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Sample records for dose guided radiotherapy

  1. Image guided dose escalated prostate radiotherapy: still room to improve

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jarad M; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Robert; Chung, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Rosewall, Tara; Warde, Padraig R; Catton, Charles N

    2009-01-01

    Background Prostate radiotherapy (RT) dose escalation has been reported to result in improved biochemical control at the cost of greater late toxicity. We report on the application of 79.8 Gy in 42 fractions of prostate image guided RT (IGRT). The primary objective was to assess 5-year biochemical control and potential prognostic factors by the Phoenix definition. Secondary endpoints included acute and late toxicity by the Radiotherapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring scales. Methods From October/2001 and June/2003, 259 men were treated with at least 2-years follow-up. 59 patients had low, 163 intermediate and 37 high risk disease. 43 had adjuvant hormonal therapy (HT), mostly for high- or multiple risk factor intermediate-risk disease (n = 25). They received either 3-dimensional conformal RT (3DCRT, n = 226) or intensity modulated RT (IMRT) including daily on-line IGRT with intraprostatic fiducial markers. Results Median follow-up was 67.8 months (range 24.4-84.7). There was no severe (grade 3-4) acute toxicity, and grade 2 acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity was unusual (10.1%). The 5-year incidence of grade 2-3 late GI and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was 13.7% and 12.1%, with corresponding grade 3 figures of 3.5% and 2.0% respectively. HT had an association with an increased risk of grade 2-3 late GI toxicity (11% v 21%, p = 0.018). Using the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure, the 5 year-bNED is 88.4%, 76.5% and 77.9% for low, intermediate and high risk patients respectively. On univariate analysis, T-category and Gleason grade correlated with Phoenix bNED (p = 0.006 and 0.039 respectively). Hormonal therapy was not a significant prognostic factor on uni- or multi-variate analysis. Men with positive prostate biopsies following RT had a lower chance of bNED at 5 years (34.4% v 64.3%; p = 0.147). Conclusion IGRT to 79.8 Gy results in favourable rates of late toxicity compared with published non-IGRT treated cohorts. Future avenues of investigation for

  2. Radiation Dose From Kilovoltage Cone Beam Computed Tomography in an Image-Guided Radiotherapy Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, George X. Coffey, Charles W.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Image-guided radiation therapy has emerged as the new paradigm in radiotherapy. This work is to provide detailed information concerning the additional imaging doses to patients' radiosensitive organs from a kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (kV CBCT) scan procedure. Methods and Materials: The Vanderbilt-Monte-Carlo-Beam-Calibration (VMCBC; Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN) algorithm was used to calculate radiation dose to organs resulting from a kV CBCT imaging guidance procedure. Eight patients, including 3 pediatric and 5 adult patients, were investigated. The CBCT scans in both full- and half-fan modes were studied. Results: For a head-and-neck scan in half-fan mode, dose-volume histogram analyses show mean doses of 7 and 8 cGy to the eyes, 5 and 6 cGy to the spinal cord, 5 and 6 cGy to the brain, and 18 and 23 cGy to the cervical vertebrae for an adult and a 29-month-old child, respectively. The dose from a scan in full-fan mode is 10-20% lower than that in half-fan mode. For an abdominal scan, mean doses are 3 and 7 cGy to prostate and 7 and 17 cGy to femoral heads for a large adult patient and a 31-month-old pediatric patient, respectively. Conclusions: Doses to radiosensitive organs can total 300 cGy accrued over an entire treatment course if kV CBCT scans are acquired daily. These findings provide needed data for clinicians to make informed decisions concerning additional imaging doses. The dose to bone is two to four times greater than dose to soft tissue for kV x-rays, which should be considered, especially for pediatric patients.

  3. MR-guided breast radiotherapy: feasibility and magnetic-field impact on skin dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heijst, Tristan C. F.; den Hartogh, Mariska D.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Desirée van den Bongard, H. J. G.; van Asselen, Bram

    2013-09-01

    The UMC Utrecht MRI/linac (MRL) design provides image guidance with high soft-tissue contrast, directly during radiotherapy (RT). Breast cancer patients are a potential group to benefit from better guidance in the MRL. However, due to the electron return effect, the skin dose can be increased in presence of a magnetic field. Since large skin areas are generally involved in breast RT, the purpose of this study is to investigate the effects on the skin dose, for whole-breast irradiation (WBI) and accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). In ten patients with early-stage breast cancer, targets and organs at risk (OARs) were delineated on postoperative CT scans co-registered with MRI. The OARs included the skin, comprising the first 5 mm of ipsilateral-breast tissue, plus extensions. Three intensity-modulated RT techniques were considered (2× WBI, 1× APBI). Individual beam geometries were used for all patients. Specially developed MRL treatment-planning software was used. Acceptable plans were generated for 0 T, 0.35 T and 1.5 T, using a class solution. The skin dose was augmented in WBI in the presence of a magnetic field, which is a potential drawback, whereas in APBI the induced effects were negligible. This opens possibilities for developing MR-guided partial-breast treatments in the MRL.

  4. The management of imaging dose during image-guided radiotherapy: Report of the AAPM Task Group 75

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Martin J.; Balter, James; Balter, Stephen; BenComo, Jose A. Jr.; Das, Indra J.; Jiang, Steve B.; Ma, C.-M.; Olivera, Gustavo H.; Rodebaugh, Raymond F.; Ruchala, Kenneth J.; Shirato, Hiroki; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2007-10-15

    Radiographic image guidance has emerged as the new paradigm for patient positioning, target localization, and external beam alignment in radiotherapy. Although widely varied in modality and method, all radiographic guidance techniques have one thing in common--they can give a significant radiation dose to the patient. As with all medical uses of ionizing radiation, the general view is that this exposure should be carefully managed. The philosophy for dose management adopted by the diagnostic imaging community is summarized by the acronym ALARA, i.e., as low as reasonably achievable. But unlike the general situation with diagnostic imaging and image-guided surgery, image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) adds the imaging dose to an already high level of therapeutic radiation. There is furthermore an interplay between increased imaging and improved therapeutic dose conformity that suggests the possibility of optimizing rather than simply minimizing the imaging dose. For this reason, the management of imaging dose during radiotherapy is a different problem than its management during routine diagnostic or image-guided surgical procedures. The imaging dose received as part of a radiotherapy treatment has long been regarded as negligible and thus has been quantified in a fairly loose manner. On the other hand, radiation oncologists examine the therapy dose distribution in minute detail. The introduction of more intensive imaging procedures for IGRT now obligates the clinician to evaluate therapeutic and imaging doses in a more balanced manner. This task group is charged with addressing the issue of radiation dose delivered via image guidance techniques during radiotherapy. The group has developed this charge into three objectives: (1) Compile an overview of image-guidance techniques and their associated radiation dose levels, to provide the clinician using a particular set of image guidance techniques with enough data to estimate the total diagnostic dose for a specific

  5. Positron Emission Tomography-Guided, Focal-Dose Escalation Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Madani, Indira . E-mail: indira@krtkg1.ugent.be; Duthoy, Wim; Derie, Cristina R.N.; De Gersem, Werner Ir.; Boterberg, Tom; Saerens, Micky; Jacobs, Filip Ir.; Gregoire, Vincent; Lonneux, Max; Vakaet, Luc; Vanderstraeten, Barbara; Bauters, Wouter; Bonte, Katrien; Thierens, Hubert; Neve, Wilfried de

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using positron emission tomography (PET)-guided dose escalation, and to determine the maximum tolerated dose in head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: A Phase I clinical trial was designed to escalate the dose limited to the [{sup 18}-F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET)-delineated subvolume within the gross tumor volume. Positron emission tomography scanning was performed in the treatment position. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with an upfront simultaneously integrated boost was employed. Two dose levels were planned: 25 Gy (level I) and 30 Gy (level II), delivered in 10 fractions. Standard IMRT was applied for the remaining 22 fractions of 2.16 Gy. Results: Between 2003 and 2005, 41 patients were enrolled, with 23 at dose level I, and 18 at dose level II; 39 patients completed the planned therapy. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 14 months. Two cases of dose-limiting toxicity occurred at dose level I (Grade 4 dermitis and Grade 4 dysphagia). One treatment-related death at dose level II halted the study. Complete response was observed in 18 of 21 (86%) and 13 of 16 (81%) evaluated patients at dose levels I and II (p < 0.7), respectively, with actuarial 1-year local control at 85% and 87% (p n.s.), and 1-year overall survival at 82% and 54% (p = 0.06), at dose levels I and II, respectively. In 4 of 9 patients, the site of relapse was in the boosted {sup 18}F-FDG-PET-delineated region. Conclusions: For head and neck cancer, PET-guided dose escalation appears to be well-tolerated. The maximum tolerated dose was not reached at the investigated dose levels.

  6. Evaluation of Imaging Dose From Different Image Guided Systems During Head and Neck Radiotherapy: A Phantom Study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chun Shing; Jong, Wei Loong; Ung, Ngie Min; Wong, Jeannie Hsiu Ding

    2016-12-09

    This work evaluated and compared the absorbed doses to selected organs in the head and neck region from the three image guided radiotherapy systems: cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and kilovoltage (kV) planar imaging using the On-board Imager(®) (OBI) as well as the ExacTrac(®) X-ray system, all available on the Varian Novalis TX linear accelerator. The head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom was used to simulate patients' head within the imaging field. Nanodots optically stimulated luminescent dosemeters were positioned at selected sites to measure the absorbed doses. CBCT was found to be delivering the highest dose to internal organs while OBI-2D gave the highest doses to the eye lenses. The setting of half-rotation in CBCT effectively reduces the dose to the eye lenses. Daily high-quality CBCT verification was found to increase the secondary cancer risk by 0.79%.

  7. Dosimetric evaluation of the OneDose MOSFET for measuring kilovoltage imaging dose from image-guided radiotherapy procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, George X.; Coffey, Charles W.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using a single-use dosimeter, OneDose MOSFET designed for in vivo patient dosimetry, for measuring the radiation dose from kilovoltage (kV) x rays resulting from image-guided procedures. Methods: The OneDose MOSFET dosimeters were precalibrated by the manufacturer using Co-60 beams. Their energy response and characteristics for kV x rays were investigated by using an ionization chamber, in which the air-kerma calibration factors were obtained from an Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (ADCL). The dosimetric properties have been tested for typical kV beams used in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Results: The direct dose reading from the OneDose system needs to be multiplied by a correction factor ranging from 0.30 to 0.35 for kilovoltage x rays ranging from 50 to 125 kVp, respectively. In addition to energy response, the OneDose dosimeter has up to a 20% reduced sensitivity for beams (70-125 kVp) incident from the back of the OneDose detector. Conclusions: The uncertainty in measuring dose resulting from a kilovoltage beam used in IGRT is approximately 20%; this uncertainty is mainly due to the sensitivity dependence of the incident beam direction relative to the OneDose detector. The ease of use may allow the dosimeter to be suitable for estimating the dose resulting from image-guided procedures.

  8. SU-E-J-198: Out-Of-Field Dose and Surface Dose Measurements of MRI-Guided Cobalt-60 Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J; Agazaryan, N; Cao, M; Low, D; Thomas, D; Yang, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To measure quantities of dosimetric interest in an MRI-guided cobalt radiotherapy machine that was recently introduced to clinical use. Methods: Out-of-field dose due to photon scatter and leakage was measured using an ion chamber and solid water slabs mimicking a human body. Surface dose was measured by irradiating stacks of radiochromic film and extrapolating to zero thickness. Electron out-of-field dose was characterized using solid water slabs and radiochromic film. Results: For some phantom geometries, up to 50% of Dmax was observed up to 10 cm laterally from the edge of the beam. The maximum penetration was between 1 and 2 mm in solid water, indicating an electron energy not greater than approximately 0.4 MeV. Out-of-field dose from photon scatter measured at 1 cm depth in solid water was found to fall to less than 10% of Dmax at a distance of 1.2 cm from the edge of a 10.5 × 10.5 cm field, and less that 1% of Dmax at a distance of 10 cm from field edge. Surface dose was measured to be 8% of Dmax. Conclusion: Surface dose and out-of-field dose from the MRIguided cobalt radiotherapy machine was measured and found to be within acceptable limits. Electron out-of-field dose, an effect unique to MRI-guided radiotherapy and presumed to arise from low-energy electrons trapped by the Lorentz force, was quantified. Dr. Low is a member of the scientific advisory board of ViewRay, Inc.

  9. Predictors of Local Control After Single-Dose Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Extracranial Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, Carlo; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Lovelock, Michael; Fuks, Zvi; Hunt, Margie; Rosenzweig, Kenneth; Zatcky, Joan; Kim, Balem; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To report tumor local control after treatment with single-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SD-IGRT) to extracranial metastatic sites. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 metastases in 103 patients were treated with SD-IGRT to prescription doses of 18-24 Gy (median, 24 Gy) between 2004 and 2007. Results: The overall actuarial local relapse-free survival (LRFS) rate was 64% at a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 2-45 months). The median time to failure was 9.6 months (range, 1-23 months). On univariate analysis, LRFS was significantly correlated with prescription dose (p = 0.029). Stratification by dose into high (23 to 24 Gy), intermediate (21 to 22 Gy), and low (18 to 20 Gy) dose levels revealed highly significant differences in LRFS between high (82%) and low doses (25%) (p < 0.0001). Overall, histology had no significant effect on LRFS (p = 0.16). Renal cell histology displayed a profound dose-response effect, with 80% LRFS at the high dose level (23 to 24 Gy) vs. 37% with low doses ({<=}22 Gy) (p = 0.04). However, for patients who received the high dose level, histology was not a statistically significant predictor of LRFS (p = 0.90). Target organ (bone vs. lymph node vs. soft tissues) (p = 0.5) and planning target volume size (p = 0.55) were not found to be associated with long-term LRFS probability. Multivariate Cox regression analysis confirmed prescription dose to be a significant predictor of LRFS (p = 0.003). Conclusion: High-dose SD-IGRT is a noninvasive procedure resulting in high probability of local tumor control. Single-dose IGRT may be effectively used to locally control metastatic deposits regardless of histology and target organ, provided sufficiently high doses (> 22 Gy) of radiation are delivered.

  10. Tumor Control Outcomes After Hypofractionated and Single-Dose Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Extracranial Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Greco, Carlo; Motzer, Robert; Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Pei Xin; Lovelock, Michael; Mechalakos, Jim; Zatcky, Joan; Fuks, Zvi; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report tumor local progression-free outcomes after treatment with single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy and hypofractionated regimens for extracranial metastases from renal cell primary tumors. Patients and Methods: Between 2004 and 2010, 105 lesions from renal cell carcinoma were treated with either single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy to a prescription dose of 18-24 Gy (median, 24) or hypofractionation (three or five fractions) with a prescription dose of 20-30 Gy. The median follow-up was 12 months (range, 1-48). Results: The overall 3-year actuarial local progression-free survival for all lesions was 44%. The 3-year local progression-free survival for those who received a high single-dose (24 Gy; n = 45), a low single-dose (<24 Gy; n = 14), or hypofractionation regimens (n = 46) was 88%, 21%, and 17%, respectively (high single dose vs. low single dose, p = .001; high single dose vs. hypofractionation, p < .001). Multivariate analysis revealed the following variables were significant predictors of improved local progression-free survival: 24 Gy dose compared with a lower dose (p = .009) and a single dose vs. hypofractionation (p = .008). Conclusion: High single-dose, image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy is a noninvasive procedure resulting in high probability of local tumor control for metastatic renal cell cancer generally considered radioresistant according to the classic radiobiologic ranking.

  11. High-Dose, Single-Fraction Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Metastatic Spinal Lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Yoshiya Bilsky, Mark H.; Lovelock, D. Michael; Venkatraman, Ennapadam S.; Toner, Sean; Johnson, Jared; Zatcky, Joan N.P.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Fuks, Zvi

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To report tumor control and toxicity for patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) for spinal metastases with high-dose single-fraction RT. Methods and Materials: A total of 103 consecutive spinal metastases in 93 patients without high-grade epidural spinal cord compression were treated with image-guided intensity-modulated RT to doses of 18-24 Gy (median, 24 Gy) in a single fraction between 2003 and 2006. The spinal cord dose was limited to a 14-Gy maximal dose. The patients were prospectively examined every 3-4 months with clinical assessment and cross-sectional imaging. Results: The overall actuarial local control rate was 90% (local failure developed in 7 patients) at a median follow-up of 15 months (range, 2-45 months). The median time to local failure was 9 months (range, 2-15 months) from the time of treatment. Of the 93 patients, 37 died. The median overall survival was 15 months. In all cases, death was from progression of systemic disease and not local failure. The histologic type was not a statistically significant predictor of survival or local control. The radiation dose was a significant predictor of local control (p = 0.03). All patients without local failure also reported durable symptom palliation. Acute toxicity was mild (Grade 1-2). No case of radiculopathy or myelopathy has developed. Conclusion: High-dose, single-fraction image-guided intensity-modulated RT is a noninvasive intervention that appears to be safe and very effective palliation for patients with spinal metastases, with minimal negative effects on quality of life and a high probability of tumor control.

  12. SU-D-9A-07: Imaging Dose and Cancer Risk in Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, L; Bai, S; Zhang, Y; Ming, X; Zhang, Y; Deng, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To systematically evaluate the imaging doses and cancer risks associated with various imaging procedures involving ionizing radiation during image-guided radiotherapy of an increasingly large number of cancer patients. Methods: 141 patients (52 brain cases, 47 thoracic cases, 42 abdominal cases, aged 3 to 91 years old) treated between October 2009 and March 2010 were included in this IRB-approved retrospective study. During the whole radiotherapy course, each patient underwent at least one type of imaging procedures, i.e., kV portal, MV portal and kVCBCT, besides CT simulations. Based on Monte Carlo modeling and particle transport in human anatomy of various dimensions, the correlations between the radiation doses to the various organs-at-risk (OARs) at the head, the thoracic and the abdominal regions and one's weight, circumference, scan mAs and kVp have been obtained and used to estimate the radiation dose from a specific imaging procedure. The radiation-induced excess relative risk (ERR) was then estimated with BEIR VII formulism based on one's gender, age and radiation dose. 1+ ERR was reported in this study as relative cancer risk. Results: For the whole cohort of 141 patients, the mean imaging doses from various imaging procedures were 8.3 cGy to the brain, 10.5 cGy to the lungs and 19.2 cGy to the red bone marrow, respectively. Accordingly, the cancer risks were 1.140, 1.369 and 2.671, respectively. In comparison, MV portal deposited largest doses to the lungs while kVCBCT delivered the highest doses to the red bone marrow. Conclusion: The compiled imaging doses to a patient during his/her treatment course were patient-specific and site-dependent, varying from 1.2 to 263.5 cGy on average, which were clinically significant and should be included in the treatment planning and overall decision-making. Our results indicated the necessity of personalized imaging to maximize its clinical benefits while reducing the associated cancer risks. Sichuan

  13. Evaluations of an adaptive planning technique incorporating dose feedback in image-guided radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Han; Wu Qiuwen

    2011-12-15

    treatment course, then 11 patients fail. If the same criteria is assessed at the end of each week (every five fractions), then 14 patients fail, with three patients failing the 1st or 2nd week but passing at the end. The average dose deficit from these 14 patients was 4.4%. They improved to 2% after the weekly compensation. Out of these 14 patients who needed dose compensation, ten passed the dose criterion after weekly dose compensation, three patients failed marginally, and one patient still failed the criterion significantly (10% deficit), representing 3.6% of the patient population. A more aggressive compensation frequency (every three fractions) could successfully reduce the dose deficit to the acceptable level for this patient. The average number of required dose compensation re-planning per patient was 0.82 (0.79) per patient for schedule A (B) delivery strategy. The doses to OARs were not significantly different from the online IG only plans without dose compensation. Conclusions: We have demonstrated the effectiveness of offline dose compensation technique in image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer. It can effectively account for residual uncertainties which cannot be corrected through online IG. Dose compensation allows further margin reduction and critical organs sparing.

  14. Personalized Assessment of kV Cone Beam Computed Tomography Doses in Image-guided Radiotherapy of Pediatric Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yibao; Yan Yulong; Nath, Ravinder; Bao Shanglian; Deng Jun

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To develop a quantitative method for the estimation of kV cone beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) doses in pediatric patients undergoing image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Forty-two children were retrospectively analyzed in subgroups of different scanned regions: one group in the head-and-neck and the other group in the pelvis. Critical structures in planning CT images were delineated on an Eclipse treatment planning system before being converted into CT phantoms for Monte Carlo simulations. A benchmarked EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose distributions of kVCBCT scans with full-fan high-quality head or half-fan pelvis protocols predefined by the manufacturer. Based on planning CT images and structures exported in DICOM RT format, occipital-frontal circumferences (OFC) were calculated for head-and-neck patients using DICOMan software. Similarly, hip circumferences (HIP) were acquired for the pelvic group. Correlations between mean organ doses and age, weight, OFC, and HIP values were analyzed with SigmaPlot software suite, where regression performances were analyzed with relative dose differences (RDD) and coefficients of determination (R{sup 2}). Results: kVCBCT-contributed mean doses to all critical structures decreased monotonically with studied parameters, with a steeper decrease in the pelvis than in the head. Empirical functions have been developed for a dose estimation of the major organs at risk in the head and pelvis, respectively. If evaluated with physical parameters other than age, a mean RDD of up to 7.9% was observed for all the structures in our population of 42 patients. Conclusions: kVCBCT doses are highly correlated with patient size. According to this study, weight can be used as a primary index for dose assessment in both head and pelvis scans, while OFC and HIP may serve as secondary indices for dose estimation in corresponding regions. With the proposed empirical functions, it is possible

  15. SU-E-J-10: Imaging Dose and Cancer Risk in Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, L; Bai, S; Zhang, Y; Deng, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To systematically evaluate imaging doses and cancer risks to organs-at-risk as a Result of cumulative doses from various radiological imaging procedures in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in a large cohort of cancer patients. Methods: With IRB approval, imaging procedures (computed tomography, kilo-voltage portal imaging, megavoltage portal imaging and kilo-voltage cone-beam computed tomography) of 4832 cancer patients treated during 4.5 years were collected with their gender, age and circumference. Correlations between patient’s circumference and Monte Carlo simulated-organ dose were applied to estimate organ doses while the cancer risks were reported as 1+ERR using BEIR VII models. Results: 80 cGy or more doses were deposited to brain, lungs and RBM in 273 patients (maximum 136, 278 and 267 cGy, respectively), due largely to repetitive imaging procedures and non-personalized imaging settings. Regardless of gender, relative cancer risk estimates for brain, lungs, and RBM were 3.4 (n = 55), 2.6 (n = 49), 1.8 (n = 25) for age group of 0–19; 1.2 (n = 87), 1.4 (n = 98), 1.3 (n = 51) for age group of 20–39; 1.0 (n = 457), 1.1 (n = 880), 1.8 (n=360) for age group of 40–59; 1.0 (n = 646), 1.1 (n = 1400), 2.3 (n = 716) for age group of 60–79 and 1.0 (n = 108),1.1 (n = 305),1.6 (n = 147) for age group of 80–99. Conclusion: The cumulative imaging doses and associated cancer risks from multi-imaging procedures were patient-specific and site-dependent, with up to 2.7 Gy imaging dose deposited to critical structures in some pediatric patients. The associated cancer risks in brain and lungs for children of age 0 to 19 were 2–3 times larger than those for adults. This study indicated a pressing need for personalized imaging protocol to maximize its clinical benefits while reducing associated cancer risks. Sichuan University Scholarship.

  16. Evaluation of Patient Doses from Verification Techniques in Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Dufek, Vladimir; Horakova, Ivana; Novak, Leos; Koncek, Ondrej; Richter, Vit; Janeckova, Lenka

    2010-01-05

    The purpose of this work was an evaluation of organ doses and effective doses from kilovoltage (kV) cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans and from pairs of orthogonal kV image projections for two different treatment sites (a head and a pelvis). Measurements of organ doses were performed in an anthropomorphic rando phantom by means of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). Irradiations were performed using on-board imager (OBI) and X-ray volume imaging (XVI) systems.

  17. Tumor Control Outcomes Following Hypofractionated and Single-Dose Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Extracranial Metastases from Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zelefsky, Michael J; Greco, Carlo; Motzer, Robert; Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Pei, Xin; Lovelock, Michael; Mechalakos, Jim; Zatcky, Joan; Fuks, Zvi; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report tumor local progression-free outcomes following treatment with single-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SD-IGRT) and hypofractionated regimens for extracranial metastases from renal cell primary tumors. Methods and Materials Between 2004 and 2010, a total of 105 lesions from renal cell carcinomas were treated with either SD-IGRT to prescription doses of 18–24 Gy (median, 24 Gy) or hypofractionation (3 or 5 fractions) with prescription doses ranging between 20 and 30 Gy. The median follow-up was 12 months (range, 1–48 months). Results The overall 3-year actuarial local progression-free survival (LPFS) for all lesions was 44%. The 3-year LPFS for those who received high single-dose (24 Gy; n = 45), low single-dose (< 24 Gy; n = 14), and hypofractionation regimens (n = 46) were 88%, 21%, and 17%, respectively (high single dose versus low single dose, p = 0.001; high single dose versus hypofractionation, p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed the following variables as significant predictors of improved LPFS: dose of 24 Gy compared with lower dose (p = 0.009), and single dose versus hypofractionation (p = 0.008). Conclusion High-dose SD-IGRT is a non-invasive procedure resulting in high probability of local tumor control for metastatic renal cell cancers, generally considered radioresistant according to classical radiobiological ranking. PMID:21596489

  18. [Adaptative radiotherapy: The case for MRI-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Maingon, P

    2016-10-01

    The concept of image-guided radiotherapy benefits from the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) associated with different capacities of tissue analyses such as spectroscopy or diffusion analysis. The production of devices allowing the repositioning of patients through MRI represents a strong added value without delivering any additional dose to the patient while the optimization of the adaptative strategies are facilitated by a better contrast of the soft tissues compared to the scanner. The advantages of MRI are well demonstrated for brain tumours, head and neck carcinomas, pelvic tumors, mediastinal malignancies, gastrointestinal tract diseases. Adaptative radiotherapy inaugurates a new area of radiotherapy with different modalities. Several technological solutions are provided or discussed allowing the patients to benefit from thses new technologies as soon as possible.

  19. Clinical Application of High-Dose, Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bayley, Andrew; Rosewall, Tara; Craig, Tim; Bristow, Rob; Chung, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: To report the feasibility and early toxicity of dose-escalated image-guided IMRT to the pelvic lymph nodes (LN), prostate (P), and seminal vesicles (SV). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 high-risk prostate cancer patients received two-phase, dose-escalated, image-guided IMRT with 3 years of androgen deprivation therapy. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) were delineated using computed tomography/magnetic resonance co-registration and included the prostate, portions of the SV, and the LN. Planning target volume margins (PTV) used were as follows: P (10 mm, 7 mm posteriorly), SV (10 mm), and LN (5 mm). Organs at risk (OaR) were the rectal and bladder walls, femoral heads, and large and small bowel. The IMRT was planned with an intended dose of 55.1 Gy in 29 fractions to all CTVs (Phase 1), with P+SV consecutive boost of 24.7 Gy in 13 fractions. Daily online image guidance was performed using bony landmarks and intraprostatic markers. Feasibility criteria included delivery of intended doses in 80% of patients, 95% of CTV displacements incorporated within PTV during Phase 1, and acute toxicity rate comparable to that of lower-dose pelvic techniques. Results: A total of 91 patients (88%) received the total prescription dose. All patients received at least 72 Gy. In Phase 1, 63 patients (61%) received the intended 55.1 Gy, whereas 87% of patients received at least 50 Gy. Dose reductions were caused by small bowel and rectal wall constraints. All CTVs received the planned dose in >95% of treatment fractions. There were no Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicities greater than Grade 3, although there were five incidences equivalent to Grade 3 within a median follow-up of 23 months. Conclusion: These results suggest that dose escalation to the PLN+P+SV using IMRT is feasible, with acceptable rates of acute toxicity.

  20. Fiducial marker guided prostate radiotherapy: a review.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Angela G M; Jain, Suneil; Hounsell, Alan R; O'Sullivan, Joe M

    2016-12-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is an essential tool in the accurate delivery of modern radiotherapy techniques. Prostate radiotherapy positioned using skin marks or bony anatomy may be adequate for delivering a relatively homogeneous whole-pelvic radiotherapy dose, but these surrogates are not reliable when using reduced margins, dose escalation or hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Fiducial markers (FMs) for prostate IGRT have been in use since the 1990s. They require surgical implantation and provide a surrogate for the position of the prostate gland. A variety of FMs are available and they can be used in a number of ways. This review aimed to establish the evidence for using prostate FMs in terms of feasibility, implantation procedures, types of FMs used, FM migration, imaging modalities used and the clinical impact of FMs. A search strategy was defined and a literature search was carried out in Medline. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, which resulted in 50 articles being included in this review. The evidence demonstrates that FMs provide a more accurate surrogate for the position of the prostate than either external skin marks or bony anatomy. A combination of FM alignment and soft-tissue analysis is currently the most effective and widely available approach to ensuring accuracy in prostate IGRT. FM implantation is safe and well tolerated. FM migration is possible but minimal. Standardization of all techniques and procedures in relation to the use of prostate FMs is required. Finally, a clinical trial investigating a non-surgical alternative to prostate FMs is introduced.

  1. Do We Need Daily Image-Guided Radiotherapy by Megavoltage Computed Tomography in Head and Neck Helical Tomotherapy? The Actual Delivered Dose to the Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Duma, Marciana Nona; Kampfer, Severin; Schuster, Tibor; Aswathanarayana, Nandana; Fromm, Laura-Sophie; Molls, Michael; Andratschke, Nicolaus; Geinitz, Hans

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To quantify the actual delivered dose to the cervical spinal cord with different image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) approaches during head and neck (HN) cancer helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty HN patients (HNpts) treated with bilateral nodal irradiation were analyzed. Daily megavoltage computed tomography MVCT) scans were performed for setup purposes. The maximum dose on the planning CT scan (plan-Dmax) and the magnitude and localization of the actual delivered Dmax (a-Dmax) were analyzed for four scenarios: daily image-guided radiotherapy (dIGRT), twice weekly IGRT (2 Multiplication-Sign WkIGRT), once weekly IGRT (1 Multiplication-Sign WkIGRT), and no IGRT at all (non-IGRT). The spinal cord was recontoured on 236 MVCTs for each scenario (total, 944 fractions), and the delivered dose was recalculated for each fraction (fx) separately. Results: Fifty-one percent of the analyzed fx for dIGRT, 56% of the analyzed fx for the 2 Multiplication-Sign WkIGRT, 62% of the analyzed fx for the 1 Multiplication-Sign WkIGRT, and 63% of the analyzed fx for the non-IGRT scenarios received a higher a-Dmax than the plan-Dmax. The median increase of dose in these fx was 3.3% more for dIGRT, 5.8% more for 2 Multiplication-Sign WkIGRT, 10.0% more for 1 Multiplication-Sign WkIGRT, and 9.5% more for non-IGRT than the plan-Dmax. The median spinal cord volumes receiving a higher dose than the plan-Dmax were 0.02 cm{sup 3} for dIGRT, 0.11 cm{sup 3} for 2 Multiplication-Sign WkIGRT, 0.31 cm{sup 3} for 1 Multiplication-Sign WkIGRT, and 0.22 cm{sup 3} for non-IGRT. Differences between the dIGRT and all other scenarios were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Compared to the Dmax of the initial plan, daily IGRT had the smallest increase in dose. Furthermore, daily IGRT had the lowest proportion of fractions and the smallest volumes affected by a dose that was higher than the planned dose. For patients treated with doses close to the tolerance dose of the

  2. [Image-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Chauvet, B; Barillot, I; Lafond, C; Mahé, M; Delpon, G

    2016-09-01

    The IGRT is described in its various equipment and implementation. IGRT can be based either on ionizing radiation generating 2D imaging (MV or kV) or 3D imaging (CBCT or MV-CT) or on non-ionizing radiation (ultrasound, optical imaging, MRI or radiofrequency). Adaptive radiation therapy is then presented in its principles of implementation. The function of the technicians for IGRT is then presented and the possible dose delivered by the on-board imaging is discussed. The quality control of IGRT devices is finally described.

  3. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Dose constraints for the anterior rectal wall to minimize rectal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Jennifer L.; Buskirk, Steven J.; Heckman, Michael G.; Diehl, Nancy N.; Bernard, Johnny R.; Tzou, Katherine S.; Casale, Henry E.; Bellefontaine, Louis P.; Serago, Christopher; Kim, Siyong; Vallow, Laura A.; Daugherty, Larry C.; Ko, Stephen J.

    2014-04-01

    Rectal adverse events (AEs) are a major concern with definitive radiotherapy (RT) treatment for prostate cancer. The anterior rectal wall is at the greatest risk of injury as it lies closest to the target volume and receives the highest dose of RT. This study evaluated the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall receiving a high dose to identify potential ideal dose constraints that can minimize rectal AEs. A total of 111 consecutive patients with Stage T1c to T3a N0 M0 prostate cancer who underwent image-guided intensity-modulated RT at our institution were included. AEs were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The volume of anterior rectal wall receiving 5 to 80 Gy in 2.5-Gy increments was determined. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to identify cut points in these volumes that led to an increased risk of early and late rectal AEs. Early AEs occurred in most patients (88%); however, relatively few of them (13%) were grade ≥2. At 5 years, the cumulative incidence of late rectal AEs was 37%, with only 5% being grade ≥2. For almost all RT doses, we identified a threshold of irradiated absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which there was at least a trend toward a significantly higher rate of AEs. Most strikingly, patients with more than 1.29, 0.73, or 0.45 cm{sup 3} of anterior rectal wall exposed to radiation doses of 67.5, 70, or 72.5 Gy, respectively, had a significantly increased risk of late AEs (relative risks [RR]: 2.18 to 2.72; p ≤ 0.041) and of grade ≥ 2 early AEs (RR: 6.36 to 6.48; p = 0.004). Our study provides evidence that definitive image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) for prostate cancer is well tolerated and also identifies dose thresholds for the absolute volume of anterior rectal wall above which patients are at greater risk of early and late complications.

  4. Phase II dose escalation study of image-guided adaptive radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Use of dose-volume constraints to achieve rectal isotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos; Yan Di; Kestin, Larry L.; Krauss, Daniel; Lockman, David M.; Brabbins, Donald S.; Martinez, Alvaro A. . E-mail: amartinez@beaumont.edu

    2005-09-01

    significant difference by dose level was seen in the 2-year rate of Grade 2 or higher chronic rectal toxicity. These rates were 27%, 15%, 14%, 17%, and 24% for dose levels equal to or less than 72, 73.8, 75.6, 77.4, and 79.2 Gy, respectively (p = 0.3). Grade 2 or higher chronic rectal bleeding was significantly greater for Group 2 than for Group 1, 17% vs. 8% (p = 0.035). Conclusions: High doses (79.2 Gy) were safely delivered in selected patients by our adaptive radiotherapy process. Under the rectal dose-volume histogram constraints for the dose level selection, the risk of chronic rectal toxicity is similar among patients treated to different dose levels. Therefore, rectal chronic toxicity rates reflect the dose-volume cutoff used and are independent of the actual dose levels. On the other hand, a larger PTV will increase the rectal wall dose and chronic rectal toxicity rates. PTV volume and dose constraints should be defined, considering their potential benefit.

  5. Imaging practices and radiation doses from imaging in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Siiskonen, Teemu; Kaijaluoto, Sampsa; Florea, Tudor

    2017-03-25

    Modern radiotherapy treatments require frequent imaging for accurate patient positioning relative to the therapeutic radiation beam. Imaging practices in five Finnish radiotherapy clinics were assessed and discussed from the patient dose optimization point of view. The results show that imaging strategies are not jointly established and variations exist. The organ absorbed doses depend on imaging technique and imaging frequency. In particular, organ doses from the cone beam computed tomography can have very large variations (a factor of 10-50 in breast imaging and factor of 5 in prostate imaging). The cumulative imaging organ dose from the treatment can vary by a factor of ten or more for the same treatment, depending on the chosen technique and imaging frequency. Awareness and optimization of the imaging dose in image-guided radiotherapy should be strengthened.

  6. [Hopes of high dose-rate radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Fouillade, Charles; Favaudon, Vincent; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Romeo, Paul-Henri; Bourhis, Jean; Verrelle, Pierre; Devauchelle, Patrick; Patriarca, Annalisa; Heinrich, Sophie; Mazal, Alejandro; Dutreix, Marie

    2017-03-07

    In this review, we present the synthesis of the newly acquired knowledge concerning high dose-rate irradiations and the hopes that these new radiotherapy modalities give rise to. The results were presented at a recent symposium on the subject.

  7. Target localization and toxicity in dose-escalated prostate radiotherapy with image-guided approach using daily planar kilovoltage imaging.

    PubMed

    Nath, S K; Sandhu, A P; Sethi, R A; Jensen, L G; Rosario, M D; Kane, C J; Parsons, J K; Millard, F E; Jiang, S B; Rice, R K; Pawlicki, T; Mundt, A J

    2011-02-01

    Dose escalation with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for carcinoma of the prostate has augmented the need for accurate prostate localization prior to dose delivery. Daily planar kilovoltage (kV) imaging is a low-dose image-guidance technique that is prevalent among radiation oncologists. However, clinical outcomes evaluating the benefit of daily kV imaging are lacking. The purpose of this study was to report our clinical experience, including prostate motion and gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities, using this modality. A retrospective analysis of 100 patients treated consecutively between December 2005 and March 2008 with definitive external beam IMRT for T1c-T4 disease were included in this analysis. Prescription doses ranged from 74-78 Gy (median, 76) in 2 Gy fractions and were delivered following daily prostate localization using on-board kV imaging (OBI) to localize gold seed fiducial markers within the prostate. Acute and late toxicities were graded as per the NCI CTCAEv3.0. The median follow-up was 22 months. The magnitude and direction of prostate displacement and daily shifts in three axes are reported. Of note, 9.1% and 12.9% of prostate displacements were ≥ 5 mm in the anterior-posterior and superior-inferior directions, respectively. Acute grade 2 GI and GU events occurred in 11% and 39% of patients, respectively, however no grade 3 or higher acute GI or GU events were observed. Regarding late toxicity, 2% and 17% of patients developed grade 2 toxicities, and similarly no grade 3 or higher events had occurred by last follow-up. Thus, kV imaging detected a substantial amount of inter-fractional displacement and may help reduce toxicity profiles, especially high grade events, by improving the accuracy of dose delivery.

  8. [Task sharing with radiotherapy technicians in image-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Diaz, O; Lorchel, F; Revault, C; Mornex, F

    2013-10-01

    The development of accelerators with on-board imaging systems now allows better target volumes reset at the time of irradiation (image-guided radiotherapy [IGRT]). However, these technological advances in the control of repositioning led to a multiplication of tasks for each actor in radiotherapy and increase the time available for the treatment, whether for radiotherapy technicians or radiation oncologists. As there is currently no explicit regulatory framework governing the use of IGRT, some institutional experiments show that a transfer is possible between radiation oncologists and radiotherapy technicians for on-line verification of image positioning. Initial training for every technical and drafting procedures within institutions will improve audit quality by reducing interindividual variability.

  9. Gold Nanoparticle Hyperthermia Reduces Radiotherapy Dose

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lynn; Slatkin, Daniel N.; Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Vadas, Timothy M.; Smilowitz, Henry M.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles can absorb near infrared light, resulting in heating and ablation of tumors. Gold nanoparticles have also been used for enhancing the dose of X-rays in tumors during radiotherapy. The combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy is synergistic, importantly allowing a reduction in X-ray dose with improved therapeutic results. Here we intratumorally infused small 15 nm gold nanoparticles engineered to be transformed from infrared-transparent to infrared-absorptive by the tumor, which were then heated by infrared followed by X-ray treatment. Synergy was studied using a very radioresistant subcutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII) in mice. It was found that the dose required to control 50% of the tumors, normally 55 Gy, could be reduced to <15 Gy (a factor of >3.7). Gold nanoparticles therefore provide a method to combine hyperthermia and radiotherapy to drastically reduce the X-ray radiation needed, thus sparing normal tissue, reducing the side effects, and making radiotherapy more effective. PMID:24990355

  10. [Good practice of image-guided radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Créhange, G; Castelli, J; Lafond, C; Delpon, G

    2015-10-01

    Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) aims to take into account the anatomical variations occurring during the course of radiotherapy, by direct or indirect visualization of the target volume followed by a corrective action. The movements of the target, or at least the set-up errors are corrected by moving the treatment table, corresponding to the simplest and most validated IGRT modality in a standard practice. The deformations of the target volume and organs at risk are however much more common, and unfortunately much more complicated to consider, requiring multiple planning before or during the treatment, corresponding to the adaptive radiotherapy strategies. The planning target volume must be carefully chosen according to these anatomic variations. This article reviews the modalities of IGRT, standard or under evaluation, according to the different tumour sites.

  11. Low-Dose Radiotherapy in Indolent Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Rossier, Christine; Schick, Ulrike; Miralbell, Raymond; Mirimanoff, Rene O.; Weber, Damien C.; Ozsahin, Mahmut

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the response rate, duration of response, and overall survival after low-dose involved-field radiotherapy in patients with recurrent low-grade lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Methods and Materials: Forty-three (24 women, 19 men) consecutive patients with indolent lymphoma or CLL were treated with a total dose of 4 Gy (2 x 2 Gy) using 6- 18-MV photons. The median age was 73 years (range, 39-88). Radiotherapy was given either after (n = 32; 75%) or before (n = 11; 25%) chemotherapy. The median time from diagnosis was 48 months (range, 1-249). The median follow-up period was 20 months (range, 1-56). Results: The overall response rate was 90%. Twelve patients (28%) had a complete response, 15 (35%) had a partial response, 11 (26%) had stable disease, and 5 (11%) had progressive disease. The median overall survival for patients with a positive response (complete response/partial response/stable disease) was 41 months; for patients with progressive disease it was 6 months (p = 0.001). The median time to in-field progression was 21 months (range, 0-24), and the median time to out-field progression was 8 months (range, 0-40). The 3-year in-field control was 92% in patients with complete response (median was not reached). The median time to in-field progression was 9 months (range, 0.5-24) in patients with partial response and 6 months (range, 0.6-6) in those with stable disease (p < 0.05). Younger age, positive response to radiotherapy, and no previous chemotherapy were the best factors influencing the outcome. Conclusions: Low-dose involved-field radiotherapy is an effective treatment in the management of patients with recurrent low-grade lymphoma or CLL.

  12. Monte Carlo dose calculations in advanced radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Karl Kenneth

    The remarkable accuracy of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation algorithms has led to the widely accepted view that these methods should and will play a central role in the radiotherapy treatment verification and planning of the future. The advantages of using MC clinically are particularly evident for radiation fields passing through inhomogeneities, such as lung and air cavities, and for small fields, including those used in today's advanced intensity modulated radiotherapy techniques. Many investigators have reported significant dosimetric differences between MC and conventional dose calculations in such complex situations, and have demonstrated experimentally the unmatched ability of MC calculations in modeling charged particle disequilibrium. The advantages of using MC dose calculations do come at a cost. The nature of MC dose calculations require a highly detailed, in-depth representation of the physical system (accelerator head geometry/composition, anatomical patient geometry/composition and particle interaction physics) to allow accurate modeling of external beam radiation therapy treatments. To perform such simulations is computationally demanding and has only recently become feasible within mainstream radiotherapy practices. In addition, the output of the accelerator head simulation can be highly sensitive to inaccuracies within a model that may not be known with sufficient detail. The goal of this dissertation is to both improve and advance the implementation of MC dose calculations in modern external beam radiotherapy. To begin, a novel method is proposed to fine-tune the output of an accelerator model to better represent the measured output. In this method an intensity distribution of the electron beam incident on the model is inferred by employing a simulated annealing algorithm. The method allows an investigation of arbitrary electron beam intensity distributions and is not restricted to the commonly assumed Gaussian intensity. In a second component of

  13. Dose masking feature for BNCT radiotherapy planning

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Jeremy L.; Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.

    2000-01-01

    A system for displaying an accurate model of isodoses to be used in radiotherapy so that appropriate planning can be performed prior to actual treatment on a patient. The nature of the simulation of the radiotherapy planning for BNCT and Fast Neutron Therapy, etc., requires that the doses be computed in the entire volume. The "entire volume" includes the patient and beam geometries as well as the air spaces in between. Isodoses derived from the computed doses will therefore extend into the air regions between the patient and beam geometries and thus depict the unrealistic possibility that radiation deposition occurs in regions containing no physical media. This problem is solved by computing the doses for the entire geometry and then masking the physical and air regions along with the isodose contours superimposed over the patient image at the corresponding plane. The user is thus able to mask out (remove) the contour lines from the unwanted areas of the image by selecting the appropriate contour masking region from the raster image.

  14. Post-Prostatectomy Image-Guided Radiotherapy: The Invisible Target Concept

    PubMed Central

    Vilotte, Florent; Antoine, Mickael; Bobin, Maxime; Latorzeff, Igor; Supiot, Stéphane; Richaud, Pierre; Thomas, Laurence; Leduc, Nicolas; Guérif, Stephane; Iriondo-Alberdi, Jone; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Sargos, Paul

    2017-01-01

    In the era of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) appears crucial to control dose delivery and to promote dose escalation while allowing healthy tissue sparing. The place of IGRT following radical prostatectomy is poorly described in the literature. This review aims to highlight some key points on the different IGRT techniques applicable to prostatic bed radiotherapy. Furthermore, methods used to evaluate target motion and to reduce planning target volume margins will also be explored. PMID:28337425

  15. Post-Prostatectomy Image-Guided Radiotherapy: The Invisible Target Concept.

    PubMed

    Vilotte, Florent; Antoine, Mickael; Bobin, Maxime; Latorzeff, Igor; Supiot, Stéphane; Richaud, Pierre; Thomas, Laurence; Leduc, Nicolas; Guérif, Stephane; Iriondo-Alberdi, Jone; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Sargos, Paul

    2017-01-01

    In the era of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) appears crucial to control dose delivery and to promote dose escalation while allowing healthy tissue sparing. The place of IGRT following radical prostatectomy is poorly described in the literature. This review aims to highlight some key points on the different IGRT techniques applicable to prostatic bed radiotherapy. Furthermore, methods used to evaluate target motion and to reduce planning target volume margins will also be explored.

  16. High Dose-Per-Fraction Irradiation of Limited Lung Volumes Using an Image-Guided, Highly Focused Irradiator: Simulating Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Regimens in a Small-Animal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jaeho; Kodym, Reinhard; Seliounine, Serguei

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the underlying biology associated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), both in vivo models and image-guided, highly focal irradiation systems are necessary. Here, we describe such an irradiation system and use it to examine normal tissue toxicity in a small-animal model at lung volumes similar to those associated with human therapy. Methods and Materials: High-dose radiation was delivered to a small volume of the left lung of C3H/HeJCr mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. The irradiator has a collimation mechanism to produce focal radiation beams, an imaging subsystem consisting of a fluorescent screen coupled to a charge-coupled device camera, and a manual positioning stage. Histopathologic examination and micro-CT were used to evaluate the radiation response. Results: Focal obliteration of the alveoli by fibrous connective tissue, hyperplasia of the bronchiolar epithelium, and presence of a small number of inflammatory cells are the main reactions to low-volume/high-dose irradiation of the mouse lung. The tissue response suggested a radiation dose threshold for early phase fibrosis lying between 40 and 100 Gy. The irradiation system satisfied our requirements of high-dose-rate, small beam diameter, and precise localization and verification. Conclusions: We have established an experimental model and image-guided animal irradiation system for the study of high dose per fraction irradiations such as those used with SBRT at volumes analogous to those used in human beings. It will also allow the targeting of specific anatomical structures of the thorax or ultimately, orthotopic tumors of the lung.

  17. Dynamic targeting image-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huntzinger, Calvin; Munro, Peter; Johnson, Scott; Miettinen, Mika; Zankowski, Corey; Ahlstrom, Greg; Glettig, Reto; Filliberti, Reto; Kaissl, Wolfgang; Kamber, Martin; Amstutz, Martin; Bouchet, Lionel; Klebanov, Dan; Mostafavi, Hassan; Stark, Richard

    2006-07-01

    Volumetric imaging and planning for 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) have highlighted the need to the oncology community to better understand the geometric uncertainties inherent in the radiotherapy delivery process, including setup error (interfraction) as well as organ motion during treatment (intrafraction). This has ushered in the development of emerging technologies and clinical processes, collectively referred to as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The goal of IGRT is to provide the tools needed to manage both inter- and intrafraction motion to improve the accuracy of treatment delivery. Like IMRT, IGRT is a process involving all steps in the radiotherapy treatment process, including patient immobilization, computed tomogaphy (CT) simulation, treatment planning, plan verification, patient setup verification and correction, delivery, and quality assurance. The technology and capability of the Dynamic Targeting{sup TM} IGRT system developed by Varian Medical Systems is presented. The core of this system is a Clinac (registered) or Trilogy{sup TM} accelerator equipped with a gantry-mounted imaging system known as the On-Board Imager{sup TM} (OBI). This includes a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray source, an amorphous silicon kV digital image detector, and 2 robotic arms that independently position the kV source and imager orthogonal to the treatment beam. A similar robotic arm positions the PortalVision{sup TM} megavoltage (MV) portal digital image detector, allowing both to be used in concert. The system is designed to support a variety of imaging modalities. The following applications and how they fit in the overall clinical process are described: kV and MV planar radiographic imaging for patient repositioning, kV volumetric cone beam CT imaging for patient repositioning, and kV planar fluoroscopic imaging for gating verification. Achieving image-guided motion management throughout the radiation oncology process

  18. Characterizing geometric accuracy and precision in image guided gated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenn, Stephen Edward

    Gated radiotherapy combined with intensity modulated or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for tumors in the thorax and abdomen can deliver dose distributions which conform closely to tumor shapes allowing increased tumor dose while sparing healthy tissues. These conformal fields require more accurate and precise placement than traditional fields or tumors may receive suboptimal dose thereby reducing tumor control probability. Image guidance based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) provides a means to improve accuracy and precision in radiotherapy. The ability of 4DCT to accurately reproduce patient geometry and the ability of image guided gating equipment to position tumors and place fields around them must be characterized in order to determine treatment parameters such as tumor margins. Fiducial based methods of characterizing accuracy and precision of equipment for 4DCT planning and image guided gated radiotherapy (IGGRT) are presented with results for specific equipment. Fiducial markers of known geometric orientation are used to characterize 4DCT image reconstruction accuracy. Accuracy is determined under different acquisition protocols, reconstruction phases, and phantom trajectories. Targeting accuracy of fiducial based image guided gating is assessed by measuring in-phantom field positions for different motions, gating levels and target rotations. Synchronization parameters for gating equipment are also determined. Finally, end-to-end testing is performed to assess overall accuracy and precision of the equipment under controlled conditions. 4DCT limits fiducial geometric distance errors to 2 mm for repeatable target trajectories and to 5 mm for a pseudo-random trajectory. Largest offsets were in the longitudinal direction. If correctly calibrated and synchronized, the IGGRT system tested here can target reproducibly moving tumors with accuracy better than 1.2 mm. Gating level can affect accuracy if target motion is asymmetric about the

  19. A dose comparison of proton radiotherapy and photon radiotherapy for pediatric brain tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. Y.; Cho, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of photon radiotherapy and to compare the dose of treatment planning between proton radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for pediatric brain tumor patients. This study was conducted in five pediatric brain tumor patients who underwent craniospinal irradiation treatment from October 2013 to April 2014 in the hospital. The study compared organs at risk (OARs) by assessing the dose distribution of normal tissue from the proton plan and 3D-CRT. Furthermore, this study assessed the treatment plans by looking at the homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI). As a result, the study revealed OARs due to the small volume proton radiotherapy dose distribution in the normal tissue. Also, by comparing HI and CI between the 3D-CRT and proton radiotherapy plan, the study found that the dose of proton radiotherapy plan was homogenized. When conducting 3D-CRT and proton radiotherapy in a dose-volume histogram comparison, the dose of distribution turned out to be low. Consequently, proton radiotherapy is used for protecting the normal tissue, and is used in tumor tissue as a homogenized dose for effective treatment.

  20. [Image-guided radiotherapy: rational, modalities and results].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Louvel, G; Cazoulat, G; Leseur, J; Lafond, C; Lahbabi, K; Chira, C; Lagrange, J-L

    2009-01-01

    The objective of Image-Guided Radiotherapy (IGRT) is to take in account the inter- or/and intrafraction anatomic variations (organ motion and deformations) in order to improve treatment accuracy. The IGRT should therefore translate in a clinical benefit the recent advances in both tumor definition thanks to functional imaging, and dose distribution thanks to intensity modulated radiotherapy. The IGRT enables direct or indirect tumor visualization during radiation delivery. If the tumor position does not correspond with the theoretical location of target derived from planning system, the table is moved. In case of important uncertainties related to target deformation, a new planning can be discussed. IGRT is realized by different types of devices which can vary in principle and as well as in their implementation: from LINAC-integrated-kV (or MV)-Cone Beam CTs to helicoidal tomotherapy, Cyberknife and Novalis low-energy stereoscopic imaging system. These techniques led to a more rational choice of Planning Target Volume. Being recently introduced in practice, the clinical results of this technique are still limited. Nevertheless, until so far, IGRT has showed promising results with reports of minimal acute toxicity. This review describes IGRT for various tumor localizations. The dose delivered by on board imaging should be taken in account. A strong quality control is required for safety and proper prospective evaluation of the clinical benefit of IGRT.

  1. SU-F-303-17: Real Time Dose Calculation of MRI Guided Co-60 Radiotherapy Treatments On Free Breathing Patients, Using a Motion Model and Fast Monte Carlo Dose Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D; O’Connell, D; Lamb, J; Cao, M; Yang, Y; Agazaryan, N; Lee, P; Low, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate real-time dose calculation of free-breathing MRI guided Co−60 treatments, using a motion model and Monte-Carlo dose calculation to accurately account for the interplay between irregular breathing motion and an IMRT delivery. Methods: ViewRay Co-60 dose distributions were optimized on ITVs contoured from free-breathing CT images of lung cancer patients. Each treatment plan was separated into 0.25s segments, accounting for the MLC positions and beam angles at each time point. A voxel-specific motion model derived from multiple fast-helical free-breathing CTs and deformable registration was calculated for each patient. 3D images for every 0.25s of a simulated treatment were generated in real time, here using a bellows signal as a surrogate to accurately account for breathing irregularities. Monte-Carlo dose calculation was performed every 0.25s of the treatment, with the number of histories in each calculation scaled to give an overall 1% statistical uncertainty. Each dose calculation was deformed back to the reference image using the motion model and accumulated. The static and real-time dose calculations were compared. Results: Image generation was performed in real time at 4 frames per second (GPU). Monte-Carlo dose calculation was performed at approximately 1frame per second (CPU), giving a total calculation time of approximately 30 minutes per treatment. Results show both cold- and hot-spots in and around the ITV, and increased dose to contralateral lung as the tumor moves in and out of the beam during treatment. Conclusion: An accurate motion model combined with a fast Monte-Carlo dose calculation allows almost real-time dose calculation of a free-breathing treatment. When combined with sagittal 2D-cine-mode MRI during treatment to update the motion model in real time, this will allow the true delivered dose of a treatment to be calculated, providing a useful tool for adaptive planning and assessing the effectiveness of gated treatments.

  2. Image-Guided Radiotherapy and -Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  3. Image-guided radiotherapy and -brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer.

  4. Low-dose prophylactic craniospinal radiotherapy for intracranial germinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfeld, Gordon O.; Amdur, Robert J. . E-mail: amdurrj@ufl.edu; Schmalfuss, Ilona M.; Morris, Christopher G.; Keole, Sameer R.; Mendenhall, William M.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes of patients with localized intracranial germinoma treated with low-dose craniospinal irradiation (CSI) followed by a boost to the ventricular system and primary site. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one patients had pathologically confirmed intracranial germinoma and no spine metastases. Low-dose CSI was administered in 29 patients: usually 21 Gy of CSI, 9.0 Gy of ventricular boost, and a 19.5-Gy tumor boost, all at 1.5 Gy per fraction. Our neuroradiologist recorded three-dimensional tumor size on magnetic resonance images before, during, and after radiotherapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 7.0 years, 29 of 31 patients (94%) are disease free. One failure had nongerminomatous histology; the initial diagnosis was a sampling error. Of 3 patients who did not receive CSI, 1 died. No patient developed myelopathy, visual deficits, dementia, or skeletal growth problems. In locally controlled patients, tumor response according to magnetic resonance scan was nearly complete within 6 months after radiotherapy. Conclusions: Radiotherapy alone with low-dose prophylactic CSI cures almost all patients with localized intracranial germinoma. Complications are rare when the daily dose of radiotherapy is limited to 1.5 Gy and the total CSI dose to 21 Gy. Patients without a near-complete response to radiotherapy should undergo resection to rule out a nongerminomatous element.

  5. Incidence of Secondary Cancer Development After High-Dose Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Image-Guided Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Housman, Douglas M.; Pei Xin; Alicikus, Zumre; Magsanoc, Juan Martin; Dauer, Lawrence T.; St Germain, Jean; Yamada, Yoshiya; Kollmeier, Marisa; Cox, Brett; Zhang Zhigang

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report the incidence and excess risk of second malignancy (SM) development compared with the general population after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2001, 1,310 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with EBRT (n = 897) or brachytherapy (n = 413). We compared the incidence of SMs in our patients with that of the general population extracted from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data set combined with the 2000 census data. Results: The 10-year likelihood of SM development was 25% after EBRT and 15% after brachytherapy (p = .02). The corresponding 10-year likelihood for in-field SM development in these groups was 4.9% and 1.6% (p = .24). Multivariate analysis showed that EBRT vs. brachytherapy and older age were the only significant predictors for the development of all SMs (p = .037 and p = .030), with a trend for older patients to develop a SM. The increased incidence of SM for EBRT patients was explained by the greater incidence of skin cancer outside the radiation field compared with that after brachytherapy (10.6% and 3.3%, respectively, p = .004). For the EBRT group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate was 1.96% and 5.1% from out-of field cancer, respectively; for in-field SM, the corresponding mortality rates were 0.1% and 0.7%. Among the brachytherapy group, the 5- and 10-year mortality rate related to out-of field SM was 0.8% and 2.7%, respectively. Our observed SM rates after prostate RT were not significantly different from the cancer incidence rates in the general population. Conclusions: Using modern sophisticated treatment techniques, we report low rates of in-field bladder and rectal SM risks after prostate cancer RT. Furthermore, the likelihood of mortality secondary to a SM was unusual. The greater rate of SM observed with EBRT vs. brachytherapy was related to a small, but significantly increased

  6. A review of uncertainties in radiotherapy dose reconstruction and their impacts on dose-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Vũ Bezin, Jérémi; Allodji, Rodrigue S; Mège, Jean-Pierre; Beldjoudi, Guillaume; Saunier, Fleur; Chavaudra, Jean; Deutsch, Eric; de Vathaire, Florent; Bernier, Valérie; Carrie, Christian; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2017-03-20

    Proper understanding of the risk of radiation-induced late effects for patients receiving external photon beam radiotherapy requires the determination of reliable dose-response relationships. Although significant efforts have been devoted to improving dose estimates for the study of late effects, the most often questioned explanatory variable is still the dose. In this work, based on a literature review, we provide an in-depth description of the radiotherapy dose reconstruction process for the study of late effects. In particular, we focus on the identification of the main sources of dose uncertainty involved in this process and summarise their impacts on the dose-response relationship for radiotherapy late effects. We provide a number of recommendations for making progress in estimating the uncertainties in current studies of radiotherapy late effects and reducing these uncertainties in future studies.

  7. Radiotherapy Dose-Volume Effects on Salivary Gland Function

    SciTech Connect

    Deasy, Joseph O.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Marks, Lawrence; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Nam, Jiho; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2010-03-01

    Publications relating parotid dose-volume characteristics to radiotherapy-induced salivary toxicity were reviewed. Late salivary dysfunction has been correlated to the mean parotid gland dose, with recovery occurring with time. Severe xerostomia (defined as long-term salivary function of <25% of baseline) is usually avoided if at least one parotid gland is spared to a mean dose of less than {approx}20 Gy or if both glands are spared to less than {approx}25 Gy (mean dose). For complex, partial-volume RT patterns (e.g., intensity-modulated radiotherapy), each parotid mean dose should be kept as low as possible, consistent with the desired clinical target volume coverage. A lower parotid mean dose usually results in better function. Submandibular gland sparing also significantly decreases the risk of xerostomia. The currently available predictive models are imprecise, and additional study is required to identify more accurate models of xerostomia risk.

  8. Effect of image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy on peripheral non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu-wen; Ren, Juan; Yan, Yan-li; Xue, Chao-fan; Tan, Li; Ma, Xiao-wei

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy and conventional fractionated radiotherapy on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Fifty stage- and age-matched cases with NSCLC were randomly divided into two groups (A and B). There were 23 cases in group A and 27 cases in group B. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and stereotactic radiotherapy were conjugately applied to the patients in group A. Group A patients underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (6–8 Gy/time) three times per week, with a total dose of 64–66 Gy; group B received conventional fractionated radiotherapy, with a total dose of 68–70 Gy five times per week. In group A, 1-year and 2-year local failure survival rate and 1-year local failure-free survival rate were significantly higher than in group B (P<0.05). The local failure rate (P<0.05) and distant metastasis rate (P>0.05) were lower in group A than in group B. The overall survival rate of group A was significantly higher than that of group B (P=0.03), and the survival rate at 1 year was 87% vs 63%, (P<0.05). The median survival time of group A was longer than that of group B. There was no significant difference in the incidence of complications between the two groups (P>0.05). Compared with conventional fractionated radiation therapy, image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in NSCLC received better treatment efficacy and showed good tolerability. PMID:27574441

  9. In vivo skin dose measurement in breast conformal radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Noghreiyan, Atefeh Vejdani; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Jamali, Farideh; Davenport, David

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Accurate skin dose assessment is necessary during breast radiotherapy to assure that the skin dose is below the tolerance level and is sufficient to prevent tumour recurrence. The aim of the current study is to measure the skin dose and to evaluate the geometrical/anatomical parameters that affect it. Material and methods Forty patients were simulated by TIGRT treatment planning system and treated with two tangential fields of 6 MV photon beam. Wedge filters were used to homogenise dose distribution for 11 patients. Skin dose was measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) and the effects of beam incident angle, thickness of irradiated region, and beam entry separation on the skin dose were analysed. Results Average skin dose in treatment course of 50 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV) was 36.65 Gy. The corresponding dose values for patients who were treated with and without wedge filter were 35.65 and 37.20 Gy, respectively. It was determined that the beam angle affected the average skin dose while the thickness of the irradiated region and the beam entry separation did not affect dose. Since the skin dose measured in this study was lower than the amount required to prevent tumour recurrence, application of bolus material in part of the treatment course is suggested for post-mastectomy advanced breast radiotherapy. It is more important when wedge filters are applied to homogenize dose distribution. PMID:27358592

  10. Dose factor entry and display tool for BNCT radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.; Cook, Jeremy L.

    1999-01-01

    A system for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) radiotherapy planning where a biological distribution is calculated using a combination of conversion factors and a previously calculated physical distribution. Conversion factors are presented in a graphical spreadsheet so that a planner can easily view and modify the conversion factors. For radiotherapy in multi-component modalities, such as Fast-Neutron and BNCT, it is necessary to combine each conversion factor component to form an effective dose which is used in radiotherapy planning and evaluation. The Dose Factor Entry and Display System is designed to facilitate planner entry of appropriate conversion factors in a straightforward manner for each component. The effective isodose is then immediately computed and displayed over the appropriate background (e.g. digitized image).

  11. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy.

  12. [CUDA-based fast dose calculation in radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianliang; Liu, Cao; Hou, Qing

    2011-10-01

    Dose calculation plays a key role in treatment planning of radiotherapy. Algorithms for dose calculation require high accuracy and computational efficiency. Finite size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm is a method commonly adopted in the treatment planning system for radiotherapy. However, improvement on its computational efficiency is still desirable for such purpose as real time treatment planning. In this paper, we present an implementation of the FSPB, by which the most time-consuming parts in the algorithm are parallelized and ported on graphic processing unit (GPU). Compared with the FSPB completely running on central processing unit (CPU), the GPU-implemented FSPB can speed up the dose calculation for 25-35 times on a low price GPU (Geforce GT320) and for 55-100 times on a Tesla C1060, indicating that the GPU-implemented FSPB can provide fast enough dose calculations for real-time treatment planning.

  13. Challenges of Using High-Dose Fractionation Radiotherapy in Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying-Chieh; Chiang, Chi-Shiun

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is crucial and substantially contributes to multimodal cancer treatment. The combination of conventional fractionation radiotherapy (CFRT) and systemic therapy has been established as the standard treatment for many cancer types. With advances in linear accelerators and image-guided techniques, high-dose fractionation radiotherapy (HFRT) is increasingly introduced in cancer centers. Clinicians are currently integrating HFRT into multimodality treatment. The shift from CFRT to HFRT reveals different effects on the tumor microenvironment and responses, particularly the immune response. Furthermore, the combination of HFRT and drugs yields different results in different types of tumors or using different treatment schemes. We have reviewed clinical trials and preclinical evidence on the combination of HFRT with drugs, such as chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and immune therapy. Notably, HFRT apparently enhances tumor cell killing and antigen presentation, thus providing opportunities and challenges in treating cancer. PMID:27446811

  14. Actual Dose Variation of Parotid Glands and Spinal Cord for Nasopharyngeal Cancer Patients During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Han Chunhui Chen Yijen; Liu An; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: For intensity-modulated radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal cancer, accurate dose delivery is crucial to the success of treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the significance of daily image-guided patient setup corrections and to quantify the parotid gland volume and dose variations for nasopharyngeal cancer patients using helical tomotherapy megavoltage computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Five nasopharyngeal cancer patients who underwent helical tomotherapy were selected retrospectively. Each patient had received 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Daily megavoltage CT scans were registered with the planning CT images to correct the patient setup errors. Contours of the spinal cord and parotid glands were drawn on the megavoltage CT images at fixed treatment intervals. The actual doses delivered to the critical structures were calculated using the helical tomotherapy Planned Adaptive application. Results: The maximal dose to the spinal cord showed a significant increase and greater variation without daily setup corrections. The significant decrease in the parotid gland volume led to a greater median dose in the later phase of treatment. The average parotid gland volume had decreased from 20.5 to 13.2 cm{sup 3} by the end of treatment. On average, the median dose to the parotid glands was 83 cGy and 145 cGy for the first and the last treatment fractions, respectively. Conclusions: Daily image-guided setup corrections can eliminate significant dose variations to critical structures. Constant monitoring of patient anatomic changes and selective replanning should be used during radiotherapy to avoid critical structure complications.

  15. Data required for testicular dose calculation during radiotherapy of seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Kokona, Georgiana; Varveris, Haralambos; Damilakis, John; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2006-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to provide the required data for the direct calculation of testicular dose resulting from radiotherapy in patients with seminoma. Paraortic (PA) treatment fields and dog-leg (DL) portals including paraortic and ipsilateral pelvic nodes were simulated on a male anthropomorphic phantom equipped with an artificial testicle. Anterior and posterior irradiations were performed for five different PA and DL field dimensions. Dose measurements were carried out using a calibrated ionization chamber. The dependence of testicular dose upon the distance separating the testicle from the treatment volume and upon the tissue thickness at the entrance point of the beam was investigated. A clamshell lead shield was used to reduce testicular dose. The scattered dose to testicle was measured in nine patients using thermoluminescent dosimeters. Phantom and patient exposures were generated with a 6 MV x-ray beam. Linear and nonlinear regression analysis was employed to obtain formulas describing the relation between the radiation dose to an unshielded and/or shielded testicle with the field size and the distance from the inferior field edge. Correction factors showing the variation of testicular dose with the patient thickness along beam axis were found. Bland-Altman statistical analysis showed that testicular dose obtained by the proposed calculation method may differ from the measured dose value by less than 25%. The current study presents a method providing reasonable estimations of testicular dose for individual patients undergoing PA or DL radiotherapy.

  16. Implementation of an analytical model for leakage neutron equivalent dose in a proton radiotherapy planning system.

    PubMed

    Eley, John; Newhauser, Wayne; Homann, Kenneth; Howell, Rebecca; Schneider, Christopher; Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph

    2015-03-11

    Equivalent dose from neutrons produced during proton radiotherapy increases the predicted risk of radiogenic late effects. However, out-of-field neutron dose is not taken into account by commercial proton radiotherapy treatment planning systems. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an analytical model to calculate leakage neutron equivalent dose in a treatment planning system. Passive scattering proton treatment plans were created for a water phantom and for a patient. For both the phantom and patient, the neutron equivalent doses were small but non-negligible and extended far beyond the therapeutic field. The time required for neutron equivalent dose calculation was 1.6 times longer than that required for proton dose calculation, with a total calculation time of less than 1 h on one processor for both treatment plans. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to predict neutron equivalent dose distributions using an analytical dose algorithm for individual patients with irregular surfaces and internal tissue heterogeneities. Eventually, personalized estimates of neutron equivalent dose to organs far from the treatment field may guide clinicians to create treatment plans that reduce the risk of late effects.

  17. Implementation of an Analytical Model for Leakage Neutron Equivalent Dose in a Proton Radiotherapy Planning System

    PubMed Central

    Eley, John; Newhauser, Wayne; Homann, Kenneth; Howell, Rebecca; Schneider, Christopher; Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Equivalent dose from neutrons produced during proton radiotherapy increases the predicted risk of radiogenic late effects. However, out-of-field neutron dose is not taken into account by commercial proton radiotherapy treatment planning systems. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an analytical model to calculate leakage neutron equivalent dose in a treatment planning system. Passive scattering proton treatment plans were created for a water phantom and for a patient. For both the phantom and patient, the neutron equivalent doses were small but non-negligible and extended far beyond the therapeutic field. The time required for neutron equivalent dose calculation was 1.6 times longer than that required for proton dose calculation, with a total calculation time of less than 1 h on one processor for both treatment plans. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to predict neutron equivalent dose distributions using an analytical dose algorithm for individual patients with irregular surfaces and internal tissue heterogeneities. Eventually, personalized estimates of neutron equivalent dose to organs far from the treatment field may guide clinicians to create treatment plans that reduce the risk of late effects. PMID:25768061

  18. Low Dose, Low Energy 3d Image Guidance during Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. J.; Marchant, T.; Amer, A.; Sharrock, P.; Price, P.; Burton, D.

    2006-04-01

    Patient kilo-voltage X-ray cone beam volumetric imaging for radiotherapy was first demonstrated on an Elekta Synergy mega-voltage X-ray linear accelerator. Subsequently low dose, reduced profile reconstruction imaging was shown to be practical for 3D geometric setup registration to pre-treatment planning images without compromising registration accuracy. Reconstruction from X-ray profiles gathered between treatment beam deliveries was also introduced. The innovation of zonal cone beam imaging promises significantly reduced doses to patients and improved soft tissue contrast in the tumour target zone. These developments coincided with the first dynamic 3D monitoring of continuous body topology changes in patients, at the moment of irradiation, using a laser interferometer. They signal the arrival of low dose, low energy 3D image guidance during radiotherapy itself.

  19. Temporal compartmental dosing effects for robotic prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiao, Stephen L.; Sahgal, Arjun; Hu, Weigang; Jabbari, Siavash; Chuang, Cynthia; Descovich, Martina; Hsu, I.-Chow; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Roach, Mack, III; Ma, Lijun

    2011-12-01

    The rate of dose accumulation within a given area of a target volume tends to vary significantly for non-isocentric delivery systems such as Cyberknife stereotactic body radiotherapy. In this study, we investigated whether intra-target temporal dose distributions produce significant variations in the biological equivalent dose. For the study, time courses of ten patients were reconstructed and calculation of a biologically equivalent uniform dose (EUD) was performed using a formula derived from the linear quadratic model (α/β = 3 for prostate cancer cells). The calculated EUD values obtained for the actual patient treatments were then compared with theoretical EUD values for delivering the same physical dose distribution except that the whole target being irradiated continuously (e.g. large-field ‘dose-bathing’ type of delivery). For all the case, the EUDs for the actual treatment delivery were found to correlate strongly with the EUDs for the large-field delivery: a linear correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.98 was obtained and the average EUD for the actual Cyberknife delivery was somewhat higher (5.0 ± 4.7%) than that for the large-field delivery. However, no statistical significance was detected between the two types of delivery (p = 0.21). We concluded that non-isocentric small-field Cyberknife delivery produced consistent biological dosing that tracked well with the constant-dose-rate, large-field-type delivery for prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy.

  20. A New Proton Dose Algorithm for Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chungchi (Chris).

    This algorithm recursively propagates the proton distribution in energy, angle and space at one level in an absorbing medium to another, at slightly greater depth, until all the protons are stopped. The angular transition density describing the proton trajectory is based on Moliere's multiple scattering theory and Vavilov's theory of energy loss along the proton's path increment. These multiple scattering and energy loss distributions are sampled using equal probability spacing to optimize computational speed while maintaining calculational accuracy. Nuclear interactions are accounted for by using a simple exponential expression to describe the loss of protons along a given path increment and the fraction of the original energy retained by the proton is deposited locally. Two levels of testing for the algorithm are provided: (1) Absolute dose comparisons with PTRAN Monte Carlo simulations in homogeneous water media. (2) Modeling of a fixed beam line including the scattering system and range modulator and comparisons with measured data in a homogeneous water phantom. The dose accuracy of this algorithm is shown to be within +/-5% throughout the range of a 200-MeV proton when compared to measurements except in the shoulder region of the lateral profile at the Bragg peak where a dose difference as large as 11% can be found. The numerical algorithm has an adequate spatial accuracy of 3 mm. Measured data as input is not required.

  1. On effective dose for radiotherapy based on doses to nontarget organs and tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Uselmann, Adam J. Thomadsen, Bruce R.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The National Council for Radiation Protection and Measurement (NCRP) published estimates for the collective population dose and the mean effective dose to the population of the United States from medical imaging procedures for 1980/1982 and for 2006. The earlier report ignored the effective dose from radiotherapy and the latter gave a cursory discussion of the topic but again did not include it in the population exposure for various reasons. This paper explains the methodology used to calculate the effective dose in due to radiotherapy procedures in the latter NCRP report and revises the values based on more detailed modeling. Methods: This study calculated the dose to nontarget organs from radiotherapy for reference populations using CT images and published peripheral dose data. Results: Using International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 60 weighting factors, the total effective dose to nontarget organs in radiotherapy patients is estimated as 298 ± 194 mSv per patient, while the U.S. population effective dose is 0.939 ± 0.610 mSv per person, with a collective dose of 283 000 ± 184 000 person Sv per year. Using ICRP 103 weighting factors, the effective dose is 281 ± 183 mSv per patient, 0.887 ± 0.577 mSv per person in the U.S., and 268 000 ± 174 000 person Sv per year. The uncertainty in the calculations is largely governed by variations in patient size, which was accounted for by considering a range of patient sizes and taking the average treatment site to nontarget organ distance. Conclusions: The methods used to estimate the effective doses from radiotherapy used in NCRP Report No. 160 have been explained and the values updated.

  2. Radiotherapy dose calculations in the presence of hip prostheses

    SciTech Connect

    Keall, Paul J.; Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Jeraj, Robert; Mohan, Radhe

    2003-06-30

    The high density and atomic number of hip prostheses for patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy challenge our ability to accurately calculate dose. A new clinical dose calculation algorithm, Monte Carlo, will allow accurate calculation of the radiation transport both within and beyond hip prostheses. The aim of this research was to investigate, for both phantom and patient geometries, the capability of various dose calculation algorithms to yield accurate treatment plans. Dose distributions in phantom and patient geometries with high atomic number prostheses were calculated using Monte Carlo, superposition, pencil beam, and no-heterogeneity correction algorithms. The phantom dose distributions were analyzed by depth dose and dose profile curves. The patient dose distributions were analyzed by isodose curves, dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and tumor control probability/normal tissue complication probability (TCP/NTCP) calculations. Monte Carlo calculations predicted the dose enhancement and reduction at the proximal and distal prosthesis interfaces respectively, whereas superposition and pencil beam calculations did not. However, further from the prosthesis, the differences between the dose calculation algorithms diminished. Treatment plans calculated with superposition showed similar isodose curves, DVHs, and TCP/NTCP as the Monte Carlo plans, except in the bladder, where Monte Carlo predicted a slightly lower dose. Treatment plans calculated with either the pencil beam method or with no heterogeneity correction differed significantly from the Monte Carlo plans.

  3. Optimal radiotherapy dose schedules under parametric uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badri, Hamidreza; Watanabe, Yoichi; Leder, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    We consider the effects of parameter uncertainty on the optimal radiation schedule in the context of the linear-quadratic model. Our interest arises from the observation that if inter-patient variability in normal and tumor tissue radiosensitivity or sparing factor of the organs-at-risk (OAR) are not accounted for during radiation scheduling, the performance of the therapy may be strongly degraded or the OAR may receive a substantially larger dose than the allowable threshold. This paper proposes a stochastic radiation scheduling concept to incorporate inter-patient variability into the scheduling optimization problem. Our method is based on a probabilistic approach, where the model parameters are given by a set of random variables. Our probabilistic formulation ensures that our constraints are satisfied with a given probability, and that our objective function achieves a desired level with a stated probability. We used a variable transformation to reduce the resulting optimization problem to two dimensions. We showed that the optimal solution lies on the boundary of the feasible region and we implemented a branch and bound algorithm to find the global optimal solution. We demonstrated how the configuration of optimal schedules in the presence of uncertainty compares to optimal schedules in the absence of uncertainty (conventional schedule). We observed that in order to protect against the possibility of the model parameters falling into a region where the conventional schedule is no longer feasible, it is required to avoid extremal solutions, i.e. a single large dose or very large total dose delivered over a long period. Finally, we performed numerical experiments in the setting of head and neck tumors including several normal tissues to reveal the effect of parameter uncertainty on optimal schedules and to evaluate the sensitivity of the solutions to the choice of key model parameters.

  4. Out-of-field doses in radiotherapy: Input to epidemiological studies and dose-risk models.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Roger

    2017-04-06

    Out-of-field doses in radiotherapy have been increasingly studied in recent years because of the generally improved survival of patients who have received radiotherapy as part of their treatment for cancer and their subsequent risk of a second malignancy. This short article attempts to identify some current problems, challenges and opportunities for dosimetry developments in this field. Out-of-field doses and derived risk estimates contribute to general knowledge about radiation effects on humans as well as contributing to risk-benefit considerations for the individual patient. It is suggested that for input into epidemiological studies, the complete dose description (i.e. the synthesis of therapy and imaging doses from all the treatment and imaging modalities) is ideally required, although there is currently no common dosimetry framework which easily covers all modalities. A general strategy for out-of-field dose estimation requires development and improvement in several areas including (i) dosimetry in regions of steep dose gradient close to the field edge (ii) experimentally verified analytical and Monte Carlo models for out-of-field doses (iii) the validity of treatment planning system algorithms outside the field edge (iv) dosimetry of critical sub-structures in organs at risk (v) mixed field (including neutron) dosimetry in proton and ion radiotherapy and photoneutron production in high energy photon beams (vi) the most appropriate quantities to use in neutron dosimetry in a radiotherapy context and (vii) simplification of measurement methods in regions distant from the target volume.

  5. Biological effects and equivalent doses in radiotherapy: A software solution

    PubMed Central

    Voyant, Cyril; Julian, Daniel; Roustit, Rudy; Biffi, Katia; Lantieri, Céline

    2013-01-01

    Background The limits of TDF (time, dose, and fractionation) and linear quadratic models have been known for a long time. Medical physicists and physicians are required to provide fast and reliable interpretations regarding delivered doses or any future prescriptions relating to treatment changes. Aim We, therefore, propose a calculation interface under the GNU license to be used for equivalent doses, biological doses, and normal tumor complication probability (Lyman model). Materials and methods The methodology used draws from several sources: the linear-quadratic-linear model of Astrahan, the repopulation effects of Dale, and the prediction of multi-fractionated treatments of Thames. Results and conclusions The results are obtained from an algorithm that minimizes an ad-hoc cost function, and then compared to an equivalent dose computed using standard calculators in seven French radiotherapy centers. PMID:24936319

  6. Human Collagen Injections to Reduce Rectal Dose During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, William R.; Hosford, Charles C.; Schultz, Steven E.

    2012-04-01

    Objectives: The continuing search for interventions, which address the incidence and grade of rectal toxicities associated with radiation treatment of prostate cancer, is a major concern. We are reporting an investigational trial using human collagen to increase the distance between the prostate and anterior rectal wall, thereby decreasing the radiation dose to the rectum. Methods: This is a pilot study evaluating the use of human collagen as a displacing agent for the rectal wall injected before starting a course of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Using a transperineal approach, 20 mL of human collagen was injected into the perirectal space in an outpatient setting. Computerized IMRT plans were performed pre- and postcollagen injection, and after a patient completed their radiotherapy, to determine radiation dose reduction to the rectum associated with the collagen injection. Computed tomography scans were performed 6 months and 12 months after completing their radiotherapy to evaluate absorption rate of the collagen. All patients were treated with IMRT to a dose of 75.6 Gy to the prostate. Results: Eleven patients were enrolled into the study. The injection of human collagen in the outpatient setting was well tolerated. The mean separation between the prostate and anterior rectum was 12.7 mm. The mean reduction in dose to the anterior rectal wall was 50%. All men denied any rectal symptoms during the study. Conclusions: The transperineal injection of human collagen for the purpose of tissue displacement is well tolerated in the outpatient setting. The increased separation between the prostate and rectum resulted in a significant decrease in radiation dose to the rectum while receiving IMRT and was associated with no rectal toxicities.

  7. Selecting radiotherapy dose distributions by means of constrained optimization problems.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, J C L; Buttazzo, G; García-Archilla, B; Herrero, M A; Núñez, L

    2014-05-01

    The main steps in planning radiotherapy consist in selecting for any patient diagnosed with a solid tumor (i) a prescribed radiation dose on the tumor, (ii) bounds on the radiation side effects on nearby organs at risk and (iii) a fractionation scheme specifying the number and frequency of therapeutic sessions during treatment. The goal of any radiotherapy treatment is to deliver on the tumor a radiation dose as close as possible to that selected in (i), while at the same time conforming to the constraints prescribed in (ii). To this day, considerable uncertainties remain concerning the best manner in which such issues should be addressed. In particular, the choice of a prescription radiation dose is mostly based on clinical experience accumulated on the particular type of tumor considered, without any direct reference to quantitative radiobiological assessment. Interestingly, mathematical models for the effect of radiation on biological matter have existed for quite some time, and are widely acknowledged by clinicians. However, the difficulty to obtain accurate in vivo measurements of the radiobiological parameters involved has severely restricted their direct application in current clinical practice.In this work, we first propose a mathematical model to select radiation dose distributions as solutions (minimizers) of suitable variational problems, under the assumption that key radiobiological parameters for tumors and organs at risk involved are known. Second, by analyzing the dependence of such solutions on the parameters involved, we then discuss the manner in which the use of those minimizers can improve current decision-making processes to select clinical dosimetries when (as is generally the case) only partial information on model radiosensitivity parameters is available. A comparison of the proposed radiation dose distributions with those actually delivered in a number of clinical cases strongly suggests that solutions of our mathematical model can be

  8. Image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy in inoperable endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Petsuksiri, J; Chansilpa, Y; Hoskin, P J

    2014-01-01

    Inoperable endometrial cancer may be treated with curative aim using radical radiotherapy alone. The radiation techniques are external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) alone, EBRT plus brachytherapy and brachytherapy alone. Recently, high-dose-rate brachytherapy has been used instead of low-dose-rate brachytherapy. Image-guided brachytherapy enables sufficient coverage of tumour and reduction of dose to the organs at risk, thus increasing the therapeutic ratio of treatment. Local control rates with three-dimensional brachytherapy appear better than with conventional techniques (about 90–100% and 70–90%, respectively). PMID:24807067

  9. High Dose Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Adults with Glioblastomas

    SciTech Connect

    Koukourakis, Michael; Scarlatos, John; Yiannakakis, Dimitrios; Kordiolis, Nicolas; Zambatis, Haralambos; Sotiropoulou, Anastasia

    2015-01-15

    From 1989 to 1991, 27 patients with glioblastoma multiforme or anaplastic astrocytoma of the brain were treated with radiotherapy. Fifteen of twenty-seven patients were treated through limited volume fields, with a thrice-a-day (1.1 Gy/f) or twice-a-day (1.4 Gy/f) hyperfractionated regimen to a total physical dose of 62–92 Gy (median dose 76 Gy). The remaining 12 were treated with whole brain irradiation (40 Gy of total conventionally fractionated dose) and a localised boost to a total dose of 60 Gy. The hyperfractionated regimen was well tolerated and there was no sign of increased brain oedema to indicate the insertion of a split. Of six patients who received a NTD10 (normalised total dose for α/β =10) higher than 71 Gy, five showed CR (83% CR rate) versus three of 21 patients who received a lower NTD10 (14% CR rate). For 13 patients who received a NTD10 higher than 66 Gy, the 18-months survival was 61% (8/13) versus 28% (4/14) for 14 patients who received a NTD10 less than 66 Gy. As far as the late morbidity is concerned, of six patients treated with 76-92 Gy of physical dose, none died because of radiation-induced brain necrosis within 18-42 months of follow-up, and three of them are without evidence of disease 18-31 months after the end of radiation treatment. None of our 15 patients who received less than whole brain irradiation relapsed outside the radiation portals. The present study strongly suggests the use of limited volume hyperfractionated radiotherapy schemes, so as to increase the local tumor dose (NTD10) to values higher than 79 Gy, at the same time keeping the NTD2 (NTD for α/β = 2) below 68 Gy.

  10. Personalized estimation of dose to red bone marrow and the associated leukaemia risk attributable to pelvic kilo-voltage cone beam computed tomography scans in image-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yibao; Yan, Yulong; Nath, Ravinder; Bao, Shanglian; Deng, Jun

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the imaging dose to red bone marrow (RBM) and the associated leukaemia risks attributable to pelvic kilo-voltage cone beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) scans in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). The RBM doses of 42 patients (age 2.7-86.4 years) were calculated using Monte Carlo simulations. The trabecular spongiosa was segmented to substitute RBM rather than the whole bone. Quantitative correlations between anthropometric variables such as age, physical bone density (PBD) and RBM dose were established. Personalized leukaemia risk was evaluated using an improved Boice model which included the age-associated RBM involvement. An incremental leukaemia risk of 29%-82% (mean = 45%) was found to be associated with 40 pelvic kVCBCT scans in the subject group used in a typical external beam radiation therapy course. Higher risks were observed in children. Due to the enhanced photoelectric effect in high atomic number materials, PBD was observed to strongly affect the RBM dose. Considerable overestimations (9%-42%, mean = 28%) were observed if the whole bone doses were used as surrogates of RBM doses. The personalized estimation of RBM dose and associated leukaemia risk caused by pelvic kVCBCT scans is clinically feasible with the proposed empirical models. Higher radiogenic cancer risks are associated with repeated kVCBCT scans in IGRT of cancer patients, especially children.

  11. Surface-Constrained Nonrigid Registration for Dose Monitoring in Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Cazoulat, Guillaume; Simon, Antoine; Dumenil, Aurelien; Gnep, Khemara; De Crevoisier, Renaud; Acosta-Tamayo, Oascar; Haigron, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    When no means are available for directly measuring 3D dose distribution, online imaging could be employed for dose monitoring in image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). This paper addresses the issue of cumulative dose estimation from CBCT images in prostate cancer radiotherapy cases. It focuses on the dose received by the surfaces of the main organs at risk, namely the bladder and rectum. We have proposed both a surface-constrained dose accumulation approach and its extensive evaluation. Our approach relied on the nonrigid registration (NRR) of daily acquired CBCT images on the planning CT image. This proposed NRR method was based on a Demons-like algorithm, implemented in combination with mutual information metric. It allowed for different levels of geometrical constraints to be considered, ensuring a better point to point correspondence, especially when large deformations occurred, or in high dose gradient areas. The three following implementations of the NRR approach with different levels of constraints were considered: (i) full iconic NRR; (ii) iconic NRR constrained with landmarks defined interactively at the surface of organs (LCNRR); (iii) NRR constrained with full delineation of organs (DBNRR). To assess dose accumulation accuracy, we designed a numerical phantom based on finite-element modeling and image simulation. This model provided known deformations of organs and a reference accumulated dose. The methods were assessed on both the numerical phantom and real patient data in order to quantify uncertainties in terms of dose accumulation. The LCNRR method appeared to constitute a good compromise between dose monitoring capability and compatibility with clinical practice constraints (low interactivity level). PMID:24710827

  12. Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: evaluation of PTV coverage and dose conformity.

    PubMed

    Hädinger, Ulrich; Thiele, Wibke; Wulf, Jörn

    2002-01-01

    During the past few years the concept of cranial stereotactic radiotherapy has been successfully extended to extracranial tumoral targets. In our department, hypofractionated treatment of tumours in lung, liver, abdomen, and pelvis is performed in the Stereotactic Body Frame (ELEKTA Instrument AB) since 1997. We present the evaluation of 63 consecutively treated targets (22 lung, 21 liver, 20 abdomen/pelvis) in 58 patients with respect to dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) as well as conformity of the dose distribution. The mean PTV coverage was found to be 96.3% +/- 2.3% (lung), 95.0% +/- 4.5% (liver), and 92.1% +/- 5.2% (abdomen/pelvis). For the so-called conformation number we obtained values of 0.73 +/- 0.09 (lung), 0.77 +/- 0.10 (liver), and 0.70 +/- 0.08 (abdomen/pelvis). The results show that highly conformal treatment techniques can be applied also in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. This is primarily due to the relatively simple geometrical shape of most of the targets. Especially lung and liver targets turned out to be approximately spherically/cylindrically shaped, so that the dose distribution can be easily tailored by rotational fields.

  13. Analytical modelling of regional radiotherapy dose response of lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangkyu; Stroian, Gabriela; Kopek, Neil; AlBahhar, Mahmood; Seuntjens, Jan; El Naqa, Issam

    2012-06-01

    Knowledge of the dose-response of radiation-induced lung disease (RILD) is necessary for optimization of radiotherapy (RT) treatment plans involving thoracic cavity irradiation. This study models the time-dependent relationship between local radiation dose and post-treatment lung tissue damage measured by computed tomography (CT) imaging. Fifty-eight follow-up diagnostic CT scans from 21 non-small-cell lung cancer patients were examined. The extent of RILD was segmented on the follow-up CT images based on the increase of physical density relative to the pre-treatment CT image. The segmented RILD was locally correlated with dose distribution calculated by analytical anisotropic algorithm and the Monte Carlo method to generate the corresponding dose-response curves. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model was fit to the dose-response curves at six post-RT time periods, and temporal change in the LKB parameters was recorded. In this study, we observed significant correlation between the probability of lung tissue damage and the local dose for 96% of the follow-up studies. Dose-injury correlation at the first three months after RT was significantly different from later follow-up periods in terms of steepness and threshold dose as estimated from the LKB model. Dependence of dose response on superior-inferior tumour position was also observed. The time-dependent analytical modelling of RILD might provide better understanding of the long-term behaviour of the disease and could potentially be applied to improve inverse treatment planning optimization.

  14. Comparison of image-guided radiotherapy technologies for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Das, Satya; Liu, Tian; Jani, Ashesh B; Rossi, Peter; Shelton, Joseph; Shi, Zheng; Khan, Mohammad K

    2014-12-01

    Radiation oncology has seen a rapid increase in the use of image-guided radiotherapy technology (IGRT) for prostate cancer patients over the past decade. The increase in the use of IGRT is largely driven by the fact that these technologies have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration and are now readily reimbursed by many insurance companies. Prostate cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) now have access to a wide variety of IGRTs that can cost anywhere from $500,000 or more in upfront costs, and can add anywhere from 10 to 15 thousand dollars to a course of IMRT. Some of the IGRT options include daily cone beam computed tomography, ultrasound, orthogonal x-ray units using implanted fiducial markers, implanted radiofrequency markers with the ability to localize and track prostate motion during radiotherapy (Calypso 4D), and cine magnetic resonance imaging. Although these technologies add to the cost of IMRT, there is little direct comparative effectiveness data to help patients, physicians, and policy makers decide if one technology is better than another. In our critical review, the first of its kind, we summarize the advantages, disadvantages, and the limitations of each technology. We also provide an overview of existing literature as it pertains to the comparison of existing IGRTs. Lastly, we provide insights about the need for future outcomes research that may have a significant impact on health policies as it comes to reimbursement in the modern era.

  15. Precision, high dose radiotherapy: helium ion treatment of uveal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, W.M.; Char, D.H.; Quivey, J.M.; Castro, J.R.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Collier, J.M.; Cartigny, A.; Blakely, E.A.; Lyman, J.T.; Zink, S.R.

    1985-02-01

    The authors report on 75 patients with uveal melanoma who were treated by placing the Bragg peak of a helium ion beam over the tumor volume. The technique localizes the high dose region very tightly around the tumor volume. This allows critical structures, such as the optic disc and the macula, to be excluded from the high dose region as long as they are 3 to 4 mm away from the edge of the tumor. Careful attention to tumor localization, treatment planning, patient immobilization and treatment verification is required. With a mean follow-up of 22 months (3 to 60 months) the authors have had only five patients with a local recurrence, all of whom were salvaged with another treatment. Pretreatment visual acuity has generally been preserved as long as the tumor edge is at least 4 mm away from the macula and optic disc. The only serious complication to date has been an 18% incidence of neovascular glaucoma in the patients treated at our highest dose level. Clinical results and details of the technique are presented to illustrate potential clinical precision in administering high dose radiotherapy with charged particles such as helium ions or protons.

  16. Two non-parametric methods for derivation of constraints from radiotherapy dose-histogram data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, M. A.; Gulliford, S. L.; Buettner, F.; Foo, K.; Haworth, A.; Kennedy, A.; Joseph, D. J.; Denham, J. W.

    2014-07-01

    Dose constraints based on histograms provide a convenient and widely-used method for informing and guiding radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods of derivation of such constraints are often poorly described. Two non-parametric methods for derivation of constraints are described and investigated in the context of determination of dose-specific cut-points—values of the free parameter (e.g., percentage volume of the irradiated organ) which best reflect resulting changes in complication incidence. A method based on receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and one based on a maximally-selected standardized rank sum are described and compared using rectal toxicity data from a prostate radiotherapy trial. Multiple test corrections are applied using a free step-down resampling algorithm, which accounts for the large number of tests undertaken to search for optimal cut-points and the inherent correlation between dose-histogram points. Both methods provide consistent significant cut-point values, with the rank sum method displaying some sensitivity to the underlying data. The ROC method is simple to implement and can utilize a complication atlas, though an advantage of the rank sum method is the ability to incorporate all complication grades without the need for grade dichotomization.

  17. Kilovoltage Imaging Doses in the Radiotherapy of Pediatric Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jun; Chen Zhe; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Nath, Ravinder

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate doses induced by kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) to pediatric cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy, as well as strategies for dose reduction. Methods and Materials: An EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose deposition due to kVCBCT on 4 pediatric cancer patients. Absorbed doses to various organs were analyzed for both half-fan and full-fan modes. Clinical conditions, such as distance from organ at risk (OAR) to CBCT field border, kV peak energy, and testicular shielding, were studied. Results: The mean doses induced by one CBCT scan operated at 125 kV in half-fan mode to testes, liver, kidneys, femoral heads, spinal cord, brain, eyes, lens, and optical nerves were 2.9, 4.7, 7.7, 10.5, 8.8, 7.6, 7.7, 7.8, and 7.2 cGy, respectively. Increasing the distances from OARs to CBCT field border greatly reduced the doses to OARs, ranging from 33% reduction for spinal cord to 2300% reduction for testes. As photon beam energy increased from 60 to 125 kV, the dose increase due to kVCBCT ranged from 170% for lens to 460% for brain and spinal cord. A testicular shielding made of 1-cm cerrobend could reduce CBCT doses down to 31%, 51%, 68%, and 82%, respectively, for 60, 80, 100, and 125 kV when the testes lay within the CBCT field. Conclusions: Generally speaking, kVCBCT deposits much larger doses to critical structures in children than in adults, usually by a factor of 2 to 3. Increasing the distances from OARs to CBCT field border greatly reduces doses to OARs. Depending on OARs, kVCBCT-induced doses increase linearly or exponentially with photon beam energy. Testicular shielding works more efficiently at lower kV energies. On the basis of our study, it is essential to choose an appropriate scanning protocol when kVCBCT is applied to pediatric cancer patients routinely.

  18. Large Cohort Dose-Volume Response Analysis of Parotid Gland Function After Radiotherapy: Intensity-Modulated Versus Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dijkema, Tim Terhaard, Chris H.J.; Roesink, Judith M.; Braam, Petra M.; Gils, Carla H. van; Moerland, Marinus A.; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To compare parotid gland dose-volume response relationships in a large cohort of patients treated with intensity-modulated (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Methods and materials: A total of 221 patients (64 treated with IMRT, 157 with CRT) with various head-and-neck malignancies were prospectively evaluated. The distribution of tumor subsites in both groups was unbalanced. Stimulated parotid flow rates were measured before and 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year after radiotherapy. Parotid gland dose-volume histograms were derived from computed tomography-based treatment planning. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model proposed by Lyman was fit to the data. A complication was defined as stimulated parotid flow ratio <25% of the pretreatment flow rate. The relative risk of complications was determined for IMRT vs. CRT and adjusted for the mean parotid gland dose using Poisson regression modeling. Results: One year after radiotherapy, NTCP curves for IMRT and CRT were comparable with a TD{sub 50} (uniform dose leading to a 50% complication probability) of 38 and 40 Gy, respectively. Until 6 months after RT, corrected for mean dose, different complication probabilities existed for IMRT vs. CRT. The relative risk of a complication for IMRT vs. CRT after 6 weeks was 1.42 (95% CI 1.21-1.67), after 6 months 1.41 (95% CI; 1.12-1.77), and at 1 year 1.21 (95% CI 0.87-1.68), after correcting for mean dose. Conclusions: One year after radiotherapy, no difference existed in the mean dose-based NTCP curves for IMRT and CRT. Early after radiotherapy (up to 6 months) mean dose based (Lyman) models failed to fully describe the effects of radiotherapy on the parotid glands.

  19. Surface and superficial dose dosimetric verification for postmastectomy radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shiau, An-Cheng; Chiu, Min-Chi; Chen, Tung-Ho; Chiou, Jeng-Fong; Shueng, Pei-Wei; Chen, Shang-Wen; Chen, Wei-Li; Kuan, Wei-Peng

    2012-01-01

    In patients given postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT), the chest wall is a very thin layer of soft tissue with a low-density lung tissue behind. Chest wall treated in this situation with a high-energy photon beam presents a high dosimetric uncertainty region for both calculation and measurement. The purpose of this study was to measure and to evaluate the surface and superficial doses for patients requiring PMRT with different treatment techniques. An elliptic cylinder cork and superflab boluses were used to simulate the lung and the chest wall, respectively. Sets of computed tomography (CT) images with different chest wall thicknesses were acquired for the study phantom. Hypothetical clinical target volumes (CTVs) were outlined and modified to fit a margin of 1-3 mm, depending on the chest wall thickness, away from the surface for the sets of CT images. The planning target volume (PTV) was initially created by expanding an isotropic 3-mm margin from the CTV, and then a margin of 3 mm was shrunk from the phantom surface to avoid artifact-driven results in the beam-let intensity. Treatment techniques using a pair of tangential wedged fields (TWFs) and 4-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were designed with a prescribed fraction dose (D{sub p}) of 180 cGy. Superficial dose profiles around the phantom circumference at depths of 0, 1, 2, 3, and 5 mm were obtained for each treatment technique using radiochromic external beam therapy (EBT) films. EBT film exhibits good characteristics for dose measurements in the buildup region. Underdoses at the median and lateral regions of the TWF plans were shown. The dose profiles at shallow depths for the TWF plans show a dose buildup about 3 mm at the median and lateral tangential incident regions with a surface dose of about 52% of D{sub p}. The dose was gradually increased toward the most obliquely tangential angle with a maximum dose of about 118% of D{sub p.} Dose profiles were more uniform in the PTV region for

  20. Monte Carlo Study of Radiation Dose Enhancement by Gadolinium in Megavoltage and High Dose Rate Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Daniel G.; Feygelman, Vladimir; Moros, Eduardo G.; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey G.

    2014-01-01

    MRI is often used in tumor localization for radiotherapy treatment planning, with gadolinium (Gd)-containing materials often introduced as a contrast agent. Motexafin gadolinium is a novel radiosensitizer currently being studied in clinical trials. The nanoparticle technologies can target tumors with high concentration of high-Z materials. This Monte Carlo study is the first detailed quantitative investigation of high-Z material Gd-induced dose enhancement in megavoltage external beam photon therapy. BEAMnrc, a radiotherapy Monte Carlo simulation package, was used to calculate dose enhancement as a function of Gd concentration. Published phase space files for the TrueBeam flattening filter free (FFF) and conventional flattened 6MV photon beams were used. High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with Ir-192 source was also investigated as a reference. The energy spectra difference caused a dose enhancement difference between the two beams. Since the Ir-192 photons have lower energy yet, the photoelectric effect in the presence of Gd leads to even higher dose enhancement in HDR. At depth of 1.8 cm, the percent mean dose enhancement for the FFF beam was 0.38±0.12, 1.39±0.21, 2.51±0.34, 3.59±0.26, and 4.59±0.34 for Gd concentrations of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/mL, respectively. The corresponding values for the flattened beam were 0.09±0.14, 0.50±0.28, 1.19±0.29, 1.68±0.39, and 2.34±0.24. For Ir-192 with direct contact, the enhanced were 0.50±0.14, 2.79±0.17, 5.49±0.12, 8.19±0.14, and 10.80±0.13. Gd-containing materials used in MRI as contrast agents can also potentially serve as radiosensitizers in radiotherapy. This study demonstrates that Gd can be used to enhance radiation dose in target volumes not only in HDR brachytherapy, but also in 6 MV FFF external beam radiotherapy, but higher than the currently used clinical concentration (>5 mg/mL) would be needed. PMID:25275550

  1. Application of EPR dosimetry in bone for ex vivo measurements of doses in radiotherapy patients.

    PubMed

    Krefft, K; Drogoszewska, B; Kaminska, J; Juniewicz, M; Wołąkiewicz, G; Jakacka, I; Ciesielski, B

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, bone samples from three patients treated in radiotherapy facilities in Poland were used for the determination of doses absorbed during radiotherapy. The samples were obtained during surgical treatments of patients performed due to medical indications. For the purpose of retrospective dosimetry, sensitivity of the radiation-induced EPR signal was individually calibrated in the samples by re-irradiation of the samples with known doses. The doses reconstructed in bones extracted within 6 months after irradiation were consistent with those calculated by treatment planning systems. The dose reconstructed in the bone removed 6 y after radiotherapy was ∼14% lower than the calculated one.

  2. Equivalent dose and effective dose from stray radiation during passively scattered proton radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontenot, Jonas; Taddei, Phillip; Zheng, Yuanshui; Mirkovic, Dragan; Jordan, Thomas; Newhauser, Wayne

    2008-03-01

    Proton therapy reduces the integral therapeutic dose required for local control in prostate patients compared to intensity-modulated radiotherapy. One proposed benefit of this reduction is an associated decrease in the incidence of radiogenic secondary cancers. However, patients are also exposed to stray radiation during the course of treatment. The purpose of this study was to quantify the stray radiation dose received by patients during proton therapy for prostate cancer. Using a Monte Carlo model of a proton therapy nozzle and a computerized anthropomorphic phantom, we determined that the effective dose from stray radiation per therapeutic dose (E/D) for a typical prostate patient was approximately 5.5 mSv Gy-1. Sensitivity analysis revealed that E/D varied by ±30% over the interval of treatment parameter values used for proton therapy of the prostate. Equivalent doses per therapeutic dose (HT/D) in specific organs at risk were found to decrease with distance from the isocenter, with a maximum of 12 mSv Gy-1 in the organ closest to the treatment volume (bladder) and 1.9 mSv Gy-1 in the furthest (esophagus). Neutrons created in the nozzle predominated effective dose, though neutrons created in the patient contributed substantially to the equivalent dose in organs near the proton field. Photons contributed less than 15% to equivalent doses.

  3. Image-Guided Intensity-Modulated Photon Radiotherapy Using Multifractionated Regimen to Paraspinal Chordomas and Rare Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Terezakis, Stephanie A. Lovelock, D. Michael; Bilsky, Mark H.; Hunt, Margaret A.; Zatcky, Joan N.P.; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy enables delivery of high-dose radiation to tumors close to the spinal cord. We report our experience with multifractionated regimens using image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy to treat gross paraspinal disease to doses beyond cord tolerance. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of 27 consecutive patients with partially resected or unresectable paraspinal tumors irradiated to >5,300 cGy in standard fractionation. Results: The median follow-up was 17.4 months (range, 2.1-47.3). Eighteen sarcomas, seven chordomas, and two ependymomas were treated. The median dose to the planning target volume was 6,600 cGy (range, 5,396-7,080) in 180- or 200-cGy fractions. The median planning target volume was 164 cm{sup 3} (range, 29-1,116). Seven patients developed recurrence at the treatment site (26%), and 6 of these patients had high-grade tumors. Three patients with recurrence had metastatic disease at the time of radiotherapy. The 2-year local control rate was 65%, and the 2-year overall survival rate was 79%. Of the 5 patients who died, 4 had metastatic disease at death. Twenty-three patients (84%) reported either no pain or improved pain at the last follow-up visit. Sixteen patients discontinued narcotic use after treatment (62.5%). Twenty-three patients (89%) had a stable or improved American Spine Injury Association score at the last follow-up visit. No patient experienced radiation-induced myelopathy. Conclusions: The dose to paraspinal tumors has traditionally been limited to respect cord tolerance. With image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy, greater doses of radiation delivered in multiple fractions can be prescribed with excellent target coverage, effective palliation, and acceptable toxicity and local control.

  4. Intra-fraction dose delivery timing during stereotactic radiotherapy can influence the radiobiological effect

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Martin J.; Lin, Peck-Sun; Ozhasoglu, Cihat

    2007-02-15

    The sequence of incremental dose delivery during a radiotherapy fraction can potentially influence the radiobiological effect. This would be most noticeable during the long fractions characteristic of hypo-fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery. We demonstrate here the spatio-temporal variation of dose delivery by the CyberKnife to a lung tumor and propose strategies to reduce and/or correct for any resultant dose-time cytotoxic effects.

  5. The CNAO dose delivery system for modulated scanning ion beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Giordanengo, S.; Marchetto, F.; Garella, M. A.; Donetti, M.; Bourhaleb, F.; Monaco, V.; Hosseini, M. A.; Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R.; Cirio, R.; Ciocca, M.; Mirandola, A.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: This paper describes the system for the dose delivery currently used at the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO) for ion beam modulated scanning radiotherapy. Methods: CNAO Foundation, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and University of Torino have designed, built, and commissioned a dose delivery system (DDS) to monitor and guide ion beams accelerated by a dedicated synchrotron and to distribute the dose with a full 3D scanning technique. Protons and carbon ions are provided for a wide range of energies in order to cover a sizable span of treatment depths. The target volume, segmented in several layers orthogonally to the beam direction, is irradiated by thousands of pencil beams which must be steered and held to the prescribed positions until the prescribed number of particles has been delivered. For the CNAO beam lines, these operations are performed by the DDS. The main components of this system are two independent beam monitoring detectors, called BOX1 and BOX2, interfaced with two control systems performing the tasks of real-time fast and slow control, and connected to the scanning magnets and the beam chopper. As a reaction to any condition leading to a potential hazard, a DDS interlock signal is sent to the patient interlock system which immediately stops the irradiation. The essential tasks and operations performed by the DDS are described following the data flow from the treatment planning system through the end of the treatment delivery. Results: The ability of the DDS to guarantee a safe and accurate treatment was validated during the commissioning phase by means of checks of the charge collection efficiency, gain uniformity of the chambers, and 2D dose distribution homogeneity and stability. A high level of reliability and robustness has been proven by three years of system activity needing rarely more than regular maintenance and working with 100% uptime. Four identical and independent DDS devices have been tested showing

  6. Dose enhancement in radiotherapy of small lung tumors using inline magnetic fields: A Monte Carlo based planning study

    SciTech Connect

    Oborn, B. M.; Ge, Y.; Hardcastle, N.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Keall, P. J.

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To report on significant dose enhancement effects caused by magnetic fields aligned parallel to 6 MV photon beam radiotherapy of small lung tumors. Findings are applicable to future inline MRI-guided radiotherapy systems. Methods: A total of eight clinical lung tumor cases were recalculated using Monte Carlo methods, and external magnetic fields of 0.5, 1.0, and 3 T were included to observe the impact on dose to the planning target volume (PTV) and gross tumor volume (GTV). Three plans were 6 MV 3D-CRT plans while 6 were 6 MV IMRT. The GTV’s ranged from 0.8 to 16 cm{sup 3}, while the PTV’s ranged from 1 to 59 cm{sup 3}. In addition, the dose changes in a 30 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom were investigated for small beams. The central 20 cm of this phantom contained either water or lung density insert. Results: For single beams, an inline magnetic field of 1 T has a small impact in lung dose distributions by reducing the lateral scatter of secondary electrons, resulting in a small dose increase along the beam. Superposition of multiple small beams leads to significant dose enhancements. Clinically, this process occurs in the lung tissue typically surrounding the GTV, resulting in increases to the D{sub 98%} (PTV). Two isolated tumors with very small PTVs (3 and 6 cm{sup 3}) showed increases in D{sub 98%} of 23% and 22%. Larger PTVs of 13, 26, and 59 cm{sup 3} had increases of 9%, 6%, and 4%, describing a natural fall-off in enhancement with increasing PTV size. However, three PTVs bounded to the lung wall showed no significant increase, due to lack of dose enhancement in the denser PTV volume. In general, at 0.5 T, the GTV mean dose enhancement is around 60% lower than that at 1 T, while at 3 T, it is 5%–60% higher than 1 T. Conclusions: Monte Carlo methods have described significant and predictable dose enhancement effects in small lung tumor plans for 6 MV radiotherapy when an external inline magnetic field is included. Results of this study

  7. An image guided small animal stereotactic radiotherapy system

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Hao; Udayakumar, Thirupandiyur S.; Johnson, Perry B.; Dogan, Nesrin; Pollack, Alan; Yang, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Small animal radiotherapy studies should be performed preferably on irradiators capable of focal tumor irradiation and healthy tissue sparing. In this study, an image guided small animal arc radiation treatment system (iSMAART) was developed which can achieve highly precise radiation targeting through the utilization of onboard cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. The iSMAART employs a unique imaging and radiation geometry where animals are positioned upright. It consists of a stationary x-ray tube, a stationary flat panel detector, and a rotatable and translational animal stage. System performance was evaluated in regards to imaging, image guidance, animal positioning, and radiation targeting using phantoms and tumor bearing animals. The onboard CBCT achieved good signal, contrast, and sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The iodine contrast CBCT accurately delineated orthotopic prostate tumors. Animal positioning was evaluated with ∼0.3 mm vertical displacement along superior-inferior direction. The overall targeting precision was within 0.4 mm. Stereotactic radiation beams conformal to tumor targets can be precisely delivered from multiple angles surrounding the animal. The iSMAART allows radiobiology labs to utilize an image guided precision radiation technique that can focally irradiate tumors while sparing healthy tissues at an affordable cost. PMID:26958942

  8. Development of an integral system test for image-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rowbottom, Carl G.; Jaffray, David A.

    2004-12-01

    An integral system test was developed to determine the precision and accuracy of an image-guided radiotherapy system involving an x-ray volumetric imaging device mounted onto the gantry of a medical linear accelerator. The test was designed to interrogate the system components as a whole without deconstructing the individual sources of error. The integral system test was based on the imaging of an unambiguous stationary object in the treatment position and so took no account of patient related errors. An array of micromosfets interspersed within slices of a tissue equivalent phantom was developed as an imaging test object. It has previously been demonstrated that micromosfets have a very small active volume, are clearly visible on CT images, and produce no significant artifacts. In addition, the active volume of the micromosfets can be accurately inferred radiographically via the use of x-ray volumetric imaging. X-ray volumetric imaging was performed with the object in the treatment position, then reconstructed and transferred to a treatment planning system. With the phantom remaining undisturbed in the treatment position a series of treatment fields were designed to produce a series of fields with the leaf edge sweeping across active volume of the micromosfets. The fields were delivered with a micro-MLC to dosimetrically verify the position of the mosfets and compare with dose values produced by the treatment planning system. It was demonstrated that the systematic gantry flex could be accounted for by the imaging and delivery systems. For the delivery system small changes in leaf positions of the micro-MLC were required to account for gantry flex. The position of the micromosfets determined by the 50% dose position was on average (0.15{+-}0.13) mm away from the position determined radiographically for the x and y axes, and (1.0{+-}0.14) mm for the z axis. This implies that a margin of approximately 0.2 mm in the axial plane and 1.0 mm in the superior

  9. Evaluation of volume change in rectum and bladder during application of image-guided radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, J. A.; Rojas, J. I.

    2016-07-01

    All prostate cancer patients from Centro Médico Radioterapia Siglo XXI receive Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). This therapy uses image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with the Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). This study compares the planned dose in the reference CT image against the delivered dose recalculate in the CBCT image. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the anatomic changes and related dosimetric effect based on weekly CBCT directly for patients with prostate cancer undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment. The collected data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA.

  10. Equivalent normalized total dose estimates in cyberknife radiotherapy dose delivery in prostate cancer hypofractionation regimens.

    PubMed

    Sudahar, H; Kurup, P G G; Murali, V; Mahadev, P; Velmurugan, J

    2012-04-01

    As the α/β value of prostate is very small and lower than the surrounding critical organs, hypofractionated radiotherapy became a vital mode of treatment of prostate cancer. Cyberknife (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA) treatment for localized prostate cancer is performed in hypofractionated dose regimen alone. Effective dose escalation in the hypofractionated regimen can be estimated if the corresponding conventional 2 Gy per fraction equivalent normalized total dose (NTD) distribution is known. The present study aims to analyze the hypofractionated dose distribution of localized prostate cancer in terms of equivalent NTD. Randomly selected 12 localized prostate cases treated in cyberknife with a dose regimen of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions were considered. The 2 Gy per fraction equivalent NTDs were calculated using the formula derived from the linear quadratic (LQ) model. Dose distributions were analyzed with the corresponding NTDs. The conformity index for the prescribed target dose of 36.25 Gy equivalent to the NTD dose of 90.63 Gy (α/β = 1.5) or 74.31 Gy (α/β = 3) was ranging between 1.15 and 1.73 with a mean value of 1.32 ± 0.15. The D5% of the target was 111.41 ± 8.66 Gy for α/β = 1.5 and 90.15 ± 6.57 Gy for α/β = 3. Similarly, the D95% was 91.98 ± 3.77 Gy for α/β = 1.5 and 75.35 ± 2.88 Gy for α/β = 3. The mean values of bladder and rectal volume receiving the prescribed dose of 36.25 Gy were 0.83 cm3 and 0.086 cm3, respectively. NTD dose analysis shows an escalated dose distribution within the target for low α/β (1.5 Gy) with reasonable sparing of organs at risk. However, the higher α/β of prostate (3 Gy) is not encouraging the fact of dose escalation in cyberknife hypofractionated dose regimen of localized prostate cancer.

  11. [Which rules apply to hypofractionated radiotherapy?].

    PubMed

    Supiot, S; Clément-Colmou, K; Paris, F; Corre, I; Chiavassa, S; Delpon, G

    2015-10-01

    Hypofractionated radiotherapy is now more widely prescribed due to improved targeting techniques (intensity modulated radiotherapy, image-guided radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy). Low dose hypofractionated radiotherapy is routinely administered mostly for palliative purposes. High or very high dose hypofractionated irradiation must be delivered according to very strict procedures since every minor deviation can lead to major changes in dose delivery to the tumor volume and organs at risk. Thus, each stage of the processing must be carefully monitored starting from the limitations and the choice of the hypofractionation technique, tumour contouring and dose constraints prescription, planning and finally dose calculation and patient positioning verification.

  12. Fluoroscopic tumor tracking for image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tong; Cerviño, Laura I.; Tang, Xiaoli; Vasconcelos, Nuno; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-02-01

    Accurate lung tumor tracking in real time is a keystone to image-guided radiotherapy of lung cancers. Existing lung tumor tracking approaches can be roughly grouped into three categories: (1) deriving tumor position from external surrogates; (2) tracking implanted fiducial markers fluoroscopically or electromagnetically; (3) fluoroscopically tracking lung tumor without implanted fiducial markers. The first approach suffers from insufficient accuracy, while the second may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previous studies in fluoroscopic markerless tracking are mainly based on template matching methods, which may fail when the tumor boundary is unclear in fluoroscopic images. In this paper we propose a novel markerless tumor tracking algorithm, which employs the correlation between the tumor position and surrogate anatomic features in the image. The positions of the surrogate features are not directly tracked; instead, we use principal component analysis of regions of interest containing them to obtain parametric representations of their motion patterns. Then, the tumor position can be predicted from the parametric representations of surrogates through regression. Four regression methods were tested in this study: linear and two-degree polynomial regression, artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM). The experimental results based on fluoroscopic sequences of ten lung cancer patients demonstrate a mean tracking error of 2.1 pixels and a maximum error at a 95% confidence level of 4.6 pixels (pixel size is about 0.5 mm) for the proposed tracking algorithm.

  13. Analysis of Electronic Densities and Integrated Doses in Multiform Glioblastomas Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baron-Aznar, C.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Celis, M. A.; Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.

    2008-08-11

    Integrated dose is the total energy delivered in a radiotherapy target. This physical parameter could be a predictor for complications such as brain edema and radionecrosis after stereotactic radiotherapy treatments for brain tumors. Integrated Dose depends on the tissue density and volume. Using CT patients images from the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery and BrainScan(c) software, this work presents the mean density of 21 multiform glioblastomas, comparative results for normal tissue and estimated integrated dose for each case. The relationship between integrated dose and the probability of complications is discussed.

  14. Analysis of Electronic Densities and Integrated Doses in Multiform Glioblastomas Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barón-Aznar, C.; Moreno-Jiménez, S.; Celis, M. A.; Lárraga-Gutiérrez, J. M.; Ballesteros-Zebadúa, P.

    2008-08-01

    Integrated dose is the total energy delivered in a radiotherapy target. This physical parameter could be a predictor for complications such as brain edema and radionecrosis after stereotactic radiotherapy treatments for brain tumors. Integrated Dose depends on the tissue density and volume. Using CT patients images from the National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery and BrainScansoftware, this work presents the mean density of 21 multiform glioblastomas, comparative results for normal tissue and estimated integrated dose for each case. The relationship between integrated dose and the probability of complications is discussed.

  15. Decreasing Temporal Lobe Dose With Five-Field Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Treatment of Pituitary Macroadenomas

    SciTech Connect

    Parhar, Preeti K.; Duckworth, Tamara; Shah, Parinda; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Narayana, Ashwatha; Formenti, Silvia C.; Shah, Jinesh N.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To compare temporal lobe dose delivered by three pituitary macroadenoma irradiation techniques: three-field three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), three-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (3F IMRT), and a proposed novel alternative of five-field IMRT (5F IMRT). Methods and Materials: Computed tomography-based external beam radiotherapy planning was performed for 15 pituitary macroadenoma patients treated at New York University between 2002 and 2007 using: 3D-CRT (two lateral, one midline superior anterior oblique [SAO] beams), 3F IMRT (same beam angles), and 5F IMRT (same beam angles with additional right SAO and left SAO beams). Prescription dose was 45 Gy. Target volumes were: gross tumor volume (GTV) = macroadenoma, clinical target volume (CTV) = GTV, and planning target volume = CTV + 0.5 cm. Structure contouring was performed by two radiation oncologists guided by an expert neuroradiologist. Results: Five-field IMRT yielded significantly decreased temporal lobe dose delivery compared with 3D-CRT and 3F IMRT. Temporal lobe sparing with 5F IMRT was most pronounced at intermediate doses: mean V25Gy (% of total temporal lobe volume receiving {>=}25 Gy) of 13% vs. 28% vs. 29% for right temporal lobe and 14% vs. 29% vs. 30% for left temporal lobe for 5F IMRT, 3D-CRT, and 3F IMRT, respectively (p < 10{sup -7} for 5F IMRT vs. 3D-CRT and 5F IMRT vs. 3F IMRT). Five-field IMRT plans did not compromise target coverage, exceed normal tissue dose constraints, or increase estimated brain integral dose. Conclusions: Five-field IMRT irradiation technique results in a statistically significant decrease in the dose to the temporal lobes and may thus help prevent neurocognitive sequelae in irradiated pituitary macroadenoma patients.

  16. Parotid Gland Dose in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer: Is What You Plan What You Get?

    SciTech Connect

    O'Daniel, Jennifer C.; Garden, Adam S.; Schwartz, David L.; Wang He; Ang, Kian K.; Ahamad, Anesa; Rosenthal, David I.; Morrison, William H.; Asper, Joshua A.; Zhang Lifei; Tung Shihming; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To quantify the differences between planned and delivered parotid gland and target doses, and to assess the benefits of daily bone alignment for head and neck cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Eleven head and neck cancer patients received two CT scans per week with an in-room CT scanner over the course of their radiotherapy. The clinical IMRT plans, designed with 3-mm to 4-mm planning margins, were recalculated on the repeat CT images. The plans were aligned using the actual treatment isocenter marked with radiopaque markers (BB) and bone alignment to the cervical vertebrae to simulate image-guided setup. In-house deformable image registration software was used to map daily dose distributions to the original treatment plan and to calculate a cumulative delivered dose distribution for each patient. Results: Using conventional BB alignment led to increases in the parotid gland mean dose above the planned dose by 5 to 7 Gy in 45% of the patients (median, 3.0 Gy ipsilateral, p = 0.026; median, 1.0 Gy contralateral, p = 0.016). Use of bone alignment led to reductions relative to BB alignment in 91% of patients (median, 2 Gy; range, 0.3-8.3 Gy; 15 of 22 parotids improved). However, the parotid dose from bone alignment was still greater than planned (median, 1.0 Gy, p = 0.007). Neither approach affected tumor dose coverage. Conclusions: With conventional BB alignment, the parotid gland mean dose was significantly increased above the planned mean dose. Using daily bone alignment reduced the parotid dose compared with BB alignment in almost all patients. A 3- to 4-mm planning margin was adequate for tumor dose coverage.

  17. A method for measuring the dose distribution of the radiotherapy domain using the computed radiography system.

    PubMed

    Homma, Mitsuhiko; Tabushi, Katsuyoshi; Obata, Yasunori; Tamiya, Tadashi; Koyama, Shuji; Ishigaki, Takeo

    2002-01-01

    Knowing the dose distribution in a tissue is as important as being able to measure exposure or absorbed dose in radiotherapy. Therefore, we have developed a measurement method for the dose distribution (CR dosimetry) in the phantom based on the imaging plate (IP) of the computed radiography (CR). The IP was applied for the dose measurement as a dosimeter instead of the film used for film dosimetry. The data from the irradiated IP were processed by a personal computer with 10 bits and were depicted as absorbed dose distributions in the phantom. The image of the dose distribution was obtained from the CR system using the DICOM form. The CR dosimetry is an application of CR system currently employed in medical examinations to dosimetry in radiotherapy. A dose distribution can be easily shown by the Dose Distribution Depiction System we developed this time. Moreover, the measurement method is simpler and a result is obtained more quickly compared with film dosimetry.

  18. Dose calculation accuracies in whole breast radiotherapy treatment planning: a multi-institutional study.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Shogo; Miyabe, Yuki; Tohyama, Naoki; Kumazaki, Yu; Kurooka, Masahiko; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Tachibana, Hidenobu; Kito, Satoshi; Wakita, Akihisa; Ohotomo, Yuko; Ikagawa, Hiroyuki; Ishikura, Satoshi; Nozaki, Miwako; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Nishio, Teiji

    2015-07-01

    Our objective in this study was to evaluate the variation in the doses delivered among institutions due to dose calculation inaccuracies in whole breast radiotherapy. We have developed practical procedures for quality assurance (QA) of radiation treatment planning systems. These QA procedures are designed to be performed easily at any institution and to permit comparisons of results across institutions. The dose calculation accuracy was evaluated across seven institutions using various irradiation conditions. In some conditions, there was a >3 % difference between the calculated dose and the measured dose. The dose calculation accuracy differs among institutions because it is dependent on both the dose calculation algorithm and beam modeling. The QA procedures in this study are useful for verifying the accuracy of the dose calculation algorithm and of the beam model before clinical use for whole breast radiotherapy.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Lymphography-Guided Selective High-Dose Lymph Node Irradiation in Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Meijer, Hanneke J.M.; Debats, Oscar A.; Kunze-Busch, Martina; Kollenburg, Peter van; Leer, Jan Willem; Witjes, J. Alfred; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Barentsz, Jelle O.; Lin, Emile N.J.Th. van

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of magnetic resonance lymphography (MRL) -guided delineation of a boost volume and an elective target volume for pelvic lymph node irradiation in patients with prostate cancer. The feasibility of irradiating these volumes with a high-dose boost to the MRL-positive lymph nodes in conjunction with irradiation of the prostate using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was also investigated. Methods and Materials: In 4 prostate cancer patients with a high risk of lymph node involvement but no enlarged lymph nodes on CT and/or MRI, MRL detected pathological lymph nodes in the pelvis. These lymph nodes were identified and delineated on a radiotherapy planning CT to create a boost volume. Based on the location of the MRL-positive lymph nodes, the standard elective pelvic target volume was individualized. An IMRT plan with a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) was created with dose prescriptions of 42 Gy to the pelvic target volume, a boost to 60 Gy to the MRL-positive lymph nodes, and 72 Gy to the prostate. Results: All MRL-positive lymph nodes could be identified on the planning CT. This information could be used to delineate a boost volume and to individualize the pelvic target volume for elective irradiation. IMRT planning delivered highly acceptable radiotherapy plans with regard to the prescribed dose levels and the dose to the organs at risk (OARs). Conclusion: MRL can be used to select patients with limited lymph node involvement for pelvic radiotherapy. MRL-guided delineation of a boost volume and an elective pelvic target volume for selective high-dose lymph node irradiation with IMRT is feasible. Whether this approach will result in improved outcome for these patients needs to be investigated in further clinical studies.

  20. Radiotherapy dose enhancement using BNCT in conventional LINACs high-energy treatment: Simulation and experiment

    PubMed Central

    Alikaniotis, Katia; Borla, Oscar; Monti, Valeria; Vivaldo, Gianna; Zanini, Alba; Giannini, Gianrossano

    2016-01-01

    Aim To employ the thermal neutron background that affects the patient during a traditional high-energy radiotherapy treatment for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) in order to enhance radiotherapy effectiveness. Background Conventional high-energy (15–25 MV) linear accelerators (LINACs) for radiotherapy produce fast secondary neutrons in the gantry with a mean energy of about 1 MeV due to (γ, n) reaction. This neutron flux, isotropically distributed, is considered as an unavoidable undesired dose during the treatment. Considering the moderating effect of human body, a thermal neutron fluence is localized in the tumour area: this neutron background could be employed for BNCT by previously administering 10B-Phenyl-Alanine (10BPA) to the patient. Materials and methods Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP4B-GN code) were performed to estimate the total amount of neutrons outside and inside human body during a traditional X-ray radiotherapy treatment. Moreover, a simplified tissue equivalent anthropomorphic phantom was used together with bubble detectors for thermal and fast neutron to evaluate the moderation effect of human body. Results Simulation and experimental results confirm the thermal neutron background during radiotherapy of 1.55E07 cm−2 Gy−1. The BNCT equivalent dose delivered at 4 cm depth in phantom is 1.5 mGy-eq/Gy, that is about 3 Gy-eq (4% of X-rays dose) for a 70 Gy IMRT treatment. Conclusions The thermal neutron component during a traditional high-energy radiotherapy treatment could produce a localized BNCT effect, with a localized therapeutic dose enhancement, corresponding to 4% or more of photon dose, following tumour characteristics. This BNCT additional dose could thus improve radiotherapy, acting as a localized radio-sensitizer. PMID:26933394

  1. SU-E-J-97: Pretreatment Test and Post-Treatment Evaluation for Iso-NTCP Dose Guided Adapive Radiotherapy (DGART), Experience with Prostate Cancer Patients Treated with Rectal Balloons

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J; Hardcastle, N; Bender, E; Jeong, K; Tome', M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of pretreatment test for iso-NTCP DGART and to compare the pretreatment test results with post-treatment evaluations. Methods: NTCP here refers to late rectal wall toxicity only and is calculated with the ring rectal wall DVH. Simulation for one time iso- NTCP DGART starts after half of the total dose was done for 10 patients to investigate if TCP gains could be achieved. Six patients were treated using a 12-fraction 4.3Gy technique and four using 16-fraction 3.63Gy technique. For each of the 12-fraction cases a VMAT plan was generated in Pinnacle3™ using the daily CT obtained prior to the 6th fraction. A pretreatment simulation was performed using only the first 6 daily CTs. The idea is to add the 6 original plan delivered doses with 6 DGART plan delivered doses by deformable dose accumulation (DDA) on each of the first 6 CTs, resulting in 6 rectal wall doses (RWDs) and NTCPs. The 95% confidence interval (95%CI) for the 6 NTCPs were computed.The posttreatment evaluation was done by: a) copy the DGART plan to 6 CTs for fraction 7–12 and calculate the 6 actual DGART delivered fractional doses; b) sum the 6 actual DGART doses with the 6 original plan delivered doses by DDA on each of the 12 CTs resulting in 12 post-treatment RWDs and NTCPs; c) boxplot the 12 post-treatment NTCPs. Results: Target dose gain is 0.76–1.93 Gy. The 95%CI widths of the pretreatment tests NTCPs were 1.1–2.7%. For 5 patients, the planned NTCP fell within the 95%CI. For 4 patients, the planned NTCP was lower than the 95%CI lines. Post-treatment results show that for 7 patients, the upper quartile was within the 95%CI; for 2 patients, the upper quartile were higher than the 95%CI. Conclusion: The pretreatment test yields conservative prediction of the actual delivered NTCP.

  2. Estimation of effective imaging dose for kilovoltage intratreatment monitoring of the prostate position during cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, J. A.; Booth, J.; Poulsen, P.; Kuncic, Z.; Keall, P. J.

    2013-09-01

    Kilovoltage intratreatment monitoring (KIM) is a novel real-time localization modality where the tumor position is continuously measured during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or intensity modulated arc therapy (IMAT) by a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imager. Adding kV imaging during therapy adds radiation dose. The additional effective dose is quantified for prostate radiotherapy and compared to dose from other localization modalities. The software PCXMC 2.0 was used to calculate the effective dose delivered to a phantom as a function of imager angle and field size for a Varian On-Board Imager. The average angular effective dose was calculated for a field size of 6 cm × 6 cm. The average angular effective dose was used in calculations for different treatment scenarios. Treatment scenarios considered were treatment type and fractionation. For all treatment scenarios, (i.e. conventionally fractionated and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), IMRT and IMAT), the total KIM dose at 1 Hz ranged from 2-10 mSv. This imaging dose is less than the Navotek radioactive implant dose (64 mSv) and a standard SBRT cone beam computed tomography pretreatment scan dose (22 mSv) over an entire treatment regime. KIM delivers an acceptably low effective dose for daily use as a real-time image-guidance method for prostate radiotherapy.

  3. Temporary organ displacement coupled with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy for paraspinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the feasibility and dosimetric improvements of a novel technique to temporarily displace critical structures in the pelvis and abdomen from tumor during high-dose radiotherapy. Methods Between 2010 and 2012, 11 patients received high-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy with temporary organ displacement (TOD) at our institution. In all cases, imaging revealed tumor abutting critical structures. An all-purpose drainage catheter was introduced between the gross tumor volume (GTV) and critical organs at risk (OAR) and infused with normal saline (NS) containing 5-10% iohexol. Radiation planning was performed with the displaced OARs and positional reproducibility was confirmed with cone-beam CT (CBCT). Patients were treated within 36 hours of catheter placement. Radiation plans were re-optimized using pre-TOD OARs to the same prescription and dosimetrically compared with post-TOD plans. A two-tailed permutation test was performed on each dosimetric measure. Results The bowel/rectum was displaced in six patients and kidney in four patients. One patient was excluded due to poor visualization of the OAR; thus 10 patients were analyzed. A mean of 229 ml (range, 80–1000) of NS 5-10% iohexol infusion resulted in OAR mean displacement of 17.5 mm (range, 7–32). The median dose prescribed was 2400 cGy in one fraction (range, 2100–3000 in 3 fractions). The mean GTV Dmin and PTV Dmin pre- and post-bowel TOD IG-IMRT dosimetry significantly increased from 1473 cGy to 2086 cGy (p=0.015) and 714 cGy to 1214 cGy (p=0.021), respectively. TOD increased mean PTV D95 by 27.14% of prescription (p=0.014) while the PTV D05 decreased by 9.2% (p=0.011). TOD of the bowel resulted in a 39% decrease in mean bowel Dmax (p=0.008) confirmed by CBCT. TOD of the kidney significantly decreased mean kidney dose and Dmax by 25% (0.022). Conclusions TOD was well tolerated, reproducible, and facilitated dose escalation to previously radioresistant tumors

  4. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Might Increase Pneumonitis Risk Relative to Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy in Patients Receiving Combined Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy: A Modeling Study of Dose Dumping

    SciTech Connect

    Vogelius, Ivan S.; Westerly, David C.; Cannon, George M.; Mackie, Thomas R.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Sugie, Chikao; Bentzen, Soren M.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To model the possible interaction between cytotoxic chemotherapy and the radiation dose distribution with respect to the risk of radiation pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 18 non-small-cell lung cancer patients previously treated with helical tomotherapy at the University of Wisconsin were selected for the present modeling study. Three treatment plans were considered: the delivered tomotherapy plans; a three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) plan; and a fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan. The IMRT and 3D-CRT plans were generated specifically for the present study. The plans were optimized without adjusting for the chemotherapy effect. The effect of chemotherapy was modeled as an independent cell killing process by considering a uniform chemotherapy equivalent radiation dose added to all voxels of the organ at risk. The risk of radiation pneumonitis was estimated for all plans using the Lyman and the critical volume models. Results: For radiotherapy alone, the critical volume model predicts that the two IMRT plans are associated with a lower risk of radiation pneumonitis than the 3D-CRT plan. However, when the chemotherapy equivalent radiation dose exceeds a certain threshold, the radiation pneumonitis risk after IMRT is greater than after 3D-CRT. This threshold dose is in the range estimated from clinical chemoradiotherapy data sets. Conclusions: Cytotoxic chemotherapy might affect the relative merit of competing radiotherapy plans. More work is needed to improve our understanding of the interaction between chemotherapy and the radiation dose distribution in clinical settings.

  5. Quantitative Assessment of Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Paraspinal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Stoiber, Eva M.; Lechsel, Gerhard; Giske, Kristina; Muenter, Marc W.; Hoess, Angelika; Bendl, Rolf; Debus, Juergen; Huber, Peter E.; Thieke, Christian

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate stereotactic positioning uncertainties of patients with paraspinal tumors treated with fractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy; and to determine whether target-point correction via rigid registration is sufficient for daily patient positioning. Patients and Methods: Forty-five patients with tumors at the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine received regular control computed-tomography (CT) scans using an in-room CT scanner. All patients were immobilized with the combination of Scotch cast torso and head masks. The positioning was evaluated regarding translational and rotational errors by applying a rigid registration algorithm based on mutual information. The registration box was fitted to the target volume for optimal registration in the high-dose area. To evaluate the suitability of the rigid registration result for correcting the target volume position we subsequently registered three small subsections of the upper, middle, and lower target volume. The resulting residual deviations reflect the extent of the elastic deformations, which cannot be covered by the rigid-body registration procedure. Results: A total of 321 control CT scans were evaluated. The rotational errors were negligible. Translational errors were smallest for cervical tumors (-0.1 +- 1.1, 0.3 +- 0.8, and 0.1 +- 0.9 mm along left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior axes), followed by thoracic (0.8 +- 1.1, 0.3 +- 0.8, and 1.1 +- 1.3 mm) and lumbar tumors (-0.7 +- 1.3, 0.0 +- 0.9, and 0.5 +- 1.6 mm). The residual deviations of the three subsections were <1 mm. Conclusions: The applied stereotactic patient setup resulted in small rotational errors. However, considerable translational positioning errors may occur; thus, on the basis of these data daily control CT scans are recommended. Rigid transformation is adequate for correcting the target volume position.

  6. Reconstruction of organ dose for external radiotherapy patients in retrospective epidemiologic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choonik; Jung, Jae Won; Pelletier, Christopher; Pyakuryal, Anil; Lamart, Stephanie; Kim, Jong Oh; Lee, Choonsik

    2015-03-01

    Organ dose estimation for retrospective epidemiological studies of late effects in radiotherapy patients involves two challenges: radiological images to represent patient anatomy are not usually available for patient cohorts who were treated years ago, and efficient dose reconstruction methods for large-scale patient cohorts are not well established. In the current study, we developed methods to reconstruct organ doses for radiotherapy patients by using a series of computational human phantoms coupled with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) and a radiotherapy-dedicated Monte Carlo transport code, and performed illustrative dose calculations. First, we developed methods to convert the anatomy and organ contours of the pediatric and adult hybrid computational phantom series to Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM)-image and DICOM-structure files, respectively. The resulting DICOM files were imported to a commercial TPS for simulating radiotherapy and dose calculation for in-field organs. The conversion process was validated by comparing electron densities relative to water and organ volumes between the hybrid phantoms and the DICOM files imported in TPS, which showed agreements within 0.1 and 2%, respectively. Second, we developed a procedure to transfer DICOM-RT files generated from the TPS directly to a Monte Carlo transport code, x-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) for more accurate dose calculations. Third, to illustrate the performance of the established methods, we simulated a whole brain treatment for the 10 year-old male phantom and a prostate treatment for the adult male phantom. Radiation doses to selected organs were calculated using the TPS and XVMC, and compared to each other. Organ average doses from the two methods matched within 7%, whereas maximum and minimum point doses differed up to 45%. The dosimetry methods and procedures established in this study will be useful for the reconstruction of organ dose to support

  7. Reconstruction of organ dose for external radiotherapy patients in retrospective epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Choonik; Jung, Jae Won; Pelletier, Christopher; Pyakuryal, Anil; Lamart, Stephanie; Kim, Jong Oh; Lee, Choonsik

    2015-03-21

    Organ dose estimation for retrospective epidemiological studies of late effects in radiotherapy patients involves two challenges: radiological images to represent patient anatomy are not usually available for patient cohorts who were treated years ago, and efficient dose reconstruction methods for large-scale patient cohorts are not well established. In the current study, we developed methods to reconstruct organ doses for radiotherapy patients by using a series of computational human phantoms coupled with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) and a radiotherapy-dedicated Monte Carlo transport code, and performed illustrative dose calculations. First, we developed methods to convert the anatomy and organ contours of the pediatric and adult hybrid computational phantom series to Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM)-image and DICOM-structure files, respectively. The resulting DICOM files were imported to a commercial TPS for simulating radiotherapy and dose calculation for in-field organs. The conversion process was validated by comparing electron densities relative to water and organ volumes between the hybrid phantoms and the DICOM files imported in TPS, which showed agreements within 0.1 and 2%, respectively. Second, we developed a procedure to transfer DICOM-RT files generated from the TPS directly to a Monte Carlo transport code, x-ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) for more accurate dose calculations. Third, to illustrate the performance of the established methods, we simulated a whole brain treatment for the 10 year-old male phantom and a prostate treatment for the adult male phantom. Radiation doses to selected organs were calculated using the TPS and XVMC, and compared to each other. Organ average doses from the two methods matched within 7%, whereas maximum and minimum point doses differed up to 45%. The dosimetry methods and procedures established in this study will be useful for the reconstruction of organ dose to support

  8. Improvement in toxicity in high risk prostate cancer patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy compared to 3D conformal radiotherapy without daily image guidance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) facilitates the delivery of a very precise radiation dose. In this study we compare the toxicity and biochemical progression-free survival between patients treated with daily image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) without daily image guidance for high risk prostate cancer (PCa). Methods A total of 503 high risk PCa patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) and endocrine treatment between 2000 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. 115 patients were treated with 3DCRT, and 388 patients were treated with IG-IMRT. 3DCRT patients were treated to 76 Gy and without daily image guidance and with 1–2 cm PTV margins. IG-IMRT patients were treated to 78 Gy based on daily image guidance of fiducial markers, and the PTV margins were 5–7 mm. Furthermore, the dose-volume constraints to both the rectum and bladder were changed with the introduction of IG-IMRT. Results The 2-year actuarial likelihood of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity following RT was 57.3% in 3DCRT patients and 5.8% in IG-IMRT patients (p < 0.001). For GU toxicity the numbers were 41.8% and 29.7%, respectively (p = 0.011). On multivariate analysis, 3DCRT was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing grade > = 2 GI toxicity compared to IG-IMRT (p < 0.001, HR = 11.59 [CI: 6.67-20.14]). 3DCRT was also associated with an increased risk of developing GU toxicity compared to IG-IMRT. The 3-year actuarial biochemical progression-free survival probability was 86.0% for 3DCRT and 90.3% for IG-IMRT (p = 0.386). On multivariate analysis there was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival between 3DCRT and IG-IMRT. Conclusion The difference in toxicity can be attributed to the combination of the IMRT technique with reduced dose to organs-at-risk, daily image guidance and margin reduction. PMID:24495815

  9. Increasing the Therapeutic Ratio of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy by Individualized Isotoxic Dose Prescription.

    PubMed

    Zindler, Jaap D; Thomas, Charles R; Hahn, Stephen M; Hoffmann, Aswin L; Troost, Esther G C; Lambin, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    To obtain a favorable tradeoff between treatment benefits and morbidity ("therapeutic ratio"), radiotherapy (RT) dose is prescribed according to the tumor volume, with the goal of controlling the disease while respecting normal tissue tolerance levels. We propose a new paradigm for tumor dose prescription in stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) based on organ-at-risk (OAR) tolerance levels called isotoxic dose prescription (IDP), which is derived from experiences and limitations of conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. With IDP, the radiation dose is prescribed based on the predefined level of normal tissue complication probability of a nearby dose-limiting OAR at a prespecified dose-volume constraint. Simultaneously, the prescribed total tumor dose (TTD) is maximized to the technically highest achievable level in order to increase the local tumor control probability (TCP). IDP is especially relevant for tumors located at eloquent locations or for large tumors in which severe toxicity has been described. IDP will result in a lower RT dose or a treatment scheduled with more fractions if the OAR tolerance level is exceeded, and potential dose escalation occurs when the OAR tolerance level allows it and when it is expected to be beneficial (if TCP < 90%). For patients with small tumors at noneloquent sites, the current SABR dose prescription already results in high rates of local control at low toxicity rates. In this review, the concept of IDP is described in the context of SABR.

  10. Dose response explorer: an integrated open-source tool for exploring and modelling radiotherapy dose volume outcome relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Naqa, I.; Suneja, G.; Lindsay, P. E.; Hope, A. J.; Alaly, J. R.; Vicic, M.; Bradley, J. D.; Apte, A.; Deasy, J. O.

    2006-11-01

    Radiotherapy treatment outcome models are a complicated function of treatment, clinical and biological factors. Our objective is to provide clinicians and scientists with an accurate, flexible and user-friendly software tool to explore radiotherapy outcomes data and build statistical tumour control or normal tissue complications models. The software tool, called the dose response explorer system (DREES), is based on Matlab, and uses a named-field structure array data type. DREES/Matlab in combination with another open-source tool (CERR) provides an environment for analysing treatment outcomes. DREES provides many radiotherapy outcome modelling features, including (1) fitting of analytical normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and tumour control probability (TCP) models, (2) combined modelling of multiple dose-volume variables (e.g., mean dose, max dose, etc) and clinical factors (age, gender, stage, etc) using multi-term regression modelling, (3) manual or automated selection of logistic or actuarial model variables using bootstrap statistical resampling, (4) estimation of uncertainty in model parameters, (5) performance assessment of univariate and multivariate analyses using Spearman's rank correlation and chi-square statistics, boxplots, nomograms, Kaplan-Meier survival plots, and receiver operating characteristics curves, and (6) graphical capabilities to visualize NTCP or TCP prediction versus selected variable models using various plots. DREES provides clinical researchers with a tool customized for radiotherapy outcome modelling. DREES is freely distributed. We expect to continue developing DREES based on user feedback.

  11. Use of image guided radiation therapy techniques and imaging dose measurement at Indian hospitals: A survey

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Sudesh; Dhote, D. S.; Kumar, Rajesh; Naidu, Suresh; Sutar, A.; Kannan, V.

    2015-01-01

    A national survey was conducted to obtain information about the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) techniques and IGRT dose measurement methods being followed at Indian radiotherapy centers. A questionnaire containing parameters relevant to use of IGRT was prepared to collect the information pertaining to (i) availability and type of IGRT delivery system, (ii) frequency of image acquisition protocol and utilization of these images for different purpose, and (iii) imaging dose measurement. The questionnaire was circulated to 75 hospitals in the country having IGRT facility, and responses of 51 centers were received. Survey results showed that among surveyed hospitals, 86% centers have IGRT facility, 78% centers have kilo voltage three-dimensional volumetric imaging. 75% of hospitals in our study do not perform computed tomography dose index measurements and 89% of centers do not perform patient dose measurements. Moreover, only 29% physicists believe IGRT dose is additional radiation burden to patient. This study has brought into focus the need to design a national protocol for IGRT dose measurement and development of indigenous tools to perform IGRT dose measurements. PMID:26865758

  12. Dosimetry of dose distributions in radiotherapy of patients with surgical implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brożyna, Bogusław; Chełmiński, Krzysztof; Bulski, Wojciech; Giżyńska, Marta; Grochowska, Paulina; Walewska, Agnieszka; Zalewska, Marta; Kawecki, Andrzej; Krajewski, Romuald

    2014-11-01

    The investigation was performed in order to evaluate the use of Gafchromic EBT films for measurements of dose distributions created during radiotherapy in tissues surrounding titanium or resorbable implants used for joining and consolidating facial bones. Inhomogeneous dose distributions at implant-tissue interfaces can be the reason of normal tissue complications observed in radiotherapy patients after surgery with implants. The dose measured at a depth of 2.5 cm on contact surfaces, proximal and distal to the beam source, between the titanium implant and the phantom material was 109% and 92% respectively of the reference dose measured in a homogeneous phantom. For the resorbable implants the doses measured on the proximal and the distal contact surfaces were 102% and 101% respectively of the reference dose. The resorbable implants affect the homogeneity of dose distribution at a significantly lesser degree than the titanium implants. Gafchromic EBT films allowed for precise dose distribution measurements at the contact surfaces between tissue equivalent materials and implants. We measured doses at contact surfaces between titanium implants and RW3 phantom. We measured doses at contact surfaces between resorbable implants and RW3 phantom. We compared doses measured on contact surfaces and doses in homogeneous phantom. Doses at contact surfaces between RW3 phantom and titanium were distorted about 8-9%. Doses at RW3 phantom and resorbable implant contact surfaces were distorted about 2%.

  13. Dose-Volume Comparison of Proton Radiotherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kadoya, Noriyuki; Obata, Yasunori; Kato, Takahiro; Kagiya, Masaru; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Tomoda, Takuya; Takada, Akinori; Takayama, Kanako; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: This study designed photon and proton treatment plans for patients treated with hypofractionated proton radiotherapy (PT) at the Southern Tohoku Proton Therapy Center (STPTC). We then calculated dosimetric parameters and compared results with simulated treatment plans for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), using dose--volume histograms to clearly explain differences in dose distributions between PT and SBRT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (stage IA, n = 15 patients; stage IB, n = 6 patients) were studied. All tumors were located in the peripheral lung, and total dose was 66 Gray equivalents (GyE) (6.6 GyE/fraction). For treatment planning, beam incidence for proton beam technique was restricted to two to three directions for PT, and seven or eight noncoplanar beams were manually selected for SBRT to achieve optimal planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal dose to organs at risk. Results: Regarding lung tissues, mean dose, V5, V10, V13, V15, and V20 values were 4.6 Gy, 13.2%, 11.4%, 10.6%, 10.1%, and 9.1%, respectively, for PT, whereas those values were 7.8 Gy, 32.0%, 21.8%, 17.4%, 15.3%, and 11.4%, respectively, for SBRT with a prescribed dose of 66 Gy. Pearson product moment correlation coefficients between PTV and dose--volume parameters of V5, V10, V15, and V20 were 0.45, 0.52, 0.58, and 0.63, respectively, for PT, compared to 0.52, 0.45, 0.71, and 0.74, respectively, for SBRT. Conclusions: Correlations between dose--volume parameters of the lung and PTV were observed and may indicate that PT is more advantageous than SBRT when treating a tumor with a relatively large PTV or several tumors.

  14. Low-Dose Palliative Radiotherapy for Cutaneous B- and T-Cell Lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Neelis, Karen J. Schimmel, Erik C.; Vermeer, Maarten H.; Senff, Nancy J.; Willemze, Rein; Noordijk, Evert M.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of low-dose palliative radiotherapy for both low-grade malignant cutaneous B-cell lymphomas (CBCLs) and cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (mycosis fungoides). Methods and Materials: A total of 18 patients with low-grade CBCL (10 primary cutaneous marginal zone B-cell and 8 primary cutaneous follicle center lymphomas) with 44 symptomatic plaques and tumors underwent low-dose (4 Gy in two fractions) local radiotherapy. A total of 31 patients with mycosis fungoides were treated at 82 symptomatic sites, initially with 4 Gy and later with 8 Gy in two fractions. Results: The complete response rate for CBCL lesions was 72%. Of the 44 B-cell lymphoma lesions, 13 were re-treated to the same site after a median of 6.3 months because of persistent (n = 8) or recurrent (n = 5) symptomatic disease. Of the mycosis fungoides patients treated with 4 Gy in two fractions (17 lesions), 70% failed to respond. Increasing the dose to 8 Gy in two fractions yielded a complete response rate of 92% (60 of 65 lesions). The patients in whom low-dose radiotherapy failed were retreated with 20 Gy in eight fractions. Conclusion: Our results have demonstrated that low-dose involved-field radiotherapy induces a high response rate in both CBCL and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma lesions without any toxicity. Therefore, this treatment is now our standard palliative treatment. At progression, it is safe and feasible to apply greater radiation doses.

  15. Phase I dose-escalation study of helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy-based stereotactic body radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Won; Seong, Jinsil; Lee, Ik Jae; Woo, Joong Yeol; Han, Kwang-Hyub

    2016-01-01

    Background Phase I trial was conducted to determine feasibility and toxicity of helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Results Eighteen patients (22 lesions) were enrolled. With no DLT at 52 Gy (13 Gy/fraction), protocol was amended for further escalation to 60 Gy (15 Gy/fraction). Radiologic complete response rate was 88.9%. Two outfield intrahepatic, 2 distant, 4 concurrent local and outfield, and 1 concurrent local, outfield and distant failures (no local failure at dose levels 3–4) occurred. The worst toxicity was grade 3 hematologic in five patients, with no gastrointestinal toxicity > grade 1. At median follow-up of 28 months for living patients, 2-year local control, progression-free (PFS), and overall survival rates were 71.3%, 49.4% and 69.3%, respectively. Multi-segmental recurrences prior to SBRT was independent prognostic factor for PFS (p = 0.033). Materials and Methods Eligible patients had Child-Pugh's class A or B, unresectable HCC, ≤ 3 lesions, and cumulative tumor diameter ≤ 6 cm. Starting at 36 Gy in four fractions, dose was escalated with 2 Gy/fraction per dose-level. CTCAE v 3.0 ≥ grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity and radiation induced liver disease defined dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). Conclusions Helical IMRT-based SBRT was tolerable and showed encouraging results. Confirmatory phase II trial is underway. PMID:27213593

  16. Inverse Relationship Between Biochemical Outcome and Acute Toxicity After Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vesprini, Danny; Catton, Charles; Jacks, Lindsay; Lockwood, Gina; Rosewall, Tara; Bayley, Andrew; Chung, Peter; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Menard, Cynthia; Milosevic, Michael; Nichol, Alan; Skala, Marketa; Warde, Padraig; Bristow, Robert G.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Prostate cancer patients exhibit variability in normal tissue reactions and biochemical failure. With the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), there is a greater likelihood that the differences in normal tissue and tumor response are due to biological rather than physical factors. We tested the hypothesis that prospectively scored acute toxicity is associated with biochemical failure-free rate (BFFR) in prostate cancer patients treated with IGRT. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed BFFR in 362 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with IGRT. We compared BFFR with prospectively collected Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) maximum acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity scores. Median follow-up for all patients was 58.3 months after total radiotherapy doses of 75.6-79.8 Gy. Results: Patients reporting RTOG acute GU or GI toxicity scores of {>=}2 were considered 'sensitive' (n = 141, 39%) and patients reporting scores <2 were considered 'nonsensitive' (n = 221, 61%). When calculating biochemical failure (BF) using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition at 5 years, 76% (CI 70-82%) of the 'nonsensitive' patients were failure free, compared with only 53% (CI 43-62%) of the 'sensitive' patients (log-rank test, p < 0.0001). This difference was also observed using the Phoenix definition; 'nonsensitive' 5-year BFFR was 81% (CI 74-86%) vs. 'sensitive' BFFR was 68% (CI 58-76%; log-rank test p = 0.0012). The difference in BF between cohorts remained significant when controlled for radiation dose (75.6 vs. 79.8 Gy), prognostic stratification (T category, prostate-specific antigen, and Gleason score), and prostate volume. Conclusions: This study unexpectedly shows that prostate cancer patients who develop {>=}Grade 2 RTOG acute toxicity during radiotherapy are less likely to remain BFF at 5 years. These results deserve further study and, if validated in other large IGRT cohorts

  17. Threshold dose for peripheral neuropathy following intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) in a large animal model

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J.; DeLuca, A.M.; Barnes, M.; Anderson, W.; Terrill, R.; Sindelar, W.F. )

    1991-04-01

    Radiation injury to peripheral nerve is a dose-limiting toxicity in the clinical application of intraoperative radiotherapy, particularly for pelvic and retroperitoneal tumors. Intraoperative radiotherapy-related peripheral neuropathy in humans receiving doses of 20-25 Gy is manifested as a mixed motor-sensory deficit beginning 6-9 months following treatment. In a previous experimental study of intraoperative radiotherapy-related neuropathy of the lumbro-sacral plexus, an approximate inverse linear relationship was reported between the intraoperative dose (20-75 Gy range) and the time to onset of hind limb paresis (1-12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy). The principal histological lesion in irradiated nerve was loss of large nerve fibers and perineural fibrosis without significant vascular injury. Similar histological changes in irradiated nerves were found in humans. To assess peripheral nerve injury to lower doses of intraoperative radiotherapy in this same large animal model, groups of four adult American Foxhounds received doses of 10, 15, or 20 Gy to the right lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve using 9 MeV electrons. The left lumbro-sacral plexus and sciatic nerve were excluded from the intraoperative field to allow each animal to serve as its own control. Following treatment, a complete neurological exam, electromyogram, and nerve conduction studies were performed monthly for 1 year. Monthly neurological exams were performed in years 2 and 3 whereas electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were performed every 3 months during this follow-up period. With follow-up of greater than or equal to 42 months, no dog receiving 10 or 15 Gy IORT shows any clinical or laboratory evidence of peripheral nerve injury. However, all four dogs receiving 20 Gy developed right hind limb paresis at 8, 9, 9, and 12 mos following intraoperative radiotherapy.

  18. Biologically Effective Dose-Response Relationship for Breast Cancer Treated by Conservative Surgery and Postoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Plataniotis, George A. Dale, Roger G.

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To find a biologically effective dose (BED) response for adjuvant breast radiotherapy (RT) for initial-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Results of randomized trials of RT vs. non-RT were reviewed and the tumor control probability (TCP) after RT was calculated for each of them. Using the linear-quadratic formula and Poisson statistics of cell-kill, the average initial number of clonogens per tumor before RT and the average tumor cell radiosensitivity (alpha-value) were calculated. An {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 4 Gy was assumed for these calculations. Results: A linear regression equation linking BED to TCP was derived: -ln[-ln(TCP)] = -ln(No) + {alpha}{sup *} BED = -4.08 + 0.07 * BED, suggesting a rather low radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells (alpha = 0.07 Gy{sup -1}), which probably reflects population heterogeneity. From the linear relationship a sigmoid BED-response curve was constructed. Conclusion: For BED values higher than about 90 Gy{sub 4} the radiation-induced TCP is essentially maximizing at 90-100%. The relationship presented here could be an approximate guide in the design and reporting of clinical trials of adjuvant breast RT.

  19. High-Dose Conformal Radiotherapy for Patients With Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Satoh, Hiroaki; Kurishima, Koichi; Ishikawa, Hiroichi; Tokuuye, Koichi

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of high-dose conformal radiotherapy to the involved field for patients with Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between May 1999 and April 2006, a total of 100 consecutive patients with inoperable Stage IIIA or IIIB NSCLC with a performance score of 0 to 2 and treatment by radical radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy were included. Up to August 2002, 33 patients underwent conventional radiotherapy of 56 Gy to 66 Gy using anteroposterior opposite ports to the primary tumor and elective lymph nodes (conventional group). After September 2002, the remaining 67 patients underwent high-dose radiotherapy of 66 Gy to 84 Gy to the involved volume with three-dimensional (3-D) conformal radiotherapy (conformal group). Results: The median survival was 13.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 7.5-18.5 months) in the conventional group and 17.3 months (95% CI, 10.7- 24.0 months) in the conformal group. The overall survival at 3 years were 9.1% (95% CI, -0.7-18.9%) in the conventional group and 31.0% (95% CI, 18.9-43.1%) in the conformal group; the conformal group had a significantly better overall survival (p < 0.05). The radiotherapy method (hazard ratio = 0.55, p < 0.05) and performance status (hazard ratio = 1.48, p < 0.05) were shown to be statistically significant independent prognostic factors. Conclusions: Based on the practical experience reported here, 3-D conformal radiotherapy allowed dose escalation without excessive toxicity, and may improve overall survival rates for patients with Stage III NSCLC.

  20. Integral test phantom for dosimetric quality assurance of image guided and intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Letourneau, Daniel; Keller, Harald; Sharpe, Michael B.; Jaffray, David A.

    2007-05-15

    The objective of this work is to develop a dosimetric phantom quality assurance (QA) of linear accelerators capable of cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guided and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT). This phantom is to be used in an integral test to quantify in real-time both the performance of the image guidance and the dose delivery systems in terms of dose localization. The prototype IG-IMRT QA phantom consisted of a cylindrical imaging phantom (CatPhan) combined with an array of 11 radiation diodes mounted on a 10 cm diameter disk, oriented perpendicular to the phantom axis. Basic diode response characterization was performed for 6 and 18 MV photons. The diode response was compared to planning system calculations in the open and penumbrae regions of simple and complex beam arrangements. The clinical use of the QA phantom was illustrated in an integral test of an IG-IMRT treatment designed for a clinical spinal radiosurgery case. The sensitivity of the phantom to multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration and setup errors in the clinical setting was assessed by introducing errors in the IMRT plan or by displacing the phantom. The diodes offered good response linearity and long-term reproducibility for both 6 and 18 MV. Axial dosimetry of coplanar beams (in a plane containing the beam axes) was made possible with the nearly isoplanatic response of the diodes over 360 deg. of gantry (usually within {+-}1%). For single beam geometry, errors in phantom placement as small as 0.5 mm could be accurately detected (in gradient {>=}1%/mm). In clinical setting, MLC systematic errors of 1 mm on a single MLC bank introduced in the IMRT plan were easily detectable with the QA phantom. The QA phantom demonstrated also sufficient sensitivity for the detection of setup errors as small as 1 mm for the IMRT delivery. These results demonstrated that the prototype can accurately and efficiently verify the entire IG-IMRT process. This tool, in conjunction with image guidance capabilities

  1. Image-driven, model-based 3D abdominal motion estimation for MR-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, Rob H. N.; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory motion introduces substantial uncertainties in abdominal radiotherapy for which traditionally large margins are used. The MR-Linac will open up the opportunity to acquire high resolution MR images just prior to radiation and during treatment. However, volumetric MRI time series are not able to characterize 3D tumor and organ-at-risk motion with sufficient temporal resolution. In this study we propose a method to estimate 3D deformation vector fields (DVFs) with high spatial and temporal resolution based on fast 2D imaging and a subject-specific motion model based on respiratory correlated MRI. In a pre-beam phase, a retrospectively sorted 4D-MRI is acquired, from which the motion is parameterized using a principal component analysis. This motion model is used in combination with fast 2D cine-MR images, which are acquired during radiation, to generate full field-of-view 3D DVFs with a temporal resolution of 476 ms. The geometrical accuracies of the input data (4D-MRI and 2D multi-slice acquisitions) and the fitting procedure were determined using an MR-compatible motion phantom and found to be 1.0-1.5 mm on average. The framework was tested on seven healthy volunteers for both the pancreas and the kidney. The calculated motion was independently validated using one of the 2D slices, with an average error of 1.45 mm. The calculated 3D DVFs can be used retrospectively for treatment simulations, plan evaluations, or to determine the accumulated dose for both the tumor and organs-at-risk on a subject-specific basis in MR-guided radiotherapy.

  2. Automatic block-matching registration to improve lung tumor localization during image-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Scott Patrick

    To improve relatively poor outcomes for locally-advanced lung cancer patients, many current efforts are dedicated to minimizing uncertainties in radiotherapy. This enables the isotoxic delivery of escalated tumor doses, leading to better local tumor control. The current dissertation specifically addresses inter-fractional uncertainties resulting from patient setup variability. An automatic block-matching registration (BMR) algorithm is implemented and evaluated for the purpose of directly localizing advanced-stage lung tumors during image-guided radiation therapy. In this algorithm, small image sub-volumes, termed "blocks", are automatically identified on the tumor surface in an initial planning computed tomography (CT) image. Each block is independently and automatically registered to daily images acquired immediately prior to each treatment fraction. To improve the accuracy and robustness of BMR, this algorithm incorporates multi-resolution pyramid registration, regularization with a median filter, and a new multiple-candidate-registrations technique. The result of block-matching is a sparse displacement vector field that models local tissue deformations near the tumor surface. The distribution of displacement vectors is aggregated to obtain the final tumor registration, corresponding to the treatment couch shift for patient setup correction. Compared to existing rigid and deformable registration algorithms, the final BMR algorithm significantly improves the overlap between target volumes from the planning CT and registered daily images. Furthermore, BMR results in the smallest treatment margins for the given study population. However, despite these improvements, large residual target localization errors were noted, indicating that purely rigid couch shifts cannot correct for all sources of inter-fractional variability. Further reductions in treatment uncertainties may require the combination of high-quality target localization and adaptive radiotherapy.

  3. Effect of beam arrangement on oral cavity dose in external beam radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Vincent W.C.; Yang Zhining; Zhang Wuzhe; Wu Lili; Lin Zhixiong

    2012-07-01

    This study compared the oral cavity dose between the routine 7-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beam arrangement and 2 other 7-beam IMRT with the conventional radiotherapy beam arrangements in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten NPC patients treated by the 7-beam routine IMRT technique (IMRT-7R) between April 2009 and June 2009 were recruited. Using the same computed tomography data, target information, and dose constraints for all the contoured structures, 2 IMRT plans with alternative beam arrangements (IMRT-7M and IMRT-7P) by avoiding the anterior facial beam and 1 conventional radiotherapy plan (CONRT) were computed using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the planning target volumes (PTVs) and oral cavity from which the dose parameters and the conformity index of the PTV were recorded for dosimetric comparisons among the plans with different beam arrangements. The dose distributions to the PTVs were similar among the 3 IMRT beam arrangements, whereas the differences were significant between IMRT-7R and CONRT plans. For the oral cavity dose, the 3 IMRT beam arrangements did not show significant difference. Compared with IMRT-7R, CONRT plan showed a significantly lower mean dose, V30 and V-40, whereas the V-60 was significantly higher. The 2 suggested alternative beam arrangements did not significantly reduce the oral cavity dose. The impact of varying the beam angles in IMRT of NPC did not give noticeable effect on the target and oral cavity. Compared with IMRT, the 2-D conventional radiotherapy irradiated a greater high-dose volume in the oral cavity.

  4. Effect of beam arrangement on oral cavity dose in external beam radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Vincent W C; Yang, Zhi-Ning; Zhang, Wu-Zhe; Wu, Li-li; Lin, Zhi-xiong

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the oral cavity dose between the routine 7-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beam arrangement and 2 other 7-beam IMRT with the conventional radiotherapy beam arrangements in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten NPC patients treated by the 7-beam routine IMRT technique (IMRT-7R) between April 2009 and June 2009 were recruited. Using the same computed tomography data, target information, and dose constraints for all the contoured structures, 2 IMRT plans with alternative beam arrangements (IMRT-7M and IMRT-7P) by avoiding the anterior facial beam and 1 conventional radiotherapy plan (CONRT) were computed using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the planning target volumes (PTVs) and oral cavity from which the dose parameters and the conformity index of the PTV were recorded for dosimetric comparisons among the plans with different beam arrangements. The dose distributions to the PTVs were similar among the 3 IMRT beam arrangements, whereas the differences were significant between IMRT-7R and CONRT plans. For the oral cavity dose, the 3 IMRT beam arrangements did not show significant difference. Compared with IMRT-7R, CONRT plan showed a significantly lower mean dose, V30 and V-40, whereas the V-60 was significantly higher. The 2 suggested alternative beam arrangements did not significantly reduce the oral cavity dose. The impact of varying the beam angles in IMRT of NPC did not give noticeable effect on the target and oral cavity. Compared with IMRT, the 2-D conventional radiotherapy irradiated a greater high-dose volume in the oral cavity.

  5. Dosimetric evaluation of four-dimensional dose distributions of CyberKnife and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy in stereotactic body lung radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Mark K H; Kwong, Dora L W; Law, Gilbert M L; Tam, Eric; Tong, Anthony; Lee, Venus; Ng, Sherry C Y

    2013-07-08

    Advanced image-guided stereotatic body lung radiotherapy techniques using volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) with four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) and CyberKnife with real-time target tracking have been clinically implemented by different authors. However, dosimetric comparisons between these techniques are lacking. In this study, 4D CT scans of 14 patients were used to create VMAT and CyberKnife treatment plans using 4D dose calculations. The GTV and the organs at risk (OARs) were defined on the end-exhale images for CyberKnife planning and were then deformed to the midventilation images (MidV) for VMAT optimization. Direct 4D Monte Carlo dose optimizations were performed for CyberKnife (4D(CK)). Four-dimensional dose calculations were also applied to VMAT plans to generate the 4D dose distributions (4D(VMAT)) on the exhale images for direct comparisons with the 4D(CK) plans. 4D(CK) and 4D(VMAT) showed comparable target conformity (1.31 ± 0.13 vs. 1.39 ± 0.24, p = 0.05). GTV mean doses were significantly higher with 4D(CK). Statistical differences of dose volume metrics were not observed in the majority of OARs studied, except for esophagus, with 4D(VMAT) yielding marginally higher D1% than 4D(CK). The normal tissue volumes receiving 80%, 50%, and 30% of the prescription dose (V80%, V50%, and V30%) were higher with 4D(VMAT), whereas 4D(CK) yielded slightly higher V10% in posterior lesions than 4D(VMAT). VMAT resulted in much less monitor units and therefore greater delivery efficiency than CyberKnife. In general, it was possible to produce dosimetrically acceptable plans with both techniques. The selection of treatment modality should consider the dosimetric results as well as the patient's tolerance of the treatment process specific to the SBRT technique.

  6. Specific recommendations for accurate and direct use of PET-CT in PET guided radiotherapy for head and neck sites

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, C. M. Convery, D. J.; Greener, A. G.; Pike, L. C.; Baker, S.; Woods, E.; Hartill, C. E.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To provide specific experience-based guidance and recommendations for centers wishing to develop, validate, and implement an accurate and efficient process for directly using positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) for the radiotherapy planning of head and neck cancer patients. Methods: A PET-CT system was modified with hard-top couch, external lasers and radiotherapy immobilization and indexing devices and was subject to a commissioning and quality assurance program. PET-CT imaging protocols were developed specifically for radiotherapy planning and the image quality and pathway tested using phantoms and five patients recruited into an in-house study. Security and accuracy of data transfer was tested throughout the whole data pathway. The patient pathway was fully established and tested ready for implementation in a PET-guided dose-escalation trial for head and neck cancer patients. Results: Couch deflection was greater than for departmental CT simulator machines. An area of high attenuation in the couch generated image artifacts and adjustments were made accordingly. Using newly developed protocols CT image quality was suitable to maintain delineation and treatment accuracy. Upon transfer of data to the treatment planning system a half pixel offset between PET and CT was observed and corrected. By taking this into account, PET to CT alignment accuracy was maintained below 1 mm in all systems in the data pathway. Transfer of structures delineated in the PET fusion software to the radiotherapy treatment planning system was validated. Conclusions: A method to perform direct PET-guided radiotherapy planning was successfully validated and specific recommendations were developed to assist other centers. Of major concern is ensuring that the quality of PET and CT data is appropriate for radiotherapy treatment planning and on-treatment verification. Couch movements can be compromised, bore-size can be a limitation for certain immobilization

  7. Pain and Mean Absorbed Dose to the Pubic Bone After Radiotherapy Among Gynecological Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Waldenstroem, Ann-Charlotte; Olsson, Caroline; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Dunberger, Gail; Lind, Helena; Al-Abany, Massoud; Palm, Asa; Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Steineck, Gunnar

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the relationship between mean absorbed dose to the pubic bone after pelvic radiotherapy for gynecological cancer and occurrence of pubic bone pain among long-term survivors. Methods and Materials: In an unselected, population-based study, we identified 823 long-term gynecological cancer survivors treated with pelvic radiotherapy during 1991-2003. For comparison, we used a non-radiation-treated control population of 478 matched women from the Swedish Population Register. Pain, intensity of pain, and functional impairment due to pain in the pubic bone were assessed with a study-specific postal questionnaire. Results: We analyzed data from 650 survivors (participation rate 79%) with median follow-up of 6.3 years (range, 2.3-15.0 years) along with 344 control women (participation rate, 72 %). Ten percent of the survivors were treated with radiotherapy; ninety percent with surgery plus radiotherapy. Brachytherapy was added in 81%. Complete treatment records were recovered for 538/650 survivors, with dose distribution data including dose-volume histograms over the pubic bone. Pubic bone pain was reported by 73 survivors (11%); 59/517 (11%) had been exposed to mean absorbed external beam doses <52.5 Gy to the pubic bone and 5/12 (42%) to mean absorbed external beam doses {>=}52.5 Gy. Thirty-three survivors reported pain affecting sleep, a 13-fold increased prevalence compared with control women. Forty-nine survivors reported functional impairment measured as pain walking indoors, a 10-fold increased prevalence. Conclusions: Mean absorbed external beam dose above 52.5 Gy to the pubic bone increases the occurrence of pain in the pubic bone and may affect daily life of long-term survivors treated with radiotherapy for gynecological cancer.

  8. Estimation of effective imaging dose for kilovoltage intratreatment monitoring of the prostate position during cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ng, J A; Booth, J; Poulsen, P; Kuncic, Z; Keall, P J

    2013-01-01

    Kilovoltage Intratreatment Monitoring (KIM) is a novel real-time localization modality where the tumor position is continuously measured during Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) or Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy (IMAT) by a kilovoltage (kV) x-ray imager. Adding kV imaging during therapy adds radiation dose. The additional effective dose is quantified for prostate radiotherapy and compared to dose from other localization modalities. The software PCXMC 2.0 was used to calculate the effective dose delivered to a phantom as a function of imager angle and field size for a Varian On-Board Imager. The average angular effective dose was calculated for a field size of 6 cm × 6 cm. The average angular effective dose was used in calculations for different treatment scenarios. Treatment scenarios considered were treatment type and fractionation. For all treatment scenarios, (i.e. conventionally fractionated and SBRT; IMRT and IMAT), the total KIM dose at 1 Hz ranged from 2–10 mSv. This imaging dose is less than the Navotek radioactive implant dose (64 mSv) and a standard SBRT CBCT pretreatment scan dose (22 mSv) over an entire treatment regime. KIM delivers an acceptably low effective dose for daily use as a real-time image-guidance method for prostate radiotherapy. PMID:23938470

  9. Consideration of the radiation dose delivered away from the treatment field to patients in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michael L.; Kron, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    Radiation delivery to cancer patients for radiotherapy is invariably accompanied by unwanted radiation to other parts of the patient’s body. Traditionally, considerable effort has been made to calculate and measure the radiation dose to the target as well as to nearby critical structures. Only recently has attention been focused also on the relatively low doses that exist far from the primary radiation beams. In several clinical scenarios, such doses have been associated with cardiac toxicity as well as an increased risk of secondary cancer induction. Out-of-field dose is a result of leakage and scatter and generally difficult to predict accurately. The present review aims to present existing data, from measurements and calculations, and discuss its implications for radiotherapy. PMID:21731221

  10. Dose profile measurements during respiratory-gated lung stereotactic radiotherapy: A phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jong, W. L.; Wong, J. H. D.; Ng, K. H.; Ung, N. M.

    2016-03-01

    During stereotactic body radiotherapy, high radiation dose (∼60 Gy) is delivered to the tumour in small fractionation regime. In this study, the dosimetric characteristics were studied using radiochromic film during respiratory-gated and non-gated lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Specifically, the effect of respiratory cycle and amplitude, as well as gating window on the dosimetry were studied. In this study, the dose profiles along the irradiated area were measured. The dose profiles for respiratory-gated radiation delivery with different respiratory or tumour motion amplitudes, gating windows and respiratory time per cycle were in agreement with static radiation delivery. The respiratory gating system was able to deliver the radiation dose accurately (±1.05 mm) in the longitudinal direction. Although the treatment time for respiratory-gated SBRT was prolonged, this approach can potentially reduce the margin for internal tumour volume without compromising the tumour coverage. In addition, the normal tissue sparing effect can be improved.

  11. Effect of Breathing Motion on Radiotherapy Dose Accumulation in the Abdomen Using Deformable Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Velec, Michael; Moseley, Joanne L.; Eccles, Cynthia L.; Craig, Tim; Sharpe, Michael B.; Dawson, Laura A.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of breathing motion and dose accumulation on the planned radiotherapy dose to liver tumors and normal tissues using deformable image registration. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one free-breathing stereotactic liver cancer radiotherapy patients, planned on static exhale computed tomography (CT) for 27-60 Gy in six fractions, were included. A biomechanical model-based deformable image registration algorithm retrospectively deformed each exhale CT to inhale CT. This deformation map was combined with exhale and inhale dose grids from the treatment planning system to accumulate dose over the breathing cycle. Accumulation was also investigated using a simple rigid liver-to-liver registration. Changes to tumor and normal tissue dose were quantified. Results: Relative to static plans, mean dose change (range) after deformable dose accumulation (as % of prescription dose) was -1 (-14 to 8) to minimum tumor, -4 (-15 to 0) to maximum bowel, -4 (-25 to 1) to maximum duodenum, 2 (-1 to 9) to maximum esophagus, -2 (-13 to 4) to maximum stomach, 0 (-3 to 4) to mean liver, and -1 (-5 to 1) and -2 (-7 to 1) to mean left and right kidneys. Compared to deformable registration, rigid modeling had changes up to 8% to minimum tumor and 7% to maximum normal tissues. Conclusion: Deformable registration and dose accumulation revealed potentially significant dose changes to either a tumor or normal tissue in the majority of cases as a result of breathing motion. These changes may not be accurately accounted for with rigid motion.

  12. Investigation of Linac-Based Image-Guided Hypofractionated Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlicki, Todd . E-mail: tpaw@stanford.edu; Kim, Gwe-Ya; Hsu, Annie; Cotrutz, Cristian; Boyer, Arthur L.; Xing Lei; King, Christopher R.; Luxton, Gary

    2007-07-01

    A hypofractionation treatment protocol for prostate cancer was initiated in our department in December 2003. The treatment regimen consists of a total dose of 36.25 Gy delivered at 7.25 Gy per fraction over 10 days. We discuss the rationale for such a prostate hypofractionation protocol and the need for frequent prostate imaging during treatment. The CyberKnife (Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA), a linear accelerator mounted on a robotic arm, is currently being used as the radiation delivery device for this protocol, due to its incorporation of near real-time kV imaging of the prostate via 3 gold fiducial seeds. Recently introduced conventional linac kV imaging with intensity modulated planning and delivery may add a new option for these hypofractionated treatments. The purpose of this work is to investigate the use of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and the Varian Trilogy Accelerator with on-board kV imaging (Varian Medical Systems Inc., Palo Alto, CA) for treatment of our hypofractionated prostate patients. The dose-volume histograms and dose statistics of 2 patients previously treated on the CyberKnife were compared to 7-field IMRT plans. A process of acquiring images to observe intrafraction prostate motion was achieved in an average time of about 1 minute and 40 seconds, and IMRT beam delivery takes about 40 seconds per field. A complete 7-field IMRT plan can therefore be imaged and delivered in 10 to 17 minutes. The Varian Trilogy Accelerator with on-board imaging and IMRT is well suited for image-guided hypofractionated prostate treatments. During this study, we have also uncovered opportunities for improvement of the on-board imaging hardware/software implementation that would further enhance performance in this regard.

  13. Image-guided radiotherapy and motion management in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this review, image guidance and motion management in radiotherapy for lung cancer is discussed. Motion characteristics of lung tumours and image guidance techniques to obtain motion information are elaborated. Possibilities for management of image guidance and motion in the various steps of the treatment chain are explained, including imaging techniques and beam delivery techniques. Clinical studies using different motion management techniques are reviewed, and finally future directions for image guidance and motion management are outlined. PMID:25955231

  14. SU-E-T-238: Monte Carlo Estimation of Cerenkov Dose for Photo-Dynamic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chibani, O; Price, R; Ma, C; Eldib, A; Mora, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Estimation of Cerenkov dose from high-energy megavoltage photon and electron beams in tissue and its impact on the radiosensitization using Protoporphyrine IX (PpIX) for tumor targeting enhancement in radiotherapy. Methods: The GEPTS Monte Carlo code is used to generate dose distributions from 18MV Varian photon beam and generic high-energy (45-MV) photon and (45-MeV) electron beams in a voxel-based tissueequivalent phantom. In addition to calculating the ionization dose, the code scores Cerenkov energy released in the wavelength range 375–425 nm corresponding to the pick of the PpIX absorption spectrum (Fig. 1) using the Frank-Tamm formula. Results: The simulations shows that the produced Cerenkov dose suitable for activating PpIX is 4000 to 5500 times lower than the overall radiation dose for all considered beams (18MV, 45 MV and 45 MeV). These results were contradictory to the recent experimental studies by Axelsson et al. (Med. Phys. 38 (2011) p 4127), where Cerenkov dose was reported to be only two orders of magnitude lower than the radiation dose. Note that our simulation results can be corroborated by a simple model where the Frank and Tamm formula is applied for electrons with 2 MeV/cm stopping power generating Cerenkov photons in the 375–425 nm range and assuming these photons have less than 1mm penetration in tissue. Conclusion: The Cerenkov dose generated by high-energy photon and electron beams may produce minimal clinical effect in comparison with the photon fluence (or dose) commonly used for photo-dynamic therapy. At the present time, it is unclear whether Cerenkov radiation is a significant contributor to the recently observed tumor regression for patients receiving radiotherapy and PpIX versus patients receiving radiotherapy only. The ongoing study will include animal experimentation and investigation of dose rate effects on PpIX response.

  15. Radiotherapy Dose Perturbation of Esophageal Stents Examined in an Experimental Model

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, Todd F.; Hsu, Annie; Ogara, Maydeen M.; Luba, Daniel G.; Tamler, Bradley J.; DiSario, James A.; Maxim, Peter G.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the radiotherapy dose perturbations caused by esophageal stents in patients undergoing external beam treatments for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: Four esophageal stents were examined (three metallic stents: WallFlex, Ultraflex, and Alveolus; one nonmetallic stent with limited radiopaque markers for visualization: Polyflex). All experiments were performed in a liquid water phantom with a custom acrylic stent holder. Radiochromic film was used to measure the dose distributions adjacent to the stents at locations proximal and distal to the radiation source. The stents were placed in an air-filled cavity to simulate the esophagus. Treatment plans were created and delivered for photon energies of 6 and 15 MV, and data analysis was performed on uniform regions of interest, according to the size and geometric placement of the films, to quantify the dose perturbations. Results: The three metallic stents produced the largest dose perturbations with distinct patterns of 'hot' spots (increased dose) measured proximal to the radiation source (up to 15.4%) and both 'cold' (decreased dose) and hot spots measured distal to the radiation source (range, -6.1%-5.8%). The polymeric Polyflex stent produced similar dose perturbations when the radiopaque markers were examined (range, -7.6%-15.4%). However, when the radiopaque markers were excluded from the analysis, the Polyflex stent produced significantly smaller dose perturbations, with maximum hot spots of 7.3% and cold spots of -3.2%. Conclusions: The dose perturbations caused by esophageal stents during the treatment of esophageal cancer using external beam radiotherapy should be understood. These perturbations will result in hot and cold spots in the esophageal mucosa, with varying magnitudes depending on the stent. The nonmetallic Polyflex stent appears to be the most suitable for patients undergoing radiotherapy, but further studies are necessary to determine the clinical significance of the

  16. An assessment of PTV margin based on actual accumulated dose for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ning; Kumarasiri, Akila; Nurushev, Teamour; Burmeister, Jay; Xing, Lei; Liu, Dezhi; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Kim, Jinkoo; Zhong, Hualiang; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present the results of a margin reduction study involving dosimetric and radiobiologic assessment of cumulative dose distributions, computed using an image guided adaptive radiotherapy based framework. Eight prostate cancer patients, treated with 7–9, 6 MV, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields, were included in this study. The workflow consists of cone beam CT (CBCT) based localization, deformable image registration of the CBCT to simulation CT image datasets (SIMCT), dose reconstruction and dose accumulation on the SIM-CT, and plan evaluation using radiobiological models. For each patient, three IMRT plans were generated with different margins applied to the CTV. The PTV margin for the original plan was 10 mm and 6 mm at the prostate/anterior rectal wall interface (10/6 mm) and was reduced to: (a) 5/3 mm, and (b) 3 mm uniformly. The average percent reductions in predicted tumor control probability (TCP) in the accumulated (actual) plans in comparison to the original plans over eight patients were 0.4%, 0.7% and 11.0% with 10/6 mm, 5/3 mm and 3 mm uniform margin respectively. The mean increase in predicted normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for grades 2/3 rectal bleeding for the actual plans in comparison to the static plans with margins of 10/6, 5/3 and 3 mm uniformly was 3.5%, 2.8% and 2.4% respectively. For the actual dose distributions, predicted NTCP for late rectal bleeding was reduced by 3.6% on average when the margin was reduced from 10/6 mm to 5/3 mm, and further reduced by 1.0% on average when the margin was reduced to 3 mm. The average reduction in complication free tumor control probability (P+) in the actual plans in comparison to the original plans with margins of 10/6, 5/3 and 3 mm was 3.7%, 2.4% and 13.6% correspondingly. The significant reduction of TCP and P+ in the actual plan with 3 mm margin came from one outlier, where individualizing patient treatment plans through margin adaptation

  17. An assessment of PTV margin based on actual accumulated dose for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Ning; Kumarasiri, Akila; Nurushev, Teamour; Burmeister, Jay; Xing, Lei; Liu, Dezhi; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Kim, Jinkoo; Zhong, Hualiang; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to present the results of a margin reduction study involving dosimetric and radiobiologic assessment of cumulative dose distributions, computed using an image guided adaptive radiotherapy based framework. Eight prostate cancer patients, treated with 7-9, 6 MV, intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields, were included in this study. The workflow consists of cone beam CT (CBCT) based localization, deformable image registration of the CBCT to simulation CT image datasets (SIM-CT), dose reconstruction and dose accumulation on the SIM-CT, and plan evaluation using radiobiological models. For each patient, three IMRT plans were generated with different margins applied to the CTV. The PTV margin for the original plan was 10 mm and 6 mm at the prostate/anterior rectal wall interface (10/6 mm) and was reduced to: (a) 5/3 mm, and (b) 3 mm uniformly. The average percent reductions in predicted tumor control probability (TCP) in the accumulated (actual) plans in comparison to the original plans over eight patients were 0.4%, 0.7% and 11.0% with 10/6 mm, 5/3 mm and 3 mm uniform margin respectively. The mean increase in predicted normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for grades 2/3 rectal bleeding for the actual plans in comparison to the static plans with margins of 10/6, 5/3 and 3 mm uniformly was 3.5%, 2.8% and 2.4% respectively. For the actual dose distributions, predicted NTCP for late rectal bleeding was reduced by 3.6% on average when the margin was reduced from 10/6 mm to 5/3 mm, and further reduced by 1.0% on average when the margin was reduced to 3 mm. The average reduction in complication free tumor control probability (P+) in the actual plans in comparison to the original plans with margins of 10/6, 5/3 and 3 mm was 3.7%, 2.4% and 13.6% correspondingly. The significant reduction of TCP and P+ in the actual plan with 3 mm margin came from one outlier, where individualizing patient treatment plans through margin adaptation

  18. Universal Survival Curve and Single Fraction Equivalent Dose: Useful Tools in Understanding Potency of Ablative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Clint; Papiez, Lech; Zhang Shichuan; Story, Michael; Timmerman, Robert D.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: Overprediction of the potency and toxicity of high-dose ablative radiotherapy such as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) by the linear quadratic (LQ) model led to many clinicians' hesitating to adopt this efficacious and well-tolerated therapeutic option. The aim of this study was to offer an alternative method of analyzing the effect of SBRT by constructing a universal survival curve (USC) that provides superior approximation of the experimentally measured survival curves in the ablative, high-dose range without losing the strengths of the LQ model around the shoulder. Methods and Materials: The USC was constructed by hybridizing two classic radiobiologic models: the LQ model and the multitarget model. We have assumed that the LQ model gives a good description for conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (CFRT) for the dose to the shoulder. For ablative doses beyond the shoulder, the survival curve is better described as a straight line as predicted by the multitarget model. The USC smoothly interpolates from a parabola predicted by the LQ model to the terminal asymptote of the multitarget model in the high-dose region. From the USC, we derived two equivalence functions, the biologically effective dose and the single fraction equivalent dose for both CFRT and SBRT. Results: The validity of the USC was tested by using previously published parameters of the LQ and multitarget models for non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines. A comparison of the goodness-of-fit of the LQ and USC models was made to a high-dose survival curve of the H460 non-small-cell lung cancer cell line. Conclusion: The USC can be used to compare the dose fractionation schemes of both CFRT and SBRT. The USC provides an empirically and a clinically well-justified rationale for SBRT while preserving the strengths of the LQ model for CFRT.

  19. Dose to the intracranial arteries in stereotactic and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for skull base tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Nieder, Carsten . E-mail: cnied@hotmail.com; Grosu, Anca L.; Stark, Sybille; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Busch, Raymonde; Kneschaurek, Peter; Molls, Michael

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To examine retrospectively the maximum dose to the large skull base/intracranial arteries in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), because of the potential risk of perfusion disturbances. Methods and Materials: Overall, 56 patients with tumors adjacent to at least one major artery were analyzed. Our strategy was to perform FSRT with these criteria: 1.8 Gy per fraction, planning target volume (PTV) enclosed by the 95% isodose, maximum dose 107%. Dose limits were applied to established organs at risk, but not the vessels. If FSRT planning failed to meet any of these criteria, IMRT was planned with the same objectives. Results: In 31 patients (median PTV, 23 cm{sup 3}), the FSRT plan fulfilled all criteria. No artery received a dose {>=}105%. Twenty-five patients (median PTV, 39 cm{sup 3}) needed IMRT planning. In 11 of 25 patients (median PTV, 85 cm{sup 3}), no plan satisfying all our criteria could be calculated. Only in this group, moderately increased maximum vessel doses were observed (106-110%, n = 7, median PTV, 121 cm{sup 3}). The median PTV dose gradient was 29% (significantly different from the 14 patients with satisfactory IMRT plans). Three of the four patients in this group had paranasal sinus tumors. Conclusion: The doses to the major arteries should be calculated in IMRT planning for critical tumor locations if a dose gradient >13% within the PTV can not be avoided because the PTV is large or includes air cavities.

  20. Accumulated Dose in Liver Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: Positioning, Breathing, and Deformation Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Velec, Michael; Moseley, Joanne L.; Craig, Tim; Dawson, Laura A.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the accumulated dose deviations to tumors and normal tissues in liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and investigate their geometric causes. Methods and Materials: Thirty previously treated liver cancer patients were retrospectively evaluated. Stereotactic body radiotherapy was planned on the static exhale CT for 27-60 Gy in 6 fractions, and patients were treated in free-breathing with daily cone-beam CT guidance. Biomechanical model-based deformable image registration accumulated dose over both the planning four-dimensional (4D) CT (predicted breathing dose) and also over each fraction's respiratory-correlated cone-beam CT (accumulated treatment dose). The contribution of different geometric errors to changes between the accumulated and predicted breathing dose were quantified. Results: Twenty-one patients (70%) had accumulated dose deviations relative to the planned static prescription dose >5%, ranging from -15% to 5% in tumors and -42% to 8% in normal tissues. Sixteen patients (53%) still had deviations relative to the 4D CT-predicted dose, which were similar in magnitude. Thirty-two tissues in these 16 patients had deviations >5% relative to the 4D CT-predicted dose, and residual setup errors (n = 17) were most often the largest cause of the deviations, followed by deformations (n = 8) and breathing variations (n = 7). Conclusion: The majority of patients had accumulated dose deviations >5% relative to the static plan. Significant deviations relative to the predicted breathing dose still occurred in more than half the patients, commonly owing to residual setup errors. Accumulated SBRT dose may be warranted to pursue further dose escalation, adaptive SBRT, and aid in correlation with clinical outcomes.

  1. Efficacy of low-dose radiotherapy in painful gonarthritis: experiences from a retrospective East German bicenter study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of low-dose radiotherapy in painful gonarthritis. Methods We assessed the medical records of 1037 patients with painful gonarthritis who had undergone low-dose radiotherapy between 1981 and 2008. The subjective patient perception of the response to irradiation as graded immediately or up to two months after the completion of a radiotherapy series was evaluated and correlated with age, gender, radiological grading and the duration of symptoms before radiotherapy. Moreover, we performed a mail survey to obtain additional long-term follow-up information and received one hundred and six evaluable questionnaires. Results We assessed 1659 series of radiotherapy in 1037 patients. In 79.3% of the cases the patients experienced a slight, marked or complete pain relief immediately or up to two months after the completion of radiotherapy. Gender, age and the duration of pain before radiotherapy did not have a significant influence on the response to irradiation. In contrast, severe signs of osteoarthritis were associated with more effective pain relief. In more than 50% of the patients who reported a positive response to irradiation a sustained period of symptomatic improvement was observed. Conclusions Our results confirm that low-dose radiotherapy is an effective treatment for painful osteoarthritis of the knee. In contrast to an earlier retrospective study, severe signs of osteoarthritis constituted a positive prognostic factor for the response to irradiation. A randomized trial is urgently required to compare radiotherapy with other treatment modalities. PMID:23369282

  2. Activation of hip prostheses in high energy radiotherapy and resultant dose to nearby tissue.

    PubMed

    Keehan, Stephanie; Smith, Ryan L; Millar, Jeremy; Esser, Max; Taylor, Michael L; Lonski, Peta; Kron, Tomas; Franich, Rick D

    2017-03-01

    High energy radiotherapy can produce contaminant neutrons through the photonuclear effect. Patients receiving external beam radiation therapy to the pelvis may have high-density hip prostheses. Metallic materials such as those in hip prostheses, often have high cross-sections for neutron interaction. In this study, Thackray (UK) prosthetic hips have been irradiated by 18 MV radiotherapy beams to evaluate the additional dose to patients from the activation products. Hips were irradiated in- and out-of field at various distances from the beam isocenter to assess activation caused in-field by photo-activation, and neutron activation which occurs both in and out-of-field. NaI(Tl) scintillator detectors were used to measure the subsequent gamma-ray emissions and their half-lives. High sensitivity Mg, Cu, P doped LiF thermoluminescence dosimeter chips (TLD-100H) were used to measure the subsequent dose at the surface of a prosthesis over the 12 h following an in-field irradiation of 10,000 MU to a hip prosthesis located at the beam isocenter in a water phantom. (53) Fe, (56) Mn, and (52) V were identified within the hip following irradiation by radiotherapy beams. The dose measured at the surface of a prosthesis following irradiation in a water phantom was 0.20 mGy over 12 h. The dose at the surface of prostheses irradiated to 200 MU was below the limit of detection (0.05 mGy) of the TLD100H. Prosthetic hips are activated by incident photons and neutrons in high energy radiotherapy, however, the dose resulting from activation is very small.

  3. A method to determine the planar dose distributions in patient undergone radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilla, S.; Viola, P.; Augelli, B. G.; D'Onofrio, G.; Grimaldi, L.; Craus, M.; Digesù, C.; Deodato, F.; Macchia, G.; Morganti, A. G.; Fidanzio, A.; Azario, L.; Piermattei, A.

    2008-06-01

    A 2D-array equipped with 729 vented plane parallel ion-chambers has been calibrated as a portal dose detector for radiotherapy in vivo measurements. The array has been positioned by a radiographic film stand at 120 cm from the source orthogonal to the radiotherapy beam delivered with the gantry angle at 180°. The collision between the 2D-array and the patient's couch have been avoided. In this work, using the measurements of the portal detector, we present a method to reconstruct the dose variations in the patient treated with step and shoot intensity-modulated beams (IMRT) for head-neck tumours. For this treatment morphological changes often occur during the fractionated therapy. In a first step an in-house software supplied the comparison between the measured portal dose and the one computed by a commercial treatment planning system within the field of view of the computed tomography (CT) scanner. For each patient, the percentage Pγ of chambers, where the comparison is in agreement within a selected acceptance criteria, was determined 8 times. At the first radiotherapy fraction the γ-index analysis supplied Pγ values of about 95%, within acceptance criteria in terms of dose-difference, ΔD, and distance-agreement, Δd, that was equal to 5% and 4 mm, respectively. These acceptance criteria were taken into account for small errors in the patient's set-up reproducibility and for the accuracy of the portal dose calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS) in particular when the beam was attenuated by inhomogeneous tissues and the shape of the head-neck body contours were irregular. During the treatment, some patients showed a reduction of the Pγ below 90% because due to radiotherapy treatment there was a change of the patient's morphology. In a second step a method, based on dosimetric measurements that used standard phantoms, supplied the percentage dose variations in a coronal plane of the patient using the percentage dose variations measured by the 2D

  4. Scattered radiation doses to some critical organs during pediatric radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Agard, E T; Ehlers, G; Kirchberg, S

    1985-04-01

    The levels of scattered radiation doses imparted to the eyes, thyroid and gonads of pediatric patients treated with orthovoltage radiation (300 kVp, 2.0 mmCu HVL) and with a 4-MV linear accelerator, were determined by making thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements in three paraffin phantoms of different sizes. These phantoms were made from molds of mannequins used for store display, of approximate heights 30", 40" and 50", representing children of ages 1-2, 4-5 and 8-10 yr, respectively. The sites chosen for irradiation were (1) the whole brain, (2) the chest, (3) the kidney bed, (4) the whole abdomen and (5) the spinal column. These sites are normally treated in such pediatric malignancies as medulloblastoma, neuroblastoma and Wilms' tumor. Some of the doses measured are less than 10 rad for an entire treatment regimen, and would therefore be categorized as low-level doses. Where radiation was the only mode of treatment for long-term survivors of such malignancies, especially those treated 20-30 yr ago with orthovoltage radiation, useful data may be extracted for contributing to our knowledge about the long-term effects of low levels of radiation.

  5. Functional Image-Guided Radiotherapy Planning in Respiratory-Gated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Tomoki; Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Nagata, Yasushi

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incorporation of functional lung image-derived low attenuation area (LAA) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) into respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in treatment planning for lung cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods and Materials: Eight lung cancer patients with COPD were the subjects of this study. LAA was generated from 4D-CT data sets according to CT values of less than than -860 Hounsfield units (HU) as a threshold. The functional lung image was defined as the area where LAA was excluded from the image of the total lung. Two respiratory-gated radiotherapy plans (70 Gy/35 fractions) were designed and compared in each patient as follows: Plan A was an anatomical IMRT or VMAT plan based on the total lung; Plan F was a functional IMRT or VMAT plan based on the functional lung. Dosimetric parameters (percentage of total lung volume irradiated with {>=}20 Gy [V20], and mean dose of total lung [MLD]) of the two plans were compared. Results: V20 was lower in Plan F than in Plan A (mean 1.5%, p = 0.025 in IMRT, mean 1.6%, p = 0.044 in VMAT) achieved by a reduction in MLD (mean 0.23 Gy, p = 0.083 in IMRT, mean 0.5 Gy, p = 0.042 in VMAT). No differences were noted in target volume coverage and organ-at-risk doses. Conclusions: Functional IGRT planning based on LAA in respiratory-guided IMRT or VMAT appears to be effective in preserving a functional lung in lung cancer patients with COPD.

  6. An automatic dose verification system for adaptive radiotherapy for helical tomotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Xiaohu; Chen, Mingli; Parnell, Donald; Olivera, Gustavo; Galmarini, Daniel; Lu, Weiguo

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: During a typical 5-7 week treatment of external beam radiotherapy, there are potential differences between planned patient's anatomy and positioning, such as patient weight loss, or treatment setup. The discrepancies between planned and delivered doses resulting from these differences could be significant, especially in IMRT where dose distributions tightly conforms to target volumes while avoiding organs-at-risk. We developed an automatic system to monitor delivered dose using daily imaging. Methods: For each treatment, a merged image is generated by registering the daily pre-treatment setup image and planning CT using treatment position information extracted from the Tomotherapy archive. The treatment dose is then computed on this merged image using our in-house convolution-superposition based dose calculator implemented on GPU. The deformation field between merged and planning CT is computed using the Morphon algorithm. The planning structures and treatment doses are subsequently warped for analysis and dose accumulation. All results are saved in DICOM format with private tags and organized in a database. Due to the overwhelming amount of information generated, a customizable tolerance system is used to flag potential treatment errors or significant anatomical changes. A web-based system and a DICOM-RT viewer were developed for reporting and reviewing the results. Results: More than 30 patients were analysed retrospectively. Our in-house dose calculator passed 97% gamma test evaluated with 2% dose difference and 2mm distance-to-agreement compared with Tomotherapy calculated dose, which is considered sufficient for adaptive radiotherapy purposes. Evaluation of the deformable registration through visual inspection showed acceptable and consistent results, except for cases with large or unrealistic deformation. Our automatic flagging system was able to catch significant patient setup errors or anatomical changes. Conclusions: We developed an automatic dose

  7. Biological dose representation for carbon-ion radiotherapy of unconventional fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Inaniwa, Taku

    2017-02-01

    In carbon-ion radiotherapy, single-beam delivery each day in alternate directions has been common practice for efficient operation, taking advantage of the Bragg peak and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for uniform dose conformation to a tumor. Treatments are usually fractionated and treatment plans are evaluated with the total RBE-weighted dose; however, this is of limited relevance to the biological effect. In this study, we reformulate the biologically effective dose (BED) to normalize the dose-fractionation and cell-repopulation effects as well as the RBE of treating radiation, based on inactivation of a reference cell line by a reference carbon-ion radiation. The BED distribution virtually represents the biological effect of a treatment regardless of radiation modality or fractionation scheme. We applied the BED formulation to simplistic model treatments and to a preclinical survey for hypofractionation based on an actual prostate cancer treatment with carbon ions. The proposed formulation was demonstrated to be practical and to give theoretical implications. For a prostate cancer treatment in 12 fractions, the distributions of BED and of RBE-weighted dose were very similar. With hypofractionation, while the RBE-weighted dose distribution varied significantly, the BED distribution was nearly invariant, implying that carbon-ion radiotherapy would be effectively insensitive to fractionation. However, treatment evaluation with such a simplistic biological dose is intrinsically limited and must be complemented in practice by clinical experience and biological experiments.

  8. The feasibility of using a conventional flexible RF coil for an online MR-guided radiotherapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogcarspel, Stan J.; Crijns, Sjoerd P. M.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; van Vulpen, Marco; Raaymakers, Bas W.

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of a flexible radiofrequency coil on the treatment delivery of an online MR-guided radiotherapy treatment. For this study, we used a Synergy MR body coil (Philips, Best) in combination with the current MRL prototype of the UMC Utrecht. The compatibility of the coil is evaluated in two steps. First, we evaluated the dosimetric impact of the MR coil on both a simple and a complex irradiation strategy for treating spinal bone metastases. This tumor site will likely be chosen for the first in-man treatments with the UMC Utrecht MRL system. Second, we investigated the impact of the treatment beam on the MRI performance of the body coil. In case a single posterior-anterior rectangular field was applied, dose to the target volume was underestimated up to 2.2% as a result of beam attenuation in the MR coil. This underestimation however, decreased to 1% when a stereotactic treatment strategy was employed. The presence of the MR coil in or near the distal site of the treatment beam decreased the exit dose when a magnetic field was present. The MRI performance of the coil was unaffected as the result of the radiation. It is feasible to use the Synergy MR body coil for an online MR-guided radiotherapy treatment without any modification to the coil or attenuation correction methods in the planning stage. The effect of the MRI coil on the dose delivery is minimal and there is no effect of the treatment beam on the SNR of the acquired MRI data.

  9. Low-Dose Involved-Field Radiotherapy as Alternative Treatment of Nodular Lymphocyte Predominance Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Rick L.M. Girinsky, Theo; Aleman, Berthe; Henry-Amar, Michel; Boer, Jan-Paul de; Jong, Daphne de

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Nodular lymphocyte predominance Hodgkin's lymphoma is a very rare disease, characterized by an indolent clinical course, with sometimes very late relapses occurring in a minority of all patients. Considerable discussion is ongoing on the treatment of primary and relapsed disease. Patients and Methods: A group of 9 patients were irradiated to a dose of 4 Gy on involved areas only. Results: After a median follow-up of 37 months (range, 6-66), the overall response rate was 89%. Six patients had complete remission (67%), two had partial remission (22%), and one had stable disease (11%). Of 8 patients, 5 developed local relapse 9-57 months after radiotherapy. No toxicity was noted. Conclusion: In nodular lymphocyte predominance Hodgkin's lymphoma, low-dose radiotherapy provided excellent response rates and lasting remissions without significant toxicity.

  10. Skin dose mapping for fluoroscopically guided interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Perry B.; Borrego, David; Balter, Stephen; Johnson, Kevin; Siragusa, Daniel; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To introduce a new skin dose mapping software system for interventional fluoroscopy dose assessment and to analyze the benefits and limitations of patient-phantom matching. Methods: In this study, a new software system was developed for visualizing patient skin dose during interventional fluoroscopy procedures. The system works by translating the reference point air kerma to the location of the patient's skin, which is represented by a computational model. In order to orient the model with the x-ray source, geometric parameters found within the radiation dose structured report (RDSR) are used along with a limited number of in-clinic measurements. The output of the system is a visual indication of skin dose mapped onto an anthropomorphic model at a resolution of 5 mm. In order to determine if patient-dependent and patient-sculpted models increase accuracy, peak skin dose was calculated for each of 26 patient-specific models and compared with doses calculated using an elliptical stylized model, a reference hybrid model, a matched patient-dependent model and one patient-sculpted model. Results were analyzed in terms of a percent difference using the doses calculated using the patient-specific model as the true standard. Results: Anthropometric matching, including the use of both patient-dependent and patient-sculpted phantoms, was shown most beneficial for left lateral and anterior-posterior projections. In these cases, the percent difference using a reference model was between 8 and 20%, using a patient-dependent model between 7 and 15%, and using a patient-sculpted model between 3 and 7%. Under the table tube configurations produced errors less than 5% in most situations due to the flattening affects of the table and pad, and the fact that table height is the main determination of source-to-skin distance for these configurations. In addition to these results, several skin dose maps were produced and a prototype display system was placed on the in

  11. Skin dose mapping for fluoroscopically guided interventions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Perry B.; Borrego, David; Balter, Stephen; Johnson, Kevin; Siragusa, Daniel; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To introduce a new skin dose mapping software system for interventional fluoroscopy dose assessment and to analyze the benefits and limitations of patient-phantom matching. Methods: In this study, a new software system was developed for visualizing patient skin dose during interventional fluoroscopy procedures. The system works by translating the reference point air kerma to the location of the patient’s skin, which is represented by a computational model. In order to orient the model with the x-ray source, geometric parameters found within the radiation dose structured report (RDSR) are used along with a limited number of in-clinic measurements. The output of the system is a visual indication of skin dose mapped onto an anthropomorphic model at a resolution of 5 mm. In order to determine if patient-dependent and patient-sculpted models increase accuracy, peak skin dose was calculated for each of 26 patient-specific models and compared with doses calculated using an elliptical stylized model, a reference hybrid model, a matched patient-dependent model and one patient-sculpted model. Results were analyzed in terms of a percent difference using the doses calculated using the patient-specific model as the true standard. Results: Anthropometric matching, including the use of both patient-dependent and patient-sculpted phantoms, was shown most beneficial for left lateral and anterior–posterior projections. In these cases, the percent difference using a reference model was between 8 and 20%, using a patient-dependent model between 7 and 15%, and using a patient-sculpted model between 3 and 7%. Under the table tube configurations produced errors less than 5% in most situations due to the flattening affects of the table and pad, and the fact that table height is the main determination of source-to-skin distance for these configurations. In addition to these results, several skin dose maps were produced and a prototype display system was placed on the in

  12. Radiotherapy dosimetry of the breast : Factors affecting dose to the patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venables, Karen

    The work presented in this thesis developed from the quality assurance for the START trial. This provided a unique opportunity to perform measurements in a breast shaped, soft tissue equivalent phantom in over 40 hospitals, representing 75% of the radiotherapy centres in the UK. A wide range of planning systems using beam library, beam model and convolution based algorithms have been compared. The limitations of current algorithms as applied to breast radiotherapy have been investigated by analysing the results of the START quality assurance programme, performing further measurements of surface dose and setting up of a Monte Carlo system to calculate dose distributions and superficial doses. Measurements in both 2D and 3D breast phantoms indicated that the average measured dose at the centre of the breast was lower than that calculated on the planning system by approximately 2%. Surface dose measurements showed good agreement between measurements and Monte Carlo calculations with values ranging from 6% of the maximum dose for a small field (5cmx5cm) at normal incidence to 37% for a large field (9cmx20cm) at an angle of 75°. Calculation on CT plans with pixel by pixel correction for the breast density indicated that monitor units are lower by an average 3% compared to a bulk density corrected plan assuming a density of 1g.cm-3. The average dose estimated from TLD in build-up caps placed on the patient surface was 0.99 of the prescribed dose. This shows that the underestimation of dose due to the assumption of unit density tissue is partially cancelled by the overestimation of dose by the algorithms. The work showed that simple calculation algorithms can be used for calculation of dose to the breast, however they are less accurate for patients who have undergone a mastectomy and in regions close to inhomogeneities where more complex algorithms are needed.

  13. Utilising pseudo-CT data for dose calculation and plan optimization in adaptive radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Brendan; Kumar, Shivani; Dowling, Jason; Begg, Jarrad; Lambert, Jonathan; Lim, Karen; Vinod, Shalini K; Greer, Peter B; Holloway, Lois

    2015-12-01

    To quantify the dose calculation error and resulting optimization uncertainty caused by performing inverse treatment planning on inaccurate electron density data (pseudo-CT) as needed for adaptive radiotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) based treatment planning. Planning Computer Tomography (CT) data from 10 cervix cancer patients was used to generate 4 pseudo-CT data sets. Each pseudo-CT was created based on an available method of assigning electron density to an anatomic image. An inversely modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan was developed on each planning CT. The dose calculation error caused by each pseudo-CT data set was quantified by comparing the dose calculated each pseudo-CT data set with that calculated on the original planning CT for the same IMRT plan. The optimization uncertainty introduced by the dose calculation error was quantified by re-optimizing the same optimization parameters on each pseudo-CT data set and comparing against the original planning CT. Dose differences were quantified by assessing the Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD) for targets and relevant organs at risk. Across all pseudo-CT data sets and all organs, the absolute mean dose calculation error was 0.2 Gy, and was within 2 % of the prescription dose in 98.5 % of cases. Then absolute mean optimisation error was 0.3 Gy EUD, indicating that that inverse optimisation is impacted by the dose calculation error. However, the additional uncertainty introduced to plan optimisation is small compared the sources of variation which already exist. Use of inaccurate electron density data for inverse treatment planning results in a dose calculation error, which in turn introduces additional uncertainty into the plan optimization process. In this study, we showed that both of these effects are clinically acceptable for cervix cancer patients using four different pseudo-CT data sets. Dose calculation and inverse optimization on pseudo-CT is feasible for this patient cohort.

  14. Measurement of radiation dose with BeO dosimeters using optically stimulated luminescence technique in radiotherapy applications.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Serdar; Güneş Tanır, A; Meriç, Niyazi; Aydınkarahaliloğlu, Ercan

    2015-09-01

    The radiation dose delivered to the target by using different radiotherapy applications has been measured with the help of beryllium oxide (BeO) dosimeters to be placed inside the rando phantom. Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy (3DCRT), Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy (IMAT) have been used as radiotherapy application. Individual treatment plans have been made for the three radiotherapy applications of rando phantom. The section 4 on the phantom was selected as target and 200 cGy doses were delivered. After the dosimeters placed on section 4 (target) and the sections 2 and 6 (non-target) were irradiated, the result was read through the OSL technique on the Risø TL/OSL system. This procedure was repeated three times for each radiotherapy application. The doses delivered to the target and the non-target sections as a result of the 3DCRT, IMRT and IMAT plans were analyzed. The doses received by the target were measured as 204.71 cGy, 204.76 cGy and 205.65 cGy, respectively. The dose values obtained from treatment planning system (TPS) were compared to the dose values obtained using the OSL technique. It has been concluded that, the radiation dose can be measured with the OSL technique by using BeO dosimeters in medical practices.

  15. Conversion coefficients for determination of dispersed photon dose during radiotherapy: NRUrad input code for MCNP

    PubMed Central

    Krstic, D.; Nikezic, D.

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a common cancer treatment module, where a certain amount of dose will be delivered to the targeted organ. This is achieved usually by photons generated by linear accelerator units. However, radiation scattering within the patient’s body and the surrounding environment will lead to dose dispersion to healthy tissues which are not targets of the primary radiation. Determination of the dispersed dose would be important for assessing the risk and biological consequences in different organs or tissues. In the present work, the concept of conversion coefficient (F) of the dispersed dose was developed, in which F = (Dd/Dt), where Dd was the dispersed dose in a non-targeted tissue and Dt is the absorbed dose in the targeted tissue. To quantify Dd and Dt, a comprehensive model was developed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) package to simulate the linear accelerator head, the human phantom, the treatment couch and the radiotherapy treatment room. The present work also demonstrated the feasibility and power of parallel computing through the use of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) version of MCNP5. PMID:28362837

  16. Conversion coefficients for determination of dispersed photon dose during radiotherapy: NRUrad input code for MCNP.

    PubMed

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Ng, C Y P; Krstic, D; Nikezic, D; Yu, K N

    2017-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a common cancer treatment module, where a certain amount of dose will be delivered to the targeted organ. This is achieved usually by photons generated by linear accelerator units. However, radiation scattering within the patient's body and the surrounding environment will lead to dose dispersion to healthy tissues which are not targets of the primary radiation. Determination of the dispersed dose would be important for assessing the risk and biological consequences in different organs or tissues. In the present work, the concept of conversion coefficient (F) of the dispersed dose was developed, in which F = (Dd/Dt), where Dd was the dispersed dose in a non-targeted tissue and Dt is the absorbed dose in the targeted tissue. To quantify Dd and Dt, a comprehensive model was developed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) package to simulate the linear accelerator head, the human phantom, the treatment couch and the radiotherapy treatment room. The present work also demonstrated the feasibility and power of parallel computing through the use of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) version of MCNP5.

  17. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) modelling using spatial dose metrics and machine learning methods for severe acute oral mucositis resulting from head and neck radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Jamie A; Wong, Kee H; Welsh, Liam C; Jones, Ann-Britt; Schick, Ulrike; Newbold, Kate L; Bhide, Shreerang A; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M; Gulliford, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Severe acute mucositis commonly results from head and neck (chemo)radiotherapy. A predictive model of mucositis could guide clinical decision-making and inform treatment planning. We aimed to generate such a model using spatial dose metrics and machine learning. Material and Methods Predictive models of severe acute mucositis were generated using radiotherapy dose (dose-volume and spatial dose metrics) and clinical data. Penalised logistic regression, support vector classification and random forest classification (RFC) models were generated and compared. Internal validation was performed (with 100-iteration cross-validation), using multiple metrics, including area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and calibration slope, to assess performance. Associations between covariates and severe mucositis were explored using the models. Results The dose-volume-based models (standard) performed equally to those incorporating spatial information. Discrimination was similar between models, but the RFCstandard had the best calibration. The mean AUC and calibration slope for this model were 0.71 (s.d.=0.09) and 3.9 (s.d.=2.2), respectively. The volumes of oral cavity receiving intermediate and high doses were associated with severe mucositis. Conclusions The RFCstandard model performance is modest-to-good, but should be improved, and requires external validation. Reducing the volumes of oral cavity receiving intermediate and high doses may reduce mucositis incidence. PMID:27240717

  18. Comparison of EGS4 and MCNP Monte Carlo codes when calculating radiotherapy depth doses.

    PubMed

    Love, P A; Lewis, D G; Al-Affan, I A; Smith, C W

    1998-05-01

    The Monte Carlo codes EGS4 and MCNP have been compared when calculating radiotherapy depth doses in water. The aims of the work were to study (i) the differences between calculated depth doses in water for a range of monoenergetic photon energies and (ii) the relative efficiency of the two codes for different electron transport energy cut-offs. The depth doses from the two codes agree with each other within the statistical uncertainties of the calculations (1-2%). The relative depth doses also agree with data tabulated in the British Journal of Radiology Supplement 25. A discrepancy in the dose build-up region may by attributed to the different electron transport algorithims used by EGS4 and MCNP. This discrepancy is considerably reduced when the improved electron transport routines are used in the latest (4B) version of MCNP. Timing calculations show that EGS4 is at least 50% faster than MCNP for the geometries used in the simulations.

  19. Feasibility of normal tissue dose reduction in radiotherapy using low strength magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Youngseob; Jung, In-Hye; Kwak, Jungwon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Toxicity of mucosa is one of the major concerns of radiotherapy (RT), when a target tumor is located near a mucosal lined organ. Energy of photon RT is transferred primarily by secondary electrons. If these secondary electrons could be removed in an internal cavity of mucosal lined organ, the mucosa will be spared without compromising the target tumor dose. The purpose of this study was to present a RT dose reduction in near target inner-surface (NTIS) of internal cavity, using Lorentz force of magnetic field. Materials and Methods Tissue equivalent phantoms, composed with a cylinder shaped internal cavity, and adjacent a target tumor part, were developed. The phantoms were irradiated using 6 MV photon beam, with or without 0.3 T of perpendicular magnetic field. Two experimental models were developed: single beam model (SBM) to analyze central axis dose distributions and multiple beam model (MBM) to simulate a clinical case of prostate cancer with rectum. RT dose of NTIS of internal cavity and target tumor area (TTA) were measured. Results With magnetic field applied, bending effect of dose distribution was visualized. The depth dose distribution of SBM showed 28.1% dose reduction of NTIS and little difference in dose of TTA with magnetic field. In MBM, cross-sectional dose of NTIS was reduced by 33.1% with magnetic field, while TTA dose were the same, irrespective of magnetic field. Conclusion RT dose of mucosal lined organ, located near treatment target, could be modulated by perpendicular magnetic field. PMID:26484306

  20. Improvement of dose distribution with irregular surface compensator in whole breast radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hideki, Fujita; Nao, Kuwahata; Hiroyuki, Hattori; Hiroshi, Kinoshita; Haruyuki, Fukuda

    2013-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare the dosimetric aspects of whole breast radiotherapy (WBRT) between an irregular surface compensator (ISC) and a conventional tangential field technique using physical wedges. Treatment plans were produced for 20 patients. The Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian Medical Systems) was used for the dose calculation: For the physical wedge technique, the wedge angle was selected to provide the best dose homogeneity; for the ISC technique, the fluence editor application was used to extend the optimal fluence. These two treatment plans were compared in terms of doses in the planning target volume, the dose homogeneity index, the maximum dose, ipsilateral lung and heart doses for left breast irradiation, and the monitor unit counts required for treatment. Compared with the physical wedge technique, the ISC technique significantly reduced the dose homogeneity index, the maximum dose, the volumes received at 105% of the prescription dose, as well as reducing both the ipsilateral lung and heart doses (P < 0.01 for all comparisons). However, the monitor unit counts were not significantly different between the techniques (P > 0.05). Thus, the ISC technique for WBRT enables significantly better dose distribution in the planning target volume. PMID:24049317

  1. Radiation Pneumonitis After Hypofractionated Radiotherapy: Evaluation of the LQ(L) Model and Different Dose Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Borst, Gerben R.; Ishikawa, Masayori; Nijkamp, Jasper

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the linear quadratic (LQ) model for hypofractionated radiotherapy within the context of predicting radiation pneumonitis (RP) and to investigate the effect if a linear (L) model in the high region (LQL model) is used. Methods and Materials: The radiation doses used for 128 patients treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy were converted to the equivalent doses given in fractions of 2 Gy for a range of {alpha}/{beta} ratios (1 Gy to infinity) according to the LQ(L) model. For the LQL model, different cut-off values between the LQ model and the linear component were used. The Lyman model parameters were fitted to the events of RP grade 2 or higher to derive the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). The lung dose was calculated as the mean lung dose and the percentage of lung volume (V) receiving doses higher than a threshold dose of xGy (V{sub x}). Results: The best NTCP fit was found if the mean lung dose, or V{sub x}, was calculated with an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3 Gy. The NTCP fit of other {alpha}/{beta} ratios and the LQL model were worse but within the 95% confidence interval of the NTCP fit of the LQ model with an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3 Gy. The V{sub 50} NTCP fit was better than the NTCP fit of lower threshold doses. Conclusions: For high fraction doses, the LQ model with an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3 Gy was the best method for converting the physical lung dose to predict RP.

  2. Verification of dose volume histograms in stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy using polymer gel and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šemnická, Jitka; Novotný, Josef, Jr.; Spěváček, Václav; Garčic, Jirí; Steiner, Martin; Judas, Libor

    2006-12-01

    In this work we focus on dose volume histograms (DVHs) measurement in stereotactic radiosurgery (SR) performed with the Leksell gamma knife (ELEKTA Instrument AB, Stockholm, Sweden) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) performed with linear accelerator 6 MV Varian Clinac 2100 C/D (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, USA) in conjunction with BrainLAB stereotactic system (BrainLAB, Germany) using modified BANG gel and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of the experiments was to investigate a method for acquiring entire dose volume information from irradiated gel dosimeter and calculate DVHs.

  3. Mutant frequency of radiotherapy technicians appears to be associated with recent dose of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Messing, K.; Ferraris, J.; Bradley, W.E.; Swartz, J.; Seifert, A.M. )

    1989-10-01

    The frequency of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) mutants among peripheral T-lymphocytes of radiotherapy technicians primarily exposed to 60Co was measured by the T-cell cloning method. Mutant frequencies of these technicians in 1984 and 1986 were significantly higher than those of physiotherapy technicians who worked in a neighboring service, and correlated significantly with thermoluminescence dosimeter readings recorded during the 6 mo preceding mutant frequency determination. Correlations decreased when related to dose recorded over longer time intervals. HPRT mutant frequency determination in peripheral lymphocytes is a good measure of recently received biologically effective radiation dose in an occupationally exposed population.

  4. External beam radiotherapy for palliation of painful bone metastases: pooled data bioeffect dose response analysis of dose fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveen, T.; Supe, Sanjay S.; Ganesh, K. M.; Samuel, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Bone metastases develop in up to 70% of newly diagnosed cancer patients and result in immobility, anxiety, and depression, severely diminishing the patients quality of life. Radiotherapy is a frequently used modality for bone metastasis and has been shown to be effective in reducing metastatic bone pain and in some instances, causing tumor shrinkage or growth inhibition. There is controversy surrounding the optimal fractionation schedule and total dose of external beam radiotherapy, despite many randomized trials and overviews addressing the issue. This study was undertaken to apply BED to clinical fractionation data of radiotherapeutic management of bone metastases in order to arrive at optimum BED values for acceptable level of response rate. A computerised literature search was conducted to identify all prospective clinical studies that addressed the issue of fractionation for the treatment of bone metastasis. The results of these studies were pooled together to form the database for the analysis. A total of 4111 number of patients received radiation dose ranging from 4 to 40.5 Gy in 1 to 15 fractions with dose per fraction ranging from 2 to 10 Gy. Single fraction treatments were delivered in 2013 patients and the dose varied from 4 to 10 Gy. Multifraction treatments were delivered in 2098 patients and the dose varied from 15 to 40.5 Gy. The biological effective dose (BED) was evaluated for each fractionation schedule using the linear quadratic model and an α/β value of 10 Gy. Response rate increased significantly beyond a BED value of 14.4 Gy (p < 0.01). Based on our analysis and indications from the literature about higher retreatment and fracture rate of single fraction treatments, minimum BED value of 14.4 Gy is recommended.

  5. Time- and Dose-Dependency of Radiographic Normal Tissue Changes of the Lung After Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hof, Holger; Zgoda, Jacqueline; Nill, Simeon; Hoess, Angelika; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Herfarth, Klaus; Debus, Juergen; Plathow, Christian

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Normal tissue changes (NTC) of the normal lung parenchyma are commonly seen after stereotactic single-dose radiotherapy (radiosurgery) of lung tumors. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent and dynamics of NTCs after radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Fifty lung tumors in 49 patients were treated with radiosurgery. Follow-up CTs were anatomically matched to the treatment planning CTs, incorporating the treatment plan and enabling spatial correlation of initial radiation dose distribution and subsequent NTCs of the lung. Lung parenchyma was divided into nine areas of different radiation dose exposures (range, 6-35 Gy). Areas were investigated and compared at different time points according to the development of NTCs. Results: Twenty-six patients developed NTCs during follow-up. The evaluation of the dependency of the extent of NTCs on the amount of radiation dose lead to a linear model for the fixed effects: Fraction of reacting volume =Intercept{sub T} +0.0208 * Dose ('Dose' should be given in Gy). Dose had a slope of 0.0208 (fraction of normal tissue reaction/Gy) (SE 0.000804, p < 0.0001), implying a significant correlation between dose level and the extent of NTC. Conclusion: For radiosurgery of lung tumors, a significant correlation of radiation dose and the extent of NTCs could be demonstrated. Using the introduced formula, a preview on the extent of NTCs to develop in normal lung parenchyma according to the dose level can be performed.

  6. Systematic measurements of whole-body imaging dose distributions in image-guided radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Haelg, Roger A.; Besserer, Juergen; Schneider, Uwe

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: The full benefit of the increased precision of contemporary treatment techniques can only be exploited if the accuracy of the patient positioning is guaranteed. Therefore, more and more imaging modalities are used in the process of the patient setup in clinical routine of radiation therapy. The improved accuracy in patient positioning, however, results in additional dose contributions to the integral patient dose. To quantify this, absorbed dose measurements from typical imaging procedures involved in an image-guided radiation therapy treatment were measured in an anthropomorphic phantom for a complete course of treatment. The experimental setup, including the measurement positions in the phantom, was exactly the same as in a preceding study of radiotherapy stray dose measurements. This allows a direct combination of imaging dose distributions with the therapy dose distribution. Methods: Individually calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters were used to measure absorbed dose in an anthropomorphic phantom at 184 locations. The dose distributions from imaging devices used with treatment machines from the manufacturers Accuray, Elekta, Siemens, and Varian and from computed tomography scanners from GE Healthcare were determined and the resulting effective dose was calculated. The list of investigated imaging techniques consisted of cone beam computed tomography (kilo- and megavoltage), megavoltage fan beam computed tomography, kilo- and megavoltage planar imaging, planning computed tomography with and without gating methods and planar scout views. Results: A conventional 3D planning CT resulted in an effective dose additional to the treatment stray dose of less than 1 mSv outside of the treated volume, whereas a 4D planning CT resulted in a 10 times larger dose. For a daily setup of the patient with two planar kilovoltage images or with a fan beam CT at the TomoTherapy unit, an additional effective dose outside of the treated volume of less than 0.4 mSv and 1

  7. Comparison of selected dose calculation algorithms in radiotherapy treatment planning for tissues with inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woon, Y. L.; Heng, S. P.; Wong, J. H. D.; Ung, N. M.

    2016-03-01

    Inhomogeneity correction is recommended for accurate dose calculation in radiotherapy treatment planning since human body are highly inhomogeneous with the presence of bones and air cavities. However, each dose calculation algorithm has its own limitations. This study is to assess the accuracy of five algorithms that are currently implemented for treatment planning, including pencil beam convolution (PBC), superposition (SP), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), Monte Carlo (MC) and Acuros XB (AXB). The calculated dose was compared with the measured dose using radiochromic film (Gafchromic EBT2) in inhomogeneous phantoms. In addition, the dosimetric impact of different algorithms on intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was studied for head and neck region. MC had the best agreement with the measured percentage depth dose (PDD) within the inhomogeneous region. This was followed by AXB, AAA, SP and PBC. For IMRT planning, MC algorithm is recommended for treatment planning in preference to PBC and SP. The MC and AXB algorithms were found to have better accuracy in terms of inhomogeneity correction and should be used for tumour volume within the proximity of inhomogeneous structures.

  8. [Single-dose palliative radiotherapy in inoperable non-small-cell lung carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Scolaro, T; Bacigalupo, A; Giudici, S; Guenzi, M; Vitale, V

    1995-12-01

    The treatment of choice for advanced inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is radiation therapy. Palliative radiotherapy schedules vary considerably in different centers, but a 30-Gy dose given in ten fractions over two weeks is a typical standard schedule. Our study was aimed at investigating whether a shorter course of only one 10-Gy fraction allows good palliation in the treatment of inoperable NSCLC patients whose main symptoms are related to an intrathoracic lesion. Patients of both sexes and any age, untreated with radiotherapy, with inoperable and histologically or cytologically proved NSCLC were examined. Seventeen patients, too advanced for radical "curative" radiotherapy and whose main symptoms were related to primary intrathoracic lesions, entered the study even though they had metastases. On admission, 76% (13/17) of patients had cough 76% (13/17) dyspnea, 70.7% (12/17) chest pain and 23.6% (4/17) hemoptysis. They received a single dose of 10 Gy, delivered with an 18-Mv linear accelerator via anteroposteriorly opposing portals without spinal cord shielding. Treatment volume usually included the macroscopically detected lesion identified with a CT simulator. Palliation of symptoms was achieved in high rates of patients: 46% for cough, 69% for dyspnea, 83% for pain and 75% for hemoptysis. These results were obtained within one month of treatment. Unfortunately, palliation of symptoms did not last long, decreasing to 42% within two months of the end of treatment and to 32% at three months. Four patients were retreated, one patient three months and three patients two months after the end of radiotherapy. Ten Gy to the target volume were administered as retreatment with spinal cord shielding. Side-effects were mild: nausea in 3 patients (17%), vomiting in one patient (5%) and grade-II dysphagia in two patients were observed and classified according to WHO criteria. Pain increased 24 hours after radiotherapy in five patients. We can conclude that

  9. Low-Dose-Rate Californium-252 Neutron Intracavitary Afterloading Radiotherapy Combined With Conformal Radiotherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Min; Xu Hongde; Pan Songdan; Lin Shan; Yue Jianhua; Liu Jianren

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To study the efficacy of low-dose-rate californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) neutron intracavitary afterloading radiotherapy (RT) combined with external pelvic RT for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 96 patients treated for cervical cancer from 2006 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. For patients with tumors {<=}4 cm in diameter, external beam radiation was performed (1.8 Gy/day, five times/week) until the dose reached 20 Gy, and then {sup 252}Cf neutron intracavitary afterloading RT (once/week) was begun, and the frequency of external beam radiation was changed to four times/week. For patients with tumors >4 cm, {sup 252}Cf RT was performed one to two times before whole-pelvis external beam radiation. The tumor-eliminating dose was determined by using the depth limit of 5 mm below the mucosa as the reference point. In all patients, the total dose of the external beam radiation ranged from 46.8 to 50 Gy. For {sup 252}Cf RT, the dose delivered to point A was 6 Gy/fraction, once per week, for a total of seven times, and the total dose was 42 Gy. Results: The mean {+-} SD patient age was 54.7 {+-} 13.7 years. Six patients had disease assessed at stage IB, 13 patients had stage IIA, 49 patients had stage IIB, 3 patients had stage IIIA, 24 patients had stage IIIB, and 1 patient had stage IVA. All patients obtained complete tumor regression (CR). The mean {+-} SD time to CR was 23.5 {+-} 3.4 days. Vaginal bleeding was fully controlled in 80 patients within 1 to 8 days. The mean {+-} SD follow-up period was 27.6 {+-} 12.7 months (range, 6-48 months). Five patients died due to recurrence or metastasis. The 3-year survival and disease-free recurrence rates were 89.6% and 87.5 %, respectively. Nine patients experienced mild radiation proctitis, and 4 patients developed radiocystitis. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate {sup 252}Cf neutron RT combined with external pelvic RT is effective for treating cervical cancer, with a low incidence of

  10. Molecular PET imaging for biology-guided adaptive radiotherapy of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoeben, Bianca A W; Bussink, Johan; Troost, Esther G C; Oyen, Wim J G; Kaanders, Johannes H A M

    2013-10-01

    Integration of molecular imaging PET techniques into therapy selection strategies and radiation treatment planning for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) can serve several purposes. First, pre-treatment assessments can steer decisions about radiotherapy modifications or combinations with other modalities. Second, biology-based objective functions can be introduced to the radiation treatment planning process by co-registration of molecular imaging with planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Thus, customized heterogeneous dose distributions can be generated with escalated doses to tumor areas where radiotherapy resistance mechanisms are most prevalent. Third, monitoring of temporal and spatial variations in these radiotherapy resistance mechanisms early during the course of treatment can discriminate responders from non-responders. With such information available shortly after the start of treatment, modifications can be implemented or the radiation treatment plan can be adapted tailing the biological response pattern. Currently, these strategies are in various phases of clinical testing, mostly in single-center studies. Further validation in multicenter set-up is needed. Ultimately, this should result in availability for routine clinical practice requiring stable production and accessibility of tracers, reproducibility and standardization of imaging and analysis methods, as well as general availability of knowledge and expertise. Small studies employing adaptive radiotherapy based on functional dynamics and early response mechanisms demonstrate promising results. In this context, we focus this review on the widely used PET tracer (18)F-FDG and PET tracers depicting hypoxia and proliferation; two well-known radiation resistance mechanisms.

  11. A DVH-guided IMRT optimization algorithm for automatic treatment planning and adaptive radiotherapy replanning

    SciTech Connect

    Zarepisheh, Masoud; Li, Nan; Long, Troy; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel algorithm that incorporates prior treatment knowledge into intensity modulated radiation therapy optimization to facilitate automatic treatment planning and adaptive radiotherapy (ART) replanning. Methods: The algorithm automatically creates a treatment plan guided by the DVH curves of a reference plan that contains information on the clinician-approved dose-volume trade-offs among different targets/organs and among different portions of a DVH curve for an organ. In ART, the reference plan is the initial plan for the same patient, while for automatic treatment planning the reference plan is selected from a library of clinically approved and delivered plans of previously treated patients with similar medical conditions and geometry. The proposed algorithm employs a voxel-based optimization model and navigates the large voxel-based Pareto surface. The voxel weights are iteratively adjusted to approach a plan that is similar to the reference plan in terms of the DVHs. If the reference plan is feasible but not Pareto optimal, the algorithm generates a Pareto optimal plan with the DVHs better than the reference ones. If the reference plan is too restricting for the new geometry, the algorithm generates a Pareto plan with DVHs close to the reference ones. In both cases, the new plans have similar DVH trade-offs as the reference plans. Results: The algorithm was tested using three patient cases and found to be able to automatically adjust the voxel-weighting factors in order to generate a Pareto plan with similar DVH trade-offs as the reference plan. The algorithm has also been implemented on a GPU for high efficiency. Conclusions: A novel prior-knowledge-based optimization algorithm has been developed that automatically adjust the voxel weights and generate a clinical optimal plan at high efficiency. It is found that the new algorithm can significantly improve the plan quality and planning efficiency in ART replanning and automatic treatment

  12. Development of the DVH management software for the biologically-guided evaluation of radiotherapy plan

    PubMed Central

    Kim, BoKyong; Park, Hee Chul; Oh, Dongryul; Shin, Eun Hyuk; Ahn, Yong Chan; Kim, Jinsung

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop the dose volume histogram (DVH) management software which guides the evaluation of radiotherapy (RT) plan of a new case according to the biological consequences of the DVHs from the previously treated patients. Materials and Methods We determined the radiation pneumonitis (RP) as an biological response parameter in order to develop DVH management software. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of lung cancer patients treated with curative 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). The biological event was defined as RP of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grade III or more. Results The DVH management software consisted of three parts (pre-existing DVH database, graphical tool, and Pinnacle3 script). The pre-existing DVH data were retrieved from 128 patients. RP events were tagged to the specific DVH data through retrospective review of patients' medical records. The graphical tool was developed to present the complication histogram derived from the pre-existing database (DVH and RP) and was implemented into the radiation treatment planning (RTP) system, Pinnacle3 v8.0 (Phillips Healthcare). The software was designed for the pre-existing database to be updated easily by tagging the specific DVH data with the new incidence of RP events at the time of patients' follow-up. Conclusion We developed the DVH management software as an effective tool to incorporate the phenomenological consequences derived from the pre-existing database in the evaluation of a new RT plan. It can be used not only for lung cancer patients but also for the other disease site with different toxicity parameters. PMID:23120743

  13. Effects of Prostate-Rectum Separation on Rectal Dose From External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Susil, Robert C.; McNutt, Todd R.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Song, Danny

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy for prostate cancer, the rectum is the major dose-limiting structure. Physically separating the rectum from the prostate (e.g., by injecting a spacer) can reduce the rectal radiation dose. Despite pilot clinical studies, no careful analysis has been done of the risks, benefits, and dosimetric effects of this practice. Methods and Materials: Using cadaveric specimens, 20 mL of a hydrogel was injected between the prostate and rectum using a transperineal approach. Imaging was performed before and after spacer placement, and the cadavers were subsequently dissected. Ten intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans were generated (five before and five after separation), allowing for characterization of the rectal dose reduction. To quantify the amount of prostate-rectum separation needed for effective rectal dose reduction, simulations were performed using nine clinically generated intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. Results: In the cadaveric studies, an average of 12.5 mm of prostate-rectum separation was generated with the 20-mL hydrogel injections (the seminal vesicles were also separated from the rectum). The average rectal volume receiving 70 Gy decreased from 19.9% to 4.5% (p < .05). In the simulation studies, a prostate-rectum separation of 10 mm was sufficient to reduce the mean rectal volume receiving 70 Gy by 83.1% (p <.05). No additional reduction in the average rectal volume receiving 70 Gy was noted after 15 mm of separation. In addition, spacer placement allowed for increased planning target volume margins without exceeding the rectal dose tolerance. Conclusion: Prostate-rectum spacers can allow for reduced rectal toxicity rates, treatment intensification, and/or reduced dependence on complex planning and treatment delivery techniques.

  14. Derivation and representation of dose-volume response from large clinical trial data sets: an example from the RADAR prostate radiotherapy trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, M. A.; Foo, K.; Haworth, A.; Gulliford, S. L.; Kearvall, R.; Kennedy, A.; Richardson, S.; Krawiec, M.; Stewart, N.; Joseph, D. J.; Denham, J. W.

    2014-03-01

    Large multicentre radiotherapy trials incorporating assessment of multiple outcomes at multiple timepoints can generate extensive datasets. We have investigated graphical techniques for presentation of this data and the associated underlying dose-volume response information, necessary for guiding statistical analyses and translating outcomes to future patient treatments. A relational database was used to archive reviewed plan data for patients accrued to the TROG 03.04 RADAR trial. Viewing software was used to clean and enhance the data. Scripts were developed to export arbitrary dose-histogram data which was combined with clinical toxicity data with a median follow-up of 72 months. Graphical representations of dose-volume response developed include prevalence atlasing, univariate logistic regression and dose-volume-point odds ratios, and continuous cut-point derivation via ROC analysis. These representations indicate variable association of toxicities across structures and time-points.

  15. Lung dose analysis in loco-regional hypofractionated radiotherapy of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Attar, Mohammad A.; Bahadur, Yasir A.; Constantinescu, Camelia T.; Eltaher, Maha M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To report the ipsilateral lung dosimetry data of breast cancer (BC) patients treated with loco-regional hypofractionated radiotherapy (HFRT). Methods: Treatment plans of 150 patients treated in the Radiotherapy Unit, King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January 2012 and March 2015 by HFRT for BC were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received 42.4 Gy in 16 fractions by tangential and supra-clavicular fields with 6 MV, 18 MV, or mixed energies. Ipsilateral lung dosimetric data V20Gy and mean lung dose (MLD) were recorded. Correlations between lung dose, patient characteristics, and treatment delivery parameters were assessed by a logistic regression test. Results: The mean ipsilateral lung V20Gy was 24.6% and mean MLD was 11.9 Gy. A weak, but statistically significant correlation was found between lung dose and lung volume (p=0.043). The lung dose was significantly decreasing with patient separation and depth of axillary lymph node (ALN) and supra-claviculary lymph nodes (SCLN) (p<0.0001), and increasing with ALN (p=0.001) and SCLN (p=0.003) dose coverage. Lung dose significantly decreased with beam energy (p<0.0001): mean V20Gy was 27.8%, 25.4% for 6 MV, mixed energy, and 21.2% for 18 MV. The use of a low breast-board angle correlates with low lung dose. Conclusion: Our data suggest that the use of high energy photon beams and low breast-board angulation can reduce the lung dose. PMID:27279508

  16. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: implications for spatial dose redistribution.

    PubMed

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A

    2014-02-07

    Gliomas differ from many other tumors as they grow infiltratively into the brain parenchyma rather than forming a solid tumor mass with a well-defined boundary. Tumor cells can be found several centimeters away from the central tumor mass that is visible using current imaging techniques. The infiltrative growth characteristics of gliomas question the concept of a radiotherapy target volume that is irradiated to a homogeneous dose-the standard in current clinical practice. We discuss the use of the Fisher-Kolmogorov glioma growth model in radiotherapy treatment planning. The phenomenological tumor growth model assumes that tumor cells proliferate locally and migrate into neighboring brain tissue, which is mathematically described via a partial differential equation for the spatio-temporal evolution of the tumor cell density. In this model, the tumor cell density drops approximately exponentially with distance from the visible gross tumor volume, which is quantified by the infiltration length, a parameter describing the distance at which the tumor cell density drops by a factor of e. This paper discusses the implications for the prescribed dose distribution in the periphery of the tumor. In the context of the exponential cell kill model, an exponential fall-off of the cell density suggests a linear fall-off of the prescription dose with distance. We introduce the dose fall-off rate, which quantifies the steepness of the prescription dose fall-off in units of Gy mm(-1). It is shown that the dose fall-off rate is given by the inverse of the product of radiosensitivity and infiltration length. For an infiltration length of 3 mm and a surviving fraction of 50% at 2 Gy, this suggests a dose fall-off of approximately 1 Gy mm(-1). The concept is illustrated for two glioblastoma patients by optimizing intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. The dose fall-off rate concept reflects the idea that infiltrating gliomas lack a defined boundary and are characterized by a

  17. Dosimetric characteristics of fabricated silica fibre for postal radiotherapy dose audits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadzil, M. S. Ahmad; Ramli, N. N. H.; Jusoh, M. A.; Kadni, T.; Bradley, D. A.; Ung, N. M.; Suhairul, H.; Mohd Noor, N.

    2014-11-01

    Present investigation aims to establish the dosimetric characteristics of a novel fabricated flat fibre TLD system for postal radiotherapy dose audits. Various thermoluminescence (TL) properties have been investigated for five sizes of 6 mol% Ge-doped optical fibres. Key dosimetric characteristics including reproducibility, linearity, fading and energy dependence have been established. Irradiations were carried out using a linear accelerator (linac) and a Cobalt-60 machine. For doses from 0.5 Gy up to 10 Gy, Ge-doped flat fibres exhibit linearity between TL yield and dose, reproducible to better than 8% standard deviation (SD) following repeat measurements (n = 3). For photons generated at potentials from 1.25 MeV to 10 MV an energy-dependent response is noted, with a coefficient of variation (CV) of less than 40% over the range of energies investigated. For 6.0 mm length flat fibres 100 μm thick × 350 pm wide, the TL fading loss following 30 days of storage at room temperature was < 8%. The Ge-doped flat fibre system represents a viable basis for use in postal radiotherapy dose audits, corrections being made for the various factors influencing the TL yield.

  18. The dose and dose-rate effects of paternal irradiation on transgenerational instability in mice: a radiotherapy connection.

    PubMed

    Mughal, Safeer K; Myazin, Andrey E; Zhavoronkov, Leonid P; Rubanovich, Alexander V; Dubrova, Yuri E

    2012-01-01

    The non-targeted effects of human exposure to ionising radiation, including transgenerational instability manifesting in the children of irradiated parents, remains poorly understood. Employing a mouse model, we have analysed whether low-dose acute or low-dose-rate chronic paternal γ-irradiation can destabilise the genomes of their first-generation offspring. Using single-molecule PCR, the frequency of mutation at the mouse expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) locus Ms6-hm was established in DNA samples extracted from sperm of directly exposed BALB/c male mice, as well as from sperm and the brain of their first-generation offspring. For acute γ-irradiation from 10-100 cGy a linear dose-response for ESTR mutation induction was found in the germ line of directly exposed mice, with a doubling dose of 57 cGy. The mutagenicity of acute exposure to 100 cGy was more pronounced than that for chronic low-dose-rate irradiation. The analysis of transgenerational effects of paternal irradiation revealed that ESTR mutation frequencies were equally elevated in the germ line (sperm) and brain of the offspring of fathers exposed to 50 and 100 cGy of acute γ-rays. In contrast, neither paternal acute irradiation at lower doses (10-25 cGy), nor low-dose-rate exposure to 100 cGy affected stability of their offspring. Our data imply that the manifestation of transgenerational instability is triggered by a threshold dose of acute paternal irradiation. The results of our study also suggest that most doses of human exposure to ionising radiation, including radiotherapy regimens, may be unlikely to result in transgenerational instability in the offspring children of irradiated fathers.

  19. Prospective Trial of High-Dose Reirradiation Using Daily Image Guidance With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Recurrent and Second Primary Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Cheng, Suzan; Donald, Paul J.; Purdy, James A.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To report a single-institutional experience using intensity-modulated radiotherapy with daily image-guided radiotherapy for the reirradiation of recurrent and second cancers of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one consecutive patients were prospectively treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy from February 2006 to March 2009 to a median dose of 66 Gy (range, 60-70 Gy). None of these patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Daily helical megavoltage CT scans were obtained before each fraction as part of an image-guided radiotherapy registration protocol for patient alignment. Results: The 1- and 2-year estimates of in-field control were 72% and 65%, respectively. A total of 651 daily megavoltage CT scans were obtained. The mean systematic shift to account for interfraction motion was 1.38 {+-} 1.25 mm, 1.79 {+-} 1.45 mm, and 1.98 {+-} 1.75 mm for the medial-lateral, superior-inferior, and anterior-posterior directions, respectively. Pretreatment shifts of >3 mm occurred in 19% of setups in the medial-lateral, 27% in the superior-inferior, and 33% in the anterior-posterior directions, respectively. There were no treatment-related fatalities or hospitalizations. Complications included skin desquamation, odynophagia, otitis externa, keratitis, naso-lacrimal duct stenosis, and brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy with daily image guidance results in effective disease control with relatively low morbidity and should be considered for selected patients with recurrent and second primary cancers of the head and neck.

  20. SU-E-T-223: Computed Radiography Dose Measurements of External Radiotherapy Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Aberle, C; Kapsch, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To obtain quantitative, two-dimensional dose measurements of external radiotherapy beams with a computed radiography (CR) system and to derive volume correction factors for ionization chambers in small fields. Methods: A commercial Kodak ACR2000i CR system with Kodak Flexible Phosphor Screen HR storage foils was used. Suitable measurement conditions and procedures were established. Several corrections were derived, including image fading, length-scale corrections and long-term stability corrections. Dose calibration curves were obtained for cobalt, 4 MV, 8 MV and 25 MV photons, and for 10 MeV, 15 MeV and 18 MeV electrons in a water phantom. Inherent measurement inhomogeneities were studied as well as directional dependence of the response. Finally, 2D scans with ionization chambers were directly compared to CR measurements, and volume correction factors were derived. Results: Dose calibration curves (0.01 Gy to 7 Gy) were obtained for multiple photon and electron beam qualities. For each beam quality, the calibration curves can be described by a single fit equation over the whole dose range. The energy dependence of the dose response was determined. The length scale on the images was adjusted scan-by-scan, typically by 2 percent horizontally and by 3 percent vertically. The remaining inhomogeneities after the system’s standard calibration procedure were corrected for. After correction, the homogeneity is on the order of a few percent. The storage foils can be rotated by up to 30 degrees without a significant effect on the measured signal. First results on the determination of volume correction factors were obtained. Conclusion: With CR, quantitative, two-dimensional dose measurements with a high spatial resolution (sub-mm) can be obtained over a large dose range. In order to make use of these advantages, several calibrations, corrections and supporting measurements are needed. This work was funded by the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP

  1. Measurement of Thyroid Dose by TLD arising from Radiotherapy of Breast Cancer Patients from Supraclavicular Field

    PubMed Central

    Farhood, B.; Bahreyni Toossi, M.T.; Vosoughi, H.; Khademi, S.; Knaup, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the leading global cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Radiotherapy plays a significant role in treatment of breast cancer and reduces locoregional recurrence and eventually improves survival. The treatment fields applied for breast cancer treatment include: tangential, axillary, supraclavicular and internal mammary fields. Objective: In the present study, due to the presence of sensitive organ such as thyroid inside the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose and its effective factors were investigated. Materials and Methods: Thyroid dose of 31 female patients of breast cancer with involved supraclavicular lymph nodes which had undergone radiotherapy were measured. For each patient, three TLD-100 chips were placed on their thyroid gland surface, and thyroid doses of patients were measured. The variables of the study include shield shape, the time of patient’s setup, the technologists’ experience and qualification. Finally, the results were analyzed by ANOVA test using SPSS 11.5 software. Results: The average age of the patients was 46±10 years. The average of thyroid dose of the patients was 140±45 mGy (ranged 288.2 and 80.8) in single fraction. There was a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and shield shape. There was also a significant relationship between the thyroid dose and the patient’s setup time. Conclusion: Beside organ at risk such as thyroid which is in the supraclavicular field, thyroid dose possibility should be reduced. For solving this problem, an appropriate shield shape, the appropriate time of the patient’s setup, etc. could be considered. PMID:27853722

  2. Can high dose rates used in cancer radiotherapy change therapeutic effectiveness?

    PubMed Central

    Konopacka, Maria; Sochanik, Aleksander; Ślosarek, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    Current cancer radiotherapy relies on increasingly high dose rates of ionising radiation (100–2400 cGy/min). It is possible that changing dose rates is not paralleled by treatment effectiveness. Irradiating cancer cells is assumed to induce molecular alterations that ultimately lead to apoptotic death. Studies comparing the efficacy of radiation-induced DNA damage and apoptotic death in relation to varying dose rates do not provide unequivocal data. Whereas some have demonstrated higher dose rates (single dose) to effectively kill cancer cells, others claim the opposite. Recent gene expression studies in cells subject to variable dose rates stress alterations in molecular signalling, especially in the expression of genes linked to cell survival, immune response, and tumour progression. Novel irradiation techniques of modern cancer treatment do not rely anymore on maintaining absolute constancy of dose rates during radiation emission: instead, timing and exposure areas are regulated temporally and spatially by modulating the dose rate and beam shape. Such conditions may be reflected in tumour cells’ response to irradiation, and this is supported by the references provided. PMID:28239281

  3. SU-E-T-91: Accuracy of Dose Calculation Algorithms for Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tajaldeen, A; Ramachandran, P; Geso, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate and quantify the variation in dose distributions in small field lung cancer radiotherapy using seven different dose calculation algorithms. Methods: The study was performed in 21 lung cancer patients who underwent Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR). Two different methods (i) Same dose coverage to the target volume (named as same dose method) (ii) Same monitor units in all algorithms (named as same monitor units) were used for studying the performance of seven different dose calculation algorithms in XiO and Eclipse treatment planning systems. The seven dose calculation algorithms include Superposition, Fast superposition, Fast Fourier Transform ( FFT) Convolution, Clarkson, Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA), Acurous XB and pencil beam (PB) algorithms. Prior to this, a phantom study was performed to assess the accuracy of these algorithms. Superposition algorithm was used as a reference algorithm in this study. The treatment plans were compared using different dosimetric parameters including conformity, heterogeneity and dose fall off index. In addition to this, the dose to critical structures like lungs, heart, oesophagus and spinal cord were also studied. Statistical analysis was performed using Prism software. Results: The mean±stdev with conformity index for Superposition, Fast superposition, Clarkson and FFT convolution algorithms were 1.29±0.13, 1.31±0.16, 2.2±0.7 and 2.17±0.59 respectively whereas for AAA, pencil beam and Acurous XB were 1.4±0.27, 1.66±0.27 and 1.35±0.24 respectively. Conclusion: Our study showed significant variations among the seven different algorithms. Superposition and AcurosXB algorithms showed similar values for most of the dosimetric parameters. Clarkson, FFT convolution and pencil beam algorithms showed large differences as compared to superposition algorithms. Based on our study, we recommend Superposition and AcurosXB algorithms as the first choice of

  4. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: implications for spatial dose redistribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Gliomas differ from many other tumors as they grow infiltratively into the brain parenchyma rather than forming a solid tumor mass with a well-defined boundary. Tumor cells can be found several centimeters away from the central tumor mass that is visible using current imaging techniques. The infiltrative growth characteristics of gliomas question the concept of a radiotherapy target volume that is irradiated to a homogeneous dose—the standard in current clinical practice. We discuss the use of the Fisher-Kolmogorov glioma growth model in radiotherapy treatment planning. The phenomenological tumor growth model assumes that tumor cells proliferate locally and migrate into neighboring brain tissue, which is mathematically described via a partial differential equation for the spatio-temporal evolution of the tumor cell density. In this model, the tumor cell density drops approximately exponentially with distance from the visible gross tumor volume, which is quantified by the infiltration length, a parameter describing the distance at which the tumor cell density drops by a factor of e. This paper discusses the implications for the prescribed dose distribution in the periphery of the tumor. In the context of the exponential cell kill model, an exponential fall-off of the cell density suggests a linear fall-off of the prescription dose with distance. We introduce the dose fall-off rate, which quantifies the steepness of the prescription dose fall-off in units of Gy mm-1. It is shown that the dose fall-off rate is given by the inverse of the product of radiosensitivity and infiltration length. For an infiltration length of 3 mm and a surviving fraction of 50% at 2 Gy, this suggests a dose fall-off of approximately 1 Gy mm-1. The concept is illustrated for two glioblastoma patients by optimizing intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. The dose fall-off rate concept reflects the idea that infiltrating gliomas lack a defined boundary and are characterized by a continuous

  5. The Impact of Dose Escalation on Secondary Cancer Risk After Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Uwe . E-mail: uwe.schneider@psi.ch; Lomax, Antony; Besserer, Juergen; Pemler, Peter; Lombriser, Norbert; Kaser-Hotz, Barbara D.V.M.

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: To estimate secondary cancer risk due to dose escalation in patients treated for prostatic carcinoma with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), and spot-scanned proton RT. Methods and Materials: The organ equivalent dose (OED) concept with a linear-exponential, a plateau, and a linear dose-response curve was applied to dose distributions of 23 patients who received RT of prostate cancer. Conformal RT was used in 7 patients, 8 patients received IMRT with 6- and 15-MV photons, and 8 patients were treated with spot-scanned protons. We applied target doses ranging from 70 Gy to 100 Gy. Cancer risk was estimated as a function of target dose and tumor control probability. Results: At a 100-Gy target dose the secondary cancer risk relative to the 3D treatment plan at 70 Gy was +18.4% (15.0% for a plateau model, 22.3% for a linear model) for the 6-MV IMRT plan, +25.3% (17.0%, 14.1%) for the 15-MV IMRT plan, and -40.7% (-41.3%, -40.0%) for the spot-scanned protons. The increasing risk of developing a radiation-associated malignancy after RT with increasing dose was balanced by the enhanced cure rates at a larger dose. Conclusions: Cancer risk after dose escalation for prostate RT is expected to be equal to or lower than for conventional 3D treatment at 70 Gy, independent of treatment modality or dose-response model. Spot-scanned protons are the treatment of choice for dose escalation because this therapy can halve the risk of secondary cancers.

  6. High-dose nimotuzumab improves the survival rate of esophageal cancer patients who underwent radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunyu; Fu, Xiaolong; Cai, Xuwei; Wu, Xianghua; Hu, Xichun; Fan, Min; Xiang, Jiaqing; Zhang, Yawei; Chen, Haiquan; Jiang, Guoliang; Zhao, Kuaile

    2016-01-01

    Nimotuzumab (h-R3) is a humanized monoclonal antibody that is safe to use against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). However, the available information is insufficient about the dose effect of monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor for the treatment of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). We retrospectively recruited 66 patients with ESCC who were treated with h-R3 and chemoradiotherapy/radiotherapy. Patients who received more than 1,200 mg of h-R3 were classified as the high-dose group, and the remaining patients were classified as the low-dose group. The endpoint for efficacy was the overall survival. Differences in survival between the groups were analyzed using the log-rank test. The Cox proportional hazards model was used in multivariate analysis to identify independent prognostic factors. The low-dose and high-dose groups comprised 55 and eleven patients, respectively. The median follow-up time in the final analysis was 46 months. The high-dose group showed no increased incidence of toxicities compared to the low-dose group. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year overall survival rates in the low-dose and high-dose groups were 66.9%, 50.0%, 31.5% and 90.0%, 80.0%, 66.7%, respectively (P=0.04). Multivariate analyses showed that the high-dose group had better survival than the low-dose group (hazard ratio 0.28, 95% confidence interval 0.09–0.94, P=0.039). Taken together, high-dose h-R3 showed limited toxicity and improved survival in patients with ESCC. PMID:26766917

  7. Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using the HI-ART II Helical Tomotherapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Timothy W. Hudes, Richard; Dziuba, Sylwester; Kazi, Abdul; Hall, Mark; Dawson, Dana

    2008-07-01

    The highly integrated adaptive radiation therapy (HI-ART II) helical tomotherapy unit is a new radiotherapy machine designed to achieve highly precise and accurate treatments at all body sites. The precision and accuracy of the HI-ART II is similar to that provided by stereotactic radiosurgery systems, hence the historical distinction between external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic procedures based on differing precision requirements is removed for this device. The objectives of this work are: (1) to describe stereotactic helical tomotherapy processes (SRS, SBRT); (2) to show that the precision and accuracy of the HI-ART meet the requirements defined for SRS and SBRT; and (3) to describe the clinical implementation of a stereotactic image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) system that incorporates optical motion management.

  8. Evaluation of the peripheral dose to uterus in breast carcinoma radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Martín Rincón, C; Jerez Sainz, I; Modolell Farré, I; España López, M L; López Franco, P; Muñiz, J L; Romero, A M; Rodríguez, R

    2002-01-01

    The absorbed dose outside of the direct fields of radiotherapy treatment (or peripheral dose, PD) is responsible for radiation exposure of the fetus in pregnant women. Because the radiological protection of the unborn child is of particular concern in the early period of the pregnancy, the aim of this study is to estimate the PD in order to assess the absorbed dose in the uterus in a pregnant patient irradiated for breast carcinoma therapy. The treatment was simulated on an Alderson-Rando anthropomorphic phantom, and the radiation dose to the fetus was measured using an ionisation chamber and thermoluminescence dosemeters. Two similar treatments plans with and without wedges were delivered, using a 6 MV photon beam with two isocentric opposite tangential fields with a total dose of 50 Gy, in accordance with common established procedures. Average field parameters for more than 300 patients were studied. Measurements showed the fetal dose to be slightly lower than 50 mGy, a level at which the risk to the fetus is uncertain, although several authors consider this value as the dose threshold for deterministic effects. The planning system (PS) underestimated PD values and no significant influence was found with the use of wedge filters.

  9. Effect of Tissue Composition on Dose Distribution in Electron Beam Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, M.; Tabatabaei, Z. S.; Vejdani Noghreiyan, A.; Vosoughi, H.; Knaup, C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of tissue composition on dose distribution in electron beam radiotherapy. Methods A Siemens Primus linear accelerator and a phantom were simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. In a homogeneous cylindrical phantom, six types of soft tissue and three types of tissue-equivalent materials were investigated. The tissues included muscle (skeletal), adipose tissue, blood (whole), breast tissue, soft tissue (9-components) and soft tissue (4-component). The tissue-equivalent materials were water, A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic and perspex. Electron dose relative to dose in 9-component soft tissue at various depths on the beam’s central axis was determined for 8, 12, and 14 MeV electron energies. Results The results of relative electron dose in various materials relative to dose in 9-component soft tissue were reported for 8, 12 and 14 MeV electron beams as tabulated data. While differences were observed between dose distributions in various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials, which vary with the composition of material, electron energy and depth in phantom, they can be ignored due to the incorporated uncertainties in Monte Carlo calculations. Conclusion Based on the calculations performed, differences in dose distributions in various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials are not significant. However, due to the difference in composition of various materials, further research in this field with lower uncertainties is recommended. PMID:25973407

  10. Measurement of skin dose variations produced by a silicon-based protective dressing in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Butson, Martin J; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K N; Metcalfe, Peter

    2002-06-07

    Variations in skin dose caused by a silicon-based burn dressing used in radiotherapy during treatment have been investigated. Measurement of these variations in skin dose has been achieved using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and Gafchromic film. For a 6 MV x-ray beam results have shown that an approximately 0.4 mm thick silicon mesh dressing increases the average surface dose by approximately 12.5% to 14% of the maximum and average dose at 1 mm depth and by 4% to 6% of the maximum for field sizes ranging from 5 cm x 5 cm up to 40 cm x 40 cm at 100 cm source to surface distance (SSD). The radiation effective thickness of the silicon dressing was calculated to be 0.5 mm +/- 0.05 mm water equivalent. TLDs of various thicknesses provide point-dose assessment and Gafchromic film can provide a detailed two-dimensional dose map with a high spatial resolution. Results have shown that a large variation in skin dose is delivered under the dressing depending on the amount of material directly above it as defined by the silicon mesh outline.

  11. The effects of motion on the dose distribution of proton radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Qamhiyeh, Sima; Geismar, Dirk; Pöttgen, Christoph; Stuschke, Martin; Farr, Jonathan

    2012-05-10

    Proton radiotherapy of the prostate basal or whole seminal vesicles using scattering delivery systems is an effective treatment of prostate cancer that has been evaluated in prospective trials. Meanwhile, the use of pencil beam scanning (PBS) can further reduce the dose in the beam entrance channels and reduce the dose to the normal tissues. However, PBS dose distributions can be affected by intra- and interfractional motion. In this treatment planning study, the effects of intra- and interfractional organ motion on PBS dose distributions are investigated using repeated CT scans at close and distant time intervals. The minimum dose (Dmin) and the dose to 2% and 98% of the volumes (D2% and D98%), as well as EUD in the clinical target volumes (CTV), is used as measure of robustness. In all patients, D98% was larger than 96% and D2% was less than 106% of the prescribed dose. The combined information from Dmin, D98% and EUD led to the conclusion that there are no relevant cold spots observed in any of the verification plans. Moreover, it was found that results of single field optimization are more robust than results from multiple field optimizations.

  12. Validation of fast Monte Carlo dose calculation in small animal radiotherapy with EBT3 radiochromic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noblet, C.; Chiavassa, S.; Smekens, F.; Sarrut, D.; Passal, V.; Suhard, J.; Lisbona, A.; Paris, F.; Delpon, G.

    2016-05-01

    In preclinical studies, the absorbed dose calculation accuracy in small animals is fundamental to reliably investigate and understand observed biological effects. This work investigated the use of the split exponential track length estimator (seTLE), a new kerma based Monte Carlo dose calculation method for preclinical radiotherapy using a small animal precision micro irradiator, the X-RAD 225Cx. Monte Carlo modelling of the irradiator with GATE/GEANT4 was extensively evaluated by comparing measurements and simulations for half-value layer, percent depth dose, off-axis profiles and output factors in water and water-equivalent material for seven circular fields, from 20 mm down to 1 mm in diameter. Simulated and measured dose distributions in cylinders of water obtained for a 360° arc were also compared using dose, distance-to-agreement and gamma-index maps. Simulations and measurements agreed within 3% for all static beam configurations, with uncertainties estimated to 1% for the simulation and 3% for the measurements. Distance-to-agreement accuracy was better to 0.14 mm. For the arc irradiations, gamma-index maps of 2D dose distributions showed that the success rate was higher than 98%, except for the 0.1 cm collimator (92%). Using the seTLE method, MC simulations compute 3D dose distributions within minutes for realistic beam configurations with a clinically acceptable accuracy for beam diameter as small as 1 mm.

  13. Estimation of internal organ motion-induced variance in radiation dose in non-gated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Sumin; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Mutian; Zheng, Dandan; Lei, Yu; Li, Sicong; Bennion, Nathan; Verma, Vivek; Zhen, Weining; Enke, Charles

    2016-12-01

    In the delivery of non-gated radiotherapy (RT), owing to intra-fraction organ motion, a certain degree of RT dose uncertainty is present. Herein, we propose a novel mathematical algorithm to estimate the mean and variance of RT dose that is delivered without gating. These parameters are specific to individual internal organ motion, dependent on individual treatment plans, and relevant to the RT delivery process. This algorithm uses images from a patient’s 4D simulation study to model the actual patient internal organ motion during RT delivery. All necessary dose rate calculations are performed in fixed patient internal organ motion states. The analytical and deterministic formulae of mean and variance in dose from non-gated RT were derived directly via statistical averaging of the calculated dose rate over possible random internal organ motion initial phases, and did not require constructing relevant histograms. All results are expressed in dose rate Fourier transform coefficients for computational efficiency. Exact solutions are provided to simplified, yet still clinically relevant, cases. Results from a volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) patient case are also presented. The results obtained from our mathematical algorithm can aid clinical decisions by providing information regarding both mean and variance of radiation dose to non-gated patients prior to RT delivery.

  14. Determination of effective doses in image-guided radiation therapy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyone, Y. Y.; Suriyapee, S.; Sanghangthum, T.; Oonsiri, S.; Tawonwong, T.

    2016-03-01

    The organ and effective doses in image-guided radiotherapy system are determined in this study. For 2D imaging, incident air kerma (Ki) was measured by 6cc ionization chamber with Accu-Pro dosimeter. The entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) was calculated by multiplying Ki with backscatter factor. The effective dose was calculated by multiplying ESAK with conversion coefficient. For 3D imaging, computed tomography/cone-beam dose index (CTDI/CBDI) measurements were performed by using 100mm pencil ionization chamber with Accu-Pro dosimeter. The dose index in air and in CTDI phantom from planning CT and cone- beam CT were measured. Then, effective dose was calculated by ImPACT software. The effective doses from 2D conventional simulator for anteroposterior and lateral projections were 01 and 0.02mSv for head, 0.15 and 0.16mSv for thorax, 0.22 and 0.21mSv for pelvis, respectively. The effective doses from 3D, planning CT and CBCT, were 3.3 and 0.1mSv for head, 13 and 2.4mSv for thorax and 7.2 and 4.9mSv for pelvis, respectively. Based on 30 fractions of treatment course, total effective dose (3D CT, 2D setup verification and 6 times CBCT) of head, thorax and pelvis were 3.93, 27.71 and 37.03mSv, respectively. Therefore, IGRT should be administered with significant parameters to reduce the dose.

  15. Knowledge-based prediction of three-dimensional dose distributions for external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Satomi; Moore, Kevin L.

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate knowledge-based 3D dose prediction for external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Using previously treated plans as training data, an artificial neural network (ANN) was trained to predict a dose matrix based on patient-specific geometric and planning parameters, such as the closest distance (r) to planning target volume (PTV) and organ-at-risks (OARs). Twenty-three prostate and 43 stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) cases with at least one nearby OAR were studied. All were planned with volumetric-modulated arc therapy to prescription doses of 81 Gy for prostate and 12–30 Gy for SRS. Using these clinically approved plans, ANNs were trained to predict dose matrix and the predictive accuracy was evaluated using the dose difference between the clinical plan and prediction, δD = D{sub clin} − D{sub pred}. The mean (〈δD{sub r}〉), standard deviation (σ{sub δD{sub r}}), and their interquartile range (IQR) for the training plans were evaluated at a 2–3 mm interval from the PTV boundary (r{sub PTV}) to assess prediction bias and precision. Initially, unfiltered models which were trained using all plans in the cohorts were created for each treatment site. The models predict approximately the average quality of OAR sparing. Emphasizing a subset of plans that exhibited superior to the average OAR sparing during training, refined models were created to predict high-quality rectum sparing for prostate and brainstem sparing for SRS. Using the refined model, potentially suboptimal plans were identified where the model predicted further sparing of the OARs was achievable. Replans were performed to test if the OAR sparing could be improved as predicted by the model. Results: The refined models demonstrated highly accurate dose distribution prediction. For prostate cases, the average prediction bias for all voxels irrespective of organ delineation ranged from −1% to 0% with maximum IQR of 3% over r{sub PTV} ∈ [ − 6, 30] mm. The

  16. On-line MR imaging for dose validation of abdominal radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glitzner, M.; Crijns, S. P. M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Kontaxis, C.; Prins, F. M.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2015-11-01

    For quality assurance and adaptive radiotherapy, validation of the actual delivered dose is crucial. Intrafractional anatomy changes cannot be captured satisfactorily during treatment with hitherto available imaging modalitites. Consequently, dose calculations are based on the assumption of static anatomy throughout the treatment. However, intra- and interfraction anatomy is dynamic and changes can be significant. In this paper, we investigate the use of an MR-linac as a dose tracking modality for the validation of treatments in abdominal targets where both respiratory and long-term peristaltic and drift motion occur. The on-line MR imaging capability of the modality provides the means to perform respiratory gating of both delivery and acquisition yielding a model-free respiratory motion management under free breathing conditions. In parallel to the treatment, the volumetric patient anatomy was captured and used to calculate the applied dose. Subsequently, the individual doses were warped back to the planning grid to obtain the actual dose accumulated over the entire treatment duration. Ultimately, the planned dose was validated by comparison with the accumulated dose. Representative for a site subject to breathing modulation, two kidney cases (25 Gy target dose) demonstrated the working principle on volunteer data and simulated delivery. The proposed workflow successfully showed its ability to track local dosimetric changes. Integration of the on-line anatomy information could reveal local dose variations  -2.3-1.5 Gy in the target volume of a volunteer dataset. In the adjacent organs at risk, high local dose errors ranging from  -2.5 to 1.9 Gy could be traced back.

  17. Assessment of Out-of-Field Doses in Radiotherapy of Brain Lesions in Children

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Michael L.; Kron, Tomas; Franich, Rick D.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To characterize the out-of-field doses in pediatric radiotherapy and to identify simple methods by which out-of-field dose might be minimized, with a view to reducing the risk of secondary cancers. Methods and Materials: With the aim of characterizing the peripheral doses under different treatment conditions, the dose measurements in an anthropomorphic child phantom were taken in various organs and critical structures outside the primary field using thermoluminescent dosimetry. The doses from a Varian 600C and Varian Trilogy linear accelerator, both at 6 MV, were investigated. Results: Larger field sizes have been shown to result in greater peripheral doses close to the primary beam, with the difference becoming less significant at large distances, indicating that most of out-of-field doses result from head leakage and collimator scatter >40 cm from the primary field. The use of lead shields has been shown to reduce the absorbed dose resulting from leakage. Aligning the craniocaudal axis of the patient with the x-plane of the collimator resulted in a dose reduction of 40%, for both machines. Out-of-field doses from the Varian Trilogy were shown to be approximately 40% greater than those from the 600C linear accelerator, despite being operated at the same energy. Conclusion: Out-of-field doses to pediatric patients can be minimized by using simple treatment options, such as using the single-energy mode linear accelerator rather than the multimode, orienting the couch and collimator such that the patient lies along the x-plane and avoiding fields directed along the trunk of the body.

  18. Megavoltage cone beam CT near surface dose measurements: potential implications for breast radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Alexandra; Holloway, Lois; Cutajar, Dean; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Metcalfe, Peter

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is fast becoming standard on modern linear accelerators. CBCT increases the dose to regions within and outside the treatment field, potentially increasing secondary cancer induction and toxicity. This study quantified megavoltage (MV) CBCT skin dose and compared it to skin dose delivered during standard tangential breast radiotherapy.Method: Dosimetry was performed both in- and out-of-field using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and a metal-oxide-semiconductor-field-effect-transistor (MOSFET) detector specifically designed for skin dosimetry; these were placed superficially on a female anthropomorphic phantom. Results: The skin dose from a single treatment fraction ranged from 0.5 to 1.4 Gy on the ipsilateral breast, 0.031-0.18 Gy on the contralateral breast, and 0-0.02 Gy in the head and pelvic region. An 8 MU MV CBCT delivered a skin dose that ranged from 0.02 to 0.05 Gy in the chest region and was less than 0.01 Gy in the head and pelvis regions. One MV CBCT per fraction was found to increase the out-of-field skin dose from both the CBCT and the treatment fields by approximately 20%. The imaging dose as a percentage of treatment doses in the ipsilateral breast region was 3% for both dosimeters.Conclusion: Imaging increases the skin dose to regions outside the treatment field particularly regions immediately adjacent the target volume. This small extra dose to the breasts should be considered when developing clinical protocols and assessing dose for clinical trials.

  19. Voxel-based dose prediction with multi-patient atlas selection for automated radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Chris; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2017-01-01

    Automating the radiotherapy treatment planning process is a technically challenging problem. The majority of automated approaches have focused on customizing and inferring dose volume objectives to be used in plan optimization. In this work we outline a multi-patient atlas-based dose prediction approach that learns to predict the dose-per-voxel for a novel patient directly from the computed tomography planning scan without the requirement of specifying any objectives. Our method learns to automatically select the most effective atlases for a novel patient, and then map the dose from those atlases onto the novel patient. We extend our previous work to include a conditional random field for the optimization of a joint distribution prior that matches the complementary goals of an accurately spatially distributed dose distribution while still adhering to the desired dose volume histograms. The resulting distribution can then be used for inverse-planning with a new spatial dose objective, or to create typical dose volume objectives for the canonical optimization pipeline. We investigated six treatment sites (633 patients for training and 113 patients for testing) and evaluated the mean absolute difference in all DVHs for the clinical and predicted dose distribution. The results on average are favorable in comparison to our previous approach (1.91 versus 2.57). Comparing our method with and without atlas-selection further validates that atlas-selection improved dose prediction on average in whole breast (0.64 versus 1.59), prostate (2.13 versus 4.07), and rectum (1.46 versus 3.29) while it is less important in breast cavity (0.79 versus 0.92) and lung (1.33 versus 1.27) for which there is high conformity and minimal dose shaping. In CNS brain, atlas-selection has the potential to be impactful (3.65 versus 5.09), but selecting the ideal atlas is the most challenging.

  20. Patient doses in {gamma}-intracoronary radiotherapy: The Radiation Burden Assessment Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thierens, Hubert . E-mail: hubert.thierens@Ughent.be; Reynaert, Nick; Bacher, Klaus; Eijkeren, Marc van; Taeymans, Yves

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: To determine accurately the radiation burden of both patients and staff from intracoronary radiotherapy (IRT) with {sup 192}Ir and to investigate the importance of IRT in the patient dose compared with interventional X-rays. Methods and materials: The Radiation Burden Assessment Study (RABAS) population consisted of 9 patients undergoing {gamma}-IRT after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and 14 patients undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty only as the control group. For each patient, the dose to the organs and tissues from the internal and external exposure was determined in detail by Monte Carlo N-particle simulations. Patient skin dose measurements with thermoluminescence dosimeters served as verification. Staff dosimetry was performed with electronic dosimeters, thermoluminescence dosimeters, and double film badge dosimetry. Results: With respect to the patient dose from IRT, the critical organs are the thymus (58 mGy), lungs (31 mGy), and esophagus (27 mGy). The mean effective dose from IRT was 8 mSv. The effective dose values from interventional X-rays showed a broad range (2-28 mSv), with mean values of 8 mSv for the IRT patients and 13 mSv for the control group. The mean dose received by the radiotherapist from IRT was 4 {mu}Sv/treatment. The doses to the other staff members were completely negligible. Conclusion: Our results have shown that the patient and personnel doses in {gamma}-IRT remain at an acceptable level. The patient dose from IRT was within the variations in dose from the accompanying interventional X-rays.

  1. Fast dose algorithm for generation of dose coverage probability for robustness analysis of fractionated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilly, David; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2015-07-01

    A fast algorithm is constructed to facilitate dose calculation for a large number of randomly sampled treatment scenarios, each representing a possible realisation of a full treatment with geometric, fraction specific displacements for an arbitrary number of fractions. The algorithm is applied to construct a dose volume coverage probability map (DVCM) based on dose calculated for several hundred treatment scenarios to enable the probabilistic evaluation of a treatment plan. For each treatment scenario, the algorithm calculates the total dose by perturbing a pre-calculated dose, separately for the primary and scatter dose components, for the nominal conditions. The ratio of the scenario specific accumulated fluence, and the average fluence for an infinite number of fractions is used to perturb the pre-calculated dose. Irregularities in the accumulated fluence may cause numerical instabilities in the ratio, which is mitigated by regularisation through convolution with a dose pencil kernel. Compared to full dose calculations the algorithm demonstrates a speedup factor of ~1000. The comparisons to full calculations show a 99% gamma index (2%/2 mm) pass rate for a single highly modulated beam in a virtual water phantom subject to setup errors during five fractions. The gamma comparison shows a 100% pass rate in a moving tumour irradiated by a single beam in a lung-like virtual phantom. DVCM iso-probability lines computed with the fast algorithm, and with full dose calculation for each of the fractions, for a hypo-fractionated prostate case treated with rotational arc therapy treatment were almost indistinguishable.

  2. MRI-guided tumor tracking in lung cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerviño, Laura I.; Du, Jiang; Jiang, Steve B.

    2011-07-01

    Precise tracking of lung tumor motion during treatment delivery still represents a challenge in radiation therapy. Prototypes of MRI-linac hybrid systems are being created which have the potential of ionization-free real-time imaging of the tumor. This study evaluates the performance of lung tumor tracking algorithms in cine-MRI sagittal images from five healthy volunteers. Visible vascular structures were used as targets. Volunteers performed several series of regular and irregular breathing. Two tracking algorithms were implemented and evaluated: a template matching (TM) algorithm in combination with surrogate tracking using the diaphragm (surrogate was used when the maximum correlation between the template and the image in the search window was less than specified), and an artificial neural network (ANN) model based on the principal components of a region of interest that encompasses the target motion. The mean tracking error ē and the error at 95% confidence level e95 were evaluated for each model. The ANN model led to ē = 1.5 mm and e95 = 4.2 mm, while TM led to ē = 0.6 mm and e95 = 1.0 mm. An extra series was considered separately to evaluate the benefit of using surrogate tracking in combination with TM when target out-of-plane motion occurs. For this series, the mean error was 7.2 mm using only TM and 1.7 mm when the surrogate was used in combination with TM. Results show that, as opposed to tracking with other imaging modalities, ANN does not perform well in MR-guided tracking. TM, however, leads to highly accurate tracking. Out-of-plane motion could be addressed by surrogate tracking using the diaphragm, which can be easily identified in the images.

  3. Quality assurance for radiotherapy in prostate cancer: Point dose measurements in intensity modulated fields with large dose gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Escude, Lluis . E-mail: lluis.escude@gmx.net; Linero, Dolors; Molla, Meritxell; Miralbell, Raymond

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: We aimed to evaluate an optimization algorithm designed to find the most favorable points to position an ionization chamber (IC) for quality assurance dose measurements of patients treated for prostate cancer with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and fields up to 10 cm x 10 cm. Methods and Materials: Three cylindrical ICs (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) were used with volumes of 0.6 cc, 0.125 cc, and 0.015 cc. Dose measurements were made in a plastic phantom (PMMA) at 287 optimized points. An algorithm was designed to search for points with the lowest dose gradient. Measurements were made also at 39 nonoptimized points. Results were normalized to a reference homogeneous field introducing a dose ratio factor, which allowed us to compare measured vs. calculated values as percentile dose ratio factor deviations {delta}F (%). A tolerance range of {delta}F (%) of {+-}3% was considered. Results: Half of the {delta}F (%) values obtained at nonoptimized points were outside the acceptable range. Values at optimized points were widely spread for the largest IC (i.e., 60% of the results outside the tolerance range), whereas for the two small-volume ICs, only 14.6% of the results were outside the tolerance interval. No differences were observed when comparing the two small ICs. Conclusions: The presented optimization algorithm is a useful tool to determine the best IC in-field position for optimal dose measurement conditions. A good agreement between calculated and measured doses can be obtained by positioning small volume chambers at carefully selected points in the field. Large chambers may be unreliable even in optimized points for IMRT fields {<=}10 cm x 10 cm.

  4. PET/CT-guided Interventions: Personnel Radiation Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, E. Ronan Thornton, Raymond; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Hsu, Meier; Quinn, Brian; Dauer, Lawrence T.; Solomon, Stephen B.

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo quantify radiation exposure to the primary operator and staff during PET/CT-guided interventional procedures.MethodsIn this prospective study, 12 patients underwent PET/CT-guided interventions over a 6 month period. Radiation exposure was measured for the primary operator, the radiology technologist, and the nurse anesthetist by means of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. Radiation exposure was correlated with the procedure time and the use of in-room image guidance (CT fluoroscopy or ultrasound).ResultsThe median effective dose was 0.02 (range 0-0.13) mSv for the primary operator, 0.01 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the nurse anesthetist, and 0.02 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the radiology technologist. The median extremity dose equivalent for the operator was 0.05 (range 0-0.62) mSv. Radiation exposure correlated with procedure duration and with the use of in-room image guidance. The median operator effective dose for the procedure was 0.015 mSv when conventional biopsy mode CT was used, compared to 0.06 mSv for in-room image guidance, although this did not achieve statistical significance as a result of the small sample size (p = 0.06).ConclusionThe operator dose from PET/CT-guided procedures is not significantly different than typical doses from fluoroscopically guided procedures. The major determinant of radiation exposure to the operator from PET/CT-guided interventional procedures is time spent in close proximity to the patient.

  5. Nanoscale radiation transport and clinical beam modeling for gold nanoparticle dose enhanced radiotherapy (GNPT) using X-rays.

    PubMed

    Zygmanski, Piotr; Sajo, Erno

    2016-01-01

    We review radiation transport and clinical beam modelling for gold nanoparticle dose-enhanced radiotherapy using X-rays. We focus on the nanoscale radiation transport and its relation to macroscopic dosimetry for monoenergetic and clinical beams. Among other aspects, we discuss Monte Carlo and deterministic methods and their applications to predicting dose enhancement using various metrics.

  6. Nanoscale radiation transport and clinical beam modeling for gold nanoparticle dose enhanced radiotherapy (GNPT) using X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Sajo, Erno

    2016-01-01

    We review radiation transport and clinical beam modelling for gold nanoparticle dose-enhanced radiotherapy using X-rays. We focus on the nanoscale radiation transport and its relation to macroscopic dosimetry for monoenergetic and clinical beams. Among other aspects, we discuss Monte Carlo and deterministic methods and their applications to predicting dose enhancement using various metrics. PMID:26642305

  7. Standard-Fractionated Radiotherapy for Optic Nerve Sheath Meningioma: Visual Outcome Is Predicted by Mean Eye Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Abouaf, Lucie; Girard, Nicolas; Lefort, Thibaud; D'hombres, Anne; Tilikete, Caroline; Vighetto, Alain; Mornex, Francoise

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy has shown its efficacy in controlling optic nerve sheath meningiomas (ONSM) tumor growth while allowing visual acuity to improve or stabilize. However, radiation-induced toxicity may ultimately jeopardize the functional benefit. The purpose of this study was to identify predictive factors of poor visual outcome in patients receiving radiotherapy for ONSM. Methods and Materials: We conducted an extensive analysis of 10 patients with ONSM with regard to clinical, radiologic, and dosimetric aspects. All patients were treated with conformal radiotherapy and subsequently underwent biannual neuroophthalmologic and imaging assessments. Pretreatment and posttreatment values of visual acuity and visual field were compared with Wilcoxon's signed rank test. Results: Visual acuity values significantly improved after radiotherapy. After a median follow-up time of 51 months, 6 patients had improved visual acuity, 4 patients had improved visual field, 1 patient was in stable condition, and 1 patient had deteriorated visual acuity and visual field. Tumor control rate was 100% at magnetic resonance imaging assessment. Visual acuity deterioration after radiotherapy was related to radiation-induced retinopathy in 2 patients and radiation-induced mature cataract in 1 patient. Study of radiotherapy parameters showed that the mean eye dose was significantly higher in those 3 patients who had deteriorated vision. Conclusions: Our study confirms that radiotherapy is efficient in treating ONSM. Long-term visual outcome may be compromised by radiation-induced side effects. Mean eye dose has to be considered as a limiting constraint in treatment planning.

  8. Impact of Intrafractional Bowel Gas Movement on Carbon Ion Beam Dose Distribution in Pancreatic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kumagai, Motoki; Hara, Ryusuke; Mori, Shinichiro Yanagi, Takeshi; Asakura, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Riwa; Kato, Hirotoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Kandatsu, Susumu; Kamada, Tadashi

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To assess carbon ion beam dose variation due to bowel gas movement in pancreatic radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ten pancreatic cancer inpatients were subject to diagnostic contrast-enhanced dynamic helical CT examination under breath-holding conditions, which included multiple-phase dynamic CT with arterial, venous, and delayed phases. The arterial-venous phase and arterial-delayed phase intervals were 35 and 145 s, respectively. A compensating bolus was designed to cover the target obtained at the arterial phase. Carbon ion dose distribution was calculated by applying the bolus to the CT data sets at the other two phases. Results: Dose conformation to the clinical target volume was degraded by beam overshoot/undershoot due to bowel gas movement. The D95 for clinical target volume was degraded from 98.2% (range, 98.0-99.1%) of the prescribed dose to 94.7% (range, 88.0-99.0%) at 145 s. Excessive dosing to normal tissues varied among tissues and was, for example, 12.2 GyE/13.1 GyE (0 s/145 s) for the cord and 38.8 GyE/39.8 GyE (0 s/145 s) for the duodenum. The magnitude of beam overshoot/undershoot was particularly exacerbated from the anterior and left directions. Conclusions: Bowel gas movement causes dosimetric variation to the target during treatment for radiotherapy. The effect of bowel gas movement varies with beam angle, with greatest influence on the anterior-posterior and left-right beams.

  9. Impact of Radiotherapy Dose on Dentition Breakdown in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Mary P.; Wichman, Brian; Cheng, An-Lin; Coster, James; Williams, Karen B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the severity of post-radiation dental lesions and possible correlation with radiation dose to the teeth in patients treated for head and neck cancers. Methods and Materials Data from 93 head and neck radiotherapy patients treated between 1997 and 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. The main effect, radiation dose to the individual teeth, was evaluated with covariates of elapsed time after radiation, xerostomia, topical fluoride use, and oral hygiene status included. Patients’ radiotherapy plans were used to calculate cumulative exposure for each tooth. Patients’ teeth were evaluated using a validated index and then categorized as having none/slight or moderate/severe post-radiation damage. Results Patients (31 females, 62 males) ranged in age from 18–82 yrs (mean=57). The number of teeth/patient ranged from 3–30 (mean=20) with a total of 1873 teeth evaluated. Overall, 51% of teeth had moderate/severe damage, with the remaining having little or none. Using odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals, the odds for moderate/severe damage were 2–3x greater for teeth exposed to between 30–60 Gy as compared to no radiation. However, for teeth exposed to ≥60 Gy as compared to no radiation the odds of moderate/severe tooth damage was greater by a magnitude of 10 times. Conclusions The results indicate that there is minimal tooth damage below 30 Gy (salivary gland threshold), a greater than 1:1 increased dose-response between 30–60y likely related to salivary gland damage, and a critical threshold of ≥60Gy which may be linked to direct effects of radiation on tooth structure. These findings suggest that care should be taken during the treatment planning process to limit tooth dose, and when clinically possible to limit tooth dose to less than 60 Gy. PMID:21857887

  10. Voxel-based population analysis for correlating local dose and rectal toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Oscar; Drean, Gael; Ospina, Juan David; Simon, Antoine; Haigron, Pascal; Lafond, Caroline; De Crevoisier, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    The majority of current models utilized for predicting toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy are based on dose-volume histograms. One of their main drawbacks is the lack of spatial accuracy, since they consider the organs as a whole volume and thus ignore the heterogeneous intra-organ radio-sensitivity. In this paper, we propose a dose-image-based framework to reveal the relationships between local dose and toxicity. In this approach, the three-dimensional (3D) planned dose distributions across a population are non-rigidly registered into a common coordinate system and compared at a voxel level, therefore enabling the identification of 3D anatomical patterns, which may be responsible for toxicity, at least to some extent. Additionally, different metrics were employed in order to assess the quality of the dose mapping. The value of this approach was demonstrated by prospectively analyzing rectal bleeding (≥Grade 1 at 2 years) according to the CTCAE v3.0 classification in a series of 105 patients receiving 80Gy to the prostate by IMRT. Within the patients presenting bleeding, a significant dose excess (6Gy on average, p<0.01) was found in a region of the anterior rectal wall. This region, close to the prostate (1cm), represented less than 10% of the rectum. This promising voxel-wise approach allowed subregions to be defined within the organ that may be involved in toxicity and, as such, must be considered during the inverse IMRT planning step. PMID:23528429

  11. Monte Carlo calculation of dose distributions in oligometastatic patients planned for spine stereotactic ablative radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Moiseenko, V; Liu, M; Loewen, S; Kosztyla, R; Vollans, E; Lucido, J; Fong, M; Vellani, R; Popescu, I A

    2013-10-21

    Dosimetric consequences of plans optimized using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) implemented in the Varian Eclipse treatment planning system for spine stereotactic body radiotherapy were evaluated by re-calculating with BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo. Six patients with spinal vertebral metastases were planned using volumetric modulated arc therapy. The planning goal was to cover at least 80% of the planning target volume with a prescribed dose of 35 Gy in five fractions. Tissue heterogeneity-corrected AAA dose distributions for the planning target volume and spinal canal planning organ-at-risk volume were compared against those obtained from Monte Carlo. The results showed that the AAA overestimated planning target volume coverage with the prescribed dose by up to 13.5% (mean 8.3% +/- 3.2%) when compared to Monte Carlo simulations. Maximum dose to spinal canal planning organ-at-risk volume calculated with Monte Carlo was consistently smaller than calculated with the treatment planning system and remained under spinal cord dose tolerance. Differences in dose distribution appear to be related to the dosimetric effects of accounting for body composition in Monte Carlo simulations. In contrast, the treatment planning system assumes that all tissues are water-equivalent in their composition and only differ in their electron density.

  12. Progressive cone beam CT dose control in image-guided radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hao; Zhen, Xin; Cerviño, Laura; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Cone beam CT (CBCT) in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) offers a tremendous advantage for treatment guidance. The associated imaging dose is a clinical concern. One unique feature of CBCT-based IGRT is that the same patient is repeatedly scanned during a treatment course, and the contents of CBCT images at different fractions are similar. The authors propose a progressive dose control (PDC) scheme to utilize this temporal correlation for imaging dose reduction. Methods: A dynamic CBCT scan protocol, as opposed to the static one in the current clinical practice, is proposed to gradually reduce the imaging dose in each treatment fraction. The CBCT image from each fraction is processed by a prior-image based nonlocal means (PINLM) module to enhance its quality. The increasing amount of prior information from previous CBCT images prevents degradation of image quality due to the reduced imaging dose. Two proof-of-principle experiments have been conducted using measured phantom data and Monte Carlo simulated patient data with deformation. Results: In the measured phantom case, utilizing a prior image acquired at 0.4 mAs, PINLM is able to improve the image quality of a CBCT acquired at 0.2 mAs by reducing the noise level from 34.95 to 12.45 HU. In the synthetic patient case, acceptable image quality is maintained at four consecutive fractions with gradually decreasing exposure levels of 0.4, 0.1, 0.07, and 0.05 mAs. When compared with the standard low-dose protocol of 0.4 mAs for each fraction, an overall imaging dose reduction of more than 60% is achieved. Conclusions: PINLM-PDC is able to reduce CBCT imaging dose in IGRT utilizing the temporal correlations among the sequence of CBCT images while maintaining the quality. PMID:23718579

  13. Impact of dose size in single fraction spatially fractionated (grid) radiotherapy for melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hualin E-mail: hualinzhang@yahoo.com; Zhong, Hualiang; Barth, Rolf F.; Cao, Minsong; Das, Indra J.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of dose size in single fraction, spatially fractionated (grid) radiotherapy for selectively killing infiltrated melanoma cancer cells of different tumor sizes, using different radiobiological models. Methods: A Monte Carlo technique was employed to calculate the 3D dose distribution of a commercially available megavoltage grid collimator in a 6 MV beam. The linear-quadratic (LQ) and modified linear quadratic (MLQ) models were used separately to evaluate the therapeutic outcome of a series of single fraction regimens that employed grid therapy to treat both acute and late responding melanomas of varying sizes. The dose prescription point was at the center of the tumor volume. Dose sizes ranging from 1 to 30 Gy at 100% dose line were modeled. Tumors were either touching the skin surface or having their centers at a depth of 3 cm. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) to the melanoma cells and the therapeutic ratio (TR) were defined by comparing grid therapy with the traditional open debulking field. The clinical outcomes from recent reports were used to verify the authors’ model. Results: Dose profiles at different depths and 3D dose distributions in a series of 3D melanomas treated with grid therapy were obtained. The EUDs and TRs for all sizes of 3D tumors involved at different doses were derived through the LQ and MLQ models, and a practical equation was derived. The EUD was only one fifth of the prescribed dose. The TR was dependent on the prescribed dose and on the LQ parameters of both the interspersed cancer and normal tissue cells. The results from the LQ model were consistent with those of the MLQ model. At 20 Gy, the EUD and TR by the LQ model were 2.8% higher and 1% lower than by the MLQ, while at 10 Gy, the EUD and TR as defined by the LQ model were only 1.4% higher and 0.8% lower, respectively. The dose volume histograms of grid therapy for a 10 cm tumor showed different dosimetric characteristics from those of conventional

  14. Quantitative comparison of dose distribution in radiotherapy plans using 2D gamma maps and X-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Balosso, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Background The advanced dose calculation algorithms implemented in treatment planning system (TPS) have remarkably improved the accuracy of dose calculation especially the modeling of electrons transport in the low density medium. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of 2D gamma (γ) index to quantify and evaluate the impact of the calculation of electrons transport on dose distribution for lung radiotherapy. Methods X-ray computed tomography images were used to calculate the dose for twelve radiotherapy treatment plans. The doses were originally calculated with Modified Batho (MB) 1D density correction method, and recalculated with anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), using the same prescribed dose. Dose parameters derived from dose volume histograms (DVH) and target coverage indices were compared. To compare dose distribution, 2D γ-index was applied, ranging from 1%/1 mm to 6%/6 mm. The results were displayed using γ-maps in 2D. Correlation between DVH metrics and γ passing rates was tested using Spearman’s rank test and Wilcoxon paired test to calculate P values. Results the plans generated with AAA predicted more heterogeneous dose distribution inside the target, with P<0.05. However, MB overestimated the dose predicting more coverage of the target by the prescribed dose. The γ analysis showed that the difference between MB and AAA could reach up to ±10%. The 2D γ-maps illustrated that AAA predicted more dose to organs at risks, as well as lower dose to the target compared to MB. Conclusions Taking into account of the electrons transport on radiotherapy plans showed a significant impact on delivered dose and dose distribution. When considering the AAA represent the true cumulative dose, a readjusting of the prescribed dose and an optimization to protect the organs at risks should be taken in consideration in order to obtain the better clinical outcome. PMID:27429908

  15. Influence of image slice thickness on rectal dose-response relationships following radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, C.; Thor, M.; Liu, M.; Moissenko, V.; Petersen, S. E.; Høyer, M.; Apte, A.; Deasy, J. O.

    2014-07-01

    When pooling retrospective data from different cohorts, slice thicknesses of acquired computed tomography (CT) images used for treatment planning may vary between cohorts. It is, however, not known if varying slice thickness influences derived dose-response relationships. We investigated this for rectal bleeding using dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the rectum and rectal wall for dose distributions superimposed on images with varying CT slice thicknesses. We used dose and endpoint data from two prostate cancer cohorts treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to either 74 Gy (N = 159) or 78 Gy (N = 159) at 2 Gy per fraction. The rectum was defined as the whole organ with content, and the morbidity cut-off was Grade ≥2 late rectal bleeding. Rectal walls were defined as 3 mm inner margins added to the rectum. DVHs for simulated slice thicknesses from 3 to 13 mm were compared to DVHs for the originally acquired slice thicknesses at 3 and 5 mm. Volumes, mean, and maximum doses were assessed from the DVHs, and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) values were calculated. For each organ and each of the simulated slice thicknesses, we performed predictive modeling of late rectal bleeding using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. For the most coarse slice thickness, rectal volumes increased (≤18%), whereas maximum and mean doses decreased (≤0.8 and ≤4.2 Gy, respectively). For all a values, the gEUD for the simulated DVHs were ≤1.9 Gy different than the gEUD for the original DVHs. The best-fitting LKB model parameter values with 95% CIs were consistent between all DVHs. In conclusion, we found that the investigated slice thickness variations had minimal impact on rectal dose-response estimations. From the perspective of predictive modeling, our results suggest that variations within 10 mm in slice thickness between cohorts are unlikely to be a limiting factor when pooling multi-institutional rectal dose data that include slice thickness

  16. Influence of nuclear interactions in body tissues on tumor dose in carbon-ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Inaniwa, T. Kanematsu, N.; Tsuji, H.; Kamada, T.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning, the planar integrated dose (PID) measured in water is applied to the patient dose calculation with density scaling using the stopping power ratio. Since body tissues are chemically different from water, this dose calculation can be subject to errors, particularly due to differences in inelastic nuclear interactions. In recent studies, the authors proposed and validated a PID correction method for these errors. In the present study, the authors used this correction method to assess the influence of these nuclear interactions in body tissues on tumor dose in various clinical cases. Methods: Using 10–20 cases each of prostate, head and neck (HN), bone and soft tissue (BS), lung, liver, pancreas, and uterine neoplasms, the authors first used treatment plans for carbon-ion radiotherapy without nuclear interaction correction to derive uncorrected dose distributions. The authors then compared these distributions with recalculated distributions using the nuclear interaction correction (corrected dose distributions). Results: Median (25%/75% quartiles) differences between the target mean uncorrected doses and corrected doses were 0.2% (0.1%/0.2%), 0.0% (0.0%/0.0%), −0.3% (−0.4%/−0.2%), −0.1% (−0.2%/−0.1%), −0.1% (−0.2%/0.0%), −0.4% (−0.5%/−0.1%), and −0.3% (−0.4%/0.0%) for the prostate, HN, BS, lung, liver, pancreas, and uterine cases, respectively. The largest difference of −1.6% in target mean and −2.5% at maximum were observed in a uterine case. Conclusions: For most clinical cases, dose calculation errors due to the water nonequivalence of the tissues in nuclear interactions would be marginal compared to intrinsic uncertainties in treatment planning, patient setup, beam delivery, and clinical response. In some extreme cases, however, these errors can be substantial. Accordingly, this correction method should be routinely applied to treatment planning in clinical practice.

  17. Dosimetric impact of setup errors in head and neck cancer patients treated by image-guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Inderjit; Rawat, Sheh; Ahlawat, Parveen; Kakria, Anjali; Gupta, Gourav; Saxena, Upasna; Mishra, Manindra Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    To assess and analyze the impact of setup uncertainties on target volume coverage and doses to organs at risk (OAR) in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients treated by image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Translational setup errors in 25 HNC patients were observed by kilovoltage cone beam computed tomography (kV CBCT). Two plans were generated. Plan one – the original plan which was the initially optimized and approved plan of the patient. All patients were treated according to their respective approved plans at a defined isocenter. Plan two – the plan sum which was the sum of all plans recalculated at a different isocenter according to setup errors in x, y, and z-direction. Plan sum was created to evaluate doses that would have been received by planning target volume (PTV) and OARs if setup errors were not corrected. These 2 plans were analyzed and compared in terms of target volume coverage and doses to OARs. A total 503 kV CBCT images were acquired for evaluation of setup errors in 25 HNC patients. The systematic (mean) and random errors (standard deviation) combined for 25 patients in x, y, and z directions were 0.15 cm, 0.21 cm, and 0.19 cm and 0.09 cm, 0.12 cm, and 0.09 cm, respectively. The study showed that there was a significant difference in PTV coverage between 2 plans. The doses to various OARs showed a nonsignificant increase in the plan sum. The correction of translational setup errors is essential for IGRT treatment in terms of delivery of planned optimal doses to target volume. PMID:27217627

  18. Precision radiotherapy for brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ying; Guo, Zhanwen; Zhang, Haibo; Wang, Ning; Xu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Precision radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of brain tumors. This study aimed to identify global research trends in precision radiotherapy for brain tumors using a bibliometric analysis of the Web of Science. DATA RETRIEVAL: We performed a bibliometric analysis of data retrievals for precision radiotherapy for brain tumors containing the key words cerebral tumor, brain tumor, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy, imaging-guided radiotherapy, dose-guided radiotherapy, stereotactic brachytherapy, and stereotactic radiotherapy using the Web of Science. SELECTION CRITERIA: Inclusion criteria: (a) peer-reviewed articles on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors which were published and indexed in the Web of Science; (b) type of articles: original research articles and reviews; (c) year of publication: 2002-2011. Exclusion criteria: (a) articles that required manual searching or telephone access; (b) Corrected papers or book chapters. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) Annual publication output; (2) distribution according to country; (3) distribution according to institution; (4) top cited publications; (5) distribution according to journals; and (6) comparison of study results on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. RESULTS: The stereotactic radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and imaging-guided radiotherapy are three major methods of precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. There were 260 research articles addressing precision radiotherapy for brain tumors found within the Web of Science. The USA published the most papers on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors, followed by Germany and France. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, German Cancer Research Center and Heidelberg University were the most prolific research institutes for publications on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. Among the top 13 research institutes publishing in this field, seven

  19. The Radiobiological Basis for Improvements in Radiotherapy and Low Dose Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Hei, Tom K

    2009-12-09

    Overall Goal: This conference grant was proposed to organize and host an international conference at Columbia University in New York to critically assess the cellular and molecular signaling events and tissue response following radiation damage. The conference would also serve as a venue to play tribute to the more than forty years contributions made by Professor Eric J. Hall to the radiation biology field. The goals of the meeting were to examine tumor hypoxia and sensitizer development; recent advances made in clinical radiotherapy; addressed several low dose phenomena, including genomic instability and bystander effects that are important in radiation risk assessment. Study and Results: The symposium was held on October 13th and 14th, 2008 at the Alfred Lerner Hall in the Morningside campus of Columbia University. The symposium, entitled “From Beans to Genes: A Forty Year Odyssey in Radiation Biology” was attended by more than 120 faculty, scientists, clinicians, fellows and students. The symposium, spanned over a day and a half, covered four scientific themes. These included tumor hypoxia and radiosensitizers; low dose radiation response; radiation biology in the practice of radiotherapy, and radiation hazard in space and genetic predisposition to cancer. The program of the symposium is as follow:

  20. Effective Doses in Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography for Lung Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Shinichiro Ko, Susumu; Ishii, Takayoshi; Nishizawa, Kanae

    2009-04-01

    The recent broad adoption of 4-D computed tomography (4DCT) scanning in radiotherapy has allowed the accurate determination of the target volume of tumors by minimizing image degradation caused by respiratory motion. Although the radiation exposure of the treatment beam is significantly greater than that of CT scans used for treatment planning, it is important to recognize and optimize the radiation exposure in 4DCT from the radiological protection point of view. Here, radiation exposure in 4DCT was measured with a 16 multidetector CT. Organ doses were measured using thermoluminescence radiation dosimeter chips inserted at respective anatomical sites of an anthropomorphic phantom. Results were compared with those with the helical CT scan mode. The effective dose measured for 4DCT was 24.7 mSv, approximately four times higher than that for helical CT. However, the increase in treatment accuracy afforded by 4DCT means its use in radiotherapy is inevitable. The patient exposure in the 4DCT could be of value by clarifying the advantage of the treatment planning using 4DCT.

  1. Sensitivity analysis for dose deposition in radiotherapy via a Fokker–Planck model

    DOE PAGES

    Barnard, Richard C.; Frank, Martin; Krycki, Kai

    2016-02-09

    In this paper, we study the sensitivities of electron dose calculations with respect to stopping power and transport coefficients. We focus on the application to radiotherapy simulations. We use a Fokker–Planck approximation to the Boltzmann transport equation. Equations for the sensitivities are derived by the adjoint method. The Fokker–Planck equation and its adjoint are solved numerically in slab geometry using the spherical harmonics expansion (PN) and an Harten-Lax-van Leer finite volume method. Our method is verified by comparison to finite difference approximations of the sensitivities. Finally, we present numerical results of the sensitivities for the normalized average dose deposition depthmore » with respect to the stopping power and the transport coefficients, demonstrating the increase in relative sensitivities as beam energy decreases. In conclusion, this in turn gives estimates on the uncertainty in the normalized average deposition depth, which we present.« less

  2. Sensitivity analysis for dose deposition in radiotherapy via a Fokker–Planck model

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, Richard C.; Frank, Martin; Krycki, Kai

    2016-02-09

    In this paper, we study the sensitivities of electron dose calculations with respect to stopping power and transport coefficients. We focus on the application to radiotherapy simulations. We use a Fokker–Planck approximation to the Boltzmann transport equation. Equations for the sensitivities are derived by the adjoint method. The Fokker–Planck equation and its adjoint are solved numerically in slab geometry using the spherical harmonics expansion (PN) and an Harten-Lax-van Leer finite volume method. Our method is verified by comparison to finite difference approximations of the sensitivities. Finally, we present numerical results of the sensitivities for the normalized average dose deposition depth with respect to the stopping power and the transport coefficients, demonstrating the increase in relative sensitivities as beam energy decreases. In conclusion, this in turn gives estimates on the uncertainty in the normalized average deposition depth, which we present.

  3. A matheuristic for the selection of beam directions and dose distribution in Radiotherapy Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obal, T. M.; Florentino, H. O.; Gevert, V. G.; Jones, D. F.; Ouelhadj, D.; Volpi, N. M. P.; Wilhelm, V. E.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper a matheuristic using a combined Genetic Algorithm (GA) and exact method approach is proposed for selecting the position of the beams and dose distribution in Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Planning (IMRT). GA selects a set of beams, for which the dose distribution is determined in the process of the GA's evaluation, using an optimisation model that is solved by an Interior Point method. Two instances are used to evaluate the performance of the matheuristic, comparing to the optimum solution, in terms of solution and computation time, found using the exact methodology of Branch and Bound. The results show that the matheuristic is appropriate to this problem in the case study proposed, as it is extremely faster than the exact method and also have reached the optimum solution in several experiments done.

  4. Kilovoltage beam Monte Carlo dose calculations in submillimeter voxels for small animal radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bazalova, Magdalena; Zhou, Hu; Keall, Paul J.; Graves, Edward E.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Small animal conformal radiotherapy (RT) is essential for preclinical cancer research studies and therefore various microRT systems have been recently designed. The aim of this paper is to efficiently calculate the dose delivered using our microRT system based on a microCT scanner with the Monte Carlo (MC) method and to compare the MC calculations to film measurements. Methods: Doses from 2-30 mm diameter 120 kVp photon beams deposited in a solid water phantom with 0.2x0.2x0.2 mm{sup 3} voxels are calculated using the latest versions of the EGSnrc codes BEAMNRC and DOSXYZNRC. Two dose calculation approaches are studied: a two-step approach using phase-space files and direct dose calculation with BEAMNRC simulation sources. Due to the small beam size and submillimeter voxel size resulting in long calculation times, variance reduction techniques are studied. The optimum bremsstrahlung splitting number (NBRSPL in BEAMNRC) and the optimum DOSXYZNRC photon splitting (N{sub split}) number are examined for both calculation approaches and various beam sizes. The dose calculation efficiencies and the required number of histories to achieve 1% statistical uncertainty--with no particle recycling--are evaluated for 2-30 mm beams. As a final step, film dose measurements are compared to MC calculated dose distributions. Results: The optimum NBRSPL is approximately 1x10{sup 6} for both dose calculation approaches. For the dose calculations with phase-space files, N{sub split} varies only slightly for 2-30 mm beams and is established to be 300. N{sub split} for the DOSXYZNRC calculation with the BEAMNRC source ranges from 300 for the 30 mm beam to 4000 for the 2 mm beam. The calculation time significantly increases for small beam sizes when the BEAMNRC simulation source is used compared to the simulations with phase-space files. For the 2 and 30 mm beams, the dose calculations with phase-space files are more efficient than the dose calculations with BEAMNRC sources by

  5. A self-adaptive case-based reasoning system for dose planning in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Nishikant; Petrovic, Sanja; Sundar, Santhanam

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in the male population. Radiotherapy is often used in the treatment for prostate cancer. In radiotherapy treatment, the oncologist makes a trade-off between the risk and benefit of the radiation, i.e., the task is to deliver a high dose to the prostate cancer cells and minimize side effects of the treatment. The aim of our research is to develop a software system that will assist the oncologist in planning new treatments. Methods: A nonlinear case-based reasoning system is developed to capture the expertise and experience of oncologists in treating previous patients. Importance (weights) of different clinical parameters in the dose planning is determined by the oncologist based on their past experience, and is highly subjective. The weights are usually fixed in the system. In this research, the weights are updated automatically each time after generating a treatment plan for a new patient using a group based simulated annealing approach. Results: The developed approach is analyzed on the real data set collected from the Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, City Hospital Campus, UK. Extensive experiments show that the dose plan suggested by the proposed method is coherent with the dose plan prescribed by an experienced oncologist or even better. Conclusions: The developed case-based reasoning system enables the use of knowledge and experience gained by the oncologist in treating new patients. This system may play a vital role to assist the oncologist in making a better decision in less computational time; it utilizes the success rate of the previously treated patients and it can also be used in teaching and training processes.

  6. The influence of patient positioning uncertainties in proton radiotherapy on proton range and dose distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Liebl, Jakob; Paganetti, Harald; Zhu, Mingyao; Winey, Brian A.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy allows radiation treatment delivery with high dose gradients. The nature of such dose distributions increases the influence of patient positioning uncertainties on their fidelity when compared to photon radiotherapy. The present work quantitatively analyzes the influence of setup uncertainties on proton range and dose distributions. Methods: Thirty-eight clinical passive scattering treatment fields for small lesions in the head were studied. Dose distributions for shifted and rotated patient positions were Monte Carlo-simulated. Proton range uncertainties at the 50%- and 90%-dose falloff position were calculated considering 18 arbitrary combinations of maximal patient position shifts and rotations for two patient positioning methods. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs), equivalent uniform doses (EUDs), and tumor control probabilities (TCPs) were studied for organs at risk (OARs) and target volumes of eight patients. Results: The authors identified a median 1σ proton range uncertainty at the 50%-dose falloff of 2.8 mm for anatomy-based patient positioning and 1.6 mm for fiducial-based patient positioning as well as 7.2 and 5.8 mm for the 90%-dose falloff position, respectively. These range uncertainties were correlated to heterogeneity indices (HIs) calculated for each treatment field (38% < R{sup 2} < 50%). A NTCP increase of more than 10% (absolute) was observed for less than 2.9% (anatomy-based positioning) and 1.2% (fiducial-based positioning) of the studied OARs and patient shifts. For target volumes TCP decreases by more than 10% (absolute) occurred in less than 2.2% of the considered treatment scenarios for anatomy-based patient positioning and were nonexistent for fiducial-based patient positioning. EUD changes for target volumes were up to 35% (anatomy-based positioning) and 16% (fiducial-based positioning). Conclusions: The influence of patient positioning uncertainties on proton range in therapy of small lesions

  7. Superiority of helical tomotherapy on liver sparing and dose escalation in hepatocellular carcinoma: a comparison study of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qianqian; Wang, Renben; Zhu, Jian; Jin, Linzhi; Zhu, Kunli; Xu, Xiaoqing; Feng, Rui; Jiang, Shumei; Qi, Zhonghua; Yin, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose To compare the difference of liver sparing and dose escalation between three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for hepatocellular carcinoma. Patients and methods Sixteen unresectable HCC patients were enrolled in this study. First, some evaluation factors of 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT plans were calculated with prescription dose at 50 Gy/25 fractions. Then, the doses were increased using HT or IMRT independently until either the plans reached 70 Gy or any normal tissue reached the dose limit according to quantitative analysis of normal tissue effects in the clinic criteria. Results The conformal index of 3DCRT was lower than that of IMRT (P<0.001) or HT (P<0.001), and the homogeneity index of 3DCRT was higher than that of IMRT (P<0.001) or HT (P<0.001). HT took the longest treatment time (P<0.001). For V50% (fraction of normal liver treated to at least 50% of the isocenter dose) of the normal liver, there was a significant difference: 3DCRT > IMRT > HT (P<0.001). HT had a lower Dmean (mean dose) and V20 (Vn, the percentage of organ volume receiving ≥n Gy) of liver compared with 3DCRT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively) or IMRT (P=0.508 and P=0.007, respectively). Dmean of nontarget normal liver and V30 of liver were higher for 3DCRT than IMRT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively) or HT (P=0.005 and P=0.005, respectively). Seven patients in IMRT (43.75%) and nine patients in HT (56.25%) reached the isodose 70 Gy, meeting the dose limit of the organs at risk. Conclusion HT may provide significantly better liver sparing and allow more patients to achieve higher prescription dose in HCC radiotherapy. PMID:27445485

  8. SU-E-T-609: Perturbation Effects of Pedicle Screws On Radiotherapy Dose Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Bar-Deroma, R; Borzov, E; Nevelsky, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation therapy in conjunction with surgical implant fixation is a common combined treatment in case of bone metastases. However, metal implants generally used in orthopedic implants perturb radiation dose distributions. Carbon-Fiber Reinforced (CFR) PEEK material has been recently introduced for production of intramedullary screws and plates. Gold powder can be added to the CFR-PEEK material in order to enhance visibility of the screws during intraoperative imaging procedures. In this work, we investigated the perturbation effects of the pedicle screws made of CFR-PEEK, CFR-PEEK with added gold powder (CFR-PEEK-AU) and Titanium (Ti) on radiotherapy dose distributions. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using the EGSnrc code package for 6MV beams with 10×10 fields at SSD=100cm. By means of MC simulations, dose distributions around titanium, CFR- PEEK and CFR-PEEK-AU screws (manufactured by Carbo-Fix Orthopedics LTD, Israel) placed in a water phantom were calculated. The screw axis was either parallel or perpendicular to the beam axis. Dose perturbation (relative to dose in homogeneous water phantom) was assessed. Results: Maximum overdose due to backscatter was 10% for the Ti screws, 5% for the CFR-PEEK-AU screws and effectively zero for the CFR-PEEK screws. Maximum underdose due to attenuation was 25% for the Ti screws, 15% for the CFR-PEEK-AU screws and 5% for the CFR-PEEK screws. Conclusion: Titanium screws introduce the largest distortion on the radiation dose distribution. The gold powder added to the CFR-PEEK material improves visibility at the cost of increased dose perturbation. CFR-PEEK screws caused minimal alteration on the dose distribution. This can decrease possible over and underdose of adjacent tissue and thus favorably influence treatment efficiency. The use of such implants has potential clinical advantage in the treatment of neoplastic bone disease.

  9. Dosimetric verification of stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy dose distributions using Gafchromic EBT3

    SciTech Connect

    Cusumano, Davide; Fumagalli, Maria L.; Marchetti, Marcello; Fariselli, Laura; De Martin, Elena

    2015-10-01

    Aim of this study is to examine the feasibility of using the new Gafchromic EBT3 film in a high-dose stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy quality assurance procedure. Owing to the reduced dimensions of the involved lesions, the feasibility of scanning plan verification films on the scanner plate area with the best uniformity rather than using a correction mask was evaluated. For this purpose, signal values dispersion and reproducibility of film scans were investigated. Uniformity was then quantified in the selected area and was found to be within 1.5% for doses up to 8 Gy. A high-dose threshold level for analyses using this procedure was established evaluating the sensitivity of the irradiated films. Sensitivity was found to be of the order of centiGray for doses up to 6.2 Gy and decreasing for higher doses. The obtained results were used to implement a procedure comparing dose distributions delivered with a CyberKnife system to planned ones. The procedure was validated through single beam irradiation on a Gafchromic film. The agreement between dose distributions was then evaluated for 13 patients (brain lesions, 5 Gy/die prescription isodose ~80%) using gamma analysis. Results obtained using Gamma test criteria of 5%/1 mm show a pass rate of 94.3%. Gamma frequency parameters calculation for EBT3 films showed to strongly depend on subtraction of unexposed film pixel values from irradiated ones. In the framework of the described dosimetric procedure, EBT3 films proved to be effective in the verification of high doses delivered to lesions with complex shapes and adjacent to organs at risk.

  10. SU-E-J-14: A Novel Approach to Evaluate the Dosimetric Effect of Rectal Variation During Image Guided Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J; McQuaid, D; Dunlop, A; Nill, S; Gulliford, S; Buettner, F; Hall, E; Dearnaley, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Deformable registration establishes the spatial correspondence back to the reference image in order to accumulate dose. However, in prostate radiotherapy the changing shape and volume of the rectum present a challenge to accurate deformable registration and consequently calculation of delivered dose. We explored an alternative approach to calculating accumulated dose to the rectum, independent of deformable registration. Methods: This study was performed on three patients who received online image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with daily CBCT (XVI-system,Elekta) and target localization using intraprostatic fiducials. On each CBCT, the rectum was manually contoured and bulk density assignments were made allowing dose to be calculated for each fraction. Dose-surface maps (DSM) were generated (MATLAB,Mathworks,Natick,MA) by considering the rectum as a cylinder and sampling the dose at 21-equispaced points on each CT slice. The cylinder was “cut” at the posterior-most position on each CT and unfolded to generate a DSM. These were normalised in the longitudinal direction by interpolation creating maps of 21×21 pixels. A DSM was produced for each CBCT and the dose was accumulated. Results: The mean accumulated delivered rectal surface dose was on average 7.5(+/−3.5)% lower than the planned dose. The dose difference maps consistently show that the greatest variation in dose between planned and delivered dose is away from where the rectal surface is adjacent to the prostate. Conclusion: Estimation of dose accumulation using DSM provides an alternative method for determining actual delivered dose to the rectum. The dose difference is greatest in areas away from the region where the rectal surface abuts the prostate, the region where set-up is verified. The change in size and shape of the rectum was shown to resultin a change in the accumulated dose compared to the planned dose and this will have an impact on determining the relationships between dose delivered

  11. Dose to Larynx Predicts for Swallowing Complications After Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Caglar, Hale B.; Tishler, Roy B.; Burke, Elaine; Li Yi; Goguen, Laura; Norris, Carl M.; Allen, Aaron M.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate early swallowing after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and determine factors correlating with aspiration and/or stricture. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy between September 2004 and August 2006 at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital were evaluated with institutional review board approval. Patients underwent swallowing evaluation after completion of therapy; including video swallow studies. The clinical- and treatment-related variables were examined for correlation with aspiration or strictures, as well as doses to the larynx, pharyngeal constrictor muscles, and cervical esophagus. The correlation was assessed with logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 96 patients were evaluated. Their median age was 55 years, and 79 (82%) were men. The primary site of cancer was the oropharynx in 43, hypopharynx/larynx in 17, oral cavity in 13, nasopharynx in 11, maxillary sinus in 2, and unknown primary in 10. Of the 96 patients, 85% underwent definitive RT and 15% postoperative RT. Also, 28 patients underwent induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemotherapy, 59 received concurrent chemotherapy, and 9 patients underwent RT alone. The median follow-up was 10 months. Of the 96 patients, 31 (32%) had clinically significant aspiration and 36 (37%) developed a stricture. The radiation dose-volume metrics, including the volume of the larynx receiving {>=}50 Gy (p = 0.04 and p = 0.03, respectively) and volume of the inferior constrictor receiving {>=}50 Gy (p = 0.05 and p = 0.02, respectively) were significantly associated with both aspiration and stricture. The mean larynx dose correlated with aspiration (p = 0.003). Smoking history was the only clinical factor to correlate with stricture (p = 0.05) but not aspiration. Conclusion: Aspiration and stricture are common side effects after

  12. SU-E-J-205: Monte Carlo Modeling of Ultrasound Probes for Real-Time Ultrasound Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hristov, D; Schlosser, J; Bazalova, M; Chen, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the effect of ultrasound (US) probe beam attenuation for radiation therapy delivered under real-time US image guidance by means of Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: MC models of two Philips US probes, an X6-1 matrix-array transducer and a C5-2 curved-array transducer, were built based on their CT images in the EGSnrc BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc codes. Due to the metal parts, the probes were scanned in a Tomotherapy machine with a 3.5 MV beam. Mass densities in the probes were assigned based on an electron density calibration phantom consisting of cylinders with mass densities between 0.2–8.0 g/cm{sup 3}. Beam attenuation due to the probes was measured in a solid water phantom for a 6 MV and 15 MV 15x15 cm{sup 2} beam delivered on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator. The dose was measured with the PTW-729 ionization chamber array at two depths and compared to MC simulations. The extreme case beam attenuation expected in robotic US image guided radiotherapy for probes in upright position was quantified by means of MC simulations. Results: The 3.5 MV CT number to mass density calibration curve was found to be linear with R{sup 2} > 0.99. The maximum mass densities were 4.6 and 4.2 g/cm{sup 3} in the C5-2 and X6-1 probe, respectively. Gamma analysis of the simulated and measured doses revealed that over 98% of measurement points passed the 3%/3mm criteria for both probes and measurement depths. The extreme attenuation for probes in upright position was found to be 25% and 31% for the C5-2 and X6-1 probe, respectively, for both 6 and 15 MV beams at 10 cm depth. Conclusion: MC models of two US probes used for real-time image guidance during radiotherapy have been built. As a Result, radiotherapy treatment planning with the imaging probes in place can now be performed. J Schlosser is an employee of SoniTrack Systems, Inc. D Hristov has financial interest in SoniTrack Systems, Inc.

  13. Optimization and quality assurance of an image-guided radiation therapy system for intensity-modulated radiation therapy radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jen-San; Micaily, Bizhan; Miyamoto, Curtis

    2012-01-01

    To develop a quality assurance (QA) of XVI cone beam system (XVIcbs) for its optimal imaging-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) implementation, and to construe prostate tumor margin required for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) if IGRT is unavailable. XVIcbs spatial accuracy was explored with a humanoid phantom; isodose conformity to lesion target with a rice phantom housing a soap as target; image resolution with a diagnostic phantom; and exposure validation with a Radcal ion chamber. To optimize XVIcbs, rotation flexmap on coincidency between gantry rotational axis and that of XVI cone beam scan was investigated. Theoretic correlation to image quality of XVIcbs rotational axis stability was elaborately studied. Comprehensive QA of IGRT using XVIcbs has initially been explored and then implemented on our general IMRT treatments, and on special IMRT radiotherapies such as head and neck (H and N), stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Fifteen examples of prostate setup accounted for 350 IGRT cone beam system were analyzed. IGRT accuracy results were in agreement ± 1 mm. Flexmap 0.25 mm met the manufacturer's specification. Films confirmed isodose coincidence with target (soap) via XVIcbs, otherwise not. Superficial doses were measured from 7.2-2.5 cGy for anatomic diameters 15-33 cm, respectively. Image quality was susceptible to rotational stability or patient movement. IGRT using XVIcbs on general IMRT treatments such as prostate, SRT, SRS, and SBRT for setup accuracy were verified; and subsequently coordinate shifts corrections were recorded. The 350 prostate IGRT coordinate shifts modeled to Gaussian distributions show central peaks deviated off the isocenter by 0.6 ± 3.0 mm, 0.5 ± 4.5 mm in the X(RL)- and Z(SI)-coordinates, respectively; and 2.0 ± 3.0 mm in the Y(AP)-coordinate as a result of belly and bladder capacity variations. Sixty-eight percent of confidence was within

  14. Optimization and quality assurance of an image-guided radiation therapy system for intensity-modulated radiation therapy radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Jen-San; Micaily, Bizhan; Miyamoto, Curtis

    2012-10-01

    To develop a quality assurance (QA) of XVI cone beam system (XVIcbs) for its optimal imaging-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) implementation, and to construe prostate tumor margin required for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) if IGRT is unavailable. XVIcbs spatial accuracy was explored with a humanoid phantom; isodose conformity to lesion target with a rice phantom housing a soap as target; image resolution with a diagnostic phantom; and exposure validation with a Radcal ion chamber. To optimize XVIcbs, rotation flexmap on coincidency between gantry rotational axis and that of XVI cone beam scan was investigated. Theoretic correlation to image quality of XVIcbs rotational axis stability was elaborately studied. Comprehensive QA of IGRT using XVIcbs has initially been explored and then implemented on our general IMRT treatments, and on special IMRT radiotherapies such as head and neck (H and N), stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Fifteen examples of prostate setup accounted for 350 IGRT cone beam system were analyzed. IGRT accuracy results were in agreement {+-} 1 mm. Flexmap 0.25 mm met the manufacturer's specification. Films confirmed isodose coincidence with target (soap) via XVIcbs, otherwise not. Superficial doses were measured from 7.2-2.5 cGy for anatomic diameters 15-33 cm, respectively. Image quality was susceptible to rotational stability or patient movement. IGRT using XVIcbs on general IMRT treatments such as prostate, SRT, SRS, and SBRT for setup accuracy were verified; and subsequently coordinate shifts corrections were recorded. The 350 prostate IGRT coordinate shifts modeled to Gaussian distributions show central peaks deviated off the isocenter by 0.6 {+-} 3.0 mm, 0.5 {+-} 4.5 mm in the X(RL)- and Z(SI)-coordinates, respectively; and 2.0 {+-} 3.0 mm in the Y(AP)-coordinate as a result of belly and bladder capacity variations. Sixty-eight percent of confidence was

  15. Accurate calibration of a stereo-vision system in image-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Dezhi; Li Shidong

    2006-11-15

    Image-guided radiotherapy using a three-dimensional (3D) camera as the on-board surface imaging system requires precise and accurate registration of the 3D surface images in the treatment machine coordinate system. Two simple calibration methods, an analytical solution as three-point matching and a least-squares estimation method as multipoint registration, were introduced to correlate the stereo-vision surface imaging frame with the machine coordinate system. Both types of calibrations utilized 3D surface images of a calibration template placed on the top of the treatment couch. Image transformational parameters were derived from corresponding 3D marked points on the surface images to their given coordinates in the treatment room coordinate system. Our experimental results demonstrated that both methods had provided the desired calibration accuracy of 0.5 mm. The multipoint registration method is more robust particularly for noisy 3D surface images. Both calibration methods have been used as our weekly QA tools for a 3D image-guided radiotherapy system.

  16. The treatment of intraperitoneal malignant disease with monoclonal antibody guided 131I radiotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, B.; Mather, S.; Shepherd, J.; Crowther, M.; Hawkins, L.; Britton, K.; Slevin, M. L.

    1988-01-01

    Seven patients with small volume ovarian carcinoma, remaining after conventional therapy with surgery and a platinum containing chemotherapy regimen, were treated with intraperitoneal monoclonal antibody guided radiotherapy. 100 mCi131I conjugated to 10 mg of monoclonal antibody were injected i.p. in 2,000 ml peritoneal dialysis fluid. Patients were evaluated 3 months later; 3 had clinical progressive disease while third look laparotomy demonstrated progressive disease in 3 of the remaining 4 patients. The seventh patient did not have a third look laparotomy and is currently inevaluable for response. Five patients with recurrent malignant ascites not controlled by diuretics or repeated paracentesis were similarly treated with 75-170 mCi131I conjugated to 10 mg monoclonal antibody. In three patients the ascites was controlled for a mean of 4 months. One patient died too early to assess the control of his ascites but tumour cells disappeared from the ascitic fluid after therapy. In the patient whose ascites were not controlled, a subpopulation of antigen-negative tumour cells was demonstrated. This study was unable to demonstrate a therapeutic benefit for i.p. injected monoclonal antibody guided radiotherapy for solid intraperitoneal tumour but suggests that it may be capable of controlling the accumulation of antigen positive malignant ascites. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3219277

  17. Measuring radiation dose to patients undergoing fluoroscopically-guided interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubis, L. E.; Badawy, M. K.

    2016-03-01

    The increasing prevalence and complexity of fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) raises concern regarding radiation dose to patients subjected to the procedure. Despite current evidence showing the risk to patients from the deterministic effects of radiation (e.g. skin burns), radiation induced injuries remain commonplace. This review aims to increase the awareness surrounding radiation dose measurement for patients undergoing FGI. A review of the literature was conducted alongside previous researches from the authors’ department. Studies pertaining to patient dose measurement, its formalism along with current advances and present challenges were reviewed. Current patient monitoring techniques (using available radiation dosimeters), as well as the inadequacy of accepting displayed dose as patient radiation dose is discussed. Furthermore, advances in real-time patient radiation dose estimation during FGI are considered. Patient dosimetry in FGI, particularly in real time, remains an ongoing challenge. The increasing occurrence and sophistication of these procedures calls for further advances in the field of patient radiation dose monitoring. Improved measuring techniques will aid clinicians in better predicting and managing radiation induced injury following FGI, thus improving patient care.

  18. Development of a deformable dosimetric phantom to verify dose accumulation algorithms for adaptive radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Hualiang; Adams, Jeffrey; Glide-Hurst, Carri; Zhang, Hualin; Li, Haisen; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive radiotherapy may improve treatment outcomes for lung cancer patients. Because of the lack of an effective tool for quality assurance, this therapeutic modality is not yet accepted in clinic. The purpose of this study is to develop a deformable physical phantom for validation of dose accumulation algorithms in regions with heterogeneous mass. A three-dimensional (3D) deformable phantom was developed containing a tissue-equivalent tumor and heterogeneous sponge inserts. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed at multiple locations in the phantom each time before dose measurement. Doses were measured with the phantom in both the static and deformed cases. The deformation of the phantom was actuated by a motor driven piston. 4D computed tomography images were acquired to calculate 3D doses at each phase using Pinnacle and EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc. These images were registered using two registration software packages: VelocityAI and Elastix. With the resultant displacement vector fields (DVFs), the calculated 3D doses were accumulated using a mass-and energy congruent mapping method and compared to those measured by the TLDs at four typical locations. In the static case, TLD measurements agreed with all the algorithms by 1.8% at the center of the tumor volume and by 4.0% in the penumbra. In the deformable case, the phantom's deformation was reproduced within 1.1 mm. For the 3D dose calculated by Pinnacle, the total dose accumulated with the Elastix DVF agreed well to the TLD measurements with their differences <2.5% at four measured locations. When the VelocityAI DVF was used, their difference increased up to 11.8%. For the 3D dose calculated by EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc, the total doses accumulated with the two DVFs were within 5.7% of the TLD measurements which are slightly over the rate of 5% for clinical acceptance. The detector-embedded deformable phantom allows radiation dose to be measured in a dynamic environment, similar to deforming lung tissues, supporting

  19. High-dose-rate Three-dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Combined with Active Breathing Control for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Early-stage Non-small-cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruozheng; Yin, Yong; Qin, Yonghui; Yu, Jinming

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of using high-dose-rate three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) combined with active breathing control (ABC) for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eight patients with early-stage NSCLC underwent CT scans under standard free-breathing (FB) and moderately deep inspiration breath-hold (mDIBH) with ABC. Two high-dose-rate 3D-CRT plans (1000 Mu/min) were designed based on the CT scans with FB and mDIBH. The maximal dose (D1%), minimal dose (D99%), conformity index (CI), and homogeneity index (HI) of the planning target volume (PTV), and dose-volume indices of the organs at risk between each plan were compared. The mean PTV volume decreased from 158.04 cm(3) with FB to 76.90 cm(3) with mDIBH (p < 0.05). When mDIBH was used, increases in the affected lung volume (by 47%), contralateral lung volume (by 55%), and total lung volume (by 50%) were observed compared to FB (p < 0.05). The V5-V40 of the affected lung (Vx represented the percentage volume of organs receiving at least the x Gy), V5-V40 and the mean dose for the total lung, V5-V40 and mean dose of the chest wall, and the maximum dose of the spinal cord were less for mDIBH than FB (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in CI, HI, D1%, or D99% for the PTV between the plans. In conclusion, high-dose-rate 3D-CRT combined with ABC reduced the radiation dose to the lungs and chest wall without affecting the dose distribution in SBRT of early-stage NSCLC patients.

  20. Dose Escalation of Whole-Brain Radiotherapy for Brain Metastases From Melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Heisterkamp, Christine; Huttenlocher, Stefan; Bohlen, Guenther; Dunst, Juergen; Haatanen, Tiina; Schild, Steven E.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The majority of patients with brain metastases from melanoma receive whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). However, the results are poor. Hypofractionation regimens failed to improve the outcome of these patients. This study investigates a potential benefit from escalation of the WBRT dose beyond the 'standard' regimen 30 Gy in 10 fractions (10x3 Gy). Methods and Materials: Data from 51 melanoma patients receiving WBRT alone were retrospectively analyzed. A dosage of 10x3 Gy (n = 33) was compared with higher doses including 40 Gy/20 fractions (n = 11) and 45 Gy/15 fractions (n = 7) for survival (OS) and local (intracerebral) control (LC). Additional potential prognostic factors were evaluated: age, gender, performance status, number of metastases, extracerebral metastases, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class. Results: At 6 months, OS rates were 27% after 10x3 Gy and 50% after higher doses (p = 0.009). The OS rates at 12 months were 4% and 20%. On multivariate analysis, higher WBRT doses (p = 0.010), fewer than four brain metastases (p = 0.012), no extracerebral metastases (p = 0.006), and RPA class 1 (p = 0.005) were associated with improved OS. The LC rates at 6 months were 23% after 10x3 Gy and 50% after higher doses (p = 0.021). The LC rates at 12 months were 0% and 13%. On multivariate analysis, higher WBRT doses (p = 0.020) and fewer than brain metastases (p = 0.002) were associated with better LC. Conclusions: Given the limitations of a retrospective study, the findings suggest that patients with brain metastases from melanoma receiving WBRT alone may benefit from dose escalation beyond 10x3 Gy. The hypothesis generated by this study must be confirmed in a randomized trial stratifying for significant prognostic factors.

  1. SU-E-J-83: CBCT Based Rectum and Bladder Dose Tracking in the Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z; Wang, J; Yang, Z; Hu, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to monitor the volume changes of bladder and rectum and evaluate the dosimetric changes of bladder and rectum using daily cone-beam CT for prostate radiotherapy. Methods: The data of this study were obtained from 12 patients, totally 222 CBCTs. All the volume of the bladder and the rectum on the CBCT were normalized to the bladder and the rectum on their own original CT to monitory the volume changes. To evaluate dose delivered to the OARs, volumes that receive 70Gy (V70Gy), 60Gy, 50Gy, 40Gy and 30Gy are calculated for the bladder and the rectum, V20Gy and V10Gy for rectum additionally. And the deviation of the mean dose to the bladder and the rectum are also chosen as the evaluation parameter. Linear regression analysis was performed to identify the mean dose change of the volume change using SPSS 19. Results: The results show that the variances of the normalize volume of the bladder and the rectum are 0.15–0.58 and 0.13–0.50. The variances of V70Gy, V60Gy, V50Gy, V40Gy and V30Gy of bladder are bigger than rectum for 11 patients. The linear regression analysis indicated a negative correlation between the volume and the mean dose of the bladder (p < 0.05). A 10% increase in bladder volume will cause 5.1% (±4.3%) reduction in mean dose. Conclusion: The bladder volume change is more significant than that for rectum for the prostate cancer patient. The volume changes of rectum are not significant except air gap in the rectum. Bladder volume varies will cause significant dose change. The bladder volume monitoring before fractional treatment delivery would be crucial for accuracy dose delivery.

  2. SU-E-T-04: 3D Dose Based Patient Compensator QA Procedure for Proton Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, W; Reyhan, M; Zhang, M; Davis, R; Jabbour, S; Khan, A; Yue, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In proton double-scattering radiotherapy, compensators are the essential patient specific devices to contour the distal dose distribution to the tumor target. Traditional compensator QA is limited to checking the drilled surface profiles against the plan. In our work, a compensator QA process was established that assess the entire compensator including its internal structure for patient 3D dose verification. Methods: The fabricated patient compensators were CT scanned. Through mathematical image processing and geometric transformations, the CT images of the proton compensator were combined with the patient simulation CT images into a new series of CT images, in which the imaged compensator is placed at the planned location along the corresponding beam line. The new CT images were input into the Eclipse treatment planning system. The original plan was calculated to the combined CT image series without the plan compensator. The newly computed patient 3D dose from the combined patientcompensator images was verified against the original plan dose. Test plans include the compensators with defects intentionally created inside the fabricated compensators. Results: The calculated 3D dose with the combined compensator and patient CT images reflects the impact of the fabricated compensator to the patient. For the test cases in which no defects were created, the dose distributions were in agreement between our method and the corresponding original plans. For the compensator with the defects, the purposely changed material and a purposely created internal defect were successfully detected while not possible with just the traditional compensator profiles detection methods. Conclusion: We present here a 3D dose verification process to qualify the fabricated proton double-scattering compensator. Such compensator detection process assesses the patient 3D impact of the fabricated compensator surface profile as well as the compensator internal material and structure changes

  3. Discontinuous finite element space-angle treatment of the first order linear Boltzmann transport equation with magnetic fields: Application to MRI-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    St Aubin, J.; Keyvanloo, A.; Fallone, B. G.

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided radiotherapy systems demands the incorporation of the magnetic field into dose calculation algorithms of treatment planning systems. This is due to the fact that the Lorentz force of the magnetic field perturbs the path of the relativistic electrons, hence altering the dose deposited by them. Building on the previous work, the authors have developed a discontinuous finite element space-angle treatment of the linear Boltzmann transport equation to accurately account for the effects of magnetic fields on radiotherapy doses. Methods: The authors present a detailed description of their new formalism and compare its accuracy to GEANT4 Monte Carlo calculations for magnetic fields parallel and perpendicular to the radiation beam at field strengths of 0.5 and 3 T for an inhomogeneous 3D slab geometry phantom comprising water, bone, and air or lung. The accuracy of the authors’ new formalism was determined using a gamma analysis with a 2%/2 mm criterion. Results: Greater than 98.9% of all points analyzed passed the 2%/2 mm gamma criterion for the field strengths and orientations tested. The authors have benchmarked their new formalism against Monte Carlo in a challenging radiation transport problem with a high density material (bone) directly adjacent to a very low density material (dry air at STP) where the effects of the magnetic field dominate collisions. Conclusions: A discontinuous finite element space-angle approach has been proven to be an accurate method for solving the linear Boltzmann transport equation with magnetic fields for cases relevant to MRI guided radiotherapy. The authors have validated the accuracy of this novel technique against GEANT4, even in cases of strong magnetic field strengths and low density air.

  4. Full-Dose Gemcitabine and Concurrent Radiotherapy for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, James D.; Adusumilli, Saroja; Griffith, Kent A.; Ray, Michael E.; Zalupski, Mark M.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ben-Josef, Edgar . E-mail: edgarb@med.umich.edu

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Full-dose gemcitabine and concurrent radiotherapy is a promising treatment approach in unresectable pancreatic cancer. This study was conducted to assess the pattern of failure and toxicity associated with the use of conformal treatment volumes, omitting prophylactic lymph node irradiation. Methods and Materials: Seventy-four patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer were treated between 1997 and 2005 with full-dose (1000 mg/m{sup 2}, Days 1, 8, and 15) gemcitabine and concurrent radiotherapy (36 Gy [median] in 15 daily fractions). The planning target volume (PTV) was limited to the gross tumor volume (GTV) plus 1-cm margin. Patient computed tomography (CT) scans were systematically reviewed to determine the pattern of failure. Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression models were used to analyze freedom from local progression (FFLP), distant failure, overall survival (OS), and toxicity. Results: With a median follow-up of 10.6 months (20.6 months in living patients), the 1-year and 2-year FFLP rates were 64% and 38%, respectively. Four patients (5%) failed in the peripancreatic lymph nodes (3 in-field and 1 marginal failure). Median OS was 11.2 months. Analyzed as a time-dependent covariate, local failure was a significant predictor of OS (p = 0.0074). Sixteen patients (22%) had significant gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity ({>=} Grade 3). PTV correlated with significant GI toxicity (p = 0.007). Conclusions: Freedom from local progression in unresectable pancreatic cancer is suboptimal. In conjunction with full-dose gemcitabine, the use of conformal fields encompassing only the GTV helps reduce toxicity and does not result in marginal failures. Our findings provide rationale for intensification of local therapy in conjunction with more effective systemic therapy.

  5. SU-E-T-501: Normal Tissue Toxicities of Pulsed Low Dose Rate Radiotherapy and Conventional Radiotherapy: An in Vivo Total Body Irradiation Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetkovic, D; Zhang, P; Wang, B; Chen, L; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Pulsed low dose rate radiotherapy (PLDR) is a re-irradiation technique for therapy of recurrent cancers. We have previously shown a significant difference in the weight and survival time between the mice treated with conventional radiotherapy (CRT) and PLDR using total body irradiation (TBI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo effects of PLDR on normal mouse tissues.Materials and Methods: Twenty two male BALB/c nude mice, 4 months of age, were randomly assigned into a PLDR group (n=10), a CRT group (n=10), and a non-irradiated control group (n=2). The Siemens Artiste accelerator with 6 MV photon beams was used. The mice received a total of 18Gy in 3 fractions with a 20day interval. The CRT group received the 6Gy dose continuously at a dose rate of 300 MU/min. The PLDR group was irradiated with 0.2Gyx20 pulses with a 3min interval between the pulses. The mice were weighed thrice weekly and sacrificed 2 weeks after the last treatment. Brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen, gastrointestinal, urinary and reproductive organs, and sternal bone marrow were removed, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and stained with H and E. Morphological changes were observed under a microscope. Results: Histopathological examination revealed atrophy in several irradiated organs. The degree of atrophy was mild to moderate in the PLDR group, but severe in the CRT group. The most pronounced morphological abnormalities were in the immune and hematopoietic systems, namely spleen and bone marrow. Brain hemorrhage was seen in the CRT group, but not in the PLDR group. Conclusions: Our results showed that PLDR induced less toxicity in the normal mouse tissues than conventional radiotherapy for the same dose and regimen. Considering that PLDR produces equivalent tumor control as conventional radiotherapy, it would be a good modality for treatment of recurrent cancers.

  6. TU-F-17A-08: The Relative Accuracy of 4D Dose Accumulation for Lung Radiotherapy Using Rigid Dose Projection Versus Dose Recalculation On Every Breathing Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J; Lee, C; Tee, S; Lee, P; Iwamoto, K; Low, D; Valdes, G; Robinson, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the accuracy of 4D dose accumulation using projection of dose calculated on the end-exhalation, mid-ventilation, or average intensity breathing phase CT scan, versus dose accumulation performed using full Monte Carlo dose recalculation on every breathing phase. Methods: Radiotherapy plans were analyzed for 10 patients with stage I-II lung cancer planned using 4D-CT. SBRT plans were optimized using the dose calculated by a commercially-available Monte Carlo algorithm on the end-exhalation 4D-CT phase. 4D dose accumulations using deformable registration were performed with a commercially available tool that projected the planned dose onto every breathing phase without recalculation, as well as with a Monte Carlo recalculation of the dose on all breathing phases. The 3D planned dose (3D-EX), the 3D dose calculated on the average intensity image (3D-AVE), and the 4D accumulations of the dose calculated on the end-exhalation phase CT (4D-PR-EX), the mid-ventilation phase CT (4D-PR-MID), and the average intensity image (4D-PR-AVE), respectively, were compared against the accumulation of the Monte Carlo dose recalculated on every phase. Plan evaluation metrics relating to target volumes and critical structures relevant for lung SBRT were analyzed. Results: Plan evaluation metrics tabulated using 4D-PR-EX, 4D-PR-MID, and 4D-PR-AVE differed from those tabulated using Monte Carlo recalculation on every phase by an average of 0.14±0.70 Gy, - 0.11±0.51 Gy, and 0.00±0.62 Gy, respectively. Deviations of between 8 and 13 Gy were observed between the 4D-MC calculations and both 3D methods for the proximal bronchial trees of 3 patients. Conclusions: 4D dose accumulation using projection without re-calculation may be sufficiently accurate compared to 4D dose accumulated from Monte Carlo recalculation on every phase, depending on institutional protocols. Use of 4D dose accumulation should be considered when evaluating normal tissue complication

  7. WE-EF-BRD-01: Past, Present and Future: MRI-Guided Radiotherapy From 2005 to 2025

    SciTech Connect

    Lagendijk, J.

    2015-06-15

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php.

  8. Dose variations caused by setup errors in intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: A PRESAGE study

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Kieyin; Gagliardi, Frank; Alqathami, Mamdooh; Ackerly, Trevor; Geso, Moshi

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) requires tight margins around the tumor, thus producing a steep dose gradient between the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissue. Any setup errors might become clinically significant. To date, no study has been performed to evaluate the dosimetric variations caused by setup errors with a 3-dimensional dosimeter, the PRESAGE. This research aimed to evaluate the potential effect that setup errors have on the dose distribution of intracranial SRT. Computed tomography (CT) simulation of a CIRS radiosurgery head phantom was performed with 1.25-mm slice thickness. An ideal treatment plan was generated using Brainlab iPlan. A PRESAGE was made for every treatment with and without errors. A prescan using the optical CT scanner was carried out. Before treatment, the phantom was imaged using Brainlab ExacTrac. Actual radiotherapy treatments with and without errors were carried out with the Novalis treatment machine. Postscan was performed with an optical CT scanner to analyze the dose irradiation. The dose variation between treatments with and without errors was determined using a 3-dimensional gamma analysis. Errors are clinically insignificant when the passing ratio of the gamma analysis is 95% and above. Errors were clinically significant when the setup errors exceeded a 0.7-mm translation and a 0.5° rotation. The results showed that a 3-mm translation shift in the superior-inferior (SI), right-left (RL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions and 2° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 53.1%. Translational and rotational errors of 1.5 mm and 1°, respectively, generated a passing ratio of 62.2%. Translation shift of 0.7 mm in the directions of SI, RL, and AP and a 0.5° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 96.2%. Preventing the occurrences of setup errors in intracranial SRT treatment is extremely important as errors greater than 0.7 mm and 0.5° alter the dose distribution. The geometrical displacements affect dose delivery

  9. Dose variations caused by setup errors in intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: a PRESAGE study.

    PubMed

    Teng, Kieyin; Gagliardi, Frank; Alqathami, Mamdooh; Ackerly, Trevor; Geso, Moshi

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) requires tight margins around the tumor, thus producing a steep dose gradient between the tumor and the surrounding healthy tissue. Any setup errors might become clinically significant. To date, no study has been performed to evaluate the dosimetric variations caused by setup errors with a 3-dimensional dosimeter, the PRESAGE. This research aimed to evaluate the potential effect that setup errors have on the dose distribution of intracranial SRT. Computed tomography (CT) simulation of a CIRS radiosurgery head phantom was performed with 1.25-mm slice thickness. An ideal treatment plan was generated using Brainlab iPlan. A PRESAGE was made for every treatment with and without errors. A prescan using the optical CT scanner was carried out. Before treatment, the phantom was imaged using Brainlab ExacTrac. Actual radiotherapy treatments with and without errors were carried out with the Novalis treatment machine. Postscan was performed with an optical CT scanner to analyze the dose irradiation. The dose variation between treatments with and without errors was determined using a 3-dimensional gamma analysis. Errors are clinically insignificant when the passing ratio of the gamma analysis is 95% and above. Errors were clinically significant when the setup errors exceeded a 0.7-mm translation and a 0.5° rotation. The results showed that a 3-mm translation shift in the superior-inferior (SI), right-left (RL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions and 2° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 53.1%. Translational and rotational errors of 1.5mm and 1°, respectively, generated a passing ratio of 62.2%. Translation shift of 0.7mm in the directions of SI, RL, and AP and a 0.5° couch rotation produced a passing ratio of 96.2%. Preventing the occurrences of setup errors in intracranial SRT treatment is extremely important as errors greater than 0.7mm and 0.5° alter the dose distribution. The geometrical displacements affect dose delivery to

  10. Four-dimensional dose evaluation using deformable image registration in radiotherapy for liver cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hoon Jung, Sang; Min Yoon, Sang; Ho Park, Sung; Cho, Byungchul; Won Park, Jae; Jung, Jinhong; Park, Jin-hong; Hoon Kim, Jong; Do Ahn, Seung

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: In order to evaluate the dosimetric impact of respiratory motion on the dose delivered to the target volume and critical organs during free-breathing radiotherapy, a four-dimensional dose was evaluated using deformable image registration (DIR). Methods: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images were acquired for 11 patients who were treated for liver cancer. Internal target volume-based treatment planning and dose calculation (3D dose) were performed using the end-exhalation phase images. The four-dimensional dose (4D dose) was calculated based on DIR of all phase images from 4DCT to the planned image. Dosimetric parameters from the 4D dose, were calculated and compared with those from the 3D dose. Results: There was no significant change of the dosimetric parameters for gross tumor volume (p > 0.05). The increase D{sub mean} and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) for liver were by 3.1%{+-} 3.3% (p= 0.003) and 2.8%{+-} 3.3% (p= 0.008), respectively, and for duodenum, they were decreased by 15.7%{+-} 11.2% (p= 0.003) and 15.1%{+-} 11.0% (p= 0.003), respectively. The D{sub max} and gEUD for stomach was decreased by 5.3%{+-} 5.8% (p= 0.003) and 9.7%{+-} 8.7% (p= 0.003), respectively. The D{sub max} and gEUD for right kidney was decreased by 11.2%{+-} 16.2% (p= 0.003) and 14.9%{+-} 16.8% (p= 0.005), respectively. For left kidney, D{sub max} and gEUD were decreased by 11.4%{+-} 11.0% (p= 0.003) and 12.8%{+-} 12.1% (p= 0.005), respectively. The NTCP values for duodenum and stomach were decreased by 8.4%{+-} 5.8% (p= 0.003) and 17.2%{+-} 13.7% (p= 0.003), respectively. Conclusions: The four-dimensional dose with a more realistic dose calculation accounting for respiratory motion revealed no significant difference in target coverage and potentially significant change in the physical and biological dosimetric parameters in normal organs during free-breathing treatment.

  11. SU-E-T-43: Analytical Model for Photon Peripheral Dose in Radiotherapy Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto, B Sanchez; El far, R; Romero-Exposito, M; Lagares, J; Mateo, JC; Terron, JA; Irazola, L; Sanchez-Doblado, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The higher survival rate of radiotherapy patients entails a growing concern on second cancers associated to peripheral doses. Currently, dosimetry of out-of field doses is still under development. Our group has developed a methodology to estimate neutron equivalent dose in organs (1,2). We aimed to propose a model to estimate out-of-field photon doses in isocentric treatments from basic clinical data. Methods: The proposed function models the dose as the sum of leakage and scatter terms. The latter is modeled as a virtual source at the collimator, which suffers from attenuation in air and tissue, corrected by the inverse-square-law. The model was parameterized using experimental measurements with TLD700 chips placed inside an anthropomorphic phantom (6–18MV) irradiated with conformal and modulated techniques in Elekta, Siemens and Varian linacs. This model provides photon dose at a point as a function of clinical parameters as prescription dose/UM, PTV volume, distance to the field edge, height of the MLC leaves and distance from the the MLC to the isocenter. Model was tested against independent measurements (TLD100) for a VMAT treatment on a Elekta. Dose to organs is modeled from dose to points along the head-to-feet axis of the organ of a “standard man” escalated by patient height. Results: Our semi-empirical model depends on 3 given parameters (leakage parameter can be individualized). A novelty of our model, over other models (e.g., PERIDOSE), arises from its applicability to any technique (independently of the number of MU needed to deliver a dose). Differences between predictions and measurements were < 0.005mSv/UM. Conclusion: We have proposed a unique model which successfully account for photon peripheral organ dose. This model can be applied in the day-to-day clinic as it only needs a few basic parameters which are readily accessible.1. Radiother. Oncol. 107:234–243, 2013. 2. Phys. Med. Biol. 57:6167–6191, 2012.

  12. Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM): user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Poeton, R.W.; Moeller, M.P.; Laughlin, G.J.; Desrosiers, A.E.

    1983-05-01

    As part of the continuing emphasis on emergency preparedness the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored the development of a rapid dose assessment system by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This system, the Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM) is a micro-computer based program for rapidly assessing the radiological impact of accidents at nuclear power plants. This User's Guide provides instruction in the setup and operation of the equipment necessary to run IRDAM. Instructions are also given on how to load the magnetic disks and access the interactive part of the program. Two other companion volumes to this one provide additional information on IRDAM. Reactor Accident Assessment Methods (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 2) describes the technical bases for IRDAM including methods, models and assumptions used in calculations. Scenarios for Comparing Dose Assessment Models (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 3) provides the results of calculations made by IRDAM and other models for specific accident scenarios.

  13. Rapid Decline of Follicular Lymphoma-Associated Chylothorax after Low Dose Radiotherapy to Retroperitoneal Lymphoma Localization

    PubMed Central

    Borger, Jacques; Troost, Esther G. C.; Werner, Philo

    2014-01-01

    Chylothorax is caused by disruption or obstruction of the thoracic duct or its tributaries that results in the leakage of chyle into the pleural space. A number of interventions have been used to treat chylothorax including the treatment of the underlying disease. Lymphoma is found in 70% of cases with nontraumatic malignant aetiology. Although patients usually have advanced lymphoma, supradiaphragmatic disease is not always present. We discuss the case of a 63-year-old woman presenting with progressive respiratory symptoms due to chylothorax. She was diagnosed with a stage IIE retroperitoneal grade 1 follicular lymphoma extending from the coeliac trunk towards the pelvic inlet. Despite thoracocentesis and medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), diet chylothorax reoccurred. After low dose radiotherapy (2 × 2 Gy) to the abdominal lymphoma there was a marked decrease in lymphadenopathy at the coeliac trunk and a complete regression of the pleural fluid. In this case, radiotherapy was shown to be an effective nontoxic treatment option for lymphoma-associated chylothorax with long-term remission of pleural effusion. PMID:24891961

  14. Voxel-based population analysis for correlating local dose and rectal toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Oscar; Drean, Gael; Ospina, Juan D; Simon, Antoine; Haigron, Pascal; Lafond, Caroline; de Crevoisier, Renaud

    2013-04-21

    The majority of current models utilized for predicting toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy are based on dose-volume histograms. One of their main drawbacks is the lack of spatial accuracy, since they consider the organs as a whole volume and thus ignore the heterogeneous intra-organ radio-sensitivity. In this paper, we propose a dose-image-based framework to reveal the relationships between local dose and toxicity. In this approach, the three-dimensional (3D) planned dose distributions across a population are non-rigidly registered into a common coordinate system and compared at a voxel level, therefore enabling the identification of 3D anatomical patterns, which may be responsible for toxicity, at least to some extent. Additionally, different metrics were employed in order to assess the quality of the dose mapping. The value of this approach was demonstrated by prospectively analyzing rectal bleeding (≥Grade 1 at 2 years) according to the CTCAE v3.0 classification in a series of 105 patients receiving 80 Gy to the prostate by intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Within the patients presenting bleeding, a significant dose excess (6 Gy on average, p < 0.01) was found in a region of the anterior rectal wall. This region, close to the prostate (1 cm), represented less than 10% of the rectum. This promising voxel-wise approach allowed subregions to be defined within the organ that may be involved in toxicity and, as such, must be considered during the inverse IMRT planning step.

  15. Neutron scattered dose equivalent to a fetus from proton radiotherapy of the mother

    SciTech Connect

    Mesoloras, Geraldine; Sandison, George A.; Stewart, Robert D.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Hsi, Wen C.

    2006-07-15

    Scattered neutron dose equivalent to a representative point for a fetus is evaluated in an anthropomorphic phantom of the mother undergoing proton radiotherapy. The effect on scattered neutron dose equivalent to the fetus of changing the incident proton beam energy, aperture size, beam location, and air gap between the beam delivery snout and skin was studied for both a small field snout and a large field snout. Measurements of the fetus scattered neutron dose equivalent were made by placing a neutron bubble detector 10 cm below the umbilicus of an anthropomorphic Rando[reg] phantom enhanced by a wax bolus to simulate a second trimester pregnancy. The neutron dose equivalent in milliSieverts (mSv) per proton treatment Gray increased with incident proton energy and decreased with aperture size, distance of the fetus representative point from the field edge, and increasing air gap. Neutron dose equivalent to the fetus varied from 0.025 to 0.450 mSv per proton Gray for the small field snout and from 0.097 to 0.871 mSv per proton Gray for the large field snout. There is likely to be no excess risk to the fetus of severe mental retardation for a typical proton treatment of 80 Gray to the mother since the scattered neutron dose to the fetus of 69.7 mSv is well below the lower confidence limit for the threshold of 300 mGy observed for the occurrence of severe mental retardation in prenatally exposed Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, based on the linear no threshold hypothesis, and this same typical treatment for the mother, the excess risk to the fetus of radiation induced cancer death in the first 10 years of life is 17.4 per 10 000 children.

  16. Neutron scattered dose equivalent to a fetus from proton radiotherapy of the mother.

    PubMed

    Mesoloras, Geraldine; Sandison, George A; Stewart, Robert D; Farr, Jonathan B; Hsi, Wen C

    2006-07-01

    Scattered neutron dose equivalent to a representative point for a fetus is evaluated in an anthropomorphic phantom of the mother undergoing proton radiotherapy. The effect on scattered neutron dose equivalent to the fetus of changing the incident proton beam energy, aperture size, beam location, and air gap between the beam delivery snout and skin was studied for both a small field snout and a large field snout. Measurements of the fetus scattered neutron dose equivalent were made by placing a neutron bubble detector 10 cm below the umbilicus of an anthropomorphic Rando phantom enhanced by a wax bolus to simulate a second trimester pregnancy. The neutron dose equivalent in milliSieverts (mSv) per proton treatment Gray increased with incident proton energy and decreased with aperture size, distance of the fetus representative point from the field edge, and increasing air gap. Neutron dose equivalent to the fetus varied from 0.025 to 0.450 mSv per proton Gray for the small field snout and from 0.097 to 0.871 mSv per proton Gray for the large field snout. There is likely to be no excess risk to the fetus of severe mental retardation for a typical proton treatment of 80 Gray to the mother since the scattered neutron dose to the fetus of 69.7 mSv is well below the lower confidence limit for the threshold of 300 mGy observed for the occurrence of severe mental retardation in prenatally exposed Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, based on the linear no threshold hypothesis, and this same typical treatment for the mother, the excess risk to the fetus of radiation induced cancer death in the first 10 years of life is 17.4 per 10,000 children.

  17. Voxel-based population analysis for correlating local dose and rectal toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Oscar; Drean, Gael; Ospina, Juan D.; Simon, Antoine; Haigron, Pascal; Lafond, Caroline; de Crevoisier, Renaud

    2013-04-01

    The majority of current models utilized for predicting toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy are based on dose-volume histograms. One of their main drawbacks is the lack of spatial accuracy, since they consider the organs as a whole volume and thus ignore the heterogeneous intra-organ radio-sensitivity. In this paper, we propose a dose-image-based framework to reveal the relationships between local dose and toxicity. In this approach, the three-dimensional (3D) planned dose distributions across a population are non-rigidly registered into a common coordinate system and compared at a voxel level, therefore enabling the identification of 3D anatomical patterns, which may be responsible for toxicity, at least to some extent. Additionally, different metrics were employed in order to assess the quality of the dose mapping. The value of this approach was demonstrated by prospectively analyzing rectal bleeding (⩾Grade 1 at 2 years) according to the CTCAE v3.0 classification in a series of 105 patients receiving 80 Gy to the prostate by intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Within the patients presenting bleeding, a significant dose excess (6 Gy on average, p < 0.01) was found in a region of the anterior rectal wall. This region, close to the prostate (1 cm), represented less than 10% of the rectum. This promising voxel-wise approach allowed subregions to be defined within the organ that may be involved in toxicity and, as such, must be considered during the inverse IMRT planning step.

  18. Comparison of Heart and Coronary Artery Doses Associated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Distal Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kole, Thomas P.; Aghayere, Osarhieme; Kwah, Jason; Yorke, Ellen D.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To compare heart and coronary artery radiation exposure using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. four-field three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) treatment plans for patients with distal esophageal cancer undergoing chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients with distal esophageal cancers treated with IMRT from March 2007 to May 2008 were identified. All patients were treated to 50.4 Gy with five-field IMRT plans. Theoretical 3D-CRT plans with four-field beam arrangements were generated. Dose-volume histograms of the planning target volume, heart, right coronary artery, left coronary artery, and other critical normal tissues were compared between the IMRT and 3D-CRT plans, and selected parameters were statistically evaluated using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment planning showed significant reduction (p < 0.05) in heart dose over 3D-CRT as assessed by average mean dose (22.9 vs. 28.2 Gy) and V30 (24.8% vs. 61.0%). There was also significant sparing of the right coronary artery (average mean dose, 23.8 Gy vs. 35.5 Gy), whereas the left coronary artery showed no significant improvement (mean dose, 11.2 Gy vs. 9.2 Gy), p = 0.11. There was no significant difference in percentage of total lung volume receiving at least 10, 15, or 20 Gy or in the mean lung dose between the planning methods. There were also no significant differences observed for the kidneys, liver, stomach, or spinal cord. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved a significant improvement in target conformity as measured by the conformality index (ratio of total volume receiving 95% of prescription dose to planning target volume receiving 95% of prescription dose), with the mean conformality index reduced from 1.56 to 1.30 using IMRT. Conclusions: Treatment of patients with distal esophageal cancer using IMRT significantly decreases the exposure of the heart and right coronary artery when compared with 3D

  19. Interfractional Dose Variations in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Breath-Hold for Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shibuya, Keiko; Nakamura, Akira; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakata, Manabu; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the interfractional dose variations for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) combined with breath-hold (BH) at end-exhalation (EE) for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 10 consecutive patients with pancreatic cancer were enrolled. Each patient was fixed in the supine position on an individualized vacuum pillow with both arms raised. Computed tomography (CT) scans were performed before RT, and three additional scans were performed during the course of chemoradiotherapy using a conventional RT technique. The CT data were acquired under EE-BH conditions (BH-CT) using a visual feedback technique. The intensity-modulated RT plan, which used five 15-MV coplanar ports, was designed on the initial BH-CT set with a prescription dose of 39 Gy at 2.6 Gy/fraction. After rigid image registration between the initial and subsequent BH-CT scans, the dose distributions were recalculated on the subsequent BH-CT images under the same conditions as in planning. Changes in the dose-volume metrics of the gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV = GTV + 5 mm), stomach, and duodenum were evaluated. Results: For the GTV and clinical target volume (CTV), the 95th percentile of the interfractional variations in the maximal dose, mean dose, dose covering 95% volume of the region of structure, and percentage of the volume covered by the 90% isodose line were within {+-}3%. Although the volume covered by the 39 Gy isodose line for the stomach and duodenum did not exceed 0.1 mL at planning, the volume covered by the 39 Gy isodose line for these structures was up to 11.4 cm{sup 3} and 1.8 cm{sup 3}, respectively. Conclusions: Despite variations in the gastrointestinal state and abdominal wall position at EE, the GTV and CTV were mostly ensured at the planned dose, with the exception of 1 patient. Compared with the duodenum, large variations in the stomach volume receiving high-dose radiation were observed, which might be beyond the

  20. Reirradiation of Large-Volume Recurrent Glioma With Pulsed Reduced-Dose-Rate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Adkison, Jarrod B.; Tome, Wolfgang; Seo, Songwon; Richards, Gregory M.; Robins, H. Ian; Rassmussen, Karl; Welsh, James S.; Mahler, Peter A.; Howard, Steven P.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Pulsed reduced-dose-rate radiotherapy (PRDR) is a reirradiation technique that reduces the effective dose rate and increases the treatment time, allowing sublethal damage repair during irradiation. Patients and Methods: A total of 103 patients with recurrent glioma underwent reirradiation using PRDR (86 considered to have Grade 4 at PRDR). PRDR was delivered using a series of 0.2-Gy pulses at 3-min intervals, creating an apparent dose rate of 0.0667 Gy/min to a median dose of 50 Gy (range, 20-60) delivered in 1.8-2.0-Gy fractions. The mean treatment volume was 403.5 {+-} 189.4 cm{sup 3} according to T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and a 2-cm margin. Results: For the initial or upgraded Grade 4 cohort (n = 86), the median interval from the first irradiation to PRDR was 14 months. Patients undergoing PRDR within 14 months of the first irradiation (n = 43) had a median survival of 21 weeks. Those treated {>=}14 months after radiotherapy had a median survival of 28 weeks (n = 43; p = 0.004 and HR = 1.82 with a 95% CI ranging from 1.25 to 3.10). These data compared favorably to historical data sets, because only 16% of the patients were treated at first relapse (with 46% treated at the second relapse, 32% at the third or fourth relapse, and 4% at the fourth or fifth relapse). The median survival since diagnosis and retreatment was 6.3 years and 11.4 months for low-grade, 4.1 years and 5.6 months for Grade 3, and 1.6 years and 5.1 months for Grade 4 tumors, respectively, according to the initial histologic findings. Multivariate analysis revealed age at the initial diagnosis, initial low-grade disease, and Karnofsky performance score of {>=}80 to be significant predictors of survival after initiation of PRDR. Conclusion: PRDR allowed for safe retreatment of larger volumes to high doses with palliative benefit.

  1. Reductions in the variations of respiration signals for respiratory-gated radiotherapy when using the video-coaching respiration guiding system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Jeong; Yea, Ji Woon; Oh, Se An

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT) has been used to minimize the dose to normal tissue in lung-cancer radiotherapy. The present research aims to improve the regularity of respiration in RGRT by using a video-coached respiration guiding system. In the study, 16 patients with lung cancer were evaluated. The respiration signals of the patients were measured by using a realtime position management (RPM) respiratory gating system (Varian, USA), and the patients were trained using the video-coaching respiration guiding system. The patients performed free breathing and guided breathing, and the respiratory cycles were acquired for ~5 min. Then, Microsoft Excel 2010 software was used to calculate the mean and the standard deviation for each phase. The standard deviation was computed in order to analyze the improvement in the respiratory regularity with respect to the period and the displacement. The standard deviation of the guided breathing decreased to 48.8% in the inhale peak and 24.2% in the exhale peak compared with the values for the free breathing of patient 6. The standard deviation of the respiratory cycle was found to be decreased when using the respiratory guiding system. The respiratory regularity was significantly improved when using the video-coaching respiration guiding system. Therefore, the system is useful for improving the accuracy and the efficiency of RGRT.

  2. Integral dose investigation of non-coplanar treatment beam geometries in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Dan; Dong, Peng; Ruan, Dan; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke; Long, Troy; Romeijn, Edwin

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Automated planning and delivery of non-coplanar plans such as 4π radiotherapy involving a large number of fields have been developed to take advantage of the newly available automated couch and gantry on C-arm gantry linacs. However, there is an increasing concern regarding the potential changes in the integral dose that needs to be investigated. Methods: A digital torso phantom and 22 lung and liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) patients were included in the study. The digital phantom was constructed as a water equivalent elliptical cylinder with a major axis length of 35.4 cm and minor axis of 23.6 cm. A 4.5 cm diameter target was positioned at varying depths along the major axis. Integral doses from intensity modulated, non-coplanar beams forming a conical pattern were compared against the equally spaced coplanar beam plans. Integral dose dependence on the phantom geometry and the beam number was also quantified. For the patient plans, the non-coplanar and coplanar beams and fluences were optimized using a column generation and pricing approach and compared against clinical VMAT plans using two full (lung) or partial coplanar arcs (liver) entering at the side proximal to the tumor. Both the average dose to the normal tissue volume and the total volumes receiving greater than 2 Gy (V2) and 5 Gy (V5) were evaluated and compared. Results: The ratio of integral dose from the non-coplanar and coplanar plans depended on the tumor depth for the phantom; for tumors shallower than 10 cm, the non-coplanar integral doses were lower than coplanar integral doses for non-coplanar angles less than 60°. Similar patterns were observed in the patient plans. The smallest non-coplanar integral doses were observed for tumor 6–8 cm deep. For the phantom, the integral dose was independent of the number of beams, consistent with the liver SBRT patients but the lung SBRT patients showed slight increase in the integral dose when more beams were used. Larger

  3. Role of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Reducing Toxicity in Dose Escalation for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Peeters, Stephanie T.H.; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To compare the acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated to a total dose of 78 Gy with either a three-conformal radiotherapy technique with a sequential boost (SEQ) or a simultaneous integrated boost using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT). Patients and Methods: A total of 78 prostate cancer patients participating in the randomized Dutch trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy were the subject of this analysis. They were all treated at the same institution to a total dose of 78 Gy. The median follow-up was 76 and 56 months for the SEQ and SIB-IMRT groups, respectively. The primary endpoints were acute and late GI and GU toxicity. Results: A significantly lower incidence of acute Grade 2 or greater GI toxicity occurred in patients treated with SIB-IMRT compared with SEQ (20% vs. 61%, p = 0.001). For acute GU toxicity and late GI and GU toxicity, the incidence was lower after SIB-IMRT, but these differences were not statistically significant. No statistically significant difference were found in the 5-year freedom from biochemical failure rate (Phoenix definition) between the two groups (70% for the SIB-IMRT group vs. 61% for the SEQ group, p = 0.3). The same was true for the 5-year freedom from clinical failure rate (90% vs. 72%, p = 0.07). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that SIB-IMRT reduced the toxicity without compromising the outcome in patients with localized prostate cancer treated to 78 Gy radiation.

  4. [Clinical experience in image-guided ultra-conformal hypofractionated radiotherapy in case of metastatic diseases at the University of Pécs].

    PubMed

    László, Zoltán; Boronkai, Árpád; Lõcsei, Zoltán; Kalincsák, Judit; Szappanos, Szabolcs; Farkas, Róbert; Al Farhat, Yousuf; Sebestyén, Zsolt; Sebestyén, Klára; Kovács, Péter; Csapó, László; Mangel, László

    2015-06-01

    With the development of radiation therapy technology, the utilization of more accurate patient fixation, inclusion of PET/CT image fusion into treatment planning, 3D image-guided radiotherapy, and intensity-modulated dynamic arc irradiation, the application of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy can be extended to specified extracranial target volumes, and so even to the treatment of various metastases. Between October 2012 and August 2014 in our institute we performed extracranial, hypofractionated, image-többguided radiotherapy with RapidArc system for six cases, and 3D conformal multifield technique for one patient with Novalis TX system in case of different few-numbered and slow-growing metastases. For the precise definition of the target volumes we employed PET/CT during the treatment planning procedure. Octreotid scan was applied in one carcinoid tumour patient. Considering the localisation of the metastases and the predictable motion of the organs, we applied 5 to 20 mm safety margin during the contouring procedure. The average treatment volume was 312 cm3. With 2.5-3 Gy fraction doses we delivered 39-45 Gy total dose, and the treatment duration was 2.5 to 3 weeks. The image guidance was carried out via ExacTrac, and kV-Cone Beam CT equipment based on an online protocol, therefore localisation differences were corrected before every single treatment. The patients tolerated the treatments well without major (Gr>2) side effects. Total or near total regression of the metastases was observed at subsequent control examinations in all cases (the median follow-up time was 5 months). According to our first experience, extracranial, imageguided hypofractionated radiotherapy is well-tolerated by patients and can be effectively applied in the treatment of slow-growing and few-numbered metastases.

  5. Imaging dose in breast radiotherapy: does breast size affect the dose to the organs at risk and the risk of secondary cancer to the contralateral breast?

    SciTech Connect

    Batumalai, Vikneswary; Quinn, Alexandra; Jameson, Michael; Delaney, Geoff; Holloway, Lois

    2015-03-15

    Correct target positioning is crucial for accurate dose delivery in breast radiotherapy resulting in utilisation of daily imaging. However, the radiation dose from daily imaging is associated with increased probability of secondary induced cancer. The aim of this study was to quantify doses associated with three imaging modalities and investigate the correlation of dose and varying breast size in breast radiotherapy. Planning computed tomography (CT) data sets of 30 breast cancer patients were utilised to simulate the dose received by various organs from a megavoltage computed tomography (MV-CT), megavoltage electronic portal image (MV-EPI) and megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT). The mean dose to organs adjacent to the target volume (contralateral breast, lungs, spinal cord and heart) were analysed. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to determine the relationship between imaging dose and primary breast volume and the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) of induced secondary cancer was calculated for the contralateral breast. The highest contralateral breast mean dose was from the MV-CBCT (1.79 Gy), followed by MV-EPI (0.22 Gy) and MV-CT (0.11 Gy). A similar trend was found for all organs at risk (OAR) analysed. The primary breast volume inversely correlated with the contralateral breast dose for all three imaging modalities. As the primary breast volume increases, the likelihood of a patient developing a radiation-induced secondary cancer to the contralateral breast decreases. MV-CBCT showed a stronger relationship between breast size and LAR of developing a radiation-induced contralateral breast cancer in comparison with the MV-CT and MV-EPI. For breast patients, imaging dose to OAR depends on imaging modality and treated breast size. When considering the use of imaging during breast radiotherapy, the patient's breast size and contralateral breast dose should be taken into account.

  6. Dose escalation study of carbon ion radiotherapy for locally advanced carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Shingo . E-mail: s.kato@nirs.go.jp; Ohno, Tatsuya; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nakano, Takashi; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Kamada, Tadashi; Miyamoto, Tadaaki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirotoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Kandatsu, Susumu; Yoshikawa, Kyosan; Ezawa, Hidefumi; Suzuki, Michiya

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer by two phase I/II clinical trials. Methods and Materials: Between June 1995 and January 2000, 44 patients were treated with CIRT. Thirty patients had Stage IIIB disease, and 14 patients had Stage IVA disease. Median tumor size was 6.5 cm (range, 4.2-11.0 cm). The treatment consisted of 16 fractions of whole pelvic irradiation and 8 fractions of local boost. In the first study, the total dose ranged from 52.8 to 72.0 gray equivalents (GyE) (2.2-3.0 GyE per fraction). In the second study, the whole pelvic dose was fixed at 44.8 GyE, and an additional 24.0 or 28.0 GyE was given to the cervical tumor (total dose, 68.8 or 72.8 GyE). Results: No patient developed severe acute toxicity. In contrast, 8 patients developed major late gastrointestinal complications. The doses resulting in major complications were {>=}60 GyE. All patients with major complications were surgically salvaged. The 5-year local control rate for patients in the first and second studies was 45% and 79%, respectively. When treated with {>=}62.4 GyE, the local control was favorable even for the patients with stage IVA disease (69%) or for those with tumors {>=}6.0 cm (64%). Conclusions: In CIRT for advanced cervical cancer, the dose to the intestines should be limited to <60 GyE to avoid major complications. Although the number of patients in this study was small, the results support continued investigation to confirm therapeutic efficacy.

  7. Impact of Dose on Local Failure Rates After Image-Guided Reirradiation of Recurrent Paraspinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Damast, Shari; Wright, Jean; Bilsky, Mark; Hsu, Meier; Zhang Zhigang; Lovelock, Michael; Cox, Brett; Zatcky, Joan; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To examine the impact of dose on local failure (LF) rates in the re-treatment of recurrent paraspinal metastases with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT). Methods and Materials: The records of patients with in-field recurrence after previous spine radiation (median dose, 30 Gy) who received salvage IG-IMRT with either five 4-Gy (20-Gy group, n = 42) or five 6-Gy (30-Gy group, n = 55) daily fractions between January 2003 and August 2008 were reviewed. Institutional practice was 20 Gy before April 2006, when it changed to 30 Gy. A total of 47 cases (48%) were treated adjuvantly, after surgery to decompress epidural disease. LF after IG-IMRT was defined radiographically. Results: The median follow-up was 12.1 months (range, 0.2-63.6 months). The 1-year cumulative incidences of LF after 20 Gy and 30 Gy IG-IMRT were 45% and 26%, respectively (p = 0.04). Of all treatment characteristics examined (20-Gy vs. 30-Gy dose group, dose to 95% of the planned and gross target volume, tumor size, histology, receipt of surgery, and interval between first and second radiation), only dose group had a significant impact on actuarial LF incidence (p = 0.04; unadjusted HR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.27-0.96). There was no incidence of myelopathy. Conclusions: A significant decrease in LF after IG-IMRT with five 6-Gy fractions compared with five 4-Gy fractions was observed without increased risk of myelopathy. Until prospective data comparing stereotactic hypofractionated and single-fraction regimens become available, when reirradiating recurrent paraspinal metastases with IG-IMRT, administration of five 6-Gy daily fractions is reasonable.

  8. Characterization of a novel EPID designed for simultaneous imaging and dose verification in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Samuel J.; McNamara, Aimee L.; Deshpande, Shrikant; Holloway, Lois; Greer, Peter B.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Vial, Philip

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: Standard amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (a-Si EPIDs) are x-ray imagers used frequently in radiotherapy that indirectly detect incident x-rays using a metal plate and phosphor screen. These detectors may also be used as two-dimensional dosimeters; however, they have a well-characterized nonwater-equivalent dosimetric response. Plastic scintillating (PS) fibers, on the other hand, have been shown to respond in a water-equivalent manner to x-rays in the energy range typically encountered during radiotherapy. In this study, the authors report on the first experimental measurements taken with a novel prototype PS a-Si EPID developed for the purpose of performing simultaneous imaging and dosimetry in radiotherapy. This prototype employs an array of PS fibers in place of the standard metal plate and phosphor screen. The imaging performance and dosimetric response of the prototype EPID were evaluated experimentally and compared to that of the standard EPID.Methods: Clinical 6 MV photon beams were used to first measure the detector sensitivity, linearity of dose response, and pixel noise characteristics of the prototype and standard EPIDs. Second, the dosimetric response of each EPID was evaluated relative to a reference water-equivalent dosimeter by measuring the off-axis and field size response in a nontransit configuration, along with the off-axis, field size, and transmission response in a transit configuration using solid water blocks. Finally, the imaging performance of the prototype and standard EPIDs was evaluated quantitatively by using an image quality phantom to measure the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and spatial resolution of images acquired with each detector, and qualitatively by using an anthropomorphic phantom to acquire images representative of human anatomy.Results: The prototype EPID's sensitivity was 0.37 times that of the standard EPID. Both EPIDs exhibited responses that were linear with delivered dose over a range of 1

  9. NBN gain is predictive for adverse outcome following image-guided radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Jenna; Zafarana, Gaetano; Chu, Kenneth C.; Ramnarine, Varune R.; Ishkanian, Adrian; Sendorek, Dorota H.S.; Pasic, Ivan; Lam, Wan L.; Jurisica, Igor; van der Kwast, Theo; Milosevic, Michael; Boutros, Paul C.; Bristow, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the use of clinical prognostic factors (PSA, T-category and Gleason score), 20-60% of localized prostate cancers (PCa) fail primary local treatment. Herein, we determined the prognostic importance of main sensors of the DNA damage response (DDR): MRE11A, RAD50, NBN, ATM, ATR and PRKDC. We studied copy number alterations in DDR genes in localized PCa treated with image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT; n=139) versus radical prostatectomy (RadP; n=154). In both cohorts, NBN gains were the most frequent genomic alteration (14.4 and 11% of cases, respectively), and were associated with overall tumour genomic instability (p<0.0001). NBN gains were the only significant predictor of 5yrs biochemical relapse-free rate (bRFR) following IGRT (46% versus 77%; p=0.00067). On multivariate analysis, NBN gain remained a significant independent predictor of bRFR after adjusting for known clinical prognostic variables (HR=3.28, 95% CI 1.56–6.89, Wald p-value=0.0017). No DDR-sensing gene was prognostic in the RadP cohort. In vitro studies correlated NBN gene overexpression with PCa cells radioresistance. In conclusion, NBN gain predicts for decreased bRFR in IGRT, but not in RadP patients. If validated independently, Nibrin gains may be the first PCa predictive biomarker to facilitate local treatment decisions using precision medicine approaches with surgery or radiotherapy. PMID:25415046

  10. Dose-Volume Comparison of Proton Therapy and Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos Fryer, Amber; Mahajan, Chaitali; Indelicato, Daniel; Horne, David C.; Chellini, Angela; McKenzie, Craig C.; Lawlor, Paula C.; Henderson, Randal; Li Zuofeng; Lin Liyong; Olivier, Kenneth; Keole, Sameer

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: The contrast in dose distribution between proton radiotherapy (RT) and intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) is unclear, particularly in regard to critical structures such as the rectum and bladder. Methods and Materials: Between August and November 2006, the first 10 consecutive patients treated in our Phase II low-risk prostate proton protocol (University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute protocol 0001) were reviewed. The double-scatter proton beam plans used in treatment were analyzed for various dosimetric endpoints. For all plans, each beam dose distribution, angle, smearing, and aperture margin were optimized. IMRT plans were created for all patients and simultaneously analyzed. The IMRT plans were optimized through multiple volume objectives, beam weighting, and individual leaf movement. The patients were treated to 78 Gray-equivalents (GE) in 2-GE fractions with a biologically equivalent dose of 1.1. Results: All rectal and rectal wall volumes treated to 10-80 GE (percentage of volume receiving 10-80 GE [V{sub 10}-V{sub 80}]) were significantly lower with proton therapy (p < 0.05). The rectal V{sub 50} was reduced from 31.3% {+-} 4.1% with IMRT to 14.6% {+-} 3.0% with proton therapy for a relative improvement of 53.4% and an absolute benefit of 16.7% (p < 0.001). The mean rectal dose decreased 59% with proton therapy (p < 0.001). For the bladder and bladder wall, proton therapy produced significantly smaller volumes treated to doses of 10-35 GE (p < 0.05) with a nonsignificant advantage demonstrated for the volume receiving {<=}60 GE. The bladder V{sub 30} was reduced with proton therapy for a relative improvement of 35.3% and an absolute benefit of 15.1% (p = 0.02). The mean bladder dose decreased 35% with proton therapy (p = 0.002). Conclusion: Compared with IMRT, proton therapy reduced the dose to the dose-limiting normal structures while maintaining excellent planning target volume coverage.

  11. Measurement of radiotherapy x-ray skin dose on a chest wall phantom.

    PubMed

    Quach, K Y; Morales, J; Butson, M J; Rosenfeld, A B; Metcalfe, P E

    2000-07-01

    Sufficient skin dose needs to be delivered by a radiotherapy chest wall treatment regimen to ensure the probability of a near surface tumor recurrence is minimized. To simulate a chest wall treatment a hemicylindrical solid water phantom of 7.5 cm radius was irradiated with 6 MV x-rays using 20x20 cm2 and 10x20 cm2 fields at 100 cm source surface distance (SSD) to the base of the phantom. A surface dose profile was obtained from 0 to 180 degrees, in 10 degrees increments around the circumference of the phantom. Dosimetry results obtained from radiochromic film (effective depth of 0.17 mm) were used in the investigation, the superficial doses were found to be 28% (of Dmax) at the 0 degrees beam entry position and 58% at the 90 degrees oblique beam position. Superficial dose results were also obtained using extra thin thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) (effective depth 0.14 mm) of 30% at 0 degrees, 57% at 90 degrees, and a metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detector (effective depth 0.5 mm) of 43% at 0 degrees, 62% at 90 degrees. Because the differences in measured superficial doses were significant and beyond those related to experimental error, these differences are assumed to be mostly attributable to the effective depth of measurement of each detector. We numerically simulated a bolus on/bolus off technique and found we could increase the coverage to the skin. Using an alternate "bolus on," "bolus off" regimen, the skin would receive 36.8 Gy at 0 degrees incidence and 46.4 Gy at 90 degrees incidence for a prescribed midpoint dose of 50 Gy. From this work it is evident that, as the circumference of the phantom is traversed the SSD increases and hence there is an inverse square fluence fall-off, this is more than offset by the increase in skin dose due to surface curvature to a plateau at about 90 degrees. Beyond this angle it is assumed that beam attenuation through the phantom and inverse square fall-off is causing the surface dose to

  12. Cone beam CT dose reduction in prostate radiotherapy using Likert scale methods

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Louise A; Jordan, Suzanne; Smith, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To use a Likert scale method to optimize image quality (IQ) for cone beam CT (CBCT) soft-tissue matching for image-guided radiotherapy of the prostate. Methods: 23 males with local/locally advanced prostate cancer had the CBCT IQ assessed using a 4-point Likert scale (4 = excellent, no artefacts; 3 = good, few artefacts; 2 = poor, just able to match; 1 = unsatisfactory, not able to match) at three levels of exposure. The lateral separations of the subjects were also measured. The Friedman test and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to determine if the IQ was associated with the exposure level. We used the point-biserial correlation and a χ2 test to investigate the relationship between the separation and IQ. Results: The Friedman test showed that the IQ was related to exposure (p = 2 × 10−7) and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test demonstrated that the IQ decreased as exposure decreased (all p-values <0.005). We did not find a correlation between the IQ and the separation (correlation coefficient 0.045), but for separations <35 cm, it was possible to use the lowest exposure parameters studied. Conclusion: We can reduce exposure factors to 80% of those supplied with the system without hindering the matching process for all patients. For patients with lateral separations <35 cm, the exposure factors can be reduced further to 64% of the original values. Advances in knowledge: Likert scales are a useful tool for measuring IQ in the optimization of CBCT IQ for soft-tissue matching in radiotherapy image guidance applications. PMID:26689092

  13. SU-E-J-191: Motion Prediction Using Extreme Learning Machine in Image Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, J; Cao, R; Pei, X; Wang, H; Hu, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Real-time motion tracking is a critical issue in image guided radiotherapy due to the time latency caused by image processing and system response. It is of great necessity to fast and accurately predict the future position of the respiratory motion and the tumor location. Methods: The prediction of respiratory position was done based on the positioning and tracking module in ARTS-IGRT system which was developed by FDS Team (www.fds.org.cn). An approach involving with the extreme learning machine (ELM) was adopted to predict the future respiratory position as well as the tumor’s location by training the past trajectories. For the training process, a feed-forward neural network with one single hidden layer was used for the learning. First, the number of hidden nodes was figured out for the single layered feed forward network (SLFN). Then the input weights and hidden layer biases of the SLFN were randomly assigned to calculate the hidden neuron output matrix. Finally, the predicted movement were obtained by applying the output weights and compared with the actual movement. Breathing movement acquired from the external infrared markers was used to test the prediction accuracy. And the implanted marker movement for the prostate cancer was used to test the implementation of the tumor motion prediction. Results: The accuracy of the predicted motion and the actual motion was tested. Five volunteers with different breathing patterns were tested. The average prediction time was 0.281s. And the standard deviation of prediction accuracy was 0.002 for the respiratory motion and 0.001 for the tumor motion. Conclusion: The extreme learning machine method can provide an accurate and fast prediction of the respiratory motion and the tumor location and therefore can meet the requirements of real-time tumor-tracking in image guided radiotherapy.

  14. Feasibility of a Multigroup Deterministic Solution Method for 3D Radiotherapy Dose Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Vassiliev, Oleg N.; Wareing, Todd A.; Davis, Ian M.; McGhee, John; Barnett, Douglas; Horton, John L.; Gifford, Kent; Failla, Gregory; Titt, Uwe; Mourtada, Firas

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the potential of a novel deterministic solver, Attila, for external photon beam radiotherapy dose calculations. Methods and Materials Two hypothetical cases for prostate and head and neck cancer photon beam treatment plans were calculated using Attila and EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations. Open beams were modeled as isotropic photon point sources collimated to specified field sizes (100 cm SSD). The sources had a realistic energy spectrum calculated by Monte Carlo for a Varian Clinac 2100 operated in a 6MV photon mode. The Attila computational grids consisted of 106,000 elements, or 424,000 spatial degrees of freedom, for the prostate case, and 123,000 tetrahedral elements, or 492,000 spatial degrees of freedom, for the head and neck cases. Results For both cases, results demonstrate excellent agreement between Attila and EGSnrc in all areas, including the build-up regions, near heterogeneities, and at the beam penumbra. Dose agreement for 99% of the voxels was within 3% (relative point-wise difference) or 3mm distance-to-agreement criterion. Localized differences between the Attila and EGSnrc results were observed at bone and soft tissue interfaces, and are attributable to the effect of voxel material homogenization in calculating dose-to-medium in EGSnrc. For both cases, Attila calculation times were under 20 CPU minutes on a single 2.2 GHz AMD Opteron processor. Conclusions The methods in Attila have the potential to be the basis for an efficient dose engine for patient specific treatment planning, providing accuracy similar to that obtained by Monte Carlo. PMID:18722273

  15. The photon dose calculation algorithm used in breast radiotherapy has significant impact on the parameters of radiobiological models.

    PubMed

    Petillion, Saskia; Swinnen, Ans; Defraene, Gilles; Verhoeven, Karolien; Weltens, Caroline; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2014-07-08

    The comparison of the pencil beam dose calculation algorithm with modified Batho heterogeneity correction (PBC-MB) and the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) and the mutual comparison of advanced dose calculation algorithms used in breast radiotherapy have focused on the differences between the physical dose distributions. Studies on the radiobiological impact of the algorithm (both on the tumor control and the moderate breast fibrosis prediction) are lacking. We, therefore, investigated the radiobiological impact of the dose calculation algorithm in whole breast radiotherapy. The clinical dose distributions of 30 breast cancer patients, calculated with PBC-MB, were recalculated with fixed monitor units using more advanced algorithms: AAA and Acuros XB. For the latter, both dose reporting modes were used (i.e., dose-to-medium and dose-to-water). Next, the tumor control probability (TCP) and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of each dose distribution were calculated with the Poisson model and with the relative seriality model, respectively. The endpoint for the NTCP calculation was moderate breast fibrosis five years post treatment. The differences were checked for significance with the paired t-test. The more advanced algorithms predicted a significantly lower TCP and NTCP of moderate breast fibrosis then found during the corresponding clinical follow-up study based on PBC calculations. The differences varied between 1% and 2.1% for the TCP and between 2.9% and 5.5% for the NTCP of moderate breast fibrosis. The significant differences were eliminated by determination of algorithm-specific model parameters using least square fitting. Application of the new parameters on a second group of 30 breast cancer patients proved their appropriateness. In this study, we assessed the impact of the dose calculation algorithms used in whole breast radiotherapy on the parameters of the radiobiological models. The radiobiological impact was eliminated by

  16. Steep Dose-Response Relationship for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Using Hypofractionated High-Dose Irradiation by Real-Time Tumor-Tracking Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Onimaru, Rikiya Fujino, Masaharu; Yamazaki, Koichi; Onodera, Yuya; Taguchi, Hiroshi; Katoh, Norio; Hommura, Fumihiro; Oizumi, Satoshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Shirato, Hiroki

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical outcomes of patients with pathologically proven, peripherally located, Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer who had undergone stereotactic body radiotherapy using real-time tumor tracking radiotherapy during the developmental period. Methods and Materials: A total of 41 patients (25 with Stage T1 and 16 with Stage T2) were admitted to the study between February 2000 and June 2005. A 5-mm planning target volume margin was added to the clinical target volume determined with computed tomography at the end of the expiratory phase. The gating window ranged from {+-}2 to 3 mm. The dose fractionation schedule was 40 or 48 Gy in four fractions within 1 week. The dose was prescribed at the center of the planning target volume, giving more than an 80% dose at the planning target volume periphery. Results: For 28 patients treated with 48 Gy in four fractions, the overall actuarial survival rate at 3 years was 82% for those with Stage IA and 32% for those with Stage IB. For patients treated with 40 Gy in four fractions within 1 week, the overall actuarial survival rate at 3 years was 50% for those with Stage IA and 0% for those with Stage IB. A significant difference was found in local control between those with Stage IB who received 40 Gy vs. 48 Gy (p = 0.0015) but not in those with Stage IA (p = 0.5811). No serious radiation morbidity was observed with either dose schedule. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that 48 Gy in four fractions within 1 week is a safe and effective treatment for peripherally located, Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer. A steep dose-response curve between 40 and 48 Gy using a daily dose of 12 Gy delivered within 1 week was identified for Stage IB non-small-cell lung cancer in stereotactic body radiotherapy using real-time tumor tracking radiotherapy.

  17. Evaluating proton stereotactic body radiotherapy to reduce chest wall dose in the treatment of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James; Amini, Arya; Ciura, Katherine; Nguyen, Ngoc; Palmer, Matt; Soh, Hendrick; Allen, Pamela K.; Paolini, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing; Bluett, Jaques; Mohan, Radhe; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) can produce excellent local control of several types of solid tumor; however, toxicity to nearby critical structures is a concern. We found previously that in SBRT for lung cancer, the chest wall (CW) volume receiving 20, 30, or 40 Gy (V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, or V{sub 40}) was linked with the development of neuropathy. Here we sought to determine whether the dosimetric advantages of protons could produce lower CW doses than traditional photon-based SBRT. We searched an institutional database to identify patients treated with photon SBRT for lung cancer with tumors within < 2.5 cm of the CW. We found 260 cases; of these, chronic grade ≥ 2 CW pain was identified in 23 patients. We then selected 10 representative patients from this group and generated proton SBRT treatment plans, using the identical dose of 50 Gy in 4 fractions, and assessed potential differences in CW dose between the 2 plans. The proton SBRT plans reduced the CW doses at all dose levels measured. The median CW V{sub 20} was 364.0 cm{sup 3} and 160.0 cm{sup 3} (p < 0.0001), V{sub 30} was 144.6 cm{sup 3}vs 77.0 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0012), V{sub 35} was 93.9 cm{sup 3}vs 57.9 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.005), V{sub 40} was 66.5 cm{sup 3}vs 45.4 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0112), and mean lung dose was 5.9 Gy vs 3.8 Gy (p = 0.0001) for photons and protons, respectively. Coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) was comparable between the 2 sets of plans (96.4% for photons and 97% for protons). From a dosimetric standpoint, proton SBRT can achieve the same coverage of the PTV while significantly reducing the dose to the CW and lung relative to photon SBRT and therefore may be beneficial for the treatment of lesions closer to critical structures.

  18. Effect of Concurrent High-Dose Cisplatin Chemotherapy and Conformal Radiotherapy on Cervical Esophageal Cancer Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shaohui; Lockwood, Gina; Brierley, James; Cummings, Bernard; Kim, John; Wong, Rebecca; Bayley, Andrew; Ringash, Jolie

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether a change in treatment policy to conformal, elective nodal radiotherapy and concurrent high-dose cisplatin improved survival for cervical esophageal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: All cervical esophageal cancer patients treated between 1997 and 2005 were restaged (1983 American Joint Committee on Cancer criteria). Patients treated before 2001 (previous cohort [PC]) were compared with those treated from 2001 onward (recent cohort [RC]). The PC institutional chemoradiotherapy protocol was 54 Gy in 20 fractions within 4 weeks, with 5-fluorouracil (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1-4 and either mitomycin C (10 mg/m{sup 2}) or cisplatin (75 mg/m{sup 2}) on Day 1. The RC institutional chemoradiotherapy protocol was conformal radiotherapy, 70 Gy in 35 fractions within 7 weeks, to the primary tumor and elective nodes, with high-dose cisplatin (100 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1, 22, and 43. Results: The median follow-up was 3.1 years (PC, 8.1 and RC, 2.3). Of 71 patients (25 women and 46 men), 21 of 29 in the PC and 29 of 42 in the RC were treated curatively (curative subgroup, n = 50). Between the two groups, no differences in overall survival or locoregional relapse-free survival were seen. The overall survival rate at 2 and 5 years was 35% (range, 24-47%) and 21% (range, 12-32%) in the whole group and 46% (range 32-60%) and 28% (range, 15-42%) in the curative group, respectively. In the curative group, no statistically significant prognostic factors were found. Trends toward better locoregional relapse-free survival were seen in women (2-year rate, 73% vs. for men, 36%; p = 0.08) and in patients aged >64 years (2-year rate, 68% vs. age {<=}64 years, 34%; p = 0.10). Conclusion: No survival improvement could be demonstrated after changing the treatment policy to high-dose cisplatin-based, conventionally fractionated conformal chemoradiotherapy. Female gender and older age might predict for better outcomes.

  19. Definitive high-dose radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Kim, Eun Seok; Yeo, Seung-Gu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Standard management for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) involves preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and radical surgery. However, this level of treatment may be unnecessary for a subgroup of LARC patients. Previous reports have shown that approximately 20% of LARC patients experience a complete tumor response to preoperative CRT. Post-CRT nonoperative management of these patients may prevent morbidities associated with radical surgery. To our knowledge, this case report firstly presents the favorable long-term outcomes of a LARC patient who underwent definitive aim CRT. Methods: The patient was 73 years’ old, and staging workups revealed T3N2bM0 rectal adenocarcinoma. He agreed to receive CRT, but refused surgery. A radiotherapy (RT) dose of 64.8 Gy was prescribed, which was higher than conventional (50.4 Gy) preoperative aim RT. The regimen of concurrent chemotherapy was the same as that used in preoperative aim CRT: 2 cycles of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin. Results: Three months after CRT completion, a complete tumor response was identified clinically. Colonoscopic biopsy after 1 year showed no tumor cells. This patient is alive after 4 years with no evidence of recurrence or severe toxicity. Conclusion: The long-term outcomes of this case indicate the feasibility of definitive high-dose RT with concurrent chemotherapy for LARC. PMID:27749573

  20. Pharmacodynamic imaging guides dosing of a selective estrogen receptor degrader

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Pedram; Deng, Francis; Esfahani, Shadi A.; Leece, Alicia K.; Shoup, Timothy M.; Vasdev, Neil; Mahmood, Umar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Estrogen receptor (ER) targeting is key in management of receptor-positive breast cancer (BrCa). Currently, there are no methods to optimize anti-ER therapy dosing. This study assesses the utility of 16α-18F-fluoroestradiol (18F-FES) PET for fulvestrant dose optimization in a preclinical ER+ BrCa model. Experimental Design In vitro, 18F-FES retention was compared to ERα protein expression (ELISA) and ESR1 mRNA transcription (qPCR) in MCF7 cells (ER+) after treatment with different fulvestrant doses. MCF7 xenografts were grown in ovariectomized nude mice and assigned to vehicle, low- (0.05mg), medium- (0.5mg) or high-dose (5mg) fulvestrant treatment groups (5–7 per group). Two and three days after fulvestrant treatment, PET/CT was performed using 18F-FES and 18F-FDG, respectively. ER expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry, ELISA, and qPCR on xenografts. Tumor proliferation was assessed using Ki-67 immunohistochemistry. Results In vitro, we observed a parallel graded reduction in 18F-FES uptake and ER expression with increased fulvestrant doses, despite enhancement of ER mRNA transcription. In xenografts, ER expression significantly decreased with increased fulvestrant dose, despite similar mRNA expression and Ki-67 staining among the treatment groups. We observed a significant dose-dependent reduction of 18F-FES PET mean standardized uptake value (SUVmean) with fulvestrant treatment, but no significant difference among the treatment groups in 18F-FDG PET SUVmean.. Conclusion We demonstrated that 18F-FES uptake mirrors the dose-dependent changes in functional ER expression with fulvestrant resulting in ER degradation and/or blockade; these precede changes in tumor metabolism and proliferation. Quantitative 18F-FES PET may be useful for tracking early efficacy of ER blockade/degradation and guiding ER-targeted therapy dosing in BrCa patients. PMID:25609068

  1. High biologically effective dose radiation therapy using brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Akinori; Kohno, Naoaki

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the outcomes of high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with biologically effective dose (BED) ≥ 220 Gy of high-dose radiotherapy, using low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and short-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Material and methods From 2005 to 2013, a total of 143 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated by radiotherapy of BED ≥ 220 Gy with a combination of LDR brachytherapy, EBRT, and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). The high-risk patients in the present study included both high-risk and very high-risk prostate cancer. The number of high-risk features were: 60 patients with 1 high-risk factor (42%), 61 patients with 2 high-risk factors (43%), and 22 patients with 3 high-risk factors (15%) including five N1 disease. External beam radiotherapy fields included prostate and seminal vesicles only or whole pelvis depending on the extension of the disease. Biochemical failure was defined by the Phoenix definition. Results Six patients developed biochemical failure, thus providing a 5-year actual biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS) rate of 95.2%. Biochemical failure was observed exclusively in cases with distant metastasis in the present study. All six patients with biochemical relapse had clinical failure due to bone metastasis, thus yielding a 5-year freedom from clinical failure (FFCF) rate of 93.0%. None of the cases with N1 disease experienced biochemical failure. We observed four deaths, including one death from prostate cancer, therefore yielding a cause-specific survival (CSS) rate of 97.2%, and an overall survival (OS) rate of 95.5%. Conclusions High-dose (BED ≥ 220 Gy) radiotherapy by LDR in combination with EBRT has shown an excellent outcome on BFFS in high-risk and very high-risk cancer, although causal relationship between BED and BFFS remain to be explained further. PMID:28344597

  2. Dose-Dependent Pulmonary Toxicity After Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, David C. Smythe, W. Roy; Liao Zhongxing; Guerrero, Thomas; Chang, Joe Y.; McAleer, Mary F.; Jeter, Melenda D.; Correa, Arlene Ph.D.; Vaporciyan, Ara A.; Liu, H. Helen; Komaki, Ritsuko; Forster, Kenneth M.; Stevens, Craig W.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of fatal pulmonary events after extrapleural pneumonectomy and hemithoracic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 63 consecutive patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma who underwent extrapleural pneumonectomy and IMRT at University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The endpoints studied were pulmonary-related death (PRD) and non-cancer-related death within 6 months of IMRT. Results: Of the 63 patients, 23 (37%) had died within 6 months of IMRT (10 of recurrent cancer, 6 of pulmonary causes [pneumonia in 4 and pneumonitis in 2], and 7 of other noncancer causes [pulmonary embolus in 2, sepsis after bronchopleural fistula in 1, and cause unknown but without pulmonary symptoms or recurrent disease in 4]). On univariate analysis, the factors that predicted for PRD were a lower preoperative ejection fraction (p = 0.021), absolute volume of lung spared at 10 Gy (p = 0.025), percentage of lung volume receiving {>=}20 Gy (V{sub 20}; p 0.002), and mean lung dose (p = 0.013). On multivariate analysis, only V{sub 20} was predictive of PRD (p = 0.017; odds ratio, 1.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.08) or non-cancer-related death (p = 0.033; odds ratio, 1.21; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.45). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that fatal pulmonary toxicities were associated with radiation to the contralateral lung. V{sub 20} was the only independent determinant for risk of PRD or non-cancer-related death. The mean V{sub 20} of the non-PRD patients was considerably lower than that accepted during standard thoracic radiotherapy, implying that the V{sub 20} should be kept as low as possible after extrapleural pneumonectomy.

  3. Outcomes of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy: Analysis of dose-volume histograms and prognostic factors

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Azusa . E-mail: azusa@nirs.go.jp; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Mizota, Atsushi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the tolerance dose for retention of visual acuity in patients with head-and-neck tumors treated with carbon ion radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From June 1994 to March 2000, 163 patients with tumors in the head and neck or skull base region were treated with carbon ion radiotherapy. Analysis was performed on 54 optic nerves (ONs) corresponding to 30 patients whose ONs had been included in the irradiated volume. These patients showed no evidence of visual impairment due to other factors and had a follow-up period of >4 years. All patients had been informed of the possibility of visual impairment before treatment. We evaluated the dose-complication probability and the prognostic factors for the retention of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy, using dose-volume histograms and multivariate analysis. Results: The median age of 30 patients (14 men, 16 women) was 57.2 years. Median prescribed total dose was 56.0 gray equivalents (GyE) at 3.0-4.0 GyE per fraction per day (range, 48-64 GyE; 16-18 fractions; 4-6 weeks). Of 54 ONs that were analyzed, 35 had been irradiated with <57 GyE (maximum dose [D{sub max}]) resulting in no visual loss. Conversely, 11 of the 19 ONs (58%) irradiated with >57 GyE (D{sub max}) suffered a decrease of visual acuity. In all of these cases, the ONs had been involved in the tumor before carbon ion radiotherapy. In the multivariate analysis, a dose of 20% of the volume of the ON (D{sub 2}) was significantly associated with visual loss. Conclusions: The occurrence of visual loss seems to be correlated with a delivery of >60 GyE to 20% of the volume of the ON.

  4. Equivalence of Gyn GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image guided cervical brachytherapy with EUD-based dose prescription

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To establish a generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) -based prescription method for Image Guided Brachytherapy (IGBT) that reproduces the Gyn GEC-ESTRO WG (GGE) prescription for cervix carcinoma patients on CT images with limited soft tissue resolution. Methods The equivalence of two IGBT planning approaches was investigated in 20 patients who received external beam radiotherapy (EBT) and 5 concomitant high dose rate IGBT treatments. The GGE planning strategy based on dose to the most exposed 2 cm3 (D2cc) was used to derive criteria for the gEUD-based planning of the bladder and rectum. The safety of gEUD constraints in terms of GGE criteria was tested by maximizing dose to the gEUD constraints for individual fractions. Results The gEUD constraints of 3.55 Gy for the rectum and 5.19 Gy for the bladder were derived. Rectum and bladder gEUD-maximized plans resulted in D2cc averages very similar to the initial GGE criteria. Average D2ccs and EUDs from the full treatment course were comparable for the two techniques within both sets of normal tissue constraints. The same was found for the tumor doses. Conclusions The derived gEUD criteria for normal organs result in GGE-equivalent IGBT treatment plans. The gEUD-based planning considers the entire dose distribution of organs in contrast to a single dose-volume-histogram point. PMID:24225184

  5. Results of the Phase I Dose-Escalating Study of Motexafin Gadolinium With Standard Radiotherapy in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Judith M. Seiferheld, Wendy; Alger, Jeffrey R.; Wu, Genevieve; Endicott, Thyra J.; Mehta, Minesh; Curran, Walter; Phan, See-Chun

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: Motexafin gadolinium (MGd) is a putative radiation enhancer initially evaluated in patients with brain metastases. This Phase I trial studied the safety and tolerability of a 2-6-week course (10-22 doses) of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: A total of 33 glioblastoma multiforme patients received one of seven MGd regimens starting at 10 doses of 4 mg/kg/d MGd and escalating to 22 doses of 5.3 mg/kg/d MGd (5 or 10 daily doses then three times per week). The National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program toxicity and stopping rules were applied. Results: The maximal tolerated dose was 5.0 mg/kg/d MGd (5 d/wk for 2 weeks, then three times per week) for 22 doses. The dose-limiting toxicity was reversible transaminase elevation. Adverse reactions included rash/pruritus (45%), chills/fever (30%), and self-limiting vesiculobullous rash of the thumb and fingers (42%). The median survival of 17.6 months prompted a case-matched analysis. In the case-matched analysis, the MGd patients had a median survival of 16.1 months (n = 31) compared with the matched Radiation Therapy Oncology Group database patients with a median survival of 11.8 months (hazard ratio, 0.43; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.94). Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose of MGd with radiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme in this study was 5 mg/kg/d for 22 doses (daily for 2 weeks, then three times weekly). The baseline survival calculations suggest progression to Phase II trials is appropriate, with the addition of MGd to radiotherapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide.

  6. GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation using phase-space sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townson, Reid W.; Jia, Xun; Tian, Zhen; Jiang Graves, Yan; Zavgorodni, Sergei; Jiang, Steve B.

    2013-06-01

    A novel phase-space source implementation has been designed for graphics processing unit (GPU)-based Monte Carlo dose calculation engines. Short of full simulation of the linac head, using a phase-space source is the most accurate method to model a clinical radiation beam in dose calculations. However, in GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculations where the computation efficiency is very high, the time required to read and process a large phase-space file becomes comparable to the particle transport time. Moreover, due to the parallelized nature of GPU hardware, it is essential to simultaneously transport particles of the same type and similar energies but separated spatially to yield a high efficiency. We present three methods for phase-space implementation that have been integrated into the most recent version of the GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation package gDPM v3.0. The first method is to sequentially read particles from a patient-dependent phase-space and sort them on-the-fly based on particle type and energy. The second method supplements this with a simple secondary collimator model and fluence map implementation so that patient-independent phase-space sources can be used. Finally, as the third method (called the phase-space-let, or PSL, method) we introduce a novel source implementation utilizing pre-processed patient-independent phase-spaces that are sorted by particle type, energy and position. Position bins located outside a rectangular region of interest enclosing the treatment field are ignored, substantially decreasing simulation time with little effect on the final dose distribution. The three methods were validated in absolute dose against BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc and compared using gamma-index tests (2%/2 mm above the 10% isodose). It was found that the PSL method has the optimal balance between accuracy and efficiency and thus is used as the default method in gDPM v3.0. Using the PSL method, open fields of 4 × 4, 10 × 10 and 30 × 30 cm

  7. A comparison between anisotropic analytical and multigrid superposition dose calculation algorithms in radiotherapy treatment planning

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Vincent W.C.; Tse, Teddy K.H.; Ho, Cola L.M.; Yeung, Eric C.Y.

    2013-07-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is currently the most accurate dose calculation algorithm in radiotherapy planning but requires relatively long processing time. Faster model-based algorithms such as the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) by the Eclipse treatment planning system and multigrid superposition (MGS) by the XiO treatment planning system are 2 commonly used algorithms. This study compared AAA and MGS against MC, as the gold standard, on brain, nasopharynx, lung, and prostate cancer patients. Computed tomography of 6 patients of each cancer type was used. The same hypothetical treatment plan using the same machine and treatment prescription was computed for each case by each planning system using their respective dose calculation algorithm. The doses at reference points including (1) soft tissues only, (2) bones only, (3) air cavities only, (4) soft tissue-bone boundary (Soft/Bone), (5) soft tissue-air boundary (Soft/Air), and (6) bone-air boundary (Bone/Air), were measured and compared using the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), which was a function of the percentage dose deviations from MC. Besides, the computation time of each treatment plan was recorded and compared. The MAPEs of MGS were significantly lower than AAA in all types of cancers (p<0.001). With regards to body density combinations, the MAPE of AAA ranged from 1.8% (soft tissue) to 4.9% (Bone/Air), whereas that of MGS from 1.6% (air cavities) to 2.9% (Soft/Bone). The MAPEs of MGS (2.6%±2.1) were significantly lower than that of AAA (3.7%±2.5) in all tissue density combinations (p<0.001). The mean computation time of AAA for all treatment plans was significantly lower than that of the MGS (p<0.001). Both AAA and MGS algorithms demonstrated dose deviations of less than 4.0% in most clinical cases and their performance was better in homogeneous tissues than at tissue boundaries. In general, MGS demonstrated relatively smaller dose deviations than AAA but required longer computation time.

  8. GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation using phase-space sources.

    PubMed

    Townson, Reid W; Jia, Xun; Tian, Zhen; Graves, Yan Jiang; Zavgorodni, Sergei; Jiang, Steve B

    2013-06-21

    A novel phase-space source implementation has been designed for graphics processing unit (GPU)-based Monte Carlo dose calculation engines. Short of full simulation of the linac head, using a phase-space source is the most accurate method to model a clinical radiation beam in dose calculations. However, in GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculations where the computation efficiency is very high, the time required to read and process a large phase-space file becomes comparable to the particle transport time. Moreover, due to the parallelized nature of GPU hardware, it is essential to simultaneously transport particles of the same type and similar energies but separated spatially to yield a high efficiency. We present three methods for phase-space implementation that have been integrated into the most recent version of the GPU-based Monte Carlo radiotherapy dose calculation package gDPM v3.0. The first method is to sequentially read particles from a patient-dependent phase-space and sort them on-the-fly based on particle type and energy. The second method supplements this with a simple secondary collimator model and fluence map implementation so that patient-independent phase-space sources can be used. Finally, as the third method (called the phase-space-let, or PSL, method) we introduce a novel source implementation utilizing pre-processed patient-independent phase-spaces that are sorted by particle type, energy and position. Position bins located outside a rectangular region of interest enclosing the treatment field are ignored, substantially decreasing simulation time with little effect on the final dose distribution. The three methods were validated in absolute dose against BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc and compared using gamma-index tests (2%/2 mm above the 10% isodose). It was found that the PSL method has the optimal balance between accuracy and efficiency and thus is used as the default method in gDPM v3.0. Using the PSL method, open fields of 4 × 4, 10 × 10 and 30 × 30 cm

  9. Red bone marrow dose calculations in radiotherapy of prostate cancer based on the updated VCH adult male phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Jinqin; Xie, Tianwu; Sun, Wenjuan; Liu, Qian

    2014-04-01

    Red bone marrow (RBM) is an important dose-limiting tissue that has high radiosensitivity but is difficult to identify on clinical medical images. In this study, we investigated dose distribution in RBM for prostate cancer radiotherapy. Four suborgans were identified in the skeleton of the visible Chinese human phantom: cortical bone (CB), trabecular bone (TB), RBM, and yellow bone marrow (YBM). Dose distributions in the phantom were evaluated by the Monte Carlo method. When the left os coxae was taken as the organ-at-risk (OAR), the difference in absorbed dose between RBM and each CB and TB was up to 20%, but was much less (≤3.1%) between RBM and YBM. When the left os coxae and entire bone were both taken as OARs, RBM dose also increased with increasing planning target volume size. The results indicate the validity of using dose to homogeneous bone marrow mixture for estimating dose to RBM when RBM is not available in computational phantoms. In addition, the human skeletal system developed in this study provides a model for considering RBM dose in radiotherapy planning.

  10. Critical dose and toxicity index of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Analyzing the calculated effects of modified dose fractionation in non–small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pedicini, Piernicola; Strigari, Lidia; Benassi, Marcello; Caivano, Rocchina; Fiorentino, Alba; Nappi, Antonio; Salvatore, Marco; Storto, Giovanni

    2014-04-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiotherapy for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many schemes of dose fractionation were assessed by a new “toxicity index” (I), which allows one to choose the fractionation schedules that produce less toxic treatments. Thirty-two patients affected by non resectable NSCLC were treated by standard 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with a strategy of limited treated volume. Computed tomography datasets were employed to re plan by simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The dose distributions from plans were used to test various schemes of dose fractionation, in 3DCRT as well as in IMRT, by transforming the dose-volume histogram (DVH) into a biological equivalent DVH (BDVH) and by varying the overall treatment time. The BDVHs were obtained through the toxicity index, which was defined for each of the organs at risk (OAR) by a linear quadratic model keeping an equivalent radiobiological effect on the target volume. The less toxic fractionation consisted in a severe/moderate hyper fractionation for the volume including the primary tumor and lymph nodes, followed by a hypofractionation for the reduced volume of the primary tumor. The 3DCRT and IMRT resulted, respectively, in 4.7% and 4.3% of dose sparing for the spinal cord, without significant changes for the combined-lungs toxicity (p < 0.001). Schedules with reduced overall treatment time (accelerated fractionations) led to a 12.5% dose sparing for the spinal cord (7.5% in IMRT), 8.3% dose sparing for V{sub 20} in the combined lungs (5.5% in IMRT), and also significant dose sparing for all the other OARs (p < 0.001). The toxicity index allows to choose fractionation schedules with reduced toxicity for all the OARs and equivalent radiobiological effect for the tumor in 3DCRT, as well as in IMRT, treatments of NSCLC.

  11. Three-dimensional conformal versus intensity-modulated radiotherapy dose planning in stereotactic radiotherapy: Application of standard quality parameters for plan evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Grzadziel, Aleksandra; Grosu, Anca-Ligia . E-mail: anca-ligia.grosu@lrz.tum.de; Kneschaurek, Peter

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: The implementation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique into clinical practice is becoming routine, but still lacks a generally accepted method for plan evaluation. We present a comparison of the dose distribution of conformal three-dimensional radiotherapy plans with IMRT plans for cranial lesions in stereotactic radiotherapy. The primary aim of this study was to judge the quality of the treatment plans. The next purpose was to assess the usefulness of several quality factors for plan evaluation. Methods and Materials: Five patients, who were treated in our department, were analyzed. Four had meningioma and one had pituitary adenoma. For each case, 10 different plans were created and analyzed: 2 conventional conformal three-dimensional plans and 8 IMRT plans, using the 'step and shoot' delivery method. The first conventional plan was an individually designed beam arrangement and was used for patient treatment. The second plan was a standard plan with the same beam arrangement for all patients. Beam arrangements from the conformal plans were the base for the inversely planned IMRT. To evaluate the plans, the following factors were investigated: minimal and maximal dose to the planning target volume, homogeneity index, coverage index, conformity index, and tumor control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities. These quantities were incorporated into scoring factors and assigned to each plan. Results: The greatest homogeneity was reached in the conformal plans and IMRT plans with high planning target volume priority in the optimization process. This consequently led to a better probability of tumor control. Better protection of organs at risk and thereby lower normal tissue complication probabilities were achieved in the IMRT plans with increased weighting of the organs at risk. Conclusion: These results show the efficiency, as well as some limitations, of the IMRT techniques. The use of different quality factors allowed us

  12. SU-F-BRB-10: A Statistical Voxel Based Normal Organ Dose Prediction Model for Coplanar and Non-Coplanar Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, A; Yu, V; Nguyen, D; Woods, K; Low, D; Sheng, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Knowledge learned from previous plans can be used to guide future treatment planning. Existing knowledge-based treatment planning methods study the correlation between organ geometry and dose volume histogram (DVH), which is a lossy representation of the complete dose distribution. A statistical voxel dose learning (SVDL) model was developed that includes the complete dose volume information. Its accuracy of predicting volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and non-coplanar 4π radiotherapy was quantified. SVDL provided more isotropic dose gradients and may improve knowledge-based planning. Methods: 12 prostate SBRT patients originally treated using two full-arc VMAT techniques were re-planned with 4π using 20 intensity-modulated non-coplanar fields to a prescription dose of 40 Gy. The bladder and rectum voxels were binned based on their distances to the PTV. The dose distribution in each bin was resampled by convolving to a Gaussian kernel, resulting in 1000 data points in each bin that predicted the statistical dose information of a voxel with unknown dose in a new patient without triaging information that may be collectively important to a particular patient. We used this method to predict the DVHs, mean and max doses in a leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV) test and compared its performance against lossy estimators including mean, median, mode, Poisson and Rayleigh of the voxelized dose distributions. Results: SVDL predicted the bladder and rectum doses more accurately than other estimators, giving mean percentile errors ranging from 13.35–19.46%, 4.81–19.47%, 22.49–28.69%, 23.35–30.5%, 21.05–53.93% for predicting mean, max dose, V20, V35, and V40 respectively, to OARs in both planning techniques. The prediction errors were generally lower for 4π than VMAT. Conclusion: By employing all dose volume information in the SVDL model, the OAR doses were more accurately predicted. 4π plans are better suited for knowledge-based planning than

  13. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging After High-Dose Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Childhood Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Spreafico, Filippo Gandola, Lorenza; Marchiano, Alfonso; Simonetti, Fabio; Poggi, Geraldina; Adduci, Anna; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Luksch, Roberto; Biassoni, Veronica; Meazza, Cristina; Catania, Serena; Terenziani, Monica; Musumeci, Renato; Fossati-Bellani, Franca; Massimino, Maura

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Brain necrosis or other subacute iatrogenic reactions has been recognized as a potential complication of radiotherapy (RT), although the possible synergistic effects of high-dose chemotherapy and RT might have been underestimated. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the clinical and radiologic data of 49 consecutive children with malignant brain tumors treated with high-dose thiotepa and autologous hematopoietic stem cell rescue, preceded or followed by RT. The patients were assessed for neurocognitive tests to identify any correlation with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) anomalies. Results: Of the 49 children, 18 (6 of 25 with high-grade gliomas and 12 of 24 with primitive neuroectodermal tumors) had abnormal brain MRI findings occurring a median of 8 months (range, 2-39 months) after RT and beginning to regress a median of 13 months (range, 2-26 months) after onset. The most common lesion pattern involved multiple pseudonodular, millimeter-size, T{sub 1}-weighted unevenly enhancing, and T{sub 2}-weighted hyperintense foci. Four patients with primitive neuroectodermal tumors also had subdural fluid leaks, with meningeal enhancement over the effusion. One-half of the patients had symptoms relating to the new radiographic findings. The MRI lesion-free survival rate was 74% {+-} 6% at 1 year and 57% {+-} 8% at 2 years. The number of marrow ablative courses correlated significantly to the incidence of radiographic anomalies. No significant difference was found in intelligent quotient scores between children with and without radiographic changes. Conclusion: Multiple enhancing cerebral lesions were frequently seen on MRI scans soon after high-dose chemotherapy and RT. Such findings pose a major diagnostic challenge in terms of their differential diagnosis vis-a-vis recurrent tumor. Their correlation with neurocognitive results deserves further investigation.

  14. Influence of Radiotherapy Technique and Dose on Patterns of Failure for Mesothelioma Patients After Extrapleural Pneumonectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Aaron M. . E-mail: aallen@lroc.harvard.edu; Den, Robert; Wong, Julia S.; Zurakowski, David; Soto, Ricardo; Jaenne, Pasi A.; Zellos, Lambros; Bueno, Raphael; Sugarbaker, David J.; Baldini, Elizabeth H.

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: Extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) is an effective treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma. We compared the outcomes after moderate-dose hemithoracic radiotherapy (MDRT) and high-dose hemithoracic RT (HDRT) after EPP for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Methods and Materials: Between July 1994 and April 2004, 39 patients underwent EPP and adjuvant RT at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital. Between 1994 and 2002, MDRT, including 30 Gy to the hemithorax, 40 Gy to the mediastinum, and boosts to positive margins or nodes to 54 Gy, was given, generally with concurrent chemotherapy. In 2003, HDRT to 54 Gy with a matched photon/electron technique was given, with sequential chemotherapy. Results: A total of 39 patients underwent RT after EPP. The median age was 59 years (range, 44-77). The histologic type was epithelial in 25 patients (64%) and mixed or sarcomatoid in 14 patients (36%). Of the 39 patients, 24 underwent MDRT and 15 (39%) HDRT. The median follow-up was 23 months (range, 6-71). The median overall survival was 19 months (95% confidence interval, 14-24). The median time to distant failure (DF) and local failure (LF) was 20 months (95% confidence interval, 14-26) and 26 months (95% confidence interval, 16-36), respectively. On univariate and multivariate analyses, only a mixed histologic type was predictive of inferior DF (p <0.006) and overall survival (p <0.004). The RT technique was not predictive of LF, DF, or overall survival. The LF rate was 50% (12 of 24) after MDRT and 27% (4 of 15) after HDRT (p = NS). Four patients who had undergone HDRT were alive and without evidence of disease at the last follow-up. Conclusions: High-dose hemithoracic RT appears to limit in-field LF compared with MDRT. However, DF remains a significant challenge, with one-half of our patients experiencing DF.

  15. Patient Selection and Activity Planning Guide for Selective Internal Radiotherapy With Yttrium-90 Resin Microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Wan-Yee; Kennedy, Andrew S.; Kim, Yun Hwan; Lai, Hee Kit; Lee, Rheun-Chuan; Leung, Thomas W.T.; Liu, Ching-Sheng; Salem, Riad; Sangro, Bruno; Shuter, Borys; Wang, Shih-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Selective internal radiotherapy (SIRT) with yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) resin microspheres can improve the clinical outcomes for selected patients with inoperable liver cancer. This technique involves intra-arterial delivery of {beta}-emitting microspheres into hepatocellular carcinomas or liver metastases while sparing uninvolved structures. Its unique mode of action, including both {sup 90}Y brachytherapy and embolization of neoplastic microvasculature, necessitates activity planning methods specific to SIRT. Methods and Materials: A panel of clinicians experienced in {sup 90}Y resin microsphere SIRT was convened to integrate clinical experience with the published data to propose an activity planning pathway for radioembolization. Results: Accurate planning is essential to minimize potentially fatal sequelae such as radiation-induced liver disease while delivering tumoricidal {sup 90}Y activity. Planning methods have included empiric dosing according to degree of tumor involvement, empiric dosing adjusted for the body surface area, and partition model calculations using Medical Internal Radiation Dose principles. It has been recommended that at least two of these methods be compared when calculating the microsphere activity for each patient. Conclusions: Many factors inform {sup 90}Y resin microsphere SIRT activity planning, including the therapeutic intent, tissue and vasculature imaging, tumor and uninvolved liver characteristics, previous therapies, and localization of the microsphere infusion. The influence of each of these factors has been discussed.

  16. Reliability of the Bony Anatomy in Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenberger, Matthias Baier, Kurt; Guenther, Iris; Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Sauer, Otto; Vordermark, Dirk; Flentje, Michael

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether the position of brain metastases remains stable between planning and treatment in cranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with 20 brain metastases were treated with single-fraction (17 lesions) or hypofractionated (3 lesions) image-guided SRT. Median time interval between planning and treatment was 8 days. Before treatment a cone-beam CT (CBCT) and a conventional CT after application of i.v. contrast were acquired. Setup errors using automatic bone registration (CBCT) and manual soft-tissue registration of the brain metastases (conventional CT) were compared. Results: Tumor size was not significantly different between planning and treatment. The three-dimensional setup error (mean {+-} SD) was 4.0 {+-} 2.1 mm and 3.5 {+-} 2.2 mm according to the bony anatomy and the lesion itself, respectively. A highly significant correlation between automatic bone match and soft-tissue registration was seen in all three directions (r {>=} 0.88). The three-dimensional distance between the isocenter according to bone match and soft-tissue registration was 1.7 {+-} 0.7 mm, maximum 2.8 mm. Treatment of intracranial pressure with steroids did not influence the position of the lesion relative to the bony anatomy. Conclusion: With a time interval of approximately 1 week between planning and treatment, the bony anatomy of the skull proved to be an excellent surrogate for the target position in image-guided SRT.

  17. Early-onset dropped head syndrome after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer: dose constraints for neck extensor muscles.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Koji; Nakamura, Satoshi; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Kashihara, Tairo; Kobayashi, Kazuma; Harada, Ken; Kitaguchi, Mayuka; Sekii, Shuhei; Takahashi, Kana; Murakami, Naoya; Ito, Yoshinori; Igaki, Hiroshi; Uno, Takashi; Itami, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Dropped head syndrome (DHS) is a famous but unusual late complication of multimodality treatment for head and neck carcinoma. We reported this early-onset complication and analyzed the dose to the neck extensor muscles. We examined the records of three patients with DHS after radiotherapy. The doses to the neck extensor muscles were compared between three patients with DHS and nine patients without DHS. The mean dose to the neck extensor muscles of the three patients with DHS were 58.5 Gy, 42.3 Gy and 60.9 Gy, while the dose was <50 Gy in all nine patients in the control group. The onset of this syndrome was 5 months, 6 months and 15 months. The early-onset DHS may have something to do with dose to the neck extensor muscles. The proposed dose to the neck extensor muscles might be <46 Gy (or at least <50 Gy).

  18. Impact of dose escalation and adaptive radiotherapy for cervical cancers on tumour shrinkage—a modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Røthe Arnesen, Marius; Paulsen Hellebust, Taran; Malinen, Eirik

    2017-03-01

    Tumour shrinkage occurs during fractionated radiotherapy and is regulated by radiation induced cellular damage, repopulation of viable cells and clearance of dead cells. In some cases additional tumour shrinkage during external beam therapy may be beneficial, particularly for locally advanced cervical cancer where a small tumour volume may simplify and improve brachytherapy. In the current work, a mathematical tumour model is utilized to investigate how local dose escalation affects tumour shrinkage, focusing on implications for brachytherapy. The iterative two-compartment model is based upon linear-quadratic radiation response, a doubling time for viable cells and a half-time for clearance of dead cells. The model was individually fitted to clinical tumour volume data from fractionated radiotherapy of 25 cervical cancer patients. Three different fractionation patterns for dose escalation, all with an additional dose of 12.2 Gy, were simulated and compared to standard fractionation in terms of tumour shrinkage. An adaptive strategy where dose escalation was initiated after one week of treatment was also considered. For 22 out of 25 patients, a good model fit was achieved to the observed tumour shrinkage. A large degree of inter-patient variation was seen in predicted volume reduction following dose escalation. For the 10 best responding patients, a mean tumour volume reduction of 34  ±  3% (relative to standard treatment) was estimated at the time of brachytherapy. Timing of initiating dose escalation had a larger impact than the number of fractions applied. In conclusion, the model was found useful in evaluating the impact from dose escalation on tumour shrinkage. The results indicate that dose escalation could be conducted from the start of external beam radiotherapy in order to obtain additional tumour shrinkage before brachytherapy.

  19. High dose chemoradiation for unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinomas using intensity modulated external beam radiotherapy: a single tertiary care centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Shaesta; Kalyani, Nikhil; Chaudhari, Suresh; Dharia, Tejas; Shetty, Nitin; Chopra, Supriya; Goel, Mahesh; Kulkarni, Suyash; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2017-01-01

    Background We present results of patients diagnosed with unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinomas treated with high dose radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Methods From Aug 2005 to Dec 2012, 68 consecutive patients were treated. Fifty patients (group 1) presenting to us with obstructive jaundice were planned for endobiliary brachytherapy (EBBT 14 Gy) followed external beam radiotherapy (EBRT 45 Gy). Twenty-two patients (group 2) who had previously undergone biliary drainage underwent EBRT (57 Gy). All patients received injection Gemcitabine 300 mg/m2/weekly along with EBRT. Results Twenty-nine patients in group 1 and 22 patients in group 2 completed the treatment. Twenty-six (55%) patients achieved complete radiological response, 16 (64%) belonging to group 1 and 8 (44%) of group 2 (P=0.05). The median overall survival (MOS) was 17.5 and 16 months for group 1 and 2 respectively (P=0.07). The 1- and 2-year survival was 63%, and 18% for group I and 61% and 22% for group II respectively. The MOS was 5 months and 1 year survival was 14% for patients receiving EBBT only. MOS was significantly better after complete response (P=0.001). Conclusions Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) modulated high dose radiotherapy used either alone or with brachytherapy demonstrates potential to prolonged overall survival in unresectable hilar cholangiocarcinomas. PMID:28280622

  20. Quantitative radiation dose-response relationships for normal tissues in man - I. Gustatory tissues response during photon and neutron radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mossman, K.L.

    1982-08-01

    Quantitative radiation dose-response curves for normal gustatory tissue in man were studied. Taste function, expressed as taste loss, was evaluated in 84 patients who were given either photon or neutron radiotherapy for tumors in the head and neck region. Patients were treated to average tumor doses of 6600 cGy (photon) or 2200 cGy intervals for photon patients and 320-cGy intervals for neutron patients during radiotherapy. The dose-response curves for photons and neutrons were analyzed by fitting a four-parameter logistic equation to the data. Photon and neutron curves differed principally in their relative position along the dose axis. Comparison of the dose-response curves were made by determination of RBE. At 320 cGy, the lowest neutron dose at which taste measurements were made, RBE = 5.7. If this RBE is correct, then the therapeutic gain factor may be equal to or less than 1, indicating no biological advantage in using neutrons over photons for this normal tissue. These studies suggest measurements of taste function and evaluation of dose-response relationships may also be useful in quantitatively evaluating the efficacy of chemical modifiers of radiation response such as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers and radioprotectors.

  1. Consolidation Radiotherapy in Primary Central Nervous System Lymphomas: Impact on Outcome of Different Fields and Doses in Patients in Complete Remission After Upfront Chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreri, Andres Jose Maria; Verona, Chiara; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Chiara, Anna; Perna, Lucia; Villa, Eugenio; Reni, Michele

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Avoidance radiotherapy or reduction of irradiation doses in patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) in complete remission (CR) after high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX)-based chemotherapy has been proposed to minimize the neurotoxicity risk. Nevertheless, no study has focused on the survival impact of radiation parameters, as far as we know, and the optimal radiation schedule remains to be defined. Methods and Materials: The impact on outcome and neurologic performance of different radiation fields and doses was assessed in 33 patients with PCNSL who achieved CR after MTX-containing chemotherapy and were referred to consolidation whole-brain irradiation (WBRT). Patterns of relapse were analyzed on computed tomography-guided treatment planning, and neurologic impairment was assessed by the Mini Mental Status Examination. Results: At a median follow-up of 50 months, 21 patients are relapse-free (5-year failure-free survival [FFS], 51%). WBRT doses {>=}40 Gy were not associated with improved disease control in comparison with a WBRT dose of 30 to 36 Gy (relapse rate, 46% vs. 30%; 5-year FFS, 51% vs. 50%; p = 0.26). Disease control was not significantly different between patients irradiated to the tumor bed with 45 to 54 Gy or with 36 to 44 Gy, with a 5-year FFS of 35% and 44% (p = 0.43), respectively. Twenty patients are alive (5-year overall survival, 54%); WB and tumor bed doses did not have an impact on survival. Impairment as assessed by the Mini Mental Status Examination was significantly more common in patients treated with a WBRT dose {>=}40 Gy. Conclusion: Consolidation with WBRT 36 Gy is advisable in patients with PCNSL in CR after HD-MTX-based chemotherapy. Higher doses do not change the outcome and could increase the risk of neurotoxicity.

  2. Image-Guided Robotic Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Metastases: Is There a Dose Response Relationship?

    SciTech Connect

    Vautravers-Dewas, Claire; Dewas, Sylvain; Bonodeau, Francois; Adenis, Antoine; Lacornerie, Thomas; Penel, Nicolas; Lartigau, Eric; Mirabel, Xavier

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome, tolerance, and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy, using image-guided robotic radiation delivery, for the treatment of patients with unresectable liver metastases. Methods and Material: Patients were treated with real-time respiratory tracking between July 2007 and April 2009. Their records were retrospectively reviewed. Metastases from colorectal carcinoma and other primaries were not necessarily confined to liver. Toxicity was evaluated using National Cancer Institute Common Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Forty-two patients with 62 metastases were treated with two dose levels of 40 Gy in four Dose per Fraction (23) and 45 Gy in three Dose per Fraction (13). Median follow-up was 14.3 months (range, 3-23 months). Actuarial local control for 1 and 2 years was 90% and 86%, respectively. At last follow-up, 41 (66%) complete responses and eight (13%) partial responses were observed. Five lesions were stable. Nine lesions (13%) were locally progressed. Overall survival was 94% at 1 year and 48% at 2 years. The most common toxicity was Grade 1 or 2 nausea. One patient experienced Grade 3 epidermitis. The dose level did not significantly contribute to the outcome, toxicity, or survival. Conclusion: Image-guided robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy is feasible, safe, and effective, with encouraging local control. It provides a strong alternative for patients who cannot undergo surgery.

  3. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-07

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  4. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  5. Biological Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Rectal Cancer: Challenges and Pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Roels, Sarah; Slagmolen, Pieter; Lee, John A.; Loeckx, Dirk; Maes, Frederik; Stroobants, Sigrid; Ectors, Nadine; Penninckx, Freddy; Haustermans, Karin

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of integrating multiple imaging modalities for image-guided radiotherapy in rectal cancer. Patients and Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) were performed before, during, and after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with resectable rectal cancer. The FDG-PET signals were segmented with an adaptive threshold-based and a gradient-based method. Magnetic resonance tumor volumes (TVs) were manually delineated. A nonrigid registration algorithm was applied to register the images, and mismatch analyses were carried out between MR and FDG-PET TVs and between TVs over time. Tumor volumes delineated on the images after CRT were compared with the pathologic TV. Results: Forty-five FDG-PET/CT and 45 MR images were analyzed from 15 patients. The mean MRI and FDG-PET TVs showed a tendency to shrink during and after CRT. In general, MRI showed larger TVs than FDG-PET. There was an approximately 50% mismatch between the FDG-PET TV and the MRI TV at baseline and during CRT. Sixty-one percent of the FDG-PET TV and 76% of the MRI TV obtained after 10 fractions of CRT remained inside the corresponding baseline TV. On MRI, residual tumor was still suspected in all 6 patients with a pathologic complete response, whereas FDG-PET showed a metabolic complete response in 3 of them. The FDG-PET TVs delineated with the gradient-based method matched closest with pathologic findings. Conclusions: Integration of MRI and FDG-PET into radiotherapy seems feasible. Gradient-based segmentation is recommended for FDG-PET. Spatial variance between MRI and FDG-PET TVs should be taken into account for target definition.

  6. Magnetization curves of sintered heavy tungsten alloys for applications in MRI-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kolling, Stefan; Oborn, Bradley M.; Keall, Paul J.; Horvat, Joseph

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Due to the current interest in MRI-guided radiotherapy, the magnetic properties of the materials commonly used in radiotherapy are becoming increasingly important. In this paper, measurement results for the magnetization (BH) curves of a range of sintered heavy tungsten alloys used in radiation shielding and collimation are presented. Methods: Sintered heavy tungsten alloys typically contain >90 % tungsten and <10 % of a combination of iron, nickel, and copper binders. Samples of eight different grades of sintered heavy tungsten alloys with varying binder content were investigated. Using a superconducting quantum interference detector magnetometer, the induced magnetic momentm was measured for each sample as a function of applied external field H{sub 0} and the BH curve derived. Results: The iron content of the alloys was found to play a dominant role, directly influencing the magnetizationM and thus the nonlinearity of the BH curve. Generally, the saturation magnetization increased with increasing iron content of the alloy. Furthermore, no measurable magnetization was found for all alloys without iron content, despite containing up to 6% of nickel. For two samples from different manufacturers but with identical quoted nominal elemental composition (95% W, 3.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe), a relative difference in the magnetization of 11%–16% was measured. Conclusions: The measured curves show that the magnetic properties of sintered heavy tungsten alloys strongly depend on the iron content, whereas the addition of nickel in the absence of iron led to no measurable effect. Since a difference in the BH curves for two samples with identical quoted nominal composition from different manufacturers was observed, measuring of the BH curve for each individual batch of heavy tungsten alloys is advisable whenever accurate knowledge of the magnetic properties is crucial. The obtained BH curves can be used in FEM simulations to predict the magnetic impact of sintered heavy

  7. Patient doses from fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures in pediatrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, L. C.; Vano, E.; Gutierrez, F.; Rodriguez, C.; Gilarranz, R.; Manzanas, M. J.

    2007-08-01

    Infants and children are a higher risk population for radiation cancer induction compared to adults. Although some values on pediatric patient doses for cardiac procedures have been reported, data to determine reference levels are scarce, especially when compared to those available for adults in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The aim of this study is to make a new contribution to the scarce published data in pediatric cardiac procedures and help in the determination of future dose reference levels. This paper presents a set of patient dose values, in terms of air kerma area product (KAP) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK), measured in a pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratory equipped with a biplane x-ray system with dynamic flat panel detectors. Cardiologists were properly trained in radiation protection. The study includes 137 patients aged between 10 days and 16 years who underwent diagnostic catheterizations or therapeutic procedures. Demographic data and technical details of the procedures were also gathered. The x-ray system was submitted to a quality control programme, including the calibration of the transmission ionization chamber. The age distribution of the patients was 47 for <1 year; 52 for 1-<5 years; 25 for 5-<10 years and 13 for 10-<16 years. Median values of KAP were 1.9, 2.9, 4.5 and 15.4 Gy cm2 respectively for the four age bands. These KAP values increase by a factor of 8 when moving through the four age bands. The probability of a fatal cancer per fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedure is about 0.07%. Median values of ESAK for the four age bands were 46, 50, 56 and 163 mGy, which lie far below the threshold for deterministic effects on the skin. These dose values are lower than those published in previous papers.

  8. Patient doses from fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Martinez, L C; Vano, E; Gutierrez, F; Rodriguez, C; Gilarranz, R; Manzanas, M J

    2007-08-21

    Infants and children are a higher risk population for radiation cancer induction compared to adults. Although some values on pediatric patient doses for cardiac procedures have been reported, data to determine reference levels are scarce, especially when compared to those available for adults in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The aim of this study is to make a new contribution to the scarce published data in pediatric cardiac procedures and help in the determination of future dose reference levels. This paper presents a set of patient dose values, in terms of air kerma area product (KAP) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK), measured in a pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratory equipped with a biplane x-ray system with dynamic flat panel detectors. Cardiologists were properly trained in radiation protection. The study includes 137 patients aged between 10 days and 16 years who underwent diagnostic catheterizations or therapeutic procedures. Demographic data and technical details of the procedures were also gathered. The x-ray system was submitted to a quality control programme, including the calibration of the transmission ionization chamber. The age distribution of the patients was 47 for <1 year; 52 for 1-<5 years; 25 for 5-<10 years and 13 for 10-<16 years. Median values of KAP were 1.9, 2.9, 4.5 and 15.4 Gy cm(2) respectively for the four age bands. These KAP values increase by a factor of 8 when moving through the four age bands. The probability of a fatal cancer per fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedure is about 0.07%. Median values of ESAK for the four age bands were 46, 50, 56 and 163 mGy, which lie far below the threshold for deterministic effects on the skin. These dose values are lower than those published in previous papers.

  9. Statistical Determination of the Gating Windows for Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy Using a Visible Guiding System.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se An; Yea, Ji Woon; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT) is used to minimize the radiation dose to normal tissue in lung-cancer patients. Although determining the gating window in the respiratory phase of patients is important in RGRT, it is not easy. Our aim was to determine the optimal gating window when using a visible guiding system for RGRT. Between April and October 2014, the breathing signals of 23 lung-cancer patients were recorded with a real-time position management (RPM) respiratory gating system (Varian, USA). We performed statistical analysis with breathing signals to find the optimal gating window for guided breathing in RGRT. When we compared breathing signals before and after the breathing training, 19 of the 23 patients showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05). The standard deviation of the respiration signals after breathing training was lowest for phases of 30%-70%. The results showed that the optimal gating window in RGRT is 40% (30%-70%) with respect to repeatability for breathing after respiration training with the visible guiding system. RGRT was performed with the RPM system to confirm the usefulness of the visible guiding system. The RPM system and our visible guiding system improve the respiratory regularity, which in turn should improve the accuracy and efficiency of RGRT.

  10. Statistical Determination of the Gating Windows for Respiratory-Gated Radiotherapy Using a Visible Guiding System

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se An; Yea, Ji Woon

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory-gated radiation therapy (RGRT) is used to minimize the radiation dose to normal tissue in lung-cancer patients. Although determining the gating window in the respiratory phase of patients is important in RGRT, it is not easy. Our aim was to determine the optimal gating window when using a visible guiding system for RGRT. Between April and October 2014, the breathing signals of 23 lung-cancer patients were recorded with a real-time position management (RPM) respiratory gating system (Varian, USA). We performed statistical analysis with breathing signals to find the optimal gating window for guided breathing in RGRT. When we compared breathing signals before and after the breathing training, 19 of the 23 patients showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05). The standard deviation of the respiration signals after breathing training was lowest for phases of 30%–70%. The results showed that the optimal gating window in RGRT is 40% (30%–70%) with respect to repeatability for breathing after respiration training with the visible guiding system. RGRT was performed with the RPM system to confirm the usefulness of the visible guiding system. The RPM system and our visible guiding system improve the respiratory regularity, which in turn should improve the accuracy and efficiency of RGRT. PMID:27228097

  11. Incorporating system latency associated with real-time target tracking radiotherapy in the dose prediction step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Teboh; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Shi, Chengyu; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2010-05-01

    System latency introduces geometric errors in the course of real-time target tracking radiotherapy. This effect can be minimized, for example by the use of predictive filters, but cannot be completely avoided. In this work, we present a convolution technique that can incorporate the effect as part of the treatment planning process. The method can be applied independently or in conjunction with the predictive filters to compensate for residual latency effects. The implementation was performed on TrackBeam (Initia Ltd, Israel), a prototype real-time target tracking system assembled and evaluated at our Cancer Institute. For the experimental system settings examined, a Gaussian distribution attributable to the TrackBeam latency was derived with σ = 3.7 mm. The TrackBeam latency, expressed as an average response time, was deduced to be 172 ms. Phantom investigations were further performed to verify the convolution technique. In addition, patient studies involving 4DCT volumes of previously treated lung cancer patients were performed to incorporate the latency effect in the dose prediction step. This also enabled us to effectively quantify the dosimetric and radiobiological impact of the TrackBeam and other higher latency effects on the clinical outcome of a real-time target tracking delivery.

  12. Integral dose and radiation-induced secondary malignancies: comparison between stereotactic body radiation therapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    D'Arienzo, Marco; Masciullo, Stefano G; de Sanctis, Vitaliana; Osti, Mattia F; Chiacchiararelli, Laura; Enrici, Riccardo M

    2012-11-19

    The aim of the present paper is to compare the integral dose received by non-tumor tissue (NTID) in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with modified LINAC with that received by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), estimating possible correlations between NTID and radiation-induced secondary malignancy risk. Eight patients with intrathoracic lesions were treated with SBRT, 23 Gy × 1 fraction. All patients were then replanned for 3D-CRT, maintaining the same target coverage and applying a dose scheme of 2 Gy × 32 fractions. The dose equivalence between the different treatment modalities was achieved assuming α/β = 10 Gy for tumor tissue and imposing the same biological effective dose (BED) on the target (BED = 76 Gy(10)). Total NTIDs for both techniques was calculated considering α/β = 3 Gy for healthy tissue. Excess absolute cancer risk (EAR) was calculated for various organs using a mechanistic model that includes fractionation effects. A paired two-tailed Student t-test was performed to determine statistically significant differences between the data (p ≤ 0.05). Our study indicates that despite the fact that for all patients integral dose is higher for SBRT treatments than 3D-CRT (p = 0.002), secondary cancer risk associated to SBRT patients is significantly smaller than that calculated for 3D-CRT (p = 0.001). This suggests that integral dose is not a good estimator for quantifying cancer induction. Indeed, for the model and parameters used, hypofractionated radiotherapy has the potential for secondary cancer reduction. The development of reliable secondary cancer risk models seems to be a key issue in fractionated radiotherapy. Further assessments of integral doses received with 3D-CRT and other special techniques are also strongly encouraged.

  13. Phase I Study of Conformal Radiotherapy and Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine With Erlotinib for Unresected Pancreatic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, John M.; Margolis, Jeffrey; Jury, Robert P.; Balaraman, Savitha; Cotant, Matthew B.; Ballouz, Samer; Boxwala, Iqbal G.; Jaiyesimi, Ishmael A.; Nadeau, Laura; Hardy-Carlson, Maria; Marvin, Kimberly S.; Wallace, Michelle; Ye Hong

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the recommended dose of radiotherapy when combined with full-dose gemcitabine and erlotinib for unresected pancreas cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresected pancreatic cancer (Zubrod performance status 0-2) were eligible for the present study. Gemcitabine was given weekly for 7 weeks (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}) with erlotinib daily for 8 weeks (100 mg). A final toxicity assessment was performed in Week 9. Radiotherapy (starting at 30 Gy in 2-Gy fractions, 5 d/wk) was given to the gross tumor plus a 1-cm margin starting with the first dose of gemcitabine. A standard 3 plus 3 dose escalation (an additional 4 Gy within 2 days for each dose level) was used, except for the starting dose level, which was scheduled to contain 6 patients. In general, Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal toxicity was considered a dose-limiting toxicity, except for Grade 3 anorexia or Grade 3 fatigue alone. Results: A total of 20 patients were treated (10 men and 10 women). Nausea, vomiting, and infection were significantly associated with the radiation dose (p = .01, p = .03, and p = .03, respectively). Of the 20 patients, 5 did not complete treatment and were not evaluable for dose-escalation purposes (3 who developed progressive disease during treatment and 2 who electively discontinued it). Dose-limiting toxicity occurred in none of 6 patients at 30 Gy, 2 of 6 at 34 Gy, and 1 of 3 patients at 38 Gy. Conclusion: The results of the present study have indicated that the recommended Phase II dose is 30 Gy in 15 fractions.

  14. Relevance of Biologically Equivalent Dose Values in Outcome Evaluation of Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Lung Nodules

    SciTech Connect

    Casamassima, Franco Masi, Laura; Bonucci, Ivano; Polli, Caterina; Menichelli, Claudia; Gulisano, Massimo; Pacini, Stefania; Aterini, Stefano; Cavedon, Carlo

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Different biologically equivalent dose (BED) values associated with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) of patients with primary and metastatic pulmonary nodules were studied. The BED values were calculated for tumoral tissue and low {alpha}/{beta} ratio, assuming that better local response could be obtained by using stereotactic high-BED treatment. Methods and Materials: Fifty-eight patients with T1-T3 N0 non-small-cell lung cancer and 46 patients with metastatic lung nodules were treated with SRT. The BED was calculated for {alpha}/{beta} ratios of 3 and 10. Overall survival (OS) was assessed according to Kaplan-Meier and appraised as a function of three BED levels: low (30-50 Gy), medium (50-70 Gy), and high (70-98 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 10). Results: The OS rates for all 104 patients at 12, 24, and 36 months were 73%, 48.3%, and 35.8%, respectively. Local response greater than 50% for low, medium, and high BED values was observed in 54%, 47%, and 73%, respectively. In the high-BED treated group, OS rates at 12, 24, and 36 months (80.9%, 70%, and 53.6%, respectively) were significantly improved compared with low- (69%, 46.1%, and 30.7%, respectively) and medium-BED (67%, 28%, and 21%, respectively) treated patients. Results are also discussed in terms of BED calculated on {alpha}/{beta} 3 Gy characteristic of the microcapillary bed. No acute toxicity higher than Grade 1 was observed. Conclusions: Radioablation of pulmonary neoplastic nodules may be achieved with SRT delivered by using a high-dose fraction with high BED value.

  15. Unified registration framework for cumulative dose assessment in cervical cancer across external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sharmili; Totman, John J.; Choo, Bok A.

    2016-03-01

    Dose accumulation across External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT) and Brachytherapy (BT) treatment fractions in cervical cancer is extremely challenging due to structural dissimilarities and large inter-fractional anatomic deformations between the EBRT and BT images. The brachytherapy applicator and the bladder balloon, present only in the BT images, introduce missing structural correspondences for the underlying registration problem. Complex anatomical deformations caused by the applicator and the balloon, different rectum and bladder filling and tumor shrinkage compound the registration difficulties. Conventional free-form registration methods struggle to handle such topological differences. In this paper, we propose a registration pipeline that first transforms the original images to their distance maps based on segmentations of critical organs and then performs non-linear registration of the distance maps. The resulting dense deformation field is then used to transform the original anatomical image. The registration accuracy is evaluated on 27 image pairs from stage 2B-4A cervical cancer patients. The algorithm reaches a Hausdorff distance of close to 0:5 mm for the uterus, 2:2 mm for the bladder and 1:7 mm for the rectum when applied to (EBRT,BT) pairs, taken at time points more than three months apart. This generalized model-free framework can be used to register any combination of EBRT and BT images as opposed to methods in the literature that are tuned for either only (BT,BT) pair, or only (EBRT,EBRT) pair or only (BT,EBRT) pair. A unified framework for 3D dose accumulation across multiple EBRT and BT fractions is proposed to facilitate adaptive personalized radiation therapy.

  16. Dose calculation accuracy using cone-beam CT (CBCT) for pelvic adaptive radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Huaiqun; Dong, Hang

    2009-10-01

    This study is to evaluate the dose calculation accuracy using Varian's cone-beam CT (CBCT) for pelvic adaptive radiotherapy. We first calibrated the Hounsfield Unit (HU) to electron density (ED) for CBCT using a mini CT QC phantom embedded into an IMRT QA phantom. We then used a Catphan 500 with an annulus around it to check the calibration. The combined CT QC and IMRT phantom provided correct HU calibration, but not Catphan with an annulus. For the latter, not only was the Teflon an incorrect substitute for bone, but the inserts were also too small to provide correct HUs for air and bone. For the former, three different scan ranges (6 cm, 12 cm and 20.8 cm) were used to investigate the HU dependence on the amount of scatter. To evaluate the dose calculation accuracy, CBCT and plan-CT for a pelvic phantom were acquired and registered. The single field plan, 3D conformal and IMRT plans were created on both CT sets. Without inhomogeneity correction, the two CT generated nearly the same plan. With inhomogeneity correction, the dosimetric difference between the two CT was mainly from the HU calibration difference. The dosimetric difference for 6 MV was found to be the largest for the single lateral field plan (maximum 6.7%), less for the 3D conformal plan (maximum 3.3%) and the least for the IMRT plan (maximum 2.5%). Differences for 18 MV were generally 1-2% less. For a single lateral field, calibration with 20.8 cm achieved the minimum dosimetric difference. For 3D and IMRT plans, calibration with a 12 cm range resulted in better accuracy. Because Catphan is the standard QA phantom for the on-board imager (OBI) device, we specifically recommend not using it for the HU calibration of CBCT.

  17. Dose calculation accuracy using cone-beam CT (CBCT) for pelvic adaptive radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Guan, Huaiqun; Dong, Hang

    2009-10-21

    This study is to evaluate the dose calculation accuracy using Varian's cone-beam CT (CBCT) for pelvic adaptive radiotherapy. We first calibrated the Hounsfield Unit (HU) to electron density (ED) for CBCT using a mini CT QC phantom embedded into an IMRT QA phantom. We then used a Catphan 500 with an annulus around it to check the calibration. The combined CT QC and IMRT phantom provided correct HU calibration, but not Catphan with an annulus. For the latter, not only was the Teflon an incorrect substitute for bone, but the inserts were also too small to provide correct HUs for air and bone. For the former, three different scan ranges (6 cm, 12 cm and 20.8 cm) were used to investigate the HU dependence on the amount of scatter. To evaluate the dose calculation accuracy, CBCT and plan-CT for a pelvic phantom were acquired and registered. The single field plan, 3D conformal and IMRT plans were created on both CT sets. Without inhomogeneity correction, the two CT generated nearly the same plan. With inhomogeneity correction, the dosimetric difference between the two CT was mainly from the HU calibration difference. The dosimetric difference for 6 MV was found to be the largest for the single lateral field plan (maximum 6.7%), less for the 3D conformal plan (maximum 3.3%) and the least for the IMRT plan (maximum 2.5%). Differences for 18 MV were generally 1-2% less. For a single lateral field, calibration with 20.8 cm achieved the minimum dosimetric difference. For 3D and IMRT plans, calibration with a 12 cm range resulted in better accuracy. Because Catphan is the standard QA phantom for the on-board imager (OBI) device, we specifically recommend not using it for the HU calibration of CBCT.

  18. Image-guided adaptive gating of lung cancer radiotherapy: a computer simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Rottmann, Joerg; Park, Sang-June; Nishioka, Seiko; Shirato, Hiroki; Berbeco, Ross I.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect that image-guided adaptation of the gating window during treatment could have on the residual tumor motion, by simulating different gated radiotherapy techniques. There are three separate components of this simulation: (1) the 'Hokkaido Data', which are previously measured 3D data of lung tumor motion tracks and the corresponding 1D respiratory signals obtained during the entire ungated radiotherapy treatments of eight patients, (2) the respiratory gating protocol at our institution and the imaging performed under that protocol and (3) the actual simulation in which the Hokkaido Data are used to select tumor position information that could have been collected based on the imaging performed under our gating protocol. We simulated treatments with a fixed gating window and a gating window that is updated during treatment. The patient data were divided into different fractions, each with continuous acquisitions longer than 2 min. In accordance to the imaging performed under our gating protocol, we assume that we have tumor position information for the first 15 s of treatment, obtained from kV fluoroscopy, and for the rest of the fractions the tumor position is only available during the beam-on time from MV imaging. The gating window was set according to the information obtained from the first 15 s such that the residual motion was less than 3 mm. For the fixed gating window technique the gate remained the same for the entire treatment, while for the adaptive technique the range of the tumor motion during beam-on time was measured and used to adapt the gating window to keep the residual motion below 3 mm. The algorithm used to adapt the gating window is described. The residual tumor motion inside the gating window was reduced on average by 24% for the patients with regular breathing patterns and the difference was statistically significant (p-value = 0.01). The magnitude of the residual tumor motion depended on the

  19. Localized Low-Dose Radiotherapy for Follicular Lymphoma: History, Clinical Results, Mechanisms of Action, and Future Outlooks

    SciTech Connect

    Ganem, Gerard; Cartron, Guillaume; Girinsky, Theodore; Haas, Rick L.M.; Cosset, Jean Marc; Solal-Celigny, Philippe

    2010-11-15

    The extreme radiosensitivity of indolent lymphomas was reported in the early years of radiotherapy (RT). The efficacy of low-dose total body irradiation (1.5-2 Gy) was particularly demonstrative. Higher doses were considered appropriate for localized disease. The optimal (or conventional) dose of curative RT derived from the early studies was determined to be 30-35 Gy. Nevertheless, in older series addressing the tumoricidal radiation dose in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, investigators noted that a significant number of 'nodular' lymphomas were controlled with a dose of <22 Gy for >3 years. The idea of reintroducing localized low-dose radiotherapy (LDRT) for indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphomas came from a clinical observation. The first study showing the high efficacy of LDRT (4 Gy in two fractions of 2 Gy within 3 days) in selected patients with chemoresistant, indolent, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas was published in 1994. Since this first report, at least eight series of patients treated with localized LDRT have been published, showing a 55% complete response rate in irradiated sites, with a median duration of 15-42 months. How LDRT induces lymphoma cell death remains partly unknown. However, some important advances have recently been reported. Localized LDRT induces an apoptosis of follicular lymphoma cells. This apoptotic cell death elicits an immune response mediated by macrophages and dendritic cells. Follicular lymphoma is probably an ideal model to explore these mechanisms. This review also discusses the future of LDRT for follicular lymphoma.

  20. Accuracy of dose planning for prostate radiotherapy in the presence of metallic implants evaluated by electron spin resonance dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Alves, G.G.; Kinoshita, A.; de Oliveira, H.F.; Guimarães, F.S.; Amaral, L.L.; Baffa, O.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main approaches to cure prostate cancer, and its success depends on the accuracy of dose planning. A complicating factor is the presence of a metallic prosthesis in the femur and pelvis, which is becoming more common in elderly populations. The goal of this work was to perform dose measurements to check the accuracy of radiotherapy treatment planning under these complicated conditions. To accomplish this, a scale phantom of an adult pelvic region was used with alanine dosimeters inserted in the prostate region. This phantom was irradiated according to the planned treatment under the following three conditions: with two metallic prostheses in the region of the femur head, with only one prosthesis, and without any prostheses. The combined relative standard uncertainty of dose measurement by electron spin resonance (ESR)/alanine was 5.05%, whereas the combined relative standard uncertainty of the applied dose was 3.35%, resulting in a combined relative standard uncertainty of the whole process of 6.06%. The ESR dosimetry indicated that there was no difference (P>0.05, ANOVA) in dosage between the planned dose and treatments. The results are in the range of the planned dose, within the combined relative uncertainty, demonstrating that the treatment-planning system compensates for the effects caused by the presence of femur and hip metal prostheses. PMID:26017344

  1. Robotic Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy, for Isolated Recurrent Primary, Lymph Node or Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Beltramo, Giancarlo; Fariselli, Laura; Fodor, Cristiana; Santoro, Luigi; Vavassori, Andrea; Zerini, Dario; Gherardi, Federica; Ascione, Carmen; Bossi-Zanetti, Isa; Mauro, Roberta; Bregantin, Achille; Bianchi, Livia Corinna; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of robotic CyberKnife (Accuray, Sunnyvale, CA)-based stereotactic radiotherapy (CBK-SRT) for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between May 2007 and December 2009, 34 consecutive patients/38 lesions were treated (15 patients reirradiated for local recurrence [P], 4 patients reirradiated for anastomosis recurrence [A], 16 patients treated for single lymph node recurrence [LN], and 3 patients treated for single metastasis [M]). In all but 4 patients, [{sup 11}C]choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography was performed. CBK-SRT consisted of reirradiation and first radiotherapy in 27 and 11 lesions, respectively. The median CBK-SRT dose was 30 Gy in 4.5 fractions (P, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; A, 30 Gy in 5 fractions; LN, 33 Gy in 3 fractions; and M, 36 Gy in 3 fractions). In 18 patients (21 lesions) androgen deprivation was added to CBK-SRT (median duration, 16.6 months). Results: The median follow-up was 16.9 months. Acute toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event). Late toxicity included urinary events (3 Grade 1, 2 Grade 2, and 2 Grade 3 events) and rectal events (1 Grade 1 event and 1 Grade 2 event). Biochemical response was observed in 32 of 38 evaluable lesions. Prostate-specific antigen stabilization was seen for 4 lesions, and in 2 cases prostate-specific antigen progression was reported. The 30-month progression-free survival rate was 42.6%. Disease progression was observed for 14 lesions (5, 2, 5, and 2 in Groups P, A, LN, and M respectively). In only 3 cases, in-field progression was seen. At the time of analysis (May 2010), 19 patients are alive with no evidence of disease and 15 are alive with disease. Conclusions: CyberKnife-based stereotactic radiotherapy is a feasible approach for isolated recurrent primary, lymph node, or metastatic prostate cancer, offering excellent in-field tumor

  2. Practical aspects and applications of the biological effective dose three-dimensional calculation for multi-phase radiotherapy treatment plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauweloa, Kevin Ikaika

    The approximate BED (BEDA) is calculated for multi-phase cases due to current treatment planning systems (TPSs) being incapable of performing BED calculations. There has been no study on the mathematical accuracy and precision of BEDA relative to the true BED (BEDT), and how that might negatively impact patient care. The purpose of the first aim was to study the mathematical accuracy and precision in both hypothetical and clinical situations, while the next two aims were to create multi-phase BED optimization ideas for both multi-target liver stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) cases, and gynecological cases where patients are treated with high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy along with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). MATLAB algorithms created for this work were used to mathematically analyze the accuracy and precision of BEDA relative to BEDT in both hypothetical and clinical situations on a 3D basis. The organs-at-risk (OARs) of ten head & neck and ten prostate cancer patients were studied for the clinical situations. The accuracy of BEDA was shown to vary between OARs as well as between patients. The percentage of patients with an overall BEDA percent error less than 1% were, 50% for the Optic Chiasm and Brainstem, 70% for the Left and Right Optic Nerves, as well as the Rectum and Bladder, and 80% for the Normal Brain and Spinal Cord. As seen for each OAR among different patients, there were always cases where the percent error was greater than 1%. This is a cause for concern since the goal of radiation therapy is to reduce the overall uncertainty of treatment, and calculating BEDA distributions increases the treatment uncertainty with percent errors greater than 1%. The revealed inaccuracy and imprecision of BEDA supports the argument to use BEDT. The multi-target liver study involved applying BEDT in order to reduce the number of dose limits to one rather than have one for each fractionation scheme in multi-target liver SBRT treatments. A BEDT limit

  3. Dose-volume delivery guided proton therapy using beam on-line PET system

    SciTech Connect

    Nishio, Teiji; Ogino, Takashi; Nomura, Kazuhiro; Uchida, Hiroshi

    2006-11-15

    Proton therapy is one form of radiotherapy in which the irradiation can be concentrated on a tumor using a scanned or modulated Bragg peak. Therefore, it is very important to evaluate the proton-irradiated volume accurately. The proton-irradiated volume can be confirmed by detection of pair annihilation gamma rays from positron emitter nuclei generated by the target nuclear fragment reaction of irradiated proton nuclei and nuclei in the irradiation target using a positron emission tomography (PET) apparatus, and dose-volume delivery guided proton therapy (DGPT) can thereby be achieved using PET images. In the proton treatment room, a beam ON-LINE PET system (BOLPs) was constructed so that a PET apparatus of the planar-type with a high spatial resolution of about 2 mm was mounted with the field of view covering the isocenter of the beam irradiation system. The position and intensity of activity were measured using the BOLPs immediately after the proton irradiation of a gelatinous water target containing {sup 16}O nuclei at different proton irradiation energy levels. The change of the activity-distribution range against the change of the physical range was observed within 2 mm. The experiments of proton irradiation to a rabbit and the imaging of the activity were performed. In addition, the proton beam energy used to irradiate the rabbit was changed. When the beam condition was changed, the difference between the two images acquired from the measurement of the BOLPs was confirmed to clearly identify the proton-irradiated volume.

  4. Dose escalation in brachytherapy for cervical cancer: impact on (or increased need for) MRI-guided plan optimisation

    PubMed Central

    Paton, A M; Chalmers, K E; Coomber, H; Cameron, A L

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the impact of dose escalation on the proportion of patients requiring MR image-guided optimisation rather than standard Manchester-based CT-guided planning, and the level of escalation achievable. Methods 30 patients with cervical cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy and image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) had MR images acquired at the first fraction of IGBT. Gross tumour volume and high-risk clinical target volume (HR CTV) were contoured and treatment plans retrospectively produced for a range of total 2-Gy equivalent (EQD2) prescription doses from 66 Gyα/β=10 to 90 Gyα/β=10 (HR CTV D90). Standard Manchester system-style plans were produced, prescribed to point A and then optimised where necessary with the aim of delivering at least the prescription dose to the HR CTV D90 while respecting organ-at-risk (OAR) tolerances. Results Increasing the total EQD2 from 66 Gyα/β=10 to 90 Gyα/β=10 increased the number of plans requiring optimisation from 13.3% to 90%. After optimisation, the number of plans achieving the prescription dose ranged from 93.3% (66 Gyα/β=10) to 63.3% (90 Gyα/β=10) with the mean±standard deviation for HR CTV D90 EQD2 from 78.4±12.4 Gyα/β=10 (66 Gyα/β=10) to 94.1±19.9 Gyα/β=10 (90 Gyα/β=10). Conclusion As doses are escalated, the need for non-standard optimised planning increases, while benefits in terms of increased target doses actually achieved diminish. The maximum achievable target dose is ultimately limited by proximity of OARs. Advances in knowledge This work represents a guide for other centres in determining the highest practicable prescription doses while considering patient throughput and maintaining acceptable OAR doses. PMID:23175490

  5. Successful treatment of a 67-year-old woman with urethral adenocarcinoma with the use of external beam radiotherapy and image guided adaptive interstitial brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mujkanovic, Jasmin; Tanderup, Kari; Agerbæk, Mads; Bisgaard, Ulla; Høyer, Søren; Lindegaard, Jacob Christian

    2016-01-01

    Primary urethral cancer (PUC) is a very rare disease. This case report illustrates a successful treatment approach of a 67-year-old woman with a urethral adenocarcinoma selected for an organ preserving treatment with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and interstitial brachytherapy (BT) boost, using the GEC-ESTRO target concept originally designed for locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). Treatment included EBRT with 45 Gy in 25 fractions followed by image guided adaptive interstitial BT (IGABT) with a pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) BT boost with 30 Gy in 50 hourly pulses. The D90 for CTVHR was 79.1 Gy in EQD23. At 24 months follow-up, the patient was recurrence free and without treatment related side effects. PMID:27895686

  6. SU-E-J-68: Adaptive Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer: Re-Planning Based On Prior Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, N; Padgett, K; Evans, J; Sleeman, W; Song, S; Fatyga, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Adaptive Radiotherapy (ART) with frequent CT imaging has been used to improve dosimetric accuracy by accounting for anatomical variations, such as primary tumor shrinkage and/or body weight loss, in Head and Neck (H&N) patients. In most ART strategies, the difference between the planned and the delivered dose is estimated by generating new plans on repeated CT scans using dose-volume constraints used with the initial planning CT without considering already delivered dose. The aim of this study was to assess the dosimetric gains achieved by re-planning based on prior dose by comparing them to re-planning not based-on prior dose for H&N patients. Methods: Ten locally-advanced H&N cancer patients were selected for this study. For each patient, six weekly CT imaging were acquired during the course of radiotherapy. PTVs, parotids, cord, brainstem, and esophagus were contoured on both planning and six weekly CT images. ART with weekly re-plans were done by two strategies: 1) Generating a new optimized IMRT plan without including prior dose from previous fractions (NoPriorDose) and 2) Generating a new optimized IMRT plan based on the prior dose given from previous fractions (PriorDose). Deformable image registration was used to accumulate the dose distributions between planning and six weekly CT scans. The differences in accumulated doses for both strategies were evaluated using the DVH constraints for all structures. Results: On average, the differences in accumulated doses for PTV1, PTV2 and PTV3 for NoPriorDose and PriorDose strategies were <2%. The differences in Dmean to the cord and brainstem were within 3%. The esophagus Dmean was reduced by 2% using PriorDose. PriorDose strategy, however, reduced the left parotid D50 and Dmean by 15% and 14% respectively. Conclusion: This study demonstrated significant parotid sparing, potentially reducing xerostomia, by using ART with IMRT optimization based on prior dose for weekly re-planning of H&N cancer patients.

  7. [Intensity-modulated radiotherapy of head and neck cancers. Dose constraint for spinal cord and brachial plexus].

    PubMed

    Boisselier, P; Racadot, S; Thariat, J; Graff, P; Pointreau, Y

    2016-10-01

    Given the ballistic opportunities it offers, intensity-modulated radiotherapy has emerged as the gold standard treatment for head and neck cancers. Protection of organs at risk is one of the objectives of optimization during the planning process. The compliance of dose constraints to the nervous system must be prioritized over all others. To avoid complications, it is recommended to respect a maximum dose of 50Gy to the spinal cord, and 60Gy to the brachial plexus using conventional fractionation of 2Gy per fraction. These constraints can be adapted depending on the clinical situation; they will probably be refocused by the follow-up of the IMRT studies.

  8. Measurement and properties of dose-area product ratio in external small-beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Niemelä, Jarkko Tapio; Partanen, Mari; Ojala, Jarkko; Sipilae, Petri; Björkqvist, Mikko; Kapanen, Mika; Keyriläinen, Jani

    2017-03-22

    In small-beam radiation therapy (RT) the measurement of beam quality parameter i.e. tissue-phantom ratio or TPR20,10 with conventional point detector is a challenge. To obtain reliable results, one has to consider potential sources of error, including volume averaging and adjustment of the point detector into the narrow beam. To overcome these challenges, a different type of possible beam quality parameter in small beams was studied, namely the dose-area product ratio or DAPR20,10. With this method, the measurement of a dose-area product (DAP) with a large-area plane-parallel chamber (LAC) eliminates the uncertainties in detector positioning and volume averaging present with the use of a point detector. In this study, properties of DAPR20,10 of cone-collimated 6 MV photon beam were investigated with Monte Carlo (MC) calculations and the obtained values were compared to measurements obtained by two LAC detectors PTW Type 34073 and PTW Type 34070. In addition, the possibility of determining the DAP with EBT3 film and Razor diode detector was studied. The determination of DAPR20,10 value was found to be feasible in external small-beam radiotherapy of cone-collimated beams with diameters from 4 to 40 mm with the two LACs, MC calculation and Razor diode. Measurements indicated a constant DAPR20,10 value for fields from 20 to 40 mm in diameter with maximum relative change of 0.6%, but an increase of 7.0% for fields from 20 to 4 mm in diameter for PTW Type 34070 chamber. Simulations and measurements showed an increase of DAPR20,10 with increasing LAC size or dose integral area for studied cone-collimated 6 MV photon beams from 4 to 40 mm in diameter. This has a consequence that with reported DAPR20,10 value there should be a reference to the size of the used LAC active area or the DAP integration area.

  9. Real-time 3D surface-image-guided beam setup in radiotherapy of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Djajaputra, David; Li Shidong

    2005-01-01

    We describe an approach for external beam radiotherapy of breast cancer that utilizes the three-dimensional (3D) surface information of the breast. The surface data of the breast are obtained from a 3D optical camera that is rigidly mounted on the ceiling of the treatment vault. This 3D camera utilizes light in the visible range therefore it introduces no ionization radiation to the patient. In addition to the surface topographical information of the treated area, the camera also captures gray-scale information that is overlaid on the 3D surface image. This allows us to visualize the skin markers and automatically determine the isocenter position and the beam angles in the breast tangential fields. The field sizes and shapes of the tangential, supraclavicular, and internal mammary gland fields can all be determined according to the 3D surface image of the target. A least-squares method is first introduced for the tangential-field setup that is useful for compensation of the target shape changes. The entire process of capturing the 3D surface data and subsequent calculation of beam parameters typically requires less than 1 min. Our tests on phantom experiments and patient images have achieved the accuracy of 1 mm in shift and 0.5 deg. in rotation. Importantly, the target shape and position changes in each treatment session can both be corrected through this real-time image-guided system.

  10. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary and metastatic liver tumors using the novalis image-guided system: preliminary results regarding efficacy and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Hiromitsu; Shibamoto, Yuta; Hashizume, Chisa; Mori, Yoshimasa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Naoki; Kosaki, Katsura; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kuzuya, Teiji; Utsunomiya, Setsuo

    2010-12-01

    www.tcrt.org The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for primary and metastatic liver tumors using the Novalis image-guided radiotherapy system. After preliminarily treating liver tumors using the Novalis system from July 2006, we started a protocol-based study in February 2008. Eighteen patients (6 with primary hepatocellular carcinoma and 12 with metastatic liver tumor) were treated with 55 or 50 Gy, depending upon their planned dose distribution and liver function, delivered in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. Four non-coplanar and three coplanar static beams were used. Patient age ranged from 54 to 84 years (median: 72 years). The Child-Pugh classification was Grade A in 17 patients and Grade B in 1. Tumor diameter ranged from 12 to 35 mm (median: 23 mm). Toxicities were evaluated according to the Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events version 4.0, and radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) was defined by Lawrence's criterion. The median follow-up period was 14.5 months. For all patients, the 1-year overall survival and local control rates were 94% and 86%, respectively. A Grade 1 liver enzyme change was observed in 5 patients, but no RILD or chronic liver dysfunction was observed. SBRT using the Novalis image-guided system is safe and effective for treating primary and metastatic liver tumors. Further investigation of SBRT for liver tumors is warranted. In view of the acceptable toxicity observed with this protocol, we have moved to a new protocol to shorten the overall treatment time and escalate the dose.

  11. Analysis of Dose at the Site of Second Tumor Formation After Radiotherapy to the Central Nervous System

    SciTech Connect

    Galloway, Thomas J.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Amdur, Robert J.; Morris, Christopher G.; Swanson, Erika L.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Second tumors are an uncommon complication of multimodality treatment of childhood cancer. The present analysis attempted to correlate the dose received as a component of primary treatment and the site of the eventual development of a second tumor. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified 16 patients who had received radiotherapy to sites in the craniospinal axis and subsequently developed a second tumor. We compared the historical fields and port films of the primary treatment with the modern imaging of the second tumor locations. We classified the location of the second tumors as follows: in the boost field; marginal to the boost field, but in a whole-brain field; in a whole-brain field; marginal to the whole brain/primary treatment field; and distant to the field. We divided the dose received into 3 broad categories: high dose (>45 Gy), moderate dose (20-36 Gy), and low dose (<20 Gy). Results: The most common location of the second tumor was in the whole brain field (57%) and in the moderate-dose range (81%). Conclusions: Our data contradict previous publications that suggested that most second tumors develop in tissues that receive a low radiation dose. Almost all the second tumors in our series occurred in tissue within a target volume in the cranium that had received a moderate dose (20-36 Gy). These findings suggest that a major decrease in the brain volume that receives a moderate radiation dose is the only way to substantially decrease the second tumor rate after central nervous system radiotherapy.

  12. Intensity-Modulated and Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Patients with Locally Advanced Inoperable Pancreatic Cancer after Preradiation Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, M.; Ganeshan, R.; Graf, R.; Pelzer, U.; Stieler, J. M.; Striefler, J. K.; Bahra, M.; Wust, P.; Riess, H.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy (RT) in patients with pancreatic cancer is still a controversial subject and its benefit in inoperable stages of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), even after induction chemotherapy, remains unclear. Modern radiation techniques such as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may improve effectiveness and reduce radiotherapy-related toxicities. Methods. Patients with LAPC who underwent radiotherapy after chemotherapy between 09/2004 and 05/2013 were retrospectively analyzed with regard to preradiation chemotherapy (PRCT), modalities of radiotherapy, and toxicities. Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated by Kaplan-Meier curves. Results. 15 (68%) women and 7 men (median age 64 years; range 40–77) were identified. Median duration of PRCT was 11.1 months (range 4.3–33.0). Six patients (27%) underwent conventional RT and 16 patients (73%) advanced IMRT and IGRT; median dosage was 50.4 (range 9–54) Gray. No grade III or IV toxicities occurred. Median PFS (estimated from the beginning of RT) was 5.8 months, 2.6 months in the conventional RT group (conv-RT), and 7.1 months in the IMRT/IGRT group (P = 0.029); median OS was 11.0 months, 4.2 months (conv-RT), and 14.0 months (IMRT/IGRT); P = 0.141. Median RT-specific PFS for patients with prolonged PRCT > 9 months was 8.5 months compared to 5.6 months for PRCT < 9 months (P = 0.293). This effect was translated into a significantly better median RT-specific overall survival of patients in the PRCT > 9 months group, with 19.0 months compared to 8.5 months in the PRCT  <  9 months group (P = 0.049). Conclusions. IGRT and IMRT after PRCT are feasible and effective options for patients with LAPC after prolonged preradiation chemotherapy. PMID:25401140

  13. Improving anatomical mapping of complexly deformed anatomy for external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy dose accumulation in cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vásquez Osorio, Eliana M. Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K.; Schuring-Pereira, Monica; Zolnay, András; Heijmen, Ben J. M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: In the treatment of cervical cancer, large anatomical deformations, caused by, e.g., tumor shrinkage, bladder and rectum filling changes, organ sliding, and the presence of the brachytherapy (BT) applicator, prohibit the accumulation of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and BT dose distributions. This work proposes a structure-wise registration with vector field integration (SW+VF) to map the largely deformed anatomies between EBRT and BT, paving the way for 3D dose accumulation between EBRT and BT. Methods: T2w-MRIs acquired before EBRT and as a part of the MRI-guided BT procedure for 12 cervical cancer patients, along with the manual delineations of the bladder, cervix-uterus, and rectum-sigmoid, were used for this study. A rigid transformation was used to align the bony anatomy in the MRIs. The proposed SW+VF method starts by automatically segmenting features in the area surrounding the delineated organs. Then, each organ and feature pair is registered independently using a feature-based nonrigid registration algorithm developed in-house. Additionally, a background transformation is calculated to account for areas far from all organs and features. In order to obtain one transformation that can be used for dose accumulation, the organ-based, feature-based, and the background transformations are combined into one vector field using a weighted sum, where the contribution of each transformation can be directly controlled by its extent of influence (scope size). The optimal scope sizes for organ-based and feature-based transformations were found by an exhaustive analysis. The anatomical correctness of the mapping was independently validated by measuring the residual distances after transformation for delineated structures inside the cervix-uterus (inner anatomical correctness), and for anatomical landmarks outside the organs in the surrounding region (outer anatomical correctness). The results of the proposed method were compared with the results of the

  14. SU-E-T-306: Study of the Reduction Technique for the Secondary Cancer Risk Due to Cone Beam CT in Image Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, J; Kim, D; Kim, D; Chung, W; Baek, T; Lee, H; Yoon, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated the effectiveness of a thin lead sheet based simple shielding method for imaging doses from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Methods: The entire body, except for the region scanned by CBCT, was shielded by wrapping in a 2 mm lead sheet. Reduction of secondary doses from CBCT was measured using a radio-photoluminescence glass dosimeter (RPLGD) placed inside an anthropomorphic phantom and changes in secondary cancer risk due to the shielding effect were estimated using BEIR VII model. Results: Doses to out-of-field organs for head-and-neck, chest, and pelvis scans were decreased 15∼100 %, 23∼90 %, and 23∼98 %, respectively, and the average reductions in lifetime secondary cancer risk due to the 2 mm lead shielding were 1.61, 10.4, and 12.8 persons per 100,000, respectively. Conclusion: This study suggests that a simple thin lead sheet based shielding method results in a non-negligible reduction of secondary doses to out-of-field regions for CBCT.

  15. SU-E-T-500: Dose Escalation Strategy for Lung Cancer Patients Using a Biologically- Guided Target Definition

    SciTech Connect

    Shusharina, N; Khan, F; Choi, N; Sharp, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dose escalation strategy for lung cancer patients can lead to late symptoms such as pneumonitis and cardiac injury. We propose a strategy to increase radiation dose for improving local tumor control while simultaneously striving to minimize the injury of organs at risk (OAR). Our strategy is based on defining a small, biologically-guided target volume for receiving additional radiation dose. Methods: 106 patients with lung cancer treated with radiotherapy were selected for patients diagnosed with stage II and III disease. Previous research has shown that 50% of the maximum SUV threshold in FDG-PET imaging is appropriate for delineation of the most aggressive part of a tumor. After PET- and CT-derived targets were contoured, an IMRT treatment plan was designed to deliver 60 Gy to the GTV as delineated on a 4D CT (Plan 1). A second plan was designed with additional dose of 18 Gy to the PET-derived volume (Plan 2). A composite plan was generated by the addition of Plan 1 and Plan 2. Results: Plan 1 was compared to the composite plan and increases in OAR dose were assessed. For seven patients on average, lung V5 was increased by 1.4% and V20 by 4.2% for ipsilateral lung and by 13.5% and 7% for contralateral lung. For total lung, V5 and V20 were increased by 4.5% and 4.8% respectively. Mean lung dose was increased by 9.7% for the total lung. The maximum dose to the spinal cord increased by 16% on average. For the heart, V20 increased by 4.2% and V40 by 5.2%. Conclusion: It seems feasible that an additional 18 Gy of radiation dose can be delivered to FDG PET-derived subvolume of the CT-based GTV of the primary tumor without significant increase in total dose to the critical organs such as lungs, spinal cord and heart.

  16. SU-E-T-56: A Novel Approach to Computing Expected Value and Variance of Point Dose From Non-Gated Radiotherapy Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, S; Zhu, X; Zhang, M; Zheng, D; Zhang, Q; Lei, Y; Li, S; Driewer, J; Wang, S; Enke, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Randomness in patient internal organ motion phase at the beginning of non-gated radiotherapy delivery may introduce uncertainty to dose received by the patient. Concerns of this dose deviation from the planned one has motivated many researchers to study this phenomenon although unified theoretical framework for computing it is still missing. This study was conducted to develop such framework for analyzing the effect. Methods: Two reasonable assumptions were made: a) patient internal organ motion is stationary and periodic; b) no special arrangement is made to start a non -gated radiotherapy delivery at any specific phase of patient internal organ motion. A statistical ensemble was formed consisting of patient’s non-gated radiotherapy deliveries at all equally possible initial organ motion phases. To characterize the patient received dose, statistical ensemble average method is employed to derive formulae for two variables: expected value and variance of dose received by a patient internal point from a non-gated radiotherapy delivery. Fourier Series was utilized to facilitate our analysis. Results: According to our formulae, the two variables can be computed from non-gated radiotherapy generated dose rate time sequences at the point’s corresponding locations on fixed phase 3D CT images sampled evenly in time over one patient internal organ motion period. The expected value of point dose is simply the average of the doses to the point’s corresponding locations on the fixed phase CT images. The variance can be determined by time integration in terms of Fourier Series coefficients of the dose rate time sequences on the same fixed phase 3D CT images. Conclusion: Given a non-gated radiotherapy delivery plan and patient’s 4D CT study, our novel approach can predict the expected value and variance of patient radiation dose. We expect it to play a significant role in determining both quality and robustness of patient non-gated radiotherapy plan.

  17. Update of Dutch Multicenter Dose-Escalation Trial of Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mamgani, Abrahim Putten, Wim L.J. van; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Leenders, Geert J.L.H. van; Slot, Annerie; Dielwart, Michel F.H.; Incrocci, Luca; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To update the analysis of the Dutch dose-escalation trial of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 669 patients with localized prostate cancer were randomly assigned to receive 68 or 78 Gy. The patients were stratified by age, institution, use of neoadjuvant or adjuvant hormonal therapy, and treatment group. The primary endpoint was freedom from failure (FFF), with failure defined as clinical or biochemical failure. Two definitions of biochemical failure were used: the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition (three consecutive increases in prostate-specific antigen level) and the Phoenix definition (nadir plus 2 {mu}g/L). The secondary endpoints were freedom from clinical failure, overall survival, and genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. Results: After a median follow-up of 70 months, the FFF using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition was significantly better in the 78-Gy arm than in the 68-Gy arm (7-year FFF rate, 54% vs. 47%, respectively; p = 0.04). The FFF using the Phoenix definition was also significantly better in the 78-Gy arm than in the 68-Gy arm (7-year FFF rate, 56% vs. 45%, respectively; p = 0.03). However, no differences in freedom from clinical failure or overall survival were observed. The incidence of late Grade 2 or greater genitourinary toxicity was similar in both arms (40% and 41% at 7 years; p = 0.6). However, the cumulative incidence of late Grade 2 or greater gastrointestinal toxicity was increased in the 78-Gy arm compared with the 68-Gy arm (35% vs. 25% at 7 years; p = 0.04). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown a statistically significant improvement in FFF in prostate cancer patients treated with 78 Gy but with a greater rate of late gastrointestinal toxicity.

  18. Proton Radiotherapy for High-Risk Pediatric Neuroblastoma: Early Outcomes and Dose Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Hattangadi, Jona A.; Rombi, Barbara; Yock, Torunn I.; Broussard, George; Friedmann, Alison M.; Huang, Mary; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Kooy, Hanne; MacDonald, Shannon M.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To report the early outcomes for children with high-risk neuroblastoma treated with proton radiotherapy (RT) and to compare the dose distributions for intensity-modulated photon RT (IMRT), three-dimensional conformal proton RT (3D-CPT), and intensity-modulated proton RT to the postoperative tumor bed. Methods and Materials: All patients with high-risk (International Neuroblastoma Staging System Stage III or IV) neuroblastoma treated between 2005 and 2010 at our institution were included. All patients received induction chemotherapy, surgical resection of residual disease, high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue, and adjuvant 3D-CPT to the primary tumor sites. The patients were followed with clinical examinations, imaging, and laboratory testing every 6 months to monitor disease control and side effects. IMRT, 3D-CPT, and intensity-modulated proton RT plans were generated and compared for a representative case of adjuvant RT to the primary tumor bed followed by a boost. Results: Nine patients were treated with 3D-CPT. The median age at diagnosis was 2 years (range 10 months to 4 years), and all patients had Stage IV disease. All patients had unfavorable histologic characteristics (poorly differentiated histologic features in 8, N-Myc amplification in 6, and 1p/11q chromosomal abnormalities in 4). The median tumor size at diagnosis was 11.4 cm (range 7-16) in maximal dimension. At a median follow-up of 38 months (range 11-70), there were no local failures. Four patients developed distant failure, and, of these, two died of disease. Acute side effects included Grade 1 skin erythema in 5 patients and Grade 2 anorexia in 2 patients. Although comparable target coverage was achieved with all three modalities, proton therapy achieved substantial normal tissue sparing compared with IMRT. Intensity-modulated proton RT allowed additional sparing of the kidneys, lungs, and heart. Conclusions: Preliminary outcomes reveal excellent local control with proton therapy

  19. High-Dose Adjuvant Radiotherapy After Radical Prostatectomy With or Without Androgen Deprivation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ost, Piet; Cozzarini, Cesare; De Meerleer, Gert; Fiorino, Claudio; De Potter, Bruno; Briganti, Alberto; Nagler, Evi V.T.; Montorsi, Francesco; Fonteyne, Valerie; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the outcome and toxicity in patients receiving high-dose (>69 Gy) adjuvant radiotherapy (HD-ART) and the impact of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Methods and Materials: Between 1999 and 2008, 225 node-negative patients were referred for HD-ART with or without ADT to two large academic institutions. Indications for HD-ART were extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), and/or positive surgical margins at radical prostatectomy (RP). A dose of at least 69.1 Gy was prescribed to the prostate bed and seminal vesicle bed. The ADT consisted of a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog. The duration and indication of ADT was left at the discretion of the treating physician. The effect of HD-ART and ADT on biochemical (bRFS) and clinical (cRFS) relapse-free survival was examined through univariate and multivariate analysis, with correction for known patient- and treatment-related variables. Interaction terms were introduced to evaluate effect modification. Results: After a median follow-up time of 5 years, the 7-year bRFS and cRFS were 84% and 88%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, the addition of ADT was independently associated with an improved bRFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.4, p = 0.02) and cRFS (HR 0.2, p = 0.008). Higher Gleason scores and SVI were associated with decreased bRFS and cRFS. A lymphadenectomy at the time of RP independently improved cRFS (HR 0.09, p = 0.009). The 7-year probability of late Grade 2-3 toxicity was 29% and 5% for genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, respectively. The absolute incidence of Grade 3 toxicity was <1% and 10% for GI and GU symptoms, respectively. The study is limited by its retrospective design and the lack of a standardized use of ADT. Conclusions: This retrospective study shows significantly improved bRFS and cRFS rates with the addition of ADT to HD-ART, with low Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity and 10% Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity.

  20. Motion prediction in MRI-guided radiotherapy based on interleaved orthogonal cine-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seregni, M.; Paganelli, C.; Lee, D.; Greer, P. B.; Baroni, G.; Keall, P. J.; Riboldi, M.

    2016-01-01

    In-room cine-MRI guidance can provide non-invasive target localization during radiotherapy treatment. However, in order to cope with finite imaging frequency and system latencies between target localization and dose delivery, tumour motion prediction is required. This work proposes a framework for motion prediction dedicated to cine-MRI guidance, aiming at quantifying the geometric uncertainties introduced by this process for both tumour tracking and beam gating. The tumour position, identified through scale invariant features detected in cine-MRI slices, is estimated at high-frequency (25 Hz) using three independent predictors, one for each anatomical coordinate. Linear extrapolation, auto-regressive and support vector machine algorithms are compared against systems that use no prediction or surrogate-based motion estimation. Geometric uncertainties are reported as a function of image acquisition period and system latency. Average results show that the tracking error RMS can be decreased down to a [0.2; 1.2] mm range, for acquisition periods between 250 and 750 ms and system latencies between 50 and 300 ms. Except for the linear extrapolator, tracking and gating prediction errors were, on average, lower than those measured for surrogate-based motion estimation. This finding suggests that cine-MRI guidance, combined with appropriate prediction algorithms, could relevantly decrease geometric uncertainties in motion compensated treatments.

  1. Motion prediction in MRI-guided radiotherapy based on interleaved orthogonal cine-MRI.

    PubMed

    Seregni, M; Paganelli, C; Lee, D; Greer, P B; Baroni, G; Keall, P J; Riboldi, M

    2016-01-21

    In-room cine-MRI guidance can provide non-invasive target localization during radiotherapy treatment. However, in order to cope with finite imaging frequency and system latencies between target localization and dose delivery, tumour motion prediction is required. This work proposes a framework for motion prediction dedicated to cine-MRI guidance, aiming at quantifying the geometric uncertainties introduced by this process for both tumour tracking and beam gating. The tumour position, identified through scale invariant features detected in cine-MRI slices, is estimated at high-frequency (25 Hz) using three independent predictors, one for each anatomical coordinate. Linear extrapolation, auto-regressive and support vector machine algorithms are compared against systems that use no prediction or surrogate-based motion estimation. Geometric uncertainties are reported as a function of image acquisition period and system latency. Average results show that the tracking error RMS can be decreased down to a [0.2; 1.2] mm range, for acquisition periods between 250 and 750 ms and system latencies between 50 and 300 ms. Except for the linear extrapolator, tracking and gating prediction errors were, on average, lower than those measured for surrogate-based motion estimation. This finding suggests that cine-MRI guidance, combined with appropriate prediction algorithms, could relevantly decrease geometric uncertainties in motion compensated treatments.

  2. Influence of increased target dose inhomogeneity on margins for breathing motion compensation in conformal stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Anne; Baier, Kurt; Meyer, Juergen; Wilbert, Juergen; Krieger, Thomas; Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Background Breathing motion should be considered for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung tumors. Four-dimensional computer tomography (4D-CT) offers detailed information of tumor motion. The aim of this work is to evaluate the influence of inhomogeneous dose distributions in the presence of breathing induced target motion and to calculate margins for motion compensation. Methods Based on 4D-CT examinations, the probability density function of pulmonary tumors was generated for ten patients. The time-accumulated dose to the tumor was calculated using one-dimensional (1D) convolution simulations of a 'static' dose distribution and target probability density function (PDF). In analogy to stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), different degrees of dose inhomogeneity were allowed in the target volume: minimum doses of 100% were prescribed to the edge of the target and maximum doses varied between 102% (P102) and 150% (P150). The dose loss due to breathing motion was quantified and margins were added until this loss was completely compensated. Results With the time-weighted mean tumor position as the isocentre, a close correlation with a quadratic relationship between the standard deviation of the PDF and the margin size was observed. Increased dose inhomogeneity in the target volume required smaller margins for motion compensation: margins of 2.5 mm, 2.4 mm and 1.3 mm were sufficient for compensation of 11.5 mm motion range and standard deviation of 3.9 mm in P105, P125 and P150, respectively. This effect of smaller margins for increased dose inhomogeneity was observed for all patients. Optimal sparing of the organ-at-risk surrounding the target was achieved for dose prescriptions P105 to P118. The internal target volume concept over-compensated breathing motion with higher than planned doses to the target and increased doses to the surrounding normal tissue. Conclusion Treatment planning with inhomogeneous dose distributions in the target volume required

  3. [Image guided radiotherapy with the Cone Beam CT kV (Elekta): experience of the Léon Bérard centre].

    PubMed

    Pommier, P; Gassa, F; Lafay, F; Claude, L

    2009-09-01

    Image guide radiotherapy with the Cone Beam CT kV (CBCT-kV) developed by Elekta has been implemented at the centre Léon Bérard in November 2006. The treatment procedure is presented and detailed for prostate cancer IGRT and non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). CBCT-kV is routinely used for SRT, selected paediatric cancers, all prostate carcinomas, primitive brain tumours and head and neck cancers that do not require nodes irradiation. Thirty-five to 40 patients are treated within a daily 11-hours period. The general procedure for 3D images acquisition and their analysis is described. The CBCT-kV permitted to identify about 10% of prostate cancer patients for whom a positioning with bone-based 2D images only would have led to an unacceptable dose distribution for at least one session. SRT is now used routinely for inoperable NSCLC. The easiness of implementing CBCT-kV imaging and its expected medical benefit should lead to a rapid diffusion of this technology that is also submitted to prospective and multicentric medico-economical evaluations.

  4. Image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy of head and neck – a case series study

    PubMed Central

    Kieszko, Dariusz; Brzozowska, Anna; Kordzin’ska-Cisek, Izabela; Mazurkiewicz, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was the evaluation of image guided transdermal application of interstitial brachytherapy in patients undergoing repeated irradiation for relapsed local tumor of the head and neck area. Material and methods The article describes transdermal application of interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in 4 patients treated due to relapsed local tumor in soft palate, submandibular area, laryngopharynx, as well as pterygoid muscles and maxillary sinus. The application was conducted under continuous computed tomography (CT)-image guidance (CT fluoroscopy). Patients qualified for this type of treatment had neoplastic lesions located deep under the skin surface. Because of their location, access to the lesions was limited, and the risk of damaging the adjacent tissues such as vessels and nerves was high. The following parameters have been evaluated: clinical response using RECIST 1.1, incidence of perisurgical complications using CTCAE 4.0 and the frequency of occurrence of radiotherapy related early morbidity using RTOG. Results Various radiation schemes were used, from 3 to 5 fractions of 3.5-5 Gy. The median total dose (D90) was 20.6 Gy. Biologic effective dose (BED) and equivalent 2 Gy (DEQ2) median doses were 30.4 Gy and 25.3 Gy, respectively. In the follow-up period of 3-7 months (the median value of 3.5 months), 2 patients had partial regression of the disease and in 2 others the neoplastic process was stabilized. None of the patients had serious complications of treatment (of 3rd degree or higher). Conclusions Computed tomography-image guided brachytherapy proved to be a safe method of treatment in patients with local relapse in sites, in which traditional visually controlled application was impossible due to risk of complications. Despite short observation period and small study group, it seems justified to conduct prospective studies for the evaluation of efficacy and safety of CT-image guided brachytherapy. PMID:28115962

  5. Development of phantom and methodology for 3D and 4D dose intercomparisons for advanced lung radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caloz, Misael; Kafrouni, Marilyne; Leturgie, Quentin; Corde, Stéphanie; Downes, Simon; Lehmann, Joerg; Thwaites, David

    2015-01-01

    There are few reported intercomparisons or audits of combinations of advanced radiotherapy methods, particularly for 4D treatments. As part of an evaluation of the implementation of advanced radiotherapy technology, a phantom and associated methods, initially developed for in-house commissioning and QA of 4D lung treatments, has been developed further with the aim of using it for end-to-end dose intercomparison of 4D treatment planning and delivery. The respiratory thorax phantom can house moving inserts with variable speed (breathing rate) and motion amplitude. In one set-up mode it contains a small ion chamber for point dose measurements, or alternatively it can hold strips of radiochromic film to measure dose distributions. Initial pilot and feasibility measurements have been carried out in one hospital to thoroughly test the methods and procedures before using it more widely across a range of hospitals and treatment systems. Overall, the results show good agreement between measured and calculated doses and distributions, supporting the use of the phantom and methodology for multi-centre intercomparisons. However, before wider use, refinements of the method and analysis are currently underway particularly for the film measurements.

  6. Image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) combined with whole pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (WP-IMRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer: a prospective study from Chiang Mai University Hospital, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Wanwilairat, Somsak; Chakrabandhu, Somvilai; Klunklin, Pitchayaponne; Onchan, Wimrak; Tippanya, Damrongsak; Nopnop, Wannapa; Galalae, Razvan; Chitapanarux, Imjai

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A report of preliminary results and toxicity profiles using image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) combined with whole pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (WP-IMRT) for locally advanced cervical cancer. Material and methods Fifteen patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were enrolled into the study. WP-IMRT was used to treat the Clinical Target Volume (CTV) with a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Concurrent cisplatin (40 mg/m2) was prescribed during radiotherapy (RT) on weekly basis. IGBT using computed tomography was performed at the dose of 7 Gy × 4 fractions to the High-Risk Clinical Target Volume (HR-CTV). Results The mean cumulative doses – in terms of equivalent dose of 2 Gy (EQD2) – of IGBT plus WP-IMRT to HR-CTV, bladder, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 88.3, 85.0, 68.2 and 73.6 Gy, respectively. In comparison with standard (point A prescription) dose-volume histograms, volume-based image-guided brachytherapy improved the cumulative doses for bladder of 67%, rectum of 47% and sigmoid of 46%. At the median follow-up time of 14 months, the local control, metastasis-free survival and overall survival rates were 93%, 100% and 93%, respectively. No grade 3-4 acute and late toxicities were observed. Conclusion The combination of image-guided brachytherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy improved the dose distribution to tumor volumes and avoided overdose in OARs which could be converted in excellent local control and toxicity profiles. PMID:23634150

  7. Prospective evaluation of a hydrogel spacer for rectal separation in dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As dose-escalation in prostate cancer radiotherapy improves cure rates, a major concern is rectal toxicity. We prospectively assessed an innovative approach of hydrogel injection between prostate and rectum to reduce the radiation dose to the rectum and thus side effects in dose-escalated prostate radiotherapy. Methods Acute toxicity and planning parameters were prospectively evaluated in patients with T1-2 N0 M0 prostate cancer receiving dose-escalated radiotherapy after injection of a hydrogel spacer. Before and after hydrogel injection, we performed MRI scans for anatomical assessment of rectal separation. Radiotherapy was planned and administered to 78 Gy in 39 fractions. Results From eleven patients scheduled for spacer injection the procedure could be performed in ten. In one patient hydrodissection of the Denonvillier space was not possible. Radiation treatment planning showed low rectal doses despite dose-escalation to the target. In accordance with this, acute rectal toxicity was mild without grade 2 events and there was complete resolution within four to twelve weeks. Conclusions This prospective study suggests that hydrogel injection is feasible and may prevent rectal toxicity in dose-escalated radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Further evaluation is necessary including the definition of patients who might benefit from this approach. Trial registration: German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00003273. PMID:23336502

  8. Leukoencephalopathy in childhood hematopoietic neoplasm caused by moderate-dose methotrexate and prophylactic cranial radiotherapy - an MR analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Ko |; Takahashi, Shoki; Higano, Shuichi

    1995-07-15

    The main purpose of this study was to determine influential factors related to minor leukoencephalopathy (LEP) caused by moderate-dose methotrexate (MTX) and prophylactic cranial radiotherapy (CRT) in childhood hematopoietic malignancies. We also compared the incidence of LEP following this treatment to that reported in the literature following treatment with high-dose MTX alone. Thirty-eight pediatric patients of hematopoietic malignancies (37 acute lymphoblastic leukemias, 1 non-Hodgkin lymphoma) who were given CRT (18-24 Gy) as well as prophylactic intrathecal and per os MTX were studied for leukoencephalopathy by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. All the patients were free from grave neuropsychiatric disturbances. The data were examined to elucidate the influential ones of five factors (patients` age, doses of intrathecal and per os MTX, dose of CRT, interval between treatment, and MR study) to develop LEP using multiple regression analysis. To compare the effect of moderate-dose MTX and prophylactic CRT on LEP to that of high-dose MTX alone, we conducted a literature review. Seven out of 38 patients (18%) developed LEP. From multiple regression analysis and partial correlation coefficients, the age and CRT dose seemed influential in the subsequent development of LEP. The incidence of LEP following treatment with moderate-dose MTX and prophylactic CRT appears to be less than that reported in the literature following treatment with intravenous high-dose MTX. However, even moderate-dose MTX in combination with CRT can result in a significant incidence of MR-detectable LEP, particularly in children 6 years of age or younger receiving 24 Gy. Leukoencephalopathy was caused by moderate-dose MTX and prophylactic CRT in pediatric patients, probably less frequently than by high-dose MTX treatment alone. The influential factors were patient`s age and CRT dose. 26 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Prospective Study of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prone Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jozsef, Gabor; DeWyngaert, J. Keith; Becker, Stewart J.; Lymberis, Stella; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To report setup variations during prone accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Methods: New York University (NYU) 07-582 is an institutional review board-approved protocol of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to deliver image-guided ABPI in the prone position. Eligible are postmenopausal women with pT1 breast cancer excised with negative margins and no nodal involvement. A total dose of 30 Gy in five daily fractions of 6 Gy are delivered to the planning target volume (the tumor cavity with 1.5-cm margin) by image-guided radiotherapy. Patients are set up prone, on a dedicated mattress, used for both simulation and treatment. After positioning with skin marks and lasers, CBCTs are performed and the images are registered to the planning CT. The resulting shifts (setup corrections) are recorded in the three principal directions and applied. Portal images are taken for verification. If they differ from the planning digital reconstructed radiographs, the patient is reset, and a new CBCT is taken. Results: 70 consecutive patients have undergone a total of 343 CBCTs: 7 patients had four of five planned CBCTs performed. Seven CBCTs (2%) required to be repeated because of misalignment in the comparison between portal and digital reconstructed radiograph image after the first CBCT. The mean shifts and standard deviations in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and medial-lateral (ML) directions were -0.19 (0.54), -0.02 (0.33), and -0.02 (0.43) cm, respectively. The average root mean squares of the daily shifts were 0.50 (0.28), 0.29 (0.17), and 0.38 (0.20). A conservative margin formula resulted in a recommended margin of 1.26, 0.73, 0.96 cm in the AP, SI, and ML directions. Conclusion: CBCTs confirmed that the NYU prone APBI setup and treatment technique are reproducible, with interfraction variation comparable to those reported for supine setup. The currently applied margin (1.5 cm) adequately compensates for the setup variation detected.

  10. Cone beam CT with zonal filters for simultaneous dose reduction, improved target contrast and automated set-up in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Moore, C J; Marchant, T E; Amer, A M

    2006-05-07

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) using a zonal filter is introduced. The aims are reduced concomitant imaging dose to the patient, simultaneous control of body scatter for improved image quality in the tumour target zone and preserved set-up detail for radiotherapy. Aluminium transmission diaphragms added to the CBCT x-ray tube of the Elekta Synergytrade mark linear accelerator produced an unattenuated beam for a central "target zone" and a partially attenuated beam for an outer "set-up zone". Imaging doses and contrast noise ratios (CNR) were measured in a test phantom for transmission diaphragms 12 and 24 mm thick, for 5 and 10 cm long target zones. The effect on automatic registration of zonal CBCT to conventional CT was assessed relative to full-field and lead-collimated images of an anthropomorphic phantom. Doses along the axis of rotation were reduced by up to 50% in both target and set-up zones, and weighted dose (two thirds surface dose plus one third central dose) was reduced by 10-20% for a 10 cm long target zone. CNR increased by up to 15% in zonally filtered CBCT images compared to full-field images. Automatic image registration remained as robust as that with full-field images and was superior to CBCT coned down using lead-collimation. Zonal CBCT significantly reduces imaging dose and is expected to benefit radiotherapy through improved target contrast, required to assess target coverage, and wide-field edge detail, needed for robust automatic measurement of patient set-up error.

  11. Image-guided adaptive radiotherapy for prostate and head-and-neck cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Daniel, Jennifer C.

    In the current practice of radiation therapy, daily patient alignments have been based on external skin marks or on bone. However, internal organ variation (both motion and volumetric changes) between treatment fractions can displace the treatment target, causing target underdosage and normal tissue overdosage. In order to deliver the radiation treatment as planned, more accurate knowledge of the daily internal anatomy was needed. Additionally, treatments needed to adapt to these variations by either shifting the patient to account for the daily target position or by altering the treatment plan. In this dissertation, the question of whether inter-fractional variations in internal patient anatomy combined with external set-up uncertainties produced measurable differences between planned and delivered doses for prostate and head-and-neck cancer patients was investigated. Image-guided adaptive treatment strategies to improve tumor coverage and/or reduce normal tissue dose were examined. Treatment deliveries utilizing various alignment procedures for ten prostate cancer patients and eleven head-and-neck cancer patients, each of whom received multiple CT scans over the course of treatment, were simulated. The largest prostate dose losses between planning and delivery were correlated with anterior/posterior and superior/inferior prostate displacement. Daily bone alignment sufficiently maintained target coverage for 70% of patients, ultrasound for 90%, and CT for 100%. A no-action-level correction protocol, which corrected the daily bone alignment for the systematic internal displacement of the prostate based on a pre-determined number of CT image sets, successfully improved the prostate and seminal vesicle dosimetric coverage. Three CT image sets were sufficient to accurately correct the bone alignment scheme for the prostate internal systematic shifts. For head-and-neck cancer patient treatment, setup uncertainties and internal organ variations did not greatly affect

  12. Incorporating Androgen Deprivation With Dose-Escalated External-Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dosoretz, Arie P; Yu, James B

    2016-05-20

    The Oncology Grand Rounds series is designed to place original reports published in the Journal into clinical context. A case presentation is followed by a description of diagnostic and management challenges, a review of the relevant literature, and a summary of the authors' suggested management approaches. The goal of this series is to help readers better understand how to apply the results of key studies, including those published in Journal of Clinical Oncology, to patients seen in their own clinical practice.A 71-year-old man was seen by his primary care physician for routine evaluation in early 2015. On digital rectal examination, his prostate was moderately enlarged, although he had no obvious areas of palpable disease. His prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 7.1 ng/mL. A standard ultrasound-guided biopsy of his prostate revealed a 60-mL prostate volume and a single core (out of 12) of Gleason 3 + 3 disease. He chose to undergo surveillance. Six months later, his PSA level had risen to 10.0 ng/mL; there was still no palpable disease on digital rectal examination. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of his prostate and pelvis revealed two suspicious intraprostatic lesions with restricted diffusion, focal and earlier enhancement with contrast than adjacent normal prostate, and hypointense features on T2-weighted imaging; these findings were highly suspicious for high-grade prostate cancer (Fig 1). Magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion targeted biopsy of each lesion yielded a total of four positive biopsy cores of Gleason 4 + 3 = 7, involving 50% to 80% of each core, with perineural invasion noted. The patient's medical history is notable for overweight (but not morbidly obese), hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, cataract surgeries, and inguinal hernia repair, but the patient is otherwise healthy. He has decided against prostatectomy and brachytherapy because of strong personal preference. In particular, he wanted to avoid anesthesia, and

  13. Out-of-field organ doses and associated radiogenic risks from para-aortic radiotherapy for testicular seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mazonakis, Michalis Berris, Theocharis; Damilakis, John; Varveris, Charalambos; Lyraraki, Efrossyni

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to (a) calculate the radiation dose to out-of-field organs from radiotherapy for stage I testicular seminoma and (b) estimate the associated radiogenic risks. Methods: Monte Carlo methodology was employed to model radiation therapy with typical anteroposterior and posteroanterior para-aortic fields on an anthropomorphic phantom simulating an average adult. The radiation dose received by all main and remaining organs that defined by the ICRP publication 103 and excluded from the treatment volume was calculated. The effect of field dimensions on each organ dose was determined. Additional therapy simulations were generated by introducing shielding blocks to protect the kidneys from primary radiation. The gonadal dose was employed to assess the risk of heritable effects for irradiated male patients of reproductive potential. The lifetime attributable risks (LAR) of radiotherapy-induced cancer were estimated using gender- and organ-specific risk coefficients for patient ages of 20, 30, 40, and 50 years old. The risk values were compared with the respective nominal risks. Results: Para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy resulted in out-of-field organ doses of 5.0–538.6 mGy. Blocked field treatment led to a dose change up to 28%. The mean organ dose variation by increasing or decreasing the applied field dimensions was 18.7% ± 3.9% and 20.8% ± 4.5%, respectively. The out-of-field photon doses increased the lifetime intrinsic risk of developing thyroid, lung, bladder, prostate, and esophageal cancer by (0.1–1.4)%, (0.4–1.1)%, (2.5–5.4)%, (0.2–0.4)%, and (6.4–9.2)%, respectively, depending upon the patient age at exposure and the field size employed. A low risk for heritable effects of less than 0.029% was found compared with the natural incidence of these defects. Conclusions: Testicular cancer survivors are subjected to an increased risk for the induction of bladder and esophageal cancer following para-aortic radiotherapy. The

  14. Prediction of the location and size of the stomach using patient characteristics for retrospective radiation dose estimation following radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lamart, Stephanie; Imran, Rebecca; Simon, Steven L; Doi, Kazutaka; Morton, Lindsay M; Curtis, Rochelle E; Lee, Choonik; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Maass-Moreno, Roberto; Chen, Clara C; Whatley, Millie; Miller, Donald L; Pacak, Karel; Lee, Choonsik

    2013-12-21

    Following cancer radiotherapy, reconstruction of doses to organs, other than the target organ, is of interest for retrospective health risk studies. Reliable estimation of doses to organs that may be partially within or fully outside the treatment field requires reliable knowledge of the location and size of the organs, e.g., the stomach, which is at risk from abdominal irradiation. The stomach location and size are known to be highly variable between individuals, but have been little studied. Moreover, for treatments conducted years ago, medical images of patients are usually not available in medical records to locate the stomach. In light of the poor information available to locate the stomach in historical dose reconstructions, the purpose of this work was to investigate the variability of stomach location and size among adult male patients and to develop prediction models for the stomach location and size using predictor variables generally available in medical records of radiotherapy patients treated in the past. To collect data on stomach size and position, we segmented the contours of the stomach and of the skeleton on contemporary computed tomography (CT) images for 30 male patients in supine position. The location and size of the stomach was found to depend on body mass index (BMI), ponderal index (PI), and age. For example, the anteroposterior dimension of the stomach was found to increase with increasing BMI (≈0.25 cm kg(-1) m(2)) whereas its craniocaudal dimension decreased with increasing PI (≈-3.3 cm kg(-1) m(3)) and its transverse dimension increased with increasing PI (≈2.5 cm kg(-1) m(3)). Using the prediction models, we generated three-dimensional computational stomach models from a deformable hybrid phantom for three patients of different BMI. Based on a typical radiotherapy treatment, we simulated radiotherapy treatments on the predicted stomach models and on the CT images of the corresponding patients. Those dose calculations demonstrated

  15. Prediction of the location and size of the stomach using patient characteristics for retrospective radiation dose estimation following radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamart, Stephanie; Imran, Rebecca; Simon, Steven L.; Doi, Kazutaka; Morton, Lindsay M.; Curtis, Rochelle E.; Lee, Choonik; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Maass-Moreno, Roberto; Chen, Clara C.; Whatley, Millie; Miller, Donald L.; Pacak, Karel; Lee, Choonsik

    2013-12-01

    Following cancer radiotherapy, reconstruction of doses to organs, other than the target organ, is of interest for retrospective health risk studies. Reliable estimation of doses to organs that may be partially within or fully outside the treatment field requires reliable knowledge of the location and size of the organs, e.g., the stomach, which is at risk from abdominal irradiation. The stomach location and size are known to be highly variable between individuals, but have been little studied. Moreover, for treatments conducted years ago, medical images of patients are usually not available in medical records to locate the stomach. In light of the poor information available to locate the stomach in historical dose reconstructions, the purpose of this work was to investigate the variability of stomach location and size among adult male patients and to develop prediction models for the stomach location and size using predictor variables generally available in medical records of radiotherapy patients treated in the past. To collect data on stomach size and position, we segmented the contours of the stomach and of the skeleton on contemporary computed tomography (CT) images for 30 male patients in supine position. The location and size of the stomach was found to depend on body mass index (BMI), ponderal index (PI), and age. For example, the anteroposterior dimension of the stomach was found to increase with increasing BMI (≈0.25 cm kg-1 m2) whereas its craniocaudal dimension decreased with increasing PI (≈-3.3 cm kg-1 m3) and its transverse dimension increased with increasing PI (≈2.5 cm kg-1 m3). Using the prediction models, we generated three-dimensional computational stomach models from a deformable hybrid phantom for three patients of different BMI. Based on a typical radiotherapy treatment, we simulated radiotherapy treatments on the predicted stomach models and on the CT images of the corresponding patients. Those dose calculations demonstrated good

  16. On the significance of density-induced speed of sound variations on US-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fontanarosa, Davide; Meer, Skadi van der; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To show the effect of speed of sound (SOS) aberration on ultrasound guided radiotherapy (US-gRT) as a function of implemented workflow. US systems assume that SOS is constant in human soft tissues (at a value of 1540 m/s), while its actual nonuniform distribution produces small but systematic errors of up to a few millimeters in the positions of scanned structures. When a coregistered computerized tomography (CT) scan is available, the US image can be corrected for SOS aberration. Typically, image guided radiotherapy workflows implementing US systems only provide a CT scan at the simulation (SIM) stage. If changes occur in geometry or density distribution between SIM and treatment (TX) stage, SOS aberration can change accordingly, with a final impact on the measured position of structures which is dependent on the workflow adopted. Methods: Four basic scenarios were considered of possible changes between SIM and TX: (1) No changes, (2) only patient position changes (rigid rotation-translation), (3) only US transducer position changes (constrained on patient's surface), and (4) patient tissues thickness changes. Different SOS aberrations may arise from the different scenarios, according to the specific US-gRT workflow used: intermodality (INTER) where TX US scans are compared to SIM CT scans; intramodality (INTRA) where TX US scans are compared to SIM US scans; and INTERc and INTRAc where all US images are corrected for SOS aberration (using density information provided by SIM CT). For an experimental proof of principle, the effect of tissues thickness change was simulated in the different workflows: a dual layered phantom was filled with layers of sunflower oil (SOS 1478 m/s), water (SOS 1482 m/s), and 20% saline solution (SOS 1700 m/s). The phantom was US scanned, the layer thicknesses were increased and the US scans were repeated. The errors resulting from the different workflows were compared. Results: Theoretical considerations show that workflows

  17. Role of Intra- or Periprostatic Calcifications in Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, Samir Abdallah; Neves-Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Marta, Gustavo Nader; Haddad, Cecilia Maria Kalil; Fernandes da Silva, Joao Luis

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) allows more precise localization of the prostate, thus minimizing errors resulting from organ motion and set-up during treatment of prostate cancer. Using megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MVCBCT), references such as bones, the prostate itself or implanted fiducial markers can be used as surrogates to correct patient positioning immediately before each treatment fraction. However, the use of fiducials requires an invasive procedure and may increase costs. We aimed to assess whether intra- or periprostatic calcifications (IPC) could be used as natural fiducials. Methods and Materials: Data on patients treated with IGRT for prostate cancer with clearly visible IPC and implanted fiducials in both planning CT and MVCBCT images were reviewed. IPC were classified as central when inside the prostate and peripheral when within the planning target volume. Daily deviations in lateral, longitudinal, and vertical directions from baseline positioning using fiducials and using IPC were compared. Results: A total of 287 MVCBCT images were obtained and analyzed from 10 patients. The mean {+-} standard deviation daily deviation (mm) in the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical coordinates were 0.55 {+-} 3.11, 0.58 {+-} 3.45, and -0.54 {+-} 4.03, respectively, for fiducials, and 0.72 {+-} 3.22, 0.63 {+-} 3.58, and -0.69 {+-} 4.26, for IPC. The p values for comparisons (fiducials vs. IPC) were 0.003, 0.653, and 0.078 for lateral, longitudinal, and vertical coordinates, respectively. When cases with central IPC were analyzed (n = 7), no significant difference was found in such comparisons. Central IPC and fiducials exhibited a similar pattern of displacement during treatment, with equal values for daily displacements in the three directions for more than 90% of measurements. Conclusions: Our data suggest that centrally located IPC may be used as natural fiducials for treatment positioning during IGRT for prostate cancer, with potential

  18. Markerless tumor tracking using short kilovoltage imaging arcs for lung image-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Keall, Paul J.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Huang, Chen-Yu; Feain, Ilana

    2015-12-01

    The ability to monitor tumor motion without implanted markers is clinically advantageous for lung image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Existing markerless tracking methods often suffer from overlapping structures and low visibility of tumors on kV projection images. We introduce the short arc tumor tracking (SATT) method to overcome these issues. The proposed method utilizes multiple kV projection images selected from a nine-degree imaging arc to improve tumor localization, and respiratory-correlated 4D cone-beam CT (CBCT) prior knowledge to minimize the effects of overlapping anatomies. The 3D tumor position is solved as an optimization problem with prior knowledge incorporated via regularization. We retrospectively validated SATT on 11 clinical scans from four patients with central tumors. These patients represent challenging scenarios for markerless tumor tracking due to the inferior adjacent contrast. The 3D trajectories of implanted fiducial markers were used as the ground truth for tracking accuracy evaluation. In all cases, the tumors were successfully tracked at all gantry angles. Compared to standard pre-treatment CBCT guidance alone, trajectory errors were significantly smaller with tracking in all cases, and the improvements were the most prominent in the superior-inferior direction. The mean 3D tracking error ranged from 2.2-9.9 mm, which was 0.4-2.6 mm smaller compared to pre-treatment CBCT. In conclusion, we were able to directly track tumors with inferior visibility on kV projection images using SATT. Tumor localization accuracies are significantly better with tracking compared to the current standard of care of lung IGRT. Future work involves the prospective evaluation and clinical implementation of SATT.

  19. Late Fecal Incontinence After High-Dose Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Better Prediction Using Longitudinal Definitions

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorino, Claudio; Rancati, Tiziana; Fellin, Gianni; Vavassori, Vittorio; Cagna, Emanuela; Casanova Borca, Valeria; Girelli, Giuseppe; Menegotti, Loris; Monti, Angelo Filippo; Tortoreto, Francesca; Delle Canne, Stefania; Valdagni, Riccardo

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To model late fecal incontinence after high-dose prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT) in patients accrued in the AIROPROS (prostate working group of the Italian Association of Radiation Oncology) 0102 trial using different endpoint definitions. Methods and Materials: The self-reported questionnaires (before RT, 1 month after RT, and every 6 months for {<=}3 years after RT) of 586 patients were available. The peak incontinence (P{sub I}NC) and two longitudinal definitions (chronic incontinence [C{sub I}NC], defined as the persistence of Grade 1 or greater incontinence after any Grade 2-3 event; and mean incontinence score [M{sub I}NC], defined as the average score during the 3-year period after RT) were considered. The correlation between the clinical/dosimetric parameters (including rectal dose-volume histograms) and P{sub I}NC (Grade 2 or greater), C{sub I}NC, and M{sub I}NC of {>=}1 were investigated using multivariate logistic analyses. Receiver operating characteristic curves and the area under the curve were used to assess the predictive value of the different multivariate models. Results: Of the 586 patients, 36 with a Grade 1 or greater incontinence score before RT were not included in the present analysis. Of the 550 included patients, 197 (35.8%) had at least one control with a Grade 1 or greater incontinence score (M{sub I}NC >0). Of these 197 patients, 37 (6.7%), 22 (4.0%), and 17 (3.1%) were scored as having P{sub I}NC, M{sub I}NC {>=}1, and C{sub I}NC, respectively. On multivariate analysis, Grade 2 or greater acute incontinence was the only predictor of P{sub I}NC (odds ratio [OR], 5.9; p = .0009). Grade 3 acute incontinence was predictive of C{sub I}NC (OR, 9.4; p = .02), and percentage of the rectal volume receiving >40 Gy of {>=}80% was predictive of a M{sub I}NC of {>=}1 (OR, 3.8; p = .008) and of C{sub I}NC (OR, 3.6; p = .03). Previous bowel disease, previous abdominal/pelvic surgery, and the use of antihypertensive (protective factor

  20. Image-Guided Radiotherapy Using a Modified Industrial Micro-CT for Preclinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Manuela C.; Fleckenstein, Jens; Kirschner, Stefanie; Hartmann, Linda; Wenz, Frederik; Brockmann, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective Although radiotherapy is a key component of cancer treatment, its implementation into pre-clinical in vivo models with relatively small target volumes is frequently omitted either due to technical complexity or expected side effects hampering long-term observational studies. We here demonstrate how an affordable industrial micro-CT can be converted into a small animal IGRT device at very low costs. We also demonstrate the proof of principle for the case of partial brain irradiation of mice carrying orthotopic glioblastoma implants. Methods/Materials A commercially available micro-CT originally designed for non-destructive material analysis was used. It consists of a CNC manipulator, a transmission X-ray tube (10–160 kV) and a flat-panel detector, which was used together with custom-made steel collimators (1–5 mm aperture size). For radiation field characterization, an ionization chamber, water-equivalent slab phantoms and radiochromic films were used. A treatment planning tool was implemented using a C++ application. For proof of principle, NOD/SCID/γc−/− mice were orthotopically implanted with U87MG high-grade glioma cells and irradiated using the novel setup. Results The overall symmetry of the radiation field at 150 kV was 1.04±0.02%. The flatness was 4.99±0.63% and the penumbra widths were between 0.14 mm and 0.51 mm. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) ranged from 1.97 to 9.99 mm depending on the collimator aperture size. The dose depth curve along the central axis followed a typical shape of keV photons. Dose rates measured were 10.7 mGy/s in 1 mm and 7.6 mGy/s in 5 mm depth (5 mm collimator aperture size). Treatment of mice with a single dose of 10 Gy was tolerated well and resulted in central tumor necrosis consistent with therapeutic efficacy. Conclusion A conventional industrial micro-CT can be easily modified to allow effective small animal IGRT even of critical target volumes such as the brain. PMID:25993010

  1. Multi-System Verification of Registrations for Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Yunfeng; Galvin, James M.; Straube, William L.; Bosch, Walter R.; Purdy, James A.; Li, X. Allen; Xiao Ying

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To provide quantitative information on the image registration differences from multiple systems for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) credentialing and margin reduction in clinical trials. Methods and Materials: Images and IGRT shift results from three different treatment systems (Tomotherapy Hi-Art, Elekta Synergy, Varian Trilogy) have been sent from various institutions to the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center (ITC) for evaluation for the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Nine patient datasets (five head-and-neck and four prostate) were included in the comparison, with each patient having 1-4 daily individual IGRT studies. In all cases, daily shifts were re-calculated by re-registration of the planning CT with the daily IGRT data using three independent software systems (MIMvista, FocalSim, VelocityAI). Automatic fusion was used in all calculations. The results were compared with those submitted from institutions. Similar regions of interest (ROIs) and same initial positions were used in registrations for inter-system comparison. Different slice spacings for CBCT sampling and different ROIs for registration were used in some cases to observe the variation of registration due to these factors. Results: For the 54 comparisons with head-and-neck datasets, the absolute values of differences of the registration results between different systems were 2.6 {+-} 2.1 mm (mean {+-} SD; range 0.1-8.6 mm, left-right [LR]), 1.7 {+-} 1.3 mm (0.0-4.9 mm, superior-inferior [SI]), and 1.8 {+-} 1.1 mm (0.1-4.0 mm, anterior-posterior [AP]). For the 66 comparisons in prostate cases, the differences were 1.1 {+-} 1.0 mm (0.0-4.6 mm, LR), 2.1 {+-} 1.7 mm (0.0-6.6 mm, SI), and 2.0 {+-} 1.8 mm (0.1-6.9 mm, AP). The differences caused by the slice spacing variation were relatively small, and the different ROI selections in FocalSim and MIMvista also had limited impact. Conclusion: The extent of differences was reported when different systems were used for image

  2. Lack of therapeutic gain when low dose rate interstitial radiotherapy is combined with cisplatin in an animal tumour model.

    PubMed

    Pop, L; Levendag, P; van Geel, C; Deurloo, I K; Visser, A

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of cisplatin with low dose rate interstitial radiotherapy was studied in an animal tumour model with a range of dose rats commonly used in clinical low dose rate brachytherapy. Small pieces of R1-rhabdomyosarcoma were implanted subcutaneously in the flanks of female Wag/Rij rats. When the tumour had grown to the desired treatment volume, four afterloading catheters were inserted in the tumour in a square geometry, and a fixed spacing was attained by means of a template. Subsequently, four 2 cm Ir192 wires were inserted. A range of tumour doses of 20-120 Gy at a mean dose rate of 48 cGy/h was applied; 15 mins before the implant an intraperitoneal bolus injection of 3 mg/kg cisplatin was given. For growth delay and cure rate, no modification of the effects of low dose rate brachytherapy by the addition of cisplatin was observed. The observed effects of the combination of cisplatin with low dose rate interstitial radiation in relation to the animal tumour are discussed.

  3. Dose distribution analysis of physical and dynamic wedges by using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy MatriXX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae-Kag; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Cho, Dae-chul

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated differences between the physical wedge and the dynamic wedge distributions of radiation by using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ImRT) MatriXX. The linear accelerator used X-rays with energy levels of 6 MV and 10 MV to adjust the collimator by motoring the independent jaws (X1, X2, Y1, Y2) for setting wedge angles of 15, 30, 45, and 60 degrees. The collimator field size was set as 10 × 10 cm2 or 20 × 20 cm2 at the maximum dose point. The dose distribution for each wedge had ±5% and ±11% errors for field sizes of 10 × 10 cm2 and 20 × 20 cm2, respectively. The error was greatest at a wedge angle of 45 degrees and was pronounced at the end of the dynamic wedge where Y1 and Y2 met. Consequently, concluded that the dose distributions were similar for both wedges for the field size of a small beam profile. The beam dose was greatly increased at the end of the dynamic wedge. A more precise estimate of the therapeutic dose of radiation for a dynamic wedge that nearly matches that of the physical wedge can be achieved by correcting of the increasing part of the beam dose. The findings imply that a heavy wedge filter should not be used when calculating the isodose distribution and the therapeutic dose.

  4. Projected Second Tumor Risk and Dose to Neurocognitive Structures After Proton Versus Photon Radiotherapy for Benign Meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Arvold, Nils D.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Broussard, George P.; Adams, Judith; Fullerton, Barbara; Loeffler, Jay S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To calculated projected second tumor rates and dose to organs at risk (OAR) in patients with benign intracranial meningioma (BM), according to dosimetric comparisons between proton radiotherapy (PRT) and photon radiotherapy (XRT) treatment plans. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with BM treated at Massachusetts General Hospital during 2006-2010 with PRT were replanned with XRT (intensity-modulated or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy), optimizing dose to the tumor while sparing OAR. Total dose was 54 Gy in 1.8 Gy per fraction for all plans. We calculated equivalent uniform doses, normal tissue complication probabilities, and whole brain-based estimates of excess risk of radiation-associated intracranial second tumors. Results: Excess risk of second tumors was significantly lower among PRT compared with XRT plans (1.3 vs. 2.8 per 10,000 patients per year, p < 0.002). Mean equivalent uniform doses were lower among PRT plans for the whole brain (19.0 vs. 22.8 Gy, p < 0.0001), brainstem (23.8 vs. 35.2 Gy, p = 0.004), hippocampi (left, 13.5 vs. 25.6 Gy, p < 0.0001; right, 7.6 vs. 21.8 Gy, p = 0.001), temporal lobes (left, 25.8 vs. 34.6 Gy, p = 0.007; right, 25.8 vs. 32.9 Gy, p = 0.008), pituitary gland (29.2 vs. 37.0 Gy, p = 0.047), optic nerves (left, 28.5 vs. 33.8 Gy, p = 0.04; right, 25.1 vs. 31.1 Gy, p = 0.07), and cochleas (left, 12.2 vs. 15.8 Gy, p = 0.39; right,1.5 vs. 8.8 Gy, p = 0.01). Mean normal tissue complication probability was <1% for all structures and not significantly different between PRT and XRT plans. Conclusions: Compared with XRT, PRT for BM decreases the risk of RT-associated second tumors by half and delivers significantly lower doses to neurocognitive and critical structures of vision and hearing.

  5. SU-E-T-282: Dose Measurements with An End-To-End Audit Phantom for Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R; Artschan, R; Thwaites, D; Lehmann, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Report on dose measurements as part of an end-to-end test for stereotactic radiotherapy, using a new audit tool, which allows audits to be performed efficiently either by an onsite team or as a postal audit. Methods: Film measurements have been performed with a new Stereotactic Cube Phantom. The phantom has been designed to perform Winston Lutz type position verification measurements and dose measurements in one setup. It comprises a plastic cube with a high density ball in its centre (used for MV imaging with film or EPID) and low density markers in the periphery (used for Cone Beam Computed Tomography, CBCT imaging). It also features strategically placed gold markers near the posterior and right surfaces, which can be used to calculate phantom rotations on MV images. Slit-like openings allow insertion of film or other detectors.The phantom was scanned and small field treatment plans were created. The fields do not traverse any inhomogeneities of the phantom on their paths to the measurement location. The phantom was setup at the delivery system using CBCT imaging. The calculated treatment fields were delivered, each with a piece of radiochromic film (EBT3) placed in the anterior film holder of the phantom. MU had been selected in planning to achieve similar exposures on all films. Calibration films were exposed in solid water for dose levels around the expected doses. Films were scanned and analysed following established procedures. Results: Setup of the cube showed excellent suitability for CBCT 3D alignment. MV imaging with EPID allowed for clear identification of all markers. Film based dose measurements showed good agreement for MLC created fields down to 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm. Conclusion: An end-to-end audit phantom for stereotactic radiotherapy has been developed and tested.

  6. X-ray volumetric imaging in image-guided radiotherapy: The new standard in on-treatment imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McBain, Catherine A.; Henry, Ann M. . E-mail: catherine.mcbain@christie-tr.nwest.nhs.uk; Sykes, Jonathan; Amer, Ali; Marchant, Tom; Moore, Christopher M.; Davies, Julie; Stratford, Julia; McCarthy, Claire; Porritt, Bridget; Williams, Peter; Khoo, Vincent S.; Price, Pat

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: X-ray volumetric imaging (XVI) for the first time allows for the on-treatment acquisition of three-dimensional (3D) kV cone beam computed tomography (CT) images. Clinical imaging using the Synergy System (Elekta, Crawley, UK) commenced in July 2003. This study evaluated image quality and dose delivered and assessed clinical utility for treatment verification at a range of anatomic sites. Methods and Materials: Single XVIs were acquired from 30 patients undergoing radiotherapy for tumors at 10 different anatomic sites. Patients were imaged in their setup position. Radiation doses received were measured using TLDs on the skin surface. The utility of XVI in verifying target volume coverage was qualitatively assessed by experienced clinicians. Results: X-ray volumetric imaging acquisition was completed in the treatment position at all anatomic sites. At sites where a full gantry rotation was not possible, XVIs were reconstructed from projection images acquired from partial rotations. Soft-tissue definition of organ boundaries allowed direct assessment of 3D target volume coverage at all sites. Individual image quality depended on both imaging parameters and patient characteristics. Radiation dose ranged from 0.003 Gy in the head to 0.03 Gy in the pelvis. Conclusions: On-treatment XVI provided 3D verification images with soft-tissue definition at all anatomic sites at acceptably low radiation doses. This technology sets a new standard in treatment verification and will facilitate novel adaptive radiotherapy techniques.

  7. Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Left-Sided Breast Cancer Patients: Geometrical Uncertainty of the Heart

    SciTech Connect

    Topolnjak, Rajko; Borst, Gerben R.; Nijkamp, Jasper

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the geometrical uncertainties for the heart during radiotherapy treatment of left-sided breast cancer patients and to determine and validate planning organ at risk volume (PRV) margins. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients treated in supine position in 28 fractions with regularly acquired cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans for offline setup correction were included. Retrospectively, the CBCT scans were reconstructed into 10-phase respiration correlated four-dimensional scans. The heart was registered in each breathing phase to the planning CT scan to establish the respiratory heart motion during the CBCT scan ({sigma}{sub resp}). The average of the respiratory motion was calculated as the heart displacement error for a fraction. Subsequently, the systematic ({Sigma}), random ({sigma}), and total random ({sigma}{sub tot}={radical}({sigma}{sup 2}+{sigma}{sub resp}{sup 2})) errors of the heart position were calculated. Based on the errors a PRV margin for the heart was calculated to ensure that the maximum heart dose (D{sub max}) is not underestimated in at least 90% of the cases (M{sub heart} = 1.3{Sigma}-0.5{sigma}{sub tot}). All analysis were performed in left-right (LR), craniocaudal (CC), and anteroposterior (AP) directions with respect to both online and offline bony anatomy setup corrections. The PRV margin was validated by accumulating the dose to the heart based on the heart registrations and comparing the planned PRV D{sub max} to the accumulated heart D{sub max}. Results: For online setup correction, the cardiac geometrical uncertainties and PRV margins were N-Ary-Summation = 2.2/3.2/2.1 mm, {sigma} = 2.1/2.9/1.4 mm, and M{sub heart} = 1.6/2.3/1.3 mm for LR/CC/AP, respectively. For offline setup correction these were N-Ary-Summation = 2.4/3.7/2.2 mm, {sigma} = 2.9/4.1/2.7 mm, and M{sub heart} = 1.6/2.1/1.4 mm. Cardiac motion induced by breathing was {sigma}{sub resp} = 1.4/2.9/1.4 mm for LR/CC/AP. The PRV D{sub max

  8. Quality assurance of U.S.-guided external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer: report of AAPM Task Group 154.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Janelle A; Chan, Gordon; Markovic, Alexander; McNeeley, Shawn; Pfeiffer, Doug; Salter, Bill; Tome, Wolfgang A

    2011-02-01

    Task Group 154 (TG154) of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) was created to produce a guidance document for clinical medical physicists describing recommended quality assurance (QA) procedures for ultrasound (U.S.)-guided external beam radiotherapy localization. This report describes the relevant literature, state of the art, and briefly summarizes U.S. imaging physics. Simulation, treatment planning and treatment delivery considerations are presented in order to improve consistency and accuracy. User training is emphasized in the report and recommendations regarding peer review are included. A set of thorough, yet practical, QA procedures, frequencies, and tolerances are recommended. These encompass recommendations to ensure both spatial accuracy and image quality.

  9. Synchrotron activation radiotherapy: Effects of dose-rate and energy spectra to tantalum oxide nanoparticles selective tumour cell radiosentization enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, E.; Lerch, M.; Tehei, M.; Konstantinov, K.; Guatelli, S.; Rosenfeld, A.; Corde, S.

    2017-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is unique in its ability to deliver dose at high dose rates using kiloelectronvolt photons. We are investigating the use of Tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) nano-structured particles (NSPs) that are to date unexplored in synchrotron radiation fields as they have high atomic number (Z=73) are biocompatible and are therefore potential radio sensitizers. We exposed cell culture flasks containing 9L gliosarcoma tumour cells or Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) non-tumour cells to the NSPs and treated the cells using a broad synchrotron beam (140 keV median energy; average dose rate of 50 Gy/s) at the Australian Synchrotron. We compare the results with those from similar cells treated using a conventional 150 kVp orthovoltage field (dose rate of 0.0127 Gy/s). The results reveal that the high dose-rate synchrotron irradiation is more effective at killing the 9L cells relative to the MDCK cells than the orthovoltage irradiation. On the other hand, the NSPs are more effective at radiosensitizing the 9L cells compared to the MDCK cells in the orthovoltage radiation field, which is due to the NSP energy dependence in the kilovoltage energy range. Both the dose rate and energy spectrum need to be considered in future studies with synchrotron activation radiotherapy (SART).

  10. A simple optimization approach for improving target dose homogeneity in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for sinonasal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jia-Yang; Zhang, Ji-Yong; Li, Mei; Cheung, Michael Lok-Man; Li, Yang-Kang; Zheng, Jing; Huang, Bao-Tian; Zhang, Wu-Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Homogeneous target dose distribution in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for sinonasal cancer (SNC) is challenging to achieve. To solve this problem, we established and evaluated a basal-dose-compensation (BDC) optimization approach, in which the treatment plan is further optimized based on the initial plans. Generally acceptable initial IMRT plans for thirteen patients were created and further optimized individually by (1) the BDC approach and (2) a local-dose-control (LDC) approach, in which the initial plan is further optimized by addressing hot and cold spots. We compared the plan qualities, total planning time and monitor units (MUs) among the initial, BDC, LDC IMRT plans and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans. The BDC approach provided significantly superior dose homogeneity/conformity by 23%–48%/6%–9% compared with both the initial and LDC IMRT plans, as well as reduced doses to the organs at risk (OARs) by up to 18%, with acceptable MU numbers. Compared with VMAT, BDC IMRT yielded superior homogeneity, inferior conformity and comparable overall OAR sparing. The planning of BDC, LDC IMRT and VMAT required 30, 59 and 58 minutes on average, respectively. Our results indicated that the BDC optimization approach can achieve significantly better dose distributions with shorter planning time in the IMRT for SNC. PMID:26497620

  11. Clinical outcome of protocol based image (MRI) guided adaptive brachytherapy combined with 3D conformal radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pötter, Richard; Georg, Petra; Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Grimm, Magdalena; Berger, Daniel; Nesvacil, Nicole; Georg, Dietmar; Schmid, Maximilian P.; Reinthaller, Alexander; Sturdza, Alina; Kirisits, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Background To analyse the overall clinical outcome and benefits by applying protocol based image guided adaptive brachytherapy combined with 3D conformal external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) ± chemotherapy (ChT). Methods Treatment schedule was EBRT with 45–50.4 Gy ± concomitant cisplatin chemotherapy plus 4 × 7 Gy High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Patients were treated in the “protocol period” (2001–2008) with the prospective application of the High Risk CTV concept (D90) and dose volume constraints for organs at risk including biological modelling. Dose volume adaptation was performed with the aim of dose escalation in large tumours (prescribed D90 > 85 Gy), often with inserting additional interstitial needles. Dose volume constraints (D2cc) were 70–75 Gy for rectum and sigmoid and 90 Gy for bladder. Late morbidity was prospectively scored, using LENT/SOMA Score. Disease outcome and treatment related late morbidity were evaluated and compared using actuarial analysis. Findings One hundred and fifty-six consecutive patients (median age 58 years) with cervix cancer FIGO stages IB–IVA were treated with definitive radiotherapy in curative intent. Histology was squamous cell cancer in 134 patients (86%), tumour size was >5 cm in 103 patients (66%), lymph node involvement in 75 patients (48%). Median follow-up was 42 months for all patients. Interstitial techniques were used in addition to intracavitary brachytherapy in 69/156 (44%) patients. Total prescribed mean dose (D90) was 93 ± 13 Gy, D2cc 86 ± 17 Gy for bladder, 65 ± 9 Gy for rectum and 64 ± 9 Gy for sigmoid. Complete remission was achieved in 151/156 patients (97%). Overall local control at 3 years was 95%; 98% for tumours 2–5 cm, and 92% for tumours >5 cm (p = 0.04), 100% for IB, 96% for IIB, 86% for IIIB. Cancer specific survival at 3 years was overall 74%, 83% for tumours 2–5 cm, 70% for tumours >5 cm, 83% for IB, 84% for IIB, 52% for IIIB. Overall

  12. Automatic localization of the prostate for on-line or off-line image-guided radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Smitsmans, Monique H.P.; Wolthaus, Jochem W.H.; Artignan, Xavier; Bois, Josien de; Jaffray, David A.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Herk, Marcel van . E-mail: portal@nki.nl

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: With higher radiation dose, higher cure rates have been reported in prostate cancer patients. The extra margin needed to account for prostate motion, however, limits the level of dose escalation, because of the presence of surrounding organs at risk. Knowledge of the precise position of the prostate would allow significant reduction of the treatment field. Better localization of the prostate at the time of treatment is therefore needed, e.g. using a cone-beam computed tomography (CT) system integrated with the linear accelerator. Localization of the prostate relies upon manual delineation of contours in successive axial CT slices or interactive alignment and is fairly time-consuming. A faster method is required for on-line or off-line image-guided radiotherapy, because of prostate motion, for patient throughput and efficiency. Therefore, we developed an automatic method to localize the prostate, based on 3D gray value registration. Methods and materials: A study was performed on conventional repeat CT scans of 19 prostate cancer patients to develop the methodology to localize the prostate. For each patient, 8-13 repeat CT scans were made during the course of treatment. First, the planning CT scan and the repeat CT scan were registered onto the rigid bony structures. Then, the delineated prostate in the planning CT scan was enlarged by an optimum margin of 5 mm to define a region of interest in the planning CT scan that contained enough gray value information for registration. Subsequently, this region was automatically registered to a repeat CT scan using 3D gray value registration to localize the prostate. The performance of automatic prostate localization was compared to prostate localization using contours. Therefore, a reference set was generated by registering the delineated contours of the prostates in all scans of all patients. Gray value registrations that showed large differences with respect to contour registrations were detected with a {chi

  13. Low-Dose Radiotherapy as a Chemopotentiator of Gemcitabine in Tumors of the Pancreas or Small Bowel: A Phase I Study Exploring a New Treatment Paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Regine, William F. . E-mail: wregine@umm.edu; Hanna, Nader; Garofalo, Michael C.; Doyle, Austin; Arnold, Susanne; Kataria, Ritesh; Sims, Jacqueline; Tan Ming; Mohiuddin, Mohammed

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose of upper abdominal low-dose fractionated radiotherapy (<1.0 Gy per fraction) given in combination with, and as a chemopotentiator for, gemcitabine. Methods and Materials: Gemcitabine was given at 1,250 mg/m{sup 2} at 10 mg/m{sup 2}/min on Days 1 and 8 of a 3-week cycle. Low-dose fractionated radiotherapy was tested at two dose levels: 60 cGy per fraction and 70 cGy per fraction. Radiotherapy was given b.i.d. on Days 1, 2, 8, and 9. Four cycles were planned. Results: Twenty-seven patients have been put on study. Ten patients have been entered in Phase I: 6 with metastatic/recurrent pancreatic carcinoma and 4 with unresectable pancreatic/small bowel carcinoma. Two of four patients at Dose Level 2 experienced dose-limiting toxicity. The overall radiographic response was 30%, and median survival was 11 months (range, 4-37 months). Conclusion: Low-dose fractionated radiotherapy to the upper abdomen is well tolerated at 60 cGy per fraction when combined with gemcitabine. Phase II evaluation is ongoing.

  14. A phase II study of dose-dense and dose-intense ABVD (ABVDDD-DI ) without consolidation radiotherapy in patients with advanced Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Russo, Filippo; Corazzelli, Gaetano; Frigeri, Ferdinando; Capobianco, Gaetana; Aloj, Luigi; Volzone, Francesco; De Chiara, Annarosaria; Bonelli, Annamaria; Gatani, Tindaro; Marcacci, Gianpaolo; Donnarumma, Daniela; Becchimanzi, Cristina; de Lutio, Elisabetta; Ionna, Franco; De Filippi, Rosaria; Lastoria, Secondo; Pinto, Antonello

    2014-07-01

    We explored activity and safety of a dose-dense/dose-intense adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine regimen (ABVDDD-DI ) in 82 patients with advanced Hodgkin Lymphoma. Patients entered a two-stage Bryant-Day Phase II study to receive six cycles of ABVDDD-DI without consolidation radiotherapy. Cycles were supported with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and delivered every 21 d; drugs were administered on days 1 and 11 at the same doses of standard ABVD except for doxorubicin (35 mg/m2; first four cycles only). Co-primary endpoints were complete response (CR) rate and severe acute cardiopulmonary toxicity; secondary endpoints were event-free (EFS) and disease-free survival (DFS). All patients received the four doxorubicin-intensified courses and 96% concluded all six cycles (82.3% within the intended 18 weeks). This translated into a 66.9% increase of received dose-intensity for doxorubicin and 31.8% for the other agents over standard ABVD. The CR rate was 95.1% (78/82) and 87.8% (72/82) achieved a metabolic CR after two cycles. Cardiopulmonary toxicity never exceeded grade 2 and affected 14.6% of patients. Most frequent toxicities were grade 4 neutropenia (10%) and anaemia (9%), grade 3 infection (17%) and grade 2 mucocutaneous changes (30%). Five-year EFS and DFS was 88.3% and 93.7%, respectively. ABVDDD-DI regimen was well-tolerated and ensured substantial CR and EFS rates without radiotherapy.

  15. SU-E-T-183: Feasibility of Extreme Dose Escalation for Glioblastoma Multiforme Using 4π Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, D; Rwigema, J; Yu, V; Kaprealian, T; Kupelian, P; Selch, M; Low, D; Sheng, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: GBM recurrence primarily occurs inside or near the high-dose radiation field of original tumor site requiring greater than 100 Gy to significantly improve local control. We utilize 4π non-coplanar radiotherapy to test the feasibility of planning target volume (PTV) margin expansions or extreme dose escalations without incurring additional radiation toxicities. Methods: 11 GBM patients treated with VMAT to a prescription dose of 59.4 Gy or 60 Gy were replanned with 4π. Original VMAT plans were created with 2 to 4 coplanar or non-coplanar arcs using 3 mm hi-res MLC. The 4π optimization, using 5 mm MLC, selected and inverse optimized 30 beams from a candidate pool of 1162 beams evenly distributed through 4π steradians. 4π plans were first compared to clinical plans using the same prescription dose. Two more studies were then performed to respectively escalate the GTV and PTV doses to 100 Gy, followed by a fourth plan expanding the PTV by 5 mm and maintaining the prescription dose. Results: The standard 4π plan significantly reduced (p<0.01) max and mean doses to critical structures by a range of 47.0–98.4% and 61.0–99.2%, respectively. The high dose PTV/high dose GTV/expanded PTV studies showed a reduction (p<0.05) or unchanged* (p>0.05) maximum dose of 72.1%/86.7%/77.1% (chiasm), 7.2%*/27.7%*/30.7% (brainstem), 39.8%*/84.2%/51.9%* (spinal cord), 69.0%/87.0%/66.9% (L eye), 76.2%/88.1%/84.1% (R eye), 95.0%/98.6%/97.5% (L lens), 93.9%/98.8%/97.6% (R lens), 74.3%/88.5%/72.4% (L optical nerve), 80.4%/91.3%/75.7% (R optical nerve), 64.8%/84.2%/44.9%* (L cochlea), and 85.2%/93.0%/78.0% (R cochlea), respectively. V30 and V36 for both brain and (brain - PTV) were reduced for all cases except the high dose PTV plan. PTV dose coverage increased for all 4π plans. Conclusion: Extreme dose escalation or further margin expansion is achievable using 4π, maintaining or reducing OAR doses. This study indicates that clinical trials employing 4π delivery using

  16. Late Effects After Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer: Comparison of Two Brachytherapy Schedules and Effect of Dose Delivered Weekly

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsen Hellebust, Taran; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To compare the severe late effects (Grade 3 or greater) for two groups of cervical cancer patients treated with the same external beam radiotherapy and two high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy regimens and to investigate the influence of the dose delivered each week. Methods and Materials: For 120 patients, intracavitary brachytherapy was delivered with 33.6 Gy in eight fractions to Point A (HD group), and for 119, intracavitary brachytherapy was delivered with 29.4 Gy in seven fractions to Point A (LD group). The cumulative incidence of severe gastrointestinal and genitourinary late effects were calculated for both dose groups using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. This method was also used to explore whether the number of weeks with different dose levels could predict the cumulative incidence of late effects. Results: The actuarial rate of developing severe gastrointestinal morbidity at 7 years was 10.7% and 8.3% for HD and LD groups, respectively. The rate for genitourinary morbidity was 6.6% for the HD group and 5.0% for the LD group, respectively. No significant difference was found between the two groups. The analyses showed that a marginally significant increase occurred in severe gastrointestinal complications as the number of weeks with a physical dose >20 Gy increased in the HD group (p = .047). Conclusion: To establish dose-response relationships for late complications, three-dimensional imaging and dose-volume histogram parameters are needed. We found some indications that 20 Gy/wk is an upper tolerance level when the dose to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements rectum point is 81 Gy{sub {alpha}/{beta}=3} (isoeffective [equivalent] dose of 2-Gy fractions). However, additional investigations using three-dimensional data are needed.

  17. Verification of Entrance Dose Measurements with Thermoluminescent Dosimeters in Conventional Radiotherapy Procedures Delivered with Co-60 Teletherapy Machine

    PubMed Central

    Evwierhurhoma, OB; Ibitoye, ZA; Ojieh, CA; Duncan, JTK

    2015-01-01

    Background: The use of in vivo dosimetry with thermolumiscent dosimeters (TLDs) as a veritable means of quality control in conventional radiotherapy procedures was determined in this work. Aim: The objective of this study was to determine the role of in vivo dosimetry with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as part of quality control and audit in conventional radiotherapy procedures delivered with Co-60 teletherapy machine. Subjects and Methods: Fifty-seven patients with cancers of the breast, pelvis, head and neck were admitted for this study. TLD system at the Radiation Monitoring and Protection Centre, Lagos State University, Ojo, Lagos-Nigeria was used for the in vivo entrance dose readings. All patients were treated with Co-60 (T780c) teletherapy machine at 80 cm source to surface distance located at Eko Hospitals, Lagos. Two TLDs were placed on the patient surface within 1 cm from the center of the field of treatment. Build-up material made of paraffin wax with a density of 0.939 g/cm3 and a thickness 0.5 cm was placed on top of the TLDs. A RADOS RE 200 TLD reader was used to read out the TLDs over 12 s and at a temperature of 300°C. Results: The results showed that there was no significant difference between the expected dose and measured dose of breast (P = 0.11), H and N (P = 0.52), and pelvis (P = 0.31) patients. Furthermore, percentage difference between expected dose and measured dose of the three treatment sites were not significantly different (P = 0.11). More so, 88.9% (16/18) treated breast, 91.3% (21/23) pelvis, and 86.7% (13/15) H and N patients had percentage deviation difference less than 5%. In general, 89.3% (50/56) patients admitted for this study had their percentage deviation difference below 5% recommended standard limit. Conclusion: The values obtained establish that there are no major differences from similar studies reported in literature. This study was also part of quality control and audit of the radiotherapy procedures in the

  18. Implementation of Feedback-Guided Voluntary Breath-Hold Gating for Cone Beam CT-Based Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Yong; Vedam, Sastry; Chang, Joe Y.; Gao Song; Sadagopan, Ramaswamy; Bues, Martin; Balter, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze tumor position reproducibility of feedback-guided voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (FGBH) gating for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)-based stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and materials: Thirteen early-stage lung cancer patients eligible for SBRT with tumor motion of >1cm were evaluated for FGBH-gated treatment. Multiple FGBH CTs were acquired at simulation, and single FGBH CBCTs were also acquired prior to each treatment. Simulation CTs and treatment CBCTs were analyzed to quantify reproducibility of tumor positions during FGBH. Benefits of FGBH gating compared to treatment during free breathing, as well treatment with gating at exhalation, were examined for lung sparing, motion margins, and reproducibility of gross tumor volume (GTV) position relative to nonmoving anatomy. Results: FGBH increased total lung volumes by 1.5 times compared to free breathing, resulting in a proportional drop in total lung volume receiving 10 Gy or more. Intra- and inter-FGBH reproducibility of GTV centroid positions at simulation were 1.0 {+-} 0.5 mm, 1.3 {+-} 1.0 mm, and 0.6 {+-} 0.4 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP), superior-inferior (SI), and left-right lateral (LR) directions, respectively, compared to more than 1 cm of tumor motion at free breathing. During treatment, inter-FGBH reproducibility of the GTV centroid with respect to bony anatomy was 1.2 {+-} 0.7 mm, 1.5 {+-} 0.8 mm, and 1.0 {+-} 0.4 mm in the AP, SI, and LR directions. In addition, the quality of CBCTs was improved due to elimination of motion artifacts, making this technique attractive for poorly visualized tumors, even with small motion. Conclusions: The extent of tumor motion at normal respiration does not influence the reproducibility of the tumor position under breath hold conditions. FGBH-gated SBRT with CBCT can improve the reproducibility of GTV centroids, reduce required margins, and minimize dose to normal tissues in the treatment of mobile tumors.

  19. Intrafraction Variation of Mean Tumor Position During Image-Guided Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Chirag; Grills, Inga S.; Kestin, Larry L.; McGrath, Samuel; Ye Hong; Martin, Shannon K.; Yan Di

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Prolonged delivery times during daily cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) introduce concerns regarding intrafraction variation (IFV) of the mean target position (MTP). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnitude of the IFV-MTP and to assess target margins required to compensate for IFV and postonline CBCT correction residuals. Patient, treatment, and tumor characteristics were analyzed with respect to their impact on IFV-MTP. Methods and Materials: A total of 126 patients with 140 tumors underwent 659 fractions of lung SBRT. Dose prescribed was 48 or 60 Gy in 12 Gy fractions. Translational target position correction of the MTP was performed via onboard CBCT. IFV-MTP was measured as the difference in MTP between the postcorrection CBCT and the posttreatment CBCT excluding residual error. Results: IFV-MTP was 0.2 {+-} 1.8 mm, 0.1 {+-} 1.9 mm, and 0.01 {+-} 1.5 mm in the craniocaudal, anteroposterior, and mediolateral dimensions and the IFV-MTP vector was 2.3 {+-} 2.1 mm. Treatment time and excursion were found to be significant predictors of IFV-MTP. An IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 and 5 mm was seen in 40.8% and 7.2% of fractions, respectively. IFV-MTP greater than 2 mm was seen in heavier patients with larger excursions and longer treatment times. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were seen between immobilization devices. The stereotactic frame immobilization device was found to be significantly less likely to have an IFV-MTP vector greater than 2 mm compared with the alpha cradle, BodyFIX, and hybrid immobilization devices. Conclusions: Treatment time and respiratory excursion are significantly associated with IFV-MTP. Significant differences in IFV-MTP were found between immobilization devices. Target margins for IFV-MTP plus post-correction residuals are dependent on immobilization device with 5-mm uniform margins being acceptable for the frame immobilization device.

  20. Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head After Palliative Radiotherapy in Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Absence of a Dose Threshold?

    PubMed Central

    Daoud, Alia M; Hudson, Mack; Magnus, Kenneth G; Huang, Fleur; Danielson, Brita L; Venner, Peter; Saluja, Ronak; LeGuerrier, Bronwen; Daly, Helene; Emmenegger, Urban

    2016-01-01

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is the final common pathway resulting from insufficient blood supply to bone, commonly the femoral head. There are many postulated etiologies of non-traumatic AVN, including corticosteroids, bisphosphonates, and radiotherapy (RT). However, it is unclear whether there is a dose threshold for the development of RT-induced AVN. In this case report, we describe a patient with prostate cancer metastatic to bone diagnosed with AVN after receiving single-fraction palliative RT to the left femoral head. Potential contributing factors are discussed, along with a review of other reported cases. At present, the RT dose threshold below which there is no risk for AVN is unknown, and therefore detrimental impact from the RT cannot be excluded. Given the possibility that RT-induced AVN is a stochastic effect, it is important to be aware of the possibility of this diagnosis in any patient with a painful hip who has received RT to the femoral head. PMID:27081582

  1. Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head After Palliative Radiotherapy in Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Absence of a Dose Threshold?

    PubMed

    Daoud, Alia M; Hudson, Mack; Magnus, Kenneth G; Huang, Fleur; Danielson, Brita L; Venner, Peter; Saluja, Ronak; LeGuerrier, Bronwen; Daly, Helene; Emmenegger, Urban; Fairchild, Alysa

    2016-03-06

    Avascular necrosis (AVN) is the final common pathway resulting from insufficient blood supply to bone, commonly the femoral head. There are many postulated etiologies of non-traumatic AVN, including corticosteroids, bisphosphonates, and radiotherapy (RT). However, it is unclear whether there is a dose threshold for the development of RT-induced AVN. In this case report, we describe a patient with prostate cancer metastatic to bone diagnosed with AVN after receiving single-fraction palliative RT to the left femoral head. Potential contributing factors are discussed, along with a review of other reported cases. At present, the RT dose threshold below which there is no risk for AVN is unknown, and therefore detrimental impact from the RT cannot be excluded. Given the possibility that RT-induced AVN is a stochastic effect, it is important to be aware of the possibility of this diagnosis in any patient with a painful hip who has received RT to the femoral head.

  2. Evaluating changes in tumor volume using magnetic resonance imaging during the course of radiotherapy treatment of high-grade gliomas: Implications for conformal dose-escalation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tsien, Christina . E-mail: ctsien@umich.edu; Gomez-Hassan, Diana; Haken, Randall K. ten; Tatro, Daniel C.; Junck, L.; Chenevert, T.L.; Lawrence, T.

    2005-06-01

    Objective: To determine whether changes in tumor volume occur during the course of conformal 3D radiotherapy of high-grade gliomas by use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during treatment and whether these changes had an impact on tumor coverage. Methods and Materials: Between December 2000 and January 2004, 21 patients with WHO Grades 3 to 4 supratentorial malignant gliomas treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy (median dose, 70 Gy) were enrolled in a prospective clinical study. All patients underwent T1-weighted contrast-enhancing and T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging at approximately 1 to 2 weeks before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy (Weeks 1 and 3), and at routine intervals thereafter. All MRI scans were coregistered to the treatment-planning CT. Gross tumor volume (GTV Pre-Rx) was defined from a postoperative T1-weighted contrast-enhancing MRI performed 1 to 2 weeks before start of radiotherapy. A second GTV (GTV Week 3) was defined by use of an MRI performed during Week 3 of radiotherapy. A uniform 0.5 cm expansion of the respective GTV, PTV (Pre-Rx), and PTV (Week 3) was applied to the final boost plan. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were used to analyze any potential adverse changes in tumor coverage based on Week 3 MRI. Results: All MRI scans were reviewed independently by a neuroradiologist (DGH). Two patients were noted to have multifocal disease at presentation and were excluded from analysis. In 19 cases, changes in the GTV based on MRI at Week 3 during radiotherapy were as follows: 2 cases had an objective decrease in GTV ({>=}50%); 12 cases revealed a slight decrease in the rim enhancement or changes in cystic appearance of the GTV; 2 cases showed no change in GTV; and 3 cases demonstrated an increase in tumor volume. Both cases with objective decreases in GTV during treatment were Grade 3 tumors. No cases of tumor progression were noted in Grade 3 tumors during treatment. In comparison, three of 12 Grade 4

  3. Toward adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck patients: Uncertainties in dose warping due to the choice of deformable registration algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Veiga, Catarina Royle, Gary; Lourenço, Ana Mónica; Mouinuddin, Syed; Herk, Marcel van; Modat, Marc; Ourselin, Sébastien; McClelland, Jamie R.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The aims of this work were to evaluate the performance of several deformable image registration (DIR) algorithms implemented in our in-house software (NiftyReg) and the uncertainties inherent to using different algorithms for dose warping. Methods: The authors describe a DIR based adaptive radiotherapy workflow, using CT and cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The transformations that mapped the anatomy between the two time points were obtained using four different DIR approaches available in NiftyReg. These included a standard unidirectional algorithm and more sophisticated bidirectional ones that encourage or ensure inverse consistency. The forward (CT-to-CBCT) deformation vector fields (DVFs) were used to propagate the CT Hounsfield units and structures to the daily geometry for “dose of the day” calculations, while the backward (CBCT-to-CT) DVFs were used to remap the dose of the day onto the planning CT (pCT). Data from five head and neck patients were used to evaluate the performance of each implementation based on geometrical matching, physical properties of the DVFs, and similarity between warped dose distributions. Geometrical matching was verified in terms of dice similarity coefficient (DSC), distance transform, false positives, and false negatives. The physical properties of the DVFs were assessed calculating the harmonic energy, determinant of the Jacobian, and inverse consistency error of the transformations. Dose distributions were displayed on the pCT dose space and compared using dose difference (DD), distance to dose difference, and dose volume histograms. Results: All the DIR algorithms gave similar results in terms of geometrical matching, with an average DSC of 0.85 ± 0.08, but the underlying properties of the DVFs varied in terms of smoothness and inverse consistency. When comparing the doses warped by different algorithms, we found a root mean square DD of 1.9% ± 0.8% of the prescribed dose (pD) and that an average of 9% ± 4% of

  4. Peripheral dose in ocular treatments with CyberKnife and Gamma Knife radiosurgery compared to proton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zytkovicz, A.; Daftari, I.; Phillips, T. L.; Chuang, C. F.; Verhey, L.; Petti, P. L.

    2007-09-01

    Peripheral radiation can have deleterious effects on normal tissues throughout the body, including secondary cancer induction and cataractogenesis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the peripheral dose received by various regions of the body after ocular treatment delivered with the Model C Gamma Knife, proton radiotherapy with a dedicated ocular beam employing no passive-scattering system, or a CyberKnife unit before and after supplemental shielding was introduced. TLDs were used for stray gamma and x-ray dosimetry, whereas CR-39 dosimeters were used to measure neutron contamination in the proton experiments. Doses to the contralateral eye, neck, thorax and abdomen were measured on our anthropomorphic phantom for a 56 Gy treatment to a 588 mm3 posterior ocular lesion. Gamma Knife (without collimator blocking) delivered the highest dose in the contralateral eye, with 402-2380 mSv, as compared with 118-234 mSv for CyberKnife pre-shielding, 46-255 mSv for CyberKnife post-shielding and 9-12 mSv for proton radiotherapy. Gamma Knife and post-shielding CyberKnife delivered comparable doses proximal to the treatment site, with 190 versus 196 mSv at the thyroid, whereas protons doses at these locations were less than 10 mSv. Gamma Knife doses decreased dramatically with distance from the treatment site, delivering only 13 mSv at the lower pelvis, comparable to the proton result of 4 to 7 mSv in this region. In contrast, CyberKnife delivered between 117 and 132 mSv to the lower pelvis. In conclusion, for ocular melanoma treatments, a proton beam employing no double scattering system delivers the lowest peripheral doses proximally to the contralateral eye and thyroid when compared to radiosurgery with the Model C Gamma Knife or CyberKnife. At distal locations in the pelvis, peripheral doses delivered with proton and Gamma Knife are of an order of magnitude smaller than those delivered with CyberKnife.

  5. SU-E-T-324: The Influence of Patient Positioning Uncertainties in Proton Radiotherapy On Proton Range and Dose Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Liebl, J; Paganetti, H; Winey, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy allows radiation treatment delivery with high dose gradients. The nature of such dose distributions increases the influence of patient positioning uncertainties on their fidelity when compared to photon radiotherapy. The present work quantitatively analyzes the influence of setup uncertainties on proton range and dose distributions. Methods: 38 clinical passive scattering treatment fields for small lesions in the head were studied. Dose distributions for shifted and rotated patient positions were Monte Carlo-simulated. Proton range uncertainties at the 50% and 90%-dose falloff position were calculated considering 18 arbitrary combinations of maximal patient position shifts and rotations for two patient positioning methods. Normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs), equivalent uniform doses (EUDs) and tumor control probabilities (TCPs) were studied for organs at risk (OARs) and target volumes of eight patients. Results: We identified a median 1σ proton range uncertainty at the 50%-dose falloff of 2.8 mm for anatomy-based patient positioning and 1.6 mm for fiducial-based patient positioning as well as 7.2 mm and 5.8 mm for the 90%-dose falloff position respectively. These range uncertainties were correlated to heterogeneity indices (HIs) calculated for each treatment field (38% < R{sup 2} < 50%). A NTCP increase of more than 10% (absolute) was observed for less than 2.9% (anatomy-based positioning) and 1.2% (fiducial-based positioning) of the studied OARs and patient shifts. TCP decreases larger than 10% (absolute) were seen for less than 2.2% of the target volumes or non-existent. EUD changes were up to 178% for OARs and 35% for target volumes. Conclusion: The influence of patient positioning uncertainties on proton range in therapy of small lesions in the human brain and target and OAR dosimetry were studied. Observed range uncertainties were correlated with HIs. The clinical practice of using multiple compensator

  6. Effect of Gold Nanoparticles on Prostate Dose Distribution under Ir-192 Internal and 18 MV External Radiotherapy Procedures Using Gel Dosimetry and Monte Carlo Method

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, H.; Hashemi, B.; Mahdavi, S. R.; Hejazi, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Gel polymers are considered as new dosimeters for determining radiotherapy dose distribution in three dimensions. Objective The ability of a new formulation of MAGIC-f polymer gel was assessed by experimental measurement and Monte Carlo (MC) method for studying the effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in prostate dose distributions under the internal Ir-192 and external 18MV radiotherapy practices. Method A Plexiglas phantom was made representing human pelvis. The GNP shaving 15 nm in diameter and 0.1 mM concentration were synthesized using chemical reduction method. Then, a new formulation of MAGIC-f gel was synthesized. The fabricated gel was poured in the tubes located at the prostate (with and without the GNPs) and bladder locations of the phantom. The phantom was irradiated to an Ir-192 source and 18 MV beam of a Varian linac separately based on common radiotherapy procedures used for prostate cancer. After 24 hours, the irradiated gels were read using a Siemens 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. The absolute doses at the reference points and isodose curves resulted from the experimental measurement of the gels and MC simulations following the internal and external radiotherapy practices were compared. Results The mean absorbed doses measured with the gel in the presence of the GNPs in prostate were 15% and 8 % higher than the corresponding values without the GNPs under the internal and external radiation therapies, respectively. MC simulations also indicated a dose increase of 14 % and 7 % due to presence of the GNPs, for the same experimental internal and external radiotherapy practices, respectively. Conclusion There was a good agreement between the dose enhancement factors (DEFs) estimated with MC simulations and experiment gel measurements due to the GNPs. The results indicated that the polymer gel dosimetry method as developed and used in this study, can be recommended as a reliable method for investigating the DEF of GNPs in internal and external

  7. The evaluation of neutron and gamma ray dose equivalent distributions in patients and the effectiveness of shield materials for high energy photons radiotherapy facilities.

    PubMed

    Ghassoun, J; Senhou, N

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the MCNP5 code was used to model radiotherapy room of a medical linear accelerator operating at 18 MV and to evaluate the neutron and the secondary gamma ray fluences, the energy spectra and the dose equivalent distributions inside a liquid tissue-equivalent (TE) phantom. The obtained results were compared with measured data published in the literature. Moreover, the shielding effects of various neutron material shields on the radiotherapy room wall were also investigated. Our simulation results showed that paraffin wax containing boron carbide presents enough effectiveness to reduce both neutron and secondary gamma ray doses.

  8. In vivo surface dose measurement using GafChromic film dosimetry in breast cancer radiotherapy: comparison of 7-field IMRT, tangential IMRT and tangential 3D-CRT

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the surface dose of 7-field IMRT (7 F-IMRT), tangential beam IMRT (TB-IMRT), and tangential beam 3D-CRT (3D-CRT) of breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy by means of in vivo GafChromic film dosimetry. Material and methods Breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy of the whole breast or the chest wall were eligible for the study. Study patients were treated with a treatment plan using two different radiotherapy techniques (first patient series, 3D-CRT followed by TB-IMRT; second patient series, TB-IMRT followed by 7 F-IMRT). The surface dose was evaluated on three consecutive treatment fractions per radiotherapy technique using in vivo GafChromic film dosimetry. The paired t-test was used to assess the difference of in vivo GafChromic film readings or calculated plan parameters of the compared pairs of radiation techniques for statistical significance. Results Forty-five unselected breast cancer patients were analysed in this study. 7 F-IMRT significantly reduced the surface dose compared to TB-IMRT. Differences were greatest in the central and lateral breast or chest wall region and amounted to a dose reduction of -11.8% to -18.8%. No significant difference of the surface dose was observed between TB-IMRT and 3D-CRT. A corresponding observation was obtained for the calculated skin dose derived from dose-volume histograms. Conclusions In adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy, 7 F-IMRT offers a significantly reduced surface dose compared to TB-IMRT or 3D-CRT. PMID:25022449

  9. Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters and Local Tumor Control in Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Johannes Lang, Stefan; Kirisits, Christian; Fidarova, Elena F.; Berger, Daniel; Georg, Petra; Doerr, Wolfgang; Poetter, Richard

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the value of dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters for predicting local control in magnetic resonance (MR) image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Our study population consists of 141 patients with cervical cancer (Stages IB-IVA) treated with 45-50 Gy external beam radiotherapy plus four times 7 Gy IGBT with or without cisplatin. Gross tumor volume (GTV), high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and intermediate-risk clinical target volume (IRCTV) were contoured, and DVH parameters (minimum dose delivered to 90% of the volume of interest [D90] and D100) were assessed. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy (EQD2) by applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy). Groups were defined for patients with or without local recurrence (LR) in the true pelvis for tumor size at diagnosis (GTV at diagnosis [GTVD] of 2-5 cm (Group 1) or greater than 5 cm (Group 2) and for tumor size response at IGBT (HRCTV) of 2-5 cm (Group 2a) or greater than 5 cm (Group 2b). Results: Eighteen LRs were observed. The most important DVH parameters correlated with LR were the D90 and D100 for HRCTV. Mean D90 and D100 values for HRCTV were 86 {+-} 16 and 65 {+-} 10 Gy, respectively. The D90 for HRCTV greater than 87 Gy resulted in an LR incidence of 4% (3 of 68) compared with 20% (15 of 73) for D90 less than 87 Gy. The effect was most pronounced in the tumor group (Group 2b). Conclusions: We showed an increase in local control in IGBT in patients with cervical cancer with the dose delivered, which can be expressed by the D90 and D100 for HRCTV. Local control rates greater than 95% can be achieved if the D90 (EQD2) for HRCTV is 87 Gy or greater.

  10. Radiochromic film based transit dosimetry for verification of dose delivery with intensity modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Kwangzoo; Lee, Kiho; Shin, Dongho; Kyung Lim, Young; Byeong Lee, Se; Yoon, Myonggeun; Son, Jaeman; Yong Park, Sung

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the transit dose based patient specific quality assurance (QA) of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for verification of the accuracy of dose delivered to the patient. Methods: Five IMRT plans were selected and utilized to irradiate a homogeneous plastic water phantom and an inhomogeneous anthropomorphic phantom. The transit dose distribution was measured with radiochromic film and was compared with the computed dose map on the same plane using a gamma index with a 3% dose and a 3 mm distance-to-dose agreement tolerance limit. Results: While the average gamma index for comparisons of dose distributions was less than one for 98.9% of all pixels from the transit dose with the homogeneous phantom, the passing rate was reduced to 95.0% for the transit dose with the inhomogeneous phantom. Transit doses due to a 5 mm setup error may cause up to a 50% failure rate of the gamma index. Conclusions: Transit dose based IMRT QA may be superior to the traditional QA method since the former can show whether the inhomogeneity correction algorithm from TPS is accurate. In addition, transit dose based IMRT QA can be used to verify the accuracy of the dose delivered to the patient during treatment by revealing significant increases in the failure rate of the gamma index resulting from errors in patient positioning during treatment.

  11. MRI-Guided High–Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer: The University of Pittsburgh Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Beant S.; Kim, Hayeon; Houser, Christopher J.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Edwards, Robert P.; Comerci, John T.; Olawaiye, Alexander B.; Huang, Marilyn; Courtney-Brooks, Madeleine; Beriwal, Sushil

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Image-based brachytherapy is increasingly used for gynecologic malignancies. We report early outcomes of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patient cases with FIGO stage IB1 to IVA cervical cancer treated at a single institution were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received concurrent cisplatin with external beam radiation therapy along with interdigitated high–dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy. Computed tomography or MRI was completed after each application, the latter acquired for at least 1 fraction. High-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV) and organs at risk were identified by Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie and European SocieTy for Radiotherapy and Oncology guidelines. Doses were converted to equivalent 2-Gy doses (EQD{sub 2}) with planned HRCTV doses of 75 to 85 Gy. Results: From 2007 to 2013, 128 patients, median 52 years of age, were treated. Predominant characteristics included stage IIB disease (58.6%) with a median tumor size of 5 cm, squamous histology (82.8%), and no radiographic nodal involvement (53.1%). Most patients (67.2%) received intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at a median dose of 45 Gy, followed by a median brachytherapy dose of 27.5 Gy (range, 25-30 Gy) in 5 fractions. At a median follow up of 24.4 months (range, 2.1-77.2 months), estimated 2-year local control, disease-free survival, and cancer-specific survival rates were 91.6%, 81.8%, and 87.6%, respectively. Predictors of local failure included adenocarcinoma histology (P<.01) and clinical response at 3 months (P<.01). Among the adenocarcinoma subset, receiving HRCTV D{sub 90} EQD{sub 2} ≥84 Gy was associated with improved local control (2-year local control rate 100% vs 54.5%, P=.03). Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal or genitourinary late toxicity occurred at a 2-year actuarial rate of 0.9%. Conclusions: This study constitutes one of the largest reported series of MRI-guided

  12. Strategies for Online Organ Motion Correction for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy of Prostate Cancer: Prostate, Rectum, and Bladder Dose Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Rijkhorst, Erik-Jan; Lakeman, Annemarie; Nijkamp, Jasper; Bois, Josien de; Herk, Marcel van; Lebesque, Joos V.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To quantify and evaluate the accumulated prostate, rectum, and bladder dose for several strategies including rotational organ motion correction for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of prostate cancer using realistic organ motion data. Methods and Materials: Repeat computed tomography (CT) scans of 19 prostate patients were used. Per patient, two IMRT plans with different uniform margins were created. To quantify prostate and seminal vesicle motion, repeat CT clinical target volumes (CTVs) were matched onto the planning CTV using deformable registration. Four different strategies, from online setup to full motion correction, were simulated. Rotations were corrected for using gantry and collimator angle adjustments. Prostate, rectum, and bladder doses were accumulated for each patient, plan, and strategy. Minimum CTV dose (D{sub min}), rectum equivalent uniform dose (EUD, n = 0.13), and bladder surface receiving >=78 Gy (S78), were calculated. Results: With online CTV translation correction, a 7-mm margin was sufficient (i.e., D{sub min} >= 95% of the prescribed dose for all patients). A 4-mm margin required additional rotational correction. Margin reduction lowered the rectum EUD(n = 0.13) by approx2.6 Gy, and the bladder S78 by approx1.9%. Conclusions: With online correction of both translations and rotations, a 4-mm margin was sufficient for 15 of 19 patients, whereas the remaining four patients had an underdosed CTV volume <1%. Margin reduction combined with online corrections resulted in a similar or lower dose to the rectum and bladder. The more advanced the correction strategy, the better the planned and accumulated dose agreed.

  13. Phase I trial of escalating-dose cisplatin with 5-fluorouracil and concurrent radiotherapy in Chinese patients with esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiang; Gao, Xian-Shu; Qiao, Xue-Ying; Zhou, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Kun; Zhao, Yan-Nan; Asaumi, Junichi

    2008-02-01

    We defined the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of chemoradiotherapy (cisplatin (CDDP) with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and concurrent chemoradiotherapy) for Chinese patients with esophageal cancer. Twenty-one previously untreated patients with primary esophageal cancer were entered into this study. Escalating doses of CDDP with 5-FU were administered in a modified Fibonacci sequence, with concurrent conventional fractionation radiotherapy (CFR) of 60 Gy or 50 Gy. The starting doses were CDDP 37.5 mg/m2 on day 1, and 5-FU 500 mg/m2 on days 1-5, respectively. The regimen was repeated 4 times every 28 days. If no dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was observed, the next dose level was applied. The procedures were repeated until DLT appeared. The MTD was declared to be 1 dose level below the level at which DLT appeared. DLT was grade 3 radiation-induced esophagitis at a dose level of CDDP 60 mg/m2 with 5-FU 700 mg/m2 and concurrent 60 Gy CFR. MTD was defined as CDDP 52.5 mg/m2 with 5-FU 700 mg/m2 and concurrent 50 Gy CFR. The MTD of CDDP with 5-FU and in concurrent chemoradiotherapy for Chinese patients with esophageal cancer is CDDP 52.5 mg/m2 on day 1 and 5FU 700 mg/m2 on days 1-5, repeated 4 times every 28 days, and concurrent 50 Gy CFR. Further evaluation of this regimen in a prospective phase II trial is ongoing.

  14. A novel method for interactive multi-objective dose-guided patient positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haehnle, Jonas; Süss, Philipp; Landry, Guillaume; Teichert, Katrin; Hille, Lucas; Hofmaier, Jan; Nowak, Dimitri; Kamp, Florian; Reiner, Michael; Thieke, Christian; Ganswindt, Ute; Belka, Claus; Parodi, Katia; Küfer, Karl-Heinz; Kurz, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    In intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), 3D in-room imaging data is typically utilized for accurate patient alignment on the basis of anatomical landmarks. In the presence of non-rigid anatomical changes, it is often not obvious which patient position is most suitable. Thus, dose-guided patient alignment is an interesting approach to use available in-room imaging data for up-to-date dose calculation, aimed at finding the position that yields the optimal dose distribution. This contribution presents the first implementation of dose-guided patient alignment as multi-criteria optimization problem. User-defined clinical objectives are employed for setting up a multi-objective problem. Using pre-calculated dose distributions at a limited number of patient shifts and dose interpolation, a continuous space of Pareto-efficient patient shifts becomes accessible. Pareto sliders facilitate interactive browsing of the possible shifts with real-time dose display to the user. Dose interpolation accuracy is validated and the potential of multi-objective dose-guided positioning demonstrated for three head and neck (H&N) and three prostate cancer patients. Dose-guided positioning is compared to replanning for all cases. A delineated replanning CT served as surrogate for in-room imaging data. Dose interpolation accuracy was high. Using a 2 % dose difference criterion, a median pass-rate of 95.7% for H&N and 99.6% for prostate cases was determined in a comparison to exact dose calculations. For all patients, dose-guided positioning allowed to find a clinically preferable dose distribution compared to bony anatomy based alignment. For all H&N cases, mean dose to the spared parotid glands was below 26~\\text{Gy} (up to 27.5~\\text{Gy} with bony alignment) and clinical target volume (CTV) {{V}95 % } above 99.1% (compared to 95.1%). For all prostate patients, CTV {{V}95 % } was above 98.9% (compared to 88.5%) and {{V}50~\\text{Gy}} to the rectum below 50 % (compared to 56

  15. An experimental attenuation plate to improve the dose distribution in intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy for breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, T.; Aoyama, Y.; Shimozato, T.; Sawaki, M.; Imai, T.; Ito, Y.; Obata, Y.; Tabushi, K.

    2009-06-01

    Intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (IOERT) is a technique in which a single-fraction high dose is intraoperatively delivered to subclinical tumour cells using an electron beam after breast-conserving surgery. In IOERT, an attenuation plate consisting of a pair of metal disks is commonly used to protect the normal tissues posterior to the breast. However, the dose in front of the plate is affected by backscatter, resulting in an unpredictable delivered dose to the tumour cells. In this study, an experimental attenuation plate, termed a shielding plate, was designed using Monte Carlo simulation, which significantly diminished the electron beam without introducing any backscatter radiation. The plate's performance was verified by measurements. It was made of two layers, a first layer (source side) of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and a second layer of copper, which was selected from among other metals (aluminium, copper and lead) after testing for shielding capability and the range and magnitude of backscatter. The optimal thicknesses of the PMMA (0.71 cm) and copper (0.3 cm) layers were determined by changing their thicknesses during simulations. On the basis of these results, a shielding plate was prototyped and depth doses with and without the plate were measured by radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters using a conventional stationary linear accelerator and a mobile linear accelerator dedicated for IOERT. The trial shielding plate functioned as intended, indicating its applicability in clinical practice.

  16. High Dose Radiotherapy to Automated Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Salma K.

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of successful full-dose chemoradiotherapy to stage IIIB nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a 59-year-old man with extensive cardiac history and an automated implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (AICD) located within the radiotherapeutic field. In this case, the AICD was a St. Jude Medical Fortify Assura VR 1257-40Q ICD, and it was implanted prophylactically during bypass grafting. Although we do not recommend routine radiotherapy dose to exceed recommended current guidelines due to the potential risks to the patient, this is a situation where relocation of the device was not possible. Fortunately, our patient was not AICD-dependent; so following much discussion and deliberation, the decision was made to treat the patient with AICD in place. The patient completed definitive chemoradiotherapy with concurrent cisplatin and etoposide and thoracic irradiation to 69.6 Gy. The minimum, maximum, and mean doses to the AICD directly were 13.5 Gy, 52.4 Gy, and 29.3 Gy, respectively. The device withstood full thoracic radiation dose, and the patient denied cardiac symptoms during the time before, during, and after completi