patient, the type of scanner and the imaging protocol used. Effective doses considered low compared with previous studies.

  13. A free software for the evaluation and comparison of dose response models in clinical radiotherapy (DORES).

    PubMed

    Tsougos, Ioannis; Grout, Ioannis; Theodorou, Kyriaki; Kappas, Constantin

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a user-friendly and simple tool for fast and accurate estimation of Normal Tissue Complication Probabilities (NTCP) for several radiobiological models, which can be used as a valuable complement to the clinical experience. The software which has been named DORES (Dose Response Evaluation Software) has been developed in Visual Basic, and includes three NTCP models (Lyman-Kuther-Burman (LKB), Relative Seriality and Parallel). Required input information includes the Dose-Volume Histogram (DVH) for the Organs at Risk (OAR) of each treatment, the number of fractions and the total dose of therapy. NTCP values are computed, and subsequently placed in a spreadsheet file for further analysis. A Dose Response curve for every model is automatically generated. Every patient of the study population can be found on the curve since by definition their corresponding dose-response points fall exactly on the theoretical dose-response curve, when plotted on the same diagram. Distributions of absorbed dose alone do not provide information on the biological response of tissues to irradiation, so the use of this software may aid in the comparison of outcomes for different treatment plans or types of treatment, and also aid the evaluation of the sensitivity of different model predictions to uncertainties in parameter values. This was illustrated in a clinical case of breast cancer radiotherapy.

  14. Evaluation of hepatic impairment dosing recommendations in FDA-approved product labels.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yang; Burckart, Gilbert J; Lesko, Lawrence J; Dowling, Thomas C

    2013-09-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies in patients with liver disease are an important clinical pharmacology component of drug development. In 2003, FDA released the guidance for industry on "Pharmacokinetics in Patients with Impaired Hepatic Function," which provides recommendations to sponsors on study design, data analysis, and impact on dosing and labeling. We evaluated the quality and consistency of hepatic dosing recommendations, and compared contemporary clinical practice of dosing in patients with impaired hepatic function with product labels. All new molecular entities (NME) and labels approved by the FDA during the period of January 2004 to December 2011 were reviewed. The fraction of the dose hepatically eliminated, quality of hepatic impairment PK studies reported, and any dose recommendations provided in the label and in a tertiary clinical reference (Micromedex) were reviewed. Out of 157 NMEs, 67 met the criteria for evaluation of dosing in hepatic disease. Problem areas were identified related to the lack of specific hepatic metabolism information in 90% of FDA-approved labels, inconsistent terminology, and "use with caution in liver disease" in 27% of NME. Updating the FDA guidance on PK studies in patients with impaired hepatic function could provide a standardized approach to improve the clinical usefulness of this dosing information for practitioners.

  15. Management of Venetoclax-Posaconazole Interaction in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients: Evaluation of Dose Adjustments.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Suresh K; DiNardo, Courtney D; Potluri, Jalaja; Dunbar, Martin; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Humerickhouse, Rod A; Wong, Shekman L; Menon, Rajeev M; Konopleva, Marina Y; Salem, Ahmed Hamed

    2017-02-01

    The effect of posaconazole, a strong cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) inhibitor and commonly used antifungal agent, on the pharmacokinetic properties of venetoclax, a CYP3A substrate, was evaluated in patients with acute myeloid leukemia to determine the dose adjustments needed to manage this potential interaction. Twelve patients received 20- to 200-mg ramp-up treatment with oral venetoclax and 20 mg/m(2) of intravenous decitabine on days 1 through 5, followed by 400 mg of venetoclax alone on days 6 through 20. On days 21 through 28, patients received 300 mg of posaconazole plus reduced doses of venetoclax (50 or 100 mg) to account for expected increases in venetoclax plasma concentrations. Blood samples were collected before dosing and up to 24 hours after the venetoclax dose on days 20 and 28. Compared with a venetoclax dose of 400 mg when administered alone (day 20), coadministration of venetoclax at a 50-mg dose with multiple doses of posaconazole increased mean venetoclax Cmax and AUC0-24 by 53% and 76%, respectively, whereas coadministration of venetoclax at a 100-mg dose with posaconazole increased mean venetoclax Cmax and AUC0-24 by 93% and 155%, respectively. When adjusted for different doses and nonlinearity, posaconazole was estimated to increase venetoclax Cmax and AUC0-24 by 7.1- and 8.8-fold, respectively. Both the 50- and 100-mg venetoclax doses administered with posaconazole were well tolerated. The results are consistent with inhibition of CYP3A-mediated metabolism of venetoclax. Posaconazole can be used for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia receiving venetoclax after reducing the venetoclax dose by at least 75%. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02203773. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of Enhanced Low Dose Rate Sensitivity in Discrete Bipolar Junction Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Dakai; Ladbury Raymond; LaBel, Kenneth; Topper, Alyson; Ladbury, Raymond; Triggs, Brian; Kazmakites, Tony

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the low dose rate sensitivity in several families of discrete bipolar transistors across device parameter, quality assurance level, and irradiation bias configuration. The 2N2222 showed the most significant low dose rate sensitivity, with low dose rate enhancement factor of 3.91 after 100 krad(Si). The 2N2907 also showed critical degradation levels. The devices irradiated at 10 mrad(Si)/s exceeded specifications after 40 and 50 krad(Si) for the 2N2222 and 2N2907 devices, respectively.

  17. Applicability f the Damage Dose Concept to Ground Evaluation of Trijunction Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, J.-P.; Chanterault, C.; Rapp, E.; Inguimbert, C.

    2005-05-01

    The degradation of trijunction solar cells and subcells from the same technology is characterised. The parametric and physical degradations are presented versus damage dose deposited by electrons of different energies and protons. It appears that the physical degradation of GaInP junctions depends relatively closely on the damage dose but this is not the case for the open circuit voltage degradation. Concerning GaAs junctions, the correlation is shown on a very wide range of NIEL values but with large deviations. More work is needed to confirm these results but the damage dose concept appears to be interesting even if not sufficient for accurate ground end-of-live evaluation.

  18. Evaluation of in vivo dose measurements for patients undergoing electron boost treatments.

    PubMed

    Verney, J N; Morgan, A M

    2001-06-01

    This study evaluated p-type silicon diodes for use in in vivo dosimetry in clinical electron beams. A calibrated p-type silicon diode detector was used to measure the dose received by the patient in the centre of the field. Readings were corrected for energy, temperature and stand-off of the electron applicator from the patient surface. The mean difference between measured and prescribed dose was 1.04% (95% CI 0.72 to 1.36 %).

  19. Evaluation of the medical exposure doses regarding dental examinations with different X-ray instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Chi; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Yu, Cheng-Ching; Chao, Jiunn-Hsing; Hsu, Fang-Yuh

    2015-11-01

    Modern dental X-ray examination that consists of traditional form, panorama, and cone-beamed 3D technologies is one of the most frequent diagnostic applications nowadays. This study used the Rando Phantom and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) to measure the absorbed doses of radiosensitive organs recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and whole body effective doses which were delivered due to dental X-ray examination performed with different types of X-ray instrument. Besides, enamel samples which performed reading with Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) procedure were also used to estimate the tooth doses. EPR is a dose reconstruction method of measuring free radicals induced by radiation exposure to the calcified tissue (mainly in the tooth enamel or bone) to evaluate the accepted high dose. The tooth doses estimated by TLD and EPR methods were compared. Relationships between the tooth doses and effective doses by dental X-ray examinations with different types of X-ray equipment were investigated in this work.

  20. Evaluation of a new commercial Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm for electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Vandervoort, Eric J. Cygler, Joanna E.; Tchistiakova, Ekaterina; La Russa, Daniel J.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In this report the authors present the validation of a Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm (XiO EMC from Elekta Software) for electron beams. Methods: Calculated and measured dose distributions were compared for homogeneous water phantoms and for a 3D heterogeneous phantom meant to approximate the geometry of a trachea and spine. Comparisons of measurements and calculated data were performed using 2D and 3D gamma index dose comparison metrics. Results: Measured outputs agree with calculated values within estimated uncertainties for standard and extended SSDs for open applicators, and for cutouts, with the exception of the 17 MeV electron beam at extended SSD for cutout sizes smaller than 5 × 5 cm{sup 2}. Good agreement was obtained between calculated and experimental depth dose curves and dose profiles (minimum number of measurements that pass a 2%/2 mm agreement 2D gamma index criteria for any applicator or energy was 97%). Dose calculations in a heterogeneous phantom agree with radiochromic film measurements (>98% of pixels pass a 3 dimensional 3%/2 mm γ-criteria) provided that the steep dose gradient in the depth direction is considered. Conclusions: Clinically acceptable agreement (at the 2%/2 mm level) between the measurements and calculated data for measurements in water are obtained for this dose calculation algorithm. Radiochromic film is a useful tool to evaluate the accuracy of electron MC treatment planning systems in heterogeneous media.